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Sample records for sea-surface polarized microwave

  1. Determination of sea surface temperatures from microwave and IR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Grover, J.

    1982-01-01

    Microwave measurements from the Nimbus 7 SMMR were used to derive the atmospheric precipitable water, which was then used to obtain the atmospheric correction for use with AVHRR thermal IR measurements to obtain sea surface temperature (SST). The resulting SST's were compared with the NOAA operational sea surface temperature measurements, and the two sets of measurements were found to be in reasonable agreement. The average residuals between the two sets of measurements was 0.15 K with the NOAA operational SST's being slightly greater.

  2. A statistical method to sense sea surface temperature from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Wang, I.

    1983-01-01

    Among the five channels in the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), the brightness temperature measured at 6.6 GHz vertical polarization is least affected by the atmospheric water vapor and liquid water in clouds or rain. Furthermore, as the undisturbed sea surface emissivity at 6.6 GHz is nearly constant over the temperature range 275 to 300 K, this channel has the best sensitivity to sea surface temperature (SST). The 6.6 GHz channel on SMMR is specifically chosen for these reasons to measure SST.

  3. A statistical method to sense sea surface temperature from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Wang, I.

    1983-01-01

    Among the five channels in the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), the brightness temperature measured at 6.6 GHz vertical polarization is least affected by the atmospheric water vapor and liquid water in clouds or rain. Furthermore, as the undisturbed sea surface emissivity at 6.6 GHz is nearly constant over the temperature range 275 to 300 K, this channel has the best sensitivity to sea surface temperature (SST). The 6.6 GHz channel on SMMR is specifically chosen for these reasons to measure SST.

  4. Feasibility of microwave holography for imaging the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of imaging the sea surface in three dimensions by means of microwave holography from a low-flying aircraft is considered. Data cover a brief feasibility study and a review of some computer experiments in which it was demonstrated that it is possible to compute three-dimensional images of objects from raw holographic data recorded on magnetic tape. These experiments used synthetic data.

  5. Polarized reflectance and transmittance properties of windblown sea surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Curtis D

    2015-05-20

    Generation of random sea surfaces using wave variance spectra and Fourier transforms is formulated in a way that guarantees conservation of wave energy and fully resolves wave height and slope variances. Monte Carlo polarized ray tracing, which accounts for multiple scattering between light rays and wave facets, is used to compute effective Mueller matrices for reflection and transmission of air- or water-incident polarized radiance. Irradiance reflectances computed using a Rayleigh sky radiance distribution, sea surfaces generated with Cox-Munk statistics, and unpolarized ray tracing differ by 10%-18% compared with values computed using elevation- and slope-resolving surfaces and polarized ray tracing. Radiance reflectance factors, as used to estimate water-leaving radiance from measured upwelling and sky radiances, are shown to depend on sky polarization, and improved values are given.

  6. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  7. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  8. Dependence of sea-surface microwave emissivity on friction velocity as derived from SMMR/SASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.; Christensen, E. J.; Richardson, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The sea-surface microwave emissivity is derived using SMMR brightness temperatures and SASS inferred friction velocities for three North Pacific Seasat passes. The results show the emissivity increasing linearly with friction velocity with no obvious break between the foam-free and foam regimes up to a friction velocity of about 70 cm/sec (15 m/sec wind speed). For horizontal polarization the sensitivity of emissivity to friction velocity greatly increases with frequency, while for vertical polarization the sensitivity is much less and is independent of frequency. This behavior is consistent with two-scale scattering theory. A limited amount of high friction velocity data above 70 cm/sec suggests an additional increase in emissivity due to whitecapping.

  9. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  10. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  11. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  12. Ultra Stable Microwave Radiometers for Future Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius will measure global sea surface salinity with 100-km spatial resolution every 8 days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than 0.1 K over 8 days. This three-year research program on ultra stable radiometers has addressed the radiometer requirements and configuration necessary to achieve this objective for Aquarius and future ocean salinity missions. The system configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer testbeds at both JPL and GSFC. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature, a procedure for the measurement and correction for radiometer system non-linearity, noise diode calibration versus temperature, low noise amplifier performance over voltage, and temperature control requirements to achieve the required stability. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability. This report also presents the results of the radiometer test program, a detailed radiometer noise model, and details of the operational switching sequence optimization that can be used to achieve the low noise and stability requirements. Many of the results of this research have been incorporated into the Aquarius radiometer design and will allow this instrument to achieve its goals.

  13. Simulation of a polarized laser beam reflected at the sea surface: modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    A 3-D simulation of the polarization-dependent reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation considers polarized or unpolarized laser sources and calculates the polarization states upon reflection at the sea surface. It is suitable for the radiance calculation of the scene in different spectral wavebands (e.g. near-infrared, SWIR, etc.) not including the camera degradations. The simulation also considers a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver as well as different atmospheric conditions. In the SWIR, the detected total power of reflected laser light is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation combines the 3-D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) with the simulation of polarized or unpolarized laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the input of a camera equipped with a linear polarizer, the polarized sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. The s- and p-polarization states are calculated for the emitted sea surface radiance and the specularly reflected sky radiance to determine the total polarized sea surface radiance of each component. The states of polarization and the radiance of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are calculated by considering the s- and p- components of the electric field of laser light with respect to the specular plane of incidence. This is done by using the formalism of their coherence matrices according to E. Wolf [1]. Additionally, an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is considered for the reflection of laser light radiances. Validation of the simulation results is required to ensure model credibility and applicability to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes, field measurement data (images and

  14. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  15. Rainfall on microwave return from the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L. F.; Giovanangeli, J.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The long range goal remains unchanged; to conduct experiments and develop/test theoretical models to permit useful algorithms to be constructed for microwave systems that observe oceanic processes. This topic is relevant to altimeters, scatterometers, and rain rate measurements. The current focus is attention to scatterometer wind velocity measurement. One component of the laboratory efforts is an experiment conducted, in the wind wave tank at the GSFC/WFF, to quantify the effect of rain-generated surface wave brightening of radar cross section. Laboratory conditions can be characterized as light wind, functional rain rates, a single drop size, and a 36 GHz radar system at 30 degrees inclination.

  16. Inference of sea surface temperature, near surface wind, and atmospheric water by Fourier analysis of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer measures thermal microwave emission from the earth in both polarizations at wavelengths of 0.8, 1.4, 1.7, 2.8 and 4.6 cm. Similar instruments were launched on Nimbus 7 and Seasat. Both spatial resolution on the earth and relative sensitivity to different geophysical parameters change with wavelength. Therefore, spatial Fourier components of geophysical parameters are inferred from the corresponding Fourier components of the radiometer measurements, taking into account the different dependence of signal-to-noise ratio on spatial frequency for each radiometer wavelength. The geophysical parameters are sea surface temperature, near-surface wind speed, integrated water vapor mass, integrated liquid water mass, and the product of rainfall rate with height of the rain layer. The capabilities and limitations of the inversion method are illustrated by means of data from the North Atlantic and from tropical storms.

  17. Microwave radiometer and scatterometer design for the aquarius sea surface Salinity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon H.; Pellerano, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of sea surface salinity with L-band microwave radiometers is a very challenging task. Since the L-band brightness temperature variations associated with salinity changes are small, it is necessary to have a very sensitive and stable radiometer. In addition, the corrections for the ocean surface roughness require real time scatterometer measurements. The designs of the Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer are described in this paper.

  18. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  19. The Effect of Sea-Surface Sun Glitter on Microwave Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple model for the microwave brightness temperature of sea surface Sun glitter is presented. The model is an accurate closeform approximation for the fourfold Sun glitter integral. The model computations indicate that Sun glitter contamination of on orbit radiometer measurements is appreciable over a large swath area. For winds near 20 m/s, Sun glitter affects the retrieval of environmental parameters for Sun angles as large as 20 to 25 deg. The model predicted biases in retrieved wind speed and sea surface temperature due to neglecting Sun glitter are consistent with those experimentally observed in SEASAT SMMR retrievals. A least squares retrieval algorithm that uses a combined sea and Sun model function shows the potential of retrieving accurate environmental parameters in the presence of Sun glitter so long as the Sun angles and wind speed are above 5 deg and 2 m/s, respectively.

  20. Sea surface as seen at L-band microwaves: modeling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floury, Nicolas; Toso, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    In the microwave domain, the development of interaction models has proved itself necessary for the understanding of the interaction between the electromagnetic wave and the sea surface and for the efficient retrieval of surface parameters from spaceborne measurements, such as in altimetry and wind scatterometry. New potential applications of microwaves over oceans involve frequencies such as L-band (around 1.5 GHz), both for active (such as the use of reflected GNSS signals for scatterometry and altimetry) and passive (extraction of ocean salinity from radiometric products) measurements. Classical models, mostly developed for higher frequencies and for close-to-nadir geometry's, may show limitations when applied to these new configurations. Another important issue is the sea surface description, which may need to be somehow refined to enable a complete picture of the interaction mechanisms at these wavelengths. L-band measurements of the sea surface (concurrent to local measurements of the sea state) are still quite scarce and this makes difficult the validation of modeling tools. It is however possible to use a well controlled full-wave approach, such as the moment method, as a reference to evaluate the assets and drawbacks of simpler asymptotic models (Physical Optics, two-scale model, etc .). The objective of this exercise is to exhibit a parameterization of the simpler models efficient enough to ensure an adequate restitution of the main scattering/emission mechanisms. Studies are conducted for different sea conditions. The wave-surface interaction mechanisms expected to drive the signal are studied for different configurations of observation. Then, the preliminary consequences in terms of interaction model accuracy at these wavelengths are pointed out.

  1. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field.

  2. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  3. Infrared and Passive Microwave Radiometric Sea Surface Temperatures and Their Relationships to Atmospheric Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.

    2004-01-01

    The current generation of infrared (IR) and passive microwave (MW) satellite sensors provides highly complementary information for monitoring sea surface temperature (SST). On the one hand, infrared sensors provide high resolution and high accuracy but are obscured by clouds. Microwave sensors on the other hand, provide coverage through non-precipitating clouds but have coarser resolution and generally poorer accuracy. Assuming that the satellite SST measurements do not have spatially variable biases, they can be blended combining the merits of both SST products. These factors have motivated recent work in blending the MW and IR data in an attempt to produce high-accuracy SST products with improved coverage in regions with persistent clouds. The primary sources of retrieval uncertainty are, however, different for the two sensors. The main uncertainty in the MW retrievals lies in the effects of wind-induced surface roughness and foam on emissivity, whereas the IR retrievals are more sensitive to the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol content. Average nighttime differences between the products for the month periods of January 1999 and June 2000 are shown. These maps show complex spatial and temporal differences as indicated by the strong spatially coherent features in the product differences and the changes between seasons. Clearly such differences need to be understood and accounted for if the products are to be combined. The overall goals of this project are threefold: (1) To understand the sources of uncertainty in the IR and MW SST retrievals and to characterize the errors affecting the two types of retrieval as a fiction of atmospheric forcing; (2) To demonstrate how representative the temperature difference between the two satellite products is of Delta T; (3) To apply bias adjustments and to device a comprehensive treatment of the behavior of the temperature difference across the oceanic skin layer to determine the best method for blending thermal infrared

  4. Detection and Characterization of Deep Water Wave Breaking Using Moderate Incidence Angle Microwave Backscatter from the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    with the detected events. (A discussion of the distribution of Fmax follows in the next section.) These plots confirm that very few non-breaking waves ...8217 and 0 Oceanographic Engineering 1930 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Detection and Characterization of Deep Water Wave Breaking Using Moderate Incidence...Characterization of Deep Water Wave Breaking Using Moderate Incidence Angle Microwave Backscatter from the Sea Surface by -- Andrew Thomas Jessup ,. D, Woods

  5. Polarization Imaging over Sea Surface - A Method for Measurements of Stokes Components Angular Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, W.; Piskozub, J.; Toczek, H.

    2015-12-01

    This article describes a method for determining the angular distribution of light polarization over a roughened surface of the sea. Our method relies on measurements of the Stokes vector elements using a polarization imaging camera that operates using the Division of Focal Plane (DoFP) method. It uses special monochrome CCD array in which the neighbouring cells, instead of recording different colours (red green and blue), are equipped with micropolarizers of four directions (0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees). We combined the camera with a fish-eye lens of Field of View (FoV) > 180 deg. Such a large FoV allowed us to crop out the fragment of the frame along the circular horizon, showing a view covering all directions of the hemisphere. Because of complicated optical design of the fish-eye lens (light refraction on surfaces of parts of the lens) connected to the sensor we checked the accuracy of the measurement system. A method to determine the accuracy of measured polarization is based on comparison of the experimentally obtained rotation matrix with its theoretical form. Such a comparison showed that the maximum error of Stokes vector elements depended on zenith angle and reached as much as 24% for light coming from just above the horizon, but decreased rapidly with decreasing zenith angle to the value of 12% for the angles 10° off the edge of FoV. Moreover we present the preliminary results prepared over rough sea surface. These results include total intensity of light, Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) and their standard deviations. The results have been averaged over one thousand frames of a movie. These results indicate that the maximum polarization is observed near the reflection of the sun, and the signal coming from below the surface may be observed at zenith angles far from the vertical direction.

  6. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  7. AQUARIUS: A Passive/Active Microwave Sensor to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity Globally from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Colomb, F. Raul; Chao, Yi

    2004-01-01

    Salinity is important for understanding ocean dynamics, energy exchange with the atmosphere and the global water cycle. Existing data is limited and much of the ocean has never even been sampled. Sea surface salinity can be measured remotely by satellite and a three year mission for this purpose called AquariudSAC-D has recently been selected by NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program. The objective is to map the salinity field globally with a spatial resolution of 100 km and a monthly average accuracy of 0.2 psu. The mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, is a partnership of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Argentine Comision National de Actividades Epaciales (CONAE).

  8. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  9. Microwave emission from polar firn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave emission from a half-space medium, characterized by coordinate dependent scattering and absorbing centers, was calculated by numerically solving the radiative transfer equation by the method of invariant imbedding. Rayleigh scattering phase functions and scattering induced polarization of the radiation were included in the calculation. Using the scattering and extinction data of polar firn the brightness temperature was calculated for the 1.55 cm wavelength. This study was the first quantitative comparison of the results of numerical calculation using the actual measured information of crystal size with the observed data.

  10. Potential use of microwave sea surface temperatures for the estimation of ocean currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern-Fontanet, J.; Chapron, B.; Lapeyre, G.; Klein, P.

    2006-12-01

    We examine the emerging potential offered by satellite microwave radiometer SST measurements to complement altimeter data to quantitatively derive surface ocean currents. The proposed methodology does not follow standard sequential temporal analysis but follows the application of the Surface Quasi-Geostrophic (SQG) theory. Accordingly, under favourable environmental conditions, the implementation for this methodology is simple and robust, and most importantly, solely requires a single SST image. For the present demonstration, altimetric measurements are used to infer a necessary adjustment to match the kinetic energy level for length scales smaller than 300 km. This helps to derive a regional effective Brunt-Vaisala frequency to produce SQG surface current estimates. As demonstrated, the results are very encouraging and strongly invite to consider the systematic use of satellite microwave radiometer.

  11. Potential use of microwave sea surface temperatures for the estimation of ocean currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern-Fontanet, J.; Chapron, B.; Lapeyre, G.; Klein, P.

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, we examine the emerging potential offered by satellite microwave radiometer SST measurements to complement altimeter data to quantitatively derive surface ocean currents. The proposed methodology does not follow standard sequential temporal analysis but follows the application of the Surface Quasi-Geostrophic (SQG) theory. Accordingly, under favourable environmental conditions, the implementation for this methodology is simple and robust, and most importantly, solely requires a single SST image. For the present demonstration, altimetric measurements are used to infer a necessary adjustment to match the kinetic energy level for length scales smaller than 300 km. This helps to derive a regional effective Brunt-Väisälä frequency to produce SQG surface current estimates. As demonstrated, the results are very encouraging and strongly invite to consider the systematic use of satellite microwave radiometer measurements.

  12. A joint active/passive physical model of sea surface microwave signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.; Irisov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    Active and passive microwave signatures of the ocean can only depend on the ocean wave spectrum if bound and breaking waves are neglected. However, history has not been kind to attempts to explain both radiometer brightness temperatures (Tb) and normalized radar cross sections (σo) of the sea using the same ocean wave spectrum without bound and breaking waves. In this paper, we show that if bound and breaking waves are included in physical models of radiometer and scatterometer microwave signatures of the ocean, a single wave spectrum can explain both Tb and σo to reasonable accuracy. Bound waves are the roughness produced by gently breaking, or crumpling, waves that travel near the speed of the parent wave. Bound wave modeling is based on earlier work by Plant (1997) but using additional information about the slope probability distributions of the bound waves' parents. Breaking wave and foam modeling both build on the function Λ(cb) introduced by Phillips (1985), which describes the average length of breaking wavefronts on the ocean per unit area as a function of breaker velocity, cb. We model Λ(cb) as documented in Irisov and Plant (2016) where we show that the wave spectrum completely determines Λ(cb). We thus show here that the result of including bound and breaking waves in radiometer and scatterometer models of oceanic signatures is a much closer fit to data over a wide range of microwave frequencies and incidence angles using a single wave spectrum.

  13. The effect of monomolecular surface films on the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpers, W.; Blume, H.-J. C.; Garrett, W. D.; Huehnerfuss, H.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that monomolecular surface films of biological origin are often encountered on the ocean surface, especially in coastal regions. The thicknesses of the monomolecular films are of the order of 3 x 10 to the -9th m. Huehnerfuss et al. (1978, 1981) have shown that monomolecular surface films damp surface waves quite strongly in the centimeter to decimeter wavelength regime. Other effects caused by films are related to the reduction of the gas exchange at the air-sea interface and the decrease of the wind stress. The present investigation is concerned with experiments which reveal an unexpectedly large response of the microwave brightness temperature to a monomolecular oleyl alcohol slick at 1.43 GHz. Brightness temperature is a function of the complex dielectric constant of thy upper layer of the ocean. During six overflights over an ocean area covered with an artificial monomolecular alcohol film, a large decrease of the brightness temperature at the L-band was measured, while at the S-band almost no decrease was observed.

  14. Statistical characteristics of polar lows over the Nordic Seas based on satellite passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, J. E.; Zabolotskikh, E. V.; Bobylev, L. P.; Chapron, B.

    2016-12-01

    In this study polar lows over the Nordic Seas for the period of 1995-2008 have been detected and studied using the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data. A new methodology for polar low detection and monitoring based on the analysis of the total atmospheric water vapor content (WVC) fields retrieved from SSM/I was used. Lifetimes, diameters, translation speeds, distances traveled, and intensities were estimated for the detected polar lows using SSM/I WVC, sea surface wind speed fields and infrared imagery. Over the Norwegian and Barents Seas, the polar low activity was found to be almost equal. A positive tendency in the total number of polar lows for the time period of 1995-2008 was detected.

  15. Exploring the time and space differences between the sea surface temperature records from multiple satellite based IR and microwave sensors. Do we have a consistent record across scales of 1km to regional and global images?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, K. A.; Minnett, P. J.; Podesta, G. P.; Williams, E.; Walsh, S.

    2015-12-01

    For over three decades the most widely used atmospheric correction approach for deriving sea surface temperature (SST) in the 11-12μm has been the Non-Linear SST algorithm (NLSST). The NLSST form is used for both the NOAA Pathfinder SST, and the MODIS and VIIRS SST datasets produced by NASA. A variant is also the basis of the night-time algorithms using measurements in the mid-infrared window. Since 1981 ten IR sensors, with 4 different designs, and slightly different overpass times, are used to create a satellite based consistent record of SST. The AVHRR-2's were flown from 1981-1997, AVHRR-3's began in 1998, and in 2000 the MODIS era began. The most recent sensor, VIIRS, began collecting data in 2012 and begins a unique period with four polar orbiting IR sensors concurrently collecting SST, along with the measurements from the AMSR-2 microwave sensor. These dataset provide an opportunity to evaluate the consistency between SST from the different IR sensors in the 30-year record. A number of factors, relating to real geophysical differences in measurements, must be taken into account when making comparisons. These include depth of measurement, potential for diurnal heating, and differences in the time and space aggregation method used to create global files. Figure 1 shows the global daily 9km MODIS Aqua day and night SST relative to the Reynolds OI SST analysis (Panel A and B) and a composite microwave Windsat SST (Panel C). The comparison to the NCEP Reynolds OI, with a measurement depth referenced to buoys, suggests strong diurnal heating of the Arctic sea surface skin in the late summer. Presumably the diurnal signal is strongest in late summer due to more open ice free water, compared to spring and early summer when the day length is actually the longest of the year, but more ice may obscure the sea surface. Biases may also be present in the Reynolds field as fewer buoy observations at these latitudes guide the OI analysis. The day-time MODIS SST compared to

  16. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) offer a means to explore the universe at a very early epoch. Specifically, if the universe went through a brief period of exponential expansion called inflation as current data suggest, gravitational waves from this period would polarize the CMB in a specific pattern. At GSFC, we are currently working towards two experiments that work in concert to measure this polarization pattern in search of evidence for inflation. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization at frequencies between 40 and 150 GHz from the Atacama Desert in Chile. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne experiment that will make similar measurements at frequencies between 200 and 600 GHz.

  17. The Sun as a Source of Error for Sea Surface Salinity Retrieval by Means of Passive Microwave Remote Sensing at L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinnat, E. P.; de Matthaeis, P.; Le Vine, D. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D mission is dedicated to the remote sensing of Sea Surface Salinity(SSS) and is to be launched in 2009 by NASA. A three-beam L-band (1.41 GHz) radiometer is the core instrument for retrieving SSS. The required accuracy on the radiometric measurements for retrieving SSS within 0.2 psu is 0.1 Kelvin (K), with an ocean brightness temperature being of the order of 100 K. One potential source of noise is the Sun, because of its very large brightness temperature at this frequency, on the order of 150,000 K. Its radiation affects the measurements directly through the antenna sidelobes, and after reflection at the ocean surface. The latter influence is being minimized by adopting an orbit with 6 AM/PM equator passing times and by orienting the three antenna beams across the satellite track towards the dark side of the Earth surface. However, as the 98 degrees polar orbit is not always aligned with the day/night terminator, the satellite ground track will be on the illuminated side of the Earth for half of the time. Since the satellite altitude is relatively low (~660 km), beams pointing at the angles selected for Aquarius, between 26 and 40 degrees, will not always be in the dark side due to their limited distance from the satellite ground track. In fact, because the sea surface roughness causes scattering even from non-specular directions, radiation from the Sun will enter the antenna beams approximately one fourth of the time. The different contributions of the Sun to the antenna temperature and their potential influence on the SSS retrieval as a function of time of the year and latitude are investigated. Aquarius orbit simulations are used to calculate the Sun position with respect to the antenna during one year. In addition, the Sun specular image position is identified on the Earth surface, and the bistatic angles of the illuminated part of the antenna field of view are computed. A two-scale and a Kirchhoff electromagnetic model for the scattering

  18. Deriving Sea Surface Salinity and Density Variations from Satellite and Aircraft Microwave Radiometer Measurements: Application to Coastal Plumes Using STARRS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    otherwise change the qualitative The density shown in relation to Tb and Ts [Fig. 1(a) (blue)] features mentioned here. For horizontally polarized (H-Pol...nadir. The plots quantitatively 1) Accuracy: The claimed accuracy of KS77 based on var- differ at other incidence angles but show the same qualitative ...Noise Noise and operational configurations of these instruments do not km K K rn/S Sidev Stdes’. K K allow a comprehensive analysis . This would require

  19. The Cosmic Microwave Background and its Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The subtle spatial variations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation provide a unique astrophysical probe of the early Universe. Characterization of this relic radiation and its polarization have the power to reveal and constrain the properties of light astroparticle species, long wave gravitational radiation, and intervening mass concentrations. Recent advances in theory, observation, and instrumentation have set the stage to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm via precision polarimetric surveys of the CMB. Current and proposed future observational efforts from the ground, balloon, and spaceborne platforms will be briefly surveyed in this presentation. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be presented.

  20. Deriving Sea Surface Salinity and Density Variations From Satellite and Aircraft Microwave Radiometer Measurements: Application to Coastal Plumes Using STARRS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    change the qualitative The density shown in relation to Tb and Ts [Fig. 1 (a) (blue)] features mentioned here. For horizontally polarized (H-Pol) sig...claimed accuracy of KS77 based on var- differ at other incidence angles but show the same qualitative ious concentrations of standard mean ocean water...configurations of these instruments do not km K K r/s Stdev Stdev allow a comprehensive analysis . This would require the appli- STARRS 5 0.70 0.13 1.5 0.21

  1. Cosmological spatial curvature probed by microwave polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, R.A.; Tolman, B.W.

    1982-11-15

    If there is a large-scale anisotropy in the expansion of the universe, the microwave background radiation is expected to be linearly polarized. This communication shows that spatial curvature is capable of rotating the polarization of the microwaves relative to its direction at last scattering, which is directly correlated with the expansion anisotropy (and so also the observed intensity anisotropy). In Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models of the universe with additional small expansion anisotropy, the observed rotation relative to the intensity anisotropy would be appreciable and constant over the celestial sphere in the closed (type IX) model, but in the flat and open models, it must either vanish (types I and V) or vary ina complicated way over the celestial sphere (type VII/sub h/). These facts suggest a clear observational test of the closure of the universe. Also, an ambiguity inherent in the homogeneity of the universe does not allow prediction of the direction of rotation; thus homogeneous universes possess a property which might be called ''handedness.''

  2. Subnanosecond microwave-assisted magnetization switching in a circularly polarized microwave magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Hirofumi; Kanao, Taro; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Kudo, Kiwamu; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2017-06-01

    We study microwave-assisted magnetization switching (MAS) of a perpendicularly magnetized nanomagnet with a diameter of 50 nm in a circularly polarized microwave magnetic field. The MAS effect appears when the rotation direction of the microwave field matches that of the ferromagnetic resonance excitation, and a large switching field decrease from 7.1 kOe to 1.5 kOe is demonstrated. In comparison with a linearly polarized microwave magnetic field, the circularly polarized microwave field induces the same MAS effect at half the microwave field amplitude, thereby showing its efficiency. We also examine MAS in the subnanosecond region and show that the magnetization switching can be induced by a microwave field with the duration of 0.2 ns.

  3. Characterization of sun and sky glint from wind ruffled sea surfaces for improved estimation of polarized remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Robert; Ibrahim, Amir; Gilerson, Alex; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Carrizo, Carlos; Ahmed, Sam

    2015-09-01

    During two cruises in 2014, the polarized radiance of the ocean and the sky were continuously acquired using a HyperSAS-POL system. The system consists of seven hyperspectral radiometric sensors, three of which (one unpolarized and two polarized) look at the water and similarly three at the sky. The system autonomously tracks the Sun position and the heading of the research vessel to which it is attached in order to maintain a fixed relative azimuth angle with respect to the Sun (i.e. 90°) and therefore avoid the specular reflection of the sunlight. For the duration of both cruises, (NASA Ship Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR), and NOAA VIIRS Validation/Calibration), in situ inherent optical properties (IOPs) were continuously acquired using a set of instrument packages modified for underway measurement, and hyperspectral radiometric measurements were taken manually at all stations. During SABOR, an underwater polarimeter was deployed when conditions permitted. All measurements were combined in an effort to first develop a glint (sky + Sun) correction scheme for the upwelling polarized signal from a wind driven ocean surface and compare with one assuming that the ocean surface is flat.

  4. Impact of sea surface temperature on satellite retrieval of sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuchen; Zhu, Qiankun; He, Xianqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou; Huang, Haiqing

    2016-10-01

    Currently, global sea surface salinity (SSS) can be retrieved by the satellite microwave radiometer onboard the satellite, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) and the Aqurius. SMOS is an Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission from the European Space Agency(ESA). It was launched at a sun-synchronous orbit in 2009 and one of the payloads is called MIRAS(Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis), which is the first interferometric microwave radiometer designed for observing SSS at L-band(1.41 GHz).The foundation of the salinity retrieval by microwave radiometer is that the sea surface radiance at L-band has the most suitable sensitivity with the variation of the salinity. It is well known that the sensitivity of brightness temperatures(TB) to SSS depends on the sea surface temperature (SST), but the quantitative impact of the SST on the satellite retrieval of the SSS is still poorly known. In this study, we investigate the impact of the SST on the accuracy of salinity retrieval from the SMOS. First of all, The dielectric constant model proposed by Klein and Swift has been used to estimate the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures(TV and TH) of a smooth sea water surface at L-band and derive the derivatives of TV and TH as a function of SSS to show the relative sensitivity at 45° incident angle. Then, we use the GAM(generalized additive model) method to evaluate the association between the satellite-measured brightness temperature and in-situ SSS at different SST. Moreover, the satellite-derived SSS from the SMOS is validated using the ARGO data to assess the RMSE(root mean squared error). We compare the SMOS SSS and ARGO SSS over two regions of Pacific ocean far from land and ice under different SST. The RMSE of retrieved SSS at different SST have been estimated. Our results showed that SST is one of the most significant factors affecting the accuracy of SSS retrieval. The satellite-measured brightness temperature has a

  5. Optically Transparent Microwave Polarizer Based On Quasi-Metallic Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Marco; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; de Ceglia, Domenico; Capezzuto, Pio; Scalora, Michael; D’Orazio, Antonella; Bruno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the engineering and the realization of optically transparent graphene-based microwave devices using Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) graphene whose sheet resistance may be tailored down to values below 30 Ω/sq. In particular, we show that the process was successfully used to realize and characterize a simple, optically transparent graphene-based wire-grid polarizer at microwave frequencies (X band). The availability of graphene operating in a quasi-metallic region may allow the integration of graphene layers in several microwave components, thus leading to the realization of fully transparent (and flexible) microwave devices. PMID:26603112

  6. Optically Transparent Microwave Polarizer Based On Quasi-Metallic Graphene.

    PubMed

    Grande, Marco; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; de Ceglia, Domenico; Capezzuto, Pio; Scalora, Michael; D'Orazio, Antonella; Bruno, Giovanni

    2015-11-25

    In this paper, we report on the engineering and the realization of optically transparent graphene-based microwave devices using Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) graphene whose sheet resistance may be tailored down to values below 30 Ω/sq. In particular, we show that the process was successfully used to realize and characterize a simple, optically transparent graphene-based wire-grid polarizer at microwave frequencies (X band). The availability of graphene operating in a quasi-metallic region may allow the integration of graphene layers in several microwave components, thus leading to the realization of fully transparent (and flexible) microwave devices.

  7. Microwave frequency modulation for improving polarization transfer in DNP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Mallory; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a driven process that transfers the inherently high electron polarization to surrounding nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency. In a typical DNP experiment, the amplitude and frequency of the applied microwaves are constant. However, by adding time dependence in the form of frequency modulation, the electron excitation bandwidth is increased, thereby increasing the number of electron spins active in the polarization transfer process and improving overall efficiency. Both triangular and sinusoidal modulation show a 3 fold improvement over monochromatic irradiation. In the present study, we compare the nuclear spin polarization after DNP experiments with no modulation of the applied microwaves, triangular and sinusoidal modulation, and modulation schemes derived from the sample's ESR spectrum. We characterize the polarization as a function of the modulation amplitude and frequency and compare the optimal results from each modulation scheme. Working at a field of 3.34 T and at a temperature of 4 K, we show that by using a modulation scheme tailored to the electronic environment of the sample, polarization transfer is improved over other modulation schemes. Small-scale simulations of the spin system are developed to gain further insight into the dynamics of this driven open system. This understanding could enable the design of modulation schemes to achieve even higher polarization transfer efficiencies. With support from NSF (CHE-1410504) and by NIH (U19-A1091173).

  8. Polarized cosmic microwave background map recovery with sparse component separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-11-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting this information from microwave surveys requires distinguishing between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which means solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, but very rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to distinguish between the various components. More recent methods, which instead emphasize the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimates of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, we here introduce a new component separation technique dubbed the polarized generalized morphological component analysis (PolGMCA), which refines previous work to specifically work on the estimation of the polarized CMB maps: i) it benefits from a recently introduced sparsity-based mechanism to cope with partially correlated components; ii) it builds upon estimator aggregation techniques to further yield a better noise contamination/non-Gaussian foreground residual trade-off. The PolGMCA algorithm is evaluated on simulations of full-sky polarized microwave sky simulations using the Planck Sky Model (PSM). The simulations show that the proposed method achieves a precise recovery of the CMB map in polarization with low-noise and foreground contamination residuals. It provides improvements over standard methods, especially on the Galactic center, where estimating the CMB is challenging.

  9. Directional melting of alumina via polarized microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Nakano, Aiichiro; Wang, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Dynamical instabilities and melting of crystals upon heating are fundamental problems in physics and materials science. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we found that drastically different melting temperatures and behaviors can be achieved in α-alumina using microwave heating, where the electric field is aligned with different crystallographic orientations. Namely, alumina melts much earlier at lower temperatures when the electric field is parallel to the c-axis. The atomistic mechanism was identified as selective liberation of the Al sublattice due to the shear instability along the c-axis. This directional melting concept may be used for triggering distinct dynamical instabilities and melting of dielectric crystals using polarized microwave fields.

  10. Dipole modulation of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Shamik; Kothari, Rahul; Jain, Pankaj; Rath, Pranati K. E-mail: rahulko@iitk.ac.in E-mail: pranati@iopb.res.in

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dipole modulation model for the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) polarization field. We show that the model leads to correlations between l and l+1 multipoles, exactly as in the case of temperature. We obtain results for the case of TE, EE and BB correlations. An anisotropic or inhomogeneous model of primordial power spectrum which leads to such correlations in temperature field also predicts similar correlations in CMBR polarization. We analyze the CMBR temperature and polarization data in order to extract the signal of these correlation between l and l+1 multipoles. Our results for the case of temperature using the latest PLANCK data agree with those obtained by an earlier analysis. A detailed study of the correlation in the polarization data is not possible at present. Hence we restrict ourselves to a preliminary investigation in this case.

  11. Cosmology with the cosmic microwave background temperature-polarization correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couchot, F.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Perdereau, O.; Plaszczynski, S.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Spinelli, M.; Tristram, M.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature-polarization cross-correlation provides accurate and robust constraints on cosmological parameters. We compare them with the results from temperature or polarization and investigate the impact of foregrounds, cosmic variance, and instrumental noise. This analysis makes use of the Planck high-ℓ HiLLiPOP likelihood based on angular power spectra, which takes into account systematics from the instrument and foreground residuals directly modelled using Planck measurements. The temperature-polarization correlation (TE) spectrum is less contaminated by astrophysical emissions than the temperature power spectrum (TT), allowing constraints that are less sensitive to foreground uncertainties to be derived. For ΛCDM parameters, TE gives very competitive results compared to TT. For basic ΛCDM model extensions (such as AL, ∑mν, or Neff), it is still limited by the instrumental noise level in the polarization maps.

  12. Cosmic microwave background polarization signals from tangled magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, T R; Subramanian, K

    2001-09-03

    Tangled, primordial cosmic magnetic fields create small rotational velocity perturbations on the last scattering surface of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For fields which redshift to a present value of B0 = 3 x 10(-9) G, these vector modes are shown to generate polarization anisotropies of order 0.1-4 microK on small angular scales (500polarization, which could help in their detection.

  13. Airborne antenna polarization study for the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilreath, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the microwave landing system (MLS) airborne antenna pattern coverage requirements are investigated for a large commercial aircraft using a single omnidirectional antenna. Omnidirectional antennas having vertical and horizontal polarizations were evaluated at several different station locations on a one-eleventh scale model Boeing 737 aircraft. The results obtained during this experimental program are presented which include principal plane antenna patterns and complete volumetric coverage plots.

  14. Effects of polarization-charge shielding in microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M. S.; Lin, S. M.; Chiang, W. Y.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2015-08-15

    Heating of dielectric objects by radio frequency (RF) and microwaves has long been a method widely employed in scientific research and industrial applications. However, RF and microwave heating are often susceptible to an excessive temperature spread due to uneven energy deposition. The current study elucidates an important physical reason for this difficulty and proposes an effective remedy. Non-spherical samples are placed in an anechoic chamber, where it is irradiated by a traveling microwave wave with 99% intensity uniformity. Polarization charges induced on the samples tend to partially cancel the incident electric field and hence reduce the heating rate. The polarization-charge shielded heating rate is shown to be highly dependent on the sample's shape and its orientation relative to the wave electric field. For samples with a relatively high permittivity, the resultant uneven heating can become a major cause for the excessive temperature spread. It is also demonstrated that a circularly polarized wave, with its rapidly rotating electric field, can effectively even out the heating rate and hence the temperature spread.

  15. Doppler shifts of radar return from the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S. A.; Kapustin, I. A.; Molkov, A. A.; Sergievskaya, I. A.; Shomina, O. V.

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of the Doppler shift of radar return from the sea surface is very important for better understanding of capabilities of exploitation of microwave radar for measuring velocities of marine currents. Here new field experiments carried out from a Platform on the Black Sea with a coherent X-band scatterometer, and a Doppler multifrequency (X- /C-/S-band) dual-polarized radar recently designed at IAP RAS are discussed. It is shown that the radar return contains both Bragg (polarized) and non polarized scattering components, presumably giving different contributions to radar Doppler shifts. Radar Doppler shifts were estimated using two different definitions as a) a frequency of the "centre of gravity" of an instantaneous radar return spectrum (ASIS) averaged over periods of dominant wind waves and b) the "centre of gravity" of the averaged over dominant wave periods spectrum (SAS). The ASIS and SAS values for both VV and HH-polarizations are shown to be different due to effects of radar backscatter modulation by dominant (long) wind waves. The radar Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) has been analyzed from experimental data and difference between SAS- and ASIS-values has been satisfactory explained using the measured MTF-values. It is obtained that experimental values of ASIS can be satisfactory described by the Bragg model despite the significant contribution of NP component to the radar backscatter. A physical explanation of the effect is given.

  16. Testing cosmic microwave background polarization data using position angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Michael; Battye, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    We consider a novel null test for contamination which can be applied to cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data that involves analysis of the statistics of the polarization position angles. Specifically, we will concentrate on using histograms of the measured position angles to illustrate the idea. Such a test has been used to identify systematics in the NRAO-VLA Sky Survey point source catalogue with an amplitude well below the noise level. We explore the statistical properties of polarization angles in CMB maps. If the polarization angle is not correlated between pixels, then the errors follow a simple √{N_{pix}} law. However, this is typically not the case for CMB maps since these have correlations which result in an increase in the variance as the effective number of independent pixels is reduced. Then, we illustrate how certain classes of systematic errors can result in very obvious patterns in these histograms, and thus that these errors could possibly be identified using this method. We discuss how this idea might be applied in a realistic context, and make a preliminary analysis of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 data, finding evidence of a systematic error in the Q- and W- band data, consistent with a constant offset in Q and U.

  17. Forward Monte Carlo Computations of Polarized Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battaglia, A.; Kummerow, C.

    2000-01-01

    Microwave radiative transfer computations continue to acquire greater importance as the emphasis in remote sensing shifts towards the understanding of microphysical properties of clouds and with these to better understand the non linear relation between rainfall rates and satellite-observed radiance. A first step toward realistic radiative simulations has been the introduction of techniques capable of treating 3-dimensional geometry being generated by ever more sophisticated cloud resolving models. To date, a series of numerical codes have been developed to treat spherical and randomly oriented axisymmetric particles. Backward and backward-forward Monte Carlo methods are, indeed, efficient in this field. These methods, however, cannot deal properly with oriented particles, which seem to play an important role in polarization signatures over stratiform precipitation. Moreover, beyond the polarization channel, the next generation of fully polarimetric radiometers challenges us to better understand the behavior of the last two Stokes parameters as well. In order to solve the vector radiative transfer equation, one-dimensional numerical models have been developed, These codes, unfortunately, consider the atmosphere as horizontally homogeneous with horizontally infinite plane parallel layers. The next development step for microwave radiative transfer codes must be fully polarized 3-D methods. Recently a 3-D polarized radiative transfer model based on the discrete ordinate method was presented. A forward MC code was developed that treats oriented nonspherical hydrometeors, but only for plane-parallel situations.

  18. Microwave-mediated magneto-optical trap for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizhou, Xie; Wenhao, Bu; Bo, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Realizing a molecular magneto-optical trap has been a dream for cold molecular physicists for a long time. However, due to the complex energy levels and the small effective Lande g-factor of the excited states, the traditional magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme does not work very well for polar molecules. One way to overcome this problem is the switching MOT, which requires very fast switching of both the magnetic field and the laser polarizations. Switching laser polarizations is relatively easy, but fast switching of the magnetic field is experimentally challenging. Here we propose an alternative approach, the microwave-mediated MOT, which requires a slight change of the current experimental setup to solve the problem. We calculate the MOT force and compare it with the traditional MOT and the switching MOT scheme. The results show that we can operate a good MOT with this simple setup. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China.

  19. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and its Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its faint polarization have provided a unique means to constrain the physical state of the early Universe. Continued advances in instrumentation, observation, and analysis have revealed polarized radiation signatures associated with gravitational lensing and have heightened the prospects for using precision polarimetry to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm. Characterization of this relic radiation field has the power to constrain or reveal the detailed properties of astroparticle species and long wave gravitational radiation. On going and planned CMB polarization efforts from the ground, balloon, and space borne platforms will be briefly surveyed. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be summarized. NASA PCOS mini-symposium (invited IPSIG talk).

  20. Large-scale polarization of the microwave background and foreground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira-Costa, Angélica; Tegmark, Max; O'dell, Christopher; Keating, Brian; Timbie, Peter; Efstathiou, George; Smoot, George

    2003-10-01

    The DASI discovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization has opened a new chapter in cosmology. Most of the useful information about inflationary gravitational waves and reionization is on large angular scales where galactic foreground contamination is the worst, so a key challenge is to model, quantify, and remove polarized foregrounds. We use the POLAR experiment, COBE/DMR and radio surveys to provide the strongest limits to date on the TE cross-power spectrum of the CMB on large angular scales and to quantify the polarized synchrotron radiation, which is likely to be the most challenging polarized contaminant for the WMAP satellite. We find that the synchrotron E and B contributions are equal to within 10% from 408 820 MHz with a hint of E domination at higher frequencies. We quantify Faraday rotation and depolarization effects in the two-dimensional (l,ν) plane and show that they cause the synchrotron polarization percentage to drop both towards lower frequencies and towards lower multipoles.

  1. Large-scale polarization of the microwave background andforeground

    SciTech Connect

    de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Tegmark, M.; O'Dell, C.; Keating,B.; Timbie, P.; Efstathiou, G.; Smoot, G.

    2002-12-22

    The DASI discovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization has opened a new chapter in cosmology. Most of the useful information about inflationary gravitational waves and reionization is on large angular scales where galactic foreground contamination is the worst, so a key challenge is to model, quantify, and remove polarized foregrounds. We use the POLAR experiment, COBE/DMR and radio surveys to provide the strongest limits to date on the TE cross-power spectrum of the CMB on large angular scales and to quantify the polarized synchrotron radiation, which is likely to be the most challenging polarized contaminant for the WMAP satellite. We find that the synchrotron E and B contributions are equal to within 10 percent from 408-820 MHz with a hint of E domination at higher frequencies. We quantify Faraday rotation and depolarization effects in the two-dimensional ([script l],nu) plane and show that they cause the synchrotron polarization percentage to drop both towards lower frequencies and towards lower multipoles.

  2. Polarization properties of extragalactic radio sources and their contribution to microwave polarization fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Baccigalupi, C.; De Zotti, G.; Gregorini, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Vigotti, M.; Klein, U.

    2002-12-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of the polarized emission of extragalactic radio sources and estimate their contribution to the power spectrum of polarization fluctuations in the microwave region. The basic ingredients of our analysis are the NVSS polarization data, the multifrequency study of polarization properties of the B3-VLA sample (Mack et al. \\cite{Mack2002}) which has allowed us to quantify Faraday depolarization effects, and the 15 GHz survey by Taylor et al. (\\cite{Taylor2001}), which has provided strong constraints on the high-frequency spectral indices of sources. The polarization degree of both steep- and flat-spectrum sources at 1.4 GHz is found to be anti-correlated with the flux density. The median polarization degree at 1.4 GHz of both steep- and flat-spectrum sources brighter than S(1.4 GHz)=80 mJy is =~ 2.2%. The data by Mack et al. (\\cite{Mack2002}) indicate a substantial mean Faraday depolarization at 1.4 GHz for steep spectrum sources, while the depolarization is undetermined for most flat/inverted-spectrum sources. Exploiting this complex of information we have estimated the power spectrum of polarization fluctuations due to extragalactic radio sources at microwave frequencies. We confirm that extragalactic sources are expected to be the main contaminant of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization maps on small angular scales. At frequencies <30 GHz the amplitude of their power spectrum is expected to be comparable to that of the E-mode of the CMB. At higher frequencies, however, the CMB dominates.

  3. Searching for Faraday rotation in cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 9th-year foreground reduced data at 33, 41 and 61 GHz to derive a Faraday rotation at map and at angular power spectrum levels taking into account their observational errors. A processing mask provided by WMAP is used to avoid contamination from the disc of our Galaxy and local spurs. We have found a Faraday rotation component at both, map and power spectrum levels. The lack of correlation of the Faraday rotation with Galactic Faraday rotation, synchrotron and dust polarization from our Galaxy or with cosmic microwave background anisotropies or lensing suggests that it could be originated at reionization (ℓ ≲ 12). Even if the detected Faraday rotation signal is weak, the present study could contribute to establish magnetic fields strengths of B0 ˜ 10-8 G at reionization.

  4. Impact of polarization on the intrinsic cosmic microwave background bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinari, Guido W.; Fidler, Christian; Crittenden, Robert; Koyama, Kazuya; Lewis, Antony; Wands, David

    2014-11-01

    We compute the cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum induced by the evolution of the primordial density perturbations, including for the first time both temperature and polarization using a second-order Boltzmann code. We show that including polarization can increase the signal-to-noise by a factor 4 with respect to temperature alone. We find the expected signal-to-noise for this intrinsic bispectrum of S /N =3.8 ,2.9 ,1.6 and 0.5 for an ideal experiment with an angular resolution of ℓmax=3000 , the proposed CMB surveys PRISM and COrE, and Planck's polarized data, respectively; the bulk of this signal comes from E -mode polarization and from squeezed configurations. We discuss how CMB lensing is expected to reduce these estimates as it suppresses the bispectrum for squeezed configurations and contributes to the noise in the estimator. We find that the presence of the intrinsic bispectrum will bias a measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity of local type by fNLintr=0.66 for an ideal experiment with ℓmax=3000 . Finally, we verify the robustness of our results by recovering the analytic approximation for the squeezed-limit bispectrum in the general polarized case.

  5. Anomalous cosmic-microwave-background polarization and gravitational chirality.

    PubMed

    Contaldi, Carlo R; Magueijo, João; Smolin, Lee

    2008-10-03

    We consider the possibility that gravity breaks parity, with left and right-handed gravitons coupling to matter with a different Newton's constant and show that this would affect their zero-point vacuum fluctuations during inflation. Should there be a cosmic background of gravity waves, the effect would translate into anomalous cosmic microwave background polarization. Nonvanishing temperature-magnetic (TB) mode [and electric-magnetic mode] components emerge, revealing interesting experimental targets. Indeed, if reasonable chirality is present a TB measurement would provide the easiest way to detect a gravitational wave background. We speculate on the theoretical implications of such an observation.

  6. Detection of polarization in the cosmic microwave background using DASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, John M.

    2004-06-01

    The past several years have seen the emergence of a new standard cosmological model in which small temperature differences in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on degree angular scales are understood to arise from acoustic oscillations in the hot plasma of the early universe sourced by primordial adiabatic density fluctuations. In the context of this model, recent measurements of the temperature fluctuations have led to profound conclusions about the origin, evolution and composition of the universe. Given knowledge of the temperature angular power spectrum, this theoretical framework yields a prediction for the level of the CMB polarization with essentially no free parameters. A determination of the CMB polarization would therefore provide a critical test of the underlying theoretical framework of this standard model. In this thesis, we report the detection of polarized anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station. Observations in all four Stokes parameters were obtained within two 3°4 FWHM fields separated by one hour in Right Ascension. The fields were selected from the subset of fields observed with DASI in 2000 in which no point sources were detected and are located in regions of low Galactic synchrotron and dust emission. The temperature angular power spectrum is consistent with previous measurements and its measured frequency spectral index is -0.01 (-0.16 to 0.14 at 68% confidence), where zero corresponds to a 2.73 K Planck spectrum. The power spectrum of the detected polarization is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the interpretation of CMB anisotropy as arising from primordial scalar adiabatic fluctuations. Specifically, E-mode polarization is detected at high confidence (4.9σ). Assuming a shape for the power spectrum consistent with previous temperature measurements, the level found for the E- mode polarization

  7. Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Kunkee, D. B.; Piepmeier, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop satellite-based observational techniques for measuring both oceanic and atmospheric variables using passive polarimetric radiometry. Polarimetric radiometry offers a potential alternative to radar scatterometry in observing global ocean surface wind direction from satellites. Polarimetric radiometry might also provide a means of detecting cell-top ice in convective storms by virtue of the polarizing properties of oriented ice particles, and thus facilitate estimation of the phase of the storm. The project focuses on the development of polarimetric microwave radiometers using digital cross-correlators for obtaining precise measurements of all four Stokes' parameters. As part of the project a unique four-band polarimetric imaging radiometer, the Polar Scanning Radiometer (PSR), is being designed for use on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. In addition to providing an aircraft-based demonstration of digital correlation technology the PSR will significantly enhance the microwave imaging capability of the existing suite of DC-8 instruments. During the first grant year excellent progress has been made in the following areas: (1) demonstrating digital correlation radiometry, (2) fabricating aircraft-qualified correlators for use in the PSR, and (3) modeling observed SSM/I brightness signatures of ocean wind direction.

  8. Analysis and Modelling of Sea-Surface Doppler Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, F.; Hoogeboom, P.; Le Chevalier, F.; Stoffelen, A.

    2012-12-01

    The modelling of the Doppler spectrum of a time-varying ocean surface has gained considerable attention in the last decades. Knowledge of how the evolution of the ocean surface wave spectrum affects the scattered electromagnetic field is essential for a quantitative understanding of the properties of the measured microwave Doppler spectra. Complicated hydrodynamics, influencing the motion of the ocean surface waves, make this understanding significantly difficult. Non linear hydrodynamics couple the motion of the large and small waves and, consequently, change statistical characteristics and shapes of the surface-wave components. These hydrodynamic surface interactions are not included in the simplest linear sea-surface model, which assumes that each surface harmonic propagates according to the dispersion relation typical of water waves. In the past decades, Bass [1968] and Barrick [1972] used a surface perturbation theory to predict the Doppler spectra; Valenzuela and Laing [1970], instead, obtained similar results by using a composite surface model. Later, Doppler spectra were studied by Thompson [1989], who computed the spectra using a time-dependent composite model. Zavorotny and Voronovich [1998] made use of an approximate "two-scale" surface model based on a directional wave spectrum. However, currently available analytical scattering models are unreliable at high incidence angles and do not provide a full-polarimetric information. Exact numerical simulations of microwave scattering from time-varying ocean-like surfaces are highly recommended to eliminate concerns on the applicability of approximate models and to provide a validation tool for approximate scattering theories. A more realistic model, that accounts for hydrodynamic surface interactions, is the non-linear model for surface waves by Creamer et ali [1989]. Rino et ali [ 1991] were the first to use the Creamer model to simulate the Doppler spectra from dynamically evolving surface realizations

  9. Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector with Selective Polarization Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward; U-yen, Kongpop; Stevenson, Thomas; Brown, Ari; Moseley, Samuel; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2013-01-01

    A conventional low-noise detector requires a technique to both absorb incident power and convert it to an electrical signal at cryogenic temperatures. This innovation combines low-noise detector and readout functionality into one device while maintaining high absorption, controlled polarization sensitivity, and broadband detection capability. The resulting far-infrared detectors can be read out with a simple approach, which is compact and minimizes thermal loading. The proposed microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) consists of three basic elements. The first is the absorptive section in which the incident power is coupled to a superconducting resonator at far-infrared frequency above its superconducting critical frequency (where superconductor becomes normal conductor). This absorber's shape effectively absorbs signals in the desired polarization state and is resonant at the radio frequency (RF) used for readout of the device. Control over the metal film used in the absorber allows realization of structures with either a 50% broadband or 100% resonance absorptance over a 30% fractional bandwidth. The second element is a microwave resonator - which is realized from the thin metal films used to make the absorber as transmission lines - whose resonance frequency changes due to a variation in its kinetic inductance. The resonator's kinetic inductance is a function of the power absorbed by the device. A low-loss dielectric (mono-crystalline silicon) is used in a parallel-plate transmission line structure to realize the desired superconducting resonators. There is negligible coupling among the adjacent elements used to define the polarization sensitivity of each detector. The final component of the device is a microwave transmission line, which is coupled to the resonator, and allows detection of changes in resonance frequency for each detector in the focal plane array. The spiral shape of the detector's absorber allows incident power with two polarizations to

  10. Tunable and wideband microwave photonic phase shifter based on a single-sideband polarization modulator and a polarizer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shilong; Zhang, Yamei

    2012-11-01

    A novel microwave photonic phase shifter based on a single-sideband (SSB) polarization modulator (PolM) and a polarizer is proposed and demonstrated. In the SSB-PolM, two SSB intensity-modulated signals with a phase difference of π along two orthogonal polarization directions are generated. With the polarizer to combine the two signals, the phase of the optical microwave signal can be tuned from -180 to 180 deg by simply adjusting the polarization direction of the polarizer, whereas the amplitude keeps unchanged. An experiment is carried out. A full-range tunable phase shift in the frequency range of 11-43 GHz is achieved. The flat power response, power independent operation, and high stability of the proposed microwave photonic phase shifter is also confirmed.

  11. Microwave Radiometric Measurement of Sea Surface Salinity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    potential problems of polution and urban water sup- plies. Although salinity can be measured from a surface vessel, economic consider- ations advocate...Washington, DC 20350 Commander Naval Sea System Commandaa ComAinder ATTN: Mr. C. Smith, NAVSEA 63R* Nval Air Development Center "’-’. "Washington, DC...20362 ATTN: Mr. R. Bollard, Code 2062% .’* Warminster, PA 18974 • .’.Commander CNaval Sea System CommandCoimCander Headquarters Naval Air Systems

  12. Cosmic microwave background: Polarization and temperature anisotropies from symmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    1999-06-01

    Perturbations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are generated by primordial inhomogeneities. I consider the case of CMB anisotropies from one single ordered perturbation source, or seed, existing well before decoupling between matter and radiation. Such structures could have been left by high energy symmetries breaking in the early universe. I focus on the cases of spherical and cylindrical symmetry of the seed. I give general analytic expressions for the polarization and temperature linear perturbations, factoring out of the Fourier integral the dependence on the photon propagation direction and on the geometric coordinates describing the seed. I show how the CMB perturbations manifestly reflect the symmetries of their seeds. In particular, polarization is uniquely linked to the shape of the source because of its tensorial nature. CMB anisotropies are obtained with a line of sight integration. They are a function of the position and orientation of the seed along the photons path. This treatment highlights the undulatory properties of the CMB. I show with numerical examples how the polarization and temperature perturbations propagate beyond the size of their seeds, reaching the CMB sound horizon at the time considered. Just like the waves from a pebble thrown in a pond, CMB anisotropy from a seed intersecting the last scattering surface appears as a series of temperature and polarization waves surrounding the seed, extending on the scale of the CMB sound horizon at decoupling, roughly 1 deg in the sky. Each wave is characterized by its own value of the CMB perturbation, with the same mean amplitude of the signal coming from the seed interior; as expected for a linear structure with size L<=H-1 and density contrast δ at decoupling, the temperature anisotropy is δT/T~=δ(L/H-1)2, roughly ten times stronger than the polarization. These waves could allow one to distinguish relics from high energy processes of the early universe from pointlike astrophysical

  13. Spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien; Fidler, Christian; Pitrou, Cyril; Pettinari, Guido W. E-mail: christian.fidler@port.ac.uk E-mail: g.pettinari@sussex.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We compute the spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization induced by non-linear effects in the Compton interactions between CMB photons and the flow of intergalactic electrons. This signal is of the y-type and is dominated by contributions arising from the reionized era. We stress that it is not shadowed by the thermal SZ effect which has no equivalent for polarization. We decompose its angular dependence into E- and B-modes, and we calculate the corresponding power spectra, both exactly and using a suitable Limber approximation that allows a simpler numerical evaluation. We find that B-modes are of the same order of magnitude as E-modes. Both spectra are relatively flat, peaking around ℓ = 280, and their overall amplitude is directly related to the optical depth to reionization. Moreover, we find this effect to be one order of magnitude larger than the non-linear kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters. Finally, we discuss how to improve the detectability of our signal by cross-correlating it with other quantities sourced by the flow of intergalactic electrons.

  14. Microwave remote sensing and radar polarization signatures of natural fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models developed for simulation of microwave remote sensing of the Earth surface from airborne/spaceborne sensors are described. Theoretical model calculations were performed and the results were compared with data of field measurements. Data studied included polarimetric images at the frequencies of P band, L band, and C band, acquired with airborne polarimeters over a agricultural field test site. Radar polarization signatures from bare soil surfaces and from tree covered fields were obtained from the data. The models developed in this report include: (1) Small perturbation model of wave scatterings from randomly rough surfaces, (2) Physical optics model, (3) Geometrical optics model, and (4) Electromagnetic wave scattering from dielectric cylinders of finite lengths, which replace the trees and branches in the modeling of tree covered field. Additionally, a three-layer emissivity model for passive sensing of a vegetation covered soil surface is also developed. The effects of surface roughness, soil moisture contents, and tree parameters on the polarization signatures were investigated.

  15. Sea Surface Height 1993 - 2011

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation depicts year-to-year variability in sea surface height, and chronicles two decades of El Niño and La Niña events. It was created using NASA ocean altimetry data from 1993 to 2011, ...

  16. Circularly Polarized Microwave Antenna Element with Very Low Off-Axis Cross-Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greem. David; DuToit, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to improve off-axis cross-polarization performance and ease of assembly of a circularly polarized microwave antenna element. To ease assembly, the initial design requirement of Hexweb support for the internal circuit part, as well as the radiating disks, was eliminated. There is a need for different plating techniques to improve soldering. It was also desirable to change the design to eliminate soldering as well as the need to use the Hexweb support. Thus, a technique was developed to build the feed without using solder, solving the lathing and soldering issue. Internal parts were strengthened by adding curvature to eliminate Hexweb support, and in the process, the new geometries of the internal parts opened the way for improving the off-axis cross-polarization performance as well. The radiating disks curvatures were increased for increased strength, but it was found that this also improved crosspolarization. Optimization of the curvatures leads to very low off-axis cross-polarization. The feed circuit was curved into a cylinder for improved strength, eliminating Hexweb support. An aperture coupling feed mechanism eliminated the need for feed pins to the disks, which would have required soldering. The aperture coupling technique also improves cross-polarization performance by effectively exciting the radiating disks very close to the antenna s central axis of symmetry. Because of the shape of the parts, it allowed for an all-aluminum design bolted together and assembled with no solder needed. The advantage of a solderless design is that the reliability is higher, with no single-point failure (solder), and no need for special plating techniques in order to solder the unit together. The shapes (curved or round) make for a more robust build without extra support materials, as well as improved offaxis cross-polarization.

  17. New constraints on cosmic polarization rotation from B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Alighieri, Sperello di Serego; Ni, Wei-Tou; Pan, Wei-Ping E-mail: weitou@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    SPTpol, POLARBEAR, and BICEP2 have recently measured the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization in various sky regions of several tens of square degrees and obtained BB power spectra in the multipole range 20-3000, detecting the components due to gravitational lensing and to inflationary gravitational waves. We analyze jointly the results of these three experiments and propose modifications to their analyses of the spectra to include in the model, in addition to the gravitational lensing and the inflationary gravitational wave components, and also the effects induced by the cosmic polarization rotation (CPR), if it exists within current upper limits. Although in principle our analysis would also lead to new constraints on CPR, in practice these can only be given on its fluctuations (δα{sup 2}), since constraints on its mean angle are inhibited by the derotation which is applied by current CMB polarization experiments, in order to cope with the insufficient calibration of the polarization angle. The combined data fits from all three experiments (with 29% CPR-SPTpol correlation, depending on the theoretical model) gives the constraint (δα{sup 2}){sup 1/2} < 27.3 mrad (1.°56), with r = 0.194 ± 0.033. These results show that the present data are consistent with no CPR detection and the constraint on CPR fluctuation is about 1.°5. This method of constraining the CPR is new, is complementary to previous tests, which use the radio and optical/UV polarization of radio galaxies and the CMB E-mode polarization, and adds a new constraint for the sky areas observed by SPTpol, POLARBEAR, and BICEP2.

  18. Sea surface wind and Sea ice in the Barents Sea using microwave sensing data from Meteor-M N1 and GCOM-W1 satellites in January-March 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitnik, L. M.; Mitnik, M. L.; Chernyavsky, G. M.; Cherny, I. V.; Vykochko, A. V.; Pichugin, M. K.; Zabolotskikh, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    Application of satellite passive microwave sensing for the retrieval of key climatic parameters in the Barents Sea is considered. Fields of surface wind, atmosphere water vapor content and cloud liquid water content were found from MTVZA-GY radiometer onboard the Meteor-M N1 satellite and AMSR2 onboard the GCOM-W1 satellite with the use of original algorithms. The fields are in a good agreement with the ancillary remote and in situ measurements, which follows from the analysis of the evolution of the extra tropical and polar cyclones and cold air outbreaks with storm winds leading to intense air-sea interaction, and the formation and drift of sea ice.

  19. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) First Year Observations: TE Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Spergel, D. N.; Barnes, C.; Bennett, C. L.; Halpern, M.; Hinshaw, G.; Jarosik, N.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Page, L.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters at frequencies 23, 33, 41, 61, and 94 GHz. We detect correlations between the temperature and polarization maps significant at more than 10 standard deviations. The correlations are inconsistent with instrument noise and are significantly larger than the upper limits established for potential systematic errors. The correlations are present in all WAMP frequency bands with similar amplitude from 23 to 94 GHz, and are consistent with a superposition of a CMB signal with a weak foreground. The fitted CMB component is robust against different data combinations and fitting techniques. On small angular scales (theta less than 5 deg), the WMAP data show the temperature-polarization correlation expected from adiabatic perturbations in the temperature power spectrum. The data for l greater than 20 agree well with the signal predicted solely from the temperature power spectra, with no additional free parameters. We detect excess power on large angular scales (theta greater than 10 deg) compared to predictions based on the temperature power spectra alone. The excess power is well described by reionization at redshift 11 is less than z(sub r) is less than 30 at 95% confidence, depending on the ionization history. A model-independent fit to reionization optical depth yields results consistent with the best-fit ACDM model, with best fit value t = 0.17 +/- 0.04 at 68% confidence, including systematic and foreground uncertainties. This value is larger than expected given the detection of a Gunn-Peterson trough in the absorption spectra of distant quasars, and implies that the universe has a complex ionization history: WMAP has detected the signal from an early epoch of reionization.

  20. Seasonality in sea surface salinity and relating sea surface variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, M.; Hosoda, S.; Schneider, N.

    2016-12-01

    With accumulation of salinity observational data by Argo floats, it becomes possible to investigate salinity variability on seasonal to interannual time scales. While we know that there is strong seasonality in sea surface temperature (SST), seasonality in sea surface salinity (SSS) is not known well. Based on gridded Argo and other observational data and atmospheric reanalysis data, we examine global distribution of SSS seasonality using 12-month lagged auto-correlation map. In contrast to SST, which shows clear seasonality except for the tropical oceans especially in the Pacific, seasonality of SSS is not clear in large part of the global ocean except for tropics in the eastern Atlantic, the eastern Pacific, and the western Indian Oceans. Meanwhile the distribution depends on data products to some extent. Consistent with the limited seasonality, forcing field for SSS, i.e., precipitation-evaporation, Ekman transport, and geostrophic current advection also show limited seasonality except for the tropical oceans.

  1. Microwat : a new Earth Explorer mission proposal to measure the Sea surface Temperature and the Sea Ice Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Heygster, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Ocean surface characterization from satellites is required to understand, monitor and predict the general circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. With more than 70% global cloud coverage at any time, visible and infrared satellite observations only provide limited information. The polar regions are particularly vulnerable to the climate changes and are home to complex mesoscale mechanisms that are still poorly understood. They are also under very persis- tent cloudiness. Passive microwave observations can provide surface information such as Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Sea Ice Concentration (SIC) regardless of the cloud cover, but up to now they were limited in spatial resolution. Here, we propose a passive microwave conically scanning imager, MICROWAT, in a polar orbit, for the retrieval of the SST and SIC, with a spatial resolution of 15km. It observes at 6 and 10GHz, with low-noise dual polarization receivers, and a foldable mesh antenna of 5m-diameter. Furthermore, MICROWAT will fly in tandem with MetOp-SG B to benefit from the synergy with scatterometers (SCA) and microwave imagers (MWI). MICROWAT will provide global SST estimates, twice daily, regardless of cloud cover, with an accuracy of 0.3K and a spatial resolution of 15km. The SIC will be derived with an accuracy of 3%. With its unprecedented "all weather" accurate SST and SIC at 15km, MICROWAT will provide the atmospheric and oceanic forecasting sys- tems with products compatible with their increasing spatial resolution and complexity, with impact for societal applications. It will also answer fundamental science questions related to the ocean, the atmosphere and their interactions. * Prigent, Aires, Bernardo, Orlhac, Goutoule, Roquet, & Donlon, Analysis of the potential and limitations of microwave radiometry for the retrieval of sea surface temperature: Definition

  2. Satellite microwave radiometry of sea ice of polar regions: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, V. V.; Raev, M. D.; Sharkov, E. A.; Boyarskii, D. A.; Repina, I. A.; Komarova, N. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    This is a review of methods of passive microwave satellite monitoring of the sea-ice cover in polar regions. We briefly describe the microwave radiometers launched into the Earth's orbit and provide data used in studies of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. We give a detailed description of currently used algorithms for determining the sea-ice concentration and cover in polar regions according to satellite microwave radiometry. The methods for constructing these algorithms and their related drawbacks are considered. The final section of this paper briefly analyzes the studies that compare current algorithms with each other, with radar data, infrared data, and data of visual ship observations.

  3. A tunable and wideband microwave photonic phase shifter based on dual-polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhengxue; Wen, Aijun; Gao, Yongsheng; Tu, Zhaoyang

    2017-01-01

    A microwave photonic phase shifter based on dual-polarization Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPol-MZM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. A polarization multiplexed double sideband (DSB) signal is produced by a DPol-MZM. An optical bandpass filter (OBPF) follows after the DPol-MZM to filter out the optical carrier and one sideband. The polarization multiplexed signal is converted into a linear polarization light by a polarizer (Pol), and then beat at a photodiode (PD) to obtain the phase shifted signal. Experiments are carried out, and a continuous phase shift from -180° to 180° over a wide microwave frequency range of 10-33 GHz can be achieved by changing the polarization state using a polarization controller (PC). We also studied the spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) in the experiments. The features of this proposed phase shifter are large operation bandwidth, full-range 360° phase shift, and simple structure.

  4. SPOrt: an experiment aimed at measuring the large scale cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, Ettore; Cortiglioni, Stefano; Bernardi, Gianni; Cecchini, Stefano; Macculi, Claudio; Sbarra, Carla; Monari, Jader; Orfei, Alessandro; Poloni, Marco; Poppi, Sergio; Boella, Giuliano; Bonometto, Silvio; Gervasi, Massimo; Sironi, Giorgio; Zannoni, Mario; Tucci, Marco; Baralis, Massino; Peverini, Oscar A.; Tascone, Riccardo; Virone, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Roberto; Nicastro, Luciano; Ng, Kin-Wang; Razin, V. A.; Vinyajkin, Evgenij N.; Sazhin, Mikhail V.; Strukov, Igor A.

    2003-02-01

    SPOrt (Sky Polarization Observatory) is a space experiment to be flown on the International Space Station during Early Utilization Phase aimed at measuring the microwave polarized emission with FWHM = 7 deg, in the frequency range 22-90 GHz. The Galactic polarized emission can be observed at the lower frequencies and the polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at 90 GHz, where contaminants are expected to be less important. The extremely low level of the CMB Polarization signal calls for intrinsically stable radiometers. The SPOrt instrument is expressly devoted to CMB polarization measurements and the whole design has been optimized for minimizing instrumental polarization effects. In this contribution we present the receiver architecture based on correlation techniques, the analysis showing its intrinsic stability and the custom hardware development carried out to detect such a low signal.

  5. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  6. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  7. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  8. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  9. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  10. O2 absorption for measurements of sea surface air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Hu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Currently, sea surface air pressure measurements can only be obtained from in situ observations including buoy and dropsonde measurements, which are sparse in spatial coverage and expensive to implement. There are no operational remote sensing methods available even in experimental stages. The study considers use absorption features of microwave radiative transfer, especially the differential O2 absorption for active microwave systems working at 50-56 GHz bands, to fill the observational gap. The numerical simulation results for homogeneous sea surface backgrounds show that the rms errors of the instantaneous surface pressure estimates can be as low as 4 mb. This considered active system will have great potential for weather observations and other meteorological applications, especially for forecasts of hurricanes. Case studies show that with the remotely sensed sea surface barometric pressure data, the errors of hurricane center pressure, the most important indicator of hurricane intensity, in weather prediction models would reduce from about 48 mb to about 1.5 mb. The increased accuracy is about 1/3 of whole range of possible variations of hurricane center pressure. The uncertainties in the weather model predicted landfall positions or tracks of hurricanes also shrink greatly from ~350 km to within 100 km.

  11. Frequency swept microwaves for hyperfine decoupling and time domain dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Daniel E.M.; Albert, Brice J.; Saliba, Edward P.; Scott, Faith J.; Choi, Eric J.; Mardini, Michael; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine decoupling and pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are promising techniques to improve high field DNP NMR. We explore experimental and theoretical considerations to implement them with magic angle spinning (MAS). Microwave field simulations using the high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) software suite are performed to characterize the inhomogeneous phase independent microwave field throughout a 198 GHz MAS DNP probe. Our calculations show that a microwave power input of 17 W is required to generate an average EPR nutation frequency of 0.84 MHz. We also present a detailed calculation of microwave heating from the HFSS parameters and find that 7.1% of the incident microwave power contributes to dielectric sample heating. Voltage tunable gyrotron oscillators are proposed as a class of frequency agile microwave sources to generate microwave frequency sweeps required for the frequency modulated cross effect, electron spin inversions, and hyperfine decoupling. Electron spin inversions of stable organic radicals are simulated with SPINEVOLUTION using the inhomogeneous microwave fields calculated by HFSS. We calculate an electron spin inversion efficiency of 56% at a spinning frequency of 5 kHz. Finally, we demonstrate gyrotron acceleration potentials required to generate swept microwave frequency profiles for the frequency modulated cross effect and electron spin inversions. PMID:26482131

  12. Frequency swept microwaves for hyperfine decoupling and time domain dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Daniel E M; Albert, Brice J; Saliba, Edward P; Scott, Faith J; Choi, Eric J; Mardini, Michael; Barnes, Alexander B

    2015-11-01

    Hyperfine decoupling and pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are promising techniques to improve high field DNP NMR. We explore experimental and theoretical considerations to implement them with magic angle spinning (MAS). Microwave field simulations using the high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) software suite are performed to characterize the inhomogeneous phase independent microwave field throughout a 198GHz MAS DNP probe. Our calculations show that a microwave power input of 17W is required to generate an average EPR nutation frequency of 0.84MHz. We also present a detailed calculation of microwave heating from the HFSS parameters and find that 7.1% of the incident microwave power contributes to dielectric sample heating. Voltage tunable gyrotron oscillators are proposed as a class of frequency agile microwave sources to generate microwave frequency sweeps required for the frequency modulated cross effect, electron spin inversions, and hyperfine decoupling. Electron spin inversions of stable organic radicals are simulated with SPINEVOLUTION using the inhomogeneous microwave fields calculated by HFSS. We calculate an electron spin inversion efficiency of 56% at a spinning frequency of 5kHz. Finally, we demonstrate gyrotron acceleration potentials required to generate swept microwave frequency profiles for the frequency modulated cross effect and electron spin inversions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Generation of phase-coded microwave signals using a polarization-modulator-based photonic microwave phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    A scheme for the generation of phase-coded microwave signals using an electrically tunable photonic microwave phase shifter is proposed and demonstrated. The photonic phase shifter is based on a single-sideband polarization modulator (PolM), and the tuning of the phase shifter is implemented by a second PolM. By introducing an RF signal to the first PolM and an electrical coding signal to the second PolM, a phase-coded microwave signal with binary phase codes or polyphase codes is achieved. An experiment is performed. The simple and flexible operation, high coding rate, large frequency range, excellent transmission performance, and high stability of the system is confirmed.

  14. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are now possible using a variety of sensors. The present accuracies of these methods are in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 C. This makes them potentially useful for synoptic studies of ocean currents and for global monitoring of climatological anomalies. To improve confidence in the satellite data, objective evaluations of sensor accuracies are necessary, and the conditions under which these accuracies degrade need to be understood. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on the Nimbus-7 satellite was studied. Sea surface temperatures, derived from November 1979 SMMR data, were compared globally against ship measurements and climatology, using facilities of the JPL Pilot Ocean Data System. Methods for improved data analysis and plans for additional workshops to incorporate data from other sensors were discussed.

  15. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Global accuracies and error characteristics of presently orbiting satellite sensors are examined. The workshops are intended to lead to a better understanding of present capabilities for sea surface temperature measurement and to improve measurement concepts for the future. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVHRR and Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer is emphasized. Some data from the High Resolution Infrared Sounder HIRS and AVHRR are also examined. Comparisons of satellite data with ship and eXpendable BathyThermograph XBT measurement show standard deviations in the range 0.5 to 1.3 C with biases of less than 0.4 C, depending on the sensor, ocean region, and spatial/temporal averaging. The Sea Surface Temperature SST anomaly maps show good agreement in some cases, but a number of sensor related problems are identified.

  16. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  17. Physicochemical Studies of the Sea Surface Microlayer.

    PubMed

    Zhengbin; Liansheng; Zhijian; Jun; Haibing

    1998-08-15

    The sea surface microlayer and its thickness are theoretically analyzed. A multiple-layer model of the sea surface microlayer is proposed. Through in situ and laboratory imitation experiments using glass plate, rotating drum, screen, and funnel samplers, the relationships between pH, surface tension, the concentrations of dissolved trace metals Cu and Pb, phosphate, and particulate and sampling thicknesses are carefully investigated. The apparent sampling thickness of the sea surface microlayer is determined to be 50 +/- 10 µm, which is basically consistent with the mean thickness of the liquid boundary film in the models of gas exchange across the sea surface. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  18. Bistatic electromagnetic scattering and detection of pollutant on a sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Helmi; Khenchaf, Ali; Comblet, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    We present the study and analysis of the variations of the bistatic electromagnetic (EM) signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we start with the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we evaluate the EM scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surfaces observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical forward-backward method. The obtained numerical results of the EM scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X, and Ku), and radar polarization.

  19. Bistatic scattering from a contaminated sea surface observed in C, X, and Ku bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, H.; Khenchaf, A.; Comblet, F.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper focuses on the study and analysis of variations of the bistatic electromagnetic signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we will start the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we will evaluate the electromagnetic (EM) scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surface observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical Forward-Backward Method (FBM). The obtained numerical results of the electromagnetic scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion, and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X and Ku) and radar polarization.

  20. Modeling optical contrast for thin organic films on the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmirko, K. A.; Konstantinov, O. G.; Kul'chin, Yu. N.; Stolyarchuk, S. Yu.; Pavlov, A. N.; Korenskii, M. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    A continuation of the work dedicated to the study of slicks and film formations on the sea surface is presented. A vector model for the calculation of reflected radiation by the wavy sea surface with respect to the contribution of upwelling radiation from under the sea surface (the second type of waters) is described briefly in [5]. This work contains an analysis of numerical calculations according to the developed procedure and the search for optimal conditions of slick detection. The best conditions for detecting slicks on the sea surface are reached when a P-polarization component of reflected radiation is recorded. In this case, the value of contrast between a slick and a clean surface is 30% higher on average than in recording a contrast without using a polarization filter and is 50% higher than in the case of recording a contrast with a filter oriented to the maximum transmission of S polarization component of reflected radiation. It is shown that, under clear sky conditions, the optimal condition for recording slicks on a sea surface is videotaping in the plane of solar vertical at viewing angles sliding towards the sea surface and when a polarization filter that identifies the P polarization component of sea radiation is used. In contrast, under overcast sky conditions, it is best to perform observations in the plane that has a wind velocity vector.

  1. COMPASS: An Upper Limit on Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization at an Angular Scale of 20'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farese, Philip C.; Dall'Oglio, Giorgio; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Keating, Brian G.; Klawikowski, Slade; Knox, Lloyd; Levy, Alan; Lubin, Philip M.; O'Dell, Chris W.; Peel, Alan; Piccirillo, Lucio; Ruhl, John; Timbie, Peter T.

    2004-08-01

    COMPASS is an on-axis 2.6 m telescope coupled to a correlation polarimeter operating at a wavelength of 1 cm. The entire instrument was built specifically for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization studies. We report here on observations of 2001 February-April using this system. We set an upper limit on E-mode polarized anisotropies of 1036 μK2 (95% confidence limit) in the l range 93-555.

  2. Influence of Polarity and Activation Energy in Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis (MAOS).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Antonio M; Prieto, Pilar; de la Hoz, Antonio; Díaz-Ortiz, Ángel; Martín, D Raúl; García, José I

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the parameters that have decisive roles in microwave-assisted reactions and to develop a model, using computational chemistry, to predict a priori the type of reactions that can be improved under microwaves. For this purpose, a computational study was carried out on a variety of reactions, which have been reported to be improved under microwave irradiation. This comprises six types of reactions. The outcomes obtained in this study indicate that the most influential parameters are activation energy, enthalpy, and the polarity of all the species that participate. In addition to this, in most cases, slower reacting systems observe a much greater improvement under microwave irradiation. Furthermore, for these reactions, the presence of a polar component in the reaction (solvent, reagent, susceptor, etc.) is necessary for strong coupling with the electromagnetic radiation. We also quantified that an activation energy of 20-30 kcal mol(-1) and a polarity (μ) between 7-20 D of the species involved in the process is required to obtain significant improvements under microwave irradiation.

  3. Fast polarization changes in mm microwave emission of weak multistructured solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Strauss, F. M.; Costa, J. E. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Circular polarization of weak multistructured solar bursts was measured at mm microwaves with unprecedented sensitivity (0.03 sfu rms) and high time resolution (1ms). It was shown that sudden changes occur in the degree of polarization with time scales of 0.04 to 0.3 s. In most cases the degree of polarization attained maximum values before the maximum flux in both mm microwaves and hard X-rays with time scales of 0.04 to 1.0 s. The timing accuracy in determining the degree of polarization was 40 ms. Physical phenomena are discussed invoking one or a combination of various possible causes for the observed effects. The bursts at mm microwaves were weak compared to the contribution of the preexisting active regions, and therefore the changes in magnetoionic propagation conditions for emerging radiation plays an important role in the observed effects. Composite effects due to more than one polarizing mechanism or more than one polarized spots within the antenna beam are discussed.

  4. Stabilization of microwave signal generated by a dual-polarization DBR fiber laser via optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-12-01

    Microwave signals can be generated by beating the two orthogonal polarization modes from a dual-frequency fiber grating laser. In this paper, we present that the phase noise of the microwave signal can be significantly reduced via optical feedback by cascading an external cavity. This is achieved as a result of the bandwidth narrowing of each polarization laser mode when introducing phase-matched feedbacks into the laser cavity. By optimizing the external cavity length and the feedback ratio, the noise level over low frequencies has been reduced by up to 30 dB, from -42 to -72 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz, and from -72 to -102 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz. Meanwhile the relaxation resonant peaks can be eliminated. Compared with the existing techniques, the present method can offer a cost-effective, low-noise microwave signal, without the requirement for complex electrical feedback system.

  5. Photonic generation of versatile frequency-doubled microwave waveforms via a dual-polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Lin, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We report a photonic approach to generate frequency-doubled microwave waveforms using an integrated electro-optic dual-polarization modulator driven by a sinusoidal radio frequency (RF) signal. With active bias control, two MZMs of the dual-polarization modulator operate at minimum transmission points, a triangular waveform can be generated by a parameter setting of modulation index. After introducing a broadband 90° microwave phase shifter, a square waveform can be obtained by readjusting the power relationship of harmonics. The proposal is first theoretically analyzed and then validated by simulation. Simulation results show that a 10 GHz triangular and square waveform sequences are successfully generated from a 5 GHz sinusoidal RF drive signal, and the performance of the microwave waveforms are not influenced by the finite extinction ratio of modulator.

  6. Constraints on CPT violation from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three year polarization data: A wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cabella, Paolo; Silk, Joseph; Natoli, Paolo

    2007-12-15

    We perform a wavelet analysis of the temperature and polarization maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) delivered by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment in search for a parity-violating signal. Such a signal could be seeded by new physics beyond the standard model, for which the Lorentz and CPT symmetries may not hold. Under these circumstances, the linear polarization direction of a CMB photon may get rotated during its cosmological journey, a phenomenon also called cosmological birefringence. Recently, Feng et al. have analyzed a subset of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and BOOMERanG 2003 angular power spectra of the CMB, deriving a constraint that mildly favors a nonzero rotation. By using wavelet transforms we set a tighter limit on the CMB photon rotation angle {delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}3.0 ({delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}6.0) at the one (two) {sigma} level, consistent with a null detection.

  7. Effects of differently polarized microwave radiation on the microscopic structure of the nuclei in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shckorbatov, Yuriy G; Pasiuga, Vladimir N; Goncharuk, Elena I; Petrenko, Tatiana Ph; Grabina, Valentin A; Kolchigin, Nicolay N; Ivanchenko, Dmitry D; Bykov, Victor N; Dumin, Oleksandr M

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the influence of microwave radiation on the human fibroblast nuclei, the effects of three variants of electromagnetic wave polarization, linear and left-handed and right-handed elliptically polarized, were examined. Experimental conditions were: frequency (f) 36.65 GHz, power density (P) at the surface of exposed object 1, 10, 30, and 100 µW/cm(2), exposure time 10 s. Human fibroblasts growing in a monolayer on a cover slide were exposed to microwave electromagnetic radiation. The layer of medium that covered cells during microwave exposure was about 1 mm thick. Cells were stained immediately after irradiation by 2% (w/v) orcein solution in 45% (w/v) acetic acid. Experiments were made at room temperature (25 °C), and control cell samples were processed in the same conditions. We assessed heterochromatin granule quantity (HGQ) at 600× magnification. Microwave irradiation at the intensity of 1 µW/cm(2) produced no effect, and irradiation at the intensities of 10 and 100 µW/cm(2) induced an increase in HGQ. More intense irradiation induced more chromatin condensation. The right-handed elliptically polarized radiation revealed more biological activity than the left-handed polarized one.

  8. Effects of differently polarized microwave radiation on the microscopic structure of the nuclei in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shckorbatov, Yuriy G.; Pasiuga, Vladimir N.; Goncharuk, Elena I.; Petrenko, Tatiana Ph.; Grabina, Valentin A.; Kolchigin, Nicolay N.; Ivanchenko, Dmitry D.; Bykov, Victor N.; Dumin, Oleksandr M.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of microwave radiation on the human fibroblast nuclei, the effects of three variants of electromagnetic wave polarization, linear and left-handed and right-handed elliptically polarized, were examined. Experimental conditions were: frequency (f) 36.65 GHz, power density (P) at the surface of exposed object 1, 10, 30, and 100 µW/cm2, exposure time 10 s. Human fibroblasts growing in a monolayer on a cover slide were exposed to microwave electromagnetic radiation. The layer of medium that covered cells during microwave exposure was about 1 mm thick. Cells were stained immediately after irradiation by 2% (w/v) orcein solution in 45% (w/v) acetic acid. Experiments were made at room temperature (25 °C), and control cell samples were processed in the same conditions. We assessed heterochromatin granule quantity (HGQ) at 600× magnification. Microwave irradiation at the intensity of 1 µW/cm2 produced no effect, and irradiation at the intensities of 10 and 100 µW/cm2 induced an increase in HGQ. More intense irradiation induced more chromatin condensation. The right-handed elliptically polarized radiation revealed more biological activity than the left-handed polarized one. PMID:20872988

  9. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  10. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, W Y; Wu, M H; Wu, K L; Lin, M H; Teng, H H; Tsai, Y F; Ko, C C; Yang, E C; Jiang, J A; Barnett, L R; Chu, K R

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  11. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.

    2014-08-15

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  12. Spectral sea surface reflectance of skylight.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; He, Shuangyan; Shabani, Afshin; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Du, Keping

    2017-02-20

    In examining the dependence of the sea surface reflectance of skylight ρs on sky conditions, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and viewing geometry, Mobley [Appl. Opt.38, 7442 (1999).10.1364/AO.38.007442] assumed ρs is independent of wavelength. Lee et al. [Opt. Express18, 26313 (2010).10.1364/OE.18.026313] showed experimentally that ρs does vary spectrally due to the spectral difference of sky radiance coming from different directions, which was ignored in Mobley's study. We simulated ρs from 350 nm to 1000 nm by explicitly accounting for spectral variations of skylight distribution and Fresnel reflectance. Furthermore, we separated sun glint from sky glint because of significant differences in magnitude, spectrum and polarization state between direct sun light and skylight light. The results confirm that spectral variation of ρs(λ) mainly arises from the spectral distribution of skylight and would vary from slightly blueish due to normal dispersion of the refractive index of water, to neutral and then to reddish with increasing wind speeds and decreasing solar zenith angles. Polarization moderately increases sky glint by 8 - 20% at 400 nm but only by 0 - 10% at 1000 nm. Sun glint is inherently reddish and becomes significant (>10% of sky glint) when the sun is at the zenith with moderate winds or when the sea is roughened (wind speeds > 10 m s-1) with solar zenith angles < 20°. We recommend a two-step procedure by first correcting the glint due to direct sun light, which is unpolarized, followed by removing the glint due to diffused and polarized skylight. The simulated ρs(λ) as a function of wind speeds, sun angles and aerosol concentrations for currently recommended sensor-sun geometry, i.e., zenith angle = 40° and azimuthal angle relative to the sun = 45°, is available upon request.

  13. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Planar Metamaterial Microwave Absorber for all Wave Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bo; Wang, Zheng-Bin; Yu, Zhen-Zhong; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Jun-Ming; Feng, Yi-Jun; Jiang, Tian

    2009-11-01

    We present a design for a polarization insensitive metamaterial absorber at 9.5 GHz by utilizing properly arranged resonant unit cells with orthogonal polarization sensitivity. Full-wave electromagnetic simulation demonstrates nearly perfect microwave absorption, which has been verified by experimental measurement with a maximum absorption of about 92% for incident wave with different polarizations. Furthermore, we find such a metamaterial thin absorber could work for a wide incident angle ranging from 0° to 50° with absorption no less than 80% for both the transverse electric mode and transverse magnetic mode.

  14. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  15. PRISM3 Pliocene Sea surface Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, H.; Robinson, M.; Foley, K.; Caballero, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Project provides a conceptual model and synoptic view of the earth during a considerably warmer than modern (2-3°C warmer global mean annual temperature) interval (mid-Piacenzian Age, Pliocene Epoch; ~3.3 to 3.0 Ma) through reconstruction of sea-surface temperature (SST) and other paleoenvironmental parameters. The PRISM3 SST fields include new equatorial Pacific and subpolar - polar North Atlantic components based upon multiproxy (faunal, alkenone and Mg/Ca) temperature analyses from new sites. These data are presented in 12 interpolated global fields with 2° spatial resolution representing monthly SST estimates. Results show a reduced longitudinal temperature gradient across the equatorial Pacific and extension of warm North Atlantic surface conditions into the eastern regions of the Arctic Ocean near Spitzbergen. These data are part of the PRISM3 paleoenvironmental reconstruction designed in part to provide climate modeling groups with new SST and alternative land cover reconstructions, 3-dimensional deep ocean temperature, topography and sea level. The PRISM3 reconstruction is the primary data source for the new Pliocene Climate Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP).

  16. Stratospheric Impact of Varying Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Waugh, Darryn; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM) has been run in 50 year simulations with the: 1) 1949-1999 Hadley Centre sea surface temperatures (SST), and 2) a fixed annual cycle of SSTs. In this presentation we first show that the 1949-1999 FVGCM simulation produces a very credible stratosphere in comparison to an NCEP/NCAR reanalysis climatology. In particular, the northern hemisphere has numerous major and minor stratospheric warming, while the southern hemisphere has only a few over the 50-year simulation. During the northern hemisphere winter, temperatures are both warmer in the lower stratosphere and the polar vortex is weaker than is found in the mid-winter southern hemisphere. Mean temperature differences in the lower stratosphere are shown to be small (less than 2 K), and planetary wave forcing is found to be very consistent with the climatology. We then will show the differences between our varying SST simulation and the fixed SST simulation in both the dynamics and in two parameterized trace gases (ozone and methane). In general, differences are found to be small, with subtle changes in planetary wave forcing that lead to reduced temperatures in the SH and increased temperatures in the NH.

  17. A Large, Free-Standing Wire Grid for Microwave Variable-delay Polarization Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George

    2008-01-01

    One technique for mapping the polarization signature of the cosmic microwave background uses large, polarizing grids in reflection. We present the system requirements, the fabrication, assembly, and alignment procedures, and the test results for the polarizing grid component of a 50 cm clear aperture, Variable-delay Polarization Modulator (VPM). This grid is being built and tested at the Goddard Space Flight Center as part of the Polarimeter for Observing Inflationary Cosmology at the Reionization Epoch (POINCARE). VPMs modulate the polarized component of a radiation source by splitting the incoming beam into two orthogonal polarization components using a free-standing wire grid. The path length difference between these components is varied with a translating mirror, and then they are recombined. This precision instrumentation technique can be used to encode and demodulate the cosmic microwave background's polarization signature. For the demonstration instrument, 64 micrometer diameter tungsten wires are being assembled into a 200 pm pitch, free-standing wire grid with a 50 cm clear aperture, and an expected overall flatness better than 30 micrometers. A rectangular, aluminum stretching frame holds the wires with sufficient tension to achieve a minimum resonant frequency of 185 Hz, allowing VPM mirror translation frequencies of several Hz. A lightly loaded, flattening ring with a 50 cm inside diameter rests against the wires and brings them into accurate planarity.

  18. A Large, Free-Standing Wire Grid for Microwave Variable-delay Polarization Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George

    2008-01-01

    One technique for mapping the polarization signature of the cosmic microwave background uses large, polarizing grids in reflection. We present the system requirements, the fabrication, assembly, and alignment procedures, and the test results for the polarizing grid component of a 50 cm clear aperture, Variable-delay Polarization Modulator (VPM). This grid is being built and tested at the Goddard Space Flight Center as part of the Polarimeter for Observing Inflationary Cosmology at the Reionization Epoch (POINCARE). VPMs modulate the polarized component of a radiation source by splitting the incoming beam into two orthogonal polarization components using a free-standing wire grid. The path length difference between these components is varied with a translating mirror, and then they are recombined. This precision instrumentation technique can be used to encode and demodulate the cosmic microwave background's polarization signature. For the demonstration instrument, 64 micrometer diameter tungsten wires are being assembled into a 200 pm pitch, free-standing wire grid with a 50 cm clear aperture, and an expected overall flatness better than 30 micrometers. A rectangular, aluminum stretching frame holds the wires with sufficient tension to achieve a minimum resonant frequency of 185 Hz, allowing VPM mirror translation frequencies of several Hz. A lightly loaded, flattening ring with a 50 cm inside diameter rests against the wires and brings them into accurate planarity.

  19. PolarCube: A High Resolution Passive Microwave Satellite for Sounding and Imaging at 118 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, R. L.; Gallaher, D. W.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sanders, B.; Periasamy, L.; Hwang, K.; Alvarenga, G.; Hickey, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    PolarCube is a 3U CubeSat hosting an eight-channel passive microwave spectrometer operating at the 118.7503 GHz oxygen resonance that is currently in development. The project has an anticipated launch date in early 2015. It is currently being designed to operate for approximately12 months on orbit to provide the first global 118-GHz spectral imagery of the Earth over full seasonal cycle and to sound Arctic vertical temperature structure. The principles used by PolarCube for temperature sounding are well established in number of peer-reviewed papers going back more than two decades, although the potential for sounding from a CubeSat has never before been demonstrated in space. The PolarCube channels are selected to probe atmospheric emission over a range of vertical levels from the surface to lower stratosphere. This capability has been available operationally for over three decades, but at lower frequencies and higher altitudes that do not provide the spatial resolution that will be achieved by PolarCube. While the NASA JPSS ATMS satellite sensor provides global coverage at ~32 km resolution, the PolarCube will improve on this resolution by a factor of two, thus facilitating the primary science goal of determining sea ice concentration and extent while at the same time collecting profile data on atmospheric temperature. Additionally, we seek to correlate freeze-thaw line data from SMAP with our near simultaneously collected atmospheric temperature data. In addition to polar science, PolarCube will provide a first demonstration of a very low cost passive microwave sounder that if operated in a fleet configuration would have the potential to fulfill the goals of the Precipitation Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission, as defined in the NRC Decadal Survey. PolarCube 118-GHz passive microwave spectrometer in deployed configuration

  20. Comparative merits of multispectral optical polarization to microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Walter G.; Duggin, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A brief history of RADAR development is followed by an indication of the relevance of LIDAR to ranging and detection of targets. Initially, radiated laser power is discussed. Peak power of 100 kilowatts with a diode pumped solid-state laser appears feasible. Frequency control appears possible with atomic standards controlling the high power laser. Optical characterization of the polarization properties of lasers on targets is being pursued as well as the options. Coherence length of LASER radiation still poses a problem over ranges beyond one hundred meters. Target identification is enhanced using polarization with the aid of higher-resolution focal plane arrays. Coherence applications appear feasible in the near future.

  1. A new model of the microwave polarized sky for CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Bonaldi, Anna; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new model of the microwave sky in polarization that can be used to simulate data from cosmic microwave background polarization experiments. We exploit the most recent results from the Planck satellite to provide an accurate description of the diffuse polarized foreground synchrotron and thermal dust emission. Our model can include the two mentioned foregrounds, and also a constructed template of Anomalous Microwave Emission. Several options for the frequency dependence of the foregrounds can be easily selected, to reflect our uncertainties and to test the impact of different assumptions. Small angular scale features can be added to the foreground templates to simulate high-resolution observations. We present tests of the model outputs to show the excellent agreement with Planck and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. We determine the range within which the foreground spectral indices can be varied to be consistent with the current data. We also show forecasts for a high-sensitivity, high-resolution full-sky experiment such as the Cosmic ORigin Explorer. Our model is released as a PYTHON script that is quick and easy to use, available at http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/chervias.

  2. Dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter based on metasurfaces at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yajun; Xia, Song; Shi, Hongyu; Zhang, Anxue; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-06-01

    We present a dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter in microwave regime. The proposed converter can convert a linearly polarized wave to its cross-polarized wave for two distinct bands: Ku (11.5-20.0 GHz) and Ka (28.8-34.0 GHz). It can also convert the linearly polarized wave to a circularly polarized wave at four other frequencies. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results for both frequency bands. The polarization conversion ratio is above 0.94 for the Ku-band and 0.90 for the Ka-band. Furthermore, the converter can achieve dual-band and high-efficiency polarization conversion over angles of incidence up to 45°. The converter is also polarization-selective in that only the x- and y-polarized waves can be converted. The physical mechanism of the dual-band polarization conversion effect is interpreted via decomposed electric field components that couple with different plasmon resonance modes of the structure.

  3. Analytical Derivation of the Vegetation Optical Depth from the Microwave Polarization Difference Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meesters, Antoon G. C. A.; DeJeu, Richard A. M.; Owe, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    A numerical solution for the canopy optical depth in an existing microwave-based land surface parameter retrieval model is presented. The optical depth is derived from the microwave polarization difference index and the dielectric constant of the soil. The original procedure used an approximation in the form of a logarithmic decay function to define this relationship, and was derived through a series of lengthy polynomials. These polynomials had to be recalculated when the scattering albedo or antenna incidence angle changes. The new procedure is computationally more efficient and accurate.

  4. Modeling of Wind Direction Signals in Polarimetric Sea Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Sea surface brightness temperatures are the radiometric power measure of blackbody radiation from sea water. This radiation is the electromagnetic waves excited by the random thermal motion of charged particles in the sea water. The energy transmitted through the air- water interface produces a scattering of electromagnetic waves into the atmosphere. Polarimetric microwave emissions are investigated.

  5. Modeling of Wind Direction Signals in Polarimetric Sea Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Sea surface brightness temperatures are the radiometric power measure of blackbody radiation from sea water. This radiation is the electromagnetic waves excited by the random thermal motion of charged particles in the sea water. The energy transmitted through the air- water interface produces a scattering of electromagnetic waves into the atmosphere. Polarimetric microwave emissions are investigated.

  6. Making cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization maps with MADAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.; Sirviö, A.-S.

    2010-02-01

    MADAM is a CMB map-making code, designed to make temperature and polarization maps of time-ordered data of total power experiments like Planck. The algorithm is based on the destriping technique, but it also makes use of known noise properties in the form of a noise prior. The method in its early form was presented in an earlier work by Keihänen et al. (2005, MNRAS, 360, 390). In this paper we present an update of the method, extended to non-averaged data, and include polarization. In this method the baseline length is a freely adjustable parameter, and destriping can be performed at a different map resolution than that of the final maps. We show results obtained with simulated data. This study is related to Planck LFI activities.

  7. Aquarius Observations of Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This visualization shows changes in global sea surface salinity, as measured by NASA’s Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft, from December 2011 through December 2012. Red repr...

  8. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  9. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  10. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; ...

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response ismore » hardly sensitive to θ.« less

  11. Angular phase shift in polarization-angle dependence of microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han-Chun; Samaraweera, Rasanga L.; Mani, R. G.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the microwave frequency (f ) variation of the angular phase shift, θ0, observed in the polarization-angle dependence of microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in a high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron system. By fitting the diagonal resistance Rx x versus θ plots to an empirical cosine square law, we extract θ0 and trace its quasicontinuous variation with f . The results suggest that the overall average of θ0 extracted from Hall bar device sections with length-to-width ratios of L /W =1 and 2 is the same. We compare the observations with expectations arising from the "ponderomotive force" theory for microwave radiation-induced transport phenomena.

  12. The Application of Aperture Synthesis to the Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Sea surface salinity is measured optimally at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum in order to maximize radiometric sensitivity to changes in salinity. Long wavelengths (e.g. L-band) mean large antennas in space, and because of the technological challenge associated with putting large scanning antennas in orbit, no system currently exists to measure salinity. Aperture synthesis is an interferometric technique to make deployment of large antenna apertures in space feasible. It uses pairs of small antennas and signal processing to achieve the resolution of a single large aperture. Aperture synthesis has been demonstrated successfully for remote sensing by the aircraft prototype radiometer, ESTAR. ESTAR is an L-band instrument which employs aperture synthesis in the cross track dimension. Recent measurements with ESTAR of the fresh water outflow from the Delaware River are in good agreement (about 1 psu) with shipboard thermosalinograph measurements. Synthetic aperture radiometers are currently being developed for remote sensing from space. HYDROSTAR is an instrument for remote sensing from space based on the design of ESTAR. It employs aperture synthesis in one dimension and is being proposed as a pathfinder instrument to make global maps of soil moisture and sea surface salinity and to demonstrate the feasibility of aperture synthesis for remote sensing from space. Instruments which use remote sensing in two dimensions are currently being developed by the European Space Agency. These instruments include additional channels (frequencies and polarizations) and may be able to achieve radiometric sensitivity and spatial resolution to meet the diverse needs of the coastal zone and open ocean oceanographic communities.

  13. Polarization conversion from a thin cavity array in the microwave regime

    PubMed Central

    Tremain, B.; Rance, H. J.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Linearly polarized microwave radiation is shown to have its plane of polarization converted to the orthogonal state upon reflection from an ultrathin (λ/25) cavity array. The structure benefits from an uncomplicated design consisting of a metallic grating closely separated from a ground plane by a dielectric spacer. A single set of periodically spaced slits (monograting) exhibits polarization conversion when the normally incident electric field is aligned at 45° to the slits. Two orthogonal sets of slits (bigrating) allows this narrow-band effect to be broadened when the two orthogonal resonances are separated in frequency. We optimise the design and experimentally demonstrate near loss-less polarization conversion (95% of the incident intensity) across a 3.1 GHz frequency band. Finally, we study the dependence of the structure's performance on incident angle and slit width. PMID:25797210

  14. Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET): a ground-based probe of cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buder, Immanuel

    2010-07-01

    QUIET is an experimental program to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation from the ground. Previous CMB polarization data have been used to constrain the cosmological parameters that model the history of our universe. The exciting target for current and future experiments is detecting and measuring the faint polarization signals caused by gravity waves from the inflationary epoch which occurred < 10-30 s after the Big Bang. QUIET has finished an observing season at 44 GHz (Q-Band); observing at 95 GHz (W-Band) is ongoing. The instrument incorporates several technologies and approaches novel to CMB experiments. We describe the observing strategy, optics design, detector technology, and data acquisition. These systems combine to produce a polarization sensitivity of 64 (57) μK for a 1 s exposure of the Phase I Q (W) Band array. We describe the QUIET Phase I instrument and explain how systematic errors are reduced and quantified.

  15. Search for accelerated electron anisotropy signatures based on observed polarization of the flaring loop microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgachev, A. S.; Melnikov, V. F.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution maps of the circular polarization degree and radio brightness have been analyzed for more than 40 flares based on the Nobeyama Radioheliograph data. It has been shown that the observed microwave emission is polarized in the ordinary mode in some flaring loop parts in six events. Based on a joint analysis of the photospheric magnetic field maps obtained from the HMI/SDO and MDI/SOHO magnetograph's and the radio emission dynamics in different source parts, it has been concluded that the ordinary mode predominance in all six selected events can be connected with implementation of the longitudinal pitch-angle anisotropy of emitting electrons.

  16. A search for the large angular scale polarization of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Brian Gregory

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is one of the three observational pillars of modern cosmology, along with the Hubble Expansion Law and the measured abundances of the light elements. Being the fossil radiation from the Big Bang, it probes the conditions of the early universe. Three properties are necessary to fully characterize the CMB: its spectrum, spatial isotropy, and polarization. The first two properties have been measured, whereas the polarization state of the CMB remains undetected. Detection of, or an improved upper limit on, the polarization of the CMB at large scales holds great promise for the determination of several fundamental properties of the standard cosmological model, such as the ionization history of the Universe and the contribution of gravitational waves to the spectrum of primordial perturbations. Most models predict that the magnitude of the polarization of the CMB at large angular scales is less than 1muK. This is at least an order of magnitude below both the large scale anisotropy level of the CMB, as well as the best existing upper limits on its polarization. In this thesis I calculate the magnitude of the CMB polarization in various cosmological scenarios, and outline the fundamental challenges to measuring these signals. Following, I describe the design of the POLAR Polarization Observations of Large Angular Regions) experiment, which is the first dedicated polarimeter to study the CMB in more than a decade. POLAR is a ground-based, centimeter-wavelength correlation polarimeter designed to detect the polarization of the CMB at 28, 31, & 33 GHz. POLAR is the first correlation polarimeter ever used for CMB work and has the widest bandwidth of any correlation radiometer ever used for investigations of the CMB. POLAR has been constructed and is currently acquiring data at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  17. Microwave birefringent metamaterials for polarization conversion based on spoof surface plasmon polariton modes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Jieqiu; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Pang, Yongqiang; Feng, Dayi; Xu, Zhuo; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-10-04

    We propose the design of wideband birefringent metamaterials based on spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs). Spatial k-dispersion design of SSPP modes in metamaterials is adopted to achieve high-efficiency transmission of electromagnetic waves through the metamaterial layer. By anisotropic design, the transmission phase accumulation in metamaterials can be independently modulated for x- and y-polarized components of incident waves. Since the dispersion curve of SSPPs is nonlinear, frequency-dependent phase differences can be obtained between the two orthogonal components of transmitted waves. As an example, we demonstrate a microwave birefringent metamaterials composed of fishbone structures. The full-polarization-state conversions on the zero-longitude line of Poincaré sphere can be fulfilled twice in 6-20 GHz for both linearly polarized (LP) and circularly polarized (CP) waves incidence. Besides, at a given frequency, the full-polarization-state conversion can be achieved by changing the polarization angle of the incident LP waves. Both the simulation and experiment results verify the high-efficiency polarization conversion functions of the birefringent metamaterial, including circular-to-circular, circular-to-linear(linear-to-circular), linear-to-linear polarization conversions.

  18. Microwave birefringent metamaterials for polarization conversion based on spoof surface plasmon polariton modes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Jieqiu; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Pang, Yongqiang; Feng, Dayi; Xu, Zhuo; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-01-01

    We propose the design of wideband birefringent metamaterials based on spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs). Spatial k-dispersion design of SSPP modes in metamaterials is adopted to achieve high-efficiency transmission of electromagnetic waves through the metamaterial layer. By anisotropic design, the transmission phase accumulation in metamaterials can be independently modulated for x- and y-polarized components of incident waves. Since the dispersion curve of SSPPs is nonlinear, frequency-dependent phase differences can be obtained between the two orthogonal components of transmitted waves. As an example, we demonstrate a microwave birefringent metamaterials composed of fishbone structures. The full-polarization-state conversions on the zero-longitude line of Poincaré sphere can be fulfilled twice in 6–20 GHz for both linearly polarized (LP) and circularly polarized (CP) waves incidence. Besides, at a given frequency, the full-polarization-state conversion can be achieved by changing the polarization angle of the incident LP waves. Both the simulation and experiment results verify the high-efficiency polarization conversion functions of the birefringent metamaterial, including circular-to-circular, circular-to-linear(linear-to-circular), linear-to-linear polarization conversions. PMID:27698443

  19. Microwave birefringent metamaterials for polarization conversion based on spoof surface plasmon polariton modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Jieqiu; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Pang, Yongqiang; Feng, Dayi; Xu, Zhuo; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-10-01

    We propose the design of wideband birefringent metamaterials based on spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs). Spatial k-dispersion design of SSPP modes in metamaterials is adopted to achieve high-efficiency transmission of electromagnetic waves through the metamaterial layer. By anisotropic design, the transmission phase accumulation in metamaterials can be independently modulated for x- and y-polarized components of incident waves. Since the dispersion curve of SSPPs is nonlinear, frequency-dependent phase differences can be obtained between the two orthogonal components of transmitted waves. As an example, we demonstrate a microwave birefringent metamaterials composed of fishbone structures. The full-polarization-state conversions on the zero-longitude line of Poincaré sphere can be fulfilled twice in 6-20 GHz for both linearly polarized (LP) and circularly polarized (CP) waves incidence. Besides, at a given frequency, the full-polarization-state conversion can be achieved by changing the polarization angle of the incident LP waves. Both the simulation and experiment results verify the high-efficiency polarization conversion functions of the birefringent metamaterial, including circular-to-circular, circular-to-linear(linear-to-circular), linear-to-linear polarization conversions.

  20. Microwave Polarized Signatures Generated within Cloud Systems: SSM/I Observations Interpreted with Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Pardo, Juan R.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rossow, Willaim B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) observations in cloud systems are studied over the tropics. Over optically thick cloud systems, presence of polarized signatures at 37 and 85 GHz is evidenced and analyzed with the help of cloud top temperature and optical thickness extracted from visible and IR satellite observations. Scattering signatures at 85 GHz (TbV(85) less than or = 250 K) are associated with polarization differences greater than or = 6 K, approx. 50%, of the time over ocean and approx. 40% over land. In addition. over thick clouds the polarization difference at 37 GHz is rarely negligible. The polarization differences at 37 and 85 GHz do not stem from the surface but are generated in regions of relatively homogeneous clouds having high liquid water content. To interpret the observations, a radiative transfer model that includes the scattering by non-spherical particles is developed. based on the T-matrix approach and using the doubling and adding method. In addition to handling randomly and perfectly oriented particles, this model can also simulate the effect of partial orientation of the hydrometeors. Microwave brightness temperatures are simulated at SSM/I frequencies and are compared with the observations. Polarization differences of approx. 2 K can be simulated at 37 GHz over a rain layer, even using spherical drops. The polarization difference is larger for oriented non-spherical particles. The 85 GHz simulations are very sensitive to the ice phase of the cloud. Simulations with spherical particles or with randomly oriented non-spherical ice particles cannot replicate the observed polarization differences. However, with partially oriented non-spherical particles, the observed polarized signatures at 85 GHz are explained, and the sensitivity of the scattering characteristics to the particle size, asphericity, and orientation is analyzed. Implications on rain and ice retrievals are discussed.

  1. POLOCALC: A Novel Method to Measure the Absolute Polarization Orientation of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nati, Federico; Devlin, Mark J.; Gerbino, Martina; Johnson, Bradley R.; Keating, Brian; Pagano, Luca; Teply, Grant

    We describe a novel method to measure the absolute orientation of the polarization plane of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons with arcsecond accuracy, enabling unprecedented measurements for cosmology and fundamental physics. Existing and planned CMB polarization instruments looking for primordial B-mode signals need an independent, experimental method for systematics control on the absolute polarization orientation. The lack of such a method limits the accuracy of the detection of inflationary gravitational waves, the constraining power on the neutrino sector through measurements of gravitational lensing of the CMB, the possibility of detecting Cosmic Birefringence (CB), and the ability to measure primordial magnetic fields. Sky signals used for calibration and direct measurements of the detector orientation cannot provide an accuracy better than 1∘. Self-calibration methods provide better accuracy, but may be affected by foreground signals and rely heavily on model assumptions, losing constraining power on fundamental processes, like CB, Faraday Rotation and chiral gravity models. The POLarization Orientation CALibrator for Cosmology, POLOCALC, will dramatically improve instrumental accuracy by means of an artificial calibration source flying on high-altitude balloons and aerial drones. Polarization angle calibration requires observation of a well-characterized distant source at high elevation angles. A balloon-borne calibrator will provide a source in the far field of larger telescopes, while an aerial drone can be used for tests and smaller polarimeters. POLOCALC will also allow a unique method to measure the telescopes’ polarized beam. Even a two-hour balloon flight will allow enough time to perform polarization angle calibration and polarized beam function measurements. The source will make use of both narrow and broadband microwave emitters between 40GHz and 150GHz coupled to precise polarizing filters. The orientation of the source

  2. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  3. Production of global sea surface temperature fields for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory workshop comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J. E.; Njoku, E. G.; Chelton, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is measured from space by the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), high resolution infrared sounder (HIRS) and VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS). Typical accuracies have been reported from 0.5 C regionally to 2.0 C on a global basis. To evaluate the accuracy of the satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, a series of three workshops was organized to provide uniform data reduction and analysis. The analytical techniques used to intercompare satellite and in situ measurements are described in detail. Selected results showed the overall average rms errors were in the range 0.5-1.0 C.

  4. Solar Cycle Variation of Microwave Polar Brightening and EUV Coronal Hole Observed by Nobeyama Radioheliograph and SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sujin; Park, Jong-Yeop; Kim, Yeon-Han

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the solar cycle variation of microwave and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) intensity in latitude to compare microwave polar brightening (MPB) with the EUV polar coronal hole (CH). For this study, we used the full-sun images observed in 17 GHz of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph from 1992 July to 2016 November and in two EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 Å and 171 Å on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) from 2011 January to 2016 November. As a result, we found that the polar intensity in EUV is anti-correlated with the polar intensity in microwave. Since the depression of EUV intensity in the pole is mostly owing to the CH appearance and continuation there, the anti-correlation in the intensity implies the intimate association between the polar CH and the MPB. Considering the report of tet{gopal99} that the enhanced microwave brightness in the CH is seen above the enhanced photospheric magnetic field, we suggest that the pole area during the solar minimum has a stronger magnetic field than the quiet sun level and such a strong field in the pole results in the formation of the polar CH. The emission mechanism of the MPB and the physical link with the polar CH are not still fully understood. It is necessary to investigate the MPB using high resolution microwave imaging data, which can be obtained by the high performance large-array radio observatories such as the ALMA project.

  5. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B 1 S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B 1 S field is 13 μT/W 1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γSB 1 S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement ( ɛ) vs. ω1 S/(2 π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  6. A wideband 360° photonic-assisted microwave phase shifter using a polarization modulator and a polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangzhe; Zhang, Weifeng; Yao, Jianping

    2012-12-31

    A novel approach to implementing a wideband microwave photonic phase shifter by a joint use of a polarization modulator (PolM) and a polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A microwave signal to be phase shifted is applied to the PolM. Two phase-modulated signals along the two principal axes of the PolM are generated and sent to the PM-FBG. The phase-modulated signals have a static but complementary phase shift introduced by the dc bias applied to the PolM. Due to the birefringence of the polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber, the PM-FBG has two spectrally separated and orthogonally polarized reflection bands. By employing the PM-FBG to reflect one first-order sideband along one polarization direction and one optical carrier along the other polarization direction, and send them back to the PolM, a second-time phase modulation is imposed to the sideband and the optical carrier. By sending the two signals to a polarizer and beating them at a photodetector, a phase shifted microwave signal is obtained. Since the PolM is used twice, a low dc bias voltage would lead to a large phase shift. A full 360° microwave photonic phase shifter over a frequency range of 30-40 GHz is experimentally demonstrated. The spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) of the phase shifter is also studied.

  7. Photonic generation of frequency-sextupled microwave signal based on dual-polarization modulation without an optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Lin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-sextupled microwave signal generation based on dual-polarization modulation using an electro-optic dual-parallel polarization modulator (DPPolM) without an optical filter is proposed. From a theoretical analysis, the frequency-sextupled microwave signal can be obtained by properly adjusting the polarization directions of the modulated optical signals, the powers and the phases of the microwave drive signals applied to the DPPolM. Simulation results show that a 24 GHz microwave signal with an optical sideband suppression ratio (OSSR) exceeding 31 dB and a radio frequency spurious suppression ratio (RFSSR) higher than 25 dB is generated from a 4 GHz microwave drive signal, which match well with the theoretical analysis. Furthermore, it is also proved to be valid that even if the microwave drive voltage, the phase difference, and the polarization direction of light wave deviate from the ideal values to a certain degree, the performance of the generated frequency-sextupled microwave signal is still acceptable.

  8. Characteristics of 13.9 GHz radar scattering from oil films on the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Croswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft microwave scatterometer measurements are presented, which were made in 1979 as part of a project to study the response of a number of active and passive microwave and optical remote sensors to an oil-covered sea surface conducted by NASA Langley Research Center. A 13.9-GHz Doppler scatterometer with a fan beam antenna and coherent detection was used to measure radar backscatter as a function of incidence angle. The radar scattering signature of the clear surface and signatures of the surface covered with various crude oil films are compared. Reductions in Ku band microwave backscatter up to 14 dB are observed for both treated and untreated LaRosa and Murban crude oil films deposited on the sea surface. Maximum Ku band sensitivity to the effects of the oil in terms of differential scatter is observed in the 25-35 deg incidence angle region.

  9. Antenna-Coupled Bolometer Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M. J.; Arnold, K.; Ade, P.; Engargiola, G.; Holzapfel, W.; Lee, A. T.; Meng, X.; O'Brient, R.; Richards, P. L.; Spieler, H.; Tran, H. T.

    2008-04-01

    We are building antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor bolometer arrays to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. 217 GHz prototype pixels have previously been characterized and showed promising performance (Myers et al. in Appl. Phys. Lett. 86:114103, [2005]). Our design uses a double slot dipole antenna and an integrated microstrip band defining filter. New devices have been tested which include on-chip test structures to improve our understanding of detector performance and guide future development. In parallel with this, large arrays of bolometers based on the prototype pixel design have also been constructed. The array pixels are a heterogeneous mixture of single band pixels at 90 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz and now incorporate dual-polarization antennas (Chattopadhyay and Zmuidzinas in IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 46:736, [1998]). Preliminary results from optical testing of array pixels are presented. These bolometer arrays will be used in the upcoming CMB polarization experiment P olarbear.

  10. SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN POLARIZING FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS FOR COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Peter C.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan

    2015-11-15

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  11. Systematic Effects in Polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometers for Cosmic Microwave Background Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Peter C.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan; Tucker, Gregory S.

    2015-11-01

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  12. A linear polarization converter with near unity efficiency in microwave regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Wang, Shen-Yun; Geyi, Wen

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present a linear polarization converter in the reflective mode with near unity conversion efficiency. The converter is designed in an array form on the basis of a pair of orthogonally arranged three-dimensional split-loop resonators sharing a common terminal coaxial port and a continuous metallic ground slab. It converts the linearly polarized incident electromagnetic wave at resonance to its orthogonal counterpart upon the reflection mode. The conversion mechanism is explained by an equivalent circuit model, and the conversion efficiency can be tuned by changing the impedance of the terminal port. Such a scheme of the linear polarization converter has potential applications in microwave communications, remote sensing, and imaging.

  13. Polarimetric Doppler spectrum of backscattered echoes from nonlinear sea surface damped by natural slicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengju; Guo, Lixin

    2016-11-01

    Based on the Lombardini et al. model that can predict the hydrodynamic damping of rough sea surfaces in the presence of monomolecular slicks and the "choppy wave" model (CWM) that can describe the nonlinear interactions between ocean waves, the modeling of time-varying nonlinear sea surfaces damped by natural or organic sea slicks is presented in this paper. The polarimetric scattering model of second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II) with tapered wave incidence is utilized for evaluating co- and cross-polarized backscattered echoes from clean and contaminated CWM nonlinear sea surfaces. The influence of natural sea slicks on Doppler shift and spectral bandwidth of radar sea echoes is investigated in detail by comparing the polarimetric Doppler spectra of contaminated sea surfaces with those of clean sea surfaces. A narrowing of Doppler spectra in the presence of oil slicks is observed for both co- and cross-polarization, which is qualitatively consistent with wave-tank measurements. Simulation results also show that the Doppler shifts in slicks can increase or decrease, depending on incidence angles and polarizations.

  14. Degree Angular Scale Interferometer 3 Year Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, E. M.; Kovac, J. M.; Halverson, N. W.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Pryke, C.; Smith, M. W. E.

    2005-05-01

    We present the analysis of the complete 3 yr data set obtained with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) polarization experiment, operating from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station. New data obtained at the end of the 2002 austral winter and throughout the 2003 season were added to the data from which the first detection of polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation was reported. The analysis of the combined data supports, with increased statistical power, all of the conclusions drawn from the initial data set. In particular, the detection of E-mode polarization is increased to the 6.3 σ confidence level, TE cross-polarization is detected at 2.9 σ, and B-mode polarization is consistent with zero, with an upper limit well below the level of the detected E-mode polarization. The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the cosmological model that has emerged from CMB temperature measurements. The analysis also demonstrates that contamination of the data by known sources of foreground emission is insignificant.

  15. Circularly polarized microwaves for magnetic resonance study in the GHz range: Application to nitrogen-vacancy in diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mrózek, M. Rudnicki, D. S.; Gawlik, W.; Mlynarczyk, J.

    2015-07-06

    The ability to create time-dependent magnetic fields of controlled polarization is essential for many experiments with magnetic resonance. We describe a microstrip circuit that allows us to generate strong magnetic field at microwave frequencies with arbitrary adjusted polarization. The circuit performance is demonstrated by applying it to an optically detected magnetic resonance and Rabi nutation experiments in nitrogen-vacancy color centers in diamond. Thanks to high efficiency of the proposed microstrip circuit and degree of circular polarization of 85%; it is possible to address the specific spin states of a diamond sample using a low power microwave generator. The circuit may be applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance experiments with a well-controlled polarization of microwaves.

  16. Sea surface and remotely sensed temperatures off Cape Mendocino, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Arvesen, J. C.; Frydenlund, D.; Myers, J. S.; Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    During September 3 to 5, 1979, a multisensor oceanographic experiment was conducted off Cape Mendocino, California. The purpose of this experiment was to validate the use of remote sensing techniques over an area along the U.S. west coast where coasted upwelling is known to be intense. Remotely sensed mutlispectral data, including thermal infrared imagery, were collected above an upwelling feature off Cape Mendocino. Data were acquired from the TIRNOS-N and NOAA-6 polar orbiting satellites, the NASA Ames Research Center's high altitude U-2 aircraft, and a U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft. Supporting surface truth data over the same feature were collected aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, OCEANOGRAPHER. Atmospheric soundings were also taken aboard the ship. The results indicate that shipboard measurements of sea surface temperatures can be reproduction within 1 C or better through remote observation of absolute infrared radiance values (whether measured aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellite, the U-2 aircraft, or the Coast Guard aircraft) by using appropriate atmospheric corrections. Also, the patterns of sea surface temperature which were derived independently from the various remote platforms provide a consistent interpretation of the surface temperature field.

  17. WISE 2000 campaign: sea surface salinity and wind retrievals from L-band radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Adriano; Corbella, Ignasi; Font, Jordi; Etchetto, Jacqueline; Duffo, Nuria; Vall-llossera, Merce; Bara, Javier; Torres, Francisco; Wursteisen, Patrick; Martin-Neira, Manuel

    2000-12-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) has been recognized as a key parameter in climatological studies. SSS can be measured by passive microwave remote sensing at L band, where the sensitivity of the brightness temperatures shows a maximum and the atmosphere is almost transparent. To provide global coverage of this basic parameter with a 3-day revisit time, the SMOS mission was recently selected by ESA within the frame of the Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions. The SMOS mission will carry the MIRAS instrument, the first 2D L-band aperture synthesis interferometric radiometer. To address new challenges that this mission presents, such as incidence angle variation with pixel, polarization mixing, effect of wind and foam and others, a measurement campaign has been sponsored by ESA under the name of WISE 2000 and it is scheduled for October-November 2000. Two L-band radiometers, a video, a IR and a stereo-camera and four oceanographic and meteorological buoys will be installed in the oil platform 'Casablanca' located at 40 Km off the coast of Tarragona, where the sea conditions are representative of the Mediterranean open sea with periodic influence of the Ebro river fresh water plume.

  18. Fast cosmological parameter estimation from microwave background temperature and polarization power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia; Peiris, Hiranya; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2004-07-01

    We improve the algorithm of Kosowsky, Milosavljevic, and Jimenez for computing power spectra of the cosmic microwave background. The present algorithm computes not only the temperature power spectrum but also the E- and B-mode polarization and the temperature-polarization cross power spectra, providing the accuracy required for current cosmological parameter estimation. Both unlensed and lensed (with non-linear evolution) power spectra are provided up to l=3000 for temperature and polarization signals. We refine the optimum set of cosmological parameters for computing the power spectra as perturbations around a fiducial model, leading to an accuracy better than 0.5% for the temperature power spectrum throughout the region of parameter space within the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropic Probe’s first-year 3σ confidence region. This accuracy is comparable to the difference between the widely used CMBFAST code of Seljak and Zaldarriaga and Boltzmann codes. Our algorithm (CMBWARP) makes possible a full exploration of the likelihood region for eight cosmological parameters in about one hour on a laptop computer. We provide the code to compute power spectra as well as the Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for cosmological parameters estimation at http://www.physics.upenn.edu/˜raulj/CMBwarp.

  19. Multiresolution internal template cleaning: an application to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-yr polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Cobos, R.; Vielva, P.; Barreiro, R. B.; Martínez-González, E.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation data obtained by different experiments contain, besides the desired signal, a superposition of microwave sky contributions. Using a wavelet decomposition on the sphere, we present a fast and robust method to recover the CMB signal from microwave maps. We present an application to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) polarization data, which shows its good performance, particularly in very polluted regions of the sky. The applied wavelet has the advantages that it requires little computational time in its calculations, it is adapted to the HEALPIX pixelization scheme and it offers the possibility of multiresolution analysis. The decomposition is implemented as part of a fully internal template fitting method, minimizing the variance of the resulting map at each scale. Using a χ2 characterization of the noise, we find that the residuals of the cleaned maps are compatible with those expected from the instrumental noise. The maps are also comparable to those obtained from the WMAP team, but in our case we do not make use of external data sets. In addition, at low resolution, our cleaned maps present a lower level of noise. The E-mode power spectrum ? is computed at high and low resolutions, and a cross-power spectrum ? is also calculated from the foreground reduced maps of temperature given by WMAP and our cleaned maps of polarization at high resolution. These spectra are consistent with the power spectra supplied by the WMAP team. We detect the E-mode acoustic peak at ℓ˜ 400, as predicted by the standard ΛCDM model. The B-mode power spectrum ? is compatible with zero.

  20. Low-Temperature Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 9.4 Tesla With a 30 Milliwatt Microwave Source

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can provide large signal enhancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by transfer of polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins. We discuss several aspects of DNP experiments at 9.4 Tesla (400 MHz resonant frequency for 1H, 264 GHz for electron spins in organic radicals) in the 7–80 K temperature range, using a 30 mW, frequency-tunable microwave source and a quasi-optical microwave bridge for polarization control and low-loss microwave transmission. In experiments on frozen glycerol/water doped with nitroxide radicals, DNP signal enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed (relative to 1H NMR signals with thermal equilibrium spin polarization). The largest sensitivity enhancements are observed with a new triradical dopant, DOTOPA-TEMPO. Field modulation with a 10 G root-mean-squared amplitude during DNP increases the nuclear spin polarizations by up to 135%. Dependencies of 1H NMR signal amplitudes, nuclear spin relaxation times, and DNP build-up times on the dopant and its concentration, temperature, microwave power, and modulation frequency are reported and discussed. The benefits of low-temperature DNP can be dramatic: the 1H spin polarization is increased approximately 1000-fold at 7 K with DNP, relative to thermal polarization at 80 K. PMID:20392658

  1. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization at 9.4 T with a 30 mW microwave source.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can provide large signal enhancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by transfer of polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins. We discuss several aspects of DNP experiments at 9.4 T (400 MHz resonant frequency for (1)H, 264 GHz for electron spins in organic radicals) in the 7-80K temperature range, using a 30 mW, frequency-tunable microwave source and a quasi-optical microwave bridge for polarization control and low-loss microwave transmission. In experiments on frozen glycerol/water doped with nitroxide radicals, DNP signal enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed (relative to (1)H NMR signals with thermal equilibrium spin polarization). The largest sensitivity enhancements are observed with a new triradical dopant, DOTOPA-TEMPO. Field modulation with a 10 G root-mean-squared amplitude during DNP increases the nuclear spin polarizations by up to 135%. Dependencies of (1)H NMR signal amplitudes, nuclear spin relaxation times, and DNP build-up times on the dopant and its concentration, temperature, microwave power, and modulation frequency are reported and discussed. The benefits of low-temperature DNP can be dramatic: the (1)H spin polarization is increased approximately 1000-fold at 7 K with DNP, relative to thermal polarization at 80K. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sea-surface temperature chart enhancement in frontal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksanin, A. I.; Kim, V.

    2016-12-01

    Infrared and microwave satellite images used for sea-surface temperature (SST) retrieval often have distortions such as noise and blurring of thermal front lines that decrease the quality of SST charts. In order to solve this problem, it is proposed to use an approach based on the Mumford-Shah model that approximates an image with a piecewise smooth function. In order to combine the advantages of the proposed approach and conventional methods for noise filtering and image restoration it is proposed to divide images into flat and frontal zones and process them separately. The SST quality is enhanced by the use of edge-preserving noise filtering and restoration algorithms. The latter use the features of radiometers and different stages of the SST construction procedure to improve their accuracy. The images obtained using the MTSAT/VISSR, METEOR-M/MSU-MR, and AQUA/AMSR-E radiometers are used for testing the developed approach.

  3. MEASUREMENT OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA FROM TWO YEARS OF BICEP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H. C.; Barkats, D.; Bock, J. J.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Bierman, E. M.; Keating, B. G.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.

    2010-03-10

    Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) is a bolometric polarimeter designed to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. During three seasons of observing at the South Pole (2006 through 2008), BICEP mapped {approx}2% of the sky chosen to be uniquely clean of polarized foreground emission. Here, we present initial results derived from a subset of the data acquired during the first two years. We present maps of temperature, Stokes Q and U, E and B modes, and associated angular power spectra. We demonstrate that the polarization data are self-consistent by performing a series of jackknife tests. We study potential systematic errors in detail and show that they are sub-dominant to the statistical errors. We measure the E-mode angular power spectrum with high precision at 21 <= l <= 335, detecting for the first time the peak expected at l {approx} 140. The measured E-mode spectrum is consistent with expectations from a LAMBDACDM model, and the B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero. The tensor-to-scalar ratio derived from the B-mode spectrum is r = 0.02{sup +0.31}{sub -0.26}, or r < 0.72 at 95% confidence, the first meaningful constraint on the inflationary gravitational wave background to come directly from CMB B-mode polarization.

  4. An intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection intersatellite microwave photonic link using polarization direction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Yongjun; Han, Lei; Zhao, Jing

    2014-03-01

    A simple approach for high loss intersatellite microwave photonic link with intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection is proposed. In the transmitter, the double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) modulated optical signal and optical carrier (OC) are combined by employing a polarization combiner to chose and control the signals polarization directions, while in the receiver, they are selected respectively by using a polarization splitter for they have orthogonal polarization directions. The separated DSB-SC signal and OC put into balanced detectors and the coherent detection is realized without a local oscillator (LO). At the output, the fundamental signal is augmented and the third-order distortion is suppressed for the DSB-SC modulation, the second-order distortion is removed for the balanced detection and the noise is reduced for the polarization direction control. The signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) can be optimized by adjusting the power of OC and modulation index. The simulation results show that, a SNDR higher than 30 dB can be obtained for the proposed method, which is in agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  5. A measurement of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William C.

    We describe the design and performance of the BOOMERANG experiment, and report on measurements of the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) obtained during the January 2003 flight of BOOMERANG (B2K). To enable these studies, we have developed a bolometric detector which is intrinsically sensitive to linear polarization. The receiver consists of a pair of colocated silicon nitride micromesh absorbers that couple anisotropically to linearly polarized radiation through a corrugated waveguide structure. This system allows simultaneous background limited measurements of the Stokes I and Q parameters over ~30% bandwidths at frequencies from ~60 to 400 GHz. The science results reported here are derived from 195 hours of observation with four 145 GHz Polarization Sensitive Bolometer (PSB) pairs [83]. The data include 75 hours of observations distributed over 1.8% of the sky with an additional 120 hours concentrated on the central portion of the field, itself representing 0.22% of the full sky. The B2K data improve significantly on existing measurements of the CMB temperature power spectrum at angular scales of 500 [Special characters omitted.] [cursive l] [Special characters omitted.] 1100. In addition, we have measured a spectrum of curl-free polarization anisotropies that, in the context of the most simple adiabatic inflationary models, are consistent with the predictions of the currently favored LCDM cosmology.

  6. Quantum Suppression of Alignment in Ultrasmall Grains: Microwave Emission from Spinning Dust will be Negligibly Polarized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draine, B. T.; Hensley, Brandon S.

    2016-11-01

    The quantization of energy levels in small, cold, free-flying nanoparticles suppresses dissipative processes that convert grain rotational kinetic energy into heat. For interstellar grains small enough to have ˜GHz rotation rates, the suppression of dissipation can be extreme. As a result, alignment of such grains is suppressed. This applies both to alignment of the grain body with its angular momentum {\\boldsymbol{J}}, and to alignment of {\\boldsymbol{J}} with the local magnetic field {\\boldsymbol{B}} 0. If the anomalous microwave emission is rotational emission from spinning grains, then it will be negligibly polarized at GHz frequencies, with P ≲ 10-6 at ν > 10 GHz.

  7. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  8. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1990-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T (sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  9. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1989-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T(sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  10. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1990-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T (sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  11. Evolution of the linear-polarization-angle-dependence of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations with microwave power

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-11-10

    We examine the role of the microwave power in the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system. The diagonal resistance R{sub xx} was measured at the fixed magnetic fields of the photo-excited oscillatory extrema of R{sub xx} as a function of both the microwave power, P, and the linear polarization angle, θ. Color contour plots of such measurements demonstrate the evolution of the lineshape of R{sub xx} versus θ with increasing microwave power. We report that the non-linear power dependence of the amplitude of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations distorts the cosine-square relation between R{sub xx} and θ at high power.

  12. W-band dual-polarization receiver for array of microwave background anisotropy (AMiBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Chen, Ming-Tang; Jiang, Homing; Chu, Tah-Hsiung; Hsieh, Sun-Nieng; Han, Chi-Chian; Patt, Ferdinand; Ho, West; Huang, Yau-Der; Wilson, Warwick

    2004-10-01

    This is to report on our development for a dual-polarization receiver to detect the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in 85 to 105 GHz band. The receiver is based on a MMIC, HEMT-based LNA developed in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A W-band, orthomode transducer (OMT) is used for polarization separation. Most of the RF front-end is located in cryogenics environment at 20K. We have developed a MMIC sub-harmonically pumped diode mixer, operating at 42 GHz, for signal down-conversion. The entire base-band, 2 to 18 GHz, is correlated in a lag-correlator system. The receiver design details and the lab test results will be described in this report.

  13. Quantum pump effect induced by a linearly polarized microwave in a two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    Song, Juntao; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua

    2012-05-30

    A quantum pump effect is predicted in an ideal homogeneous two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) that is normally irradiated by linearly polarized microwaves (MW). Without considering effects from spin-orbital coupling or the magnetic field, it is found that a polarized MW can continuously pump electrons from the longitudinal to the transverse direction, or from the transverse to the longitudinal direction, in the central irradiated region. The large pump current is obtained for both the low frequency limit and the high frequency case. Its magnitude depends on sample properties such as the size of the radiated region, the power and frequency of the MW, etc. Through the calculated results, the pump current should be attributed to the dominant photon-assisted tunneling processes as well as the asymmetry of the electron density of states with respect to the Fermi energy.

  14. Microwave maps of the polar ice of the earth. [from Nimbus-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, T. C.; Nordberg, W.; Campbell, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Synoptic views of the entire polar regions of earth were obtained free of the usual persistent cloud cover using a scanning microwave radiometer operating at a wavelength of 1.55 cm on board the Nimbus-5 satellite. Three different views at each pole are presented utilizing data obtained at approximately one-month intervals during the winter of 1972-1973. The major discoveries resulting from an analysis of these data are as follows: (1) Large discrepancies exist between the climatic norm ice cover depicted in various atlases and the actual extent of the canopies. (2) The distribution of multiyear ice in the north polar region is markedly different from that predicted by existing ice dynamics models. (3) Irregularities in the edge of the Antarctic sea ice pack occur that have neither been observed previously nor anticipated. (4) The brightness temperatures of the Greenland and Antarctica glaciers show interesting contours probably related to the ice and snow morphologic structure.

  15. Cosmic birefringence fluctuations and cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seokcheon; Liu, Guo-Chin; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2015-06-01

    Recently, BICEP2 measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization has indicated the presence of primordial gravitational waves at degree angular scales, inferring the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.2 and a running scalar spectral index, provided that dust contamination is low. In this Letter, we show that the existence of the fluctuations of cosmological birefringence can give rise to CMB B-mode polarization that fits BICEP2 data with r < 0.11 and no running of the scalar spectral index. When dust contribution is taken into account, we derive an upper limit on the cosmological birefringence, Aβ2 < 0.0075, where A is the amplitude of birefringence fluctuations that couple to electromagnetism with a coupling strength β.

  16. Microwave brightness of polar firn as measured by Nimbus 5 and 6 ESMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Choudhury, B. J.; Gloersen, P.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave emission from a half-space medium characterized by coordinate dependent scattering and absorbing centers was calculated by numerically solving the radiative transfer equation by the method of invariant imbedding. A Mie scattering phase function and surface polarization was included in the calculation. Also included are the physical temperature profile and the temperature variation of the index of refraction for ice. Using published values of grain size and temperature profile data of polar firn, the brightness temperature was calculated for the 1.55 cm and 0.8 cm wavelengths. For selected regions in Greenland and Antarctica, the results are in reasonable agreement with the observed Nimbus-5 and Nimbus-6 ESMR data.

  17. Synthesis of passive microwave and radar altimeter data for estimating accumulation rates of polar snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we compare dry-snow extinction coefficients derived from radar altimeter data with brightness temperature data from passive microwave measurements over a portion of the East Antarctic plateau. The comparison between the extinction coefficients and the brightness temperatures shows a strong negative correlation, where the correlation coefficients ranged from -0.87 to -0.95. The extinction coefficient of the dry polar snow decreases with increasing surface elevation, while the average brightness temperature increases with surface elevation. Our analysis shows that the observed trends are related to geographic variations in scattering coefficient of snow, which in turn are controlled by variations in surface temperature and snow accumulation rate. By combining information present in the extinction coefficient and brightness temperature data sets, we develop a model that can be used to obtain quantitative estimates of the accumulation rate of dry polar snow.

  18. Extended Malus Law with metallic linear polarizers in terahertz and microwave domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, Xavier; Baida, Fadi; Boyer, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    An extended Malus' Law for the well-known Polarizer-Analyzer Mounting (PAM) is analytically obtained and investigated. The PAM is composed of two perfectly parallel Metallic Linear Polarizers (MLP), with subwavelength periodic pattern composed of rectangular holes. Our analytical theory especially highlights the influence of multiple reflections between the two MLPs which leads to an extended and tunable Malus Law. We demonstrate that the classical Malus Law (obtained for dichroic polarizers) is modulated by a factor which also depends on the angular difference between both MLP axes. In our analysis, the Malus' law is studied at the resonance wavelengths. Due to the interactions between the two MLP, the modulation factor is tuned by the optical distance between them which makes substantial variations of the Malus Law. We mention that, for each reflections, the light is re-polarized according to the orientation of the MLP. This tunable Malus' Law provides an original tool for ultrasensitive detection in the terahertz or microwave regime. For example, one can use an ultra-narrow angle Malus' Law as a hyper-sensitive device to analyze with a high accuracy the electro-optical response of a material sandwiched between polarizer and analyzer. We theoretically propose one PAM designed to detect a refractive index variation as small as 10-5. Finally, we extend the theory, which takes the form of an extended Jones formalism, to a large number of stacked MLP. It is applied to achieve many polarization manipulation processes as total polarization conversion with tunable spectral bandwidth, for instance.

  19. On the influence of resonant scattering on cosmic microwave background polarization anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2007-10-01

    We implement the theory of resonant scattering in the context of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization anisotropies. We compute the changes in the E-mode polarization (EE) and temperature E-mode (TE) CMB power spectra introduced by the scattering on a resonant transition with a given optical depth τX and polarization coefficient E1. The latter parameter, accounting for how anisotropic the scattering is, depends on the exchange of angular momentum in the transition, enabling observational discrimination between different resonances. We use this formalism in two different scenarios: cosmological recombination and cosmological re-ionization. In the context of cosmological recombination, we compute predictions in frequency and multipole space for the change in the TE and EE power spectra introduced by scattering on the Hα and Pα lines of hydrogen. This constitutes a fundamental test of the standard model of recombination, and the sensitivity it requires is comparable to that needed in measuring the primordial CMB B-mode polarization component. In the context of re-ionization, we study the scattering off metals and ions produced by the first stars, and find that polarization anisotropies, apart from providing a consistency test for intensity measurements, give some insight on how re-ionization evolved. Since polarization anisotropies have memory of how anisotropic the line scattering is, they should be able to discern the OI 63.2-μm transition from other possible transitions associated to OIII, NII, NIII, etc. The amplitude of these signals are, however, between 10 and 100 times below the (already challenging) level of CMB B-mode polarization anisotropies.

  20. Extraction of Water from Polar Lunar Permafrost with Microwaves - Dielectric Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing indicates the presence of hydrogen rich regions associated with the lunar poles. The logical hypothesis is that there is cryogenically trapped water ice located in craters at the lunar poles. Some of the craters have been in permanent darkness for a billion years. The presence of water at the poles as well as other scientific advantages of a polar base, have influenced NASA plans for the lunar outpost. The lunar outpost has water and oxygen requirements on the order of 1 ton per year scaling up to as much as 10 tons per year. Microwave heating of the frozen permafrost has unique advantages for water extraction. Proof of principle experiments have successfully demonstrated that microwaves will couple to the cryogenic soil in a vacuum and the sublimed water vapor can be successfully captured on a cold trap. The dielectric properties of lunar soil will determine the hardware requirements for extraction processes. Microwave frequency dielectric property measurements of lunar soil simulant have been measured.

  1. Degree of polarization technique used in PMD compensation of optical microwave transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hankui; Zhang, Xianmin; Chen, Kangsheng

    2004-06-01

    Polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) can severely degrade the performance of optical microwave transmission systems by inducing a periodic power fading of the received RF signal that depends on the subcarrier frequency and accumulated differential group delay (DGD) along fiber. We derive a compact analytical expression of the degree of polarization (DOP) of optical signal using Jones and Stokes representations based on first-order assumption. Using this expression, we quantify the signal DOP fading induced by PMD by means of numerical simulations for BPSK and ASK modulations. The dependences of signal DOP on subcarrier frequency, accumulated DGD, and modulation formats have been demonstrated. It is found that signal DOP has similar periodic fading with the power of received RF signal, which is caused by DGD. Moreover, if the DOP technique is used in the PMD compensation of the optical microwave transmission systems, the DOP degradation is more sensitive to the DGD in the system modulated by BPSK than by ASK. The performance of this technique is immune to residual chromatic dispersion of the fiber.

  2. Monte Carlo Calculations of Polarized Microwave Radiation Emerging from Cloud Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Roberti, Laura

    1998-01-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous growth in cloud dynamical and microphysical models that are able to simulate storms and storm systems with very high spatial resolution, typically of the order of a few kilometers. The fairly realistic distributions of cloud and hydrometeor properties that these models generate has in turn led to a renewed interest in the three-dimensional microwave radiative transfer modeling needed to understand the effect of cloud and rainfall inhomogeneities upon microwave observations. Monte Carlo methods, and particularly backwards Monte Carlo methods have shown themselves to be very desirable due to the quick convergence of the solutions. Unfortunately, backwards Monte Carlo methods are not well suited to treat polarized radiation. This study reviews the existing Monte Carlo methods and presents a new polarized Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The code is based on a forward scheme but uses aliasing techniques to keep the computational requirements equivalent to the backwards solution. Radiative transfer computations have been performed using a microphysical-dynamical cloud model and the results are presented together with the algorithm description.

  3. Statistical simulations of the dust foreground to cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansyngel, F.; Boulanger, F.; Ghosh, T.; Wandelt, B.; Aumont, J.; Bracco, A.; Levrier, F.; Martin, P. G.; Montier, L.

    2017-07-01

    The characterization of the dust polarization foreground to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a necessary step toward the detection of the B-mode signal associated with primordial gravitational waves. We present a method to simulate maps of polarized dust emission on the sphere that is similar to the approach used for CMB anisotropies. This method builds on the understanding of Galactic polarization stemming from the analysis of Planck data. It relates the dust polarization sky to the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and its coupling with interstellar matter and turbulence. The Galactic magnetic field is modeled as a superposition of a mean uniform field and a Gaussian random (turbulent) component with a power-law power spectrum of exponent αM. The integration along the line of sight carried out to compute Stokes maps is approximated by a sum over a small number of emitting layers with different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field. The model parameters are constrained to fit the power spectra of dust polarization EE, BB, and TE measured using Planck data. We find that the slopes of the E and B power spectra of dust polarization are matched for αM = -2.5, an exponent close to that measured for total dust intensity but larger than the Kolmogorov exponent - 11/3. The model allows us to compute multiple realizations of the Stokes Q and U maps for different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field, and to quantify the variance of dust polarization spectra for any given sky area outside of the Galactic plane. The simulations reproduce the scaling relation between the dust polarization power and the mean total dust intensity including the observed dispersion around the mean relation. We also propose a method to carry out multifrequency simulations, including the decorrelation measured recently by Planck, using a given covariance matrix of the polarization maps. These simulations are well suited to optimize

  4. Detection of polarization in the cosmic microwave background using DASI. Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J M; Leitch, E M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L

    The past several years have seen the emergence of a standard cosmological model, in which small temperature differences in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales of the order of a degree are understood to arise from acoustic oscillations in the hot plasma of the early Universe, arising from primordial density fluctuations. Within the context of this model, recent measurements of the temperature fluctuations have led to profound conclusions about the origin, evolution and composition of the Universe. Using the measured temperature fluctuations, the theoretical framework predicts the level of polarization of the CMB with essentially no free parameters. Therefore, a measurement of the polarization is a critical test of the theory and thus of the validity of the cosmological parameters derived from the CMB measurements. Here we report the detection of polarization of the CMB with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI). The polarization is deteced with high confidence, and its level and spatial distribution are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the standard theory.

  5. Rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization from weak gravitational lensing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang

    2014-01-31

    When a cosmic microwave background (CMB) photon travels from the surface of last scatter through spacetime metric perturbations, the polarization vector may rotate about its direction of propagation. This gravitational rotation is distinct from, and occurs in addition to, the lensing deflection of the photon trajectory. This rotation can be sourced by linear vector or tensor metric perturbations and is fully coherent with the curl deflection field. Therefore, lensing corrections to the CMB polarization power spectra as well as the temperature-polarization cross correlations due to nonscalar perturbations are modified. The rotation does not affect lensing by linear scalar perturbations, but needs to be included when calculations go to higher orders. We present complete results for weak lensing of the full-sky CMB power spectra by general linear metric perturbations, taking into account both deflection of the photon trajectory and rotation of the polarization. For the case of lensing by gravitational waves, we show that the B modes induced by the rotation largely cancel those induced by the curl component of deflection.

  6. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  7. A high-power microwave circular polarizer and its application on phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hao; Hu, Yongmei; Chang, Chao; Guo, Letian

    2016-04-01

    A high-power waveguide dual circular polarizer was theoretically designed and proof-of-principle was experimentally tested. It consists of two incident rectangular waveguides with a perpendicular H-plane junction, one circular waveguide with a pair of trapezoidal grooves coupled in E-plane at the top, a spherical crown located at the bottom, and an iris at the perpendicular junction of two rectangular waveguides. When wave incidents at one of the two separated rectangular waveguides, it, respectively, generates a left-hand circular polarized wave or a right-hand circular polarized wave in the circular waveguide. By adding a dumbbell-like metal plug driven with a high speed servomotor, a movable short circuit is formed along the circular waveguide to adjust the output RF phase of the rectangular port, realizing a high-speed high-power phase shifter. The C-band high power microwave (HPM) experiments were carried out, and the power capacity of the HPM polarizer and phase shifter was demonstrated to reach gigawatt level.

  8. Evaluation of the potential of one to three SEASAT-SMMR channels in retrieving sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, P. C.; Kniffen, S.

    1982-01-01

    The scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) aboard the SEASAT satellite measured emitted radiation in both horizontal and vertical polarizations at microwave frequencies of 6.6, 10.69, 18.0, 21.0 and 37.0 GHz. Retrieval algorithms, for sea surface temperature (SST) determination, from subsets of one to three SMMR channels are obtained by a two step statistical technique. The technique first selects the best subsets of a given size defined by an R2 criterion (coefficient of determination), of a given size by the application of an efficient 'leaps and bounds' technique on a statistical data base. It then performs a regression analysis on the selected subsets. The statistical data base employed a large (600) set of seasonally and geographically diverse atmospheric and surface parameters for radiative transfer calculations. The results of the study of one to three channel subset retrieval algorithms indicate the possibility of using 6.6V, 6.6H and 18V channels for SST determination from SEASAT-SMMR data.

  9. Equatorial long waves in geostationary satellite observations and in a multichannel sea surface temperature analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legeckis, R.; Pichel, W.; Nesterczuk, G.

    1983-01-01

    Geostationary satellite observations of a zonally oriented sea surface temperature front in the eastern equatorial Pacific were made between 1975 and 1981. Long waves appeared along the front mainly during the summer and fall, except during 1976, the year of an El Nino. The waves have averaged periods of 25 days and wavelengths of 1000 km. At the end of 1981, the long waves also were detected in a new sea surface temperature analysis based on multichannel infrared measurements from a polar-orbiting satellite. This quantitative analysis may improve the ability to resolve low-frequency equatorial wave motions from satellite observations.

  10. Sea-surface salinity: the missing measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Erich F.; Koblinsky, Chester

    2003-04-01

    Even the youngest child knows that the sea is salty. Yet, routine, global information about the degree of saltiness and the distribution of the salinity is not available. Indeed, the sea surface salinity measurement is a key missing measurement in global change research. Salinity influences circulation and links the ocean to global change and the water-cycle. Space-based remote sensing of important global change ocean parameters such as sea-surface temperature and water-cycle parameters such as precipitation have been available to the research community but a space-based global sensing of salinity has been missing. In July 2002, the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) announced that the Aquarius mission, focused on the global measurement of sea surface salinity, is one of the missions approved under its ESSP-3 program. Aquarius will begin a risk-reduction phase during 2003. Aquarius will carry a multi-beam 1.4 GHz (L-band) radiometer used for retrieving salinity. It also will carry a 1.2 GHz (L-band) scatterometer used for measuring surface roughness. Aquarius is tentatively scheduled for a 2006 launch into an 8-day Sun-synchronous orbit. Aquarius key science data product will be a monthly, global surface salinity map at 100 km resolution with an accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units. Aquarius will have a 3 year operational period. Among other things, global salinity data will permit estimates of sea surface density, or buoyancy, that drives the ocean's three-dimensional circulation.

  11. Biogeochemical patchiness at the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Campbell, J. W.

    2002-10-01

    The surface distributions of many tracers in the ocean are highly correlated in time and space on meso (~100 km) and smaller scales (Figure 1). However, their characteristic scales of variability differ. Some variables like sea surface chlorophyll (Chl) are very fine-scaled or patchy, while others like sea surface temperature (SST) are not. We characterize the patchiness of a distribution quantitatively by the dependence of the variance V on the length scale L as V ~ Lp; smaller p corresponds to greater patchiness. Using scaling and a numerical model we show that patchiness, p, varies with the characteristic response time τ of the tracer to processes that alter its concentration in the upper ocean as p ~ log τ. This suggests that sea surface Chl is more patchy (has smaller p) than SST at mesoscales because the characteristic time scale of phytoplankton growth in response to the availability of nutrients is less than that for the equilibration of temperature in response to heat fluxes. Similarly, sea surface dissolved oxygen (O2) exhibits more fine-scaled variability than total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) because O2 equilibrates with the atmosphere much more rapidly than TCO2. Tracers that are more patchy require higher resolution to model and sample; the sampling or model grid spacing required scales as exp(-1/log τ). The quantitative relationship between p and τ can be used to relate various biogeochemical distributions, particularly to those that are remotely sensed, and to deduce biogeochemical response times of various tracers or plankton species from the characteristics of their distributions in space or time.

  12. Cross-polarization microwave radar return at severe wind conditions: laboratory model and geophysical model function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Abramov, Victor; Ermoshkin, Alexey; Zuikova, Emma; Kazakov, Vassily; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing is one of the main techniques of monitoring severe weather conditions over the ocean. The principal difficulty of the existing algorithms of retrieving wind based on dependence of microwave backscattering cross-section on wind speed (Geophysical Model Function, GMF) is due to its saturation at winds exceeding 25 - 30 m/s. Recently analysis of dual- and quad-polarization C-band radar return measured from satellite Radarsat-2 suggested that the cross-polarized radar return has much higher sensitivity to the wind speed than co-polarized back scattering [1] and conserved sensitivity to wind speed at hurricane conditions [2]. Since complete collocation of these data was not possible and time difference in flight legs and SAR images acquisition was up to 3 hours, these two sets of data were compared in [2] only statistically. The main purpose of this paper is investigation of the functional dependence of cross-polarized radar cross-section on the wind speed in laboratory experiment. Since cross-polarized radar return is formed due to scattering at small-scale structures of the air-sea interface (short-crested waves, foam, sprays, etc), which are well reproduced in laboratory conditions, then the approach based on laboratory experiment on radar scattering of microwaves at the water surface under hurricane wind looks feasible. The experiments were performed in the Wind-wave flume located on top of the Large Thermostratified Tank of the Institute of Applied Physics, where the airflow was produced in the flume with the straight working part of 10 m and operating cross section 0.40?0.40 sq. m, the axis velocity can be varied from 5 to 25 m/s. Microwave measurements were carried out by a coherent Doppler X-band (3.2 cm) scatterometer with the consequent receive of linear polarizations. Experiments confirmed higher sensitivity to the wind speed of the cross-polarized radar return. Simultaneously parameters of the air flow in the turbulent boundary layer

  13. Precise orbit computation and sea surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakker, Karel F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Rummel, R.; Vermaat, E.; Deruijter, W. P. M.; Vandermade, J. W.; Zimmerman, J. T. F.

    1991-01-01

    The research project described below is part of a long-term program at Delft University of Technology aiming at the application of European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1) and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements for geophysical purposes. This program started in 1980 with the processing of Seasat laser range and altimeter height measurements and concentrates today on the analysis of Geosat altimeter data. The objectives of the TOPEX/POSEIDON research project are the tracking of the satellite by the Dutch mobile laser tracking system MTLRS-2, the computation of precise TOPEX/POSEIDON orbits, the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of the orbit errors, the improvement of ERS-1 orbits through the information obtained from the altimeter crossover difference residuals for crossing ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON tracks, the combination of ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data into a single high-precision data set, and the application of this data set to model the sea surface. The latter application will focus on the determination of detailed regional mean sea surfaces, sea surface variability, ocean topography, and ocean currents in the North Atlantic, the North Sea, the seas around Indonesia, the West Pacific, and the oceans around South Africa.

  14. Precise orbit computation and sea surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakker, Karel F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Rummel, R.; Vermaat, E.; Deruijter, W. P. M.; Vandermade, J. W.; Zimmerman, J. T. F.

    1991-01-01

    The research project described below is part of a long-term program at Delft University of Technology aiming at the application of European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1) and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements for geophysical purposes. This program started in 1980 with the processing of Seasat laser range and altimeter height measurements and concentrates today on the analysis of Geosat altimeter data. The objectives of the TOPEX/POSEIDON research project are the tracking of the satellite by the Dutch mobile laser tracking system MTLRS-2, the computation of precise TOPEX/POSEIDON orbits, the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of the orbit errors, the improvement of ERS-1 orbits through the information obtained from the altimeter crossover difference residuals for crossing ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON tracks, the combination of ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data into a single high-precision data set, and the application of this data set to model the sea surface. The latter application will focus on the determination of detailed regional mean sea surfaces, sea surface variability, ocean topography, and ocean currents in the North Atlantic, the North Sea, the seas around Indonesia, the West Pacific, and the oceans around South Africa.

  15. Investigation on the GPS single scattering from a 2-D largescale sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiwen; Guo, Lixin

    2014-05-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) signals reflected from the ocean surface can be used for various remote sensing purposes. In this paper, we develop a facet model to simulate the received GPS single from a 2-D largescale sea surface. In this model, the sea surface is envisaged as a two-scale profile on which the long waves are locally approximated by planar facets. The microscopic profile within a facet is assumed to be represented by a set of sinusoidal ripple patches. The complex reflective function of each modified facet is evaluated by a modified formula of the original Bass and Fuks' two-scale model, in which the phase factor of each facet is with the capillary wave modification. The scattering field and the bistatic scattering coefficient of facet model is derived in detail. With received GPS single, we give a detail analysis of the polarization property, the scattering property of GPS scattering signal over the sea surface.

  16. Degree-scale cosmic microwave background polarization measurements from three years of BICEP1 data

    SciTech Connect

    Barkats, D.; Aikin, R.; Bock, J. J.; Filippini, J.; Hristov, V. V.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Kovac, J. M.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Bierman, E. M.; Su, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Chiang, H. C.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Jones, W. C.; and others

    2014-03-10

    BICEP1 is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed specifically to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at degree angular scales. We present results from an analysis of the data acquired during three seasons of observations at the South Pole (2006-2008). This work extends the two-year result published in Chiang et al., with additional data from the third season and relaxed detector-selection criteria. This analysis also introduces a more comprehensive estimation of band power window functions, improved likelihood estimation methods, and a new technique for deprojecting monopole temperature-to-polarization leakage that reduces this class of systematic uncertainty to a negligible level. We present maps of temperature, E- and B-mode polarization, and their associated angular power spectra. The improvement in the map noise level and polarization spectra error bars are consistent with the 52% increase in integration time relative to Chiang et al. We confirm both self-consistency of the polarization data and consistency with the two-year results. We measure the angular power spectra at 21 ≤ ℓ ≤ 335 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with Lambda cold dark matter cosmology, with the first acoustic peak of the EE spectrum now detected at 15σ. The BB spectrum remains consistent with zero. From B-modes only, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r=0.03{sub −0.23}{sup +0.27}, or r < 0.70 at 95% confidence level.

  17. Bifurcations in the hydrogen atom in the presence of a circularly polarized microwave field and a static magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lanchares, V.; Inarrea, M.; Salas, J.P.

    1997-09-01

    In a classical model, the dynamics of the hydrogen atom subjected to a circularly polarized microwave field and a magnetic field is shown to belong to the family of so-called biparametric quadratic Hamiltonians. The energy-level structure is studied in terms of the parametric bifurcations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; va der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (T(sub B))'s measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These T(sub B)'s measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly T(sub B)'s could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly T(sub B). Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, h(sub r), on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on T(sub B) simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent h(sub r) parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of T(sub B) simulations in the early growth cycle.

  19. Homogenizing microwave illumination in thermoacoustic tomography by a linear-to-circular polarizer based on frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Shen, Yuecheng; Feng, Xiaohua; Liu, Changjun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-08-01

    A circularly polarized antenna, providing more homogeneous illumination compared to a linearly polarized antenna, is more suitable for microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT). The conventional realization of a circular polarization is by using a helical antenna, but it suffers from low efficiency, low power capacity, and limited aperture in TAT systems. Here, we report an implementation of a circularly polarized illumination method in TAT by inserting a single-layer linear-to-circular polarizer based on frequency selective surfaces between a pyramidal horn antenna and an imaging object. The performance of the proposed method was validated by both simulations and experimental imaging of a breast tumor phantom. The results showed that a circular polarization was achieved, and the resultant thermoacoustic signal-to-noise was twice greater than that in the helical antenna case. The proposed method is more desirable in a waveguide-based TAT system than the conventional method.

  20. Microwave dielectric relaxation studies of hydrogen bonded polar binary mixtures of isobutanol and aniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwam, T.; Murthy, V. R. K.

    2013-03-01

    The molecular interaction between the polar systems of isobutanol and aniline for various mole fractions at different temperatures were studied by determining the frequency dependent complex dielectric permittivity by using the open-ended coaxial probe technique method in the microwave frequency range from 20 MHz to 20 GHz. The geometries are optimized at HF and B3LYP with 6-31G and 6-31G+ basis sets. Dipole moments of the binary mixtures are calculated from the dielectric data using Higasi's method and compared with the theoretical results. Conformational analysis of the formation of hydrogen bond between the isobutanol and aniline is supported by the FT-IR and molecular polarizability calculations. The average relaxation times are calculated from their respective Cole-Cole plots. The activation entropy, activation enthalpy and Kirkwood correlation 'g' factor, excess permittivities (ɛE), Bruggeman parameters (fB) have also been determined for isobutanol and aniline and the results were correlated.

  1. EOS Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of the Antarctic Polar Vortex Breakup in 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Waters, J. W.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's new Aura satellite give an unprecedentedly detailed picture of the spring Antarctic polar vortex breakup throughout the stratosphere. HCl is a particularly valuable tracer in the lower stratosphere after chlorine deactivation. MLS HCl, N2O, H2O broke up in the upper stratosphere by early October, in the midstratosphere by early November, and in the lower stratosphere by late December. The subvortex broke up just a few days later than the lower stratospheric vortex. Vortex remnants persisted in the midstratosphere through December, but only through early January 2005 in the lower stratosphere. MLS N2O observations show diabatic descent continuing throughout November, with evidence of weak ascent after late October in the lower stratospheric vortex core.

  2. Deciphering inflation with gravitational waves: Cosmic microwave background polarization vs direct detection with laser interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tristan L.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-06-15

    A detection of the primordial gravitational wave background is considered to be the 'smoking-gun' evidence for inflation. While superhorizon waves are probed with cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, the relic background will be studied with laser interferometers. The long lever arm spanned by the two techniques improves constraints on the inflationary potential and validation of consistency relations expected under inflation. If gravitational waves with a tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio greater than 0.01 are detected by the CMB, then a direct-detection experiment with a sensitivity consistent with current concept studies should be pursued vigorously. If no primordial tensors are detected by the CMB, a direct-detection experiment to understand the simplest form of inflation must have a sensitivity improved by two to 3 orders of magnitude over current plans.

  3. A spinning thermometer to monitor microwave heating and glass transitions in dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Miéville, Pascal; Vitzthum, Veronika; Caporini, Marc A; Jannin, Sami; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    As previously demonstrated by Thurber and Tycko, the peak position of (79)Br in potassium bromide (KBr) allows one to determine the temperature of a spinning sample. We propose to adapt the original design by using a compact KBr tablet placed at the bottom of the magic angle spinning rotor, separated from the sample under investigation by a thin disk made of polytetrafluoroethylene (or 'Teflon'®). This design allows spinning the sample up to at least 16 kHz. The KBr tablet can remain in the rotor when changing the sample under investigation. Calibration in the range of 98 < T < 320 K has been carried out in a static rotor by inserting a platinum thermometer. The accuracy is better than ± 0.9 K, even in the presence of microwave irradiation. Irradiation with 5 W microwaves at 263 GHz leads to a small temperature increase of 3.6 ± 1.4 K in either static or spinning samples. The dynamic nuclear polarization enhancement decreases with increasing temperature, in particular when a frozen glassy sample undergoes a glass transition. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Sea Surface Signature of Tropical Cyclones Using Microwave Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    tropics as part of the water cycle in the current climate system. It provides much needed information on rainfall, SST, wind speed and water vapor in...hurricane was found to be increased around the Amazon River plume, however preexisting barrier layers were shown to play a role. 4 The Gulf Coast...region also has major river discharge similar to the Amazon River , but the observations shown here for Isaac are well offshore. Proc. of SPIE Vol

  5. A Computer Model for Bistatic Sea Surface Microwave Reflectivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-14

    Organization ( WMO ) and the related significant wave heights, rms wave height, and correlation distance. The autocorrelation function for the two...Slope WMO Sea State Significant Wave Height(m) Characteristics RMS Wave Height h (m) Correlation Distance T(m) RMS Wave Slope,  0

  6. On the Relationship between Water Vapor over the Oceans and Sea Surface Temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1990-06-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry (SMMR) are correlated with NMC-blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of O.36 g cm2. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range Ts gt; 15°C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the mass of SMMR water vapor integrated over the global oceans is shown to differ from analyses of fully global water vapor data in both phase and amplitude, and these difference paint to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about ±20% of the seasonal mean.

  7. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne Telescope for Measuring Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    EBEX is a long-duration balloon-borne (LDB) telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It is designed to measure or place an upper limit on the inflationary B-mode signal, a signal predicted by inflationary theories to be imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves, to detect the effects of gravitational lensing on the polarization of the CMB, and to characterize polarized Galactic foreground emission. The payload consists of a pointed gondola that houses the optics, polarimetry, detectors and detector readout systems, as well as the pointing sensors, control motors, telemetry sytems, and data acquisition and flight control computers. Polarimetry is achieved with a rotating half-wave plate and wire grid polarizer. The detectors are sensitive to frequency bands centered on 150, 250, and 410 GHz. EBEX was flown in 2009 from New Mexico as a full system test, and then flown again in December 2012 / January 2013 over Antarctica in a long-duration flight to collect scientific data. In the instrumentation part of this thesis we discuss the pointing sensors and attitude determination algorithms. We also describe the real-time map making software, "QuickLook", that was custom-designed for EBEX. We devote special attention to the design and construction of the primary pointing sensors, the star cameras, and their custom-designed flight software package, "STARS" (the Star Tracking Attitude Reconstruction Software). In the analysis part of this thesis we describe the current status of the post-flight analysis procedure. We discuss the data structures used in analysis and the pipeline stages related to attitude determination and map making. We also discuss a custom-designed software framework called "LEAP" (the LDB EBEX Analysis Pipeline) that supports most of the analysis pipeline stages.

  8. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values.

  9. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values.

  10. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Dennis J.; Trenberth, Kevin E.; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S.

  11. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Dennis J.; Trenberth, Kevin E.; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S.

  12. Polarization- and frequency-tunable microwave circuit for selective excitation of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Johannes; Appleton, Marc A.; Sasaki, Kento; Monnai, Yasuaki; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Itoh, Kohei M.; Abe, Eisuke

    2016-10-01

    We report on a planar microwave resonator providing arbitrarily polarized oscillating magnetic fields that enable selective excitation of the electronic spins of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. The polarization plane is parallel to the surface of diamond, which makes the resonator fully compatible with (111)-oriented diamond. The field distribution is spatially uniform in a circular area with a diameter of 4 mm, and a near-perfect circular polarization is achieved. We also demonstrate that the original resonance frequency of 2.8 GHz can be varied in the range of 2-3.2 GHz by introducing varactor diodes that serve as variable capacitors.

  13. A TSVD Analysis of the Impact of Polarization on Microwave Breast Imaging using an Enclosed Array of Miniaturized Patch Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Mays, R. Owen; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave breast imaging performance is fundamentally dependent on the quality of information contained within the scattering data. We apply a truncated singular-value decomposition (TSVD) method to evaluate the information contained in a simulated scattering scenario wherein a compact, shielded array of miniaturized patch antennas surrounds an anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. In particular, we investigate the impact of different antenna orientations (and thus polarizations), namely two array configurations with uniform antenna orientations and one mixed-orientation array configuration. The latter case is of interest because it may offer greater flexibility in antenna and array design. The results of this analysis indicate that mixed-polarization configurations do not degrade information quality compared to uniform-polarization configurations and in fact may enhance imaging performance, and thus represent viable design options for microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25705136

  14. A TSVD Analysis of the Impact of Polarization on Microwave Breast Imaging using an Enclosed Array of Miniaturized Patch Antennas.

    PubMed

    Mays, R Owen; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C

    Microwave breast imaging performance is fundamentally dependent on the quality of information contained within the scattering data. We apply a truncated singular-value decomposition (TSVD) method to evaluate the information contained in a simulated scattering scenario wherein a compact, shielded array of miniaturized patch antennas surrounds an anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. In particular, we investigate the impact of different antenna orientations (and thus polarizations), namely two array configurations with uniform antenna orientations and one mixed-orientation array configuration. The latter case is of interest because it may offer greater flexibility in antenna and array design. The results of this analysis indicate that mixed-polarization configurations do not degrade information quality compared to uniform-polarization configurations and in fact may enhance imaging performance, and thus represent viable design options for microwave breast imaging systems.

  15. Passive L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly TB's could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly TB. Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, hr, on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on TB simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent hr parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of TB simulations in the early growth cycle. A.T. Joseph, R. Van der Velde, P.E. O'Neill, R.H. Lang, and T. Gish, "Soil moisture retrieval during a corn growth cycle using L-band (1.6 GHz) radar observations", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 46, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2008.917214, Aug. 2008. M.C. Dobson, F.T. Ulaby, M

  16. The POLARBEAR Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment and Anti-Reflection Coatings for Millimeter Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quealy, Erin Elizabeth

    New technology has rapidly advanced the field of observational cosmology over the last 30 years. This trend will continue with the development of technologies to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization. The B-mode component of the polarization map will place limits on the energy scale of inflation and the sum of the neutrino masses. This thesis describes the pb instrument which will measure the CMB polarization anisotropy to unprecedented sensitivity. POLARBEAR-I is currently observing, and an upgraded version, POLARBEAR-II, is planned for the future. The first version of the experiment, POLARBEAR-I, is fielding several new technologies for the first time. POLARBEAR-I has high sensitivity due to its detector count. It employs a 1274 detector Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer array. The bolometers are coupled to a planar array of polarization sensitive antennas. These antennas are lithographed on the same substrate as the TES detectors, allowing on-chip band defining filters between the antenna and detector. The focal plane is composed of seven hexagonal detector modules. This modular scheme can be extended to create larger focal plane arrays in the future. POLARBEAR-I is observing at a single band near 150 GHz, the peak in the CMB blackbody curve. The lenslet antenna coupled detector technology, fielding for the first time in POLARBEAR-I, is naturally scalable to larger arrays with multi-chroic pixels. This broadband technology will have higher sensitivity and better capability for astronomical foreground contaminant removal. The antenna geometry can be changed to receive a wider frequency bandwidth. This bandwidth can be broken into multiple frequency bands with the on-chip band defining filters. Each band will be read out by one TES detector. A dual band instrument, pbtwo, is in development with bands at 90 and 150 GHz. One challenge for all CMB polarization measurements is minimization of systematic errors. One source of error is

  17. The Seasat scanning multichannel microwave radiometer /SMMR/ - Instrument description and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Stacey, J. M.; Barath, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    The scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) is an imaging 5-frequency radiometer flown on the Seasat and Nimbus-7 earth satellites launched in 1978. It measures dual-polarized microwave radiances from the earth's atmosphere and surface, primarily for the purpose of deriving global and nearly all-weather measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed, and atmospheric liquid water and water vapor. This paper describes the SMMR instrument and its calibration, antenna pattern measurements, and data processing procedures. Analysis of early data from the Seasat SMMR shows that the expected engineering performance in flight was achieved, and the measurement of sea surface temperature and wind speed with accuracies of 1.5 K and 2 m/s, respectively, may be achievable once the geophysical data processing algorithms and analysis have been completed.

  18. Modern average global sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    The data contained in this data set are derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature data (AVHRR MCSST), which are obtainable from the Distributed Active Archive Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. The JPL tapes contain weekly images of SST from October 1981 through December 1990 in nine regions of the world ocean: North Atlantic, Eastern North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Agulhas, Indian, Southeast Pacific, Southwest Pacific, Northeast Pacific, and Northwest Pacific. This data set represents the results of calculations carried out on the NOAA data and also contains the source code of the programs that made the calculations. The objective was to derive the average sea-surface temperature of each month and week throughout the whole 10-year series, meaning, for example, that data from January of each year would be averaged together. The result is 12 monthly and 52 weekly images for each of the oceanic regions. Averaging the images in this way tends to reduce the number of grid cells that lack valid data and to suppress interannual variability.

  19. Statistical Seasonal Sea Surface based Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Roberto; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Diouf, Ibrahima

    2014-05-01

    The interannual variability of the sea surface temperature (SST) plays a key role in the strongly seasonal rainfall regime on the West African region. The predictability of the seasonal cycle of rainfall is a field widely discussed by the scientific community, with results that fail to be satisfactory due to the difficulty of dynamical models to reproduce the behavior of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). To tackle this problem, a statistical model based on oceanic predictors has been developed at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid (UCM) with the aim to complement and enhance the predictability of the West African Monsoon (WAM) as an alternative to the coupled models. The model, called S4CAST (SST-based Statistical Seasonal Forecast) is based on discriminant analysis techniques, specifically the Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). Beyond the application of the model to the prediciton of rainfall in West Africa, its use extends to a range of different oceanic, atmospheric and helth related parameters influenced by the temperature of the sea surface as a defining factor of variability.

  20. Probing 'Parent Universe' in Loop Quantum Cosmology with B-mode Polarization in Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucky Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei

    2016-06-01

    We aim to use the observations of B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to probe the ‘parent universe’ under the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC). In particular, we investigate the possibility for the gravitational waves (GW) such as those from the stellar binary systems in the parent universe to survive the big bounce and thus to be still observable today. Our study is based on the background dynamics with the zeroth-order holonomy correction using the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We propose a new framework in which transfer functions are invoked to bring the GWs in the parent universe through the big bounce, inflation, and big bang to reach today. This transparent and intuitive formalism allows us to accurately discuss the influence of the GWs from the parent universe on the B-mode polarization in the CMB today under backgrounds of different LQC parameters. These features can soon be tested by the forth-coming CMB observations and we note that the LQC backgrounds with symmetric bouncing scenarios are ruled out by the latest observational results from Planck and BICEP2/Keck experiments.

  1. Determination of the Structure of the Coronal Magnetic Field Using Microwave Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogod, V. M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory motions and wave processes in active regions requires knowledge of the structure of the magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. We study the magnetic field structure of active regions at coronal heights, as they are determined by means of multiwave observations of polarized radio emission of active regions in the microwave range. Two methods, a stereoscopic method and the analysis of the radio spectrum are used. The method of stereoscopy rotation allows estimating the height of radio sources in a stable active region relative to the photosphere, based on its apparent motion in the image plane recorded over several days of observation. At various times one-dimensional scans at multiple frequencies spanning the 5.98 - 15.95 GHz frequency range from the RATAN-600 instrument are used. The gyroresonance emission mechanism, which is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field strength, is applied to convert the radio source estimated heights at various frequencies, h(f), to information as regards magnetic field vs. height, B(h). Diagrams of longitude - height of some polarized radio sources revealed multiple reversals, suggestive of a spiral magnetic structure. In all cases, the magnetic field strength maintains high values (800 - 1000 G) at the highest altitudes analysed, which reflects a relatively weak divergence in the field of magnetic flux tubes (in the height range 8 - 14 Mm) responsible for the main part of the radio emission of active regions.

  2. Isotropy-violation diagnostics for B-mode polarization foregrounds to the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotti, Aditya; Huffenberger, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Isotropy-violation statistics can highlight polarized galactic foregrounds that contaminate primordial B-modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We propose a particular isotropy-violation test and apply it to polarized Planck 353 GHz data, constructing a map that indicates B-mode foreground dust power over the sky. We build our main isotropy test in harmonic space via the bipolar spherical harmonic basis, and our method helps us to identify the least-contaminated directions. By this measure, there are regions of low foreground in and around the BICEP field, near the South Galactic Pole, and in the Northern Galactic Hemisphere. There is also a possible foreground feature in the BICEP field. We compare our results to those based on the local power spectrum, which is computed on discs using a version of the method of Planck Int. XXX (2016). The discs method is closely related to our isotropy-violation diagnostic. We pay special care to the treatment of noise, including chance correlations with the foregrounds. Currently we use our isotropy tool to assess the cleanest portions of the sky, but in the future such methods will allow isotropy-based null tests for foreground contamination in maps purported to measure primordial B-modes, particularly in cases of limited frequency coverage.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9 T using a novel 250 GHz gyrotron microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, V. S.; Farrar, C. T.; Hornstein, M. K.; Mastovsky, I.; Vieregg, J.; Bryant, J.; Eléna, B.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9 T (250 GHz for g = 2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170 ± 50 have been observed in 1- 13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20 K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of ˜17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C- 13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U- 13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments.

  4. High-fidelity spatial and polarization addressing of +43Ca qubits using near-field microwave control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aude Craik, D. P. L.; Linke, N. M.; Sepiol, M. A.; Harty, T. P.; Goodwin, J. F.; Ballance, C. J.; Stacey, D. N.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.; Allcock, D. T. C.

    2017-02-01

    Individual addressing of qubits is essential for scalable quantum computation. Spatial addressing allows unlimited numbers of qubits to share the same frequency, while enabling arbitrary parallel operations. We demonstrate addressing of long-lived +43Ca "atomic clock" qubits held in separate zones (960 μ m apart) of a microfabricated surface trap with integrated microwave electrodes. Such zones could form part of a "quantum charge-coupled device" architecture for a large-scale quantum information processor. By coherently canceling the microwave field in one zone we measure a ratio of Rabi frequencies between addressed and nonaddressed qubits of up to 1400, from which we calculate a spin-flip probability on the qubit transition of the nonaddressed ion of 1.3 ×10-6 . Off-resonant excitation then becomes the dominant error process, at around 5 ×10-3 . It can be prevented either by working at higher magnetic field, or by polarization control of the microwave field. We implement polarization control with error 2 ×10-5 , which would suffice to suppress off-resonant excitation to the ˜10-9 level if combined with spatial addressing. Such polarization control could also enable fast microwave operations.

  5. The Aquarius Mission: Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, Chester; Chao, Y.; deCharon, A.; Edelstein, W.; Hildebrand, P.; Lagerloef, G.; LeVine, D.; Pellerano, F.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Ruf, C.

    2001-01-01

    Aquarius is a new satellite mission concept to study the impact of the global water cycle on the ocean, including the response of the ocean to buoyancy forcing and the subsequent feedback of the ocean on the climate. The measurement objective of Aquarius is sea surface salinity, which reflects the concentration of freshwater at the ocean surface. Salinity affects the dielectric constant of sea water and, consequently, the radiometric emission of the sea surface to space. Rudimentary space observations with an L-band radiometer were first made from Skylab in the mid-70s and numerous aircraft missions of increasing quality and improved technology have been conducted since then. Technology is now available to carry out a global mission, which includes both an accurate L band (1.413 Ghz) radiometer and radar system in space and a global array of in situ observations for calibration and validation, in order to address key NASA Earth Science Enterprise questions about the global cycling of water and the response of the ocean circulation to climate change. The key scientific objectives of Aquarius examine the cycling of water at the ocean's surface, the response of the ocean circulation to buoyancy forcing, and the impact of buoyancy forcing on the ocean's thermal feedback to the climate. Global surface salinity will also improve our ability to model the surface solubility chemistry needed to estimate the air-sea exchange of CO2. In order to meet these science objectives, the NASA Salinity Sea Ice Working Group over the past three years has concluded that the mission measurement goals should be better than 0.2 practical salinity units (psu) accuracy, 100 km resolution, and weekly to revisits. The Aquarius mission proposes to meet these measurement requirements through a real aperture dual-polarized L band radiometer and radar system. This system can achieve the less than 0.1 K radiometric temperature measurement accuracy that is required. A 3 m antenna at approx. 600km

  6. Improved Sea Surface Salinity Retrievals using Ancillary data for Aquarius Ocean Roughness Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.; Hejazin, Y.; Rabollii, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D sea surface salinity (SSS) measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is a combined L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which derives SSS from ocean surface brightness temperature (Tb) measurements. This paper deals with a method of improving AQ SSS by making a making an ocean roughness brightness temperature correction (ΔTbr). The ΔTbr is derived using several ancillary data sources of surface wind measurements, namely; NOAA numerical weather model - Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS), WindSat ocean vector wind, and the CONAE Microwave Radiometer (MWR). The basis of the correction is the excess (warming) brightness temperature that is produced when the ocean is roughened by the surface wind. We model the increase in L-band Tb as a function of wind speed and direction relative to the antenna azimuth look direction. Our radiative transfer model by El-Nimri [2010] has been tuned to actual AQ ocean surface Tb's with corresponding surface wind vector. Using this ocean emissivity model and the ancillary wind vector, we derive the roughness correction, ΔTbr, which is applied to the AQ measured ocean surface Tb before retrieving SSS. Finally the effect of ΔTbr is evaluated by computing the difference between the HYCOM ocean salinity model and the AQ retrievals. These differences are cross correlated with the ancillary surface wind vector to assess the effectiveness of the roughness correction. Finally, we compare our ΔTbr with the AQ scatterometer derived ΔTbr. We compare the similarities and differenced versus the ancillary surface wind speed. S. El-Nimri et al., 2010, "An improved C-band ocean surface emissivity model at hurricane force wind speeds over a wide range of earth incidence angles," IEEE Geosci. Rem. Sens. Letters, vol. 7, NO. 4, October.

  7. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  8. Sea surface wind stress in stratified atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the wind shear stress on the sea surface as well as the velocity profile in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over wind waves by using similarity theory. For a given geostrophic velocity, Coriolis parameter, spectral peak period and stratification parameter the sea surface shear stress is determined. Further, the direction of the sea surface shear stress and the velocity profile are given. Parameterizations of the results are also presented. Finally, the engineering relevance of the results is discussed.

  9. Hierarchical Phased Array Antenna Focal Plane for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Sub-mm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian

    -IDS and in space on the LiteBIRD CMB polarization mission. The deliverables for the proposed work include: *Fabrication and test of a sinuous-antenna-based pixel with a 5:1 total bandwidth. Separate pixels will be built that are sensitive down to 30 GHz and others that are sensitive up to 400 GHz to cover the full range required for CMB measurements and to push into the sub-mm wavelength range. The efficiency of these pixels will be maximized by introducing a low loss silicon nitride insulator layer in all of the transmission lines. *Hierarchical phased arrays that use up to five levels of arraying will be fabricated and tested. The hierarchical phased array approaches the optimal mapping speed (sensitivity) at all frequencies by adjusting the beam size of the array with frequency. *We will develop 3 and 5 layer anti-reflection coatings using a new ``thermal spray" technique that we have developed which heats ceramics and plastics to melting temperature an then sprays them on optical surfaces with excellent uniformity and thickness control. The dielectric constant of each layer can be adjusted by choosing mixing ratios of high and low dielectric constant materials. Prioritization committees including the Astro2010 decadal, Quarks to Cosmos, and Weiss Committee have strongly advocated for prioritizing Cosmic Microwave Background polarization measurements and other science goals in the mm and sub-mm wavelength regime. The technology we propose to develop has the potential to greatly increase the cost effectiveness of potential missions in this frequency range. We have assembled an experienced team that includes expertise in antenna design, RF superconducting circuits, microfabrication, and CMB observations. Our team includes detector and/or CMB observation experts Bill Holzapfel, Adrian Lee, Akito Kusaka, and Aritoki Suzuki.

  10. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Satellite monitoring of sea surface pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, G.; Telfer, D. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Image processing techniques developed are well adapted to the exploration and isolation of local areas which exhibit small temperature differences between themselves and their surroundings. In the worst case of imagery of small areal extent of sea surface having no coastal boundary in the area, there is yet no method of distinguishing unambiguously an oil spill from fog, cloud, the effect produced by shallow sediments, or the effects of naturally occuring thermal fronts. In the case of uniform slicks of liquid North Sea oil in still air, laboratory simulation experiments show that, for oil thicknesses in excess of 1 or 2 mm, there is, under equilibrium conditions, little dependence of oil surface temperature on the thickness of the oil layer. The surface temperature of oil is consistently higher than that of water, the difference being about 1 K at low values of relative humidity, but tending to increase as the relative humidity increases.

  12. Recent advance in Mean Sea Surface estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, M. I.; Gerald, D.; Claire, D.; Raynal, M.; Faugere, Y.; Picot, N.; Guillot, A.

    2016-12-01

    Gridded Mean Sea Surface (MSS) estimate is an important issue for precise SLA computation along geodetic orbits. Previous studies emphasized that the error from MSS models older than Jason-1 GM was substantial: on average more than 10 to 15% of the SLA variance for wavelengths ranging from 30 to 150 km. Other MSS have been released this last 2 years, and they use geodetic missions such as CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 GM which strongly contribute to improve their resolution and accuracy.We evaluate in this paper the improvements of the recent MSS. This study, mainly based on spectral approach allows us to quantify the errors at various wavelengths. The use of new missions (e.g. SARAL-DP/AltiKa; Sentinel-3A) with low instrumental noise measurement levels (Ka, SAR) opens new perspectives to understand the MSS errors and improve MSS estimate for wavelengths lower than 100km.

  13. Sea surface temperatures from VAS MSI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is developed for estimating sea surface temperatures from multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder on the geostationary GOES satellites. Theoretical regression equations for two and three infrared window channels are empirically tuned using clear field of view satellite radiances matched with reports of SST from NOAA fixed environmental buoys. The empirical regression equations are then used to produce daily regional analyses of SST. Monthly mean SST's for the western North Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific during March and July 1982 were produced for use in the SST Intercomparison Workshop Series. Workshop results showed VAS SST's have a scatter of 0.8-1.0 C and a slight warm bias with respect to the other measurements of SST. The VAS SST's show no discernible bias in the region of El Chichon volcanic aerosol cloud.

  14. Improved dark energy detection through the polarization-assisted cross correlation of the cosmic microwave background with radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ng, Kin-Wang; Pen, Ue-Li

    2011-03-15

    Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect can be estimated by cross-correlating the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky with tracers of the local matter distribution. At late cosmic time, the dark energy-induced decay of gravitation potential generates a cross correlation signal on large angular scales. The dominant noise is the intrinsic CMB anisotropies from the inflationary epoch. In this paper we use CMB polarization to reduce this intrinsic noise. We cross-correlate the microwave sky observed by Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) with the radio source catalog compiled by NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) to study the efficiency of the noise suppression. We find that the error bars are reduced by about 4 to 14% and the statistical power in the signal is improved.

  15. Achieving the interfacial polarization on C/Fe3C heterojunction structures for highly efficient lightweight microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Liu, Wei; Quan, Bin; Ji, Guangbin; Ma, Jianna; Li, Daoran; Meng, Wei

    2017-12-15

    Design of dielectric/magnetic heterostructure and multiple interfaces is a challenge for the microwave absorption. Thus, in this study, a novel C/Fe3C nanocomposites have been fabricated by annealing the precursors obtained by the facile chemical blowing of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and Fe(NO3)3·9H2O. By changing the content of Fe(NO3)3·9H2O, the honeycomb-like structure with scads of pores and electromagnetic parameters could be successfully tailored. When the addition of Fe(NO3)3·9H2O is ranging from 1 to 2g, honeycomb-structured nanocomposites possess high performance microwave absorption when mixed with 90wt% paraffin. The minimal reflection loss is -37.4dB at 13.6GHz and effective bandwidth can reach to 5.6GHz when the thickness is 2.0mm, indicating its great potential in microwave absorbing field. Its outstanding microwave performance is tightly related to the porous structure and substantial interface such as carbon/air and carbon/Fe3C, which are in favor of the impedance matching and interfacial polarization. Thus, our study may provide a good reference for the facile synthesis of light-weight carbon-based nanocomposites with effective interfacial polarization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. On discrimination between film slicks and "look-alikes" on the sea surface in multifrequency radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergievskaya, Irina; Ermakov, Stanislav A.; Kapustin, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Slicks on the sea surface are characterized by attenuation of short wind waves and appear in radar imagery at moderate incidence angles as areas of reduced intensity. In the proximity of oil platforms, ship routes, fish farms, etc. marine slicks are often identified as oil spills or biogenic films. However, probability of false alarm when detecting film slicks is very high because of the occurrence of structures in radar images looking similar but not related to surface films ("lookalikes"). One of the most frequent "look-alikes" is wind depression areas (WDAs) where the wind excitation of short surface waves is reduced compared to the ambient background. Results of field observations of films slicks and WDA are described and differences in character of wind wave attenuation in different parts of the wind wave spectrum are revealed. Model calculations of wave damping degree (contrast) in film slick and in WDA are carried out and are shown to be in general agreement with experiment. Capabilities of dual-polarization and multi-band microwave radar for discrimination between film slicks and "look-alikes" are analyzed based on experiment and model results.

  17. Evidence for gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background polarization from cross-correlation with the cosmic infrared background.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Borys, C; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-04-04

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.

  18. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field From Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    The primary focus of this project was on the estimation of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. This effort is directly related to an attempt to describe the mechanisms which give rise to observed SST and its variability on seasonal and inter-annual timescales, its relation to ocean-atmosphere interaction, and the dynamical coupling between the ocean mixed layer and the deep interior ocean. This is one of the fundamental climate related questions being pursued currently under the CLIVAR Program. Because of the strong turbulent mixing associated with atmospheric fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater through the sea surface, the ocean forms a shallow surface boundary layer, the mixed layer which is largely homogeneous in its constituents. The relation between the temperature of the remotely sensed "skin" and the bulk of the mixed layer is largely understood (Reynolds and Smith 1994; Emery et al., 1995). However, because the surface mixed layer is effectively decoupled from the underlying ocean dynamics, an interpretation of satellite SST observations in isolation and in direct use for dynamical studies is very difficult. As a result, the impact of SST data on the understanding of ocean variability.

  19. Multisensor monitoring of sea surface state of the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Mityagina, Marina; Bocharova, Tatina

    Results of many-year monitoring of the state of coastal zone based on a multisensor approach are presented. The monitoring is aimed at solving the following tasks: operational mapping of parameters characterizing the state and pollution (coastal, ship and biogenic) of water; analysis of meteorological state and its effect on the drift and spread of pollutants; study of coastal circulation patterns and their impact on the drift and spread of pollutants; deriving typical pollution distribution patterns in the coastal zone.Processing and analysis is performed using data in visual, infrared and microwave ranges from ERS-2 SAR, Envisat ASAR/MERIS, Terra and Aqua MODIS and NOAA AVHRR instruments. These are complimented with ground data from meteorological stations on the shore and results of satellite data processing of previous periods. The main regions of interest are the Russian sectors of the Black and Azov Seas, southeastern part of the Baltic Sea, and northern and central regions of the Caspian Sea. Adjacent coasts are extremely populated and have well-developed industry, agriculture and rapidly growing tourist sectors. The necessity of constant monitoring of the sea state there is obvious.The monitoring activities allow us to accumulate extensive material for the study of hydrodynamic processes in the regions, in particular water circulation. Detailing the occurrence, evolution and drift of smalland meso-scale vortex structures is crucial for the knowledge of the mechanisms determining mixing and circulation processes in the coastal zone. These mechanisms play an important role in ecological, hydrodynamic and meteorological status of a coastal zone. Special attention is paid to the sea surface state in the Kerch Strait, where a tanker catastrophe took place on November 11, 2007 causing a spillage of over 1.5 thousand tons of heavy oil. The Kerch Strait is characterized by a complex current system with current directions changing to their opposites depending on

  20. Litmus Test for Cosmic Hemispherical Asymmetry in the Cosmic Microwave Background B -Mode Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Recent measurements of the temperature field of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide tantalizing evidence for violation of statistical isotropy (SI) that constitutes a fundamental tenet of contemporary cosmology. CMB space based missions, WMAP, and Planck have observed a 7% departure in the SI temperature field at large angular scales. However, due to higher cosmic variance at low multipoles, the significance of this measurement is not expected to improve from any future CMB temperature measurements. We demonstrate that weak lensing of the CMB due to scalar perturbations produces a corresponding SI violation in B modes of CMB polarization at smaller angular scales. The measurability of this phenomenon depends upon the scales (l range) over which power asymmetry is present. Power asymmetry, which is restricted only to l <64 in the temperature field, cannot lead to any significant observable effect from this new window. However, this effect can put an independent bound on the spatial range of scales of hemispherical asymmetry present in the scalar sector.

  1. Litmus Test for Cosmic Hemispherical Asymmetry in the Cosmic Microwave Background B-Mode Polarization.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-03

    Recent measurements of the temperature field of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide tantalizing evidence for violation of statistical isotropy (SI) that constitutes a fundamental tenet of contemporary cosmology. CMB space based missions, WMAP, and Planck have observed a 7% departure in the SI temperature field at large angular scales. However, due to higher cosmic variance at low multipoles, the significance of this measurement is not expected to improve from any future CMB temperature measurements. We demonstrate that weak lensing of the CMB due to scalar perturbations produces a corresponding SI violation in B modes of CMB polarization at smaller angular scales. The measurability of this phenomenon depends upon the scales (l range) over which power asymmetry is present. Power asymmetry, which is restricted only to l<64 in the temperature field, cannot lead to any significant observable effect from this new window. However, this effect can put an independent bound on the spatial range of scales of hemispherical asymmetry present in the scalar sector.

  2. A triple-band, polarization- and incident angle-independent microwave metamaterial absorber with interference theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junfeng; Hu, Zhaoyang; Wang, Shengming; Huang, Xiutao; Liu, Minghai

    2016-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of an ultrathin triple-band metamaterial absorber (MMA) in the microwave frequencies. The unit cell of the MMA consists of three different sizes of electric split ring resonators (eSRRs) and continuous metal film separated by only 1 mm dielectric substrate. The single-band MMA of this structure is firstly investigated. Then, by tuning the scale factor of the unit cells, the proposed triple-band MMA achieves absorption peaks at 9.85 GHz, 13.05 GHz and 14.93 GHz, respectively. Electric field distributions at three resonant frequencies are investigated to qualitatively analyze the loss mechanism. The further simulated and experimental results indicate that the proposed MMA is also polarization- and incident angle-independent. Finally, the interference theory is introduced to quantitatively analyze the MMA, which provides good insight into the physics behind the absorbing structure. To calculate the absorption rates accurately, we employ a simulation strategy make the near-field coupling between two metallic layers get back (compensation method). The measured absorption spectra show an excellent agreement with the theoretical calculation and simulation results. Therefore, the explanation to the physical mechanism of the triple-band MMA is presented and verified.

  3. Robust likelihoods for inflationary gravitational waves from maps of cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Watts, Duncan J.

    2016-09-01

    The B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background provides a unique window into tensor perturbations from inflationary gravitational waves. Survey effects complicate the estimation and description of the power spectrum on the largest angular scales. The pixel-space likelihood yields parameter distributions without the power spectrum as an intermediate step, but it does not have the large suite of tests available to power spectral methods. Searches for primordial B -modes must rigorously reject and rule out contamination. Many forms of contamination vary or are uncorrelated across epochs, frequencies, surveys, or other data treatment subsets. The cross power and the power spectrum of the difference of subset maps provide approaches to reject and isolate excess variance. We develop an analogous joint pixel-space likelihood. Contamination not modeled in the likelihood produces parameter-dependent bias and complicates the interpretation of the difference map. We describe a null test that consistently weights the difference map. Excess variance should either be explicitly modeled in the covariance or be removed through reprocessing the data.

  4. Ratchet effect study in Si/SiGe heterostructures in the presence of asymmetrical antidots for different polarizations of microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisotto, Isabelle; Kannan, Ethirajulu S.; Portal, Jean-Claude; Brown, Devin; Beck, Thomas J.; Krupko, Yuriy; Jalabert, Laurent; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Hoshi, Yusuke; Shiraki, Yasuhiro; Saraya, Takura

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we studied the photovoltage response of an antidot lattice to microwave radiation for different antidot parameters. The study was carried out in a Si/SiGe heterostructure by illuminating the antidot lattice with linearly polarized microwaves and recording the polarity of induced photovoltage for different angles of incidence. Our study revealed that with increased antidot density and etching depth, the polarity of induced photovoltage changed when the angle of incidence was rotated 90 degrees. In samples with large antidot density and/or a deeply etched antidot lattice, scattering was dominated by electron interaction with the asymmetrical potential created by semicircular antidots. The strong electron-electron interaction prevailed in other cases. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of interaction between microwaves and electrons in an antidot lattice, which is the key for developing an innovative ratchet-based device. Moreover, we present an original and fundamental example of antidot lattice etching through the use of a two-dimensional electron gas. This system deals with a hole lattice instead of an electron depletion in the antidot lattice region.

  5. Ratchet effect study in Si/SiGe heterostructures in the presence of asymmetrical antidots for different polarizations of microwaves.

    PubMed

    Bisotto, Isabelle; Kannan, Ethirajulu S; Portal, Jean-Claude; Brown, Devin; Beck, Thomas J; Krupko, Yuriy; Jalabert, Laurent; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Hoshi, Yusuke; Shiraki, Yasuhiro; Saraya, Takura

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we studied the photovoltage response of an antidot lattice to microwave radiation for different antidot parameters. The study was carried out in a Si/SiGe heterostructure by illuminating the antidot lattice with linearly polarized microwaves and recording the polarity of induced photovoltage for different angles of incidence. Our study revealed that with increased antidot density and etching depth, the polarity of induced photovoltage changed when the angle of incidence was rotated 90 degrees. In samples with large antidot density and/or a deeply etched antidot lattice, scattering was dominated by electron interaction with the asymmetrical potential created by semicircular antidots. The strong electron-electron interaction prevailed in other cases. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of interaction between microwaves and electrons in an antidot lattice, which is the key for developing an innovative ratchet-based device. Moreover, we present an original and fundamental example of antidot lattice etching through the use of a two-dimensional electron gas. This system deals with a hole lattice instead of an electron depletion in the antidot lattice region.

  6. A multispectral method of determining sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A multispectral method for determining sea surface temperatures is discussed. The specifications of the equipment and the atmospheric conditions required for successful multispectral data acquisition are described. Examples of data obtained in the North Atlantic Ocean are presented. The differences between the actual sea surface temperatures and the equivalent blackbody temperatures as determined by a radiometer are plotted.

  7. Making maps of cosmic microwave background polarization for B-mode studies: the POLARBEAR example

    DOE PAGES

    Poletti, Davide; Fabbian, Giulio; Le Jeune, Maude; ...

    2017-03-30

    Analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) datasets typically requires some filtering of the raw time-ordered data. For instance, in the context of ground-based observations, filtering is frequently used to minimize the impact of low frequency noise, atmospheric contributions and/or scan synchronous signals on the resulting maps. In this paper, we have explicitly constructed a general filtering operator, which can unambiguously remove any set of unwanted modes in the data, and then amend the map-making procedure in order to incorporate and correct for it. We show that such an approach is mathematically equivalent to the solution of a problem in whichmore » the sky signal and unwanted modes are estimated simultaneously and the latter are marginalized over. We investigated the conditions under which this amended map-making procedure can render an unbiased estimate of the sky signal in realistic circumstances. We then discuss the potential implications of these observations on the choice of map-making and power spectrum estimation approaches in the context of B-mode polarization studies. Specifically, we have studied the effects of time-domain filtering on the noise correlation structure in the map domain, as well as impact it may haveon the performance of the popular pseudo-spectrum estimators. We conclude that although maps produced by the proposed estimators arguably provide the most faithful representation of the sky possible given the data, they may not straightforwardly lead to the best constraints on the power spectra of the underlying sky signal and special care may need to be taken to ensure this is the case. By contrast, simplified map-makers which do not explicitly correct for time-domain filtering, but leave it to subsequent steps in the data analysis, may perform equally well and be easier and faster to implement. We focused on polarization-sensitive measurements targeting the B-mode component of the CMB signal and apply the proposed methods to

  8. Making maps of cosmic microwave background polarization for B-mode studies: the POLARBEAR example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Davide; Fabbian, Giulio; Le Jeune, Maude; Peloton, Julien; Arnold, Kam; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Beckman, Shawn; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Ducout, Anne; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Groh, John; Hall, Grantland; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jeong, Oliver; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T.; Leon, David; Linder, Eric; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Navaroli, Martin; Paar, Hans; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ross, Colin; Siritanasak, Praween; Stebor, Nathan; Steinbach, Bryan; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant; Whitehorn, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) datasets typically requires some filtering of the raw time-ordered data. For instance, in the context of ground-based observations, filtering is frequently used to minimize the impact of low frequency noise, atmospheric contributions and/or scan synchronous signals on the resulting maps. In this work we have explicitly constructed a general filtering operator, which can unambiguously remove any set of unwanted modes in the data, and then amend the map-making procedure in order to incorporate and correct for it. We show that such an approach is mathematically equivalent to the solution of a problem in which the sky signal and unwanted modes are estimated simultaneously and the latter are marginalized over. We investigated the conditions under which this amended map-making procedure can render an unbiased estimate of the sky signal in realistic circumstances. We then discuss the potential implications of these observations on the choice of map-making and power spectrum estimation approaches in the context of B-mode polarization studies. Specifically, we have studied the effects of time-domain filtering on the noise correlation structure in the map domain, as well as impact it may haveon the performance of the popular pseudo-spectrum estimators. We conclude that although maps produced by the proposed estimators arguably provide the most faithful representation of the sky possible given the data, they may not straightforwardly lead to the best constraints on the power spectra of the underlying sky signal and special care may need to be taken to ensure this is the case. By contrast, simplified map-makers which do not explicitly correct for time-domain filtering, but leave it to subsequent steps in the data analysis, may perform equally well and be easier and faster to implement. We focused on polarization-sensitive measurements targeting the B-mode component of the CMB signal and apply the proposed methods to realistic

  9. Interpretation of Polarization Features in Ground-Based Microwave Observations as Caused by Horizontally Aligned Oblate Raindrops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekala, Harald; Crewell, Susanne; Simmer, Clemens; Thiele, Ariane; Hornbostel, Achim; Schroth, Arno

    2001-11-01

    Based on a comparison of ground-based radiometer measurements with microwave radiative transfer calculations, it is shown that raindrops with an oblate shape and a preferred horizontal orientation have a significant effect on microwave polarization signals when compared with spherical particle shape. Measurements with a dual-polarized 19-GHz radiometer reveal a polarization difference of as much as 18 K in the downwelling microwave radiation at 30° elevation angle. Averaging all rain observations within 19 months leads to a signal of 6 K. Model calculations covering roughly the same range of weather conditions as that inferred from the meteorological data recorded with the radiometer measurements were carried out with spherical raindrop shape and an oblate particle shape with a fixed horizontal alignment. From the model results, positive polarization difference is expected for spherical particles. This signal was never observed in the recorded data. For oblate drops, the averaged model results lead to a polarization difference of 8 K, which is in reasonable agreement with the long-term averaged observations. Case studies that compare isolated rain events usually lead to a better match of model and observations. However, there are some major discrepancies in some cases. Possible reasons for the remaining differences are the short-term variations in the cloud microphysics for which the model does not correctly account, such as variations in the melting layer, drop oscillations, or variations in the drop size distribution or angular distribution of the drop alignment. Three-dimensional effects are also important when observing small-scale heavy precipitation. Despite remaining small uncertainties, the comparison presents strong evidence that the oblate raindrop shape, with fixed horizontal alignment, is by far the better choice for accurate radiative transfer calculations than is the spherical shape. The omission of this shape effect can cause significant errors when

  10. Low-frequency microwave radiometer for N-ROSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Lo, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The all weather, global determination of sea surface temperature (SST) has been identified as a requirement needed to support naval operations. The target SST accuracy is + or - 1.0 K with a surface resolution of 10 km. Investigations of the phenomenology and technology of remote passive microwave sensing of the ocean environment over the past decade have demonstrated that this objective is presently attainable. Preliminary specification and trade off studies were conducted to define the frequency, polarization, scan geometry, antenna size, and other esstential parameters of the low frequency microwave radiometer (LFMR). It will be a dual polarized, dual frequency system at 5.2 and 10.4 GHz using a 4.9 meter deployable mesh surface antenna. It is to be flown on the Navy-Remote Ocean Sensing System (N-ROSS) satellite scheduled to be launched in late 1988.

  11. Mapping photosynthetically available radiation at the sea surface using GOCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongkuk; Kim, Jihye; Yang, Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Eon; Frouin, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) controls the composition of marine ecosystem by affecting the growth of phytoplankton, thus estimating PAR at the ocean surface accurately is important to understand the marine ecological environment. Although many studies have been attempted to estimate PAR employing ocean colour satellite data since 2003, previous studies using data from the polar orbit systems had spatial and temporal limitations to estimate accurate daily PAR. Here, we estimate daily PAR from Geostationary Ocean Colour Imager (GOCI) which collects data eight times a day at an hour interval in daytime and compare it with in-situ measurement and MODIS-based daily PAR. The algorithm we developed in this study, employed GOCI visible bands (centred at (412, 443, 490, 555, 660, 680 nm) which belongs to the range of PAR by calculating albedo at the layer of clouds and the sea surface to estimate daily PAR. The resultant value was validated by comparing the in-situ measurements acquired from an ocean research station, Socheongcho between February and May 2015, which showed a similar pattern with somewhat GOCI-base PAR's overestimations. The comparison with the results from MODIS, a polar orbit system showed that a good agreement with each other was illustrated at clear sky conditions, while MODIS showed some over- or underestimations at cloudy conditions with irregular patterns. This study shows that GOCI can estimate effectively the daily PAR with its advantages of acquiring data more frequently than other polar orbit ocean colour satellites by reducing the uncertainties induced by insufficient images to map the daily PAR at ocean surface.

  12. Improving the Arctic Mean Sea Surface with CryoSat-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, L.; Andersen, O. B.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental basis for estimating short and long-term changes in the sea surface is a reliable mean sea surface (MSS). Existing MSS models, derived from satellite radar altimetry, generally lack observations above 82 degrees latitude making high Arctic sea surface change estimates unreliable. Most current MSS models use ICESat data, geoid models, ocean circulation models, or a combination of these to extrapolate the MSS above 82 degrees latitude. This approach makes the MSS models unsuited for deriving sea surface anomalies from short-term observations like airborne campaigns (e.g. operation IceBridge). The new state of the art DTU13MSS is a global high-resolution MSS that includes retracked CryoSat-2 data and thereby extends the polar data coverage up to 88 degrees latitude. Furthermore, in the sea-ice covered areas, the SAR and SARin feature of the altimeter on-board CryoSat-2 increases the amount of useable observations dramatically compared to conventional altimeters like ENVISAT and ERS-1/2. Finally the continuous time-series, below 82 degrees latitude, has been extended to cover more than 20 years compared to the 17 years use for the DTU10MSS model. A comparison between DTU13MSS and DTU10MSS show an improvement of more than 20 cm between 82 and 88 degrees latitude. For the first time the three years of retracked CryoSat-2 data will, in combination with DTU13MSS, allow reliable estimation of the trend and annual variations in the high Arctic Ocean sea surface height.

  13. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  14. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    Satellites now play an increasing role in systematic monitoring of the global oceans. Measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) are of primary importance in understanding heat storage and transport within the ocean and cross the ocean-atmosphere boundary. In some regions, local changes in SST of only 1 to 2 C have major effects on global climate and weather patterns. The satellite measurements provide a data base complementary to the (sometimes) accurate but sparsely-distributed point measurements available from ships and buoys. The demands placed on satellite sensors are stringent. Accuracies of better than 1 C are required and are often desired to a few tenths of a degree. Furthermore, measurement accuracies must be stable spatially and temporally in order for satellite data to be used with confidence in models of air-sea interaction and climate. There now exists a need to evaluate objectively the performance of the latest generation of sensors under a sufficient variety of environmental conditions to indicate present accuracies, deficiencies, and potential for improvement.

  15. On the performance of telemedicine system using 17-GHz orthogonally polarized microwave links under the influence of heavy rainfall.

    PubMed

    Fong, Bernard; Fong, A C M; Hong, G Y

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes the design of a telemedicine system based on next-generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) operating at 17 GHz. Seventeen gigahertz is proposed for next-generation WLAN services offering numerous advantages over traditional IEEE 802.11 networks that operate in the range of 2.4-5 GHz. Orthogonal polarization is often used to increase spectrum efficiency by utilizing signal paths of horizontal and vertical polarization. Radio waves exceeding 10 GHz are particularly vulnerable to signal degradation under the influence of rain which causes an effective reduction in isolation between polarized signal paths. This paper investigates the influence of heavy rain in a tropical region on wide-band microwave signals at 17 GHz using two links provided by a fixed broad-band wireless access system for two-way data exchange between paramedics attending an accident scene and the hospital via microwave equipment installed in the ambulance. We also study the effects of cross polarization and phase rotation due to persistent heavy rainfall in tropical regions.

  16. Frequency-dependence of the linear-polarization-angle phase-shift in the microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han-Chun; Samaraweera, Rasanga; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh

    High-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunctions subjected to microwave photoexcitation in the perpendicular magnetic field configuration exhibit ¼-cycle phase-shifted oscillatory magnetoresistance and zero-resistance states at low magnetic fields or high filling factors. Recent studies showed that the amplitude of oscillatory magnetoresistance is polarization-angle sensitive and can be described by a fitting formula, Rxx(θ) = A+/-Ccos2(θ- θ0) with diagonal resistance, Rxx, polarization angle θ, and the extracted phase shift, θ0. Previous works have demonstrated that θ0 is frequency-dependent by investigating some specific frequencies. Here, we examine the continuous variation of θ0 with frequency over the bands, 36-40 GHz and 45-49 GHz. Surprisingly, the results indicate dissimilar θ0 variation within the two frequency bands. A comparison of θ0(f) with the microwave polarization reported by an in-situ polarization sensor suggests that the frequency variation of θ0 might be caused by two different mechanisms in the two examined bands.

  17. Experimental evaluation of theoretical sea surface reflectance factors relevant to above-water radiometry.

    PubMed

    Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2016-03-21

    Determination of the water-leaving radiance LW through above-water radiometry requires knowledge of accurate reflectance factors ρ of the sea surface. Publicly available ρ relevant to above-water radiometry include theoretical data sets generated: i. by assuming a sky radiance distribution accounting for aerosols and multiple scattering, but neglecting polarization, and quantifying sea surface effects through Cox-Munk wave slope statistics; or differently ii. accounting for polarization, but assuming an ideal Rayleigh sky radiance distribution, and quantifying sea surface effects through modeled wave elevation and slope variance spectra. The impact on above-water data products of differences between those factors ρ was quantified through comparison of LW from the Ocean Color component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC) with collocated LW from in-water radiometry. Results from the analysis of radiance measurements from the sea performed with 40 degrees viewing angle and 90 degrees azimuth offset with respect to the sun plane, indicated a slightly better agreement between above- and in-water LW determined for wind speeds tentatively lower than 4 m s-1 with ρ computed accounting for aerosols, multiple scattering and Cox-Munk surfaces. Nevertheless, analyses performed by partitioning the investigated data set also indicated that actual ρ values would exhibit dependence on sun zenith comprised between those characterizing the two sets of reflectance factors.

  18. The Effect of Ocean Currents on Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Leeuwenburgh, Olwijn

    2000-01-01

    We investigate regional and global-scale correlations between observed anomalies in sea surface temperature and height. A strong agreement between the two fields is found over a broad range of latitudes for different ocean basins. Both time-longitude plots and wavenumber-frequency spectra suggest an advective forcing of SST anomalies by a first-mode baroclinic wave field on spatial scales down to 400 km and time scales as short as 1 month. Even though the magnitude of the mean background temperature gradient is determining for the effectiveness of the forcing, there is no obvious seasonality that can be detected in the amplitudes of SST anomalies. Instead, individual wave signatures in the SST can in some cases be followed over periods of two years. The phase relationship between SST and SSH anomalies is dependent upon frequency and wavenumber and displays a clear decrease of the phase lag toward higher latitudes where the two fields come into phase at low frequencies. Estimates of the damping coefficient are larger than generally obtained for a purely atmospheric feedback. From a global frequency spectrum a damping time scale of 2-3 month was found. Regionally results are very variable and range from 1 month near strong currents to 10 month at low latitudes and in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Strong agreement is found between the first global EOF modes of 10 day averaged and spatially smoothed SST and SSH grids. The accompanying time series display low frequency oscillations in both fields.

  19. SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Reeves, R.; Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.; Bronfman, L.; Church, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Gaier, T.; Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  20. Detecting chiral gravity with the pure pseudospectrum reconstruction of the cosmic microwave background polarized anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferté, A.; Grain, J.

    2014-05-01

    We consider the possible detection of parity violation at the linear level in gravity using polarized anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. Since such a parity violation would lead to nonzero temperature-B modes (TB) and E modes-B modes (EB) correlations, this makes those odd-parity angular power spectra a potential probe of parity violation in the gravitational sector. These spectra are modeled incorporating the impact of lensing and we explore their possible detection in the context of small-scale (balloon-borne or ground-based) experiments and a future satellite mission dedicated to B-mode detection. We assess the statistical uncertainties on their reconstruction using mode counting and a (more realistic) pure pseudospectrum estimator approach. Those uncertainties are then translated into constraints on the level of parity asymmetry. We found that detecting chiral gravity is impossible for ongoing small-scale experiments. However, for a satellite-like mission, a parity asymmetry of 50% could be detected at 68% of confidence level (C.L.) (at least, depending on the value of the tensor-to-scalar ratio), and a parity asymmetry of 100% is measurable with at least a confidence level of 95%. We also assess the impact of a possible miscalibration of the orientation of the polarized detectors, leading to spurious TB and EB cross correlations. We show that in the context of pseudospectrum estimation of the angular power spectra, self calibration of this angle could significantly reduce the statistical significance of the measured level of parity asymmetry (by e.g. a factor ˜2.4 for a miscalibration angle of 1 degree). For chiral gravity and assuming a satellite mission dedicated to primordial B mode, a nondetection of the TB and EB correlation would translate into an upper bound on parity violation of 39% at 95% confidence level for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of 0.2, excluding values of the (imaginary) Barbero-Immirzi parameter comprised between 0.2 and 4.9 at

  1. Silicon-based antenna-coupled polarization-sensitive millimeter-wave bolometer arrays for cosmic microwave background instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostem, Karwan; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Brown, Ari; Chang, Meng-Ping; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe A.; Costen, Nick; Denis, Kevin L.; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Hu, Ron; Marriage, Tobias A.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei

    2016-07-01

    We describe feedhorn-coupled polarization-sensitive detector arrays that utilize monocrystalline silicon as the dielectric substrate material. Monocrystalline silicon has a low-loss tangent and repeatable dielectric constant, characteristics that are critical for realizing efficient and uniform superconducting microwave circuits. An additional advantage of this material is its low specific heat. In a detector pixel, two Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers are antenna-coupled to in-band radiation via a symmetric planar orthomode transducer (OMT). Each orthogonal linear polarization is coupled to a separate superconducting microstrip transmission line circuit. On-chip filtering is employed to both reject out-of-band radiation from the upper band edge to the gap frequency of the niobium superconductor, and to flexibly define the bandwidth for each TES to meet the requirements of the application. The microwave circuit is compatible with multi-chroic operation. Metalized silicon platelets are used to define the backshort for the waveguide probes. This micro-machined structure is also used to mitigate the coupling of out-of-band radiation to the microwave circuit. At 40 GHz, the detectors have a measured efficiency of ˜90%. In this paper, we describe the development of the 90 GHz detector arrays that will be demonstrated using the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) ground-based telescope.

  2. The interaction of polarized microwaves with planar arrays of femtosecond laser-produced plasma filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, Anca; El Morsli, Mbark; Vidal, Francois; Payeur, Stephane; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Chateauneuf, Marc; Theberge, Francis; Dubois, Jacques

    2013-02-15

    The interaction of polarized microwaves with subwavelength arrays of parallel plasma filaments, such as those produced by the propagation of high-power femtosecond laser pulses in ambient air, was investigated by calculating the reflection and transmission coefficients as a function of the incidence angles using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The time evolution of these coefficients was calculated and compared with experiments. It is found that the plasma filaments array becomes transparent when the polarization of the microwave radiation is perpendicular to the filaments axis, regardless the incidence angle of the microwave with respect to the filaments, except near grazing incidence. Increasing the filaments electron density or diameter, or decreasing the electron collision frequency or filaments spacing, decreases the transmission and increases the reflection. Transmission decreases when increasing the number of filament layers while reflection remains unchanged as the number of filament layers exceeds a given number ({approx}3 in our case). Transmission slightly increases when disorder is introduced in the filament arrays. The detailed calculation results are compared with those obtained from the simple birefringent slab model, which provides a convenient framework to calculate approximately the properties of filament arrays.

  3. Investigation of electromagnetic backscattering from nearshore sea surfaces modulated by shoaling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, D.; Zhang, M.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) scattering features of radar scattered echoes from nearshore sea surfaces are investigated using the second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II). The joint influences of wind fetch and water depth on the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of and Doppler spectra for echoes from nearshore sea surfaces are mainly studied. The numerical results show that with a further increasing fetch, the excess of NRCS for small depth sea over that for deeper sea increases, and Doppler spectral features are also intensely influenced by nonlinear interactions between waves in the large wind fetch and small water depth marine environment. These both indicate that the effects of the finite depth are more prominent with increasing wind fetch, especially for HH polarization.

  4. Annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan observed by ASCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Y.; Shimada, S.; Ohsawa, T.; Kozai, K.; Kogaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface wind speeds and these statistics can be applied for many marine industrial activities. For example, the averaged wind speed is crucial information for a site selection of an offshore wind farm. It has widely been recognized that a total amount of the offshore wind generation is strongly depended on the annual average wind speeds. A advanced scatterometer (ASCAT), which is a kind of scatterometer aboard METOP-A and B, has observed sea surface wind speeds at the height of 10 m above the sea surface approximately twice a day using active microwaves. The annual average wind speed can be calculated from the observed wind speed. For an actual use of the annual average wind speed, generalities and representativeness of the wind speed must be clarified. To investigate annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan (120°E to 165°E, 19°N to 49°N), the annual average wind speeds and these standard deviations are calculated from 5 years of ASCAT observations from 2010 through 2014. It is found that there are some sea areas where standard deviations are relatively higher than their surroundings. Annual average wind speed maps indicate that the high standard deviation is caused by strong winds from Eurasia in the winter of 2011 in part of North Pacific Ocean and Sea of Okhotsk. Additionally standard deviations for only winter are also higher than for summer in those sea areas. Therefore the strong wind speed in the winter of a particular year can easily affect to the annual average wind speed. Meanwhile off the coast of Niigata and Hokkaido, there are also higher standard deviation areas than their surroundings. Differences between monthly maximum wind speeds for the winter and minimum wind speeds for the summer in these areas are larger and the large differences seem to be a cause of the high standard deviations.

  5. Novel wideband microwave polarization network using a fully-reconfigurable photonic waveguide interleaver with a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Beeker, Willem; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; van Dijk, Paulus; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2013-02-11

    We propose and demonstrate a novel wideband microwave photonic polarization network for dual linear-polarized antennas. The polarization network is based on a waveguide-implemented fully-reconfigurable optical interleaver using a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure. For microwave photonic signal processing, this structure is able to serve as a wideband 2 × 2 RF coupler with reconfigurable complex coefficients, and therefore can be used as a polarization network for wideband antennas. Such a device can equip the antennas with not only the polarization rotation capability for linear-polarization signals but also the capability to operate with and tune between two opposite circular polarizations. Operating together with a particular modulation scheme, the device is also able to serve for simultaneous feeding of dual-polarization signals. These photonic-implemented RF functionalities can be applied to wideband antenna systems to perform agile polarization manipulations and tracking operations. An example of such a interleaver has been realized in TriPleX waveguide technology, which was designed with a free spectral range of 20 GHz and a mask footprint of smaller than 1 × 1 cm. Using the realized device, the reconfigurable complex coefficients of the polarization network were demonstrated with a continuous bandwidth from 2 to 8 GHz and an in-band phase ripple of smaller than 5 degree. The waveguide structure of the device allows it to be further integrated with other functional building blocks of a photonic integrated circuit to realize on-chip, complex microwave photonic processors. Of particular interest, it can be included in an optical beamformer for phased array antennas, so that simultaneous wideband beam and polarization trackings can be achieved photonically. To our knowledge, this is the first-time on-chip demonstration of an integrated microwave photonic polarization network for dual linear-polarized antennas.

  6. Direct Sea Surface Height Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helber, R. W.; Smith, S. R.; Jacobs, G. A.; Barron, C. N.; Townsend, T. L.

    2016-02-01

    New methods are developed for assimilating satellite sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and velocity observations into a numerical ocean model of the Gulf of Mexico. Vertical correlations, derived from historical ocean profiles of temperature (T) and salinity (S), are used to relate T and S to geopotential (G) by integrating the specific volume anomaly vertical structure. The resulting vertical correlations (of T & T, T & S, T & G, S & S, etc.) are then used to assimilate SSHA and velocity observations by creating increments of subsurface T, S, and velocity. Velocity is related to G using the geostrophic relation. Since satellite derived SSHA observations are the most important data stream used to improve numerical ocean forecasts, this presentation will focus on SSHA data assimilation. The Naval Research Laboratory traditionally employs a method where SSHA data is used to create ocean synthetic subsurface profiles of T and S, which are then assimilated as observations in an ocean forecasting system. The latest version has a one-dimensional variational scheme based on historically observed ocean vertical correlations for T and S globally at ½ degree resolution. The new method uses these correlations directly within the 3DVAR Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation system, without making synthetics. The results from both assimilation methods will be compared and discussed. The velocities from these assimilation methods are validated relative to the 295 drifters deployed in July 2012 in the north-eastern Gulf of Mexico as part of the Gulf of Mexico Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD). This system will also utilized velocity data from the upcoming drifter deployment of the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER).

  7. A technique for measuring vertically and horizontally polarized microwave brightness temperatures using electronic polarization-basis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, Albin J.

    1992-01-01

    This technique for electronically rotating the polarization basis of an orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer is based on the measurement of the first three feedhorn Stokes parameters, along with the subsequent transformation of this measured Stokes vector into a rotated coordinate frame. The technique requires an accurate measurement of the cross-correlation between the two orthogonal feedhorn modes, for which an innovative polarized calibration load was developed. The experimental portion of this investigation consisted of a proof of concept demonstration of the technique of electronic polarization basis rotation (EPBR) using a ground based 90-GHz dual orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer. Practical calibration algorithms for ground-, aircraft-, and space-based instruments were identified and tested. The theoretical effort consisted of radiative transfer modeling using the planar-stratified numerical model described in Gasiewski and Staelin (1990).

  8. A Methodology for Surface Soil Moisture and Vegetation Optical Depth Retrieval Using the Microwave Polarization Difference Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, Manfred; deJeu, Richard; Walker, Jeffrey; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A methodology for retrieving surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth from satellite microwave radiometer data is presented. The procedure is tested with historical 6.6 GHz brightness temperature observations from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer over several test sites in Illinois. Results using only nighttime data are presented at this time, due to the greater stability of nighttime surface temperature estimation. The methodology uses a radiative transfer model to solve for surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth simultaneously using a non-linear iterative optimization procedure. It assumes known constant values for the scattering albedo and roughness. Surface temperature is derived by a procedure using high frequency vertically polarized brightness temperatures. The methodology does not require any field observations of soil moisture or canopy biophysical properties for calibration purposes and is totally independent of wavelength. Results compare well with field observations of soil moisture and satellite-derived vegetation index data from optical sensors.

  9. Modeling of the environmental factors influence on solar irradiance reflectance and transmittance through the wind-ruffled sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Slawomir B.

    1997-02-01

    The spectral model of solar irradiance transmittance through the wind - ruffled sea surface was developed. Modified dependencies for both wind - ruffled sea surface slope distribution based on Cox and Munk and foam coverage of the sea surface based on Gordon and Jacobs were used, with incorporation of effects of hydrometeorological factors and basin geometry. Snell and Fresnel laws were applied for light transmission through the surface. Spectral dependencies of light refraction in the range 350-18000 nm were taken into account. Polarization effects were neglected. This approach seems to be much more accurate than presented in known monographs, such as Mullamaa. This model is a part of the model of radiation inflow to the Baltic developed by the team from the Institute of Oceanology PAS Sopot.

  10. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field from Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project was part of a previous grant at MIT that was moved over to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) together with the principal investigator. The final report provided here is concerned only with the work performed at SIO since January 2000. The primary focus of this project was the study of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. The central goal of the project was to improve our understanding and modeling of the relationship between the SST and its variability to internal ocean dynamics, and the overlying atmosphere, and to explore the relative roles of air-sea fluxes and internal ocean dynamics in establishing anomalies in SST on annual and longer time scales. An understanding of those problems will feed into the general discussion on how SST anomalies vary with time and the extend to which they interact with the atmosphere.

  11. Effects of cytoplasm and reactant polarities on acid-catalyzed lipid transesterification in wet microalgal cells subjected to microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Cheng, Jun; Qiu, Yi; Li, Tao; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    The polarities of the cytoplasm and reactants were measured through dielectric spectroscopy, contact angle test, NMR, and FTIR to investigate the mechanisms underlying acid-catalyzed lipid transesterification in wet microalgal cells subjected to microwave irradiation. Organics with apolar functional groups in the cytoplasm decreased the contact angle of methanol against triglyceride by 13.92°, which subsequently increased transesterification efficiency by 2.4 times. The microalgal biomass, given its higher hydrophilicity index of 1.96 than lipids, was more accessible to hydrophilic alcohols, which subsequently promoted transesterification. Water in the cytoplasm promoted the dielectric constant of methanol and increased the contact angle of methanol against triglyceride by 20.51°, which subsequently decreased transesterification efficiency by 72.6%. The inhibitory effect of water on transesterification weakened with the prolonged carbon lengths of the alcohols because of decreased polarity. Microwave decreased the electric constants of alcohols and reduced the polarity difference between alcohols and lipids, thereby improving transesterification efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulation study for ground-based Ku-band microwave observations of ozone and hydroxyl in the polar middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, David; Clilverd, Mark; Kosch, Michael; Verronen, Pekka

    2017-04-01

    Commercial satellite TV broadcasting is possible due to remarkable advances in microwave electronics, enabling weak signals transmitted over 36,000 km from geostationary orbit to be received by inexpensive rooftop dishes. The Ku band satellite frequencies (10.70-14.25 GHz) overlap microwave emissions from ozone (O3) at 11.072 GHz and hydroxyl radical (OH) at 13.44 GHz. These important chemical species in the polar middle atmosphere respond strongly to solar variability and, at high latitudes, geomagnetic activity associated with space weather. Atmospheric model calculations predict that energetic electron precipitation (EEP) driven by magnetospheric substorms produces large changes in polar mesospheric O3 and OH. The EEP typically peaks at geomagnetic latitudes ˜65˚ (e.g. Kilpisjärvi, Finland and Syowa station, Antarctica) and evolves rapidly with time eastwards and over the geomagnetic latitude range 60˚ -80˚ (e.g. reaching Halley, Antarctica). During the substorms OH can increase by more than 1000% at 64-84 km. The substorms leave footprints of 5-55% O3 loss lasting many hours of local time, with strong altitude and seasonal dependences. An atmospheric simulation and retrieval study is performed to determine the specification and design requirements for microwave radiometers capable of measuring O3 and OH profiles from Arctic and Antarctic locations using accessible satellite TV receiver technology. The proposed observations are highly applicable to studies of EEP, atmospheric dynamics, planetaryscale circulation, chemical transport, and the representation of these processes in polar and global climate models. They would provide a lowcost, reliable alternative to increasingly sparse satellite measurements, extending long-term data records and also providing "ground truth" calibration data.

  13. Interferometric measurements of sea surface temperature and emissivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Lars; Bakan, Stephan

    1997-09-01

    A new multispectral method to derive sea surface emissivity and temperature by using interferometer measurements of the near surface upwelling radiation in the infrared window region is presented. As reflected sky radiation adds substantial spectral variability to the otherwise spectrally smooth surface radiation, an appropriate estimate of surface emissivity allows the measured upwelling radiation to be corrected for the reflected sky component. The remaining radiation, together with the estimated surface emissivity, yields an estimate of the sea surface temperature. Measurements from an ocean pier in the Baltic Sea in October 1995 indicate an accuracy of about 0.1 K for the sea surface temperature thus derived. A strong sea surface skin effect of about 0.6 K is found in that particular case.

  14. Improving the Bulk Formula for Sea-Surface Fluxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-14

    weak SST heterogeneity. J. Geophys. Res, 115, D11103,doi:10.1029/2009JD013161. Vickers D and L. Mahrt 2010: Sea-surface roughness lengths in the midlatitude coastal zone. Quart. J. Roy. Meterol. Soc. 136, 1089 -1093.

  15. Relative sensitivity of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) for vegetation and desertification monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Francois; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple equation relating the Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is proposed which represents well data obtained from Nimbus 7/SMMR at 37 GHz and NOAA/AVHRR Channels 1 and 2. It is found that there is a limit which is characteristic of a particular type of cover for which both indices are equally sensitive to the variation of vegetation, and below which MPDI is more efficient than NDVI. The results provide insight into the relationship between water content and chlorophyll absorption at pixel size scales.

  16. Relative sensitivity of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) for vegetation and desertification monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Francois; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple equation relating the Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is proposed which represents well data obtained from Nimbus 7/SMMR at 37 GHz and NOAA/AVHRR Channels 1 and 2. It is found that there is a limit which is characteristic of a particular type of cover for which both indices are equally sensitive to the variation of vegetation, and below which MPDI is more efficient than NDVI. The results provide insight into the relationship between water content and chlorophyll absorption at pixel size scales.

  17. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    develops a new technique for estimating quasi- homogeneous and quasi-stationary sea surface wave frequency-direction spectra using acoustic tomog...problems for the homogeneous and quasi- homogeneous frequency-direction spectrum are introduced. The theory is ap- plied tosynthetic data which simulate...thesis introduces a technique that estimates the quasi-stationary and quasi- homogeneous sea surface wave frequency-direction spectrum from the spectra of

  18. The distribution of iodide at the sea surface.

    PubMed

    Chance, Rosie; Baker, Alex R; Carpenter, Lucy; Jickells, Tim D

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the impact of sea surface iodide concentrations on the deposition of ozone to the sea surface and the sea to air flux of reactive iodine. The use of models to predict this flux demands accurate, spatially distributed sea surface iodide concentrations, but to date, the observational data required to support this is sparse and mostly arises from independent studies conducted on small geographical and temporal scales. We have compiled the available measurements of sea surface iodide to produce a data set spanning latitudes from 69°S to 66°N, which reveals a coherent, large scale distribution pattern, with highest concentrations observed in tropical waters. Relationships between iodide concentration and more readily available parameters (chlorophyll, nitrate, sea surface temperature, salinity, mixed layer depth) are evaluated as tools to predict iodide concentration. Of the variables tested, sea surface temperature is the strongest predictor of iodide concentration. Nitrate was also strongly inversely associated with iodide concentration, but chlorophyll-a was not.

  19. IMPROVED MEASUREMENTS OF THE TEMPERATURE AND POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND FROM QUaD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. L.; Ade, P.; Bowden, M.; Gear, W. K.; Gupta, S.; Orlando, A.; Bock, J.; Leitch, E.; Cahill, G.; Murphy, J. A.; Castro, P. G.; Memari, Y.; Church, S.; Hinderks, J.; Culverhouse, T.; Friedman, R. B.; Ganga, K.; Melhuish, S. J.

    2009-11-01

    We present an improved analysis of the final data set from the QUaD experiment. Using an improved technique to remove ground contamination, we double the effective sky area and hence increase the precision of our cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum measurements by approx30% versus that previously reported. In addition, we have improved our modeling of the instrument beams and have reduced our absolute calibration uncertainty from 5% to 3.5% in temperature. The robustness of our results is confirmed through extensive jackknife tests, and by way of the agreement that we find between our two fully independent analysis pipelines. For the standard six-parameter LAMBDACDM model, the addition of QUaD data marginally improves the constraints on a number of cosmological parameters over those obtained from the WMAP experiment alone. The impact of QUaD data is significantly greater for a model extended to include either a running in the scalar spectral index, or a possible tensor component, or both. Adding both the QUaD data and the results from the Arcminute Cosmology Bolometer Array Receiver experiment, the uncertainty in the spectral index running is reduced by approx25% compared to WMAP alone, while the upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio is reduced from r < 0.48 to r < 0.33 (95% c.l.). This is the strongest limit on tensors to date from the CMB alone. We also use our polarization measurements to place constraints on parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering, constraining the energy scale of Lorentz violating interactions to <1.5 x 10{sup -43} GeV (68% c.l.). Finally, we place a robust upper limit on the strength of the lensing B-mode signal. Assuming a single flat band power between l = 200 and l = 2000, we constrain the amplitude of B-modes to be <0.57 muK{sup 2} (95% c.l.).

  20. Front-End Electronics for the Array Readout of a Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector Towards Observation of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, H.; Ikeno, M.; Oguri, S.; Tajima, O.; Tomita, N.; Uchida, T.

    2016-07-01

    Precise measurements of polarization patterns in cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide deep knowledge about the begin of the Universe. The GroundBIRD experiment aims to measure the CMB polarization by using microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays. The MKID is suited to multiplexing. One of our requirements is a MUX factor (the number of readout channels for a single wire pair) of at least 100. If we make frequency combs of the MKIDs with 2-MHz spacing, a bandwidth of 200 MHz satisfies 100 MUX. The analog electronics must consist of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-to-analog converter (DAC), and local oscillator. We developed our own analog electronics board " RHEA." Two outputs/inputs of DAC/ADC with a 200-MHz clock provide an effective bandwidth of 200 MHz. The RHEA allows us to measure both the amplitude and phase responses of each MKID simultaneously. These data are continuously sampled at a high rate (e.g., 1 kSPS) and with no dead time. We achieved 12 and 14 bits resolution for ADC and DAC, respectively. This corresponds to achieve that our electronics achieved low noise: 1/1000 compared with the detector noise. We also achieved low power consumption compared with that of other electronics development for other experiments. Another important feature is that the board is completely separated from the digital part. Each user can choose their preferred field-programmable array. With the combination of the Kintex-7 evaluation kit from Xilinx, we demonstrated readout of MKID response.

  1. Message-passing-interface-based parallel FDTD investigation on the EM scattering from a 1-D rough sea surface using uniaxial perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Guo, L-X; Zeng, H; Han, X-B

    2009-06-01

    A message-passing-interface (MPI)-based parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for the electromagnetic scattering from a 1-D randomly rough sea surface is presented. The uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) medium is adopted for truncation of FDTD lattices, in which the finite-difference equations can be used for the total computation domain by properly choosing the uniaxial parameters. This makes the parallel FDTD algorithm easier to implement. The parallel performance with different processors is illustrated for one sea surface realization, and the computation time of the parallel FDTD algorithm is dramatically reduced compared to a single-process implementation. Finally, some numerical results are shown, including the backscattering characteristics of sea surface for different polarization and the bistatic scattering from a sea surface with large incident angle and large wind speed.

  2. Polar microwave brightness temperatures from Nimbus-7 SMMR: Time series of daily and monthly maps from 1978 to 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1989-01-01

    A time series of daily brightness temperature gridded maps (October 25, 1978 through August 15, 1987) were generated from all ten channels of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer orbital data. This unique data set can be utilized in a wide range of applications including heat flux, ocean circulation, ice edge productivity, and climate studies. Two sets of data in polar stereographic format are created for the Arctic region: one with a grid size of about 30 km on a 293 by 293 array similar to that previously utilized for the Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer, while the other has a grid size of about 25 km on a 448 by 304 array identical to what is now being used for the DMSP Scanning Multichannel Microwave Imager. Data generated for the Antaractic region are mapped using the 293 by 293 grid only. The general technique for mapping, and a quality assessment of the data set are presented. Monthly and yearly averages are also generated from the daily data and sample geophysical ice images and products derived from the data are given. Contour plots of monthly ice concentrations derived from the data for October 1978 through August 1987 are presented to demonstrate spatial and temporal detail which this data set can offer, and to show potential research applications.

  3. The EUMETSAT Polar System-Second Generation (EPS-SG) micro-wave and sub-millimetre wave imaging missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accadia, Christophe; Schlüssel, Peter; Phillips, Pepe L.; Wilson, J. Julian W.

    2013-10-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) will be followed by a second generation system, EPS-SG, in the 2020-2040 timeframe and contribute to the Joint Polar System being jointly set up with NOAA. Among the various missions which are part of EPS-SG, there are the Microwave Imager (MWI) and the Ice Cloud Imager (ICI). The MWI frequencies are from 18 GHz up to 183 GHz. All MWI channels up to 89 GHz measure both V and H polarisations. The primary objective of the MWI mission is to support Numerical Weather Prediction at regional and global scales. The MWI will not only provide continuity of measurements for some heritage microwave imager channels (e.g. SSM/I, AMSR-E) but will also include additional channels such as the 50-55 / 118 GHz bands. The combined use of these channels will provide more information on cloud and precipitation over sea and land. The ICI will provide measurements over the sub-millimetre spectral range contributing to an innovative characterisation of clouds over the whole globe. The ICI has channels at 183 GHz, 325 GHz and 448 GHz with single V polarisation and two channels at 243 GHz and 664 GHz with both V and H polarisation. The ICI's primary objectives are to support climate monitoring and validation of ice cloud models and the parameterisation of ice clouds in weather and climate models through the provision of ice cloud products.

  4. A measurement of the cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization power spectrum at sub-degree scales with POLARBEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Anthony, A. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Elleflot, T.; Feng, C.; Borrill, J.; Errard, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Flanigan, D.; Dobbs, M.; Gilbert, A.; Fabbian, G.; Collaboration: Polarbear Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < ℓ < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 deg{sup 2} with 3.'5 resolution at 150 GHz. On these angular scales, gravitational lensing of the CMB by intervening structure in the universe is expected to be the dominant source of B-mode polarization. Including both systematic and statistical uncertainties, the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing is rejected at 97.2% confidence. The band powers are consistent with the standard cosmological model. Fitting a single lensing amplitude parameter A{sub BB} to the measured band powers, A{sub BB}=1.12±0.61(stat){sub −0.12}{sup +0.04}(sys)±0.07(multi), where A{sub BB} = 1 is the fiducial WMAP-9 ΛCDM value. In this expression, 'stat' refers to the statistical uncertainty, 'sys' to the systematic uncertainty associated with possible biases from the instrument and astrophysical foregrounds, and 'multi' to the calibration uncertainties that have a multiplicative effect on the measured amplitude A{sub BB}.

  5. A Texture-Polarization Method for Estimating Convective/Stratiform Precipitation Area Coverage from Passive Microwave Radiometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Hong, Ye; Kummerow, Christian D.; Turk, Joseph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observational and modeling studies have described the relationships between convective/stratiform rain proportion and the vertical distributions of vertical motion, latent heating, and moistening in mesoscale convective systems. Therefore, remote sensing techniques which can quantify the relative areal proportion of convective and stratiform, rainfall can provide useful information regarding the dynamic and thermodynamic processes in these systems. In the present study, two methods for deducing the convective/stratiform areal extent of precipitation from satellite passive microwave radiometer measurements are combined to yield an improved method. If sufficient microwave scattering by ice-phase precipitating hydrometeors is detected, the method relies mainly on the degree of polarization in oblique-view, 85.5 GHz radiances to estimate the area fraction of convective rain within the radiometer footprint. In situations where ice scattering is minimal, the method draws mostly on texture information in radiometer imagery at lower microwave frequencies to estimate the convective area fraction. Based upon observations of ten convective systems over ocean and nine systems over land, instantaneous 0.5 degree resolution estimates of convective area fraction from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TRMM TMI) are compared to nearly coincident estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). The TMI convective area fraction estimates are slightly low-biased with respect to the PR, with TMI-PR correlations of 0.78 and 0.84 over ocean and land backgrounds, respectively. TMI monthly-average convective area percentages in the tropics and subtropics from February 1998 exhibit the greatest values along the ITCZ and in continental regions of the summer (southern) hemisphere. Although convective area percentages. from the TMI are systematically lower than those from the PR, monthly rain patterns derived from the TMI and PR rain algorithms are very similar

  6. High-Resolution Radar Scattering Characteristics of a Disturbed Sea Surface and Floating Debris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-29

    theoretically and experimentally. Oil drums, logs, and aluminum-covered plastic gallon milk bottles were considered and measured. A comparison of the echoing...covered plastic bottle ,38 N R tEPO R1 8 131 0 DBSM L LJ v ’ da) B 6 GH1 0 DSM -- DBSM ib) 9.2 GHz Ils Fig. 29 - Vertically polarized return from wave...j2 ’ NRL Report 8131 (~High-Resolution Radar Scattering Characteristics of a Disturbed Sea Surface and Floating Debris B. L. LEWIS. J. P. HANSEN. 1

  7. Assessing the impact of satellite-based observations in sea surface temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Boyin; Liu, Chunying; Banzon, Viva F.; Zhang, Huai-Min; Karl, Thomas R.; Lawrimore, Jay H.; Vose, Russell S.

    2016-04-01

    Global trends of sea surface temperature (SST) are assessed for the existing and new experimental SST analyses that incorporate advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) observations from NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. These analyses show that globally and annually averaged SST trends over the 21st century (2000-2015) are similar to the trends for the full satellite record period (1982-2015), regardless of whether AVHRR data are included in the analyses. It is shown that appropriate bias correction is an important step to remove discontinuities of AVHRR data for consistent time series and trend analysis.

  8. Influence of polarity on the scalability and reproducibility of solvent-free microwave-assisted reactions.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Ortiz, Angel; de la Hoz, Antonio; Alcázar, Jesús; Carrillo, José R; Herrero, María A; Fontana, Alberto; Muñoz, Juan de M; Prieto, Pilar; de Cózar, Abel

    2011-02-01

    Organic reactions performed in the absence of solvent in domestic ovens without appropriate temperature control are generally considered as not reproducible, particularly when different instruments are used. For this reason, reproducibility has historically been one of the major issues associated with Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis (MAOS) especially when domestic ovens are involved. The lack of reproducibility limits the general applicability and the scale up of these reactions. In this work several solvent-free reactions previously carried out in domestic ovens have been translated into a single-mode microwave reactor and then scaled up in a multimode oven. The results show that most of these reactions, although not considered as reproducible, can be easily updated and applied in microwave reactors using temperature-controlled conditions. Furthermore, computational calculations can assist to explain and/or predict whether a reaction will be reproducible or not.

  9. The effects of the variations in sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the estimation of average wind speed by SEASAT-SASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The average wind speeds from the scatterometer (SASS) on the ocean observing satellite SEASAT are found to be generally higher than the average wind speeds from ship reports. In this study, two factors, sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability, are identified which affect microwave scatter and, therefore, wave development. The problem of relating satellite observations to a fictitious quantity, such as the neutral wind, that has to be derived from in situ observations with models is examined. The study also demonstrates the dependence of SASS winds on sea surface temperature at low wind speeds, possibly due to temperature-dependent factors, such as water viscosity, which affect wave development.

  10. The effects of the variations in sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the estimation of average wind speed by SEASAT-SASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The average wind speeds from the scatterometer (SASS) on the ocean observing satellite SEASAT are found to be generally higher than the average wind speeds from ship reports. In this study, two factors, sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability, are identified which affect microwave scatter and, therefore, wave development. The problem of relating satellite observations to a fictitious quantity, such as the neutral wind, that has to be derived from in situ observations with models is examined. The study also demonstrates the dependence of SASS winds on sea surface temperature at low wind speeds, possibly due to temperature-dependent factors, such as water viscosity, which affect wave development.

  11. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  12. Changes in Sea Surface Temperature and North Atlantic Hurricane Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, R.; Mahani, S.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2006-05-01

    People of United States from Maine to Texas in the years 1995 to 2005 experienced the highest level of North Atlantic hurricane activity in the reliable collected data and reports in compare with the generally low activity of the previous two decays (1970 to 1994). The greater activity might be a consequence of instantaneous changes in North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and air temperature. This thermal energy of increased Sea Surface Temperature (warm water) is known as tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) partly powers a hurricane and has been called hurricane fuel. In primary steps of this research we are trying to examine the association of variation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Sea Surface Height (SSH) and air temperature in the past decades with changes in hurricane number, duration and intensity. Preliminary analysis demonstrated that there is correlation between global warming and the occurrence of hurricanes because of the anticipated enhancement of energy available to the storms due to higher sea surface temperatures. The goal is to characterize and specify significant factors on tropical storms to improve the capability of predicting a hurricane and its damages to human lives and the economy. This information can be used to advise strategies for warning and also minimizing the magnitude of hurricane destruction, damages, and life losses.

  13. Microwave linear polarization rotator in a bilayered chiral metasurface based on strong asymmetric transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. L.; Zhang, Q.; Qin, F. F.; Liu, Z. Z.; Piao, Y. P.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    We propose and study a kind of bilayered chiral metasurface (BCM) composed of complementary L-shaped resonators with a lossless dielectric spacer that can realize linear polarization rotation with ultrahigh conversion efficiency. We present a theoretical analysis of the BCM with specific chiral geometry that enables asymmetric transmission for linear polarization only. Numerical results show that the proposed metasurface has dual-band asymmetric transmission with nearly 100% cross-polarization conversion efficiency when the loss is ignored. More importantly, depending on the incident direction, only one of the cross-polarization transmissions can approach unity while all the remaining transmissions are close to zero. As a result, nearly perfect linear polarization rotation is achieved for a particular polarization direction. We further show that the working frequency and the bandwidth of the proposed BCM can be tuned by adjusting the geometric size and spatial arrangement of the unit cell.

  14. Polar low monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    passive microwave data make it possible to retrieve several important atmospheric and oceanic parameters inside the polar lows, such as sea surface wind speed, water vapour content in the atmosphere, total liquid water content in the clouds and others, providing not only qualitative image of a vortex, but also quantitative information about these severe events, constituting a promising tool for their study and monitoring. An approach for detection and tracking of polar lows is developed utilizing the data from two sensors: SSM/I onboard DMSP and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) onboard Aqua satellite. This approach consists of two stages. At the first stage total atmospheric water vapor fields are retrieved from SSM/I and AMSRE-E measurement data using precise Arctic polar algorithms, developed at NIERSC. These algorithms are applicable over open water. They have high retrieval accuracies under a wide range of environmental conditions. Algorithms are based on numerical simulation of brightness temperatures and their inversion by means of Neural Networks. At the second stage the vortex structures are detected in these fields, polar lows are identified and tracked and some of their parameters are calculated. A few case studies are comprehensively conducted based on SSM/I and AMSRE-E measurements and using other satellite data including visible, infrared and SAR images, QuickScat Scatterometer wind fields, surface analysis maps and re-analysis data, which demonstrated the advantages of satellite passive microwave data usage in the polar low studies.

  15. Leveraging microwave polarization information for calibration of a land data assimilation system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This letter contributes a new approach to calibrating a tau-omega radiative transfer model coupled to a land surface model with low frequency (< 10 GHz) microwave brightness temperature (TB) observations. The problem of calibrating this system is generally poorlyposed because various parameter combi...

  16. The annual and interannual variabilities of precipitable water, surface wind speed, and sea surface temperature over the tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1989-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SSMR) provided simultaneous measurements of three geophysical parameters, each of which describing a certain aspect of the evolution of the 1982-1983 ENSO: the sea-surface temperature (T), precipitable water (W), and surface-wind speed (U). In this paper, values derived from the SSMR were compared with in situ measurements from ships, research buoys, and operational island stations in the tropical Pacific between January 1980 and October 1983, demonstrating the temporal and spatial coherence of the SSMR measurements. The results show that the variabilities of the surface convergence, sea surface temperature, and precipitable water are related. It was found that W anomalies were not always colocated with T anomalies, and that W anomalies were often associated with negative U anomalies, interpreted as surface convergence.

  17. Sea Surface Temperature from EUMETSAT Including Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Bonekamp, Hans; Montagner, Francois; Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Tomazic, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of sea surface temperature (SST) activities at EUMETSAT including information on SST planned from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). Operational oceanography activities within the Marine Applications group at EUMETSAT continue with a focus on SST, sea surface winds, sea-ice products, radiative fluxes, significant wave height and sea surface topography. These are achieved through the mandatory, optional and third-party programmes, and for some products with the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF). Progress towards products from sea-ice surface temperature, ocean colour products, turbidity and aerosol optical depth over water continue. Information on oceanography products from EUMETSAT can be found through the product navigator (http://navigator.eumetsat.int). EUMETSAT have been collaborating with ESA for a number of years on the development of SST for SLSTR.

  18. Airborne full polarization radiometry using the MSFC Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, Al J.; Kunkee, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures in both atmospheric and surface remote sensing have been long recognized by many investigators, particularly those studying SMMR and SSM/I data. Here, the large contrast between the first two Stokes' parameters (T(sub V) and T(sub H)) can be used for detection of sea ice, measurement of ocean surface wind speed, and measurement of cloud and water vapor opacity. High-resolution aircraft data from instruments such as the NASA/MSFC AMPR is crucial for verifying radiative transfer models and developing retrieval algorithms. Currently, the AMPR is outfitted with single-polarization channels at 10, 18, 37 and 85 GHz. To increase its utility, it is proposed that additional orthogonal linearly polarized channels be added to the AMPR. Since the AMPR's feedhorns are already configured for dual orthogonal linearly polarized modes, this would require only a duplication of the currently existing receivers. To circumvent the resulting polarization basis skew caused by the cross-track scanning mechanism, the technique of Electronic Polarization Basis Rotation is proposed to be implemented. Implementation of EPBR requires precise measurement of the third Stokes parameter and will eliminate polarization skew by allowing the feedhorn basis skew angle to be corrected in software. In addition to upgrading AMPR to dual polarization capability (without skew), the modifications will provide an opportunity to demonstrate EPBR on an airborne platform. This is a highly desirable intermediate step prior to satellite implementation.

  19. A 3D model for carbon monoxide molecular line emission as a potential cosmic microwave background polarization contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.; Fabbian, G.; Baccigalupi, C.

    2017-08-01

    We present a model for simulating carbon monoxide (CO) rotational line emission in molecular clouds, taking account of their 3D spatial distribution in galaxies with different geometrical properties. The model implemented is based on recent results in the literature and has been designed for performing Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of this emission. We compare the simulations produced with this model and calibrate them, both on the map and the power spectrum levels, using the second release of data from the Planck satellite for the Galactic plane, where the signal-to-noise ratio is highest. We use the calibrated model to extrapolate the CO power spectrum at low Galactic latitudes where no high sensitivity observations are available yet. We then forecast the level of unresolved polarized emission from CO molecular clouds which could contaminate the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background polarization B modes away from the Galactic plane. Assuming realistic levels of the polarization fraction, we show that the level of contamination is equivalent to a cosmological signal with r ≲ 0.02. The MC MOlecular Line Emission (mcmole3d) python package, which implements this model, is being made publicly available.

  20. Photonic generation of widely tunable phase-coded microwave signals based on a dual-parallel polarization modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shifeng; Zhu, Dan; Wei, Zhengwu; Pan, Shilong

    2014-07-01

    A photonic approach for the generation of a widely tunable arbitrarily phase-coded microwave signal based on a dual-parallel polarization modulator (DP-PolM) is proposed and demonstrated without using any optical or electrical filter. Two orthogonally polarized ± first-order optical sidebands with suppressed carrier are generated based on the DP-PolM, and their polarization directions are aligned with the two principal axes of the following PolM. Phase coding is implemented at a following PolM driven by an electrical coding signal. The inherent frequency-doubling operation can make the system work at a frequency beyond the operation bandwidth of the DP-PolM and the 90° hybrid. Because no optical or electrical filter is applied, good frequency tunability is realized. An experiment is performed. The generation of phase-coded signals tuning from 10 to 40 GHz with up to 10  Gbit/s coding rates is verified.

  1. Crop moisture estimation over the southern Great Plains with dual polarization 1.66 centimeter passive microwave data from Nimbus 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J.; Harder, P. H., II; Wilke, G. D.; Huebner, G. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Moisture content of snow-free, unfrozen soil is inferred using passive microwave brightness temperatures from the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus-7. Investigation is restricted to the two polarizations of the 1.66 cm wavelength sensor. Passive microwave estimates of soil moisture are of two basic categories; those based upon soil emissivity and those based upon the polarization of soil emission. The two methods are compared and contrasted through the investigation of 54 potential functions of polarized brightness temperatures and, in some cases, ground-based temperature measurements. Of these indices, three are selected for the estimated emissivity, the difference between polarized brightness temperatures, and the normalized polarization difference. Each of these indices is about equally effective for monitoring soil moisture. Using an antecedent precipitation index (API) as ground control data, temporal and spatial analyses show that emissivity data consistently give slightly better soil moisture estimates than depolarization data. The difference, however, is not statistically significant. It is concluded that polarization data alone can provide estimates of soil moisture in areas where the emissivity cannot be inferred due to nonavailability of surface temperature data.

  2. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal gradients in French coastal zones for the period of one year were mapped in order to enable a coherent study of certain oceanic features detectable by the variations in the sea surface temperature field and their evolution in time. The phenomena examined were mesoscale thermal features in the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean; thermal gradients generated by French estuary systems; and diurnal heating in the sea surface layer. The investigation was based on Heat Capacity Mapping Mission imagery.

  3. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  4. Satellite Remote Sensing of Sea-Surface Temperatures over the Great Barrier Reef.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, P. J.; Zhu, X.; Beggs, H.; Steinberg, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal areas have great societal and economic importance but present particular problems for satellite remote sensing. Regarding the determination of sea-surface temperatures, microwave radiometry is rendered useless because of the contamination of the measurements by land surface emission through the antenna side lobes, so infrared radiometry has to be used. The challenges concern identifying pixels contaminated by clouds and aerosols, and correcting for the effects of the clear atmosphere. We will present results of a recent study to assess errors and uncertainties in satellite measurements of sea-surface temperature over the Great Barrier Reef, obtained by comparisons between satellite retrievals and in situ measurements at the depth of the corals. Despite the added complications of small scale temperature structure in such a complex coastal environment, and the consequences of a specific distribution of atmospheric properties, the accuracies of the satellite-derived surface temperatures are comparable to what can be achieved in the open ocean. This gives encouragement to the prospect of using satellite data to monitor the thermal structure in a delicate ecosystem that is threatened by natural and anthropogenic stresses. Even though the spatial resolution of currently available data is generally much poorer than that of anticipated sensors, the accuracy of present-day radiometers is limited by factors that will still be present for future missions.

  5. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles <30° due to specular reflection from regular surface. At larger incidence angles, the relative non-polarized contribution decreases, but grows again at HH-polarization approaching 0.7-0.8 at 65° for 10 m/s wind speed, suggesting that backscattering from breaking waves dominates HH NRCS at low grazing angles. At high incidence angles (>60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on

  6. In-depth Analysis of Land Surface Emissivity using Microwave Polarization Difference Index to Improve Satellite QPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Hong, Y.; Wen, Y.; Turk, J.; Gourley, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of primary uncertainties in satellite overland quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) from passive sensors such as radiometers is the impact on the brightness temperatures by the surface land emissivity. The complexity of surface land emissivity is linked to its temporal variations (diurnal and seasonal) and spatial variations (subsurface vertical profiles of soil moisture, vegetation structure and surface temperature) translating into sub-pixel heterogeneity within the satellite field of view (FOV). To better extract the useful signal from hydrometeors, surface land emissivity needs to be determined and filtered from the satellite-measured brightness temperatures. Based on the dielectric properties of surface land cover constitutes, Microwave Polarization Differential index (MPDI) is expected to carry the composite effect of surface land properties on land surface emissivity, with a higher MPDI indicating a lower emissivity. This study analyses the dependence of MPDI to soil moisture, vegetation and surface skin temperature over 9 different land surface types. Such analysis is performed using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from MODIS, the near surface air temperature from the RAP model and ante-precedent precipitation accumulation from the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor as surrogates for the vegetation, surface skin temperature and shallow layer soil moisture, respectively. This paper provides 1) evaluations of brightness temperature-based MPDI from the TRMM and GPM Microwave Imagers in both raining and non-raining conditions to test the dependence of MPDI to precipitation; 2) comparisons of MPDI categorized into instantly before, during and immediately after selected precipitation events to examine the impact of modest-to-heavy precipitation on the spatial pattern of MPDI; 3) inspections of relationship between MPDI versus rain fraction and rain rate within the satellite sensors FOV to investigate the behaviors of MPDI in varying

  7. Parity violation constraints using cosmic microwave background polarization spectra from 2006 and 2007 observations by the QUaD polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Wu, E Y S; Ade, P; Bock, J; Bowden, M; Brown, M L; Cahill, G; Castro, P G; Church, S; Culverhouse, T; Friedman, R B; Ganga, K; Gear, W K; Gupta, S; Hinderks, J; Kovac, J; Lange, A E; Leitch, E; Melhuish, S J; Memari, Y; Murphy, J A; Orlando, A; Piccirillo, L; Pryke, C; Rajguru, N; Rusholme, B; Schwarz, R; O'Sullivan, C; Taylor, A N; Thompson, K L; Turner, A H; Zemcov, M

    2009-04-24

    We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of cosmic microwave background photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible "cosmological birefringence" to be 0.55 degrees +/-0.82 degrees (random) +/-0.5 degrees (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz temperature-curl and gradient-curl spectra over the spectra over the multipole range 200

  8. DC response of hot carriers under circularly polarized intense microwave fields and intense magnetic fields in quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Norihisa

    2013-12-04

    Hot carrier dynamics under intense microwave and crossed magnetic fields are investigated theoretically for the case that the dominant scattering process is inelastic collision, especially intersubband and intrasubband transition in Quantum wells. If the applied electric fields are circularly polarized, the equation of motion forms symmetric on the x-y plane. But the carrier motions are complicated to accumulate because of acceleration and emission process. This situation makes possible to create a variation of the carrier motion, typically the carrier bunching is occurred. This state is a sort of population inversion. The DC response of this system attains strongly negative at appropriate field conditions. Through the simulation for the real case described below, it may include a type of induced emission.

  9. Parity Violation Constraints Using Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Spectra from 2006 and 2007 Observations by the QUaD Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, E. Y. S.; Church, S.; Hinderks, J.; Rusholme, B.; Thompson, K. L.; Ade, P.; Gear, W. K.; Gupta, S.; Rajguru, N.; Turner, A. H.; Bock, J.; Leitch, E.; Bowden, M.; Brown, M. L.; Cahill, G.; Murphy, J. A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Castro, P. G.; Culverhouse, T.; Friedman, R. B.

    2009-04-24

    We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of cosmic microwave background photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible 'cosmological birefringence' to be 0.55 deg. {+-}0.82 deg. (random) {+-}0.5 deg. (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz temperature-curl and gradient-curl spectra over the spectra over the multipole range 200

  10. Pre-Launch Radiometric Performance Characterization of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig K.; Kim, Edward; Leslie, R. Vincent; Lyu, Joseph; McCormick, Lisa M.; Anderson, Kent

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a space-based, cross-track radiometer for operational atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding, utilizing 22 channels over a frequency range from 23 to 183 gigahertz. The ATMS for the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 has undergone two rounds of re-work in 2014-2015 and 2016, following performance issues discovered during and following thermal vacuum chamber (TVAC) testing at the instrument and observatory level. Final shelf-level testing, including measurement of pass band characteristics and spectral response functions, was completed in December 2016. Final instrument-level TVAC testing and calibration occurred during February 2017. Here we will describe the instrument-level TVAC calibration process, and illustrate with results from the final TVAC calibration effort.

  11. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRA ESTIMATION USING LINEAR COMBINATION OF WMAP 5 YEAR MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Pramoda Kumar; Jain, Pankaj; Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Souradeep, Tarun

    2010-05-01

    We estimate cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization and temperature power spectra using Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 5 year foreground contaminated maps. The power spectrum is estimated by using a model-independent method, which does not utilize directly the diffuse foreground templates nor the detector noise model. The method essentially consists of two steps: (1) removal of diffuse foregrounds contamination by making linear combination of individual maps in harmonic space and (2) cross-correlation of foreground cleaned maps to minimize detector noise bias. For the temperature power spectrum we also estimate and subtract residual unresolved point source contamination in the cross-power spectrum using the point source model provided by the WMAP science team. Our TT, TE, and EE power spectra are in good agreement with the published results of the WMAP science team. We perform detailed numerical simulations to test for bias in our procedure. We find that the bias is small in almost all cases. A negative bias at low l in TT power spectrum has been pointed out in an earlier publication. We find that the bias-corrected quadrupole power (l(l + 1)C{sub l} /2{pi}) is 532 {mu}K{sup 2}, approximately 2.5 times the estimate (213.4 {mu}K{sup 2}) made by the WMAP team.

  12. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  13. Earth System Science at NASA: Teleconnections Between Sea Surface Temperature and Epidemics in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeson, Blanche W.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Earth Sciences in NASA and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center will be the focus of the presentations. In addition, one research project that links sea surface temperature to epidemics in Africa will be highlighted. At GSFC research interests span the full breath of disciplines in Earth Science. Branches and research groups focus on areas as diverse as planetary geomagnetics and atmospheric chemistry. These organizations focus on atmospheric sciences (atmospheric chemistry, climate and radiation, regional processes, atmospheric modeling), hydrological sciences (snow, ice, oceans, and seasonal-to-interannual prediction), terrestrial physics (geology, terrestrial biology, land-atmosphere interactions, geophysics), climate modeling (global warming, greenhouse gases, climate change), on sensor development especially using lidar and microwave technologies, and on information technologies, that enable support of scientific and technical research.

  14. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  15. Calving seismicity from iceberg-sea surface interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomaus, T.C.; Larsen, C.F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Iceberg calving is known to release substantial seismic energy, but little is known about the specific mechanisms that produce calving icequakes. At Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska, we draw upon a local network of seismometers and focus on 80 hours of concurrent, direct observation of the terminus to show that calving is the dominant source of seismicity. To elucidate seismogenic mechanisms, we synchronized video and seismograms to reveal that the majority of seismic energy is produced during iceberg interactions with the sea surface. Icequake peak amplitudes coincide with the emergence of high velocity jets of water and ice from the fjord after the complete submergence of falling icebergs below sea level. These icequakes have dominant frequencies between 1 and 3 Hz. Detachment of an iceberg from the terminus produces comparatively weak seismic waves at frequencies between 5 and 20 Hz. Our observations allow us to suggest that the most powerful sources of calving icequakes at Yahtse Glacier include iceberg-sea surface impact, deceleration under the influence of drag and buoyancy, and cavitation. Numerical simulations of seismogenesis during iceberg-sea surface interactions support our observational evidence. Our new understanding of iceberg-sea surface interactions allows us to reattribute the sources of calving seismicity identified in earlier studies and offer guidance for the future use of seismology in monitoring iceberg calving.

  16. Skylab earth resources experiment package /EREP/ - Sea surface topography experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Marsh, J. G.; Mcgoogan, J. T.; Leitao, C. D.; Vincent, S.; Wells, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    The S-193 Skylab radar altimeter was operated in a round-the-world pass on Jan. 31, 1974. The main purpose of this experiment was to test and 'measure' the variation of the sea surface topography using the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) geoid model as a reference. This model is based upon 430,000 satellite and 25,000 ground gravity observations. Variations of the sea surface on the order of -40 to +60 m were observed along this pass. The 'computed' and 'measured' sea surfaces have an rms agreement on the order of 7 m. This is quite satisfactory, considering that this was the first time the sea surface has been observed directly over a distance of nearly 35,000 km and compared to a computed model. The Skylab orbit for this global pass was computed using the Goddard Earth Model (GEM 6) and S-band radar tracking data, resulting in an orbital height uncertainty of better than 5 m over one orbital period.

  17. Long-term changes in sea surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    Historical observations of sea surface temperature since 1856 have been improved by applying corrections to compensate for the predominant use of uninsulated or partly insulated buckets until the Second World War. There are large gaps in coverage in the late nineteenth century and around the two world wars, but a range of statistical techniques suggest that these gaps do not severely prejudice estimates of global and regional climatic change. Nonetheless, to improve the analysis on smaller scales, many unused historical data are to be digitized and incorporated. For recent years, satellite-based sea surface temperatures have improved the coverage, after adjustments for their biases relative to in situ data. An initial version of a nominally globally complete sea ice and interpolated sea surface temperature data set, beginning in 1871, has been created for use in numerical simulations of recent climate. Long time series of corrected regional, hemispheric, and global sea surface temperatures are mostly consistent with corresponding night marine air temperature series, and confirm the regionally specific climatic changes portrayed in the Scientific Assessments of the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The observations also show an El Nino-like oscillation on bidecadal and longer time scales.

  18. Sea Surface Salinity: The Next Remote Sensing Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Swift, Calvin T.; LeVine, David M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of salinity remote sensing is presented. The role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the far north Atlantic and the influence of salinity variations on upper ocean dynamics in the tropics are described. An assessment of the present state of the technology of the SSS satellite remote sensing is given.

  19. Introducing VESPA-22: a ground-based microwave spectrometer for measuring middle atmospheric water vapour at polar latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagnolio, P. P.; Muscari, G.; Fiorucci, I.; Mari, M.

    2012-04-01

    We present the latest updates on the project VESPA-22 (water Vapour Emission Spectrometer for Polar Atmospheres at 22 GHz), a ground-based microwave instrument developed for long-term observations of water vapour in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere (SMWV). The short- and long-term change in water vapour concentration from the lower stratosphere to the mesosphere is one of the main areas of interest for atmospheric composition studies in the current decade. In fact, SMWV influences the temperature of the stratosphere by radiative processes, the concentration of several chemical species (also through the production of OH) and the formation of aerosols. Recent studies showed that in the last 30 years mid-latitude SMWV has been changing for mechanisms not yet fully understood. Model studies indicate that these changes could have had a significant impact (25-30%) on the tropospheric radiative forcing and surface temperature trends observed since 1980. Moreover, at polar regions, changes in SMWV strongly affect the formation rate of polar stratospheric clouds, both directly (how much is available for uptake on PSC particles) and indirectly (impact on stratospheric temperature). This is especially critical in the Arctic stratosphere where temperatures are not as cold they are over Antarctica and, for the purpose of denitrification and ozone depletion processes, an increase in SMWV of 1 ppmv is modelled to be equivalent to a 1 K decrease in temperature. In the past decade, satellite-based instruments have provided accurate and global measurements of SMWV, but a similar coverage is not expected in this decade. Conversely, the ground-based microwave spectrometers currently active provide both the long-time series necessary for decadal scale monitoring and the high time resolution (a few hours) needed to understand fast dynamical processes. Today, none of these sustained SMWV measurements are being carried out at polar regions. Our observation technique is based on the

  20. Deep Coherent Vortices and Their Sea Surface Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ienna, Federico; Bashmachnikov, Igor; Dias, Joaquim; Peliz, Alvaro

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean Water eddies, known as Meddies, are an important dynamic process occurring at depths of 1000-meters in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Meddies occur as a direct result of the Mediterranean Outflow exiting through the Gibraltar Strait, and represent a prevalent mechanism that can be found extensively throughout the ocean. Moreover, Meddy cores are known to produce measurable expressions at the sea surface in the form of rotating coherent vortices, not only affecting the sea surface from beneath, but also allowing for the possibility to remotely study these deep phenomena through data gathered at the sea surface. While many past studies have focused on the properties of Meddy cores, only a handful of studies focus on the physical characteristics and behavior of the surface expressions produced. Are Meddy surface expressions different from other like vortices that dominate the physical ocean surface? What are the relationships between deep and surface mechanisms, and do any feedbacks exist? To shed light on these questions, we investigate the relationship between Meddies and their sea-surface expressions through observations using in-situ float and drifter profiles and satellite altimetry. A total of 782 Meddy cores were examined in the Northeast Atlantic using temperature and salinity data obtained by CTD and Argo during the Mecanismos de transporte e de dispersão da Água Mediterrânica no Atlântico Nordeste (MEDTRANS) project, and their corresponding sea-level expressions were geo-temporally matched in satellite altimetry data. We report several statistical properties of the sea-surface expressions of Meddies, including their mean diameter and vertical magnitude, and compare the properties of their surface features to the underlying Meddy cores. We investigate how the deep core affects the surface, and whether surface expressions may in return yield information about the underlying cores. Additionally, we examine the variability of the surface

  1. Measurement and simulation of the polarization-dependent Purcell factor in a microwave fishnet metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustomji, Kaizad; Abdeddaim, Redha; de Sterke, C. Martijn; Kuhlmey, Boris; Enoch, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We determine, experimentally and numerically, the electric and magnetic Purcell factors in a fishnet metamaterial in the frequency range 5-15 GHz by measuring the impedance of a dipole antenna. We compare measurements and numerical simulations of the Purcell factor for transverse electric (TEz) and transverse magnetic (TMz) polarizations. For TMz polarization, the dispersion relation of the structure is hyperbolic and enhances the Purcell factor. For TEz polarization, the dispersion relation does not allow any propagating solutions and decreases the Purcell factor below the effective plasma frequency. Eigenmode calculations of the periodic unit cell of the metamaterial are used to obtain the band structure and confirm the presence of hyperbolic isofrequency surfaces. The isofrequency surfaces are used to calculate the density of states (DOS). We also use the impedance method to obtain the DOS by averaging the Purcell factor obtained at different locations over the periodic unit cell and find good agreement with DOS calculated from eigenmode calculations.

  2. Fabrication of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Kevin L.; Aamir, A.; Bennett, C. L.; Chang, M. P.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Costen, N.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Hu, R.; Marriage, T.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the minute cosmic microwave background polarization signature requires multi-frequency high-throughput precision instrument systems. We have previously described the detector fabrication of a 40 GHz focal plane and now describe the fabrication of the detector modules for measurement of the CMB at 90GHz. The 74-TES based bolometers in each module are coupled to a niobium based planar orthomode transducer with integrated band defining filters implemented in microstrip transmission line. A single crystal silicon dielectric substrate serves as microstrip dielectric and as a thermal link between the membrane isolated MoAu TES operating at 150mK and the heat bath. A short silicon leg between the heat bath and the TES bolometer is designed for ballistic phonon transport and provides improved process control and uniformity of thermal conductance in the presence of phonon scattering on roughened surfaces. Micro-machined structures are used to realize the orthomode transducer backshort, provide out of band signal rejection, and a silicon photonic choke for feedhorn coupling are described. The backshort, choke wafer, and detector wafer are indium bump bonded to create a single 37-element dual-polarization detector module. Fourteen such hexagonally shaped modules each 90 mm in size comprise two focal planes. These, along with the recently delivered 40GHz focal plane, will survey a large fraction of the sky as part of the Johns Hopkins University led ground based CLASS (Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor) telescope.

  3. Fabrication of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Kevin L.; Aamir, A.; Bennett, C. L.; Chang, M. P.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Costen, N.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Hu, R.; Marriage, T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Wollack, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the minute cosmic microwave background polarization signature requires multi-frequency high-throughput precision instrument systems. We have previously described the detector fabrication of a 40 GHz focal plane and now describe the fabrication of the detector modules for measurement of the CMB at 90GHz. The 74-TES based bolometers in each module are coupled to a niobium based planar orthomode transducer with integrated band defining filters implemented in microstrip transmission line. A single crystal silicon dielectric substrate serves as microstrip dielectric and as a thermal link between the membrane isolated MoAu TES operating at 150mK and the heat bath. A short silicon leg between the heat bath and the TES bolometer is designed for ballistic phonon transport and provides improved process control and uniformity of thermal conductance in the presence of phonon scattering on roughened surfaces. Micro-machined structures are used to realize the orthomode transducer backshort, provide out of band signal rejection, and a silicon photonic choke for feedhorn coupling are described. The backshort, choke wafer, and detector wafer are indium bump bonded to create a single 37-element dual-polarization detector module. Fourteen such hexagonally shaped modules each 90 mm in size comprise two focal planes. These, along with the recently delivered 40GHz focal plane, will survey a large fraction of the sky as part of the Johns Hopkins University led ground based CLASS (Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor) telescope.

  4. Optimisation of sea surface current retrieval using a maximum cross correlation technique on modelled sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuzé, Céline; Eriksson, Leif; Carvajal, Gisela

    2017-04-01

    Using sea surface temperature from satellite images to retrieve sea surface currents is not a new idea, but so far its operational near-real time implementation has not been possible. Validation studies are too region-specific or uncertain, due to the errors induced by the images themselves. Moreover, the sensitivity of the most common retrieval method, the maximum cross correlation, to the three parameters that have to be set is unknown. Using model outputs instead of satellite images, biases induced by this method are assessed here, for four different seas of Western Europe, and the best of nine settings and eight temporal resolutions are determined. For all regions, tracking a small 5 km pattern from the first image over a large 30 km region around its original location on a second image, separated from the first image by 6 to 9 hours returned the most accurate results. Moreover, for all regions, the problem is not inaccurate results but missing results, where the velocity is too low to be picked by the retrieval. The results are consistent both with limitations caused by ocean surface current dynamics and with the available satellite technology, indicating that automated sea surface current retrieval from sea surface temperature images is feasible now, for search and rescue operations, pollution confinement or even for more energy efficient and comfortable ship navigation.

  5. Fabrication of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, K. L.; Ali, A.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Chang, M. P.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Costen, N.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Hu, R.; Marriage, T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Wollack, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the minute cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization signature requires multi-frequency high-throughput precision instrument systems. We have previously described the detector fabrication of a 40 gigahertz focal plane and now describe the fabrication of a 37-element dual-polarization detector module for measurement of the CMB at 90 gigahertz. The 72-TES (Transition Edge Sensor)-based bolometers in each module are coupled to a niobium-based planar orthomode transducer with integrated band defining filters implemented in microstrip transmission line. A single crystal silicon dielectric substrate serves as microstrip dielectric and as a thermal link between the membrane isolated MoAu TES operating at 150 millikelvins and the heat bath. A short silicon leg between the heat bath and the TES bolometer is designed for ballistic phonon transport and provides improved process control and uniformity of thermal conductance in the presence of phonon scattering on roughened surfaces. Micro-machined structures are used to realize the orthomode transducer backshort, provide out of band signal rejection, and a silicon photonic choke for feedhorn coupling are described. The backshort, choke wafer, and detector wafer are indium bump-bonded to create a single 37-element dual-polarization detector module. Fourteen such hexagonally shaped modules each 80 millimeters in size comprise two focal planes. These, along with the recently delivered 40 gigahertz focal plane, will survey a large fraction of the sky as part of the Johns Hopkins University-led ground-based CLASS (Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor) telescope.

  6. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.

    2015-04-01

    The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same airmass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozone sonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian Trajectory Diagnostic (LTD) support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV) used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie) and the degree to which the PV of an airmass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change on these timescales is negligible, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume) loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature. As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K). This study exemplifies the insights into atmospheric

  7. Sensitivity and foreground modelling for large-scale cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remazeilles, M.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K. K.; Wehus, I. K.

    2016-05-01

    The measurement of the large-scale B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a fundamental goal of future CMB experiments. However, because of unprecedented sensitivity, future CMB experiments will be much more sensitive to any imperfect modelling of the Galactic foreground polarization in the reconstruction of the primordial B-mode signal. We compare the sensitivity to B-modes of different concepts of CMB satellite missions (LiteBIRD, COrE, COrE+, PRISM, EPIC, PIXIE) in the presence of Galactic foregrounds. In particular, we quantify the impact on the tensor-to-scalar parameter of incorrect foreground modelling in the component separation process. Using Bayesian fitting and Gibbs sampling, we perform the separation of the CMB and Galactic foreground B-modes. The recovered CMB B-mode power spectrum is used to compute the likelihood distribution of the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We focus the analysis to the very large angular scales that can be probed only by CMB space missions, i.e. the reionization bump, where primordial B-modes dominate over spurious B-modes induced by gravitational lensing. We find that fitting a single modified blackbody component for thermal dust where the `real' sky consists of two dust components strongly bias the estimation of the tensor-to-scalar ratio by more than 5σ for the most sensitive experiments. Neglecting in the parametric model the curvature of the synchrotron spectral index may bias the estimated tensor-to-scalar ratio by more than 1σ. For sensitive CMB experiments, omitting in the foreground modelling a 1 per cent polarized spinning dust component may induce a non-negligible bias in the estimated tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  8. Microwave properties of a quiet sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J.

    1985-01-01

    The microwave flux responses of a quiet sea are observed at five microwave frequencies and with both horizontal and vertical polarizations at each frequency--a simultaneous 10 channel receiving system. The measurements are taken from Earth orbit with an articulating antenna. The 10 channel responses are taken simultaneously since they share a common articulating collector with a multifrequency feed. The plotted flux responses show: (1) the effects of the relative, on-axis-gain of the collecting aperture for each frequency; (2) the effects of polarization rotation in the output responses of the receive when the collecting aperture mechanically rotates about a feed that is fixed; (3) the difference between the flux magnitudes for the horizontal and vertical channels, at each of the five frequencies, and for each pointing position, over a 44 degree scan angle; and (4) the RMS value of the clutter--as reckoned over the interval of a full swath for each of the 10 channels. The clutter is derived from the standard error of estimate of the plotted swath response for each channel. The expected value of the background temperature is computed for each of the three quiet seas. The background temperature includes contributions from the cosmic background, the downwelling path, the sea surface, and the upwelling path.

  9. Mean Sea Surface and Variability of the Gulf of Mexico Using Geosat Altimetry Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) altimetric measurements of the sea surface height in the Gulf of Mexico are used to determine the mean sea surface... Gulf of Mexico . Keywords: Altimetry; Mesoscale oceanography; Ocean forecasting; Reprints.

  10. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2003-12-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the trajectory of the spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred on January 2, 1997 in the Japan Sea by fusing two microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. In this study 'fusion' is defined as the method of more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil than before. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced drift vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. The distribution of component of spill vector is mostly accounted for by the distribution of geostrophic velocity component during the study period with some discrepancies during March, 1997.

  11. NIRST: a satellite-based IR instrument for fire and sea surface temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marraco, Hugo; Phong, Linh Ngo

    2006-05-01

    NIRST is a pushbroom scanning infrared radiometer that makes use of 512×2 arrays of resistive microbolometers. This instrument comprises mainly two cameras, one operating in the spectral band of 3.4-4.2 μm (band 1) and the other in the bands of 10.4-11.3 (band 2) and 11.4-12.3 μm (band 3). It is intended for the retrievals of forest fire and sea surface temperatures in the Aquarius / SAC-D mission. In this mission the satellite will be launched into a Sun Synchronous polar orbit with an ascending node at 6 PM. This orbit suits the need of discriminating forest fires from solar reflections. NIRST is designed to achieve a spatial resolution of 350 m and a swath width of 180 km at nadir. Its field of view can be steered across track up to 500 km on each side to shorten the revisit time. To measure fire intensity temperatures NIRST will perform multispectral scans of ground area in bands 1 and 2 and the acquired data will be analyzed using a double band algorithm. The microbolometer detectors have been designed to exhibit useful dynamic range for this application. It is projected that the detector response in band 1 saturates only when NIRST scans a 350 m ground pixel of average temperature of 700 K. The use of the data acquired in bands 2 and 3 allows for the retrieval of sea surface temperature by means of the split algorithm technique.

  12. Simulation of Earthquake-Generated Sea-Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Chris; Leveque, Randy

    2016-11-01

    Earthquake-generated tsunamis can carry with them a powerful, destructive force. One of the most well-known, recent examples is the tsunami generated by the Tohoku earthquake, which was responsible for the nuclear disaster in Fukushima. Tsunami simulation and forecasting, a necessary element of emergency procedure planning and execution, is typically done using the shallow-water equations. A typical initial condition is that using the Okada solution for a homogeneous, elastic half-space. This work focuses on simulating earthquake-generated sea-surface deformations that are more true to the physics of the materials involved. In particular, a water layer is added on top of the half-space that models the seabed. Sea-surface deformations are then simulated using the Clawpack hyperbolic PDE package. Results from considering the water layer both as linearly elastic and as "nearly incompressible" are compared to that of the Okada solution.

  13. Estimation of the sea surface's two-scale backscatter parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the sea-surface normalized radar cross section and the friction velocity vector is determined using a parametric two-scale scattering model. The model parameters are found from a nonlinear maximum likelihood estimation. The estimation is based on aircraft scatterometer measurements and the sea-surface anemometer measurements collected during the JONSWAP '75 experiment. The estimates of the ten model parameters converge to realistic values that are in good agreement with the available oceanographic data. The rms discrepancy between the model and the cross section measurements is 0.7 db, which is the rms sum of a 0.3 db average measurement error and a 0.6 db modeling error.

  14. Three-dimensional inhomogeneous rain fields: implications for the distribution of intensity and polarization of the microwave thermal radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Yaroslaw; Kutuza, Boris

    Observations and mapping of the upwelling thermal radiation of the Earth is the very promising remote sensing technique for the global monitoring of the weather and precipitations. For reliable interpretation of the observation data, numerical model of the microwave radiative transfer in the precipitating atmosphere is necessary. In the present work, numerical simulations of thermal microwave radiation in the rain have been performed at three wavelengths (3, 8 and 22 mm). Radiative properties of the rain have been simulated using public accessible T-matrix codes (Mishchenko, Moroz) for non-spherical particles of fixed orientation and realistic raindrop size distributions (Marshall-Palmer) within the range of rain intensity 1-100 mm/h. Thermal radiation of infinite flat slab medium and isolated rain cell of kilometer size has been simulated with finite difference scheme for the vectorial radiative transfer equation (VRTE) in dichroic scattering medium. Principal role of cell structure of the rain field in the formation of angular and spatial distribution of the intensity and polarization of the upwelling thermal radiation has been established. Possible approaches to interpretation of satellite data are also discussed. It is necessary that spatial resolution of microwave radiometers be less than rain cell size. At the present time the resolution is approximately 15 km. It can be considerably improved, for example by two-dimensional synthetic aperture millimeter-wave radiometric interferometer for measuring full-component Stokes vector of emission from hydrometeors. The estimates show that in millimeter band it is possible to develop such equipment with spatial resolution of the order of 1-2 km, which is significantly less than the size of rain cell, with sensitivity 0.3-0.5 K. Under this condition the second Stokes parameter may by successfully measured and may be used for investigation of precipitation regions. Y-shaped phased array antenna is the most promising to

  15. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1980-01-01

    The various thermal gradients in the coastal zones of France were mapped with regard to natural phenomena and man made thermal effluents. The mesoscale thermal features of the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean Sea were also studied. The evolution of the thermal gradients generated by the main estuaries of the French coastal zones was investigated along with the modeling of diurnal heating of the sea surface and its influence on the oceanic surface layers.

  16. Japanese Whaling Ships' Sea Surface Temperatures 1946-84.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzejewska, Anna W.; Wu, Zhongxiang; Newell, Reginald E.; Miyashita, Tomio

    1997-03-01

    Japanese whaling ship data, a homogeneous dataset mainly covering the southern high-latitude oceans, may be used to fill in gaps in recent sea surface temperature datasets, contributing a fair number of additional observations in this area. The Japanese whaling ship data are treated separately here for the period 1946-84, and they show no significant temperature changes during this period in the main fishing region of 60°-70°S or in the west Pacific warm pool.

  17. Sea surface determination from space: The GSFC geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Mcgoogan, J.; Marsh, J.; Lerch, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    The determination of the sea surface/geoid and its relative variation were investigated and results of the altimeter experiment on Skylab to test the geoid are discussed. The spaceborne altimeter on Skylab revealed that the sea surface of the world's oceans can be measured with an accuracy in the meter range. Surface variations are discussed as they relate to those computed from satellite orbital dynamics and ground based gravity data. The GSFC geoid was constructed from about 400,000 satellite tracking data (range, range rate, angles) and about 20,000 ground gravity observations. One of the last experiments on Skylab was to measure and/or test this geoid over almost one orbit. It was found that the computed water surface deviates between 5 to 20 m from the measured one. Further outlined are the influence of orbital errors on the sea surface, and numerical examples are given based upon real tracking data. Orbital height error estimates were computed for geodetic type satellites and are found to be in the order of 0.2 to 5 meters.

  18. Pre-Launch Characterization of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite (JPSS-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Edward; Leslie, Vince; Lyu, Joseph; Smith, Craig; McCormick, Lisa; Anderson, Kent

    2016-04-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is the newest generation of microwave sounder in the international fleet of polar-orbiting weather satellites, replacing the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) which first entered service in 1998. The first ATMS was launched aboard the Suomi NPP (S-NPP) satellite in late 2011. The second ATMS is manifested on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite (JPSS-1). ATMS provides 22 channels of temperature and humidity sounding observations over a frequency range from 23 to 183 GHz. These microwave soundings provide the highest impact data ingested by operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, and are the most critical of the polar-orbiting satellite observations, particularly because microwave sensing can penetrate clouds. This paper will present performance characterizations from pre-launch calibration measurements of the JPSS-1 ATMS just completed in December, 2015. The measurements were conducted in a thermal vacuum chamber with blackbody targets simulating cold space, ambient, and a variable Earth scene. They represent the best opportunity for calibration characterization of the instrument since the environment can be carefully controlled. We will present characterizations of the sensitivity (NEDT), accuracy, nonlinearity, noise spectral characteristics, gain stability, repeatability, and inter-channel correlation. An estimate of expected "striping" will be presented, and a discussion of reflector emissivity effects will also be provided. Comparisons will be made with the S-NPP flight unit. Finally, we will describe planned on-orbit characterizations - such as pitch and roll maneuvers - that will further improve both the measurement quality and the understanding of various error contributions.

  19. GroundBIRD: Observing Cosmic Microwave Polarization at Large Angular Scale with Kinetic Inductance Detectors and High-Speed Rotating Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, S.; Choi, J.; Damayanthi, T.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Ishitsuka, H.; Karatsu, K.; Mima, S.; Minowa, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Otani, C.; Sekimoto, Y.; Tajima, O.; Tomita, N.; Yoshida, M.; Won, E.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) is an important source of information about the origin of our universe. In particular, odd-parity large angular scale patterns in the CMB polarization, the primordial B-modes, are strong evidence for an inflationary universe, related to the accelerating expansion of the metric. We are developing a unique telescope, GroundBIRD, to take CMB polarization measurements. The telescope combines novel techniques: high-speed rotation scanning, cold optics, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). We evaluated the response of MKIDs on the rotation stage. Method of shielding from the geo-magnetic field is established. We have also developed a receiver cryostat. We are able to maintain a sufficient cold status for observations on the optical configuration. We plan to start commissioning the system by observing CMB in Japan in 2015-2016. We will then deploy GroundBIRD in the Canary Islands for further scientific observations.

  20. Medium-assisted non-polar solvent dynamic microwave extraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides in cereals using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Xu, Xu; Li, Na; Shao, Mingyuan; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Yu, Cui; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Chunmei; Wang, Ziming

    2014-11-01

    A fast and green pretreatment method, medium-assisted non-polar solvent dynamic microwave extraction, was first applied to extract ten of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from five cereal samples. Without adding any polar solvent, graphite powders (GP) were used as microwave absorption medium to transform microwave energy into heat energy. For recycling GP, an extractor was made by sealing GP inside the exterior tube of a glass sleeve. By dynamic microwave extraction using hexane as extraction solvent, ten OPPs could be extracted completely within 200s, and the extract was directly analysed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The effects of some experimental parameters on extraction efficiency were investigated and optimised. Relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day ranging from 1.02% to 5.32% were obtained. Five real samples were analysed, and the recoveries obtained were in the range of 73.2-99.8%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 6.63%.

  1. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, a Polar Orbiter around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact instrument called the MWR (microwave radiometer) is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA new frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. It's purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at six selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz, operating in direct detection mode, in order to quantify the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere. The goal is to understand the previously unobserved dynamics of the sub-cloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. as part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The receivers and control electronics are protected by a radiation-shielding enclosure on the Juno spacecraft that also provides for a benign and stable operating temperature environment. All antennas and RF transmission lines outside the vault must withstand low temperatures and the harsh radiation environment surrounding Jupiter. This paper describes the concept of the MWR instrument and presents results of one breadboard receiver channel.

  2. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, A Polar Orbiter Around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, P.; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact instrument called the MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA New Frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. It's purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at six selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz, operating in direct detection mode, in order to quantify the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere. The goal is to understand the previously unobserved dynamics of the sub-cloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. As part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The receivers and control electronics are protected by a radiation-shielding enclosure on the Juno spacecraft that would provide a benign and stable operating temperature environment. All antennas and RF transmission lines outside the vault must withstand low temperatures and the harsh radiation environment surrounding Jupiter. This paper describes the concept of the MWR instrument and presents results of one breadboard receiver channel.

  3. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, a Polar Orbiter around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact instrument called the MWR (microwave radiometer) is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA new frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. It's purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at six selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz, operating in direct detection mode, in order to quantify the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere. The goal is to understand the previously unobserved dynamics of the sub-cloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. as part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The receivers and control electronics are protected by a radiation-shielding enclosure on the Juno spacecraft that also provides for a benign and stable operating temperature environment. All antennas and RF transmission lines outside the vault must withstand low temperatures and the harsh radiation environment surrounding Jupiter. This paper describes the concept of the MWR instrument and presents results of one breadboard receiver channel.

  4. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, A Polar Orbiter Around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, P.; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact instrument called the MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA New Frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. It's purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at six selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz, operating in direct detection mode, in order to quantify the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere. The goal is to understand the previously unobserved dynamics of the sub-cloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. As part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The receivers and control electronics are protected by a radiation-shielding enclosure on the Juno spacecraft that would provide a benign and stable operating temperature environment. All antennas and RF transmission lines outside the vault must withstand low temperatures and the harsh radiation environment surrounding Jupiter. This paper describes the concept of the MWR instrument and presents results of one breadboard receiver channel.

  5. Broadband, polarization-insensitive, and wide-angle microwave absorber based on resistive film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan-Dan, Bu; Chun-Sheng, Yue; Guang-Qiu, Zhang; Yong-Tao, Hu; Sheng, Dong

    2016-06-01

    A simple design of broadband metamaterial absorber (MA) based on resistive film is numerically presented in this paper. The unit cell of this absorber is composed of crossed rectangular rings-shaped resistive film, dielectric substrate, and continuous metal film. The simulated results indicate that the absorber obtains a 12.82-GHz-wide absorption from about 4.75 GHz to 17.57 GHz with absorptivity over 90% at normal incidence. Distribution of surface power loss density is illustrated to understand the intrinsic absorption mechanism of the structure. The proposed structure can work at wide polarization angles and wide angles of incidence for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves. Finally, the multi-reflection interference theory is involved to analyze and explain the broadband absorption mechanism at both normal and oblique incidence. Moreover, the polarization-insensitive feature is also investigated by using the interference model. It is seen that the simulated and calculated absorption rates agree fairly well with each other for the absorber.

  6. Microwave bistatic polarization measurements for retrieval of soil moisture using an incidence angle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Dubey, V.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, the specular scattering (σOHH/VV) behaviour of ten types of plots having different percentage of moisture (mg) and roughness (hrms) has been analysed at various incidence angles with horizontal-horizontal (HH-) and vertical-vertical (VV-) polarizations by an indigenously assembled X-band bistatic scatterometer at frequency of 9.5 GHz. Still, it is very uncertain for minimizing the effect of roughness while retrieving soil moisture. For this purpose, the polarization behaviour of a radar wave has been analysed and a known polarimetric ratio (P = σOHH/σOvv) and proposed polarimetric discrimination ratio \\big(PDR = \\frac{{\\sigma _{VV}^o - \\sigma _{HH}^o }}{{\\sigma _{VV}^o + \\sigma _{HH}^o }}\\big) have been tested for minimizing the effect of roughness for the retrieval of soil moisture. It was found that PDR has minimum effect of roughness in comparison to P. To avoid the complexity of a moisture retrieval algorithm, we have proposed the incidence angle-based approach to retrieve the soil moisture. The retrieved moisture with the proposed approach is in quite a good agreement with the observed moisture. PDR gives better results than P for retrieval of soil moisture. This type of study and the development of this algorithm will be very helpful in the near future of the Cartwheel satellite system.

  7. Optimal design and loss mechanism analysis of microwave absorbing unidirectional SiC fiber composites with broad absorption band and good polarization stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Guangchao; Jiang, Jianjun; He, Yun; Bie, Shaowei

    2016-04-01

    A microwave-absorbing unidirectional SiC fiber composite with wide absorption and good polarization stability was designed by genetic algorithm. The anisotropic nature of unidirectional fiber composites was considered in the design by characterizing tensor permittivity. This special composite is composed of two kinds of SiC fibers that separately exhibit relatively high conductivity and low conductivity. The electromagnetic loss mechanism of this composite was examined for polarizations that differ in the electric field of the incident wave, applied either in the direction of the fiber or in the transverse direction, perpendicular to the fibers. For both polarizations, the absorption band of our composite can reach 6 GHz and the lowest microwave reflectivity was about -20 dB over a range of 8-18 GHz. When the electric field is polarized parallel to fibers, strong coupling among the high-conductivity fibers can induce a strong current and thus efficiently dissipate the electromagnetic energy. When the electric field is polarized perpendicular to fibers, the electromagnetic loss mechanism in the composite resembles the electric energy loss in capacitors and currents in the transverse direction are obstructed by the fibers resulting in attenuation of the electromagnetic energy in the matrix.

  8. Retrieval of latent heat flux and longwave irradiance at the sea surface from SSM/I and AVHRR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüssel, P.; Schanz, L.; Englisch, G.

    1995-03-01

    A combination of passive microwave measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I) with infrared imagery from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is used to derive flux densities of latent heat and longwave radiation at the sea surface. While the AVHRR measurements are used to derive the surface skin temperature of the ocean the SSM/I observations are analysed for the retrieval of the surface wind speed, the near-surface atmospheric humidity and the downwelling longwave irradiance. Radiative transfer calculations are carried out for the simulation of the radiometer signals and for the computation of the radiative fluxes at the sea surface for a large set of globally distributed atmospheric/oceanic situations which have been collected from historical radiosonde and surface observations. The simulations are used for the development of retrieval models and for the estimate of error budgets. Subsequently, the derived techniques are applied to real satellite data and the retrieved fluxes are compared to surface observations from the operational meteorological network as well as from special field measurements which have been taken during the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment and the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The comparisons demonstrate accuracies of 30 W/m^2 for the latent and longwave fluxes when single satellite soundings are used. Monthly averages of the fluxes can be obtained from the satellite measurements with an accuracy better than 10 W/m^2.

  9. Temperature-dependent microwave dielectric relaxation studies of hydrogen bonded polar binary mixtures of propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Vishwam, T; Parvateesam, K; Sreeharisastry, S; Murthy, V R K

    2013-10-01

    The molecular interaction between the polar systems of propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde for various mole fractions at different temperatures were studied by determining the frequency dependent complex dielectric permittivity by using the open-ended coaxial probe technique method in the microwave frequency range from 20 MHz to 20 GHz. The geometries are optimized at HF, B3LYP and MP2 with 6-311G and 6-311G+ basis sets. Dipole moments of the binary mixtures are calculated from the dielectric data using Higasi's method and compared with the theoretical results. Conformational analysis of the formation of hydrogen bond between the propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde is supported by the FT-IR and molecular polarizability calculations. The average relaxation times are calculated from their respective Cole-Cole plots. The activation entropy, activation enthalpy and Kirkwood correlation 'g' factor, excess permittivity (ε(E)), excess inverse relaxation time (1/τ)(E), Bruggeman parameter (f(B)) have also been determined for propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde and the results were correlated.

  10. Temperature-dependent microwave dielectric relaxation studies of hydrogen bonded polar binary mixtures of propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwam, T.; Parvateesam, K.; SreehariSastry, S.; Murthy, V. R. K.

    2013-10-01

    The molecular interaction between the polar systems of propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde for various mole fractions at different temperatures were studied by determining the frequency dependent complex dielectric permittivity by using the open-ended coaxial probe technique method in the microwave frequency range from 20 MHz to 20 GHz. The geometries are optimized at HF, B3LYP and MP2 with 6-311G and 6-311G+ basis sets. Dipole moments of the binary mixtures are calculated from the dielectric data using Higasi's method and compared with the theoretical results. Conformational analysis of the formation of hydrogen bond between the propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde is supported by the FT-IR and molecular polarizability calculations. The average relaxation times are calculated from their respective Cole-Cole plots. The activation entropy, activation enthalpy and Kirkwood correlation 'g' factor, excess permittivity (ɛE), excess inverse relaxation time (1/τ)E, Bruggeman parameter (fB) have also been determined for propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde and the results were correlated.

  11. Fabrication of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, K. L.; Ali, A.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Chang, M. P.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Costen, N.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Hu, R.; Marriage, T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the minute cosmic microwave background polarization signature requires multi-frequency, high-throughput precision instrument systems. We have previously described the detector fabrication of a 40 GHz focal plane and now describe the fabrication of detector modules for measurement of the CMB at 90 GHz. The 90 GHz detectors are a scaled version of the 40 GHz architecture where, due to smaller size detectors, we have implemented a modular (wafer level) rather than the chip-level architecture. The new fabrication process utilizes the same design rules with the added challenge of increased wiring density to the 74 TES's as well as a new wafer level hybridization procedure. The hexagonally shaped modules are tile-able, and as such can be used to form the large focal planes required for a space-based CMB polarimeter. The detectors described here will be deployed in two focal planes with seven modules each in the Johns Hopkins University led ground-based Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) telescope.

  12. Effect of Recent Sea Surface Temperature Trends on the Arctic Stratospheric Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Oman, Luke; Hurwitz, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The springtime Arctic polar vortex has cooled significantly over the satellite era, with consequences for ozone concentrations in the springtime transition season. The causes of this cooling trend are deduced by using comprehensive chemistry-climate model experiments. Approximately half of the satellite era early springtime cooling trend in the Arctic lower stratosphere was caused by changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). An ensemble of experiments forced only by changing SSTs is compared to an ensemble of experiments in which both the observed SSTs and chemically- and radiatively-active trace species are changing. By comparing the two ensembles, it is shown that warming of Indian Ocean, North Pacific, and North Atlantic SSTs, and cooling of the tropical Pacific, have strongly contributed to recent polar stratospheric cooling in late winter and early spring, and to a weak polar stratospheric warming in early winter. When concentrations of ozone-depleting substances and greenhouse gases are fixed, polar ozone concentrations show a small but robust decline due to changing SSTs. Ozone changes are magnified in the presence of changing gas concentrations. The stratospheric changes can be understood by examining the tropospheric height and heat flux anomalies generated by the anomalous SSTs. Finally, recent SST changes have contributed to a decrease in the frequency of late winter stratospheric sudden warmings.

  13. On the influence of North Pacific sea surface temperature on the Arctic winter climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Garfinkel, C. I.

    2012-10-01

    Differences between two ensembles of Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model simulations isolate the impact of North Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on the Arctic winter climate. One ensemble of extended winter season forecasts is forced by unusually high SSTs in the North Pacific, while in the second ensemble SSTs in the North Pacific are unusually low. High - Low differences are consistent with a strengthened Western Pacific atmospheric teleconnection pattern, and in particular, a weakening of the Aleutian low. This relative change in tropospheric circulation inhibits planetary wave propagation into the stratosphere, in turn reducing polar stratospheric temperature in mid- and late winter. The number of winters with sudden stratospheric warmings is approximately tripled in the Low ensemble as compared with the High ensemble. Enhanced North Pacific SSTs, and thus a more stable and persistent Arctic vortex, lead to a relative decrease in lower stratospheric ozone in spring, affecting the April clear-sky UV index at Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes.

  14. Analysis of Ultra High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Level 4 Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) studies are often focused on improving accuracy, or understanding and quantifying uncertainties in the measurement, as SST is a leading indicator of climate change and represents the longest time series of any ocean variable observed from space. Over the past several decades SST has been studied with the use of satellite data. This allows a larger area to be studied with much more frequent measurements being taken than direct measurements collected aboard ship or buoys. The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) is an international project that distributes satellite derived sea surface temperatures (SST) data from multiple platforms and sensors. The goal of the project is to distribute these SSTs for operational uses such as ocean model assimilation and decision support applications, as well as support fundamental SST research and climate studies. Examples of near real time applications include hurricane and fisheries studies and numerical weather forecasting. The JPL group has produced a new 1 km daily global Level 4 SST product, the Multiscale Ultrahigh Resolution (MUR), that blends SST data from 3 distinct NASA radiometers: the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer ? Earth Observing System(AMSRE). This new product requires further validation and accuracy assessment, especially in coastal regions.We examined the accuracy of the new MUR SST product by comparing the high resolution version and a lower resolution version that has been smoothed to 19 km (but still gridded to 1 km). Both versions were compared to the same data set of in situ buoy temperature measurements with a focus on study regions of the oceans surrounding North and Central America as well as two smaller regions around the Gulf Stream and California coast. Ocean fronts exhibit high temperature gradients (Roden, 1976), and thus

  15. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  16. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.

    2015-09-01

    The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same air mass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozonesonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian trajectory diagnostic (LTD) support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV) used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie) and the degree to which the PV of an air mass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change is negligible on the weekly to monthly timescales considered here, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume) loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature (~ 18 km altitude). As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K). This

  17. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, K.

    Data fusion is defined as a framework with the purpose of obtaining information of 'greater quality'. Within the framework tools are expressed for the alliance of data originating from different sources. The exact definition of 'greater quality' is stated in this context as more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil from two different microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. An example is presented in the case of trajectory of bow section and associated oil upwelling from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred from January to June in 1997 in Japan Sea. Spill distance is defined as a horizontal distance from the oil upwelling point to the location of sunken Nakhodka and a spill direction is defined as an angle made by the geographic north and the line corresponding to the spill distance. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced current vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of bow section and associated oil upwelling from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. Result of comparison between the estimated and the observed trajectory of bow section indicates that the estimated trajectory is agreed well with the observed one in the first half of drift period, while in the latter half of drift period the estimated trajectory is not agreed well with the observed one, which may be attributable to changes of wind directions within 24 hours from the satellite overpasses. Moreover the comparison between spill vector and 'fused' surface current vector shows the good correspondence in terms of direction when in situ wind accelerates the surface current vector, while the comparison between the twos shows the bad correspondence when the temporal changes of wind vector occurs.

  18. Pliocene-Pleistocene evolution of sea surface and intermediate water temperatures from the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClymont, Erin L.; Elmore, Aurora C.; Kender, Sev; Leng, Melanie J.; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Over the last 5 million years, the global climate system has evolved toward a colder mean state, marked by large-amplitude oscillations in continental ice volume. Equatorward expansion of polar waters and strengthening temperature gradients have been detected. However, the response of the mid latitudes and high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere is not well documented, despite the potential importance for climate feedbacks including sea ice distribution and low-high latitude heat transport. Here we reconstruct the Pliocene-Pleistocene history of both sea surface and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) temperatures on orbital time scales from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 593 in the Tasman Sea, southwest Pacific. We confirm overall Pliocene-Pleistocene cooling trends in both the surface ocean and AAIW, although the patterns are complex. The Pliocene is warmer than modern, but our data suggest an equatorward displacement of the subtropical front relative to present and a poleward displacement of the subantarctic front of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Two main intervals of cooling, from ~3 Ma and ~1.5 Ma, are coeval with cooling and ice sheet expansion noted elsewhere and suggest that equatorward expansion of polar water masses also characterized the southwest Pacific through the Pliocene-Pleistocene. However, the observed trends in sea surface temperature and AAIW temperature are not identical despite an underlying link to the ACC, and intervals of unusual surface ocean warmth (~2 Ma) and large-amplitude variability in AAIW temperatures (from ~1 Ma) highlight complex interactions between equatorward displacements of fronts associated with the ACC and/or varying poleward heat transport from the subtropics.

  19. Pliocene-Pleistocene evolution of sea surface and intermediate water temperatures from the southwest Pacific.

    PubMed

    McClymont, Erin L; Elmore, Aurora C; Kender, Sev; Leng, Melanie J; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Over the last 5 million years, the global climate system has evolved toward a colder mean state, marked by large-amplitude oscillations in continental ice volume. Equatorward expansion of polar waters and strengthening temperature gradients have been detected. However, the response of the mid latitudes and high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere is not well documented, despite the potential importance for climate feedbacks including sea ice distribution and low-high latitude heat transport. Here we reconstruct the Pliocene-Pleistocene history of both sea surface and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) temperatures on orbital time scales from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 593 in the Tasman Sea, southwest Pacific. We confirm overall Pliocene-Pleistocene cooling trends in both the surface ocean and AAIW, although the patterns are complex. The Pliocene is warmer than modern, but our data suggest an equatorward displacement of the subtropical front relative to present and a poleward displacement of the subantarctic front of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Two main intervals of cooling, from ~3 Ma and ~1.5 Ma, are coeval with cooling and ice sheet expansion noted elsewhere and suggest that equatorward expansion of polar water masses also characterized the southwest Pacific through the Pliocene-Pleistocene. However, the observed trends in sea surface temperature and AAIW temperature are not identical despite an underlying link to the ACC, and intervals of unusual surface ocean warmth (~2 Ma) and large-amplitude variability in AAIW temperatures (from ~1 Ma) highlight complex interactions between equatorward displacements of fronts associated with the ACC and/or varying poleward heat transport from the subtropics.

  20. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, a Polar Orbiter around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    P. Pingree; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact radiometer instrument is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA New Frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. This instrument is called the MWR (MicroWave Radiometer), and its purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz. The objective is to measure the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere, with the goal of understanding the previously unobserved dynamics of the subcloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. The MWR instrument is currently being developed to address these science questions for the Juno mission. As part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The entire MWR instrument consists of six individual radiometer channels with approximately 4% bandwidth at 0.6, 1.25,2.6,5.2, 10,22 GHz operating in direct detection mode. Each radiometer channel has up to 80 dB of gain with a noise figure of several dB. The highest frequency channel uses a corrugated feedhorn and waveguide transmission lines, whereas all other channels use highly phase stable coaxial cables and either patch array or waveguide slot array antennas. Slot waveguide array antennas were chosen for the low loss at the next three highest frequencies and patch array antennas were implemented due to the mass constraint at the two lowest frequencies. The six radiometer channels receive their voltage supplies and control lines from an electronics unit that also provides the instrument communication interface to the Juno spacecraft. For calibration purposes each receiver has integrated noise diodes, a Dicke switch, and temperature sensors near each component that contributes to the noise figure. In addition, multiple sensors will be placed along the RF transmission lines and the antennas in order to measure temperature gradients. All antennas and RF

  1. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, a Polar Orbiter around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    P. Pingree; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact radiometer instrument is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA New Frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. This instrument is called the MWR (MicroWave Radiometer), and its purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz. The objective is to measure the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere, with the goal of understanding the previously unobserved dynamics of the subcloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. The MWR instrument is currently being developed to address these science questions for the Juno mission. As part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The entire MWR instrument consists of six individual radiometer channels with approximately 4% bandwidth at 0.6, 1.25,2.6,5.2, 10,22 GHz operating in direct detection mode. Each radiometer channel has up to 80 dB of gain with a noise figure of several dB. The highest frequency channel uses a corrugated feedhorn and waveguide transmission lines, whereas all other channels use highly phase stable coaxial cables and either patch array or waveguide slot array antennas. Slot waveguide array antennas were chosen for the low loss at the next three highest frequencies and patch array antennas were implemented due to the mass constraint at the two lowest frequencies. The six radiometer channels receive their voltage supplies and control lines from an electronics unit that also provides the instrument communication interface to the Juno spacecraft. For calibration purposes each receiver has integrated noise diodes, a Dicke switch, and temperature sensors near each component that contributes to the noise figure. In addition, multiple sensors will be placed along the RF transmission lines and the antennas in order to measure temperature gradients. All antennas and RF

  2. Study of the blue-green laser scattering from the rough sea surface with foams by the improved two-scale method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangzhen; Qi, Xiao; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of laser scattering from sea surface have a great influence on application performance, from submarine communication, laser detection to laser diffusion communication. Foams will appear when the wind speed exceeds a certain value, so the foam can be seen everywhere in the upper layer of the ocean. Aiming at the volume-surface composite model of rough sea surface with foam layer driven by wind, and the similarities and differences of scattering characteristics between blue-green laser and microwave, an improved two-scale method for blue-green laser to calculate the scattering coefficient is presented in this paper. Based on the improved two-scale rough surface scattering theory, MIE theory and VRT( vector radiative transfer ) theory, the relations between the foam coverage of the sea surface and wind speed and air-sea temperature difference are analyzed. Aiming at the Gauss sea surface in blue-green laser, the dependence of back- and bistatie-scattering coefficient on the incident and azimuth angle, the coverage of foams, as well as the wind speed are discussed in detail. The results of numerical simulations are compared and analyzed in this paper. It can be concluded that the foam layer has a considerable effect on the laser scattering with the increase of wind speed, especially for a large incident angle. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations show that the improved two-scale method is reasonable and efficient.

  3. An Arctic Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Howe, Eva; Tonboe, Rasmus; Dybkjaer, Gorm

    2013-12-01

    Daily fields of gap-free sea surface temperature observations from 1982 to 2010 have been constructed using the DMI_OI processing method, satellite SST observations from the ARC and Pathfinder projects, together with OSI-SAF sea ice reanalysis and ICOADS 2.5 observations. A thorough validation of the data set shows the overall performance with biases within 0.1 oC and standard deviations about 0.6oC. The spatial and temporal validation shows small biases, with no apparent structures, except within the Marginal Ice Zone. Examples on regional SST time series are given, where the decadal warming is evident.

  4. The PRISM palaeoclimate reconstruction and Pliocene sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; ,

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I present a summary of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, with emphasis on its historical development and range of boundary condition datasets. Sea-surface temperature (SST), sea level, sea ice, land cover (vegetation and ice) and topography are discussed as well as many of the assumptions required to create an integrated global-scale reconstruction. New multiproxy research shows good general agreement on the magnitude of mid-Pliocene SST warming. Future directions, including maximum and minimum SST analyses and deep ocean temperature estimates aimed at a full three-dimensional reconstruction, are presented. ?? The Micropalaeontological Society 2007.

  5. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values. (MODIS Data Type: MODIS-PFM)

  6. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  7. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values. (MODIS Data Type: MODIS-PFM)

  8. Jason-3 Produces First Global Map of Sea Surface Height

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-16

    The U.S./European Jason-3 satellite has produced its first map of sea surface height, which corresponds well to data from its predecessor, Jason-2. Higher-than-normal sea levels are red; lower-than-normal sea levels are blue. El Niño is visible as the red blob in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Extending the timeline of ocean surface topography measurements begun by the Topex/Poseidon and Jason 1 and 2 satellites, Jason 3 will make highly detailed measurements of sea-level on Earth to gain insight into ocean circulation and climate change. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20532

  9. Spherical harmonic expansion of the Levitus Sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    Prior information for the stationary sea surface topography (SST) may be needed in altimetric solutions that intend to simultaneously improve the gravity field and determine the SST. For this purpose the oceanographically derived SST estimates are represented by a spherical harmonic expansion. The spherical harmonic coefficients are computed from a least squares adjustment of the data covering the majority of the oceanic regions of the world. Several tests are made to determine the optimum maximum degree of solution and the best configuration of the geometry of the data in order to obtain a solution that fits the data and also provides a good spectral representation of the SST.

  10. ENSO related sea surface salinity variability in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.

    2016-12-01

    Recently available satellite and Argo data have shown coherent, large-scale sea surface salinity (SSS) variability in the equatorial Pacific. Based on this variability, several SSS indices of El Nino have been introduced by previous studies. Combining results from an ocean general circulation model with available satellite and in-situ observations, this study investigates the SSS variability and its associated SSS indices in the equatorial Pacific. The ocean's role and in particular the vertical entrainment of subtropical waters in this variability are discussed, which suggests that the SSS variability in the equatorial Pacific may play some active role in ENSO evolution.

  11. Ring discretization of the wave spectrum for sea surface simulation.

    PubMed

    Varela, Jose Miguel; Guedes Soares, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Although interactive computer-generated ocean scenes based on real wave spectra are impressively realistic, they usually don't exhibit the original sea state's statistical properties. This might be unacceptable for applications in which the sea surface height field's correctness is important, such as 3D ship simulators for training professionals. Researchers have developed a discretization of the wave spectrum that obtains a sea state statistically more equivalent to the original. This method can also improve the scene's visual realism and real-time performance.

  12. Feasibility Study Of Sea Surface Currents Measurements With Doppler Scatterometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, P.; Recchia, A.; de Kloe, J.; Stoffelen, A.; Husson, R.; Collard, F.; Chapron, B.; Mouche, A.; Enjolras, V.; Johannessen, J.; Lin, C. C.; Fois, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present the activity carried out in the framework of the ESA GSP study called "Feasibility Investigation of Global Ocean Surface Current Mapping using ERS, MetOp and QuikScat Wind Scatterometer” (DOPSCAT). The study was aimed at assessing the potential of scatterometer instruments for sea surface current vector retrieval under the strong requirements of preserving both the swath and the surface wind vector estimation performances offered by the existing scatterometers. The paper describes the main results obtained during the DOPSCAT study and provides some recommendations for this new instrument concept.

  13. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperatures: A global reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.; Barron, J.; Poore, R.

    1996-01-01

    Identification and analyses of Pliocene marine microfossils from 64 globally distributed stratigraphic sequences have been used to produce a middle Pliocene sea surface temperature reconstruction of the Earth. This reconstruction shows little or no change from current conditions in low latitude regions and significant warming of the ocean surface at mid and higher latitudes of both hemispheres. This pattern of warming is consistent with terrestrial records and suggests a combination of enhanced meridional ocean heat transport and enhanced greenhouse effect were responsible for the middle Pliocene warmth.

  14. Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is a high resolution 4 meter aperture scanning radiometer system designed to determine sea surface temperature and wind speed, atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, precipitation, and various sea ice parameters by interpreting brightness temperature images from low Earth orbiting satellites. The LAMMR with dual linear horizontal and vertical polarization radiometer channels from 1.4 to 91 GHZ can provide multidiscipline data with resolutions from 105 to 7 km. The LAMMR baseline radiometer system uses total power radiometers to achieve delta T's in the 0.5 to 1.7 K range and system calibration accuracies in the 1 to 2 deg range. A cold sky horn/ambient load two point calibration technique is used in this baseline concept and the second detector output uses an integrated and dump circuit to sample the scanning cross-tract resolution cells.

  15. Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. L.

    1980-05-01

    The large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is a high resolution 4 meter aperture scanning radiometer system designed to determine sea surface temperature and wind speed, atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, precipitation, and various sea ice parameters by interpreting brightness temperature images from low Earth orbiting satellites. The LAMMR with dual linear horizontal and vertical polarization radiometer channels from 1.4 to 91 GHZ can provide multidiscipline data with resolutions from 105 to 7 km. The LAMMR baseline radiometer system uses total power radiometers to achieve delta T's in the 0.5 to 1.7 K range and system calibration accuracies in the 1 to 2 deg range. A cold sky horn/ambient load two point calibration technique is used in this baseline concept and the second detector output uses an integrated and dump circuit to sample the scanning cross-tract resolution cells.

  16. Microstrip Antenna for Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramhat-Samii, Yahya; Kona, Keerti; Manteghi, Majid; Dinardo, Steven; Hunter, Don; Njoku, Eni; Wilson, Wiliam; Yueh, Simon

    2009-01-01

    This compact, lightweight, dual-frequency antenna feed developed for future soil moisture and sea surface salinity (SSS) missions can benefit future soil and ocean studies by lowering mass, volume, and cost of the antenna system. It also allows for airborne soil moisture and salinity remote sensors operating on small aircraft. While microstrip antenna technology has been developed for radio communications, it has yet to be applied to combined radar and radiometer for Earth remote sensing. The antenna feed provides a key instrument element enabling high-resolution radiometric observations with large, deployable antennas. The design is based on the microstrip stacked-patch array (MSPA) used to feed a large, lightweight, deployable, rotating mesh antenna for spaceborne L-band (approximately equal to 1 GHz) passive and active sensing systems. The array consists of stacked patches to provide dual-frequency capability and suitable radiation patterns. The stacked-patch microstrip element was designed to cover the required L-band center frequencies at 1.26 GHz (lower patch) and 1.413 GHz (upper patch), with dual-linear polarization capabilities. The dimension of patches produces the required frequencies. To achieve excellent polarization isolation and control of antenna sidelobes for the MSPA, the orientation of each stacked-patch element within the array is optimized to reduce the cross-polarization. A specialized feed-distribution network was designed to achieve the required excitation amplitude and phase for each stacked-patch element.

  17. Internal gravity wave contributions to global sea surface variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Richman, J. G.; Shriver, J. F.; Buijsman, M. C.; Zamudio, L.; Wallcraft, A. J.; Sharma, H.

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution (1/12th and 1/25th degree) 41-layer simulations of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), forced by both atmospheric fields and the astronomical tidal potential, are used to construct global maps of sea-surface height (SSH). The HYCOM output has been separated into steric, non-steric, and total sea-surface height and the maps display variance in subtidal, tidal, and supertidal bands. Two of the global maps are of particular interest in planning for the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) wide-swath satellite altimeter mission; (1) a map of the nonstationary tidal signal (estimated after removing the stationary tidal signal via harmonic analysis), and (2) a map of the steric supertidal contributions, which are dominated by the internal gravity wave continuum. Both of these maps display signals of order 1 cm2, the target accuracy for the SWOT mission. Therefore, both non-stationary internal tides and non-tidal internal gravity waves are likely to be important sources of "noise" that must be accurately removed before examination of lower-frequency phenomena can take place.

  18. Assessing recent warming using instrumentally homogeneous sea surface temperature records

    PubMed Central

    Hausfather, Zeke; Cowtan, Kevin; Clarke, David C.; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Rohde, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) records are subject to potential biases due to changing instrumentation and measurement practices. Significant differences exist between commonly used composite SST reconstructions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Extended Reconstruction Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST), the Hadley Centre SST data set (HadSST3), and the Japanese Meteorological Agency’s Centennial Observation-Based Estimates of SSTs (COBE-SST) from 2003 to the present. The update from ERSST version 3b to version 4 resulted in an increase in the operational SST trend estimate during the last 19 years from 0.07° to 0.12°C per decade, indicating a higher rate of warming in recent years. We show that ERSST version 4 trends generally agree with largely independent, near-global, and instrumentally homogeneous SST measurements from floating buoys, Argo floats, and radiometer-based satellite measurements that have been developed and deployed during the past two decades. We find a large cooling bias in ERSST version 3b and smaller but significant cooling biases in HadSST3 and COBE-SST from 2003 to the present, with respect to most series examined. These results suggest that reported rates of SST warming in recent years have been underestimated in these three data sets. PMID:28070556

  19. Emerita analoga recruit populations and correlations with sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettway, J.; Quan, H.; Juarez, F.; Vicencio, M.; Ng, N.; Careers in Science Intern Program

    2010-12-01

    The Careers in Science program at the California Academy of Sciences is a science internship for students from groups traditionally under-represented in the sciences. Starting in 2003, interns have participated in the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association's LiMPETS Sandy Beach Monitoring program, assessing populations of Emerita analoga, the Pacific mole crab. E. analoga, an inhabitant of intertidal swash zones along the coast from Alaska to Baja California, is an important species in the sandy beach intertidal food web. Weekly, during the months of June, July and August, a group of interns go to stairwell 18 of San Francisco’s Ocean Beach in Golden Gate National Recreational Area to systematically collect live E. analoga samples and data. Along a 50 meter sampling area, five transects with ten samples in the swash zone are taken and recorded. Collected E. analoga are sexed (male, female, female w/eggs, and recruit) and measured for carapace size. Newly settled E. analoga (recruit) populations have declined in recent years. However, beginning in 2009, recruit populations began to increase in number, particularly in 2010. Our group hypothesized that this increase in recruitment is correlated with increased sea surface temperature. It has been reported that some planktonic animals become more abundant in warmer waters after a major temperature shift. After examining the data, we did not find a correlation between sea surface temperature and recruit populations, leading us to further questions on the cause of this increase in E. analoga recruits.

  20. Atmospheric response to variations in sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Atlas, R.

    1974-01-01

    An extended range prediction experiment was performed with the GISS atmospheric model on a global data to test the sensitivity of the model to sea surface temperature (SST) variation over a two-week forecast period. The use of an initial observed SST field in place of the climatological monthly mean sea temperatures for surface flux calculations in the model was found to have a significant effect on the predicted precipitation over the ocean, with enhanced convection computed over areas where moderately large warm SST anomalies are found. However, there was no detectable positive effect of the SST anomaly field on forecast quality. The influence of the SST anomalies on the daily predicted fields of pressure and geopotential is relatively insignificant up to about one week compared with the growth of prediction error, and is no greater over a two-week period than that resulting from random errors in the initial meteorological state. The 14-day average fields of sea level pressure and 500-mb height predicted by the model, appear to be similarly insensitive to anomalies of sea surface temperature.

  1. An Improved Estimation of COMS-based Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, M.; Seo, M.; Han, K. S.; Shin, J.; Shin, I.

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to implement retrieving Sea Surface Temperature (SST) using geostationary satellite of Korea, Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite/Meteorological Imager (COMS/MI). In this study, IR channels of COMS are corrected using the Global Space-Based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) that produces consistent accuracy of thermal infrared (IR) channels of satellite measurements. The new retrieval method is adopted the Multi-Channel Sea Surface Temperature (MCSST) `split-window' algorithm with First Guess and the quality controlled in-situ buoy data are used the reference data. The new MCSST_FG results are showed that RMSE is 0.85 ºC in day time (0.747 ºC in night time) by comparison with 0.92 ºC (0.827 ºC in night time) of MCSST which is the current operational retrieval method. We found the regional biases are reduced on MCSST_FG algorithm though, there are the skewness and outliers in the analysis of differences retrieved SST and in-situ. It is significant efforts reprocessing and improvement of the satellite COMS SST that expects the COMS SST is made use of thematic climate data record such as Global essential climate variables.

  2. Joint variability of global runoff and global sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 1905-2002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly temperature and precipitation data to compute time series of annual gridded runoff for the analysis period. The annual runoff time series data are combined with gridded annual sea surface temperature data, and the combined dataset is subjected to a principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the primary modes of variability. The first three components from the PCA explain 29% of the total variability in the combined runoff/SST dataset. The first component explains 15% of the total variance and primarily represents long-term trends in the data. The long-term trends in SSTs are evident as warming in all of the oceans. The associated long-term trends in runoff suggest increasing flows for parts of North America, South America, Eurasia, and Australia; decreasing runoff is most notable in western Africa. The second principal component explains 9% of the total variance and reflects variability of the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its associated influence on global annual runoff patterns. The third component explains 5% of the total variance and indicates a response of global annual runoff to variability in North Aflantic SSTs. The association between runoff and North Atlantic SSTs may explain an apparent steplike change in runoff that occurred around 1970 for a number of continental regions.

  3. Sea surface wind streaks in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Li, Xiao-Ming; Sha, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Wind streaks are often observed in Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. They are used to determine the sea surface wind direction for sea surface wind field retrievals. It is generally understood that visible wind streaks are caused by roll vortices in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. In this study, 227 X-band spaceborne SAR images of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X acquired from the three FiNO platforms in the North Sea and Baltic Sea were thoroughly analyzed for a comprehensive understanding of the manifestation of wind streaks in SAR images. Approximately 48.0% of the 227 SAR images displayed wind streaks, among which 67.3%, 20.0%, and 12.7% occurred under unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions, respectively. The proportions indicate that wind streaks are more likely to be generated from thermal convection. Further investigations suggest that the inflection point and the wind shear may be essential for the appearance of wind streaks in SAR images under stable atmospheric conditions.

  4. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  5. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  6. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  7. Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity from The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive and Aquarius Mission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Fore, A.; Tang, W.; Hayashi, A.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched in January 2015 to provide global mapping of soil moisture. SMAP has two instruments, a polarimetric radiometer and a multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar. The radar stopped operation on 7 July 2015. Both instruments operate at L-band frequencies and share a single 6-m rotating mesh antenna, producing a fixed incidence angle conical scan at 40° across a 1000-km swath. We have analyzed all available SMAP and Aquarius data to improve the geophysical model functions, relating the L-band radar and radiometer data to ocean surface wind speed, wind direction, significant wave height and sea surface temperature. We find that it is necessary to account for the fourth order harmonics for wind direction effect and SST influence on sea surface scattering. The SMAP SSS retrieval algorithm developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory leverages the QuikSCAT and Aquarius algorithms to account for SMAP's two-look geometry for retrieval of SSS and wind speed. The retrieval algorithm has been applied to more than one year of SMAP radiometer data. We have also applied the Combined Active Passive (CAP) algorithm to about three months of SMAP data from April to early July 2015. The spatial patterns of the SMAP SSS agree well with climatological distributions, but exhibit several unique spatial and temporal features. The SMAP SSS reveals the temporal evolutions of freshwater plumes from several major rivers, consistent with the timing of rainy and dry seasons, indicated in the SMAP's soil moisture and Global Precipitation Missions' daily rain products. Accuracy assessment has been performed by comparison with in situ SSS data from buoys and ARGO floats. The accuracy of monthly averaged SMAP product is about 0.2 psu for tropics and mid-latitudes. The improved roughness model function has also been applied to the Aquarius data, resulting in reduction in standard deviation errors and seasonal bias at high latitudes.

  8. Decoupling of Northern North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature and Deep Circulation during Abrupt Glacial Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, L.; Barker, S.; Hall, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    Abrupt climate change is a prominent feature of the ice ages. The prevailing view is that these changes are related to fluctuations in ocean circulation, possibly triggered by changes in freshwater forcing as a result of ice-rafting events in the North Atlantic. Here we investigate this view by presenting results from a sediment core in the Northern North Atlantic (ODP 983 60.4°N, 23.6°W, 1984m depth, ~12-35 kyr), which is ideally positioned to monitor changes in the flow speed of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Waters. The mean size of silt (10-63 μm) has been proposed as a useful flow speed indicator, but can be influenced the presence of ice-rafted detritus (IRD). We present grain size data obtained using a Coulter counter as well as a laser diffraction particle sizer, which we compare to the proportion of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (proxy for sea surface temperature) and manually counted coarse IRD. Grain size results are comparable for the two techniques and the influence of IRD is clearly visible in the mean size data. We use end-member modelling to derive an IRD-free estimate of flow speed variability and find clear reductions in the flow speed associated with IRD input. Sea surface temperature however, appears to vary independently from IRD input and hence deep circulation. In particular, IRD appears and current speed decreases after the onset of cooling and additional temperature variability is observed that is not associated with IRD events or changes in the deep circulation. These results question the classical view of freshwater forcing as the driver of abrupt climate change. We suggest that North Atlantic temperature variability may be related to shifts in position of the polar front and that, while IRD events may be coeval with changes in the deep circulation, these changes are not required to explain the abrupt temperature variability in the Northern North Atlantic.

  9. Sea Surface Salinity and Ocean Color Observations in the Northern Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J. C.; Burrage, D. M.; Wang, D. W.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne mapping of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) has been performed using L-Band radiometers for over 15 years, and has been operationally practical for over a decade. Ocean scale L-band observations of SSS are now obtained by satellite. ESA's SMOS has been operational for over two years and NASA's Aquarius satellite, launched in Jun, 2011, for over 6 months. Aircraft SSS complements satellite measurements by measuring nearer to coasts and with finer (˜1 km) spatial resolution. Due to the large effective pixel size of the satellite L-Band SSS measurements(˜35-80km), SMOS measurements do not reach the coast. Land microwave brightness signal in a given pixel contaminates the measurement of sea surface brightness temperature. However, the high signal to noise ratio (salinity contrast of 7-15 psu over 10km in some cases) of the coastal salinity signal, due to large freshwater sources, may dominate land contamination effects, to allow closer than usual SMOS SSS observations of strong coastal salinity patterns. An additional method to estimate SSS near coasts is using ocean color. Very near to coasts, freshwater sources such as rivers are relatively rich in Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). As freshwater mixes with saltwater, salinity increases and CDOM concentrations fall. For conservative mixing, there is an inverse linear relation between CDOM and salinity, allowing estimates of SSS based on CDOM. The airborne sensors we use during STARRS flights include 2 SeaWifs airborne simulator sensors, one upward looking and one downward looking, as well as digital cameras, which we have used to identify color fronts. These provide ocean color measurements in addition to the STARRS microwave SSS measurements. We present results from an airborne campaign in the northern Gulf of Mexico, June 2-13, 2011. We made four types of flights. 1) Underflights of SMOS tracks at times coincident with SMOS passes. 2) Zig-zag flights along the coast, between Texas and Mississippi. 3

  10. Variability of Sea Surface Temperature Response to Tropical Cyclones along the NEC Bifurcation Latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, I.; Villanoy, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The east of the Philippines serves as an entry point to an annual average of 20 tropical cyclones. The ocean is dynamic where the North Equatorial Current (NEC) bifurcates into the Kurushio Current to the north and Mindanao Current to the south. The displacement and intensity of NEC bifurcation in the region varies seasonally and interannually driven by local monsoons and ENSO. The variability of the NEC bifurcation latitude may alter the origins of the Kuroshio and modify the sea surface temperature field, which can alter the strength of the typhoons and upper ocean response. This paper aims to characterize the variability of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Response to Tropical Cyclones along with the NEC Bifurcation latitude using daily merged product of the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E), Sea Surface Height (SSH) and SSH Anomaly (SSHA) from AVISO and background climatological D26 (depth of 26 °C) and T100 (depth integrated temperature up to 100 meters) from ARGO profiles and CTD data from WOA09 from 2003 to 2012. SSH measurements from this period were used as a proxy for determining the bifurcation latitude (YB). Characteristics of the meridional distribution from 0° to 30°N of D26 is homogenous along 10-15°N. Monthly mean D26 along 10-15°N, 125-145°E shows high correlation with YB . Variations of the D26 and T100 showed deepening and warming along with YB. Two regions were derived from meridional distribution of T100 namely BSouth (<15°N) where background climatological condition is warm all throughout the year with deep D26 and BNorth (>15°N), where background climatological condition is shallow (D26) and varies seasonally. These regions where used to compare variability with respect to SST recovery time and the SST maximum change (ΔSSTmax) along with other factors such as TCs translation speed (TS) and intensity based on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Results showed that in both regions SST Recovery

  11. Persistence of Rainfall Imprint on SMOS Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Jacqueline; Reverdin, Gilles; Martin, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission monitors sea surface salinity (SSS) over the global ocean for more than 5 years. In previous studies, Boutin et al. (2014) have shown a clear freshening of SMOS SSS under rain cells of about -0.14pss/mm/hr at moderate wind speed (3-12m/s). This order of magnitude is compatible with in situ drifters observations taken at 45cm depth while SMOS SSS are at about 1cm depth and at a mean spatial resolution of 43km. Using Aquarius satellite SSS, Meissner and Wentz (2014) found a SSS decrease under rain cells of -0.12pss/mm/hr at 7 m/s wind speed, consistent with SMOS estimate considering the lower spatial resolution of Aquarius SSS (about 150km); Santos-Garcia et al. (2014) found an influence of the rain history preceding by a few hours the Aquarius measurement. In most cases, drifters observations also suggest that about half of the freshening observed locally disappears after one hour, likely because of mixing with surrounding waters. In this presentation, we will investigate the temporal and spatial evolution of SMOS SSS after a rain event. Rainfall information will be either derived from SSM/Is measurements (during periods when three SSM/Is satellites provide adequate sampling before and simultaneous to SMOS measurements) or from the NOAA CMORPH products. In order to separate instantaneous from historical effects, we distinguish two cases: 1) rainfall occurs at less than 30mn from SMOS observation but no rain occurred before; 2) rainfall occurred previous to SMOS observation (up to 3 hours before) but has stopped at least 30mn before SMOS acquisition. In addition to looking at the temporal evolution of SMOS SSS under the rain cell, since both vertical mixing and horizontal stirring may occur, we also investigate the size of the fresh SSS region relative to the size of the rain cell. Boutin, J., N. Martin, G. Reverdin, S. Morisset, X. Yin, L. Centurioni, and N. Reul (2014), Sea surface salinity under rain

  12. Enhancing the microwave absorption properties of amorphous CoO nanosheet-coated Co (hexagonal and cubic phases) through interfacial polarizations.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiushuai; Li, Shimei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Liang, Luyang; Zhao, Biao; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Rui

    2017-09-08

    Core-shell flower-like composites were successfully prepared by a simple polyol method. These composites were formed by coating dual-phased (face-centered cubic [fcc] and hexagonal close-packed [hcp]) Co with amorphous CoO nanosheets. The microwave absorption properties of the flower-like Co@CoO paraffin composites with various Co@CoO amounts were then investigated. Results showed that the paraffin-based composite containing 70wt% flower-like Co@CoO displayed excellent microwave absorption properties (RE=24.74dB·GHz/mm). The minimum reflection loss of -30.4dB was obtained at 16.1GHz with a small thickness of 1.5mm, and 1.5mm bandwidth reached 4.6GHz (13.4-18GHz) below -10dB (90% microwave absorption). The excellent microwave absorption properties of flower-like Co@CoO are attributed to the synergetic effect between magnetic loss and dielectric loss, and the magnetic loss makes a main contribution to absorption. The core-shell flower-like structures with dual Co phases also contributed to microwave absorption. The amorphous CoO nanosheets were able to generate multiple reflections and exhibit scattering. In addition, the novel absorption mechanism that enhanced interfacial polarization was proposed. This enhancement resulted from the presence of interfaces between the hcp and fcc phases and between the core-shell Co@CoO composites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diatom and Geochemical Constraints on Pliocene Sea Surface Conditions on the Wilkes Land Margin, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesselman, C. R.; Taylor-Silva, B.

    2015-12-01

    The mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval in Earth's history to sustain global temperatures within the range of warming predicted for the 21st century, providing an appealing analog with which to examine the changes we might encounter in the coming century. Diatom-based Southern Ocean sea surface and sea ice reconstructions by the USGS Pliocene Research Interpretations and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Group suggest an average +2° summer SST anomaly during the 3.3-3.0 Ma interval relative to modern. Here, we present a reconstruction of Pliocene sea surface conditions from a marine sediment core collected at IODP Site U1361, on the continental rise of the Wilkes Land margin. U1361 biogenic silica concentrations document the alternation of diatom-rich and diatom-poor lithologies; we interpret 8 diatom-rich mudstones within this sequence to record interglacial conditions between 3.8 and 2.8 Ma, across the transition from obliquity control to precession control on East Antarctic ice volumes. This progression also preserves 3 packages of interglacial sediments within the 3.3-3.0 PRISM interval, providing an opportunity for direct comparison to proximal PRISM site Eltanin 50-28. Diatom assemblages in both cores are characterized by Fragilariopsis barronii and Rouxia antarctica, extinct species with an inferred ecological preference for waters south of the polar front. However F. weaveri, an extinct diatom with inferred preference for more northerly waters and moderate abundance in E50-28, has not been identified at U1361. This may indicate that the polar frontal zone migrated across E50-28 (62° 54'S) but remained north of U1361 (64° 25'S) during the mid-Pliocene. This interpretation is bolstered by the low abundance of extant polar front species (e.g., Thalassiosira oliverana, T. lentiginosa) at U1361; these diatoms dominate the E50-28 assemblage. In contrast, the U1361 assemblage includes a number of extant sea ice indicators (F. sublinearis, F. curta, Chaetoceros

  14. Evaporation and solar irradiance as regulators of sea surface temperature in annual and interannual changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Zhang, Anzhen; Bishop, James K. B.

    1994-01-01

    Seven years of net surface solar irradiance (S) derived from cloud information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and 4 years of surface latent heat flux (E) derived from the observations of the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) were used to examine the relation between surface heat fluxes and sea surface temperature (T(sub s)) in their global geographical distribution, seasonal cycle, and interannual variation. The relations of seasonal changes imply that evaporation cooling is significant over most of the ocean and that solar heating is the main drive for the change of T(sub s) away from the equatorial wave guide where ocean dynamics may be more important. However, T(sub s) is not the most direct and significant factor in the seasonal changes of S and E over most of the ocean; the solar incident angle may be more important to S, and wind speed and air humidity are found to correlate better with E. Significant local correlations between anomalies of T(sub s) and S and between anomalies of T(sub s) and E are found in the central equatorial Pacific; both types of correlation are negative. The influence of ocean dynamics in changing T(sub s) in the tropical ocean cannot be ignored.

  15. Atmospheric correction for sea surface temperature retrieval from single thermal channel radiometer data onboard Kalpana satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Naveen R.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Mathur, Aloke K.; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2011-06-01

    An atmospheric correction method has been applied on sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval algorithm using Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) single window channel radiance data onboard Kalpana satellite (K-SAT). The technique makes use of concurrent water vapour fields available from Microwave Imager onboard Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/TMI) satellite. Total water vapour content and satellite zenith angle dependent SST retrieval algorithm has been developed using Radiative Transfer Model [MODTRAN ver3.0] simulations for Kalpana 10.5-12.5 μm thermal window channel. Retrieval of Kalpana SST (K-SST) has been carried out for every half-hourly acquisition of Kalpana data for the year 2008 to cover whole annual cycle of SST over Indian Ocean (IO). Validation of the retrieved corrected SST has been carried out using near-simultaneous observations of ship and buoys datasets covering Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and IO regions. A significant improvement in Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) of K-SST with respect to buoy (1.50-1.02 K) and to ship datasets (1.41-1.19 K) is seen with the use of near real-time water vapour fields of TMI. Furthermore, comparison of the retrieved SST has also been carried out using near simultaneous observations of TRMM/TMI SST over IO regions. The analysis shows that K-SST has overall cold bias of 1.17 K and an RMSD of 1.09 K after bias correction.

  16. Mean sea surface and gravity investigations using TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    From a broad point of view, we will be concerned with studying global ocean circulation patterns on the basis of ocean surface determinations with geoid undulation information. In addition, we will study local variations of the gravity field implied by the altimeter data. These general goals are reflected in the title of our investigation. To meet our general goal, we have defined a number of specific objectives: (1) sea surface topography representation; (2) mean sea surface determination; (3) development of local geoid models; (4) mean sea surface comparisons; (5) sea surface topographic files; and (6) gravity anomaly determination.

  17. Correcting infrared satellite estimates of sea surface temperature for atmospheric water vapor attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Yu, Yunyue; Wick, Gary A.; Schluessel, Peter; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A new satellite sea surface temperature (SST) algorithm is developed that uses nearly coincident measurements from the microwave special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) to correct for atmospheric moisture attenuation of the infrared signal from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). This new SST algorithm is applied to AVHRR imagery from the South Pacific and Norwegian seas, which are then compared with simultaneous in situ (ship based) measurements of both skin and bulk SST. In addition, an SST algorithm using a quadratic product of the difference between the two AVHRR thermal infrared channels is compared with the in situ measurements. While the quadratic formulation provides a considerable improvement over the older cross product (CPSST) and multichannel (MCSST) algorithms, the SSM/I corrected SST (called the water vapor or WVSST) shows overall smaller errors when compared to both the skin and bulk in situ SST observations. Applied to individual AVHRR images, the WVSST reveals an SST difference pattern (CPSST-WVSST) similar in shape to the water vapor structure while the CPSST-quadratic SST difference appears unrelated in pattern to the nearly coincident water vapor pattern. An application of the WVSST to week-long composites of global area coverage (GAC) AVHRR data demonstrates again the manner in which the WVSST corrects the AVHRR for atmospheric moisture attenuation. By comparison the quadratic SST method underestimates the SST corrections in the lower latitudes and overestimates the SST in th e higher latitudes. Correlations between the AVHRR thermal channel differences and the SSM/I water vapor demonstrate the inability of the channel difference to represent water vapor in the midlatitude and high latitudes during summer. Compared against drifting buoy data the WVSST and the quadratic SST both exhibit the same general behavior with the relatively small differences with the buoy temperatures.

  18. Correcting infrared satellite estimates of sea surface temperature for atmospheric water vapor attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Yu, Yunyue; Wick, Gary A.; Schluessel, Peter; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A new satellite sea surface temperature (SST) algorithm is developed that uses nearly coincident measurements from the microwave special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) to correct for atmospheric moisture attenuation of the infrared signal from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). This new SST algorithm is applied to AVHRR imagery from the South Pacific and Norwegian seas, which are then compared with simultaneous in situ (ship based) measurements of both skin and bulk SST. In addition, an SST algorithm using a quadratic product of the difference between the two AVHRR thermal infrared channels is compared with the in situ measurements. While the quadratic formulation provides a considerable improvement over the older cross product (CPSST) and multichannel (MCSST) algorithms, the SSM/I corrected SST (called the water vapor or WVSST) shows overall smaller errors when compared to both the skin and bulk in situ SST observations. Applied to individual AVHRR images, the WVSST reveals an SST difference pattern (CPSST-WVSST) similar in shape to the water vapor structure while the CPSST-quadratic SST difference appears unrelated in pattern to the nearly coincident water vapor pattern. An application of the WVSST to week-long composites of global area coverage (GAC) AVHRR data demonstrates again the manner in which the WVSST corrects the AVHRR for atmospheric moisture attenuation. By comparison the quadratic SST method underestimates the SST corrections in the lower latitudes and overestimates the SST in th e higher latitudes. Correlations between the AVHRR thermal channel differences and the SSM/I water vapor demonstrate the inability of the channel difference to represent water vapor in the midlatitude and high latitudes during summer. Compared against drifting buoy data the WVSST and the quadratic SST both exhibit the same general behavior with the relatively small differences with the buoy temperatures.

  19. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third of a series of three workshops, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, to investigate the state of the art in global sea surface temperature measurements from space. Three workshops were necessary to process and analyze sufficient data from which to draw conclusions on the accuracy and reliability of the satellite measurements. In this workshop, the final two (out of a total of four) months of satellite and in situ data chosen for study were processed and evaluated. Results from the AVHRR, HIRS, SMMR, and VAS sensors, in comparison with in situ data from ships, XBTs, and buoys, confirmed satellite rms accuracies in the 0.5 to 1.0 C range, but with variable biases. These accuracies may degrade under adverse conditions for specific sensors. A variety of color maps, plots, and statistical tables are provided for detailed study of the individual sensor SST measurements.

  20. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Increased occurrence of more intense tropical storms intruding further poleward has been foreshadowed as one of the potential consequences of global warming. This scenario is based almost entirely on the general circulation model predictions of warmer sea surface temperature (SST) with increasing levels of atmospheric CO[sub 2] and some theories of tropical cyclone intensification that support the notion of more intense systems with warmer SST. Whether storms are able to achieve this theoretically determined more intense state depends on whether the temperature of the underlying water is the dominant factor in tropical cyclone intensification. An examination of the historical data record in a number of ocean basins is used to identify the relative importance of SST in the tropical cyclone intensification process. The results reveal that SST alone is an inadequate predictor of tropical cyclone intensity. Other factors known to affect tropical cyclone frequency and intensity are discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Observations on electromagnetic bias in radar altimeter sea surface measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Edward J.; Jackson, Frederick C.; Uliana, Enzo A.; Swift, Robert N.

    1989-01-01

    Because the relative radar cross section of the sea surface increases below mean sea level and decreases above it, the range measurements of satellite radar altimeters are biased toward the wave troughs. Published and unpublished direct measurements of this electromagnetic (EM) bias are examined as well as the predictions of theoretical developments. The EM bias is predominantly a function of the radar frequency used, averaging 1.2 percent of the wave height of Ka band and 3.3 percent of the wave height at X band. The airborne measurements present a consistent picture of the variation of the relative radar cross section as a function of deviation from mean sea level. A technique to measure EM bias at the Ku and C band operating frequencies of the Topex satellite altimeter is described.

  2. Sea surface microplastics in Slovenian part of the Northern Adriatic.

    PubMed

    Gajšt, Tamara; Bizjak, Tine; Palatinus, Andreja; Liubartseva, Svitlana; Kržan, Andrej

    2016-12-15

    Plastics are the most common material of marine litter and have become a global pollution concern. They are persistent in the environment where they gradually degrade into increasingly smaller particles-microplastics (MP). Our study presents results of sea-surface monitoring for MP in the Slovenian part of the Trieste Bay in the Northern Adriatic Sea. In 17 trawls conducted over a 20-month period we found a high average concentration of 406×10(3)MPparticles/km(2). Over 80% of the particles were identified as polyethylene. The significant variability of MP concentrations obtained on different sampling dates is explained by use of surface current maps and a recently developed Markov chain marine litter distribution model for the Adriatic Sea.

  3. Remote sensing of the sea surface by millimeterwave SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, H.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Pagels, A.

    2006-09-01

    On several occasions the sea surface has been measured with the mmW radar MEMPHIS in SAR geometry. This research was mainly aimed to investigate the ability of SAR for imaging of disturbances of the water surface at mm-wave radar bands and to gather data on the statistical properties of sea clutter. It can be suspected, that the probability density functions for the reflectivity of sea clutter is as well dependent on the radar wavelength as on resolution, as different scattering processes may significantly contribute. While most of the available millimeterwave data have been collected with a resolution of 75 cm, improvements of the MEMPHIS radar now allow a resolution of about 20 cm. The paper describes the measurement set-up, the evaluation methods and discusses the influence of resolution and radar frequency on sea clutter characteristics as found during the experiments.

  4. Radar studies of the sea surface - An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of different radars have been used to observe the sea surface. The instruments include scatterometers to measure wind velocity, altimeters to measure wind speed and wave height, synthetic aperture radars (SAR) to map the radar reflectivity of the surface in order to see ocean surface waves and other phenomena, and two-frequency radars to measure ocean wavelength. The present investigation is concerned with the accuracy of the measurements of particular oceanic variables, improved means of calculating these variables, and a comparison of the relative similarities and differences among the various radars. Wind speed can be measured to useful accuracy from space using scatterometers such as that on Seasat. Significant wave heights can be measured to useful accuracy from space using altimeters, the present accuracy being + or - 10% for altimeters such as that on Seasat.

  5. Interdecadal variability of the sea surface height around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Tamaki; Sakurai, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    The variability of the sea surface height (SSH) around Japan during 1960-2002 was investigated using an ocean general circulation model. The first EOF mode of the simulated SSH change has bidecadal variability and exhibits simultaneous variations around Japan that are in good agreement with the observed sea level changes along the Japanese coast. The variability is caused primarily by the meridional shift of the boundary between the subtropical and subpolar gyres due to shifting of the westerlies over the central North Pacific. The second mode of SSH change indicates a north-south dipole structure around Japan, that results from a change in the strength of the subtropical gyre due to a change in the magnitude of the westerlies. The rising (descending) trend of the sea level observed in the western (eastern) part of Japan in the past 40 years is determined by the increasing trend of the westerlies.

  6. Tropical cyclone rainfall area controlled by relative sea surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanluan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclone rainfall rates have been projected to increase in a warmer climate. The area coverage of tropical cyclones influences their impact on human lives, yet little is known about how tropical cyclone rainfall area will change in the future. Here, using satellite data and global atmospheric model simulations, we show that tropical cyclone rainfall area is controlled primarily by its environmental sea surface temperature (SST) relative to the tropical mean SST (that is, the relative SST), while rainfall rate increases with increasing absolute SST. Our result is consistent with previous numerical simulations that indicated tight relationships between tropical cyclone size and mid-tropospheric relative humidity. Global statistics of tropical cyclone rainfall area are not expected to change markedly under a warmer climate provided that SST change is relatively uniform, implying that increases in total rainfall will be confined to similar size domains with higher rainfall rates. PMID:25761457

  7. Correcting biases in ICOADS sea surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, D.; Huybers, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Sea-surface temperature (SSTs) estimates based on the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) combine records across various measurement types that must be corrected for biases. For example, bucket measurements are known to be colder relative to engine room intake (ERI) measurements. Here, to further examine biases amongst ERI, bucket, and buoy measurements, we examine the data according to groups of ships that can be distinctly identified within the ICOADS dataset. Bias corrections are estimated according to classes of data for each season based on collocated records using a multiple linear regression approach. Accurate inter-comparison also benefits from accounting for diurnal variability for each measurement type. Results are compared with existing bias correction estimates.

  8. Change point detection of the Persian Gulf sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric change point models (CPMs) were applied to detect change point in the annual Persian Gulf sea surface temperature anomalies (PGSSTA) time series for the period 1951-2013. The PGSSTA time series, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series. The pre-whitened PGSSTA time series were utilized as the input file of change point models. Both the applied parametric and nonparametric CPMs estimated the change point in the PGSSTA in 1992. The PGSSTA follow the normal distribution up to 1992 and thereafter, but with a different mean value after year 1992. The estimated slope of linear trend in PGSSTA time series for the period 1951-1992 was negative; however, that was positive after the detected change point. Unlike the PGSSTA, the applied CPMs suggested no change point in the Niño3.4SSTA time series.

  9. THE IMPACT OF THE SPECTRAL RESPONSE OF AN ACHROMATIC HALF-WAVE PLATE ON THE MEASUREMENT OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, C.; Gold, B.; Hanany, S.; Baccigalupi, C.; Leach, S.; Didier, J.; Johnson, B. R.; Miller, A.; Jaffe, A.; O'Dea, D.; Matsumura, T.

    2012-03-10

    We study the impact of the spectral dependence of the linear polarization rotation induced by an achromatic half-wave plate on measurements of cosmic microwave background polarization in the presence of astrophysical foregrounds. We focus on the systematic effects induced on the measurement of inflationary gravitational waves by uncertainties in the polarization and spectral index of Galactic dust. We find that for the experimental configuration and noise levels of the balloon-borne EBEX experiment, which has three frequency bands centered at 150, 250, and 410 GHz, a crude dust subtraction process mitigates systematic effects to below detectable levels for 10% polarized dust and tensor-to-scalar ratio of as low as r = 0.01. We also study the impact of uncertainties in the spectral response of the instrument. With a top-hat model of the spectral response for each band, characterized by band center and bandwidth, and with the same crude dust subtraction process, we find that these parameters need to be determined to within 1 and 0.8 GHz at 150 GHz; 9 and 2.0 GHz at 250 GHz; and 20 and 14 GHz at 410 GHz, respectively. The approach presented in this paper is applicable to other optical elements that exhibit polarization rotation as a function of frequency.

  10. The 2015-2016 Arctic winter: Perspectives on extremes in polar processing and meteorological variability from the 12-year record of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, Michelle; Manney, Gloria; Lambert, Alyn; Livesey, Nathaniel; Lawrence, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, the Arctic lower stratosphere has seen some of the most dynamically disturbed winters, with stratospheric sudden warmings that curtailed polar processing early in the season and limited chemical ozone loss, as well as several winters marked by exceptionally cold conditions and severe chemical ozone loss. The occurrence in recent winters of different combinations of extreme meteorological conditions, and their impact on polar chemical processes, has underscored the Arctic stratosphere's sensitivity to a spectrum of dynamical variability. Launched as part of NASA's Aura satellite in July 2004, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) provides an extensive suite of measurements enabling quantification of polar processing and chemical ozone loss. Here we use MLS observations in conjunction with meteorological analyses in a comprehensive analysis of the Arctic winter of 2015-2016. An unusually large volume of low temperatures in the early winter led to strong depletion in gas-phase HNO3 and H2O associated with polar stratospheric cloud formation. As a consequence of this early-winter processing and an elongated vortex with significant portions exposed to sunlight, substantial chlorine activation (enhanced abundances of ClO, depressed abundances of HCl) was evident far earlier than is typical in Arctic winter. The degree of polar processing and chemical ozone loss in this winter will be placed in the context of the previous 11 Arctic winters observed by Aura MLS.

  11. Sea Surface Salinity signature of tropical Atlantic interannual modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awo, Mesmin; Alory, Gael; Da-Allada, Casimir; Jouanno, Julien; Delcroix, Thierry; Baloitcha, Ezinvi

    2017-04-01

    Interannual climate variability in the tropical Atlantic is dominated by two internal modes: an equatorial and a meridional mode. The equatorial mode is partly responsible for sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies observed in boreal summer in the Gulf of Guinea. The meridional mode peaks in boreal spring as an inter-hemispheric SST fluctuation. Previous studies show that these modes affect the migration of the inter tropical convergence zone which drives regional precipitation. In this study, we extracted the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) signature of these modes from in situ data. The results indicate strong SSS anomalies in the equatorial, north west and south east tropical Atlantic related to the equatorial mode. Moreover, the results also indicate the existence of a meridional SSS dipole in the equatorial region, strong SSS anomalies in north and south tropical Atlantic and in runoff regions, related to the meridional mode. Using a mixed-layer salt budget in a realistic model, we investigated the oceanic and/or atmospheric processes responsible for this signature: For the equatorial mode, both fresh water flux and horizontal advection explain the observed signature in the north equatorial region, but in the south equatorial region, the signature is explained by the combined contribution of total (horizontal and vertical) advection and vertical diffusion. For the meridional mode, changes in fresh water flux explain the observed equatorial dipole while the signature in runoff regions is explained by the total advection. In the north west and south east tropical Atlantic, only horizontal advection is important for explaining the signature of these two modes.

  12. Albatrosses as Ocean Samplers of Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, S. A.; Kappes, M.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D. P.; Weber, R.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2006-12-01

    Albatrosses are unique ocean voyagers because they range so widely and travel at speeds exceeding 90 km per hour. Because they can integrate vast areas of open-ocean, albatrosses are ideal ocean samplers. Between 2003 and 2005 breeding seasons, 21 Laysan and 15 black-footed albatrosses (body mass 2.5 to 3.5 kg) were equipped with 6 g leg-mounted geolocation archival data loggers at Tern Island, French Frigate Shoals, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The tags sampled environmental temperatures every 480 or 540 s and provided a single location per day for the duration of deployment. Whenever an albatross landed on the sea surface to feed or rest, the tag sampled sea surface temperature (SST). After nearly one year of deployment, 31 albatrosses were recaptured and 29 tags provided complete records. A total of 377,455 SST readings were obtained over 7,360 bird-days at sea. Given the location errors in the geolocation methodology (200 km) and the lack of temporal resolution (1 location per day), the SST measurements can only be used to characterize broad-scale correlates between albatross distribution and the ocean environment. However, in February 2006, we deployed 45 g GPS data loggers on 10 breeding albatrosses for 2-4 day deployments. The GPS loggers were attached to feathers on the albatrosses backs, they sampled every 10 s, and were accurate to within 10 m. One albatross was also equipped with the same leg-mounted archival tag that sampled SST every 8 s. This albatross collected 6,289 SST measurements with complementary GPS quality locations in 3 days at sea. These results highlight the efficacy of albatrosses as ocean samplers. Given that Laysan and black- footed albatrosses range throughout the North Pacific Ocean, it is conceivable that these seabirds could someday become sentinels of changing oceanic conditions. Moreover, these technologies provide exciting new information about the oceanic habitats of North Pacific albatrosses.

  13. Investigation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies over Cyprus area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Andreas; Akçit, Nuhcan

    2016-08-01

    The temperature of the sea surface has been identified as an important parameter of the natural environment, governing processes that occur in the upper ocean. This paper focuses on the analysis of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies at the greater area of Cyprus. For that, SST data derived from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on board both Aqua and Terra sun synchronous satellites were used. A four year period was chosen as a first approach to address and describe this phenomenon. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has been used as an integrated platform of analysis and presentation in addition of the support of MATLAB®. The methodology consists of five steps: (i) Collection of MODIS SST imagery, (ii) Development of the digital geo-database; (iii) Model and run the methodology in GIS as a script; (iv) Calculation of SST anomalies; and (v) Visualization of the results. The SST anomaly values have presented a symmetric distribution over the study area with an increase trend through the years of analysis. The calculated monthly and annual average SST anomalies (ASST) make more obvious this trend, with negative and positive SST changes to be distributed over the study area. In terms of seasons, the same increase trend presented during spring, summer, autumn and winter with 2013 to be the year with maximum ASST observed values. Innovative aspects comprise of straightforward integration and modeling of available tools, providing a versatile platform of analysis and semi-automation of the operation. In addition, the fine resolution maps that extracted from the analysis with a wide spatial coverage, allows the detail representation of SST and ASST respectively in the region.

  14. Detecting Global Hydrological Cycle Intensification in Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poague, J.; Stine, A.

    2016-12-01

    Global warming is expected to intensify the global hydrological cycle, but significant regional differences exist in the predicted response. The proposed zonal mean thermodynamic response is enhanced horizontal moisture transport associated with increased saturation vapor pressure, which in turn drives additional net precipitation in the tropics and at high latitudes and additional net evaporation in the subtropics. Sea surface salinity (SSS) anomalies are forced from above by changes in evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) and thus will respond to changes in the global hydrological cycle, opening the possibility of using historical SSS anomalies to diagnose the response of the hydrological cycle to warming. We estimate zonal mean SSS trends in the Atlantic and Pacific ocean basins from 1955-2015 to test whether historical changes in the global hydrological cycle are consistent with a primarily thermodynamic response. Motivated by this observation, we calculate the sensitivity of basin zonal-mean SSS anomalies to sea surface temperature (SST) forcing as a function of timescale to diagnose and estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of the purely thermodynamic signal as a function of timescale. High-frequency variability in SSS anomalies is likely to be influenced by variability in atmospheric circulation, complicating the attribution of the link between basin zonal-mean SSS anomalies and global SST anomalies. We therefore estimate the basin zonal mean SSS anomaly response to the major modes of large-scale dynamic variability. We find a strong correlation between detrended zonal-mean SSS anomalies and the Pacific-North American index (R=0.71,P<0.01) in the Pacific Ocean. We interpret the relationship between zonal mean SSS anomalies and temperature in terms of the relative contribution of thermodynamic and dynamic processes.

  15. Estimating sea surface salinity in coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico using visible channels on SNPP-VIIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermeulen, Ryan A.; Arnone, Robert; Ladner, Sherwin; Martinolich, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Sea surface salinity is determined using the visible channels from the Visual Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to derive regional algorithms for the Gulf of Mexico by normalizing to seasonal river discharge. The dilution of river discharge with open ocean waters and the surface salinity is estimated by tracking the surface spectral signature. The water leaving radiances derived from atmospherically-corrected and calibrated 750-m resolution visible M-bands (410, 443, 486, 551, 671 nm) are applied to bio-optical algorithms and subsequent multivariate statistical methods to derive regional empirical relationships between satellite radiances and surface salinity measurements. Although radiance to salinity is linked to CDOM dilution, we explored alternative statistical relationships to account for starting conditions. In situ measurements are obtained from several moorings spread across the Mississippi Sound and Mobile Bay, with a salinity range of 0.1 - 33. Data were collected over all seasons in the year 2013 in order to assess inter-annual variability. The seasonal spectral signatures at the river mouth were used to track the fresh water end members and used to develop a seasonal slope and bias between salinity and radiance. Results show an increased spatial resolution for remote detection of coastal sea surface salinity from space, compared to the Aquarius Microwave salinity. Characterizing the coastal surface salinity has a significant impact on the physical circulation which affects the coastal ecosystems. Results identify locations and dissipation of the river plumes and can provide direct data for assimilation into physical circulation models.

  16. Seasonal sea surface and sea ice signal in the fjords of Eastern Greenland from CryoSat-2 SARin altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulaitijiang, Adili; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Stenseng, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using SAR-Interferometry. This enabled qualified measurements of sea surface height (SST) in the fjords in Greenland. Scoresbysund fjord on the east coast of Greenland is the largest fjord in the world which is also covered by CryoSat-2 SAR-In mask making it a good test region. Also, the tide gauge operated by DTU Space is sitting in Scoresbysund bay, which provides solid ground-based sea level variation records throughout the year. We perform an investigation into sea surface height variation since the start of the Cryosat-2 mission using SAR-In L1B data processed with baseline B processing. We have employed a new develop method for projecting all SAR-In observations in the Fjord onto a centerline up the Fjord. Hereby we can make solid estimates of the annual and (semi-) annual signal in sea level/sea ice freeboard within the Fjord. These seasonal height variations enable us to derive sea ice freeboard changes in the fjord from satellite altimetry. Derived sea level and sea-ice freeboard can be validated by comparison with the tide gauge observations for sea level and output from the Microwave Radiometer derived observations of sea ice freeboard developed at the Danish Meteorological Institute.

  17. AVHRR/HIRS (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/High Resolution Infra-Red Sounder) operational method for satellite based sea surface temperature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, C.

    1987-03-01

    A technique is described which was used operationally to produce sea surface temperatures from the NOAA polar orbiting satellites between 1976 and 1981. The single window channel technique used before 1976 is described in NOAA Technical Memorandum NESS 78 while the multiple window channel technique (MCSST) applied since 1981 is well documented in the scientific literature. The report bridges the gap between these two periods and provides a continuous record of the evolution of one of NOAA's primary satellite derived meteorological products.

  18. Response of sea surface fugacity of CO2 to the SAM shift south of Tasmania: Regional differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Gao, Libao; Cai, Wei-Jun; Yu, Weidong; Wei, Meng

    2015-05-01

    Using observational data collected south of Tasmania during 14 austral summer cruises during 1993-2011, we examined the response of sea surface fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) shift, which occurred around 2000. In the southern part of the Southern Ocean (SO) or the Polar Zone (PZ) and the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ), fCO2 increased faster at the sea surface than in the atmosphere before the SAM shift, but not after the shift. In the northern part of the SO or the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ), however, surface fCO2 increased faster than atmospheric fCO2 both before and after the shift. The SAM shift had an important influence on the surface fCO2 trend in the PZ and PFZ but not in the SAZ, which we attribute to differences in regional oceanographic processes (upwelling versus nonupwelling). The SAM shift may have reversed the negative trend of SO CO2 uptake.

  19. Global monthly sea surface nitrate fields estimated from remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Information about oceanic nitrate is crucial for making inferences about marine biological production and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. While there are no optical properties that allow direct estimation of inorganic nitrogen, its correlation with other biogeochemical variables may permit its inference from satellite data. Here we report a new method for estimating monthly mean surface nitrate concentrations employing local multiple linear regressions on a global 1° by 1° resolution grid, using satellite-derived sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth. Our method is able to reproduce the interannual variability of independent in situ nitrate observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series, the Hawaii Ocean Time series, the California coast, and the southern New Zealand region. Our new method is shown to be more accurate than previous algorithms and thus can provide improved information on temporal and spatial nutrient variations beyond the climatological mean at regional and global scales.

  20. Reionization on Large Scales. III. Predictions for Low-l Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and High-l Kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, N.; Natarajan, A.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2013-10-01

    We present new predictions for cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature (on small angular scales) and polarization (on large angular scales) anisotropies induced during the epoch of reionization (EoR). Using a novel method calibrated from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we model the EoR in large volumes (L >~ 2 Gpc h -1). We find that the EoR contribution to the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich power spectrum (patchy kSZ) ranges between ~0.6-2.8 μK2 at l = 3000 for the explored parameter space. For each model, the patchy kSZ power spectrum is calculated from three large 15° × 15° maps for better numerical convergence. Decreasing the size of these maps biases the overall patchy kSZ power to higher values. We find that the amplitude of the patchy kSZ power spectrum at l = 3000 follows simple scalings of D_{\\ell =3000}^{{kSZ}} \\propto \\bar{z} and D_{\\ell =3000}^{{kSZ}} \\propto \\Delta _{z}^{0.51} for the mean redshift (\\bar{z}) and duration (Δ z ) of reionization. Using the constraints on \\bar{z} from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe seven year results and the lower limit on Δ z from EDGES, we find a lower limit of ~0.4 μK2 at l = 3000. Planck will infer the mean redshift from the Thomson optical depth imprinted in the low-l polarization power spectrum. Future measurements of the high-l CMB power spectrum from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope should detect the patchy kSZ signal if the cross correlation between the thermal SZ effect and the cosmic infrared background is constrained. We show that the combination of temperature and polarization measurements constrains both \\bar{z} and Δ z . The patchy kSZ maps, power spectra templates, and the polarization power spectra will be publicly available.

  1. Experimental studies of thermal radiation intensity dependence on near-water wind speed for rough sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, D. S.; Kuzmin, A. V.; Sadovsky, I. N.

    2016-12-01

    The results of in situ measurements of the characteristics of intrinsic microwave radiation from the sea surface are presented. The studies were carried out on the oceanographic platform of the Experimental Department of Marine Hydrophysical Institute during the summer-fall periods for 3 years, which made it possible to accumulate a significant amount of information on the change in the radiation intensity of under different meteorological conditions. Attention is primarily focused on the construction of wind-radiation dependences and their steepness analysis based on the measurement data obtained by a radiometer-polarimeter with a central frequency of received radiation equal to 37.7 GHz. The results are compared with the previous experimental studies and the model estimates of this effect.

  2. Temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity in the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furevik, Tore; Bentsen, Mats; Drange, Helge; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Korablev, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, the temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Nordic Seas is investigated. The data include a Russian hydrographical database for the Nordic Seas and daily to weekly observations of salinity at Ocean Weather Station Mike (OWSM) (located at 66°N, 2°E in the Norwegian Sea). In addition, output from a medium-resolution version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), forced with daily National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis data, is used to complement the analysis of the temporal and spatial fields constructed from the observational data sets. The Nordic Seas show a strong seasonal variability in the vertical density stratification and the mixed layer (ML) depth, with a weak stratification and a several hundred meters deep ML during winter and a well-defined shallow ML confined to the upper few tens of meters during summer. The seasonal variability strongly influences the strength of the high-frequency variability and to what extent subsurface anomalies are isolated from the surface. High-frequency variability has been investigated in terms of standard deviation of daily SSS, calculated for the different months of the year. From observations at OWSM, typical winter values range from 0.03 to 0.04 psu and summer values range from 0.06 to 0.07 psu. Results from the model simulation show that highest variability is found in frontal areas and in areas with strong stratification and lowest variability in the less stratified areas in the central Norwegian Sea and south of Iceland. Investigation of the interannual variability over the last 50 years shows a marked freshening of the Atlantic Water in the Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Moreover, the strength of the southern sector of the Polar front, as defined by the 34.8-35.0 psu isohalines along the western boundary of the inflowing Atlantic Water, undergoes significant interannual variability

  3. Comparison of remote sensing measurements with a two-scale polarimetric emission and scattering model for sea surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, it has been observed that the brightness temperatures of sea surfaces correlate with the azimuth angle of the ocean wind vector, indicating that ocean wind direction can not only be retrieved from the microwave backscatter, but also from the brightness temperature measurements. In this paper, comparison of the theoretical result calculated from a two-scale emission and scattering model with the Seasat and SSM/I model functions and aircraft measurements is presented and potential applications of microwave polarimetry are discussed. In our two-scale model, the modified reflectivities of large scale surfaces are calculated by extending the small perturbation method to the second order for small scale perturbation with anisotropic directional spectrum. It was found that the modified reflectivities derived from the second-order scattered field agree excellently well with the results obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation technique which numerically calculates the polarimetric reflectivities of one-dimensional random rough surfaces with a power-law spectrum. Without the second-order correction, the modified reflectivities of the rough surfaces are significantly over-estimated and sign errors are observed in the third and fourth Stokes parameters for thermal emissions. The surface spectrum parameters and two-scale cutoff are selected so that the calculated scattering and emission signatures agree with the reported model functions for Seasat and SSM/I. Subsequently, the polarimetric signatures of sea surfaces are illustrated to indicate the possibility of reducing the number of azimuthal looks required for spaceborne sensors in the remote sensing of ocean wind by using the polarimetric information. Furthermore, it is found that contrary to the dependence of backscattering coefficients on incidence angles, polarimetric brightness temperatures display a stronger wind direction dependence in the near nadir-looking direction than away from nadir. Finally, we discuss

  4. Interpretation of observed microwave signatures from ground dual polarization radar and space multi frequency radiometer for the 2011 Grímsvötn volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, M.; Vulpiani, G.; Cimini, D.; Picciotti, E.; Marzano, F. S.

    2013-07-01

    The important role played by ground-based microwave weather radars for the monitoring of volcanic ash clouds has been recently demonstrated. The potential of microwaves from satellite passive and ground-based active sensors to estimate near-source volcanic ash cloud parameters has been also proposed, though with little investigation of their synergy and the role of the radar polarimetry. The goal of this work is to show the potentiality and drawbacks of the X-band Dual Polarization radar measurements (DPX) through the data acquired during the latest Grímsvötn volcanic eruptions that took place on May 2011 in Iceland. The analysis is enriched by the comparison between DPX data and the observations from the satellite Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and a C-band Single Polarization (SPC) radar. SPC, DPX, and SSMIS instruments cover a large range of the microwaves spectrum, operating respectively at 5.4, 3.2, and 0.16-1.6 cm wavelengths. The multi-source comparison is made in terms of Total Columnar Concentration (TCC). The latter is estimated from radar observables using the "Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval for dual-Polarization X band systems" (VARR-PX) algorithm and from SSMIS brightness temperature (BT) using a linear BT-TCC relationship. The BT-TCC relationship has been compared with the analogous relation derived from SSMIS and SPC radar data for the same case study. Differences between these two linear regression curves are mainly attributed to an incomplete observation of the vertical extension of the ash cloud, a coarser spatial resolution and a more pronounced non-uniform beam filling effect of SPC measurements (260 km far from the volcanic vent) with respect to the DPX (70 km from the volcanic vent). Results show that high-spatial-resolution DPX radar data identify an evident volcanic plume signature, even though the interpretation of the polarimetric variables and the related retrievals is not always straightforward, likely due to the

  5. Enhancing the Arctic Mean Sea Surface and Mean Dynamic Topography with CryoSat-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole B.; Knudsen, Per

    2014-05-01

    A reliable mean sea surface (MSS) is essential to derive a good mean dynamic topography (MDT) and for the estimation of short and long-term changes in the sea surface. The lack of satellite radar altimetry observations above 82 degrees latitude means that existing mean sea surface models have been unreliable in the Arctic Ocean. We here present the latest DTU mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models that includes CryoSat-2 data to improve the reliability in the Arctic Ocean. In an attempt to extrapolate across the gap above 82 degrees latitude the previously models included ICESat data, gravimetrical geoids, ocean circulation models and various combinations hereof. Unfortunately cloud cover and the short periods of operation has a negative effect on the number of ICESat sea surface observations. DTU13MSS and DTU13MDT are the new generation of state of the art global high-resolution models that includes CryoSat-2 data to extend the satellite radar altimetry coverage up to 88 degrees latitude. Furthermore the SAR and SARin capability of CryoSat-2 dramatically increases the amount of useable sea surface returns in sea-ice covered areas compared to conventional radar altimeters like ENVISAT and ERS-1/2. With the inclusion of CryoSat-2 data the new mean sea surface is improved by more than 20 cm above 82 degrees latitude compared with the previous generation of mean sea surfaces.

  6. Microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based determination of polar low molecular weight compounds in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Sadones, Nele; Van Bever, Elien; Archer, John R H; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I; Van Bortel, Luc; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-09-23

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and analysis is increasingly being applied in bioanalysis. Although the use of DBS has many advantages, it is also associated with some challenges. E.g. given the limited amount of available material, highly sensitive detection techniques are often required to attain sufficient sensitivity. In gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), derivatization can be helpful to achieve adequate sensitivity. Because this additional sample preparation step is considered as time-consuming, we introduce a new derivatization procedure, i.e. "microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization", to minimize sample preparation of DBS. In this approach the derivatization reagents are directly applied onto the DBS and derivatization takes place in a microwave instead of via conventional heating. In this manuscript we evaluated the applicability of this new concept of derivatization for the determination of two polar low molecular weight molecules, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gabapentin, in DBS using a standard GC-MS configuration. The method was successfully validated for both compounds, with imprecision and bias values within acceptance criteria (<20% at LLOQ, <15% at 3 other QC levels). Calibration lines were linear over the 10-100μg/mL and 1-30μg/mL range for GHB and gabapentin, respectively. Stability studies revealed no significant decrease of gabapentin and GHB in DBS upon storage at room temperature for at least 84 days. Furthermore, DBS-specific parameters, including hematocrit and volume spotted, were evaluated. As demonstrated by the analysis of GHB and gabapentin positive samples, "microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization" proved to be reliable, fast and applicable in routine toxicology. Moreover, other polar low molecular weight compounds of interest in clinical and/or forensic toxicology, including vigabatrin, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol, 1,4-butanediol and 1,2-butanediol, can also be

  7. Seasonal sea surface temperature anomaly prediction for coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Charles A.; Pegion, Kathy; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Alexander, Michael A.; Tommasi, Desiree; Bond, Nicholas A.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Gudgel, Richard G.; Kristiansen, Trond; O'Brien, Todd D.; Xue, Yan; Yang, Xiasong

    2015-09-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies are often both leading indicators and important drivers of marine resource fluctuations. Assessment of the skill of SST anomaly forecasts within coastal ecosystems accounting for the majority of global fish yields, however, has been minimal. This reflects coarse global forecast system resolution and past emphasis on the predictability of ocean basin-scale SST variations. This paper assesses monthly to inter-annual SST anomaly predictions in coastal "Large Marine Ecosystems" (LMEs). We begin with an analysis of 7 well-observed LMEs adjacent to the United States and then examine how mechanisms responsible for prediction skill in these systems are reflected in predictions for LMEs globally. Historical SST anomaly estimates from the 1/4° daily Optimal Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature reanalysis (OISST.v2) were first found to be highly consistent with in-situ measurements for 6 of the 7 U.S. LMEs. Thirty years of retrospective forecasts from climate forecast systems developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (CM2.5-FLOR) and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (CFSv2) were then assessed against OISST.v2. Forecast skill varied widely by LME, initialization month, and lead but there were many cases of high skill that also exceeded that of a persistence forecast, some at leads greater than 6 months. Mechanisms underlying skill above persistence included accurate simulation of (a) seasonal transitions between less predictable locally generated and more predictable basin-scale SST variability; (b) seasonal transitions between different basin-scale influences; (c) propagation of SST anomalies across seasons through sea ice; and (d) re-emergence of previous anomalies upon the breakdown of summer stratification. Globally, significant skill above persistence across many tropical systems arises via mechanisms (a) and (b). Combinations of all four mechanisms contribute to less prevalent but nonetheless

  8. MODIS Sea-Surface Temperature retrieval by Optimal Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczodrak, G.; Minnett, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    We employ Optimal Estimation approach to retrieve Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from the measurements of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Optimal Estimation (OE) approach uses a prior knowledge or estimation of the state of a system as an input of a forward model to simulate `observations' (known as prior observations) and seeks to minimize the difference between these simulated observation and actual measurements in the space of the state variables. In our case of SST estimation from MODIS observations the system is the ocean surface and the atmosphere between the ocean surface and the satellite. Following previous research (Merchant et al., 2008 and 2009) we introduced a reduced state consisting of variables to which the channel brightness temperatures are expected to be most sensitive, SST and the total column water vapor (TCWV). The actual observations are brightness temperature measurements in MODIS channels with center wavelengths of 11 and 12 microns. The prior knowledge of the state of the atmosphere comes from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast interim reanalysis fields (ECMWF, Dee et al., 2011) for the atmospheric variables and from Reynolds high resolution sea surface temperature analysis fields (Reynolds et al., 2007) for the SST. The forward model in our case is the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) of Clough et al., 2005. Our a priori data set consists of 38400 data points for each month of 2009 representing the state of atmosphere and ocean with 0.5 × 0.5 resolution on the 1st and 16th day of the month at two times a day 00Z and 12Z. We performed LBLRTM simulation for all a priori state data resulting in top of atmosphere infrared spectra. The simulated spectra were integrated with the MODIS 4, 11 and 12 micron channels relative spectral response functions and thus a set of MODIS channels brightness temperatures corresponding to the a priori states was obtained. These simulated brightness

  9. Analyses of global sea surface temperature 1856-1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexey; Cane, Mark A.; Kushnir, Yochanan; Clement, Amy C.; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Rajagopalan, Balaji

    1998-08-01

    Global analyses of monthly sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies from 1856 to 1991 are produced using three statistically based methods: optimal smoothing (OS), the Kaiman filter (KF) and optimal interpolation (OI). Each of these is accompanied by estimates of the error covariance of the analyzed fields. The spatial covariance function these methods require is estimated from the available data; the timemarching model is a first-order autoregressive model again estimated from data. The data input for the analyses are monthly anomalies from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office historical sea surface temperature data set (MOHSST5) [Parker et al., 1994] of the Global Ocean Surface Temperature Atlas (GOSTA) [Bottomley et al., 1990]. These analyses are compared with each other, with GOSTA, and with an analysis generated by projection (P) onto a set of empirical orthogonal functions (as in Smith et al. [1996]). In theory, the quality of the analyses should rank in the order OS, KF, OI, P, and GOSTA. It is found that the first four give comparable results in the data-rich periods (1951-1991), but at times when data is sparse the first three differ significantly from P and GOSTA. At these times the latter two often have extreme and fluctuating values, prima facie evidence of error. The statistical schemes are also verified against data not used in any of the analyses (proxy records derived from corals and air temperature records from coastal and island stations). We also present evidence that the analysis error estimates are indeed indicative of the quality of the products. At most times the OS and KF products are close to the OI product, but at times of especially poor coverage their use of information from other times is advantageous. The methods appear to reconstruct the major features of the global SST field from very sparse data. Comparison with other indications of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle show that the analyses provide usable information on

  10. Comparison of satellite and airborne sensor data on sea surface temperature and suspended solid distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Saito, K.; Hayakawa, S.; Narigasawa, K.

    1992-07-01

    Sea surface temperature and suspended solid were observed simultaneously by LANDSAT TM, NOAA AVHRR and airborne MSS. The authors compared the following items through the data, i.e., 1) Sea surface temperature, 2) Suspended solid in the sea water, 3) Monitoring ability on ocean environment. It was found that distribution patterns of sea surface temperature and suspended solid in the Ariake Sea obtained from LANDSAT TM are similar with those from airborne MSS in a scale of 1:300,000. Sea surface temperature estimated from NOAA AVHRR data indicates a fact of an ocean environment of the Ariake Sea and the around sea area. It is concluded that the TM data can be used for the monitoring of sea environment. The NOAA AVHRR data is useful for the estimation of sea surface temperature with the airborne MSS data.

  11. Mission 119 passive microwave results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Mennella, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements of the sea surface were made for determining surface wind speeds from the NP3A aircraft (NASA-927). Observations were made at frequencies of 1.4, 10.6, and 31.4 GHz during NASA mission 119, undertaken off Bermuda in the vicinity of Argus Island sea tower during January 1970. Passive microwave observations from Argus Island ocean showed that the surface roughness effect, dependent on wind speed, is also dependent on observational frequency, increasing with increasing frequency. The roughness effect appears to be dominant for wind speeds less than 30 to 40 knots (2).

  12. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  13. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  14. Sea surface salinity fronts in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Etcheverry, L.; Maximenko, N. A.; Melnichenko, O.

    2016-12-01

    Marine fronts are narrow boundaries that separate water masses of different properties. These fronts are caused by various forcing and believed to be an important component of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system, particularly in the tropical oceans. In this study, we use sea surface salinity (SSS) observations from Aquarius satellite to investigate the spatial structure and temporal variability of SSS fronts in the tropical Atlantic. A number of frontal features have been identified. The mean magnitude of the SSS gradient is maximum near the mouth of the Congo River (0.3-0.4 psu/100km). Relative maxima are also observed in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the Gulf of Guinea, and the mouth of the Amazon River. The pattern of the magnitude of the SSS anomaly gradient revealed that the interaction between river plumes and saltier interior water is complex and highly variable during the three-year observation period. The variability of the magnitude of the density anomaly gradient computed from Aquarius SSS and Reynolds SST is also discussed. Images of the ocean color are utilized to trace the movement of the Congo and Amazon River plumes and compare them with the magnitude of the SSS gradient. Additionally, we analyze de circulation associated with the Amazon plume with altimetry data, and the vertical structure and its changes in time through Argo profiles.

  15. A model of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seager, Richard; Zebiak, Stephen E.; Cane, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the climatological mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical Pacific Ocean is developed. The upper ocean response is computed using a time dependent, linear, reduced gravity model, with the addition of a constant depth frictional surface layer. The full three-dimensional temperature equation and a surface heat flux parameterization that requires specification of only wind speed and total cloud cover are used to evaluate the SST. Specification of atmospheric parameters, such as air temperature and humidity, over which the ocean has direct influence, is avoided. The model simulates the major features of the observed tropical Pacific SST. The seasonal evolution of these features is generally captured by the model. Analysis of the results demonstrates the control the ocean has over the surface heat flux from ocean to atmosphere and the crucial role that dynamics play in determining the mean SST in the equatorial Pacific. The sensitivity of the model to perturbations in the surface heat flux, cloud cover specification, diffusivity, and mixed layer depth is discussed.

  16. Land- and sea-surface impacts on local coastal breezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, D. E.; Hughes, C.; Gilchrist, J.; Lodise, J.; Goldman, W.

    2014-12-01

    The state of Delaware has seen significant increases in population along the coastline in the past three decades. With this increase in population have come changes to the land surface, as forest and farmland has been converted to residential and commercial purposes, causing changes in the surface roughness, temperature, and land-atmosphere fluxes. There is also a semi-permanent upwelling center in the spring and summer outside the Delaware Bay mouth that significantly changes the structure of the sea surface temperature both inside and outside the Bay. Through a series of high resolution modeling and observational studies, we have determined that in cases of strong synoptic forcing, the impact of the land-surface on the boundary layer properties can be advected offshore, creating a false coastline and modifying the location and timing of the sea breeze circulation. In cases of weak synoptic forcing, the influence of the upwelling and the tidal circulation of the Delaware Bay waters can greatly change the location, strength, and penetration of the sea breeze. Understanding the importance of local variability in the surface-atmosphere interactions on the sea breeze can lead to improved prediction of sea breeze onset, penetration, and duration which is important for monitoring air quality and developing offshore wind power production.

  17. Analysis of variability of tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Georgina; Cressie, Noel

    2016-11-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) in the Pacific Ocean is a key component of many global climate models and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. We shall analyse SST for the period November 1981-December 2014. To study the temporal variability of the ENSO phenomenon, we have selected a subregion of the tropical Pacific Ocean, namely the Niño 3.4 region, as it is thought to be the area where SST anomalies indicate most clearly ENSO's influence on the global atmosphere. SST anomalies, obtained by subtracting the appropriate monthly averages from the data, are the focus of the majority of previous analyses of the Pacific and other oceans' SSTs. Preliminary data analysis showed that not only Niño 3.4 spatial means but also Niño 3.4 spatial variances varied with month of the year. In this article, we conduct an analysis of the raw SST data and introduce diagnostic plots (here, plots of variability vs. central tendency). These plots show strong negative dependence between the spatial standard deviation and the spatial mean. Outliers are present, so we consider robust regression to obtain intercept and slope estimates for the 12 individual months and for all-months-combined. Based on this mean-standard deviation relationship, we define a variance-stabilizing transformation. On the transformed scale, we describe the Niño 3.4 SST time series with a statistical model that is linear, heteroskedastic, and dynamical.

  18. Use of new satellite sea surface temperature observations in OSTIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Emma; Mao, Chongyuan; Good, Simon

    2017-04-01

    OSTIA is the Met Office's Operational SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and Ice Analysis system, which produces L4 (globally complete, gridded) analyses on a daily basis. The product is made freely available through CMEMS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service). Additional satellite SST datasets have been assimilated into the OSTIA analysis operationally from 15 March 2016. These datasets are ACSPO VIIRS L3U from NOAA/NESDIS/STAR and AMSR2 L2P from REMSS (Remote Sensing Systems). This has led to a sizable improvement in the RMS error of the OSTIA analysis compared to independent Argo observations. Test runs assimilating ACSPO VIIRS and REMSS AMSR2 observations separately have indicated that the total improvement is due to the action of both datasets together rather than one or the other. In addition, ACSPO VIIRS replaced MetOp-A AVHRR as the reference satellite dataset used in OSTIA on 6 November 2016. The reference satellite data, in addition to in situ observations, are used for bias correction of the other satellite data types used in the analysis. The change to using VIIRS as a reference has led to notable improvements in regional biases for OSTIA compared to Argo, drifters and other satellite SST datasets, particularly in the high latitudes. Methods will be described and validation results shown in this presentation.

  19. A model of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seager, Richard; Zebiak, Stephen E.; Cane, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the climatological mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical Pacific Ocean is developed. The upper ocean response is computed using a time dependent, linear, reduced gravity model, with the addition of a constant depth frictional surface layer. The full three-dimensional temperature equation and a surface heat flux parameterization that requires specification of only wind speed and total cloud cover are used to evaluate the SST. Specification of atmospheric parameters, such as air temperature and humidity, over which the ocean has direct influence, is avoided. The model simulates the major features of the observed tropical Pacific SST. The seasonal evolution of these features is generally captured by the model. Analysis of the results demonstrates the control the ocean has over the surface heat flux from ocean to atmosphere and the crucial role that dynamics play in determining the mean SST in the equatorial Pacific. The sensitivity of the model to perturbations in the surface heat flux, cloud cover specification, diffusivity, and mixed layer depth is discussed.

  20. Air-sea interactions in sea surface temperature frontal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianezze, Joris; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Reynaud, Thierry; Marié, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Garnier, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Representation of air-sea exchanges in coastal, regional and global models represent a challenge firstly due to the small scale of acting turbulent processes comparatively to the resolved scales of these models. Beyond this subgrid parameterization issue, a comprehensive understanding of air-sea interactions at the turbulent process scales is still lacking. Many successful efforts are dedicated to measure the energy and mass exchanges between atmosphere and ocean, including the effect of surface waves. In comparison less efforts are brought to understand the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer and the oceanic mixing layer. In this regard, we are developing research mainly based on ideal and realistic numerical simulations which resolve very small scales (horizontal resolutions from 1 to 100 meters) in using grid nesting technics and coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere models. As a first step, the impact of marked gradients in sea surface temperatures (SST) on air-sea exchanges has been explored through realistic numerical simulations at 100m horizontal resolution. Results from simulations of a case observed during the FROMVAR experiment will be shown. The talk will mainly focus on the marked impact of SST front on the atmospheric boundary layer (stability and winds), the air-sea exchanges and surface parameters (rugosity, drag coefficient) Results will be also shown on the strong impact on the simulated atmosphere of small scale variability of SST field.

  1. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; De Schepper, Stijn; McClymont, Erin L.

    2017-09-01

    The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial-interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST) and ice-rafted debris (IRD) in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  2. Use of VAS multispectral data for sea surface temperature determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) is a radiometer possessing eight visible channel detectors and six thermal detectors that sense infrared radiation in 12 spectral bands. Housed in the GOES satellite, VAS spins in a west to east direction at 100 rpm and achieves spatial coverage at resolutions of 1 km in the visible and 7 or 14 km in the infrared by stepping a scan mirror in a north to south direction. Designed for multipurpose applications, the VAS can be operated in two different modes: (1) a multi-spectral imaging (MSI) mode, and (2) a dwell sounding (DS) mode. The MSI mode of operation is used for sea surface temperature (SST) determination. Currently, a full-disk MSI image for SST determination is received every hour, 18 hours a day during weekdays. This MSI mode of operation for SST consists of data obtained from wavelengths centered at 3.9 microns (channel 12), 11.6 microns (channel 8), and 12.6 microns (channel 7) as well as visible data.

  3. Interannual variability in stratiform cloudiness and sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Leovy, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    Marine stratiform cloudiness (MSC)(stratus, stratocumulus, and fog) is widespread over subtropical oceans west of the continents and over midlatitude oceans during summer, the season when MSC has maximum influence on surface downward radiation and is most influenced by boundary-layer processes. Long-term datasets of cloudiness and sea surface teperature (SST) from surface observations from 1952 to 1981 are used to examine interannual variations in MSC and SST. Linear correlations of anomalies in seasonal MSC amount with seasonal SST anomalies are negative and significant in midlatitude and eastern subtropical oceans, especially during summer. Significant negative correlations between SST and nimbostratus and nonprecipitating midlevel cloudiness are also observed at midlatitudes during summer, suggesting that summer storm tracks shift from year to year following year-to-year meridional shifts in the SST gradient. Over the 30-yr period, there are significant upward trends in MSC amount over the northern midlatitude oceans and a significant downward trend off the coast of California. The highest correlations and trends occur where gradients in MSC and SST are strongest. During summer, correlations between SST and MSC anomalies peak at zero lag in midlatitudes where warm advection prevails, but SST lags MSC in subtropical regions where cold advection predominates. This difference is attributed to a tendency for anomalies in latent heat flux to compensate anomalies in surface downward radiation in warm advection regions but not in cold advection regions.

  4. A study of six operational sea surface temperature analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Folland, C.K.; Gordon, M.; Parker, D.E. ); Reynolds, R.W. )

    1993-01-01

    This study results from recommendations made by a 1984 WMO Expert Committee on Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction Relevant to Long-Range Forecasting. The committee suggested that comparisons be carried out between monthly sea surface temperature (SST) analyses routinely made in several different countries in near real time. Emphasis was placed on the improvement of such analyses for use in operational long-range forecasting, especially for initializing dynamical long-range forecasting models. Six different monthly averaged SST analyses have been compared. The extent to which the analyses agree on several space scales and for regions covering the global oceans is shown, together with estimates of the magnitude of various types of errors. Independent estimates of SST obtained from expendable bathythermographs indicate that the monthly mean Meteorological Office (UKMO), Climate Analysis Center (CAC) in situ, and CAC blended analyses showed small differences (biases) from the expendable bathythermograph data. The differences were near to or below the margins of statistical significance over the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere tropics. Apparent negative biases in the analyses were noted, however, in the extratropical Southern Hemisphere. The authors finish with a discussion of recent improvements to the accuracy and scope of SST analyses for both long-range forecasting and climate studies. These improvements include an integrated analysis of ice limit, in situ and satellite SST data, and the developing use of optimum interpolation as a method of SST analysis. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Reevaluation of mid-Pliocene North Atlantic sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Marci M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lawrence, Kira T.

    2008-01-01

    Multiproxy temperature estimation requires careful attention to biological, chemical, physical, temporal, and calibration differences of each proxy and paleothermometry method. We evaluated mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) estimates from multiple proxies at Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes 552A, 609B, 607, and 606, transecting the North Atlantic Drift. SST estimates derived from faunal assemblages, foraminifer Mg/Ca, and alkenone unsaturation indices showed strong agreement at Holes 552A, 607, and 606 once differences in calibration, depth, and seasonality were addressed. Abundant extinct species and/or an unrecognized productivity signal in the faunal assemblage at Hole 609B resulted in exaggerated faunal-based SST estimates but did not affect alkenone-derived or Mg/Ca–derived estimates. Multiproxy mid-Pliocene North Atlantic SST estimates corroborate previous studies documenting high-latitude mid-Pliocene warmth and refine previous faunal-based estimates affected by environmental factors other than temperature. Multiproxy investigations will aid SST estimation in high-latitude areas sensitive to climate change and currently underrepresented in SST reconstructions.

  6. Variability and Uncertainty in Satellite Sea-surface Salinity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayler, E. J.; Ren, L.

    2016-02-01

    When employing satellite sea-surface salinity (SSS) observations in studies of observed and modeled ocean variability and change, assessments must consider the variability and uncertainty contained within the satellite SSS data that may or may not reflect physical processes. Coherent temporal and spatial structures exists in the differences between the ascending (south to north) and descending (north to south) nodes of both NASA's Aquarius mission and ESA's Soil Moisture - Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, introducing non-physical variability into the data. When examining "simultaneous" match-ups of both Aquarius and SMOS satellite observations with Argo float in situ observations (triple match-up), the Aquarius and SMOS data exhibit different temporal and spatial variabilities with respect to the in situ data, as well as with respect to each other. While physical differences will exist between the skin salinity (approximately 1cm) observed by the satellites and the near-surface salinity (approximately 5 m) observed by Argo floats, when using satellite SSS observations, non-physical variability may intrude into assessments of ocean salinity variability.

  7. Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures during the mid-Piacenzian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, D. K.; Robinson, M. M.; Dowsett, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    Mid-Pliocene (~3.3 to 3.0 Ma) climate is being reconstructed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Project. The Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) dataset is an integral piece of PRISM’s climate reconstruction and continually evolves over time as additional data are added and refined. The Indian Ocean has in the past been a region lacking PRISM SST data coverage, while it is also a region marked with interesting climate phenomena (e.g., the Indian Ocean Dipole). Questions over the existence of these modern oceanographic elements during the mid-Piacenzian have led to increased interest in the Indian Ocean. New data analyzed by PRISM provides insight on what Indian Ocean circulation and SST may have been like ~3 million years ago. Using planktic foraminifera sampled and analyzed from Indian Ocean ODP Sites 709, 716, 754, 758, and 763, PRISM is developing new mid-Pliocene SST estimates to better understand this region’s paleoceanography.

  8. Is the Aquarius sea surface salinity variability representative?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, J.; Grodsky, S.

    2016-12-01

    The leading mode of the Aquarius monthly anomalous sea surface salinity (SSS) is evaluated within the 50S-50N belt, where SSS retrieval accuracy is higher. This mode accounts for about 18% of the variance and resembles a pattern of the ENSO-induced anomalous rainfall. The leading mode of SSS variability deducted from a longer JAMSTEC analysis also accounts for about 17% of the variance and has very similar spatial pattern and almost a perfect correspondence of its temporal principal component to the SOI index. In that sense, the Aquarius SSS variability at low and middle latitudes is representative of SSS variability that may be obtained from longer records. This is explained by the fact that during the Aquarius period (2011-2015), the SOI index changed significantly from La Nina toward El Nino state, thus spanning a significant range of its characteristic variations. Multivariate EOF analysis of anomalous SSS and SST suggests that ENSO-induced shift in the tropical Pacific rainfall produces negatively correlated variability of temperature and salinity, which are expected if the anomalous surface flux (stronger rainfall coincident with less downward radiation) drives the system. But, anomalous SSS and SST are positively correlated in some areas including the northwestern Atlantic shelf (north of the Gulfstream) and the Pacific sector adjusting to the California peninsula. This positive correlation is indicative of an advection driven regime that is analyzed separately.

  9. Reconciling Glacial Snow Lines With Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, S. J.; Lohmann, G.

    Reconstructions of tropical snow lines during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago are incompatible with the sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions of the CLIMAP project, when assuming present day atmospheric lapse rates (e.g. Pe- teet and Rind 1985). Since proxy data for the vertical structure of the atmosphere during glacial times do not exist, numerical experiments with an atmospheric gen- eral circulation model for glacial and interglacial climates have been performed. Our model experiments reveal that slightly cooler tropical SSTs relative to the ones by CLIMAP (1981) are sufficient to simulate proper glacial freezing temperature levels. The depression of tropical snow lines in our LGM experiment can be attributed to two effects: Less moisture content provides an increased environmental lapse rate in the free atmosphere. This effect is strongest in the tropical middle troposphere where we observe an additional two degrees cooling. Secondly, the surface temperature near tropical glaciers is further cooled by a longer duration of snow cover. Our model result provides a consistent view of the last glacial maximum climate with much colder tem- peratures than today in the tropical mountains in concordance with moderate lowering of tropical SSTs.

  10. Anisotropy and polarization of the microwave background radiation as a test of nonequilibrium ionization of the pregalactic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nasel'skii, P.D.; Polnarev, A.G.

    1987-11-01

    The formation of small-scale anisotropy and polarization in a model of nonstationary ionization of the pregalactic plasma is considered. It is shown that the ratio of the degree of polarization to the degree of anisotropy is rather insensitive to the actual regime of ionization and is 7-8%. However, the characteristic correlation angle is in the distribution of the anisotropy and polarization of the background radiation on the celestial sphere depends strongly on the parameters of the nonequilibrium.

  11. Mean sea surface and geoid gradient comparisons with TOPEX altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Yi, Yuchan; Wang, Yan Ming

    1994-01-01

    Cycles 4 to 54 of TOPEX data have been analyzed through comparisons with the mean sea surface given on the disturbed geophysical data record (GDR). Two inverted barometer correction procedures were considered for the data reduction. One used a constant atmospheric pressure for all data while the one adopted for use, for most computations, introduced a cycle average pressure. The maximum difference between the two estimates was 3.0 cm with a clear annual signal. With the modified correction the TOPEX sea surface was compared to The Ohio State University (OSU) mean sea surface, given on the GDR, to estimate three translations ( delta x = -2.3 cm; delta y = 25.0 cm; delta z = -0.3 cm) and a bias (43.3 cm) between the two surfaces. The only significant translation is delta y which indicates the reference frame of the TOPEX system differs from that used in the OSU mean sea surface system. The bias between the TOPEX mean sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface was used to estimate an equatorial radius of 6,378,136.55 m based on an 18-cm biased estimate of the TOPEX altimeter. Examination of the average difference, by cycle, between the TOPEX sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface suggested a bias change of 3.1 +/- 2.2 mm/yr with a positive sign indicating the average ocean surface is rising or the altimeter measured distance is decreasing. Models were implemented that solved directly for a bias, bias rate annual/semiannual, and tide correction terms. The computations indicated that a simultaneous solution for this bias, bias rate, and annual/semiannual terms gave the most accurate results. Nonsimultaneous solutions led to slightly different bias rate values. The root mean square difference between the TOPEX sea surface and OSU sea surface, after translation and bias correction, was +/- 17 cm for a typical cycle. Some locations were indentified where the difference could reach 2.3 cm and were repeated over several cycles indicating errors in the mean sea surface. Most

  12. Mean sea surface and geoid gradient comparisons with TOPEX altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Yi, Yuchan; Wang, Yan Ming

    1994-01-01

    Cycles 4 to 54 of TOPEX data have been analyzed through comparisons with the mean sea surface given on the disturbed geophysical data record (GDR). Two inverted barometer correction procedures were considered for the data reduction. One used a constant atmospheric pressure for all data while the one adopted for use, for most computations, introduced a cycle average pressure. The maximum difference between the two estimates was 3.0 cm with a clear annual signal. With the modified correction the TOPEX sea surface was compared to The Ohio State University (OSU) mean sea surface, given on the GDR, to estimate three translations ( delta x = -2.3 cm; delta y = 25.0 cm; delta z = -0.3 cm) and a bias (43.3 cm) between the two surfaces. The only significant translation is delta y which indicates the reference frame of the TOPEX system differs from that used in the OSU mean sea surface system. The bias between the TOPEX mean sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface was used to estimate an equatorial radius of 6,378,136.55 m based on an 18-cm biased estimate of the TOPEX altimeter. Examination of the average difference, by cycle, between the TOPEX sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface suggested a bias change of 3.1 +/- 2.2 mm/yr with a positive sign indicating the average ocean surface is rising or the altimeter measured distance is decreasing. Models were implemented that solved directly for a bias, bias rate annual/semiannual, and tide correction terms. The computations indicated that a simultaneous solution for this bias, bias rate, and annual/semiannual terms gave the most accurate results. Nonsimultaneous solutions led to slightly different bias rate values. The root mean square difference between the TOPEX sea surface and OSU sea surface, after translation and bias correction, was +/- 17 cm for a typical cycle. Some locations were indentified where the difference could reach 2.3 cm and were repeated over several cycles indicating errors in the mean sea surface. Most

  13. On the Influence of North Pacific Sea Surface Temperature on the Arctic Winter Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Newman, P. A.; Garfinkel, C. I.

    2012-01-01

    Differences between two ensembles of Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model simulations isolate the impact of North Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on the Arctic winter climate. One ensemble of extended winter season forecasts is forced by unusually high SSTs in the North Pacific, while in the second ensemble SSTs in the North Pacific are unusually low. High Low differences are consistent with a weakened Western Pacific atmospheric teleconnection pattern, and in particular, a weakening of the Aleutian low. This relative change in tropospheric circulation inhibits planetary wave propagation into the stratosphere, in turn reducing polar stratospheric temperature in mid- and late winter. The number of winters with sudden stratospheric warmings is approximately tripled in the Low ensemble as compared with the High ensemble. Enhanced North Pacific SSTs, and thus a more stable and persistent Arctic vortex, lead to a relative decrease in lower stratospheric ozone in late winter, affecting the April clear-sky UV index at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes.

  14. Correlations of global sea surface temperatures with the solar wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Limin; Tinsley, Brian; Chu, Huimin; Xiao, Ziniu

    2016-11-01

    A significant correlation between the solar wind speed (SWS) and sea surface temperature (SST) in the region of the North Atlantic Ocean has been found for the Northern Hemisphere winter from 1963 to 2010, based on 3-month seasonal averages. The correlation is dependent on Bz (the interplanetary magnetic field component parallel to the Earth's magnetic dipole) as well as the SWS, and somewhat stronger in the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) west phase than in the east phase. The correlations with the SWS are stronger than those with the F10.7 parameter representing solar UV inputs to the stratosphere. SST responds to changes in tropospheric dynamics via wind stress, and to changes in cloud cover affecting the radiative balance. Suggested mechanisms for the solar influence on SST include changes in atmospheric ionization and cloud microphysics affecting cloud cover, storm invigoration, and tropospheric dynamics. Such changes modify upward wave propagation to the stratosphere, affecting the dynamics of the polar vortex. Also, direct solar inputs, including energetic particles and solar UV, produce stratospheric dynamical changes. Downward propagation of stratospheric dynamical changes eventually further perturbs tropospheric dynamics and SST.

  15. OSI-SAF operational NPP/VIIRS sea surface temperature chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Borgne, Pierre; Legendre, Gérard; Marsouin, Anne; Péré, Sonia; Roquet, Hervé

    2013-06-01

    Data of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) have been acquired at Centre de Météorologie Spatiale (CMS) in Lannion (Brittany) in direct readout mode since April 2012. CMS is committed to produce sea surface temperature (SST) products from VIIRS data twice a day over an area covering North-East Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea in the framework of the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI-SAF). A cloud mask has been developed and cloud mask control techniques have been implemented. SST algorithms have been defined, as well as quality level attribution rules. Since mid October 2012 a VIIRS SST chain, similar to that used for processing METOP AVHRR has been run in a preoperational mode. The corresponding bias and standard deviation against drifting buoy measurements (mid October 2012 to mid March 2013) are -0.05 and 0.37 K for nighttime and -0.13 and 0.46 K for daytime, respectively. VIIRS derived SST production is expected operational by mid 2013. The OSI-SAF VIIRS derived SST products are compliant with the Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) GDS V2.0 format.

  16. Global Sea Surface Temperature and Ecosystem Change Across the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenstra, T. J. T.; Bakker, V. B.; Sangiorgi, F.; Peterse, F.; Schouten, S.; Sluijs, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) (ca. 17 to 14 Ma) is generally considered as the warmest episode of the Neogene based on deep marine oxygen isotope records and terrestrial plant fossils. To date, however, reasonable resolution high-quality sea surface temperature (SST) proxy records spanning its onset are scarce at best. For the remainder of the MMCO, reliable SST records are absent from the tropics and very scarce in temperate and polar regions. This leaves the question if the MMCO was truly associated with global warming and if this warming was associated with biotic change. We use organic biomarker paleothermometry (Uk'37 and TEX86) to reconstruct SST across the MMCO at four locations along a pole-to-pole transect in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. Additionally, we use marine palynology (mostly dinoflagellate cysts) to assess ecosystem change at these locations. This study includes the first tropical biomarker-based SST records of the MMCO. Together with new and existing SST records from higher latitudes and the corresponding palynological records, they provide new insights in the temporal and spatial development of the MMCO. Our results indicate that Mid-Miocene warming was most prominent in the Norwegian Sea, showed a more complex, perhaps upwelling-related pattern in a tropical location, and was small in the Southern Hemisphere.

  17. Validation of the Version 1 NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Sea Surface Temperature Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.

    1998-01-01

    A high-resolution, global satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) data set called Pathfinder, from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard the NOAA Polar Orbiters, is available from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC). Suitable for research as well as education, the Pathfinder SST data set is a result of a collaboration between the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and investigators at several universities. NOAA and NASA are the sponsors of the Pathfinder Program, which takes advantage of currently archived Earth science data from satellites. Where necessary, satellite sensors have been intercalibrated, algorithms improved and processing procedures revised, in order to produce long time-series, global measurements of ocean, land and atmospheric properties necessary for climate research. Many Pathfinder data sets are available to researchers now, nearly a decade before the first launch of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The lessons learned from the Pathfinder programs will facilitate the processing and management of terabytes of data from EOS. The Oceans component of Pathfinder has undertaken to reprocess all Global Area Coverage (GAC) data acquired by the 5-channel AVHRRs since 1981. The resultant data products are consistent and stably calibrated [Rao, 1993a, Rao, 1993b, Brown et al., 1993], Earth-gridded SST fields at a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions.

  18. Seasonal differences in intraseasonal and interannual variability of Mediterranean Sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zveryaev, Igor I.

    2015-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) data from the NOAA OI SST data set for 1982-2011 are used to investigate intraseasonal and interannual variability of Mediterranean SST during winter and summer seasons. It is shown that during winter the intraseasonal SST fluctuations are larger than the interannual SST variations in the western Mediterranean (e.g., the Tyrrhenian Sea), but smaller in the central and eastern Mediterranean Sea. In summer, the intraseasonal SST fluctuations are larger in almost the entire Mediterranean basin. Also summertime intraseasonal SST fluctuations are larger (up to three times near the Gulf of Lions) than their wintertime counterparts in the entire Mediterranean basin. The interannual SST variations are larger during summer in the western and central Mediterranean Sea and during winter in its eastern part. The leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of the Mediterranean SST and of the intensities of its intraseasonal fluctuations are characterized by the differing spatial-temporal structures both during winter and summer implying that their interannual variability is driven by different physical mechanisms. During winter, the EOF-1 of SST is associated with the East Atlantic teleconnection, whereas EOF-1 of the intensity of intraseasonal fluctuations is not linked significantly to regional atmospheric dynamics. The second EOFs of these variables are associated, respectively, with the East Atlantic/West Russia and the North Atlantic teleconnections. While during summer the atmospheric influence on Mediterranean SST is generally weaker, it is revealed that the EOF-1 of the intensity of intraseasonal SST fluctuations is linked to the Polar teleconnection.

  19. Pathfinder Version 5.3 AVHRR Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker-Yeboah, S.; Kilpatrick, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term, climate data records of global sea surface temperature (SST) are important for ocean and climate variability studies. The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information process, maintain, and continue development of the long-term, Pathfinder climate data record of global SST. These SST values are generated at approximately a 4 km resolution using a consistent algorithm for Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments aboard NOAA polar-orbiting satellites dating back to 1981. A new version of the Pathfinder SST products, version 5.3, has recently been produced for a thirty three year period (1981 - 2014). This latest reprocessing used an Amazon Web Service cloud system and a modernized version of the heritage Pathfinder SST codes integrated into the open source NASA SeaWiFS Data Analysis System (SeaDAS6.4). Coefficients for this SST product were generated using regression analyses with co-located in situ and satellite measurements. Validation results corresponding to Pathfinder Level 3 skin SST minus sub-surface buoy SST show a global mean difference of -0.2 K with a standard deviation of 0.5 K. New quality control procedures for the new version of Pathfinder SST Climate Data Record products will be presented along with other improvements made in comparison to previous versions of Pathfinder SST.

  20. A modeling study of processes controlling the Bay of Bengal sea surface salinity interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhil, V. P.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; Durand, F.; Keerthi, M. G.; Chaitanya, A. V. S.; Papa, F.; Gopalakrishna, V. V.; de Boyer Montégut, Clément

    2016-12-01

    Recent observational studies provided preliminary insights on the interannual variability of Bay of Bengal (BoB) Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), but are limited by the poor data coverage. Here, we describe the BoB interannual SSS variability and its driving processes from a regional eddy-permitting ocean general circulation model forced by interannually varying air-sea fluxes and altimeter-derived discharges of major rivers over the past two decades. Simulated interannual SSS variations compare favorably with both in situ and satellite data and are largest in boreal fall in three regions: the northern BoB, the coastal region off east India, and the Andaman Sea. In the northern BoB, these variations are independent from those in other regions and mostly driven by summer-fall Ganga-Brahmaputra runoff interannual variations. In fall, remote forcing from the Indian Ocean Dipole results in anticlockwise anomalous horizontal currents that drive interannual SSS variations of opposite polarity along the east coast of India and in the Southern Andaman Sea. From winter onward, these anomalies are damped by vertical mixing in the northern BoB and along the east coast of India and by horizontal advection in the Southern Andaman Sea. While river runoff fluctuations locally play a strong role near the Ganga-Brahmaputra river mouth, wind-driven interannual current anomalies are responsible for a large fraction of SSS interannual variability in most of the basin.

  1. Solar wind: A possible factor driving the interannual sea surface temperature tripolar mode over North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ziniu; Li, Delin

    2016-06-01

    The effect of solar wind (SW) on the North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) in boreal winter is examined through an analysis of observational data during 1964-2013. The North Atlantic SSTs show a pronounced meridional tripolar pattern in response to solar wind speed (SWS) variations. This pattern is broadly similar to the leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of interannual variations in the wintertime SSTs over North Atlantic. The time series of this leading EOF mode of SST shows a significant interannual period, which is the same as that of wintertime SWS. This response also appears as a compact north-south seesaw of sea level pressure and a vertical tripolar structure of zonal wind, which simultaneously resembles the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the overlying atmosphere. As compared with the typical low SWS winters, during the typical high SWS winters, the stratospheric polar night jet (PNJ) is evidently enhanced and extends from the stratosphere to the troposphere, even down to the North Atlantic Ocean surface. Notably, the North Atlantic Ocean is an exclusive region in which the SW signal spreads downward from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Thus, it seems that the SW is a possible factor for this North Atlantic SST tripolar mode. The dynamical process of stratosphere-troposphere coupling, together with the global atmospheric electric circuit-cloud microphysical process, probably accounts for the particular downward propagation of the SW signal.

  2. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  3. Relationship between clouds and sea surface temperatures in the western tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, Albert; Ziskin, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of four years of earth radiation budget, cloud, and sea surface temperature data confirms that cloud parameters change dramatically when and where sea surface temperatures increase above approximately 300K. These results are based upon monthly mean values within 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid points over the 'warm pool' region of the western tropical Pacific. The question of whether sea surface temperatures are influenced, in turn, by the radiative effects of these clouds (Ramanathan and Collins) is less clear. Such a feedback, if it exists, is weak. The reason why clouds might have so little influence, despite large changes in their longwave and shortwave radiative effects, might be that the sea surface responds to both the longwave heating and the shortwave cooling effects of clouds, and the two effects nearly cancel. There are strong correlations between the rate of change of sea surface temperature and any of the radiation budget parameters that are highly correlated with the incident solar flux-implying that season and latitude are the critical factors determining sea surface temperatures. With the seasonal or both seasonal and latitudinal variations removed, the rate of change of sea surface temperature shows no correlation with cloud-related parameters in the western tropical Pacific.

  4. Gaussian beam reflection characteristics on 2D randomly rough sea surface influenced by incident laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Sun, Chunsheng

    2014-12-01

    Laser reflection characteristics from the two-dimensional randomly rough sea surface are affected by the sea state, weather conditions, the incident laser parameters and other factors. All of the factors could not be artificially changed except the incident laser parameters. Therefore, the research of the relationship between laser reflection characteristics from 2-D randomly rough sea surface and incident laser parameters will give support to laser detection on the sea surface. This paper deals with the simulated calculation of the Gaussian beam reflection characteristics from the 2-D randomly rough sea surface with different incident laser parameters. In this paper, the 2-D rough sea surface is simulated with fractal method, after which the sea surface is divided into a lot of small planes, the width or length of which is much greater than the wavelength of the incident laser. Then the geometrical optics method is used to calculate the Gaussian beam reflection from 2-D randomly and rough sea surface. After that, the Gaussian beam reflection characteristics varies different incident laser parameters are numerical calculated. Finally, the detailed discussion of some factors including the divergence angle and the incident angle of the Gaussian beam which have influences on reflection properties is given.

  5. Physical Retrievals of Over-Ocean Rain Rate from Multichannel Microwave Imagery. Part 1; Theoretical Characteristics of Normalized Polarization and Scattering Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    Microwave rain rate retrieval algorithms have most often been formulated in terms of the raw brightness temperatures observed by one or more channels of a satellite radiometer. Taken individually, single-channel brightness temperatures generally represent a near-arbitrary combination of positive contributions due to liquid water emission and negative contributions due to scattering by ice and/or visibility of the radiometrically cold ocean surface. Unfortunately, for a given rain rate, emission by liquid water below the freezing level and scattering by ice particles above the freezing level are rather loosely coupled in both a physical and statistical sense. Furthermore, microwave brightness temperatures may vary significantly (approx. 30-70 K) in response to geophysical parameters other than liquid water and precipitation. Because of these complications, physical algorithms which attempt to directly invert observed brightness temperatures have typically relied on the iterative adjustment of detailed micro-physical profiles or cloud models, guided by explicit forward microwave radiative transfer calculations. In support of an effort to develop a significantly simpler and more efficient inversion-type rain rate algorithm, the physical information content of two linear transformations of single-frequency, dual-polarization brightness temperatures is studied: the normalized polarization difference P of Petty and Katsaros (1990, 1992), which is intended as a measure of footprint-averaged rain cloud transmittance for a given frequency; and a scattering index S (similar to the polarization corrected temperature of Spencer et al.,1989) which is sensitive almost exclusively to ice. A reverse Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is used to elucidate the qualitative response of these physically distinct single-frequency indices to idealized 3-dimensional rain clouds and to demonstrate their advantages over raw brightness temperatures both as stand-alone indices of

  6. Reconstruction of the sea surface elevation from the analysis of the data collected by a wave radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Soldovieri, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco; Lugni, Claudio; Fucile, Fabio; Bulian, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    X-band radar system is able to provide information about direction and intensity of the sea surface currents and dominant waves in a range of few kilometers from the observation point (up to 3 nautical miles). This capability, together with their flexibility and low cost, makes these devices useful tools for the sea monitoring either coastal or off-shore area. The data collected from wave radar system can be analyzed by using the inversion strategy presented in [1,2] to obtain the estimation of the following sea parameters: peak wave direction; peak period; peak wavelength; significant wave height; sea surface current and bathymetry. The estimation of the significant wave height represents a limitation of the wave radar system because of the radar backscatter is not directly related to the sea surface elevation. In fact, in the last period, substantial research has been carried out to estimate significant wave height from radar images either with or without calibration using in-situ measurements. In this work, we will present two alternative approaches for the reconstruction of the sea surface elevation from wave radar images. In particular, the first approach is based on the basis of an approximated version of the modulation transfer function (MTF) tuned from a series of numerical simulation, following the line of[3]. The second approach is based on the inversion of radar images using a direct regularised least square technique. Assuming a linearised model for the tilt modulation, the sea elevation has been reconstructed as a least square fitting of the radar imaging data[4]. References [1]F. Serafino, C. Lugni, and F. Soldovieri, "A novel strategy for the surface current determination from marine X-band radar data," IEEE Geosci.Remote Sens. Lett., vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 231-235, Apr. 2010. [2]Ludeno, G., Brandini, C., Lugni, C., Arturi, D., Natale, A., Soldovieri, F., Serafino, F. (2014). Remocean System for the Detection of the Reflected Waves from the Costa

  7. Modeling Tropospheric Radiowave Propagation Over Rough Sea Surfaces Using the Parabolic Equation Fourier Split-step Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadette, Pierre E.

    This thesis develops the theory for solving the parabolic equation (PE) using the Fourier Split-step method for the purpose of modeling tropospheric radiowave propagation over the sea surface. Beginning with Maxwell's equations, the standard parabolic equation (SPE) approximation is derived from a linearly polarized scalar wave equation in Cartesian coordinates. Then, an introduction to the Fourier Split-step method is presented as a solution to the PE equation. Next, we make necessary approximations to the PE formulation to appropriately represented propagation through the troposphere including a conformal transformation of the coordinate system and the inclusion of refractivity profiles to represent evaporation duct conditions. The PE derivation concludes with the incorporation of the effects of finite impedance boundary conditions and sea surface roughness, which has a Split-step solution using the mixed Fourier transform (MFT). Finally, numerical examples are given to compare the field predictions of two well known PE/Split-step propagation models: Tropospheric ElectroMagnetic Parabolic Equation Routine (TEMPER) and Advanced Propagation Model (APM).

  8. Satellite observations of a polar low over the Norwegian Sea by Special Sensor Microwave Imager, Geosat, and TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claud, Chantal; Mognard, Nelly M.; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Chedin, Alain; Scott, Noelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Many polar lows are generated at the boundary between sea ice and the ocean, in regions of large temperature gradients, where in situ observations are rare or nonexistent. Since satellite observations are frequent in high-latitude regions, they can be used to detect polar lows and track their propagation and evolution. The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) providing estimates of surface wind speed, integrated cloud liquid water content, water vapor content, and precipitation size ice-scattering signal over the ocean; the Geosat radar altimeter measuring surface wind speed and significant wave height; and the TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) allowing the determination of temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere have been used in synergy for a specific case which occurred in the Norwegian Sea on January, 23-24 1988. All three instruments show sharp atmospheric gradients associated with the propagation of this low across the ocean, which permit the detection of the polar low at a very early stage and tracking it during its development, propagation, and decay. The wind speed gradients are measured with good qualitative agreement between the altimeter and SSM/I. TOVS retrieved fields prior to the formation of the low confirm the presence of an upper level trough, while during the mature phase baroclinicity can be observed in the 1000-500 hPa geopotential thicknesses.

  9. Satellite observations of a polar low over the Norwegian Sea by Special Sensor Microwave Imager, Geosat, and TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claud, Chantal; Mognard, Nelly M.; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Chedin, Alain; Scott, Noelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Many polar lows are generated at the boundary between sea ice and the ocean, in regions of large temperature gradients, where in situ observations are rare or nonexistent. Since satellite observations are frequent in high-latitude regions, they can be used to detect polar lows and track their propagation and evolution. The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) providing estimates of surface wind speed, integrated cloud liquid water content, water vapor content, and precipitation size ice-scattering signal over the ocean; the Geosat radar altimeter measuring surface wind speed and significant wave height; and the TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) allowing the determination of temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere have been used in synergy for a specific case which occurred in the Norwegian Sea on January, 23-24 1988. All three instruments show sharp atmospheric gradients associated with the propagation of this low across the ocean, which permit the detection of the polar low at a very early stage and tracking it during its development, propagation, and decay. The wind speed gradients are measured with good qualitative agreement between the altimeter and SSM/I. TOVS retrieved fields prior to the formation of the low confirm the presence of an upper level trough, while during the mature phase baroclinicity can be observed in the 1000-500 hPa geopotential thicknesses.

  10. Measurements of E-mode polarization and temperature-E-mode correlation in the cosmic microwave background from 100 square degrees of SPTPOL data

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, A. T.; Henning, J. W.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H-M.; Citron, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Haan, T. de; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W.; Gallicchio, J.; Gao, J.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanson, D.; Harrington, N.; Hilton, G. C.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, D.; Liang, C.; Luong-Van, D.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Smecher, G.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Zahn, O.

    2015-05-18

    Here, we present measurements of $E$-mode polarization and temperature-$E$-mode correlation in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using data from the first season of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The observations used in this work cover 100~\\sqdeg\\ of sky with arcminute resolution at $150\\,$GHz. We also report the $E$-mode angular auto-power spectrum ($EE$) and the temperature-$E$-mode angular cross-power spectrum ($TE$) over the multipole range $500 < \\ell \\leq5000$. These power spectra improve on previous measurements in the high-$\\ell$ (small-scale) regime. We fit the combination of the SPTpol power spectra, data from \\planck\\, and previous SPT measurements with a six-parameter \\LCDM cosmological model. Furthermore, we find that the best-fit parameters are consistent with previous results. The improvement in high-$\\ell$ sensitivity over previous measurements leads to a significant improvement in the limit on polarized point-source power: after masking sources brighter than 50\\,mJy in unpolarized flux at 150\\,GHz, we find a 95\\% confidence upper limit on unclustered point-source power in the $EE$ spectrum of $D_\\ell = \\ell (\\ell+1) C_\\ell / 2 \\pi < 0.40 \\ \\mu{\\mbox{K}}^2$ at $\\ell=3000$, indicating that future $EE$ measurements will not be limited by power from unclustered point sources in the multipole range $\\ell < 3600$, and possibly much higher in $\\ell.$

  11. Measurements of E-Mode Polarization and Temperature E-Mode Correlation in the Cosmic Microwave Background from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, A; Henning, J W; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H. M.; Citron, R.; Crawford, T.M.; de Haan, Timo R.; Dobbs, M.A.; Everett, W.; Gallicchio, J.; Gao, J; George, E.M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mocanu, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J.T.; Schaffer, K.; Smecher, G.; Stark, Anthony A.; Story, K. T.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Zahn, O.

    2015-05-20

    We present measurements of E-mode polarization and temperature-E-mode correlation in the cosmic microwave background using data from the first season of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The observations used in this work cover 100 deg(2) of sky with arcminute resolution at 150 GHz. We report the E-mode angular auto-power spectrum (EE) and the temperature-E-mode angular cross-power spectrum (TE) over the multipole range 500 < l <= 5000. These power spectra improve on previous measurements in the high-l (small-scale) regime. We fit the combination of the SPTpol power spectra, data from Planck, and previous SPT measurements with a six-parameter Lambda CDM cosmological model. We find that the best-fit parameters are consistent with previous results. The improvement in high-l sensitivity over previous measurements leads to a significant improvement in the limit on polarized point-source power: after masking sources brighter than 50 mJy in unpolarized flux at 150 GHz, we find a 95% confidence upper limit on unclustered point-source power in the EE spectrum of D-l = l (l + 1) Cl/2 pi < 0.40 mu K-2 at l = 3000, indicating that future EE measurements will not be limited by power from unclustered point sources in the multipole range l < 3600, and possibly much higher in l.

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF E-MODE POLARIZATION AND TEMPERATURE-E-MODE CORRELATION IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND FROM 100 SQUARE DEGREES OF SPTPOL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, A. T.; Henning, J. W.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H-M.; Citron, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Haan, T. de; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W.; Gallicchio, J.; Gao, J.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanson, D.; Harrington, N.; Hilton, G. C.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, D.; Liang, C.; Luong-Van, D.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Smecher, G.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Zahn, O.

    2015-05-18

    We present measurements of E-mode polarization and temperature-E-mode correlation in the cosmic microwave background using data from the first season of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The observations used in this work cover 100 ${{{\\rm deg} }^{2}}$ of sky with arcminute resolution at 150 GHz. We report the E-mode angular auto-power spectrum (EE) and the temperature-E-mode angular cross-power spectrum (TE) over the multipole range 500 < ℓ ≤ 5000. These power spectra improve on previous measurements in the high-ℓ (small-scale) regime. We fit the combination of the SPTpol power spectra, data from Planck, and previous SPT measurements with a six-parameter ΛCDM cosmological model. We find that the best-fit parameters are consistent with previous results. The improvement in high-ℓ sensitivity over previous measurements leads to a significant improvement in the limit on polarized point-source power: after masking sources brighter than 50 mJy in unpolarized flux at 150 GHz, we find a 95% confidence upper limit on unclustered point-source power in the EE spectrum of ${{D}_{\\ell }}=\\ell (\\ell +1){{C}_{\\ell }}/2\\pi \\lt 0.40\\ \\mu {{{\\rm K}}^{2}}$ at $\\ell =3000$, indicating that future EE measurements will not be limited by power from unclustered point sources in the multipole range $\\ell \\lt 3600$, and possibly much higher in $\\ell .$

  13. North Atlantic sea-surface variability reflected in an array of Greenlandic methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Matthew; Das, Sarah B.; Trusel, Luke D.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Evans, Matthew J.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Grieman, Mackenzie

    2017-04-01

    Marine processes, including rising sea-surface temperatures (SST) and the diminished stabilizing effects of sea ice extent (SIE) on marine-terminating outlet glaciers, are known to play a significant role in modulating Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) mass balance. However, observations of these processes are largely limited to the past few decades. If proxies can be developed, ice cores have the potential to extend our understanding of ocean-ice coupling well beyond the satellite era. In polar regions, atmospheric methanesulfonic acid (MSA) appears to be uniquely traced to summertime phytoplankton blooms occurring near the sea ice margin and has a relatively short lifetime (<7 days); hence, MSA may be uniquely suited for delineating past ocean-ice feedbacks local to Greenland. Here, we present a unique array of annually resolved MSA records from five GrIS ice cores (including two previously unpublished records) spanning the past two to three centuries, and covering a broad geographic area of the GrIS accumulation zone. We use long-term Lagrangian particle back-trajectories in order to derive probabilistic spatial-estimates of the maritime source regions of precipitating airmasses arriving at each site in our array. Across all sites we observe the most likely maritime source region to be the south-southeast Greenland coast, suggesting that a common MSA signal is embedded across our Greenlandic ice core sites. Our analyses of the MSA array reveals two distinct modes of variance common amongst all records. The first is a conspicuous 200-year decline in MSA concentrations into the present. This trend is similar to that observed in the anomalous, centennial-scale cooling of SST's within the south Irminger Sea region of the North Atlantic, where spatial correlations of the MSA array to historical SST reanalyses also show the highest significant correlations (p < 0.001; n = 154 years). The second mode of variability recorded within the MSA records emulates centennial

  14. Daily sea surface salinity variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean derived from satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Portabella, Marcos; Martinez, Justino; Hoareau, Nina

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a multifractal data fusion algorithm is used to obtain daily sea surface salinity (SSS) maps from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Level 2 (L2) data. The L2 SSS retrievals are obtained from the brightness temperature reconstructions at different polarizations and incidence angles along the satellite swath. SMOS L2 data have a spatial resolution of about 43 km and accuracy between 0.6 to 1.7 (in the practical salinity scale). The main goal of the data fusion algorithm is to use the reliable information of the OSTIA sea surface temperature (SST) daily fields to increase the spatial and temporal resolution of the SMOS L2 SSS data. Our SMOS dataset consists of the European Space Agency (ESA) L2 v620 reprocessed data from January 2010 to May 2015, and of the latest L2 operational data (near real-time) version after May 2015. Salinity anomalies are constructed by removing the five-year average of the L2 salinity data as a function of the geographical position, the overpass orientation (ascending or descending), and the across-track distance to the center of the swath. The SMOS-based climatologies evidence the existence of strong systematic artifacts, especially near the coast and, as such, they allow retrieving some of the systematic errors present in the original L2 data. The 0.05-degree, daily SST product from OSTIA is used as a template in our scalar fusion algorithm to generate 0.05 degree, daily SSS maps. The resulting SSS maps are less noisy and better define the main geophysical structures as compared to the standard high-level SSS products. Differences against near-surface Argo salinity measurements are reduced by 40% with respect to the standard products. In order to assess the significance of the extrapolation to the time domain, data from the Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array are used. The results indicate that the small time-scale variability present in the mooring data are not completely reproduced by remote sensing, although data

  15. An in situ-satellite blended analysis of global sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D.; Reagan, J.; Locarnini, R.; Sun, F.; Joyce, R.; Kumar, A.

    2014-09-01

    The blended monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis, called the NOAA "Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity" (BASS), is constructed for the 4 year period from 2010 to 2013. Three data sets are employed as inputs to the blended analysis: in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius/SAC-D and the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites. The blended analysis comprises two steps. First, the biases in the satellite retrievals are removed through probability distribution function (PDF) matching against temporally spatially colocated in situ measurements. The blended analysis is then achieved through optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross validations illustrate improved quality of the blended analysis, with reduction in bias and random errors over most of the global oceans as compared to the individual inputs. Large uncertainty, however, remains in high-latitude oceans and coastal regions where the in situ networks are sparse and current-generation satellite retrievals have limitations. Our blended SSS analysis shows good agreements with the NODC in situ-based analysis over most of the tropical and subtropical oceans, but large differences are observed for high-latitude oceans and along coasts. In the tropical oceans, the BASS is shown to have coherent variability with precipitation and evaporation associated with the evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  16. Understanding and predicting changes in North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, S. G.

    The mechanisms associated with sea surface temperature variability in the North Atlantic are explored using observation-based reconstructions of the historical surface states of the atmosphere and ocean as well as simulations run with the Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1). The relationship between air-sea heat flux and SST between 1948 and 2009 yields evidence of a positive heat flux feedback at work in the subpolar gyre region on quasi-decadal timescales. Warming of the high latitude Atlantic precedes an atmospheric response which resembles a negative NAO state. The historical flux data set is used to estimate temporal variations in North Atlantic deep water formation which suggest that NAO variations drove strong decadal changes in thermohaline circulation strength in the last half century. Model simulations corroborate the observation-based inferences that substantial changes in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) ensued as a result of NAO-driven water mass perturbations, and that changes in the large-scale ocean circulation played a significant role in modulating North Atlantic SST. Surface forcing perturbation experiments show that the simulated low-frequency AMOC variability is mainly driven by turbulent buoyancy forcing over the Labrador Sea region, and that the decadal ocean variability, in uncoupled experiments, derives from low-frequency variability in the overlying atmospheric state. Surface momentum forcing accounts for most of the interannual variability in AMOC at all latitudes, and also most of the decadal AMOC variability south of the Equator. We show that the latter relates to the trend in wind stress forcing of the Southern Ocean, but that Southern Ocean forcing explains very little of the North Atlantic signal. The sea surface height in the Labrador Sea is identified as a strongly buoyancy-forced observable which supports its use as a monitor of AMOC strength. The dynamics which characterize the

  17. Fractal features of sea surface manifested in microwave remote sensing signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1988-01-01

    The wave number spectrum of a well developed sea includes a broad range of wavenumbers (the equilibrium range) where the spectral density is governed by a power law, k exp p. In the approximation of a Gaussian surface, the exponent p is related to the Hausdorff dimension. For p less than 4 the Hausdorff dimension is greater than 2 and the surface is characterized by an increased number of steep and breaking wavelets and by an increased number of specular points at near vertical incidence. The former results in the so-called spike component in the total return at oblique incidence, whereas the latter leads to an increased backscatter at nadir and near-nadir angles. Theory for both cases is reviewed and implications for satellite scatterometer and altimeter measurements of surface winds are discussed.

  18. Fractal properties of the sea surface manifested in microwave remote sensing signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The wave spectrum of a well developed sea is discussed. It includes a broad range of wavenumbers where the spectral density is governed by a power law of the form k sup-p. When p is less than or = 4, the surface exhibits properties, such as an increased surface number density of steep and breaking wavelet events and an increased number of specular points for vertical incidence, due to the cascade (fractal) pattern in its geometry. These properties manifest themselves in error trends in wind speed measurements by scatterometer and altimeter.

  19. Fractal features of sea surface manifested in microwave remote sensing signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1988-01-01

    The wave number spectrum of a well developed sea includes a broad range of wavenumbers (the equilibrium range) where the spectral density is governed by a power law, k exp p. In the approximation of a Gaussian surface, the exponent p is related to the Hausdorff dimension. For p less than 4 the Hausdorff dimension is greater than 2 and the surface is characterized by an increased number of steep and breaking wavelets and by an increased number of specular points at near vertical incidence. The former results in the so-called spike component in the total return at oblique incidence, whereas the latter leads to an increased backscatter at nadir and near-nadir angles. Theory for both cases is reviewed and implications for satellite scatterometer and altimeter measurements of surface winds are discussed.

  20. Fractal properties of the sea surface manifested in microwave remote sensing signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The wave spectrum of a well developed sea is discussed. It includes a broad range of wavenumbers where the spectral density is governed by a power law of the form k sup-p. When p is less than or = 4, the surface exhibits properties, such as an increased surface number density of steep and breaking wavelet events and an increased number of specular points for vertical incidence, due to the cascade (fractal) pattern in its geometry. These properties manifest themselves in error trends in wind speed measurements by scatterometer and altimeter.

  1. Relating the microwave radar cross section to the sea surface stress - Physics and algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.; Plant, William J.; Brown, Robert A.; Davidson, Kenneth L.; Shaw, William J.

    1991-01-01

    The FASINEX (Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment) provided a unique data set with coincident airborne measurements of the ocean surface radar cross section (at Ku-band) and surface windstress. It is bei