Science.gov

Sample records for sealed air filled

  1. Dye filled security seal

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Dennis C. W.

    1982-04-27

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member.

  2. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  3. Aerodynamical sealing by air curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Daria; Linden, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Air curtains are artificial high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in a doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The performance of an air curtain is assessed in terms of the sealing effectiveness E, the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. The main controlling parameter for air curtain dynamics is the deflection modulus Dm representing the ratio of the momentum flux of the air curtain and the transverse forces acting on it due to the stack effect. In this talk, we examine the influence of two factors on the performance of an air curtain: the presence of an additional ventilation pathway in the room, such as a small top opening, and the effects of an opposing buoyancy force which for example arises if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. Small-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the E (Dm) -curve of an air curtain in both situations. We present both experimental results and theoretical explanations for our observations. We also briefly illustrate how simplified models developed for air curtains can be used for more complex phenomena such as the effects of wind blowing around a model building on the ventilation rates through the openings.

  4. Filled glass composites for sealing of solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Rajan; Widgeon, Scarlett Joyce; Garino, Terry J.; Brochu, Mathieu; Gauntt, Bryan D.; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.

    2009-04-01

    Glasses filled with ceramic or metallic powders have been developed for use as seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program. The composites of glass (alkaline earth-alumina-borate) and powders ({approx}20 vol% of yttria-stabilized zirconia or silver) were shown to form seals with SOFC materials at or below 900 C. The type and amount of powder were adjusted to optimize thermal expansion to match the SOFC materials and viscosity. Wetting studies indicated good wetting was achieved on the micro-scale and reaction studies indicated that the degree of reaction between the filled glasses and SOFC materials, including spinel-coated 441 stainless steel, at 750 C is acceptable. A test rig was developed for measuring strengths of seals cycled between room temperature and typical SOFC operating temperatures. Our measurements showed that many of the 410 SS to 410 SS seals, made using silver-filled glass composites, were hermetic at 0.2 MPa (2 atm.) of pressure and that seals that leaked could be resealed by briefly heating them to 900 C. Seal strength measurements at elevated temperature (up to 950 C), measured using a second apparatus that we developed, indicated that seals maintained 0.02 MPa (0.2 atm.) overpressures for 30 min at 750 C with no leakage. Finally, the volatility of the borate component of sealing glasses under SOFC operational conditions was studied using weight loss measurements and found by extrapolation to be less than 5% for the projected SOFC lifetime.

  5. Air riding seal for a turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Jacob A; Brown, Wesley D; Sexton, Thomas D; Jones, Russell B

    2016-07-19

    An air riding seal between a rotor and a stator in a turbine of a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is movable in an axial direction within a housing that extends from the stator, and a bellows is secured to the annular piston to form a flexible air passageway from a compressed air inlet through the annular piston and into a cushion cavity that forms an air riding seal between the annular piston and the rotor sealing surface. In another embodiment, a flexible seal secured to and extending from the annular piston forms a sealing surface between the annular piston chamber and the annular piston to provide a seal and allow for axial movement.

  6. Locating and sealing air leaks in multiroomed buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Industrial, nontoxic smoke bombs are used in multiroomed buildings to locate and fill discovered leak areas with polyurethane foam. All obvious air escape routes are sealed and the room is then pressurized to a minimum of 0.1 inch water above the pressure of adjoining rooms.

  7. Improved Gas Filling and Sealing of an HC-PCF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel; Spiers, Gary

    2008-01-01

    An improved packaging approach has been devised for filling a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber (HC-PCF) with a gas, sealing the HC-PCF to retain the gas, and providing for optical connections and, optionally, a plumbing fitting for changing or augmenting the gas filling. Gas-filled HC-PCFs can be many meters long and have been found to be attractive as relatively compact, lightweight, rugged alternatives to conventional gas-filled glass cells for use as molecular-resonance frequency references for stabilization of lasers in some optical-metrology, lidar, optical-communication, and other advanced applications. Prior approaches to gas filling and sealing of HC-PCFs have involved, variously, omission of any attempt to connectorize the PCF, connectorization inside a vacuum chamber (an awkward and expensive process), or temporary exposure of one end of an HC-PCF to the atmosphere, potentially resulting in contamination of the gas filling. Prior approaches have also involved, variously, fusion splicing of HC-PCFs with other optical fibers or other termination techniques that give rise to Fresnel reflections of about 4 percent, which results in output intensity noise.

  8. Floating air riding seal for a turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Todd A

    2016-08-16

    A floating air riding seal for a gas turbine engine with a rotor and a stator, an annular piston chamber with an axial moveable annular piston assembly within the annular piston chamber formed in the stator, an annular cavity formed on the annular piston assembly that faces a seal surface on the rotor, where the axial moveable annular piston includes an inlet scoop on a side opposite to the annular cavity that scoops up the swirling cooling air and directs the cooling air to the annular cavity to form an air cushion with the seal surface of the rotor.

  9. Longitudinal evaluation of the seal of IRM root end fillings.

    PubMed

    Crooks, W G; Anderson, R W; Powell, B J; Kimbrough, W F

    1994-05-01

    IRM has been recommended for root end filling during endodontic surgery. This study evaluated the seal of IRM root end fillings prepared with various powder to liquid ratios (P:L) at extended time intervals using a fluid filtration method. The P:L of IRM evaluated included 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 g/ml and the P:L which resulted from the manufacturer's recommended scoop and dropper. Ten teeth were evaluated for microleakage for each group at 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 wk after insertion. There were no significant differences in the microleakage of any of the various P:L groups at weeks 3, 8, and 12. These results suggest that higher P:L of IRM than those previously recommended for temporary restorations and for endodontic access preparations may be acceptable for root end fillings. IRM of higher P:L has other advantages such as ease of placement and decreased setting time, toxicity, and solubility.

  10. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  11. Leakage in roots coronally sealed with different temporary fillings.

    PubMed

    Barthel, C R; Strobach, A; Briedigkeit, H; Göbel, U B; Roulet, J F

    1999-11-01

    This study was aimed at determining the ability of different coronal temporary fillings to prevent corono-apical penetration of bacteria. A total of 103 human teeth, including three controls, were instrumented, obturated with gutta-percha, coronally sealed with either Cavit, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), glass-ionomer cement, Cavit/glass-ionomer cement, or IRM/glass-ionomer cement, respectively. Each root was fixed with wax between two chambers: the coronal chamber harboring soy broth with 10(8) colony-forming units of Streptococcus mutans/ml, the apical chamber containing sterile soy broth. The latter was checked daily for turbidity, indicating corono-apical penetration of bacteria. The Cavit group, the IRM group, and the Cavit/glass-ionomer cement group showed significantly more leakage than the glass-ionomer cement group of the IRM/glass-ionomer cement group. If a sample leaked, all except one (IRM/glass-ionomer cement) leaked before day 12. This in vitro study seems to indicate that only glass-ionomer cement and IRM combined with glass-ionomer cement may prevent bacterial penetration to the periapex of root-filled teeth over a 1-month period.

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Sealed Air-Return Plenum Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-08-01

    In this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers greatly improved indoor air quality and HVAC performance by replacing an old, leaky air handler with a new air handler with an air-sealed return plenum with filter; they also sealed the ducts, and added a fresh air intake.

  13. Sorption of antimicrobial agents in blow-fill-seal packs.

    PubMed

    Amin, Aeshna; Chauhan, Sateesh; Dare, Manish; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The present work studies the interaction of methyl paraben (MPB) and propyl paraben (PPB), two widely used antimicrobial agents in multi-dose ophthalmic formulations, with 5 mL, low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polypropylene (PP) blow-fill-seal (BFS) packs, by subjecting the systems to accelerated stability conditions of 40°C/25% RH. The effect of pH, paraben concentration, and relative humidity (RH) on the sorption loss of both the parabens was studied. Additionally, the effects of buffer species and buffer strength on MPB sorption were studied. LDPE packs showed significantly higher loss compared to PP packs which showed < 5% loss in all cases. PPB showed a significantly higher loss (40-50%) than MPB (9-16%) in LDPE. pH (3.0, 5.0, 7.0) did not have a statistically significant effect on sorption. However, concentration, humidity and buffer at pH 7 affected paraben sorption. The application of the power law suggested that the MPB followed non-Fickian diffusion while PPB showed non-Fickian to Case II diffusion in LDPE packs. In conclusion, caution should be exercised while using parabens in LDPE BFS packs because substantial losses of the antimicrobial agent during the shelf-life can compromise the preservative effectiveness against 'in-use' contamination.

  14. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy, health, safety, and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  15. A solder sealing method for paraffin-filled microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hugo; Bejhed, Johan; Köhler, Johan; Thornell, Greger

    2006-11-01

    Demonstrated and investigated here is a method to seal microfluidic systems by soldering. As a particularly difficult case of growing importance, the sealing of openings contaminated with paraffin wax was studied. Solder paste, screen printed on a metallized silicon substrate, was melted locally through application of 6.5-10 V to a 5 Ω copper film resistor for a few seconds and was found able to drive an intermediate layer of paraffin away and seal a 0.2 mm diameter circular via by wetting a surrounding copper pad. Although verified to be robust, the process did result in failing seals on excessive heating because of consumption of the pads. Correctly performed, the technique provided a seal at least withstanding a pressure of 8 bar for 8 h at 85 °C.

  16. Reduced long-term sealing ability of adhesive root fillings after water-storage stress.

    PubMed

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Namen, Fátima; Galan, João

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to compare in vitro the short-term and long-term ability to prevent through-and-through fluid movement along Resilon/Epiphany root fillings. A sample of 40 human upper incisors were prepared and assigned to experimental groups of 20 teeth each, designated as G1, Resilon/Epiphany, and G2, gutta-percha/AH Plus. Additional 10 teeth were used as controls. Each tooth was assembled in a hermetic cell to allow the evaluation of fluid filtration. After the root filling procedures, the filled roots were stored at 37 degrees C and 100% humidity for 7 days to allow setting of the sealer. Forthwith, the teeth were submitted to the first fluid flow measurement. Leakage was measured by the movement of an air bubble traveling within a pipette connected to the teeth. Shortly after the measurements, the teeth were detached from the hermetic cell and then stored in water for 14 months at 37 degrees C. At this moment, fluid filtration was re-measured. Both Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were applied to detect differences between the experimental groups. No differences were found between the experimental groups during the immediate measure (P > .05), whereas Resilon/Epiphany group displayed significantly more fluid movement than the gutta-percha/AH Plus group after 14 months of water storage (P < .05). The water-storage stress had no significant effect on the sealing ability of the gutta-percha/AH Plus root fillings (P > .05). The main point of our study is the fact that long-term sealing was compromised in the Resilon/Epiphany samples, when exposed to long-term water storage.

  17. [Comparative study of the seal and porosity of provisional coronal filling materials in endodontics].

    PubMed

    Scherman, L; Nebot, D

    1989-06-01

    The porosity and the leakage properties of 13 temporary fillings used between each appointment during endodontic treatment were investigated by means of thermocycling and dye staining of the interface between the teeth and the filling material. A scanning electron microscope was also used for these observations. The 8 commercially produced temporary fillings seal adequately the cavity whereas the 5 materials prepared and mixed by the practitioner allowed wide staining diffusion and therefore were leaky.

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Attic Air Sealing Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored Guide to Attic Air Sealing by Building America research partner Building Science Corporation, which provides best practices for attic air sealing. The guide has had 21,000 views and 13,000 downloads since it was posted.

  19. 2003 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The following reports were included in the 2003 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop:Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP); Overview of NASA Glenn Seal Developments; NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Project Overview; Development of Higher Temperature Abradable Seals for Industrial Gas Turbines; High Misalignment Carbon Seals for the Fan Drive Gear System Technologies; Compliant Foil Seal Investigations; Test Rig for Evaluating Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts; Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control; Non-Contacting Finger Seal Developments and Design Considerations; Effect of Flow-Induced Radial Load on Brush Seal/Rotor Contact Mechanics; Seal Developments at Flowserve Corporation; Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators With Seal-Like Features; Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators; Feltmetal Seal Material Through-Flow; "Bimodal" Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) Propulsion for Future Human Mars Exploration Missions; High Temperature Propulsion System Structural Seals for Future Space Launch Vehicles; Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles; High Temperature Metallic Seal Development for Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications; and BrazeFoil Honeycomb.

  20. Measuring the fill height of sealed cans with a compound pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, P.M.

    1995-06-01

    A compound pendulum has been designed, fabricated, tested, and used to determine the fill height of material in sealed cans. The specific cans that stimulated this work are partially filled with uranium and plutonium oxide. Fill height affects nondestructive assays using fission neutrons, but corrections for various fill heights can be made once the height is known. Heights vary with use as the powder compacts or loosens, so it is necessary to determine the height at the time of the neutron measurement. The pendulum is small and readily portable so it can be taken to the location of the neutron measurement. Tests with open cans filled with sand to various known heights had accuracies generally within 3%. Factors that can affect the accuracy are examined and discussed. Experience in using the pendulum on sealed cans is related.

  1. Split ring floating air riding seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Mills, Jacob A

    2015-11-03

    A floating air riding seal for a gas turbine engine with a rotor and a stator, an annular piston chamber with an axial moveable annular piston assembly within the annular piston chamber, an annular cavity formed on the annular piston assembly that faces a seal surface on the rotor, and a central passage connecting the annular cavity to the annular piston chamber to supply compressed air to the seal face, where the annular piston assembly is a split piston assembly to maintain a tight seal as coning of the rotor disk occurs.

  2. 2006 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop; Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce, M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor); Delgado, Irebert (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA s new fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakages as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed seal technologies employed by the Apollo command module that serve as an excellent basis for seals for NASA s new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV).

  3. 2000 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The 2000 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered four main areas: (1) overviews of NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) and Access to Space Programs, with emphasis on program goals and seal needs; (2) review of turbine engine seal issues from the perspective of end users such as United Airlines; (3) reviews of sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (4) reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrates for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future engine system efficiency and emission goals. GE, Pratt & Whitney, and Honeywell presented advanced seal development work being performed within their organizations. The NASA-funded GE/Stein Seal team has successfully demonstrated a large (3-ft. diam) aspirating seal that can withstand all anticipated pressures, speeds, and rotor runouts anticipated for a GE90 L.P. turbine balance piston location. GE/Stein Seal are fabricating a full-scale seal to be tested in a GE-90 ground test engine in early 2002. Pratt & Whitney and Stein Seal are investigating carbon seals to accommodate large radial movements anticipated in future geared-fan gearbox locations. Honeywell presented a finger seal design being considered for a high-temperature static combustor location incorporating ceramic finger elements. Successful demonstration of the braided carbon rope thermal barriers to extreme temperatures (5500 F) for short durations provide a new form of very high temperature thermal barrier for future Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle joints. The X-37, X-38, and future highly reusable launch vehicles pose challenging control surface seal demands that require new seal concepts made from emerging high temperature ceramics and other materials.

  4. Development of mainshaft seals for advanced air breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobek, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    A gas-film face seal design incorporating shrouded Rayleigh step lift pads at the primary sealing face was analyzed for performance over a wide range of gas turbine engine conditions. Acceptable leakage rates and operation without rubbing contact was predicted for engine conditions that included sealed pressures to 500 psi, sliding speeds to 600 ft/sec, and sealed gas temperatures to 1200 F. In the experimental evaluation, measured gas leakage rates were, in general, close to that predicted and sometimes lower. Satisfactory performance of the gas-film seal was demonstrated at the maximum seal seat axial runout expected in present positive contact face seal applications. Stable operation was shown when testing was performed with air-entrained dirt.

  5. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, C.; Maxwell, S.

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  6. Measure Guideline. Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, Casey; Maxwell, Sean

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  7. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Modera, Mark

    2012-05-01

    This report presents a process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  8. 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Propulsion 21 Project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed tests completed for the shuttle main landing gear door seals.

  9. 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Delgado, Irebert

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA's new Orion project aimed at developing a new spacecraft that will fare astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA's fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA's turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakage as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Turbine seal development topics covered include a method for fast-acting HPT blade tip clearance control, noncontacting low-leakage seals, intershaft seals, and a review of engine seal performance requirements for current and future Army engine platforms.

  10. 2008 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor); Delgado, Irebert R. (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Orion project aimed at developing a new spacecraft that will fare astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA s fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakage as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Turbine seal development topics covered include a method for fast-acting HPT blade tip clearance control, noncontacting low-leakage seals, intershaft seals, and a review of engine seal performance requirements for current and future Army engine platforms.

  11. Effect of dowel space preparation on the apical seal of root canal fillings.

    PubMed

    Raiden, G C; Gendelman, H

    1994-06-01

    The effect of post preparation on the apical seal was studied using simulated root canals. The maximum level of removal was tested with residual fillings 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm long. All of the artificial canals were filled with gutta-percha, Grossman's sealer, and lateral condensation. The removal was immediate and carried out with warm pluggers and the dowel space was completed with a Peeso drill. Stainless steel posts were cemented with zinc phosphate cement in the free space of the root canals. The coronal access of the canals was sealed with temporary fillings. After setting the materials, the specimens were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye solution for 72 h and were observed with a measuring microscope. The final length of the apical fillings was found to be different from the intended length in every group. As far as leakage was concerned, 1, 2, and 3 mm-long fillings did not show a significant difference when compared with the negative control group (that is to say, filled canals where no dowel space was created). In the 4 mm fillings the leakage value was zero. These findings may be of clinical importance when restoring short roots.

  12. 1999 NASA Seal/secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn hosted the Seals/Secondary Air System Workshop on October 28-29, 1999. Each year NASA and our industry and university partners share their respective seal technology development. We use these workshops as a technical forum to exchange recent advancements and "lessons-leamed" in advancing seal technology and solving problems of common interest. As in the past we are publishing two volumes. Volume 1 will be publicly available and volume 2 will be restricted under International Traffic and Arms Regulations (I.T.A.R.). The 1999 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop was divided into four areas; (i) overviews of the government-sponsored gas turbine programs (NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology program and DOE Advanced Turbine System program) and the general aviation program (GAP) with emphasis on program goals and seal needs; (ii) turbine engine seal issues from the perspective of an airline customer (i.e., United Airlines), (iii) sealing concepts, methods and results including experimental facilities and numerical predictions; and (iv) reviews of seal requirements for next generation aerospace vehicles (Trailblazer, Bantam and X-38).

  13. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.; Modera, M.

    2012-05-01

    Space conditioning energy use can be significantly reduced by addressing uncontrolled infiltration and exfiltration through the envelope of a building. A process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology is presented. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  14. Solubility and bacterial sealing ability of MTA and root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Espir, Camila Galletti; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; Berbert, Fabio Luiz Camargo Villela; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Objective To evaluate solubility and sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and root-end filling materials. Material and Methods The materials evaluated were: MTA, Calcium Silicate Cement with zirconium oxide (CSC/ZrO2), and zinc oxide/eugenol (ZOE). Solubility test was performed according to ANSI/ADA. The difference between initial and final mass of the materials was analyzed after immersion in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. Retrograde cavities in human teeth with single straight root canal were performed by using ultrasonic tip CVD 9.5107-8. The cavities were filled with the evaluated materials to evaluate sealing ability using the bacterial leakage test with Enterococcus faecalis. Bacterial leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for six weeks observing the turbidity of Brain Heart infusion (BHI) medium in contact with root apex. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey tests (solubility), and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (sealing ability) at a 5% significance level. Results For the 7-day period, ZOE presented highest solubility when compared with the other groups (p<0.05). For the 30-day period, no difference was observed among the materials. Lower bacterial leakage was observed for MTA and CSC/ZrO2, and both presented better results than ZOE (p<0.05). Conclusion MTA and CSC/ZrO2 presented better bacterial sealing capacity, which may be related to lower initial solubility observed for these materials in relation to ZOE.

  15. Solubility and bacterial sealing ability of MTA and root-end filling materials

    PubMed Central

    ESPIR, Camila Galletti; GUERREIRO-TANOMARU, Juliane Maria; SPIN-NETO, Rubens; CHÁVEZ-ANDRADE, Gisselle Moraima; BERBERT, Fabio Luiz Camargo Villela; TANOMARU-FILHO, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate solubility and sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and root-end filling materials. Material and Methods The materials evaluated were: MTA, Calcium Silicate Cement with zirconium oxide (CSC/ZrO2), and zinc oxide/eugenol (ZOE). Solubility test was performed according to ANSI/ADA. The difference between initial and final mass of the materials was analyzed after immersion in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. Retrograde cavities in human teeth with single straight root canal were performed by using ultrasonic tip CVD 9.5107-8. The cavities were filled with the evaluated materials to evaluate sealing ability using the bacterial leakage test with Enterococcus faecalis. Bacterial leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for six weeks observing the turbidity of Brain Heart infusion (BHI) medium in contact with root apex. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey tests (solubility), and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (sealing ability) at a 5% significance level. Results For the 7-day period, ZOE presented highest solubility when compared with the other groups (p<0.05). For the 30-day period, no difference was observed among the materials. Lower bacterial leakage was observed for MTA and CSC/ZrO2, and both presented better results than ZOE (p<0.05). Conclusion MTA and CSC/ZrO2 presented better bacterial sealing capacity, which may be related to lower initial solubility observed for these materials in relation to ZOE. PMID:27119759

  16. Root apex sealing with different filling materials photopolymerized with argon ion laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupato Conrado, Luis Augusto; Frois, Iris M.; Amaro Zangaro, Renato; Munin, Egberto

    2003-06-01

    The present study evaluates the seal quality in apex delta of single root human teeth filled with light-curing materials (Ultrablend Calcium-hydroxide, Vitremer glass ionomer and Flow-Fill Magic composite). 45 roots prepared by the endo PTC/Dakin technique were used. All prepared samples received photopolymerization with the blue 488 nm argon ion laser light. A 200 μm optical fiber introduced into the root canal delivered 100 mW of light power to the light-curing material. The fiber tip was positioned 5 mm away from the apex. Light was applied for 20 seconds. After curing, the samples received impermeabilization with ethyl-cyanoacrylate, leaving only the apex exposed, and then immersed in a methylene-blue dye solution for 24 hours. The samples were cut longitudinally and analyzed under a stereoscopic microscope for dye infiltration. It was found that those samples sealed with Ultrablend Calcium-hydroxide or the glass ionomer presented the best results, as compared to those samples sealed with the Flow-Fill Magic composite. No statistically significant difference was observed between the group treated with Ultrablend Calcium-hydroxide and the group treated with the glass ionomer, for a significance level of 0.05.

  17. Effect of bleaching agents on sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Canoglu, Ebru; Gulsahi, Kamran; Sahin, Cem; Altundasar, Emre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on the sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials. Study Design: The root canals of extracted human premolars (n=180) were prepared by using System GT rotary files and filled with either gutta-percha+AH Plus or Resilon+Epiphany sealer. In both groups, the coronal 3mm of root filling was removed and replaced with one of the following materials applied as intraorifice barriers (n=30/group): 1. ProProot-MTA; 2. Conventional Glass ionomer cement; and 3. Hybrid resin composite. In each subgroup, intracoronal bleaching was performed using either sodium perborate with distilled water or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel for 3 weeks. The leakage of specimens was measured using fluid-filtration and dye penetration tests. The data were analyzed statistically with One-way ANOVA, Repeated Measures t-test and Independent Samples t-test (p=0.05). Results: The fluid conductance values of the test groups were not influenced by the type of the bleaching agent, the intraorifice barrier, or the root filling material (all p>0.05). However, the extent of dye leakage was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier material (p<0.05), which showed the following statistical ranking: glass ionomer cement > resin composite > ProRoot-MTA (p<0.05). Conclusions: The effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel or sodium perborate/distilled water on the sealing properties of tested intraorifice barriers and root filling materials varied conforming leakage assessment. These properties were not affected by using fluid filtration test, while the glass ionomer barrier showed the greatest amount of dye leakage in both gutta-percha and Resilon root-filled teeth. Key words:Tooth Bleaching, root canal filling materials, glass ionomer cement, mineral trioxide aggregate, micro leakage PMID:22322509

  18. 2002 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s perspective of aeronautics and space technology for the 21st century; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET), Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle (TBCC), and Revolutionary Turbine Accelator (RTA) programs; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn's seal program aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA's turbomachinery, space propulsion, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET and TBCC/RTA program overviews illustrated for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. For example, the NASA UEET program goals include an 8- to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to investigate advanced reusable space vehicle technologies (X-38) and advanced space ram/scramjet propulsion systems. Seal challenges posed by these advanced systems include high-temperature operation, resiliency at the operating temperature to accommodate sidewall flexing, and durability to last many missions.

  19. Air quality in tightly sealed and passive homes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.A.

    1981-09-01

    Indoor air quality has attracted increasing attention during the past few yars. Pollutants generated from combustion, building materials, and human activities may reach significant levels in the indoor environment to produce adverse health effects. This report deals with the classes of pollutants and their sources, and the significance of reported levels, possible health effects, and control strategies in relation to tightly sealed and passive solar construction techniques. In tightly sealed homes, residential air-to-air heat exchangers, whose design and performance are discussed, offer one method of improving air quality at reasonable cost. It is recommended that further research be implemented to identify hazardous concentrations of pollutants and set standards to minimize health impacts in the search for new energy innovations.

  20. Effect of thermoplastic filling techniques on the push-out strength of root sealing materials.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Zigomar Hideo Fecchio Nasser; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Raucci Neto, Walter; Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Silva, Silvio Rocha Corrêa da; Alfredo, Edson

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of two thermoplastic obturation systems (MicroSeal and Obtura II) on bond strength of different sealers to intraradicular dentin. Sixty root canals of human canines were prepared using ProTaper rotary files (crown-down technique) and irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA. The root canals were filled by MicroSeal, Obtura II, or lateral compaction techniques using AH Plus and Epiphany SE. 1.5 mm thick root slices were subjected to the push-out test. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the bond strength values (MPa) observed in the groups obturated with MicroSeal (2.96 ± 2.72) and Obtura II (2.68 ± 2.18) did not significantly differ from each other (p > 0.05) but were significantly higher than that observed in the group obturated with lateral condensation (2.01 ± 1.48; p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in strength (p > 0.05) among the root canal thirds (cervical: 2.44 ± 2.03; middle: 2.50 ± 2.27; and apical: 2.70 ± 2.34). Adhesive failures were predominant (60%) in all groups. In conclusion, MicroSeal and Obtura II techniques, using AH plus sealer, increased the resistance to displacement of the filling material, when compared with lateral compaction. Moreover, when used with Epiphany SE, these obturation systems did not affect the bond strength of the material to root dentin.

  1. 2004 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (1) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (2) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program; (3) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal program aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (4) Reviews of NASA prime contractor and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (5) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrated for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. For example, the NASA UEET program goals include an 8- to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle, as part of NASA s new Exploration Initiative. Plans to develop the necessary mechanism and androgynous seal technologies were reviewed. Seal challenges posed by reusable re-entry space vehicles include high-temperature operation, resiliency at temperature to accommodate gap changes during operation, and durability to meet mission requirements.

  2. 2001 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2002-10-01

    The 2001 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered the following topics: (i) overview of NASA's Vision for 21st Century Aircraft; (ii) overview of NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET); (iii) reviews of sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (iv) reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrates for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. The NASA UEET program goals include an 8-to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to investigate advanced reusable space vehicle technologies (X-38) and advanced space ram/scramjet propulsion systems. Seal challenges posed by these advanced systems include high-temperature operation, resiliency at the operating temperature to accommodate sidewall flexing, and durability to last many missions.

  3. 1999 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn hosted the Seals/Secondary Air System Workshop on October 2829, 1999. Each year NASA and our industry and university partners share their respective seal technology development. We use these workshops as a technical forum to exchange recent advancements and "lessons-learned" in advancing seal technology and solving problems of common interest. As in the past we are publishing two volumes. Volume 1 will be publicly available and will be made available on-line through the web page address listed at the end of this chapter. Volume 2 will be restricted under International Traffic and Arms Regulations (I.T.A.R.) In this conference participants gained an appreciation of NASA's new Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program and how this program will be partnering with ongoing DOE -industrial power production and DOD- military aircraft engine programs. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding into sealing advancements and challenges that lie ahead, participants gained new working and personal relationships with the attendees. When the seals and secondary fluid management program was initiated, the emphasis was on rocket engines with spinoffs to gas turbines. Today, the opposite is true and we are, again building our involvement in the rocket engine and space vehicle demonstration programs.

  4. Sealing ability of Dyract, Geristore, IRM, and super-EBA as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Greer, B D; West, L A; Liewehr, F R; Pashley, D H

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the apical sealing ability of two compomers (Dyract and Geristore), IRM, and Super-EBA. Forty single canal roots from human teeth were instrumented until a size 40 file extended 1 mm beyond the apex. One millimeter of root apex was removed and a preparation 3-mm deep was prepared. Roots were divided into 4 groups of 10 roots each and filled with IRM, Super-EBA, Dyract, or Geristore. Canals were not obturated to ensure that any leakage was due to the apical filling material alone. Each root was then affixed to a fluid filtration device and subjected to a pressure of 14 cm of H2O, which has been determined to be the normal pulpal tissue pressure. The integrity of the seal was evaluated for 5 min at 1, 7, 30, and 180 days. Data were analyzed at each time point using one-way analysis of variance on ranks. The results of this study suggest that the new compomers Dyract and Geristore are equal or superior to IRM and equivalent to Super-EBA in their ability to reduce apical leakage when used as retrofilling materials.

  5. Sealing ability of a novel endodontic cement as a root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Parirokh, Masoud

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the potential usage of novel endodontic cement (NEC) as a root-end filling material by comparing its sealing ability with that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and intermediate restorative material (IRM). Sixty-six single rooted extracted human teeth were cleaned, shaped, and obturated in a similar method. After root-end resection, 3-mm deep root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared. The samples were divided randomly into 3 test groups, having 20 roots each. Six roots were used as positive and negative controls. Samples were filled with test materials and after one day were immersed in methylene blue dye for 24 h. Roots were sectioned longitudinally and examined under stereomicroscope. Positive and negative controls responded as expected. The increasing order of mean dye microleakage values was NEC < MTA < IRM. ANOVA test showed statistically significant differences among experimental groups (p < 0.001). Tukey's test revealed no significant difference between NEC and MTA. It was concluded that the sealing ability of NEC and MTA is the same and superior to IRM.

  6. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental groups in dye penetration scores (P>0.05). Conclusion. Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement. PMID:27651886

  7. Sealing ability and adaptation of root-end filling materials in cavities prepared with different techniques.

    PubMed

    Küçükkaya Eren, Selen; Görduysus, Mehmet Ömer; Şahin, Cem

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability and marginal adaptation of calcium silicate-based cements (CSCs) in root-end cavities prepared by ultrasonic and laser tips. A total of 72 extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were randomly divided as 60 teeth in experimental groups and 6 teeth each for positive and negative control groups. Specimens in experimental groups were obturated, their root-end resections were performed and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10) as follows: G1: Ultrasonic retrotip + MTA, G2: Ultrasonic retrotip + Calcium Enriched Mixture (CEM), G3: Ultrasonic retrotip + Biodentine, G4: Er:YAG laser tip + MTA, G5: Er:YAG laser tip + CEM, G6: Er:YAG laser tip + Biodentine. The sealing ability was measured by fluid transport method. Six specimens from each experimental group were randomly selected to analyze marginal adaptation and prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Micrographs were scored and also analyzed using Image J software. Data were analyzed with; two-way ANOVA, Bonferroni, Kruskall-Wallis, Mann-Whitney-U, Siegel & Castellan, and Spearman correlation coefficient tests. No significant difference was found between materials regarding the sealing ability and marginal adaptation (p > 0.05). Significantly greater fluid movement and poor marginal adaptation were seen for materials placed in cavities prepared by laser tips (p < 0.05). Positive correlation was found between the results of scoring and Image J analysis of SEM images (r = 0.596, p < 0.001). Fluid transport method and SEM analysis gave similar results suggesting the use of ultrasonic-retrotips for preparing root-end cavities which are going to be filled with one of these CSCs.

  8. Application of I-structure though-glass interconnect filled with submicron gold particles to a hermetic sealing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kazuya; Okada, Akiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Ogashiwa, Toshinori; Mizuno, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We propose hermetic sealing of a glass-to-glass structure with an I-structure through-glass interconnect via (TGV) filled with submicron Au particles. The top and bottom bumps and the TGV were formed by a simple filling process with a bump-patterned dry film resist. The sealing devices consisting of two glass substrates were bonded via Au interlayers. Vacuum ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of oxygen gas (VUV/O3) pretreatment was used for low-temperature Au-Au bonding at 200 °C. The bonded samples showed He leakage rates of less than 1.3  ×  10-9 Pa m3 s-1. The cross-sectional scanning electron microscope images of the fabricated I-structure TGV showed perfect adhesion between the I-structure TGV and glass substrate. These results indicate that the proposed I-structure TGV is suitable for hermetic sealing devices.

  9. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-On-Grade Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, B.

    2012-02-01

    This measure guideline describes covers two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

  10. Measure Guideline. Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-on-Grade Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    This measure guideline describes two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

  11. Controlled-force end seal arrangement for an air press of a papermaking machine

    DOEpatents

    Beck, David A.

    2003-07-08

    An air press for pressing a fiber web includes a plurality of rolls and a pair of end seal arrangements. Of the plurality of rolls, each pair of adjacent rolls forms a nip therebetween. Further, each roll has a pair of roll ends, the plurality of rolls together forming two sets of roll ends. Each end seal arrangement coacts with one set of roll ends, the plurality of rolls and the pair of end seal arrangements together defining an air press chamber having an air chamber pressure. Each end seal arrangement is composed of at least one roll seal, including a first roll seal, and an adjustable bias mechanism. Each roll seal forms a seal with at least one roll end, and one side of the first roll seal being exposed to the air chamber pressure. The adjustable bias mechanism is configured for controlling a position of each roll seal relative to a respective at least one roll end and for adjusting a seal force between the roll seal and the respective at least one roll end.

  12. Comparison of the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement used as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shahriar; Yavari, Hamid R; Rahimi, Saeed; Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Shakouei, Sahar; Unchi, Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Inadequate apical seal is the major cause of surgical endodontic failure. The root-end filling material used should prevent egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue. The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of four root-end filling materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), gray MTA, white Portland cement (PC) and gray PC by dye leakage test. Ninety-six human single-rooted teeth were instrumented, and obturated with gutta-percha. After resecting the apex, an apical cavity was prepared. The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups (A: white MTA, B: gray MTA, C: white PC and D: gray PC; n = 20) and two control groups (positive and negative control groups; n = 8). Root-end cavities in the experimental groups were filled with the experimental materials. The teeth were exposed to Indian ink for 72 hours. The extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope at 16× magnification. The negative controls showed no dye penetration and dye penetration was seen in the entire root-end cavity of positive controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the four experimental groups (P > 0.05). All retrograde filling materials tested in this study showed the same microleakage in vitro. Given the low cost and apparently similar sealing ability of PC, PC could be considered as a substitute for MTA as a root-end filling material.

  13. Sealing properties of mineral trioxide aggregate orthograde apical plugs and root fillings in an in vitro apexification model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rebecca L; Monticelli, Francesca; Brackett, William W; Loushine, Robert J; Rockman, Roy A; Ferrari, Marco; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2007-03-01

    One-visit mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apexification is gaining in popularity over the use of calcium hydroxide barriers. This study examined the sealing properties of two MTA apexification procedures using an in vitro apexification model. White MTA was introduced into instrumented single-rooted canals with standardized artificially created open apices to form 3- to 5-mm-thick orthograde apical plugs or complete orthograde fillings of the root segments. The remaining canal spaces in the former group were backfilled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha without a sealer. A Flodec fluid filtration device was used to record fluid flow across filled root canals at 48 hours and after 4 weeks of immersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Although MTA root fillings exhibited a better seal than MTA apical plugs at 48 hours, seals of these two groups were not significantly different after 4 weeks. Interaction of MTA with PBS may result in apatite deposition that improves the seal of MTA apical plugs with time.

  14. Air/Oil Seals R and D at AlliedSignal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullah, M. Rifat

    2006-01-01

    AlliedSignal aerospace company is committed to significantly improving the reliabilities of air/oil seals in their gas turbine engines. One motivation for this is that aircraft cabin air quality can be affected by the performance of mainshaft air/oil seals. In the recent past, coking related failure modes have been the focus of air/oil seal R&D at AlliedSignal. Many significant advances have been made to combat coke related failures, with some more work continuing in this area. This years R&D begins to address other commin failure modes. Among them, carbon seal "blistering" has been a chronic problem facing the sealing industry for many decades. AlliedSignal has launched an aggressive effort this year to solve this problem for our aerospace rated carbon seals in a short (one to two year) timeframe. Work also continues in developing more user-friendly tools and data for seal analysis & design. Innovations in seal cooling continue. Nominally non-contacting hydropad sealing concept is being developed for aerospace applications. Finally, proprietary work is in planning stages for development of a seal with the aggressive aim of zero oil leakage.

  15. In vitro comparative study of sealing ability of Diadent BioAggregate and other root-end filling materials

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, MA; Saeed, MH

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This in vitro study evaluated and compared sealing ability of Diadent BioAggregate (DBA) as a new root-end filling material (REFM) versus amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM) and white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA). Materials and Methods: Crowns of sixty extracted human maxillary incisors were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). All the roots were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha and resin sealer. Obturated roots were divided randomly into 2 control groups and 4 experimental groups of 10 samples each. In the negative control group (group I), roots were kept without any further preparation. In the positive and experimental groups roots, were apically resected and root-end cavities were prepared and filled with: (a) gutta-percha (group 2-positive control group); (b) amalgam (group 3); (c) IRM (group 4); (d) WMTA (group 5); (e) DBA (group 6). Apical leakage was assessed using dye penetration technique. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Results: Significant difference of sealing ability was found among 4 tested groups. DBA followed by MTA showed the highest sealing ability. Conclusions: DBA with its high sealing ability can be considered a possible alternative to MTA. PMID:22876012

  16. Sealing ability of MTA used as a root end filling material: effect of the sonic and ultrasonic condensation.

    PubMed

    Bernabé, Pedro Felício Estrada; Gomes-Filho, João Eduardo; Bernabé, Daniel Galera; Nery, Mauro Juvenal; Otoboni-Filho, José Arlindo; Dezan-Jr, Eloi; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Despite the excellent properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), the condensation technique may have some influence in its sealing ability. The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of sonic and ultrasonic setting of MTA. Thirty-four extracted human teeth had their canals prepared and filled with Sealapex sealer and gutta-percha using the active lateral condensation technique. The teeth were rendered waterproof and apicoectomy performed at 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities (3.0 mm deep and 1.4 mm diameter) were prepared with diamond ultrasonic tips. The root-end cavities were filled with Pro-Root MTA® with ultrasonic vibration, sonic vibration or no vibration. The positive control group did not receive any material while the negative control group was totally rendered waterproof. After material set, the specimens were immersed in Rodhamine B for 24 h, under vacuum in the first 15 min, then washed, dried and split longitudinally for evaluating the infiltration at the dentin/material interface. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests at 5% significance level. Sonic vibration promoted the lowest infiltration values (p<0.05). It was concluded that sonic vibration could be considered an efficient aid to improve the sealing ability of MTA when used as root-end filling material.

  17. Sealed piezoelectric energy harvester driven by hyperbaric air load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingting; Wang, Liang; Cheng, Tinghai; Song, Zhaoyang; Qin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a sealed piezoelectric energy harvester is fabricated to investigate the performance of the proposed harvester when driven by a hyperbaric air load. The harvester consists of a flexible piezoceramic patch and a closed chamber. The energy from the hyperbaric air can be harvested through the deformation of the lead zirconate titanate patch. A test system is built and a prototype device is tested under various experimental conditions. The test results show that the energy generation performance of the harvester can be tuned by varying its parameters. The output voltage shows an obvious increase with increasing cycle time. When the pressure increases, the output voltage is simultaneously reduced when the flow is fixed. The maximal output voltage and power across the 1000 kΩ resistor are 70.90 V and 9.30 mW, respectively. An effective power of 3.41 mW is measured across the 200 kΩ resistor at a pressure of 0.4 MPa and a cycle time of 0.8 s with a flow of 365 l/min.

  18. Restoration of middle-ear input in fluid-filled middle ears by controlled introduction of air or a novel air-filled implant.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Chien, Wade W; Rosowski, John J

    2015-10-01

    The effect of small amounts of air on sound-induced umbo velocity in an otherwise saline-filled middle ear (ME) was investigated to examine the efficacy of a novel balloon-like air-filled ME implant suitable for patients with chronically non-aerated MEs. In this study, air bubbles or air-filled implants were introduced into saline-filled human cadaveric MEs. Umbo velocity, a convenient measure of ME response, served as an indicator of hearing sensitivity. Filling the ME with saline reduced umbo velocity by 25-30 dB at low frequencies and more at high frequencies, consistent with earlier work (Ravicz et al., Hear. Res. 195: 103-130 (2004)). Small amounts of air (∼30 μl) in the otherwise saline-filled ME increased umbo velocity substantially, to levels only 10-15 dB lower than in the dry ME, in a frequency- and location-dependent manner: air in contact with the tympanic membrane (TM) increased umbo velocity at all frequencies, while air located away from the TM increased umbo velocity only below about 500 Hz. The air-filled implant also affected umbo velocity in a manner similar to an air bubble of equivalent compliance. Inserting additional implants into the ME had the same effect as increasing air volume. These results suggest these middle-ear implants would significantly reduce conductive hearing loss in patients with chronically fluid-filled MEs.

  19. Sealing ability of MTA and radiopaque Portland cement with or without calcium chloride for root-end filling.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Eduardo Antunes; Broon, Norberto Juárez; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) on the sealing ability of three Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) cements, ProRoot MTA, MTA-Angelus, and radiopaque White Portland cement (WPC), for retrograde root filling. Seventy roots of extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented and obturated. After sectioning the samples at 2 mm from the apex, they received one layer of Araldite and two coats of nail enamel, except for the apical dentinal surface submitted to apicectomy. Standardized retrograde cavities were prepared, filled with one of the materials, and immersed in 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 72 hours. Dye leakage was analyzed on a light microscope with ocular micrometer. Kruskal-Wallis and Miller tests were used to compare groups arranged in increasing order of leakage, according to mean rank of scores: WPC+CaCl(2), MTA-Angelus+CaCl(2), ProRoot MTA+CaCl(2), MTA-Angelus, ProRoot MTA, and WPC. CaCl(2) improved the sealing ability of all three MTA cements.

  20. Sealing efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate with and without nanosilver for root end filling: An in vitro bacterial leakage study

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Sajjad; Shakouie, Sahar; Milani, Amin-Salem; Balaei, Esrafil

    2017-01-01

    Background Various materials have been added to mineral trioxide aggregate to enhance its properties. This study was aimed to compare the sealing efficacy of MTA with and without nanosilver using bacterial leakage approach. Material and Methods Seventy canine teeth were prepared and obturated. Then, after apical resection, the root-end cavities were prepared by ultrasonic retrotips. Teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups containing two experimental groups (n=30) and two negative and positive controls (n=5). In group 1 and 2, root-end cavities were respectively filled with MTA and MTA with nanosilver (by 1% weight). Leakage assessment was carried out by bacterial leakage apparatus with Enterococcus faecalis species. Leakage comparison between experimental groups was done using Mann-Whitney test by Spss 16 software at significancy level of 0.05. Results The median bacterial leakages for MTA and MTA with nanosilver were 19 and 2, respectively. The mean bacterial leakages for MTA and MTA with nanosilver were 30.06±28.67 and 9.66±14.25, respectively. Mann-Whitney test indicated that there was a significant difference in bacterial leakage day between two experimental groups (P=0.002). Conclusions Based on the findings of this in-vitro bacterial leakage study, adding nanosilver to MTA decreased its sealing ability. Key words:Root canal therapy, root canal obturation, root canal filling materials, nanosilver, MTA. PMID:28149459

  1. In vitro Study on Apical Sealing Ability of Nano-Hydroxyapatite-Filled Epoxy Resin Based Endodontic Sealer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masudi, S. M.; Luddin, N.; Mohamad, D.; Alkashakhshir, J. J.; Adnan, R.; Ramli, R. A.

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this in vitro study were to evaluate the apical sealing ability of experimental nano hydroxyapatite (HA)-filled epoxy resin based endodontic sealer and to compare it with the commercial AH26 sealant. A total of 76 extracted human anterior teeth were instrumented using NiTi files and randomly divided into two groups of 33 teeth each and two control groups of 5 teeth each. The first group was obturated using gutta-percha with AH26 sealer. The second group was obturated with the nano HA-filled epoxy resin based sealer. All teeth were coated with nail polish except 2 mm from foramen apical and then suspended in 2% methylene blue for 7 days. All teeth were sectioned longitudinally for measuring penetration of the dye using stereo-microscope (x36). The result showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in apical sealing ability between AH26 silver-free sealer and nano HA sealer.

  2. Sealing ability, marginal adaptation and their correlation using three root-end filling materials as apical plugs

    PubMed Central

    OROSCO, Fernando Accorsi; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; GARCIA, Roberto Brandão; BERNARDINELI, Norberti; de MORAES, Ivaldo Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study used dye leakage assay and scanning electron microscopy to evaluate, respectively, the sealing ability and marginal adaptation of three root-end filling materials used as apical plugs, as well as the possible correlation between these properties. Material and Methods Ninety-eight single-rooted human teeth were prepared to simulate an open apex. The teeth were allocated to three experimental groups (n = 30), which received a 5-mm thick apical plug of (1) gray MTA AngelusTM, (2) CPMTM and (3) MBPc, and two controls groups (n = 4). After immersion in 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 48 h, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally and analyzed by Image Tool 3.0 software. The marginal adaptation between apical plugs and the root canal walls were analyzed by SEM. Results MBPc had significantly less (p<0.05) apical leakage than the other materials. Regarding marginal adaptation, CPMTM showed the best numerical results, though without statistical significance from the other materials (p<0.05). There was no correlation between the two properties. Conclusions When used as apical plugs, the tested root-end filling materials had similar marginal adaptation to the dentin walls, but MBPc had the best sealing ability, as demonstrated by the least apical leakage from all tested materials. PMID:20485923

  3. JT9D ceramic outer air seal system refinement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1982-01-01

    The abradability and durability characteristics of the plasma sprayed system were improved by refinement and optimization of the plasma spray process and the metal substrate design. The acceptability of the final seal system for engine testing was demonstrated by an extensive rig test program which included thermal shock tolerance, thermal gradient, thermal cycle, erosion, and abradability tests. An interim seal system design was also subjected to 2500 endurance test cycles in a JT9D-7 engine.

  4. The Effect of Thickness on the Sealing Ability of CEM Cement as a Root-end Filling Material

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Saeed; Asgary, Saeed; Samiei, Mohammad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Vahid Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Different materials have been used for root-end filling during surgical endodontic treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the dye penetration in different thicknesses of calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement as root-end filling material. Materials and methods. Following root canal filling in 70 extracted human single-rooted premolar teeth, the apical 3 mm of their root-ends was resected; the root-end cavities with depths of 1, 2 and 3 mm were prepared by ultrasonic retrotips and filled with CEM cement. After setting of cement, the roots were immersed in 2% Rhodamine B and the dye leakage was measured under stereomicroscope (×16) using Image J software. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests at 5% significance level. Results. The means and standard deviations of dye penetration in the 1, 2, and 3 mm groups were 3395.5±1893.4, 3410.4±1440.5, and 2581.6±1852.9 μm, respectively. The one-way ANOVA analysis indicated significant differences (P < 0.001); however, the Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that only the positive control group differed significantly from the experimental groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The findings demonstrated CEM cement to have an adequate root-end sealing ability in 3-mm thickness. PMID:25973147

  5. Design of a two dimensional planer pressurized air labyrinth seal test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konicki, Joseph S.

    1993-12-01

    A two-dimensional planer labyrinth seal test rig was designed to operate with air supplied at 45 psig and temperatures up to 150 F. The rig operates with a manually specified test section pressure up to 30 psig yielding Mach numbers to 0.9 and gap Reynolds numbers to 100,000. The air flow rate through the seal will be controlled by setting inlet pressure and adjusting an outlet control valve. The test section measurements are 18 inches wide by 1.5 inches depth by 6 inches in length and provides for 10:1 large scale geometry seals to be used to facilitate measurements. Design maximum seal gap size is 0.15 inches. The test section has a glass viewing port to allow flow field measurement by non-intrusive means such as Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) with seals containing up to 5 sealing knives. Measurements of pressure, temperature and flow fields can also be simultaneously measured by probes inserted in the seal itself, or mounted on the removable/replaceable top plate. Inlet flow is conditioned through the use of a dump diffuser incorporating screens, honeycombs, expansion and contraction portions. The inlet flow to the test section can be modified from uniform to various non-uniform conditions by employing profile generators such as screens and winglets. A detailed mechanical design has been conducted including stress analysis and seal flow rate predictions.

  6. Sealing Ability of Resilon and MTA as Root-end Filling Materials: A Bacterial and Dye Leakage Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Faramarzi, Farhad; Paymanpour, Payam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endodontic surgery is a valuable option for maintaining patient's natural dentition when previous orthograde endodontic treatments fail to succeed. Proper root-end preparation and placement of a retro-filling material are recommended for successful endodontic surgery. The objective of this experimental study was to compare sealing ability of Resilon/Epiphany system, as a potential root-end filling material, with ProRoot MTA using both dye and bacterial leakage models. Materials and Methods Ninety two single-rooted extracted human teeth were decoronated and prepared endodontically. Specimens were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n = 20) and four control groups (n = 3). After removal of apical 3 mm and root-end cavity preparation, MTA, or Resilon were used to fill root end cavities. For bacterial leakage, specimens (20 for each experimental group, 3 negative, and 3 positive controls) were subjected to E. faecalis over a 70-day period. Methylene blue was used for dye leakage (the same in number as before). Using stereomicroscope (40× mag.) complete dye leakage was assessed after 72 h. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed for bacterial leakage. The data was analyzed using t-test and Chi-square analysis (α = 0.05). Results All of the positive controls and none of negative controls revealed leakage. Result of log rank test showed no significant difference between MTA and Resilon in time of bacterial leakage at the end of the 70 days (P > 0.05) There was also no statistical difference in complete dye leakage for both groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion Leakage occurred in both MTA and Resilon as root-end filling material but the difference was not statistically significant. Resilon might be noticed as a potential root-end filling material if good isolation is attainable. PMID:24171025

  7. JT8D revised high-pressure turbine cooling and other outer air seal program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1979-01-01

    The JT8D high pressure turbine was revised to reduce leakage between the blade tip shrouds and the outer air seal, and engine testing was performed to determine the effect on performance. The addition of a second knife-edge on the blade tip shroud, the extension of the honeycomb seal land to cover the added knife-edge and an existing spoiler on the shroud, and a material substitution in the seal support ring to improve thermal growth characteristics are included. A relocation of the blade cooling air discharge to insure adequate cooling flow is required. Significant specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas temperature improvements were demonstrated with the revised turbine in sea level and simulated altitude engine tests. Inspection of the revised seal hardware after these tests showed no unusual wear or degradation.

  8. Measure Guideline: Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-09-01

    This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks. The purpose of this document is to provide the outline of the overview and process of insulating and air sealing walls so that home retrofit professionals can identify approaches to air sealing and insulation measures.

  9. Micro-CT assessment of the sealing ability of three root canal filling techniques.

    PubMed

    Celikten, Berkan; F Uzuntas, Ceren; I Orhan, Ayse; Tufenkci, Pelin; Misirli, Melis; O Demiralp, Kemal; Orhan, Kaan

    2015-01-01

    This study used micro-CT to compare three obturation techniques with respect to void occurrence in canals filled with bioceramic sealer. Thirty extracted first mandibular premolars were prepared with a ProTaper Universal system and randomly allocated to three groups. Canals were obturated with gutta-percha and bioceramic root canal sealer, using either single-cone, lateral compaction, or Thermafil filling technique. Each tooth was then scanned with micro-CT. Voids in 2D cross-sectional images and void volumes in 3D images of all root thirds were assessed in relation to obturation technique. There was no significant difference between obturation techniques in the proportion of sections with voids (P > 0.05). However, the results of the obturation techniques significantly differed in relation to root region (P < 0.05). In conclusion, no root filling technique resulted in void-free specimens. Void volumes were highest for the single-cone technique and lowest for Thermafil, in all regions (P < 0.05).

  10. Masked hearing thresholds of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in air.

    PubMed

    Renouf, D

    1980-10-01

    Two wild seals, maintained in captivity in good health, were trained to swim on verbal command to a spot 27 cm above the water, and subsequently to make a L or R turn to a pure tone vs no tone. White noise was present at 80, 70, or 60 db SPL. Masked thresholds were determined by a staircase method in 2-db steps at 2, 4, 8.6, and 15 kc/s (at 15 kc/s only noise at 60 db SPL was presented). Critical bandwidths in db were calculated, all of the order of 25 db (range of to 28 db). These values are close to those reported by Terhune and Ronald (J. Acoust.Soc.Am., 1975, 58, 515-516) for seals' aerial hearing but are unexplainably lower (i.e., worse) than for seals underwater. It was calculated that in their often noisy and visually restricted natural environment, a mother would not be able to hear her pup if separated by more than 8 m. This situation was generally corroborated by field observation on the breeding grounds.

  11. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study

    PubMed Central

    MEDEIROS, Paulo Leal; BERNARDINELI, Norberti; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; TORRES, Sérgio Aparecido; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; MARCIANO, Marina Angélica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc) using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (p<0.05). Results All cements showed bacterial leakage after 24 hours, except for the negative control group. The MBPc showed significantly less bacterial leakage compared with the MTA group (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between the CPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM. PMID:27119763

  12. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Paulo Leal; Bernardineli, Norberti; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Torres, Sérgio Aparecido; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Marciano, Marina Angélica

    2016-04-01

    Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc) using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (p<0.05). Results All cements showed bacterial leakage after 24 hours, except for the negative control group. The MBPc showed significantly less bacterial leakage compared with the MTA group (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between the CPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM.

  13. Copper-Filled Through-Hole Electrode of a ZnS Window Material for Sealing a Thermal Infrared Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Takafumi; Okamoto, Naoki; Ohta, Yoshimi; Fukuyama, Yasuhiro; Hirota, Masaki; Kondo, Kazuo

    The through-hole electrode for the wafer level package (WLP) was formed with the aim of lowering the cost of infrared sensors. It has been difficult to plate a ZnS substrate for use as the window material of WLPs because of low adhesion. However, through-hole filling was successfully accomplished in this work by applying a newly developed method of direct nonelectrolyte plating. Concretely, a blast cleaning process was performed on a ZnS substrate of 1 mm thickness. Then, a through-hole with both sides tapered was formed with an aspect ratio of 7. A compound process of Cu substitution plating and Ni nonelectrolyte plating was applied to the through-hole, forming a uniform plating film with high adhesion in the hole. Finally, the through-hole was completely filled by Cu electroplating. A He leak test confirmed that the sample had high sealing properties, with a measured leak rate of 1.0 × 10-10 Pa·m3/sec or less. The results showed that a ZnS substrate can be used effectively for IR window material, making it possible to reduce the cost of infrared cameras.

  14. Capillary flow porometry to assess the seal provided by root-end filling materials in a standardized and reproducible way.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Mieke A A; De Bruyne, Roger J E; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2006-03-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the root-end sealing ability of gutta-percha + AH26 (GP), Ketac-Fil, Fuji IX (FIX), tooth-colored MTA (MTA), IRM, Ketac-Fil + conditioner (Ketac-FilC), and Fuji IX + conditioner (FIXC). A total of 140 standardized bovine root sections were divided into seven groups, filled with the mentioned root-end filling materials, and, at 48 h, submitted to capillary flow porometry to assess minimum, mean flow and maximum pore diameters. Results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Level of significance was set at 0.05. Using the Kruskal-Wallis tests we found that there was no significant difference between the minimum pore diameters of the different materials, but significant differences between the mean flow (p < 0.001) and maximum (p < 0.001) pore diameters could be demonstrated. For the mean flow pore diameters, there was a significant difference between FIX and all other materials, between Ketac-Fil and IRM and between Ketac-FilC and IRM. Concerning maximum pore diameters, there was a significant difference between FIX and all other materials, between Ketac-Fil and MTA, GP and IRM, FIXC and IRM, and Ketac-FilC and IRM. The data showed that each sample had leaked. Glass ionomer cements leaked more than other materials, although dentin conditioning diminished the maximum through pore diameters. This maximum pore diameter, which corresponds to the largest leak in the sample, together with the size of bacteria and their metabolites, will be indicative of the eventual leakage along the root-end filling materials.

  15. Source levels of northern elephant seal vocalizations in-air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insley, Stephen J.; Southall, Brandon L.

    2005-09-01

    Accurate measurements of vocalization sound-pressure levels are necessary to determine the acoustical active space of animals in natural and human-altered ambient noise conditions. Despite this basic need, such data are limited or nonexistent for most species. Our study characterized aerial ambient noise and vocalization source levels for northern elephant seals during the breeding season. Subjects were adult males, lactating females, and dependent offspring (pups) at An~o Nuevo State Reserve. Source level measurements were made using a Type 1 sound level meter and calibrated microphones on-axis: (1) at 1 m; (2) at several known distances (laser measured); and (3) simultaneously at 1 m and a second known distance. Concurrent ambient noise conditions were measured in situ (non-weighted 5 min Leq integrated averages) and recorded for later spectral analysis. Measurements were made at two sites, one relatively noisy and the other relatively quiet, to determine whether animals compensate for higher noise conditions by increasing source levels (Lombard effect). Results indicate a wide range in signal strength, particularly for adult males whose vocalization source levels appear to be correlated with dominance rank and related to ambient noise conditions. The Lombard effect was not observed for adult females or elephant seal pups.

  16. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Han, Baolu; Xue, Nandong; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g., in plastic and glass sheds), which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)). Air was sampled at 5, 15, and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cylinders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges. Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs. These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air. The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed.

  17. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  18. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  19. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-04-12

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

  20. Frictional healing and sealing in anhydrite-filled faults: from short duration experiments to long-term CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluymakers, Anne; Bakker, Elisenda; Samuelson, Jon; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of long-term subsurface CO2 storage requires that the stored gas remains isolated from the atmosphere for thousands of years. Faults crosscutting the reservoir and topseal system of storage sites are considered one of the most likely leakage pathways, especially if reactivation leads to fault dilation. For a proper risk assessment it is important to know if CO2 affects the self-sealing potential of fault gouges, as well as how it affects strength recovery after fault slip ceases (frictional healing). A thorough understanding of the physical processes operating in the fault gouge will help to extrapolate the data from short-term experimental time scales to long-term storage time scales. Anhydrite is a common caprock mineral in many hydrocarbon fields worldwide, and particularly in the Netherlands. In cases where faults crosscut the caprock, it is likely that these contain fine-grained, anhydrite-rich, damage material, or "fault gouge". Therefore, we have performed two sets of experiments: 1) fault shearing experiments on simulated anhydrite fault gouge, to investigate the frictional behavior of anhydrite faults, and 2) compaction creep experiments, to investigate the potential for self-sealing. All experiments were performed under pressure and temperature conditions representative for CO2 storage conditions (set 1: T = 80-150°C; normal stress = 25MPa; Pf = 15MPa; set 2: T = 80°C; stress = 5-12MPa and P¬f = 15MPa). The use of different pore fluid phases (air, vacuum, water, CO2 saturated solution, moist CO¬2 and dry CO2), as well as the range in pressures and temperatures, allows us to study the effect of the in-situ conditions on the frictional behavior, and also to identify the mechanisms responsible for the compaction behavior. Our results indicate that in both types of experiments water plays an essential role, by enhancing both fault-healing (type 1) and fault-sealing potential (type 2). The compaction experiments indicate fault sealing in fine

  1. 2001 NASA Seal/secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered the following topics: (i) overview of NASA's Vision for 21st Century Aircraft; (ii) overview of NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET); (iii) reviews of sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (iv) reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrates for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. The NASA UEET program goals include an 8-to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to investigate advanced reusable space vehicle technologies (X-38) and advanced space ram/scramjet propulsion systems. Seal challenges posed by these advanced systems include high-temperature operation, resiliency at the operating temperature to accommodate sidewall flexing, and durability to last many missions.

  2. Comparison of the Root End Sealing Ability of Four Different Retrograde Filling Materials in Teeth with Root Apices Resected at Different Angles – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K.C.; Yadav, Pankaj; Rao, Yogesh; Relhan, Nikhil; Gupta, Priyanka; Choubey, Ashish; Bhardwaj, Shivanshu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Insufficient apical seal is the significant reason for surgical endodontic disappointment. The root-end filling material utilized should avoid egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the sealing ability of four root-end filling materials MTA, Portland cement, IRM, RMGIC in teeth with root apices resected at 0 and 45 angle using dye penetration method under fluorescent microscope. Materials and Methods Hundred extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were sectioned horizontally at the cement-enamel junction. After cleaning, shaping and obturation with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer, the tooth samples were randomly divided in two groups (the root apices resected at 0° and 45° to the long axis of the root). The root resections were carried out by removing 2 mm and 1 mm in both the groups. Following which 3 mm deep root-end cavities were prepared at the apices and the root were coated with nail varnish except the tip. The teeth in both the group were randomly divided into four subgroups each (Pro root MTA, Portland cement, IRM and Light cure nano GIC Ketac N-100). All the retrofilled samples were stored in acrydine orange for 24 hours after which they were cleaned and vertically sectioned buccolingually. The sectioned root samples were observed under fluorescent microscope. Results The root apex sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was superior to Portland cement, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) and LC GIC. IRM demonstrated the maximum apical leakage value among all the materials. Portland cement and LC GIC showed comparable sealing ability. Conclusion The angulation whether 0° or 45° angle did not affect the sealing ability of all the four materials used, MTA proved to be one of the superior materials for root-end filling. PMID:26894168

  3. Space Station Freedom seal leakage rate analysis and testing summary: Air leaks in ambient versus vacuum exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.; Markovitch, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report is intended to reveal the apparent relationship of air seal leakage rates between 2 atmospheres (atm) to 1 atm and 1 atm to vacuum conditions. Gas dynamics analysis is provided as well as data summarizing the MSFC test report, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study With Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report'.

  4. Mathematical model of an air-filled alpha stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Patrick; Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a mathematical model for an alpha Stirling refrigerator with air as the working fluid and will be useful in optimizing the mechanical design of these machines. Two pistons cyclically compress and expand air while moving sinusoidally in separate chambers connected by a regenerator, thus creating a temperature difference across the system. A complete non-linear mathematical model of the machine, including air thermodynamics, and heat transfer from the walls, as well as heat transfer and fluid resistance in the regenerator, is developed. Non-dimensional groups are derived, and the mathematical model is numerically solved. The heat transfer and work are found for both chambers, and the coefficient of performance of each chamber is calculated. Important design parameters are varied and their effect on refrigerator performance determined. This sensitivity analysis, which shows what the significant parameters are, is a useful tool for the design of practical Stirling refrigeration systems.

  5. Controlling a rabbet load and air/oil seal temperatures in a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2002-01-01

    During a standard fired shutdown of a turbine, a loaded rabbet joint between the fourth stage wheel and the aft shaft of the machine can become unloaded causing a gap to occur due to a thermal mismatch at the rabbet joint with the bearing blower turned on. An open or unloaded rabbet could cause the parts to move relative to each other and therefore cause the rotor to lose balance. If the bearing blower is turned off during a shutdown, the forward air/oil seal temperature may exceed maximum design practice criterion due to "soak-back." An air/oil seal temperature above the established maximum design limits could cause a bearing fire to occur, with catastrophic consequences to the machine. By controlling the bearing blower according to an optimized blower profile, the rabbet load can be maintained, and the air/oil seal temperature can be maintained below the established limits. A blower profile is determined according to a thermodynamic model of the system.

  6. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: monitoring heat-denature with auto-fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Maya; Arai, Tsunenori

    2008-02-01

    We studied the monitoring of heat-denature by autofluorescence spectrum from lung dissection plane during laser air leak sealing procedure. In order to seal the air leakage from lung in thoracotomy, we proposed novel laser sealing method with the combination of the diode laser (810nm wavelength) irradiation and indocyanine green staining (peak absorption wavelength: 805 nm). This sealing method is expected to preserve the postoperative ventilatory capacity and achieve minimally invasive surgery. We previously reported that this laser sealing only requires thin sealing margin (less than 300 μm in thickness) compared with that of the suturing or stapling. The most serious issue on the laser air leak sealing might be re-air-leakage due to rigid surface layer caused by excessive heat-denature, such as carbonization. We should achieve laser air leak sealing minimizing the degree of heat denature. Dissection planes of isolated porcine lung with /without the diode laser irradiation were prepared as samples. We measured the auto-fluorescence from these samples using a spectrometer. When the diode laser was irradiated with 400J/cm2, the surface of diode laser irradiated lung was fully carbonized. The ration of auto-fluorescence emission of 450nm / 500 nm, with 280 nm excitation wavelength was decreased less tha 50 % of initial value. That of 600 nm / 500 nm was increased over 700 % of initial value. The decreasing of the 450 nm auto-fluorescence intensity might be attributed to the heat-denaturing of the interstitial collagen in lung. However, increasing of the 600 nm didn't specify the origins, we suppose it might be originated from heat-denature substance, like carbonization. We could establish the useful monitoring for lung heat-denaturing with simple methodology. We think the auto-fluorescence measurement can be helpful not only for understanding the sealing mechanism, but also for controlling the degree of heat-denaturing during the procedure.

  7. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Klocke, S.; Faakye, O.; Puttagunta, S.

    2014-10-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of Consortium for Advanced Residential Building's (CARB’s) multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  8. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Klocke, S.; Faakye, O.; Puttagunta, S.

    2014-10-01

    ​While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  9. The frequency response of the vibrissae of harp seal, Pagophilus Groenlandicus, to sound in air and water.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Lisa F; De Groot, Theodorus

    2013-01-01

    The motion of isolated seal vibrissae due to low frequency sound in air has been measured using a microscope with a video camera and modeled using an FEM method with good agreement between the measurements and the model; the model has also been used to predict the motion of seal vibrissae in water. The shape of the seal vibrissae is that of a tapered right rectangular prism, unlike that of the previously studied rat vibrissae which are conical in shape. Moreover, unlike rat vibrissae which oscillate in the direction of the sound stimulus, two different modes of vibration of seal vibrissae were observed - one corresponding to the wider side being stimulated and one with the narrow side stimulated. The tuning of the seal vibrissae was much sharper than those of rat vibrissae, with quality factors about three times as large as those of rat vibrissae. As shown by the model, this increased sharpness is caused by the larger cross-sectional areas (by more than a factor of ten) of the seal vibrissae. This increased sharpness may be necessary for seal vibrissae so that they can have tuning in water, where the drag more heavily dampens the tuning than in air. The results suggest that vibrissae tuning may be important in the seal's ability to track the wake of its prey.

  10. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  11. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  12. Comparative evaluation of sealing ability of glass ionomer-resin continuum as root-end filling materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Hitesh; Dewan, Harisha; Annapoorna, B. M.; Manjunath, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Root-end filling is a prudent procedure aimed at sealing the root canal to prevent penetration of tissue fluids into the root canals. An ideal root-end filling material should produce a complete apical seal. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the leakage behavior of four different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight maxillary central incisors were obturated with laterally condensed gutta-percha and AH plus sealer. The roots were resected at the level of 3 mm perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth. Root-end cavities were prepared with straight fissure stainless steel bur. The teeth were then divided into four experimental and two control groups, and cavities restored as per the groupings. The teeth were immersed in methylene blue for 48 h, split longitudinally, and dye penetration was measured. Results: A highly significant difference existed in the mean dye penetration of Group I (conventional glass ionomer) and the other groups (resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified composite, and composite resin). There was no statistically significant difference among the three groups. Conclusions: (1) Significant difference was found in the dye penetration values of conventional glass ionomer cement and other groups. (2) No statistically significant difference was found in the dye penetration values of groups II, III, and IV. PMID:26759803

  13. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates were analyzed for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. The reason for choosing this house type was they are very common in our area and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR Building America industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled us to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  14. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1 ½-Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team analyzed five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. These homes were chosen for testing as they are common in Minnesota and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled the team to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  15. Development of High-Temperature Air Braze Filler Metals for Use in Two-Step Joining and Sealing Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-11-02

    Reactive air brazing (RAB) creates metallic braze joints between oxide surfaces. RAB can be performed in air and can undergo subsequent operation at temperatures up to 900ºC in oxidizing environments. This makes RAB an attractive joining method for creating seals in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) which operate at temperatures between 700 and 850ºC and comprise cathode materials which are intolerant of reducing environments. Many planar SOFC designs require a two-step sealing process. Thus the seal formed during the first step must not melt or soften at the firing temperature of the second step, otherwise its integrity could be compromised. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of adding Pd to a Ag-CuO RAB to produce a braze composition with a melting temperature high enough that it might be used in the first step of a two-step sealing process with unmodified Ag-CuO RAB used in the second step, thereby making possible a two step reactive air brazing process. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the substrate of choice in this study in order to simulate the initial sealing step in planar SOFCs which often involves sealing a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte to a metallic support frame. RAB compositions containing a 15 mol% Pd : 85 mol% Ag alloy with 8 mol% Cu added were found to provide the best combination of wettability, mechanical strength, and melting characteristics for brazing YSZ.

  16. Inflation pressure effect on performance of air-filled wheelchair cushions.

    PubMed

    Krouskop, T A; Williams, R; Noble, P; Brown, J

    1986-02-01

    Air-filled wheelchair cushions are frequently used in the prevention of pressure sores. Their effectiveness in reducing interface pressures and in redistributing body weight (BW) appears dependent on their internal inflation pressure. This pilot study examines and defines this relationship. Interface pressures were measured with the TIPE (Texas Interface Pressure Evaluator) system for 14 subjects while sitting on each of three commercially available air-filled wheelchair cushions. This relationship between interface pressure and internal pressure was then determined for each of the three body-build categories. In each category the interface pressure displayed a higher degree of sensitivity to underinflation than to overinflation. A high correlation found between BW and internal air pressure (IAP), may be useful in the design of a customized pressure indicator system. The study documents the influence of IAP on seating pressure and supports the need for further research in the development of an indicator system that alerts users to under- or overinflation of the cushion.

  17. An in-vitro comparative study for assessment of apical sealing ability of Epiphany/AH Plus sealer with Resilon/gutta-percha root canal filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Meraj; Musani, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Iffat M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Endodontic treatment is directed to eliminate microbial challenges from the root canal system and to create a complete seal. The aim of this study was to assess the apical sealing ability of resin-based Epiphany-Resilon root canal filling system and to compare it with the sealing abilities of different combinations of AH Plus, gutta-percha, Epiphany, and Resilon. Materials and Methods: One hundred extracted human maxillary incisor roots were treated endodontically. The samples were divided into groups A, B, C, and D, with each group containing 25 samples. Group A: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer; Group B: Canals obturated with Resilon and Epiphany; Group C: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and Epiphany; Group D: Control group canals obturated with gutta-percha without a sealer. The sealing ability of each of the obturation techniques was tested using the dye penetration method followed by the clearing method using alcohol. Stereo microscope was used to measure the extent of dye penetration. Statistical data analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Tukey tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all the four groups. Apical extent of mean microleakage was maximum for gutta-percha, followed by Gutta-percha + AH-plus and Gutta-percha + Epiphany, and the least with Resilon + Epiphany. Statistically significant difference (P < 0.01) was seen in the apical leakage. Conclusion: All the samples tested showed microleakage. The “Epiphany soft resin endodontic obturation system” showed a superior result compared to other obturation materials. PMID:27583220

  18. In-Air Evoked Potential Audiometry of Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the North and Baltic Seas

    PubMed Central

    Ruser, Andreas; Dähne, Michael; Sundermeyer, Janne; Lucke, Klaus; Houser, Dorian S.; Finneran, James J.; Driver, Jörg; Pawliczka, Iwona; Rosenberger, Tanja; Siebert, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    In-air anthropogenic sound has the potential to affect grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) behaviour and interfere with acoustic communication. In this study, a new method was used to deliver acoustic signals to grey seals as part of an in-air hearing assessment. Using in-ear headphones with adapted ear inserts allowed for the measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) on sedated grey seals exposed to 5-cycle (2-1-2) tone pips. Thresholds were measured at 10 frequencies between 1–20 kHz. Measurements were made using subcutaneous electrodes on wild seals from the Baltic and North Seas. Thresholds were determined by both visual and statistical approaches (single point F-test) and good agreement was obtained between the results using both methods. The mean auditory thresholds were ≤40 dB re 20 µPa peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) between 4–20 kHz and showed similar patterns to in-air behavioural hearing tests of other phocid seals between 3 and 20 kHz. Below 3 kHz, a steep reduction in hearing sensitivity was observed, which differed from the rate of decline in sensitivity obtained in behavioural studies on other phocids. Differences in the rate of decline may reflect influence of the ear inserts on the ability to reliably transmit lower frequencies or interference from the structure of the distal end of the ear canal. PMID:24632891

  19. In-air evoked potential audiometry of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the North and Baltic Seas.

    PubMed

    Ruser, Andreas; Dähne, Michael; Sundermeyer, Janne; Lucke, Klaus; Houser, Dorian S; Finneran, James J; Driver, Jörg; Pawliczka, Iwona; Rosenberger, Tanja; Siebert, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    In-air anthropogenic sound has the potential to affect grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) behaviour and interfere with acoustic communication. In this study, a new method was used to deliver acoustic signals to grey seals as part of an in-air hearing assessment. Using in-ear headphones with adapted ear inserts allowed for the measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) on sedated grey seals exposed to 5-cycle (2-1-2) tone pips. Thresholds were measured at 10 frequencies between 1-20 kHz. Measurements were made using subcutaneous electrodes on wild seals from the Baltic and North Seas. Thresholds were determined by both visual and statistical approaches (single point F-test) and good agreement was obtained between the results using both methods. The mean auditory thresholds were ≤40 dB re 20 µPa peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) between 4-20 kHz and showed similar patterns to in-air behavioural hearing tests of other phocid seals between 3 and 20 kHz. Below 3 kHz, a steep reduction in hearing sensitivity was observed, which differed from the rate of decline in sensitivity obtained in behavioural studies on other phocids. Differences in the rate of decline may reflect influence of the ear inserts on the ability to reliably transmit lower frequencies or interference from the structure of the distal end of the ear canal.

  20. Hybrid plasmonic microcavity with an air-filled gap for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Binbin; Wu, Genzhu; Chen, Daru

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid plasmonic microcavity with air-filled regions in the low-permittivity dielectric gap is proposed for sensing applications. Compared with the conventional structure with homogeneous gap, the introduced air-filled regions could improve the key modal characteristics of the hybrid mode. Simulation results reveal that this kind of hybrid microcavity maintains low loss with high quality factor ∼3062, and high field confinement with small mode volume 0.891 μm3. Moreover, in the sensing applications, this hybrid microcavity features simultaneously large refractive index sensitivity of 100 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and relatively high quality factor of 3062. Hence, it shows that the hybrid plasmonic microcavity has potential applications in ultra-compact refractive index sensor.

  1. Methods for Predicting More Confident Lifetimes of Seals in Air Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Celina, M.; Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.

    1999-03-05

    We have been working for many years to develop improved methods for predicting the lifetimes of polymers exposed to air environments and have recently turned our attention to seal materials. This paper describes an extensive study on a butyl material using elevated temperature compression stress-relaxation (CSR) techniques in combination with conventional oven aging exposures. The results initially indicated important synergistic effects when mechanical strain is combined with oven aging, as well as complex, non-Arrhenius behavior of the CSR results. By combining modeling and experiments, we show that diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) anomalies dominate traditional CSR experiments. A new CSR approach allows us to eliminate DLO effects and recover Arrhenius behavior. Furthermore, the resulting CSR activation energy (E{sub a}) from 125 C to 70 C is identical to the activation energies for the tensile elongation and for the oxygen consumption rate of unstrained material over similar temperature ranges. This strongly suggests that the same underlying oxidation reactions determine both the unstrained and strained degradation rates. We therefore utilize our ultrasensitive oxygen consumption rate approach down to 23 C to show that the CSR E{sub a} likely remains unchanged when extrapolated below 70 C, allowing very confident room temperature lifetime predictions for the butyl seal.

  2. Development of a high temperature ceramic-to-metal seal for Air Force Weapons Laboratory Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnell, R. E.; Stoddard, S. D.

    1987-03-01

    Procedures were developed for fabricating vacuum tight metal-to-ceramic ring seals between Inconel 625 and MgO-3 wt % Y2O3 tubes metallized with a calcia-alumina-silica glass (CaO-29 wt % Al2O3-35 wt % SiO2) containing 50 vol % molybdenum filler. Palniro No. 1 (Au-25 wt % Pd-25 wt % Ni) was found to be the most reliable braze for joining Inconel to metallized MgO-3 wt % Y2O3 bodies. The reliabilities of the processing procedures and the material systems were demonstrated. A prototype electrical feedthrough was fabricated for 1173 K operation in air or vacuum.

  3. Measure Guideline. Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-09-01

    This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks.

  4. Effect of pH on sealing ability of white mineral trioxide aggregate as a root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Saghiri, Ali Mohammad; Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Fatemi, Ali; Shiezadeh, Vahab; Ranjkesh, Bahram

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate microleakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a root-end filling material after its exposure to a range of acidic environments during hydration. Seventy single-rooted teeth were divided into 4 experimental and 2 control groups. All the teeth were instrumented, and their apices were resected. Root-end cavities were filled with white MTA in the experimental groups. In the control groups root-end cavities were not filled. Root-end fillings were exposed to acidic environments with pH values of 4.4, 5.4, 6.4, or 7.4 for 3 days in the experimental groups. Microleakage was evaluated by using bovine serum albumin. The evaluation was conducted at 24-hour intervals for 80 days. Data were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test. The earliest bovine serum albumin microleakage was observed in a pH value of 4.4 followed by pH values of 5.4, 6.4, and 7.4, respectively. There was a significantly longer time necessary for leakage to occur in samples stored in higher pH values (P < .000).

  5. Engineering report. Part 1: NASA wheel air seal development for space shuttle type environmental requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The sealing techniques are studied for existing aircraft wheel-tire designs to meet the hard vacuum .00001 torr and cold temperature -65 F requirements of space travel. The investigation covers the use of existing wheel seal designs.

  6. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L; Schroeder, John E; Kalsi, Manmohan S; Alvarez, Patricio D

    2013-08-13

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  7. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Alvarez, Patricio D.

    2010-09-21

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  8. Sealing ability of white and gray mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with distilled water and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate when used as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shahriar; Rahimi, Saeed; Yavari, Hamid Reza; Shakouie, Sahar; Nezafati, Saeed; Abdolrahimi, Majid

    2007-12-01

    This in vitro study used dye penetration to compare the sealing ability of white and gray mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with distilled water and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate when used as root-end filling materials. Ninety-six single-rooted human teeth were cleaned, shaped, and obturated with gutta-percha and AH26 root canal sealer. The apical 3 mm of each root was resected, and 3-mm deep root-end cavity preparations were made. The teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups, each containing 20 teeth, and 2 negative and positive control groups, each containing 8 teeth. Root-end cavities in the experimental groups were filled with the experimental materials. After decoronation of the teeth and application of nail polish, the teeth were exposed to India ink for 72 hours and longitudinally sectioned, and the extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis showed that there were no significant differences among the 4 experimental groups.

  9. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107-1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103-104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30-700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  10. Building America Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  11. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  12. Evaluation of Sealing Ability of Biodentine as Retrograde Filling Material by Using two Different Manipulation Methods: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj Kumar; Garg, Gaurav; Kalita, Chandana; Saikia, Anjan; Srinivasa, T S; Satish, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: The study was aimed to evaluate the microleakage of Biodentine using two different manipulation methods by dye penetration. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 single-rooted human maxillary permanent teeth were cleaned and obturated with gutta-percha using lateral condensation method. Standardized root-end cavities were prepared after apical resection. All teeth were divided randomly into two groups of 30 specimens and were filled with Biodentine by trituration and hand manipulation methods. The samples were coated with varnish and immersed in 1% methylene blue dye for 72 h. Then the teeth were sectioned longitudinally and observed under a stereomicroscope. The depth of dye penetration was measured in millimeters. Results: There was highly statistical significant difference observed between Group I and Group II (P < 0.001) when dye penetration scores were compared. Conclusion: More microleakage was seen when Biodentine was manually manipulated as compared to machine trituration. PMID:26229383

  13. Measurements of two types of dilatational waves in an air-filled unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.J.; Sabatier, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    This study consists of laboratory measurements of dilatational waves propagating through an air-filled unconsolidated sand. One excitation technique consists of a loudspeaker suspended in the air above the packing of sand. A second excitation technique uses a mechanical shaker in contact with the sand. The transmitted signals are received using microphones and geophones located at various depths within the sand. An interpretation based on measured phase speeds indicates that the transmitted energy from the suspended loudspeaker source is partitioned primarily but not exclusively into the type-II dilatational wave. This wave attenuates rapidly and is only detected at depths of less than about 15 cm for this particular sample. At the deeper depths the detected signal is associated with the type-I dilatational wave. The mechanical shaker produces only a type-I dilatational wave. Both the geophone and microphone sensors can detect both types of dilatational waves. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  14. Seals and Sealing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Developments by the aerospace industry in seals and sealing techniques are announced for possible use in other areas. The announcements presented are grouped as: sealing techniques for cryogenic fluids, high pressure applications, and modification for improved performance.

  15. Filling a Conical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  16. Apical adaptation, sealing ability and push-out bond strength of five root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Amoroso-Silva, Pablo Andrés; Marciano, Marina Angélica; Guimarães, Bruno Martini; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Sanson, Ana Flavia; Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes de

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the fluid filtration, adaptation to the root canal walls, and the push-out bond strength of two resin-based sealers and three calcium silicate-based retrograde filling materials. Fifty maxillary canines were shaped using manual instruments and the apical portion was sectioned. Retrograde cavities of 3-mm depth were prepared. The specimens were divided into five groups (n = 10): Sealer 26 (S26); MBPc (experimental); MTA; Portland cement with 20% zirconium oxide (PC/ZO), and Portland cement with 20% calcium tungstate (PC/CT). The fluid filtration was measured at 7 and 15 days. To evaluate the interfacial adaptation, sections of the teeth, 1 and 2 mm from the apex, were prepared and the percentage of gaps was calculated. The push-out bond strength at 2 mm from the apex was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA/Tukey's test (p < 0.05). At 7 and 15 days (p = 0.0048, p = 0.006), the PC/CT group showed higher fluid filtration values when compared to other groups. At 1 mm from the apex, no statistical differences in the adaptation were found among the cements (p = 0.44). At 2 mm from the apex, the PC/ZO group presented statistically lower percentage of gaps than S26, MBPc, and MTA (p = 0.0007). The MBPc group showed higher push-out bond strength than other cements evaluated (p = 0.0008). The fluid filtration and interfacial adaptation of the calcium silicate-based cements were similar to those of the resin-based cements. The resinous cement MBPc showed superior push-out bond strength.

  17. Concentration of dimethylnitrosamine in the air of smoke-filled rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Stehlik, G.; Richter, O.; Altmann, H.

    1982-12-01

    In order to evaluate the contribution of volatile nitrosamines from tobacco smoke to indoor air pollution, N-nitroso-dimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitroso-diethylamine (NDEA) were measured in indoor air under artificial and natural conditions. In controlled experiments under extreme conditions, we found that tobacco smoke-related NDMA levels above 0.07 ng/liter were associated with a highly irritating atmosphere which was scarcely tolerable to those present. In smoke-filled rooms under natural conditions NDMA levels ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ng/liter except a minimum value of less than 0.01 ng/liter in a restaurant and a maximum of 0.07 ng/liter in a dancing bar. These NDMA levels are thus below comparable values reported by others. The NDMA/NDEA ratios found in air samples taken from some rooms under conditions of everyday life are quite different from those found in sidestream smoke of cigarettes. Irritation was not reported under natural conditions. From the results it is concluded that NDMA levels, measured under real life conditions, are usually not caused by tobacco smoke alone. Evidence for other sources of volatile nitrosamines is discussed.

  18. Rotary kiln seal

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A rotary seal used to prevent the escape of contaminates from a rotating kiln incinerator. The rotating seal combines a rotating disc plate which is attached to the rotating kiln shell and four sets of non-rotating carbon seal bars housed in a primary and secondary housing and which rub on the sides of the disc. A seal air system is used to create a positive pressure in a chamber between the primary and secondary seals to create a positive air flow into the contaminated gas chamber. The seal air system also employs an air inlet located between the secondary and tertiary seals to further insure that no contaminates pass the seal and enter the external environment and to provide makeup air for the air which flows into the contaminated gas chamber. The pressure exerted by the seal bars on the rotating disc is controlled by means of a preload spring. The seal is capable of operating in a thermally changing environment where the both radial expansion and axial movement of the rotating kiln do not result in the failure of the seal.

  19. Interaction of finite-amplitude sound with air-filled porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of high intensity sound waves through an air-filled porus material was studied. The material is assumed: (1) to be rigid, incompressible, and homogeneous, and (2) to be adequately described by two properties: resistivity r and porosity. The resulting wave equation is still nonlinear, however, because of the u sgn(u) term in the resistivity. The equation is solved in the frequency domain as an infinite set of coupled inhomogeneous Helmholtz equations, one for each harmonic. An approximate but analytical solution leads to predictions of excess attenuation, saturation, and phase speed reduction for the fundamental component. A more general numerical solution is used to calculate the propagation curves for the higher harmonics. The u sgn(u) nonlinearity produces a cubic distortion pattern; when the input signal is a pure tone, only odd harmonic distortion products are generated.

  20. Curvature effects on axisymmetric instability of conduction regime in a tall air-filled annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécheux, J.; Le Quéré, P.; Abcha, F.

    1994-10-01

    This paper numerically studies curvature effects on the instability of the conduction regime of natural convection in a tall air-filled differentially heated annulus of vertical aspect ratio 16 by integrating the two-dimensional axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. The numerical algorithm combines a pseudospectral Chebyshev space discretization with a second-order time-stepping scheme. It is shown that, in contrast with linear stability analysis of the conduction solution, the time-periodic cross-roll instability does not take place in finite aspect ratio cavities for small values of the radius ratio. For all values of the radius ratio transition to unsteadiness occurs through supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Extensive computations show very complex behaviors of the unsteady solutions depending on the radius ratio. The nature of the reverse transition to steady state that occurs for increasing value of the Rayleigh number is also found to depend strongly on the value of the radius ratio.

  1. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  2. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-02

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems.

  3. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  4. Inadvertent venous air embolism during cesarean section: collapsible intravenous fluid bags without self-sealing outlet have risks. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Esen, Asim; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozturk, Erdogan

    2013-01-01

    The anesthesiologist must be aware of the causes, diagnosis and treatment of venous air embolism and adopt the practice patterns to prevent its occurrence. Although venous air embolism is a known complication of cesarean section, we describe an unusual inattention that causes iatrogenic near fatal venous air embolism during a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. One of the reasons for using self-collapsible intravenous (IV) infusion bags instead of conventional glass or plastic bottles is to take precaution against air embolism. We also demonstrated the risk of air embolism for two kinds of plastic collapsible intravenous fluid bags: polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polypropylene-based. Fluid bags without self-sealing outlets pose a risk for air embolism if the closed system is broken down, while the flexibility of the bag limits the amount of air entry. PVC-based bags, which have more flexibility, have significantly less risk of air entry when IV administration set is disconnected from the outlet. Using a pressure bag for rapid infusion can be dangerous without checking and emptying all air from the IV bag.

  5. Inadvertent venous air embolism during cesarean section: Collapsible intravenous fluid bags without self-sealing outlet have risks. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Esen, Asim; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozturk, Erdogan

    2013-01-01

    The anesthesiologist must be aware of the causes, diagnosis and treatment of venous air embolism and adopt the practice patterns to prevent its occurrence. Although venous air embolism is a known complication of cesarean section, we describe an unusual inattention that causes iatrogenic near fatal venous air embolism during a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. One of the reasons for using self-collapsible intravenous (IV) infusion bags instead of conventional glass or plastic bottles is to take precaution against air embolism. We also demonstrated the risk of air embolism for two kinds of plastic collapsible intravenous fluid bags: polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polypropylene-based. Fluid bags without self-sealing outlets pose a risk for air embolism if the closed system is broken down, while the flexibility of the bag limits the amount of air entry. PVC-based bags, which have more flexibility, have significantly less risk of air entry when IV administration set is disconnected from the outlet. Using a pressure bag for rapid infusion can be dangerous without checking and emptying all air from the IV bag.

  6. Characterization of Air-Gap Sealing with Organic Dielectric Using Spin-Coating Film Transfer and Hot-Pressing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norio; Machida, Katsuyuki; Ishii, Hiromu; Ishimura, Yoji; Saito, Hidenori; Asakuma, Sumitoshi; Kawagoe, Masafumi; Adachi, Hideki

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a dielectric material and its application to sealing air gaps using spin-coating film transfer and hot-pressing (STP) technology. STP technology is a new film-formation process that consists of spin coating a dielectric material on a base film, hot pressing the dielectric film on a wafer with gaps in a vacuum chamber, and peeling the base film off the dielectric adhered to the wafer. In order to seal the gaps with thin dielectric films, it is necessary to prevent the dielectric from breaking during the peel-off step. Thus, a dielectric of poly(benzoxazole) (PBO) with additives for reducing the adhesion strength between the dielectric and the base film is proposed. The experimental results show that 0.3-μm-wide gaps can be sealed with dielectric films as thin as 0.25 μm without film breaking. The mechanism by which adhesion strength decreases in the peel-off step is discussed in terms of its dependence on the proportion of additives. The synergy of the STP process and the type of dielectric material used paves the way for the development of future interconnect schemes using air gaps.

  7. Effect of Intra-Orifice Depth on Sealing Ability of Four Materials in the Orifices of Root-Filled Teeth: An Ex-Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghulman, Motaz Ahmad; Gomaa, Madiha

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of orifice cavity depth on the sealing ability of Fusio, Fuji II, Fuji IX, and MTA“G”. Materials and Methods. Ninety-two canals in extracted mandibular premolars were prepared, obturated, and randomly grouped into 4 groups. Each group was subgrouped for a 2 mm and 3 mm orifice cavity depth (n = 10). The remaining roots were divided to serve as positive and negative controls (n = 6). Cavities of the 4 experimental groups were filled with the respective materials and subjected to methylene blue dye leakage. Linear leakage was measured in mm using a stereomicroscope. Statistical Analysis. Kruskall-Wallis test was used at P < 0.05, and t-test was done to compare 2 mm and 3 mm. Results. All tested materials leaked to various degrees. Significantly higher leakage score was found for Fuji IX, Fusio, Fuji II, and MTA “G” in a descending order, when the materials were placed at 3 mm depths. A significant difference was found in the leakage score between the 2 mm and 3 mm depths in all tested materials with the 3 mm depth showing a greater leakage score in all tested materials. Exception was in MTA “G” at 2 mm and 3 mm depths (0.551 mm ± 0.004 mm and 0.308 mm ± 0.08 mm, resp.). Conclusion. The null hypothesis should be partially rejected. Fusio and MTA “G” were affected by orifice cavity depth with regard to their sealing ability. MTA “G” had the least leakage when placed at 2 or 3 mm depths, and Fusio is the next when placed at 2 mm depth. Two millimeters orifice cavity depth is suitable for most adhesive orifice barrier materials. PMID:22675356

  8. Demonstration/Validation of Hazardous Air Pollutant-Free Torque Seal Inspection Lacquer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    formulation samples were dried in an oven until the sample weight remained constant. This dried material was pulverized in a coffee bean grinder to...0.5-oz Tubes Pounds of Material Pounds of HAP 8030011432702 Red 1638 51.19 10.24 8030011250055 Orange 847 26.47 5.29 8030004081137 Green 42...system diagram. Figure 2. Torque Seal applied to UH-1 helicopter. Green - Baseline Red-HAP free 7 free and baseline Torque Seal formulations

  9. Bubble absorption by an air-filled helically-supported capillary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Negar; Thiessen, David

    2016-11-01

    Gas-liquid phase separation under microgravity conditions where buoyancy is not active represents a challenge for two-phase liquid-continuous space systems. Similar challenges are present in micro-scale electrochemical systems on Earth that generate gas bubbles in geometries where surface tension prevails over gravity. A possible ground-based application would be the removal of carbon dioxide bubbles from large aspect ratio channels in a direct-methanol fuel cell that could otherwise occlude the channel. In this study we use a 3-mm diameter stretched stainless-steel spring coated with a superhydrophobic layer to create a helically-supported capillary channel. Such a channel that is submerged in water and filled with air while vented to the atmosphere was found to absorb a stream of 2.5-mm diameter air bubbles at a rate of at least 36 bubbles/s. An optical detector and high-speed imaging system have been used to study bubble absorption dynamics. A significant finding is that the initial attachment of the bubble to the channel that involves the rupture of a thin film of water happens in less than 1 ms. The rapid rupture of the water film separating the bubble from the channel might be attributed to the roughness of the hydrophobic coating.

  10. Autonomous generation of a thermoacoustic solitary wave in an air-filled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Dai; Sugimoto, Nobumasa

    2016-10-01

    Experiments are performed to demonstrate the autonomous generation of an acoustic solitary wave in an air-filled, looped tube with an array of Helmholtz resonators. The solitary wave is generated spontaneously due to thermoacoustic instability by a pair of stacks installed in the tube and subject to a temperature gradient axially. No external drivers are used to create initial disturbances. Once the solitary wave is generated, it keeps on propagating to circulate along the loop endlessly. The stacks, which are made of ceramics and of many pores of square cross section, are placed in the tube diametrically on exactly the opposite side of the loop, and they are sandwiched by hot and cold (ambient) heat exchangers. When the temperature gradient along both stacks is appropriate, pulses of smooth profiles are generated and propagated in both directions of the tube. From good agreements of not only the pressure profile measured but also the propagation speed with the theory, the pulse is identified as the acoustic solitary wave, and it can be called thermoacoustic solitary wave or thermoacoustic soliton corresponding to the soliton solution of the K-dV equation in one limit.

  11. Protective supplied-breathing-air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; von Hortenau, E.F.

    1982-05-28

    A breathing-air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants is disclosed. The garment includes a suit and a separate head-protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air-delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air-delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  12. Detection of Air and Water-Filled Subsurface Defects in GFRP Composite Bridge Decks Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Roy, M.; Klinkhachorn, P.; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    2006-03-01

    Any discontinuity within a structural component influences the transmission of thermal energy through its thickness, which leads to differences in surface temperatures just above the defective and defect-free areas. The variation in the surface temperatures are recorded using a digital infrared camera and the thermal images (thermograms) are analyzed to locate the presence of subsurface defects such as debonds and delaminations within the structure. While past studies focused on detection of air-filled subsurface defects (debonds and delaminations) in fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite bridge decks using infrared thermography, this paper includes the detection of fully and partially water-filled defects as well. Simulated water-filled defects were embedded within the flange-to-flange junction of adjacent GFRP bridge deck modules to create delaminations. The deck specimens were then tested before and after the application of a 3/8″ (9.5 mm) thick polymer concrete wearing surface. It was found that water-filled delaminations as small as 2″ × 2″ × 1/16″ (51 mm × 51 mm × 1.6 mm) could be detected in case of specimens without wearing surface, but this was not possible after application of the wearing surface. The heating source considered included heater and solar radiation. Use of cooling sources such as cold water and liquid carbon dioxide were also explored. These results helped establish the limits of detection for fully and partially water-filled delaminations using Infrared Thermograpy. Additional studies included the detection of debond between 2″ (51mm) thick asphalt overlay and the underlying composite deck and it was found that air-filled debonds as small as 4″ × 4″ × 1/16″ (102 mm × 102 mm × 1.6 mm) could be detected using heater as well as solar radiation as heat sources.

  13. 30 CFR 57.8535 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....8535 Seals. Seals shall be provided with a means for checking the quality of air behind the seal and a means to prevent a water head from developing unless the seal is designed to impound water. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seals. 57.8535 Section 57.8535...

  14. Sliding durability of two carbide-oxide candidate high temperature fiber seal materials in air to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    A test program to determine the friction and wear properties of two complex carbide oxide ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is described. The fibers are based on Si, C, O, and Ti or Si, C, N, and O ceramic systems. Pin on disk tests using ceramic fiber covered pins and Inconel 718 disks, were conducted in air from 25 to 900 C to evaluate potential seal materials. This testing procedure was used in a previous study of oxide ceramic fibers which were found to exhibit wear behavior based predominantly on their mechanical properties. Like the oxide fibers tested previously, these carbide oxide ceramic fibers, show an increase in friction and wear with increased test temperature. At room temperature, the wear behavior seems to be based upon mechanical properties, namely tensile strength. At 500 and especially 900 C, the fibers wear by both mechanical fracture and by oxidative type wear. Based upon post test microscopic and x ray analyses, interaction between the fiber constituents and elements transferred from the counterface, namely Ni and Cr, may have occurred enhancing the tribochemical wear process. These results are interpreted.

  15. Student understanding of the volume, mass, and pressure of air within a sealed syringe in different states of compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Berg, Kevin Charles

    Problem-solving strategies in the physical sciences have been characterized by a dependence on algorithmic techniques often devoid of any reasoning skills. The purpose of this study was to examine student responses to a task relating to Boyle's Law for gases, which did not demand the use of a mathematical equation for its solution. Students (17- to 18-year-olds) in lower sixth form from two colleges in the Leeds district of Yorkshire in England were asked to respond to a task relating to pressure and volume measurements of air within a sealed syringe in different states of compression. Both qualitative and quantitative tasks for the sealed syringe system were examined. It was found that 34% to 38% of students did not understand the concepts of volume and mass, respectively, of a gas under such circumstances. Performance on an inverse ratio (2:1) task was shown to depend on gender and those students who performed well on the 2:1 inverse ratio task did not necessarily perform well on a different inverse ratio task when an arithmetic averaging principle was present. Tasks which draw upon qualitative knowledge as well as quantitative knowledge have the potential to reduce dependence on algorithms, particularly equation substitution and solution. The implications for instructional design are discussed.Received: 14 April 1993; Revised: 29 June 1994;

  16. Profiles of exercise history and overuse injuries among United States Navy Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) recruits.

    PubMed

    Shwayhat, A F; Linenger, J M; Hofherr, L K; Slymen, D J; Johnson, C W

    1994-01-01

    This prospective study examined running history as a risk factor for subsequent overuse injury in Navy Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) recruits. Recruits preparing to be Navy SEALs undergo 6 months of rigorous physical training programs, which place these recruits at high risk for developing an overuse injury. We assessed the independent variables of age; prior running frequency, duration, and pace; and training surface. Univariate and multivariate estimates of risk were determined for each variable. We observed an incidence of 3.4 overuse injuries per 1000 recruit-days. Assessing the physical activity of the recruits in the 6 months before entrance into basic training, we found that the recruits who ran at a pace slower than 8 minutes per mile and on softer training surfaces were more likely to sustain an overuse injury during basic training, in both univariate and multivariate estimates of risk. Recruits who ran fewer weekly miles and for shorter durations before basic training were also more likely to sustain an overuse injury according to univariate estimates of risk. Our findings suggest that risk of overuse injuries can be reduced by adjusting exercise routines before training. Running on different type surfaces with a gradual increase in speed, duration, and weekly mileage in the period preceding basic training may reduce risk of overuse injury.

  17. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  18. Air-filled postcranial bones in theropod dinosaurs: physiological implications and the 'reptile'-bird transition.

    PubMed

    Benson, Roger B J; Butler, Richard J; Carrano, Matthew T; O'Connor, Patrick M

    2012-02-01

    Pneumatic (air-filled) postcranial bones are unique to birds among extant tetrapods. Unambiguous skeletal correlates of postcranial pneumaticity first appeared in the Late Triassic (approximately 210 million years ago), when they evolved independently in several groups of bird-line archosaurs (ornithodirans). These include the theropod dinosaurs (of which birds are extant representatives), the pterosaurs, and sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Postulated functions of skeletal pneumatisation include weight reduction in large-bodied or flying taxa, and density reduction resulting in energetic savings during foraging and locomotion. However, the influence of these hypotheses on the early evolution of pneumaticity has not been studied in detail previously. We review recent work on the significance of pneumaticity for understanding the biology of extinct ornithodirans, and present detailed new data on the proportion of the skeleton that was pneumatised in 131 non-avian theropods and Archaeopteryx. This includes all taxa known from significant postcranial remains. Pneumaticity of the cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae occurred early in theropod evolution. This 'common pattern' was conserved on the line leading to birds, and is likely present in Archaeopteryx. Increases in skeletal pneumaticity occurred independently in as many as 12 lineages, highlighting a remarkably high number of parallel acquisitions of a bird-like feature among non-avian theropods. Using a quantitative comparative framework, we show that evolutionary increases in skeletal pneumaticity are significantly concentrated in lineages with large body size, suggesting that mass reduction in response to gravitational constraints at large body sizes influenced the early evolution of pneumaticity. However, the body size threshold for extensive pneumatisation is lower in theropod lineages more closely related to birds (maniraptorans). Thus, relaxation of the relationship between body size and pneumatisation preceded

  19. Compensating For Shrinkage In A Cryogenic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Arnold E.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed design for seals in liquid-hydrogen plumbing eliminates leaks caused by contraction of seals at low operating temperature. Each seal consists of rubber, polytetrafluorethylene, or lead O-ring including hollow core filled with water. At temperature of liquid hydrogen, anomalous expansion of water keeps seal gland filled and leaktight despite shrinkage of surrounding O-ring material. Design also used in systems using cryogenic fluids other than liquid hydrogen.

  20. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  1. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  2. Flow Field in a Single-Stage Model Air Turbine With Seal Rings and Pre-Swirled Purge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Dennis M.

    Modern gas turbines operate at high mainstream gas temperatures and pressures, which requires high durability materials. A method of preventing these hot gases from leaking into the turbine cavities is essential for improved reliability and cost reduction. Utilizing bleed-off air from the compressor to cool internal components has been a common solution, but at the cost of decreasing turbine performance. The present work thoroughly describes the complex flow field between the mainstream gas and a single rotor-stator disk cavity, and mechanisms of mainstream gas ingestion. A combined approach of experimental measurement and numerical simulation are performed on the flow in a single-stage model gas turbine. Mainstream gas ingestion into the cavity is further reduced by utilizing two axially overlapping seal rings, one on the rotor disk and the other on the stator wall. Secondary purge air is injected into the rotor-stator cavity pre-swirled through the stator radially inboard of the two seal rings. Flow field predictions from the simulations are compared against experimental measurements of static pressure, velocity, and tracer gas concentration acquired in a nearly identical model configuration. Operational conditions were performed with a main airflow Reynolds number of 7.86e4 and a rotor disk speed of 3000rpm. Additionally the rotational Reynolds number was 8.74 e5 with a purge air nondimensional flow rate cw=4806. The simulation models a 1/14 rotationally periodic sector of the turbine rig, consisting of four rotor blades and four stator vanes. Gambit was used to generate the three-dimensional unstructured grids ranging from 10 to 20 million cells. Effects of turbulence were modeled using the single-equation Spalart-Allmaras as well as the realizable k-epsilon models. Computations were performed using FLUENT for both a simplified steady-state and subsequent time-dependent formulation. Simulation results show larger scale structures across the entire sector angle

  3. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators.

  4. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  5. The influence of temporally varying noise from seismic air guns on the detection of underwater sounds by seals.

    PubMed

    Sills, Jillian M; Southall, Brandon L; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2017-02-01

    Standard audiometric data are often applied to predict how noise influences hearing. With regard to auditory masking, critical ratios-obtained using tonal signals and flat-spectrum maskers-can be combined with noise spectral density levels derived from 1/3-octave band levels to predict signal amplitudes required for detection. However, the efficacy of this conventional model of masking may vary based on features of the signal and noise in question. The ability of resource managers to quantify masking from intermittent seismic noise is relevant due to widespread geophysical exploration. To address this, spotted and ringed seals with previously measured critical ratios were trained to detect low-frequency tonal signals within seismic pulses recorded 1 and 30 km from an operational air gun array. The conventional model of masking accurately predicted the extent of masking only in certain cases. When noise amplitude varied significantly in time, the results suggested that detection was driven by higher signal-to-noise ratios within time windows shorter than the full signal duration. This study evaluates when it is appropriate to use average noise levels and critical ratios to predict auditory masking experienced by marine mammals, and suggests how masking models can be improved by incorporating time-based analyses of signals and noise.

  6. Glass sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S.

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  7. Navy GTE seal development activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grala, Carl P.

    1993-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative, the Naval Air Warfare Center conducts advanced development programs for demonstration in the next generation of air-breathing propulsion systems. Among the target technologies are gas path and lube oil seals. Two development efforts currently being managed by NAWCAD are the High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal and the Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal. The High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal Program aims at reducing parasitic leakage through application of a film-riding face sea concept to the compressor discharge location of a Phase 2 IHPTET engine. An order-of-magnitude leakage reduction relative to current labyrinth seal configurations is expected. Performance goals for these seals are (1) 1200 F air temperature, (2) 800 feet-per-second surface velocity, and (3) 600 SPI differential pressure. The two designs chosen for fabrication and rig test are a spiral groove and a Rayleigh step seal. Rig testing is currently underway. The Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal Program is developing shaft-to-ground seals for next-generation propulsion systems that will minimize leakage and provide full life. Significantly higher rotor speeds and temperatures will be experienced. Technologies being exploited include, hydrodynamic lift assist features, ultra light weight designs, and improved cooling schemes. Parametric testing has been completed; a final seal design is entering the endurance test phase.

  8. Navy GTE seal development activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grala, Carl P.

    1993-10-01

    Under the auspices of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative, the Naval Air Warfare Center conducts advanced development programs for demonstration in the next generation of air-breathing propulsion systems. Among the target technologies are gas path and lube oil seals. Two development efforts currently being managed by NAWCAD are the High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal and the Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal. The High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal Program aims at reducing parasitic leakage through application of a film-riding face sea concept to the compressor discharge location of a Phase 2 IHPTET engine. An order-of-magnitude leakage reduction relative to current labyrinth seal configurations is expected. Performance goals for these seals are (1) 1200 F air temperature, (2) 800 feet-per-second surface velocity, and (3) 600 SPI differential pressure. The two designs chosen for fabrication and rig test are a spiral groove and a Rayleigh step seal. Rig testing is currently underway. The Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal Program is developing shaft-to-ground seals for next-generation propulsion systems that will minimize leakage and provide full life. Significantly higher rotor speeds and temperatures will be experienced. Technologies being exploited include, hydrodynamic lift assist features, ultra light weight designs, and improved cooling schemes. Parametric testing has been completed; a final seal design is entering the endurance test phase.

  9. Repository seals requirements study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  10. Reducing Energy Usage in Residential and Industrial Buildings via the Sealing of Heating and Air Conditioning Ductwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witriol, Norman; Katz, Myron; McKim, Robert; Erinjeri, Jinson; Saber, Aziz

    2003-03-01

    Many existing residential and industrial heating and cooling systems have leaky ductwork. These leaks result in large energy losses, and thus significantly higher than necessary utility costs. We will discuss the use of extensions of well investigated cost effective sealing methodologies to ductwork, and quantify the energy savings that can be achieved by sealing these leaks.

  11. Coining seal

    DOEpatents

    Mancebo, Lloyd

    1976-01-01

    A bakeable high pressure-vacuum seal is provided in which an inductile sealing element having a butterfly shaped crosssection with protruding sharp edges at each of the four corners, is sandwiched between two ductile sealing elements, the sandwiched assembly then being compressed between the surfaces of the flange elements of a high pressure or high vacuum vessel to coin the ductile sealing element into the surface of the inductile sealing element as well as the surfaces of the flange elements.

  12. Sealing device

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  13. Intraoperative measurement of intraocular pressure in vitrectomized aphakic air-filled eyes using the Tono-Pen XL.

    PubMed

    Badrinath, S S; Vasudevan, R; Murugesan, R; Basti, S; Nicholson, A D; Singh, P; Gopal, L; Sharma, T; Rao, S B; Abraham, C

    1993-01-01

    The Tono-Pen XL (Bio-Rad, Santa Ana, CA) was compared with manometer readings for intraoperative measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) in 40 eyes of 40 consecutive patients after vitrectomy, lensectomy, and fluid-air exchange. Tono-Pen readings corresponding to manometer readings of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mmHg were obtained in a masked fashion with a randomized sequence of manometer readings. A correlation was obtained between the manometer and Tono-Pen readings (r = 0.96 in emmetropic eyes and r = 0.93 in myopic eyes). The regression curve that represents the calibration curve of Tono-Pen in terms of the manometer readings for air-filled vitrectomized eyes was obtained. Any Tono-Pen reading can be easily translated into the corresponding manometer reading by referring to the curve. The Tono-Pen can therefore be effectively used to accurately determine intraoperative IOP in eyes undergoing vitrectomy, lensectomy, and fluid-air exchange.

  14. Repository seals requirement study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  15. Nonlinear compression of high energy fiber amplifier pulses in air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Florent; Giree, Achut; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Machinet, Guillaume; Debord, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Dupriez, Pascal; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Benabid, Fetah; Georges, Patrick

    2015-03-23

    We report on the generation of 34 fs and 50 µJ pulses from a high energy fiber amplifier system with nonlinear compression in an air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. The unique properties of such fibers allow bridging the gap between solid core fibers-based and hollow capillary-based post-compression setups, thereby operating with pulse energies obtained with current state-of-the-art fiber systems. The overall transmission of the compression setup is over 70%. Together with Yb-doped fiber amplifier technologies, Kagome fibers therefore appear as a promising tool for efficient generation of pulses with durations below 50 fs, energies ranging from 10 to several hundreds of µJ, and high average powers.

  16. Thruster sealing system and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A thruster nozzle sealing system and apparatus is provided for protection of spacecraft thruster motors. The system includes a sealing plug, a sealing plug insertion tool, an outer cover, an outer cover attachment, and a ferry flight attachment. The sealing plug prevents moisture from entering the thruster engine so as to prevent valve failure. The attachments are interchangeably connectable with the sealing plug. The ferry flight attachment is used during air transportation of the spacecraft, and the outer cover attachment is used during storage and service of the spacecraft. The outer cover provides protection to the thruster nozzle from mechanical damage.

  17. Setting properties and sealing ability of hydraulic temporary sealing materials.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoko; Katsuumi, Ichiroh

    2008-09-01

    This study sought to investigate the setting progress and sealing ability of hydraulic temporary sealing materials used in endodontic treatment: Lumicon, Caviton, and HY-Seal. To evaluate setting progress, the materials were filled into glass tubes with one end sealed and immersed in water. After immersion, a measurement apparatus was inserted from the non-immersed end and the set area was determined by subtracting the unset area from the sample thickness. To evaluate sealing ability, materials were filled into glass tubes and divided into four groups based on different immersion times. Thermal cycling and dye penetration were performed. At 7 days, the setting depths of HY-Seal and Caviton were almost equivalent to full sample thickness, while that of Lumicon was only half of full sample thickness (p < 0.01). On sealing ability, Lumicon ranked the highest followed by Caviton, whereas HY-Seal was unstable (p < 0.01). These results suggested that there was no correlation between setting progress and sealing ability.

  18. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient; the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Building's (CARB) multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in three multifamily buildings.

  19. Step-Wise Velocity of an Air Bubble Rising in a Vertical Tube Filled with a Liquid Dispersion of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cho, Heon Ki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2017-03-21

    The motion of air bubbles in tubes filled with aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) is of practical interest for bubble jets, lab-on-a-chip, and transporting media. Therefore, the focus of this study is the dynamics of air bubbles rising in a tube in a nanofluid. Many authors experimentally and analytically proposed that the velocity of rising air bubbles is constant for long air bubbles suspended in a vertical tube in common liquids (e.g. an aqueous glycerol solution) when the capillary number is larger than 10(-4). For the first time, we report here a systematic study of an air bubble rising in a vertical tube in a nanofluid (e.g. an aqueous silica dioxide nanoparticle suspension, nominal particle size, 19 nm). We varied the bubble length scaled by the diameter of the tubes (L/D), the concentration of the nanofluid (10 and 12.5 v %), and the tube diameter (0.45, 0.47, and 0.50 cm). The presence of the nanoparticles creates a significant change in the bubble velocity compared with the bubble rising in the common liquid with the same bulk viscosity. We observed a novel phenomenon of a step-wise increase in the air bubble rising velocity versus bubble length for small capillary numbers less than 10(-7). This step-wise velocity increase versus the bubble length was not observed in a common fluid. The step-wise velocity increase is attributed to the nanoparticle self-layering phenomenon in the film adjacent to the tube wall. To elucidate the role of the nanoparticle film self-layering on the bubble rising velocity, the effect of the capillary number, the tube diameter (e.g. the capillary pressure), and nanofilm viscosity are investigated. We propose a model that takes into consideration the nanoparticle layering in the film confinement to explain the step-wise velocity phenomenon versus the length of the bubble. The oscillatory film interaction energy isotherm is calculated and the Frenkel approach is used to estimate the film viscosity.

  20. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation.

  1. Effects of thermal cycling and thermal aging on the hermeticity and strength of silver-copper oxide air-brazed seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott Weil, K.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Darsell, Jens T.; Xia, Gordon G.; Hardy, John S.

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to metal washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4 mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750 °C for 200, 400, and 800 h in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75 °C min -1) between room temperature and 750 °C for as many as 50 cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800 h of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800 h of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air-brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze-electrolyte interface after 50 cycles.

  2. Security seal

    DOEpatents

    Gobeli, Garth W.

    1985-01-01

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  3. Multiple Solutions in Natural Convection in an Air Filled Square Enclosure: Fractal Dimension of Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklouche Benouaguef, S.; Zeghmati, B.; Bouhadef, K.; Daguenet, M.

    In this study, we investigated numerically the transient natural convection in a square cavity with two horizontal adiabatic sides and vertical walls composed of two regions of same size maintained at different temperatures. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and bi-dimensional. The governing equations written in dimensionless form and expressed in terms of stream function and vorticity, have been solved using the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method and the GAUSS elimination method. Calculations were performed for air (Pr = 0.71), with a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 3.7x106. We analysed the effect of the Rayleigh number on the route to the chaos of the system. The first transition has been found from steady-state to oscillatory flow and the second is a subharmonic bifurcation as the Rayleigh number is increased further. For sufficiently small Rayleigh numbers, present results show that the flow is characterized by four cells with horizontal and vertical symmetric axes. The attractor bifurcates from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle for a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 2.51x105. A limit cycle settles from Ra = 3x105 and persists until Ra = 5x105. At a Rayleigh number of 2.5x105 the temporal evolution of the Nusselt number Nu(t) was stationary. As the Rayleigh number increases, the flow becomes unstable and bifurcates to a time periodic solution at a critical Rayleigh number between 2.5x105 and 2.51x105. After the first HOPF bifurcation at Ra = 2.51x105, the oscillatory flow undergoes several bifurcations and ultimately evolves into a chaotic flow.

  4. Seals cap rotary kiln emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Gunkle, D.W. )

    1993-09-01

    The possibility of producing fugitive emissions is one of the most critical aspects of an incineration system. Whether such a system processes hazardous, medical, mixed or municipal waste, fugitive emissions are of special concern to system operators and the public alike. Effectively designed rotary-kiln seals can reduce fugitive emissions to acceptable, minimal levels. Modern air monitoring systems track incineration site emissions. Possible emissions sources include excavation and transfer sites, storage areas, material-feed systems, rotary kiln seals, and exhaust stacks. Several options are available for rotary-kiln seals. Six are discussed here: labyrinth; overlapping spring plate; graphite block; pneumatic; shrouded; and overpressure. Kiln seals are used to prevent process gases from escaping or ambient air from entering a rotary kiln uncontrolled. They are not designed to function as material seals, or prevent spills of solids or liquids. Seal design involves considering differential pressure produced by a kiln's internal-to-external temperature, pressure excursions (explosions) and material spills.

  5. Seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  6. Preliminary study of cyclic thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed zirconium oxide turbine outer air seal shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Several experimental concepts representing potential high pressure turbine seal material systems were subjected to cyclic thermal shock exposures similar to those that might be encountered under severe engine start-up and shut-down sequences. All of the experimental concepts consisted of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized ZrO2 on the high temperature side of the blade tip seal shroud. Between the ZrO2 and a cooled, dense metal backing, various intermediate layer concepts intended to mitigate thermal stresses were incorporated. Performance was judged on the basis of the number of thermal shock cycles required to cause loss of seal material through spallation. The most effective approach was to include a low modulus, sintered metal pad between the ZrO2 and the metallic backing. It was also found that reducing the density of the ZrO2 layer significantly improved the performance of specimens with plasma-sprayed metal/ceramic composite intermediate layers.

  7. Bismuth alloy potting seals aluminum connector in cryogenic application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J. F.; Stafford, R. L.

    1966-01-01

    Bismuth alloy potting seals feedthrough electrical connector for instrumentation within a pressurized vessel filled with cryogenic liquids. The seal combines the transformation of high-bismuth content alloys with the thermal contraction of an external aluminum tube.

  8. Overview of NASA Glenn Seal Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Proctor, Margaret P.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Delgado, Irebert; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Lattime, Scott B.

    2003-01-01

    The Seal Team is divided into four primary areas. These areas include turbine engine seal development, structural seal development, acoustic seal development, and adaptive seal development. The turbine seal area focuses on high temperature, high speed shaft seals for secondary air system flow management. The structural seal area focuses on high temperature, resilient structural seals required to accommodate large structural distortions for both space- and aero-applications. Our goal in the acoustic seal project is to develop non-contacting, low leakage seals exploiting the principles of advanced acoustics. We are currently investigating a new acoustic field known as Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis (RMS) to see if we can harness the large acoustic standing pressure waves to form an effective air-barrier/seal. Our goal in the adaptive seal project is to develop advanced sealing approaches for minimizing blade-tip (shroud) or interstage seal leakage. We are planning on applying either rub-avoidance or regeneration clearance control concepts (including smart structures and materials) to promote higher turbine engine efficiency and longer service lives.

  9. Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads coming out of a brazing retort that operates with a controlled atmosphere so that air cannot enter the retort and hydrogen cannot escape. The trap is fastened to a duct welded to the retort. Thermocouple leads are led out through the duct and trap, with the fluid forming a gastight seal between the atmosphere and the retort.

  10. Nozzle seal

    DOEpatents

    Groff, Russell Dennis; Vatovec, Richard John

    1978-06-11

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with annular sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop and partly within a retaining annulus formed in the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and one of the sealing members is provided with a piston type pressure ring sealing member which effectively closes the path between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle establishing a leak-proof condition. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel.

  11. Labyrinth seal testing for lift fan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobek, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    An abradable buffered labyrinth seal for the control of turbine gas path leakage in a tip-turbine driven lift fan was designed, tested, and analyzed. The seal configuration was not designed to operate in any specific location but was sized to be evaluated in an existing test rig. The final sealing diameter selected was 28 inches. Results of testing indicate that the flow equations predicted seal air flows consistent with measured values. Excellent sealing characteristics of the abradable coating on the stator land were demonstrated when a substantial seal penetration of .030 inch into the land surface was encountered without appreciable wear on the labyrinth knife edges.

  12. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; Hortenau, E.F. von.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment is disclosed for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap. 17 figs.

  13. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, Edward L.; von Hortenau, Erik F.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  14. Ferrules seals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.

    1984-01-01

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible.

  15. Ferrules seals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.L.

    1984-07-10

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible. 3 figs.

  16. Ceramic Seal.

    SciTech Connect

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  17. Sealing Quality of a Temporary Filling Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-10

    microorganisms from gaining entrance into the root canal , thus preventing infection or re-infection; second, to prevent medicaments placed into the pulp ...integrity and stored until their use in water. Endodontic access cavity preparations were performed . The pulp chamber content was removed but no attempt

  18. Seal arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Lundholm, Gunnar

    1987-01-01

    A seal arrangement is provided for preventing gas leakage along a reciprocating piston rod or other reciprocating member passing through a wall which separates a high pressure gas chmber and a low pressure gas chamber. Liquid lubricant is applied to the lower pressure side of a sealing gland surrounding the piston rod to prevent the escape of gas between the rod and the gland. The sealing gland is radially forced against the piston rod by action of a plurality of axially stacked O-rings influenced by an axially acting spring as well as pressure from the gas.

  19. Ferrofluid Would Seal Linear-Motion Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed valve employs ferrofluid to make tight seal. Seal requires no precisely machined parts, and hand lapping of valve seats are unnecessary. Magnetic fluid fills gap between shaft and annular pole piece in chamber wall. Precise shaft fit is not necessary.

  20. Feedthrough Seal For High-Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R.; Mullins, O.; Smith, D.; Teasley, G.

    1984-01-01

    Combination of ceramic and plastic withstands many depressurizations. Stack of washers surrounds leadthrough electrode. Under pressure washers expand to fill leadthrough hole in high-pressure vessel. Seal thus formed withstands 20 or more pressurization/depressurization cycles. Seal composed of neoprene, polytetrafluoroethylene, nylon and high-purity, high-density commercial alumina ceramic.

  1. Gas Turbine Engine Carbon Oil Seals Computerized Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In a bearing compartment there are a series of parts when assembled determine the location of the bearing and seal as related to the centerline of rotation. We see part datums that do not establish A coincident path from the bearing to the seal. High engine vibration can cause severe oil leakage. The inability of the seal to respond fast enough to the rotating element Radial Seal: Sensitive to housing air pressure Sensitive to seal runout ? Axial Seal: Very sensitive to seal perpendicularity to shaft. Goals include: 1) Repeatable assembly process; 2) Accurate assembly process; 3) Minimize seal runout; 4) Design to engine centerline of rotation, i.e. bearings.

  2. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  3. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  4. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  5. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  6. Characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells, open circuit and sealed-off reactors.

    PubMed

    Shehab, Noura; Li, Dong; Amy, Gary L; Logan, Bruce E; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2013-11-01

    A large percentage of organic fuel consumed in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is lost as a result of oxygen transfer through the cathode. In order to understand how this oxygen transfer affects the microbial community structure, reactors were operated in duplicate using three configurations: closed circuit (CC; with current generation), open circuit (OC; no current generation), and sealed off cathodes (SO; no current, with a solid plate placed across the cathode). Most (98 %) of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed during power production in the CC reactor (maximum of 640 ± 10 mW/m(2)), with a low percent of substrate converted to current (coulombic efficiency of 26.5 ± 2.1 %). Sealing the cathode reduced COD removal to 7 %, but with an open cathode, there was nearly as much COD removal by the OC reactor (94.5 %) as the CC reactor. Oxygen transfer into the reactor substantially affected the composition of the microbial communities. Based on analysis of the biofilms using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, microbes most similar to Geobacter were predominant on the anodes in the CC MFC (72 % of sequences), but the most abundant bacteria were Azoarcus (42 to 47 %) in the OC reactor, and Dechloromonas (17 %) in the SO reactor. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were most predominant, with sequences most similar to Methanobacterium in the CC and SO reactor, and Methanocorpusculum in the OC reactors. These results show that oxygen leakage through the cathode substantially alters the bacterial anode communities, and that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominate despite high concentrations of acetate. The predominant methanogens in the CC reactor most closely resembled those in the SO reactor, demonstrating that oxygen leakage alters methanogenic as well as general bacterial communities.

  7. Enhancement of fill factor in air-processed inverted organic solar cells using self-assembled monolayer of fullerene catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Il; Ogumi, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Takafumi; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    [60]Fullerene catechol self-assembled monolayers were prepared and applied to inverted organic solar cells by an immersion method, and their energy conversion properties were measured. By introducing fullerenes at the surface, we improved the hole-blocking capability of electron-transporting metal oxide, as shown by the fill factor enhancement. The fullerene catechol-treated TiO x -containing device gave a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.81% with a fill factor of 0.56 while the non treated device gave a PCE of 2.46% with a fill factor of 0.49. The solar cell efficiency improved by 13% compared with the non treated reference device.

  8. Investigations of Shuttle Main Landing Gear Door Environmental Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkbeiner, Joshua; Dunlap, Pat; Steinetz, Bruce; DeMango, Jeff; Newswander, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The environmental seals for the main landing gear doors of the Shuttle Orbiters were raised by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board as a potential safety concern. Inspections of seals installed on the Shuttle Discovery revealed that they were permanently deformed and no longer met certified seal compression requirements. Replacement of the seals led to the inability to fully close the main landing gear doors. Johnson Space Center requested that Glenn Research Center conduct tests on the main landing gear door environmental seals to assist in installing the seals in a manner to allow the main landing gear doors to fully close. Further testing was conducted to fill out the seal performance database. Results from the testing indicated that the method of bonding the seals was important in reducing seal loads on the main landing gear doors. Also, the replacement seals installed in Shuttle Discovery were found to have leakage performance sufficient to meet the certification requirements.

  9. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  10. Effective sealing of a disk cavity using a double-toothed rim seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavnani, S. H.; Khilnani, V. I.; Tsai, L.-C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Goodling, J. S.; Waggott, J.

    1992-06-01

    The sealing characteristics of an advanced air-cooled turbo-expander disk cavity are examined employing laser sheet flow visualization and static pressure measurements. Tests are conducted on a simplified half-scale model of an actual low pressure turbo-expander first-stage disk cavity. The superior performance of the seal studied is confirmed by comparison with a single-toothed rim seal and a simple axial rim seal.

  11. 30 CFR 75.1711-1 - Sealing of shaft openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sealing of shaft openings. 75.1711-1 Section 75... shaft openings. Shaft openings required to be sealed under § 75.1711 shall be effectively capped or filled. Filling shall be for the entire depth of the shaft and, for the first 50 feet from the bottom...

  12. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  13. JTAGG II Brush Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    1997-01-01

    The Tri-services JTAGG 2 engine uses two identical brush seals, in tandem, located aft of the high pressure compressor. The engine operating conditions, at intermediate rated power (IRP), for this seal are estimated to be 50,000 rpm (899 ft/sec) speed, 175 psid air to air pressure differential and 1200 F air temperature. The testing was comprised of static air leakage, performance, seal offset, rotor run out tests and a 50 hr endurance test in the NASA Lewis seal rig. Based on the test results, it is concluded that the brush seal design should be able to meet the air leakage flow factor goal of less than 0.004 for the engine IRP operating conditions. For the 4.12 in. i.d. labyrinth seal, 0.005 in. typical radial clearance, at the JTAGG 2 operating conditions, the leakage flow factor is 0.007. The long term seal life can not be predicted accurately due to the limited endurance testing of 50 hr. However, based on the excellent condition of the test seal and rotor after 50 hr of testing, it is anticipated that the seals should easily meet the JTAGG 2 engine test requirement.

  14. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Erik P

    2014-09-30

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to a base and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  15. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Erik P.

    2017-02-28

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to abase and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  16. Repository Closure and Sealing Approach

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Watkins

    2000-06-28

    The scope of this analysis will be to develop the conceptual design of the closure seals and their locations in the Subsurface Facilities. The design will be based on the recently established program requirements for transitioning to the Site Recommendation (SR) design as outlined by ''Approach to Implementing the Site Recommendation Baseline'' (Stroupe 2000) and the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b). The objective of this analysis will be to assist in providing a description for the Subsurface Facilities System Description Document, Section 2 and finally to document any conclusions reached in order to contribute and provide support to the SR. This analysis is at a conceptual level and is considered adequate to support the SR design. The final closure barriers and seals for the ventilation shafts, and the north and south ramps will require these openings to be permanently sealed to limit excessive air and water inflows and prevent human intrusion. The major tasks identified with closure in this analysis are: (1) Developing the overall subsurface seal layout and identifying design and operational interfaces for the Subsurface Facilities. (2) Summarizing the general site conditions and general rock characteristic with respect to seal location and describing the seal selected. (3) Identify seal construction materials, methodology of construction and strategic locations including design of the seal and plugs. (4) Discussing methods to prevent human intrusion.

  17. Comparison of the effects of room air and N2O + O2 used for ProSeal LMA cuff inflation on cuff pressure and oropharyngeal structure.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Murat; Kati, Ismail; Tomak, Yakup; Yuca, Koksal

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of different inflating gases used for ProSeal LMA (PLMA) cuff inflation on cuff pressure, oropharyngeal structure, and the incidence of sore throat. Eighty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists; ASA I-II) were randomly divided into two groups. PLMA cuff inflation was achieved with appropriate volumes of 50% N2O + 50% O2 in group I and room air in group II, respectively. When the PLMA was removed, oropharyngeal examination was carried out immediately, using a rigid optical telescope. Patients were asked about sore throat symptoms postoperatively. Cuff pressures were significantly lower in group I, except at the initial pressure measurement. Cuff pressure was positively correlated with the length of the operation in group II, and negatively correlated in group I. PLMA cuff inflation with room air led to increased cuff pressure during the operation, possibly due to the diffusion of N2O into the cuff. We consider that a PLMA cuff inflated with an N2O-O2 mixture is convenient, especially in operations in which N2O has been used.

  18. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOEpatents

    Stang, L.G.

    1979-08-29

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  19. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Louis G.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  20. [Microorganisms distribution in the aerosol of a manned sealed cabin and the effect of artificial air ionization on this process].

    PubMed

    Zaloguev, S N; Anisimov, B V; Viktorov, A N; Gorshkov, V P

    1981-01-01

    In a manned enclosure the distribution of bacterial aerosol with respect to the size of particles is bimodal. Artificial bipolar ionization of the air may decrease the content of relatively large particles of bacterial aerosol, leaving particles with 2.0-0.6/micrometer in diameter in predominance. These properties of the bacterial aerosol structure may be of importance in the prophylaxis of aerogenic infections of cosmonauts.

  1. Forming a seal between planar sealing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ezekoye, L.I.; Rusnica, E.J.; Sepp, H.A. Jr.

    1987-12-29

    A method of forming a seal between the confronting planar sealing surfaces on two annular structural members which are drawn together by axially extending bolts is described comprising the steps of: forming a seal assembly by locking a toroidal, crushable seal member within a substantially flat annular spacer member against an annular shoulder formed on the inner diameter thereof with an annular resilient member seated in a radially extending groove in the inner surface of the substantially flat annular member, the flat annular member being axially thinner than the toroidal, crushable seal member; placing the sealing assembly between the planar sealing surfaces and positively aligning the assembly relative to the axially extending bolts; and tightening the bolts to draw the planar sealing surfaces toward each other and into contact with the flat annular member while crushing the toroidal, crushable seal member to form a seal between the planar sealing surfaces.

  2. Python fiber optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  3. A Hot Dynamic Seal Rig for Measuring Hypersonic Engine Seal Durability and Flow Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts was installed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The test fixture was designed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C (1550 F) and air pressure differentials up to 690 kPa (100 psi). Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or distorted walls. In the fixture two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 30 cm (1 ft) long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. The capabilities of this test fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling are addressed.

  4. A hot dynamic seal rig for measuring hypersonic engine seal durability and flow performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts has been installed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The test fixture has been designed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C (1550 F) and air pressure differentials up to 690 kPa (100 psi). Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or distorted walls. In the fixture two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 30 cm (1 ft) long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. This report covers the capabilities of this test fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling.

  5. A nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer concept for hermetically sealed magic angle spinning investigations on highly toxic, radiotoxic, or air sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Somers, J.; Berkmann, C.; Koepp, F.; Rothermel, A.; Pauvert, O.; Selfslag, C.; Farnan, I.

    2013-05-01

    A concept to integrate a commercial high-resolution, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) probe capable of very rapid rotation rates (70 kHz) in a hermetically sealed enclosure for the study of highly radiotoxic materials has been developed and successfully demonstrated. The concept centres on a conventional wide bore (89 mm) solid-state NMR magnet operating with industry standard 54 mm diameter probes designed for narrow bore magnets. Rotor insertion and probe tuning take place within a hermetically enclosed glovebox, which extends into the bore of the magnet, in the space between the probe and the magnet shim system. Oxygen-17 MAS-NMR measurements demonstrate the possibility of obtaining high quality spectra from small sample masses (˜10 mg) of highly radiotoxic material and the need for high spinning speeds to improve the spectral resolution when working with actinides. The large paramagnetic susceptibility arising from actinide paramagnetism in (Th1-xUx)O2 solid solutions gives rise to extensive spinning sidebands and poor resolution at 15 kHz, which is dramatically improved at 55 kHz. The first 17O MAS-NMR measurements on NpO2+x samples spinning at 55 kHz are also reported. The glovebox approach developed here for radiotoxic materials can be easily adapted to work with other hazardous or even air sensitive materials.

  6. GAS SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

    1961-07-11

    A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

  7. Low thermal expansion seal ring support

    DOEpatents

    Dewis, David W.; Glezer, Boris

    2000-01-01

    Today, the trend is to increase the temperature of operation of gas turbine engines. To cool the components with compressor discharge air, robs air which could otherwise be used for combustion and creates a less efficient gas turbine engine. The present low thermal expansion sealing ring support system reduces the quantity of cooling air required while maintaining life and longevity of the components. Additionally, the low thermal expansion sealing ring reduces the clearance "C","C'" demanded between the interface between the sealing surface and the tip of the plurality of turbine blades. The sealing ring is supported by a plurality of support members in a manner in which the sealing ring and the plurality of support members independently expand and contract relative to each other and to other gas turbine engine components.

  8. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100 C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changed suddenly.

  9. Fluid pressure balanced seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. W. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A seal which increases in effectiveness with increasing pressure is presented. The seal's functional capability throughout both static and dynamic operation makes it particularly useful for sealing ball valve ports. Other features of the seal include the ability to seal two opposed surfaces simultaneously, tolerance of small misalignments, tolerance of wide temperature ranges, ability to maintain positive sealing contact under conditions of internal or external pressurization, and ability to conform to slight irregularities in seal or surface contours.

  10. Cryogenic Flange and Seal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of flanges, seals, and pipes are used to carry cryogenic fluid from a storage tank to the vehicle at launch sites. However, after a certain amount of cycles these raised face flanges with glass-filled Teflon gaskets have been found to have torque relaxation and are as a result susceptible to cryogenic fluid leakage if not re-torqued. The intent of this project is to identify alternate combinations of flanges and seals which may improve thermal cycle performance and decrease re-torque requirements. The general approach is to design a test fixture to evaluate leak characteristics between spiral and concentric serrations and to test alternate flange and seal combinations. Due to insufficient time, it was not possible to evaluate these different types of combinations for the combination that improved thermal cycle performance the most. However, the necessary drawings for the test fixture were designed and assembled along with the collection of the necessary parts.

  11. Beta testing of MTI seal codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharrer, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of MTI seal codes is made by comparing cylindrical air and water seals. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that: ICYL and GCYL geometry variations are desirable; load and direct stiffness calculations are good; damping and cross-coupled stiffness predictions are poor; added mass coefficients should be calculated; and variation in inlet tangential velocity is critical to design.

  12. Quantification of VX vapor in ambient air by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometric analysis of glass bead filled sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald A; Smith, Wendy L; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong; Crouse, Kathy L; Crouse, Charles L; Norman, Steven D; Jakubowski, E Michael

    2011-02-15

    An analysis method has been developed for determining low parts-per-quadrillion by volume (ppqv) concentrations of nerve agent VX vapor actively sampled from ambient air. The method utilizes glass bead filled depot area air monitoring system (DAAMS) sampling tubes with isopropyl alcohol extraction and isotope dilution using liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization for quantitation. The dynamic range was from one-tenth of the worker population limit (WPL) to the short-term exposure limit (STEL) for a 24 L air sample taken over a 1 h period. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using liquid-spiked tubes, and the collection characteristics of the DAAMS tubes were assessed by collecting trace level vapor generated in a 1000 L continuous flow chamber. The method described here has significant improvements over currently employed thermal desorption techniques that utilize a silver fluoride pad during sampling to convert VX to a higher volatility G-analogue for gas chromatographic analysis. The benefits of this method are the ability to directly analyze VX with improved selectivity and sensitivity, the injection of a fraction of the extract, quantitation using an isotopically labeled internal standard, and a short instrument cycle time.

  13. Turbine with radial acting seal

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, Darryl S; Ebert, Todd A

    2016-11-22

    A floating brush seal in a rim cavity of a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where the floating brush seal includes a seal holder in which the floating brush seal floats, and a expandable seal that fits within two radial extending seal slots that maintains a seal with radial displacement of the floating brush seal and the seal holder.

  14. Seals/Secondary Fluid Flows Workshop 1997; Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 1997 Conference provided discussions and data on (a) program overviews, (b) developments in seals and secondary air management systems, (c) interactive seals flows with secondary air or fluid flows and powerstream flows, (d) views of engine externals and limitations, (e) high speed engine research sealing needs and demands, and (f) a short course on engine design development margins. Sealing concepts discussed include, mechanical rim and cavity seals, leaf, finger, air/oil, rope, floating-brush, floating-T-buffer, and brush seals. Engine externals include all components of engine fluid systems, sensors and their support structures that lie within or project through the nacelle. The clean features of the nacelle belie the minefield of challenges and opportunities that lie within. Seals; Secondary air flows; Rotordynamics; Gas turbine; Aircraft; CFD; Testing; Turbomachinery

  15. Dynamic Face Seal Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radial face seal arrangement is disclosed comprising a stationary seal ring that is spring loaded against a seal seat affixed to a rotating shaft. The radial face seal arrangement further comprises an arrangement that not only allows for preloading of the stationary seal ring relative to the seal seat, but also provides for dampening yielding a dynamic seating response for the radial face seal arrangement. The overall seal system, especially regarding the selection of the material for the stationary seal ring, is designed to operate over a wide temperature range from below ambient up to 900 C.

  16. Regenerator seal design

    DOEpatents

    Eckart, Francis H.

    1982-01-01

    A rotary regenerator disc matrix has a face seal with a cross arm and arcuate rim segments joined by prestress clamps to prestrain the arcuate rim seals so as to compensate seal rim twisting or coning and resultant disc face seal leakage as produced by operating thermal gradients across the seal.

  17. Sealing arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenstein, M.; Hans, R.; Kiener, H.

    1985-04-09

    An hydraulically operated clutch release has an annular piston hydraulically moveable in an annular chamber. A felt ring is mounted on a shoulder of the piston away from the chamber, to engage the bore surface of the chamber, and a holding ring is snapped onto the end of the shoulder to hold the felt ring on the shoulder. An extension of the holding ring forms a seal with the bore on the chamber, and defines, with the felt ring a dust catching recesS.

  18. The performance of a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new mixed packing materials for the removal of H2S from air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingwen; Wang, Xiaojun; He, Shuo; Zhu, Shemin; Shen, Shubao

    2016-01-01

    In the work described here, a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new packing materials was used to remove H2S from air. The upper layer of the filter was packed with activated carbon-loaded polyurethane, whereas the lower layer was filled with modified organism-suspended fillers. The effects of inlet load, empty bed residence time (EBRT) from 79 s to 53 s, pH and contaminant starvation time were investigated. For loads of 15-50 g/(m(3) h), the average removal efficiency (RE) was higher than 96% under a consistent supply of pollutants. The critical elimination capacity was 39.95 g/(m(3) h) for an EBRT of 53 s with an RE of 99.9%. The two-layer BTF was capable of withstanding contaminant starvation periods for 1.5 d and 7 d with only a few hours of recovery time. The biodegradation kinetics was studied using Michaelis-Menten type equations under different EBRTs. At an EBRT of 66 s, the optimal kinetic constants rmax and Km were 333.3 g/(m(3) h) and 0.93 g/m(3), respectively. During the operation, the two-layer BTF performed well under various reasonable conditions.

  19. Stability of two-dimensional (2D) natural convection flows in air-filled differentially heated cavities: 2D/3D disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Shihe; Le Quéré, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Following our previous two-dimensional (2D) studies of flows in differentially heated cavities filled with air, we studied the stability of 2D natural convection flows in these cavities with respect to 3D periodic perturbations. The basis of the numerical methods is a time-stepping code using the Chebyshev spectral collocation method and the direct Uzawa method for velocity-pressure coupling. Newton's iteration, Arnoldi's method and the continuation method have been used in order to, respectively, compute the 2D steady-state base solution, estimate the leading eigenmodes of the Jacobian and perform linear stability analysis. Differentially heated air-filled cavities of aspect ratios from 1 to 7 were investigated. Neutral curves (Rayleigh number versus wave number) have been obtained. It turned out that only for aspect ratio 7, 3D stationary instability occurs at slightly higher Rayleigh numbers than the onset of 2D time-dependent flow and that for other aspect ratios 3D instability always takes place before 2D time-dependent flows. 3D unstable modes are stationary and anti-centro-symmetric. 3D nonlinear simulations revealed that the corresponding pitchfork bifurcations are supercritical and that 3D instability leads only to weak flow in the third direction. Further 3D computations are also performed at higher Rayleigh number in order to understand the effects of the weak 3D fluid motion on the onset of time-dependent flow. 3D flow structures are responsible for the onset of time-dependent flow for aspect ratios 1, 2 and 3, while for larger aspect ratios they do not alter the transition scenario, which was observed in the 2D cases and that vertical boundary layers become unstable to traveling waves.

  20. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  1. Regenerator seal

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  2. Dynamic, High-Temperature, Flexible Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    New seal consists of multiple plies of braided ceramic sleeves filled with small ceramic balls. Innermost braided sleeve supported by high-temperature-wire-mesh sleeve that provides both springback and preload capabilities. Ceramic balls reduce effect of relatively high porosity of braided ceramic sleeves by acting as labyrinth flow path for gases and thereby greatly increasing pressure gradient seal can sustain. Dynamic, high-temperature, flexible seal employed in hypersonic engines, two-dimensional convergent/divergent and vectorized-thrust exhaust nozzles, reentry vehicle airframes, rocket-motor casings, high-temperature furnaces, and any application requiring non-asbestos high-temperature gaskets.

  3. Damper Spring For Omega Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclaughlin, Scott T.; Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1993-01-01

    Damper spring reduces deflections of omega-cross-section seal, reducing probability of failure and extending life of seal. Spring is split ring with U-shaped cross section. Placed inside omega seal and inserted with seal into seal cavity. As omega seal compressed into cavity, spring and seal make contact near convolution of seal, and spring becomes compressed also. During operation, when seal dynamically loaded, spring limits deflection of seal, reducing stress on seal.

  4. Triple acting radial seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  5. A real-time approach to detect seal defects in food packages using ultrasonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Shah, N N; Rooney, P K; Ozguler, A; Morris, S A; O'Brien, W D

    2001-09-01

    The microbial integrity of many types of flexible food packages depends on a zero defect level in the fused seam seal. Human inspection for defects in these seals is marginal at best, and secondary incubation protocols are often used to spot packages with compromised integrity before releasing product for sale. A new type of inspection method has been developed and is being evaluated for robustness. The purpose of the study was to evaluate a new raster scanning geometry to simulate continuous motion, online ultrasonic inspection of the seal region in flexible food package seals. A principal engineering tradeoff of scanning inspection systems is between increased line speed that results from decreased spatial sampling (less acquired data to process) and decreased image quality. The previously developed pulse-echo Backscattered Amplitude Integral (BAI) mode imaging technique is used to form ultrasound images using the new scanning geometry. At an ultrasonic frequency of 22.9 MHz, 38- and 50-microm-diameter air-filled channel defects in all-plastic transparent trilaminate are evaluated. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the processed BAI-mode image is used to quantify image quality as a function of spatial sampling. Results show seal defects (38- and 50-microm diameter) are still detectable for undersampled conditions, although image quality degrades as spatial sampling decreases. Further, it is concluded that the raster scanning geometry is feasible for online inspection.

  6. Fundamentals of fluid sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of fluid sealing, including seal operating regimes, are discussed and the general fluid-flow equations for fluid sealing are developed. Seal performance parameters such as leakage and power loss are presented. Included in the discussion are the effects of geometry, surface deformations, rotation, and both laminar and turbulent flows. The concept of pressure balancing is presented, as are differences between liquid and gas sealing. Mechanisms of seal surface separation, fundamental friction and wear concepts applicable to seals, seal materials, and pressure-velocity (PV) criteria are discussed.

  7. A Comparison of Candidate Seal Designs for Future Docking Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick, H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce, M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, and other destinations. A key component of this system is the seal at the main docking interface which inhibits the loss of cabin air once docking is complete. Depending on the mission, the seal must be able to dock in either a seal-on-flange or seal-on-seal configuration. Seal-on-flange mating would occur when a docking system equipped with a seal docks to a system with a flat metal flange. This would occur when a vehicle docks to a node on the International Space Station. Seal-on-seal mating would occur when two docking systems equipped with seals dock to each other. Two types of seal designs were identified for this application: Gask-O-seals and multi-piece seals. Both types of seals had a pair of seal bulbs to satisfy the redundancy requirement. A series of performance assessments and comparisons were made between the candidate seal designs indicating that they meet the requirements for leak rate and compression and adhesion loads under a range of operating conditions. Other design factors such as part count, integration into the docking system tunnel, seal-on-seal mating, and cost were also considered leading to the selection of the multi-piece seal design for the new docking system. The results of this study can be used by designers of future docking systems and other habitable volumes to select the seal design best-suited for their particular application.

  8. Development of spiral-groove self-acting face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental evaluation and a 100-hour endurance test were performed on a spiral groove geometry, self-acting face seal. The seal was tested and operated successfully at maximum conditions of 243.8 m/s surface speed, 199.9 N/sq cm air pressure, and 645.4K (702 F) air temperature. The maximum speed condition of 243.8 m/s was obtained at a shaft speed of 72,500 rpm. Seal wear, gas leakage, and sealing element temperature were monitored during the test. Condition of the seal at the completion of the test was documented and found acceptable for further use. The spiral groove wear rate measured during the endurance test indicates a minimum potential seal life of over 2700 hours. Seal air leakage measured during the test program is within the range considered acceptable for consideration for use in a small gas turbine engine.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation of sealing ability of MTA and EndoSequence as root-end filling materials with chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) as retrograde smear layer removing agents

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, Bolla; Jeevani, Eppala; Sujana, Varri; Damaraju, Bharagavi; Sreeha, Kaluvakolanu; Ramesh, Penumaka

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and EndoSequence with chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) as retrograde smear layer removing agents using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Forty human single rooted teeth were taken. Crowns were decoronated and canals were obturated. Apically roots were resected and retrograde cavities were done. Based on the type of retrograde material placed and the type of smear layer removal agent used for retrograde cavities, they were divided into four groups (N = 10): Group I chitosan with EndoSequence, group II chitosan with MTA, group III CMC with EndoSequence, and Group IV CMC with MTA. All the samples were longitudinally sectioned, and the SEM analysis was done for marginal adaptation. Statistical Analysis: Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Witney analysis tests. Results: SEM images showed the presence of less gaps in group III, i.e., CMC with EndoSequence when compared to other groups with statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Within the limited scope of this study, it was concluded that EndoSequence as retrograde material showed better marginal sealing ability. PMID:27099420

  10. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  11. Pneumatic stowing seals mines

    SciTech Connect

    Brezovec, D.

    1983-11-01

    A mechanized technique to seal abandoned mines has been used successfully to close 13 openings at Duquesne Light Co.'s mined-out Warwick No. 2 mine, near Greensboro, Pa. The mechanized system, which uses a pneumatic stower and crushed limestone, closed the entries more economically and in less time than it would have taken to install traditional concrete block stopping and clay plug seals, according to John C. Draper. Draper, a mining engineer with Duquesne Light's coal department, was in charge of installing the Warwick seals in a Bureau of Mines-sponsored field test on the pneumatic sealing technique. The lowest estimated cost for installing conventional stopping and plug closures for the 13 Warwick openings was $225,000, says Draper, while the openings were closed using the mechanized system for $245,000. Draper says the newer stopping cost more in the instance because work was stopped often to gather information for the experiment. The experimental closures were installed in 38 days. The job would have taken at least 149 days if traditional closures were being installed, Draper say. To install a traditional concrete block/clay plug closure, the mine opening must be cleaned thoroughly and the roof must be supported for some 3 ft from the outside. Then a solid wall or stopping must be built 25 ft from the surface and the entry must be packed with clay to the surface. Much of this job requires workers to remain underground. In pneumatic stowing, 1 1/2-in. crushed limestone with fines is conveyed through a pipeline and into the mine opening under low air pressure. Watertight seals can be installed by blowing about 10 ft of rock into the opening against the top to act as roof support. Safety posts are installed and about 10 or 15 ft of mine entry is cleaned. About 2 in. of raw cement or bentonite is placed on the floor and limestone mixed with dry cement or bentonite is blown into the opening.

  12. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  13. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  14. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transfering it to the mechanical diode.

  15. Turbine blade platform seal

    SciTech Connect

    Zagar, Thomas W.; Schiavo, Anthony L.

    2001-01-01

    A rotating blade group 90 for a turbo-machine having an improved device for sealing the gap 110 between the edges 112,114 of adjacent blade platforms 96,104. The gap 110 between adjacent blades 92,100 is sealed by a seal pin 20 its central portion 110 and by a seal plate 58,60 at each of the front 54 and rear 56 portions. The seal plates 58,60 are inserted into corresponding grooves 62,64 formed in the adjacent edges 112,114 of adjoining blades 92,100 and held in place by end plates 40,42. The end of the seal plates 58,60 may be chamfered 78,80 to improve the seal against the end plate 40,42. The seal pin 20 provides the required damping between the blades 92,100 and the seal plates 58,60 provide improved sealing effectiveness.

  16. Seal design alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sambeek, L.L.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

  17. Actively Controlled Shaft Seals for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.; Wolff, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  18. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  19. Method of making hermetic seals for hermetic terminal assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2010-04-13

    This invention teaches methods of making a hermetic terminal assembly comprising the steps of: inserting temporary stops, shims and jigs on the bottom face of a terminal assembly thereby blocking assembly core open passageways; mounting the terminal assembly inside a vacuum chamber using a temporary assembly perimeter seal and flange or threaded assembly interfaces; mixing a seal admixture and hardener in a mixer conveyor to form a polymer seal material; conveying the polymer seal material into a polymer reservoir; feeding the polymer seal material from the reservoir through a polymer outlet valve and at least one polymer outlet tube into the terminal assembly core thereby filling interstitial spaces in the core adjacent to service conduits, temporary stop, and the terminal assembly casing; drying the polymer seal material at room temperature thereby hermetically sealing the core of the terminal assembly; removing the terminal assembly from the vacuum chamber, and; removing the temporary stops, shims.

  20. Gas carburizing of steel with furnace atmospheres formed In Situ from propane and air: Part II. Analysis of the characteristics of gas flow in a batch-type sealed quench furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickels, C. A.; Mack, C. M.

    1980-09-01

    Gas flow dynamics in a batch-type sealed quench carburizing furnace were studied for operations utilizing low inlet gas flow rates. By analyzing the rate of change of furnace atmosphere composition when a sudden change is made in the inlet gas composition, it is shown that a significant amount of gas circulation occurs between the hot furnace chamber and the unheated vestibule. This circulation has the effect of increasing the mean residence time of gases within the furnace. A long mean residence time is advantageous for carburizing when the inlet gases consist of an airJhydrocarbon blend rather than prereacted endothermic gas.

  1. The modified Cobra Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.J.; Drayer, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Cobra Seal was developed in response to the International Atomic Energy Agency's request for an in situ verifiable seal. The Type E metal cap seal, still widely used by the IAEA, must be removed and returned to Agency headquarters for verification. The Cobra Seal allows an inspector to verify seal identity and integrity on site, without removing the seal. The seal consists of a loop of multi-strand fiber optic cable, which can be routed around or through the object to be sealed, and a seal body that secures the ends of the fiber optic cable. A cutting blade in the seal body randomly cuts a portion of the optical fibers in the cable. After the seal assembly is completed, a reference image is recorded of the unique pattern of light spots produced when the seal face is illuminated. Subsequent photographs of the seal pattern are compared to the original to establish the seal identity and integrity. This paper reviews the improvements and the technology of the cobra seal system. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  2. The Relationship Between Soil Air Filled Porosity and Soil Methane Oxidation is Almost Identical in Both Dry and Wet Temperate Eucalypt Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fest, B. J.; Wardlaw, T.; Hinko-Najera, N.; Arndt, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the temporal variation in soil methane (CH4) exchange in temperate evergreen eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia we measured soil CH4 exchange in high temporal resolution (every 2 hours or less) over two consecutive years (Wombat State Forest, Victoria, AUS) and over one year (Warra, Tasmania, AUS) in two temperate Eucalyptus obliqua (L. Her) forests with contrasting annual precipitation (Wombat State Forest = 870 mm yr-1, Warra = 1700 mm yr-1). Both forests were continuous CH4 sinks with the Victorian site having a sink strength of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 and the Tasmanian site having a sink strength of -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1. Our results show that CH4 uptake was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both sites and explained up to 90% of the temporal variability in CH4 uptake. Furthermore, when soil moisture was expressed as soil air filled porosity (AFP) we were able to predict the CH4 uptake of one site by the linear regression between AFP and CH4 uptake from the other site. Soil temperature only had an apparent control over seasonal variation in CH4 uptake during periods when soil moisture and soil temperature were closely correlated. The fluctuation of the generally low soil nitrogen levels did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either site.

  3. High temperature NASP engine seal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This video details research being conducted at the Lewis Research Center on high temperature engine seal design for the National Aerospace Plane. To maximize the speed, the jets on the NASP extract oxygen from the air rather than carry large liquid fuel tanks; this creates temperatures within the jet of over 5000 F. To prevent these potentially explosive gases from escaping, researchers are developing new technologies for use in the engine seals. Two examples explained are the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal. Computer simulations and laboratory footage are used to illustrate the workings of these seals. Benefits for other aerospace and industrial applications, as well as for the space shuttle, are explored.

  4. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    DOEpatents

    McEdwards, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel.

  5. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Springer, David

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology.

  6. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Harrington, C.

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  7. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  8. Crashworthy sealed pressure vessel for plutonium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A rugged transportation package for the air shipment of radioisotopic materials was recently developed. This package includes a tough, sealed, stainless steel inner containment vessel of 1460 cc capacity. This vessel, intended for a mass load of up to 2 Kg PuO/sub 2/ in various isotopic forms (not to exceed 25 watts thermal activity), has a positive closure design consisting of a recessed, shouldered lid fastened to the vessel body by twelve stainless-steel bolts; sealing is accomplished by a ductile copper gasket in conjunction with knife-edge sealing beads on both the body and lid. Follow-on applications of this seal in newer, smaller packages for international air shipments of plutonium safeguards samples, and in newer, more optimized packages for greater payload and improved efficiency and utility, are briefly presented.

  9. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected

  10. Compliant Foil Seal Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret; Delgado, Irebert

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature testing of an 8.5 inch diameter foil seal was conducted in the High Speed, High Temperature Turbine Seal Test Rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The seal was operated at speeds up to 30,000 rpm and pressure differentials up to 75 psid. Seal leakage and power loss data will be presented and compared to brush seal performance. The failure of the seal and rotor coating at 30,000 rpm and 15 psid will be presented and future development needs discussed.

  11. Inboard seal mounting

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, John R.

    1983-01-01

    A regenerator assembly for a gas turbine engine has a hot side seal assembly formed in part by a cast metal engine block having a seal recess formed therein that is configured to supportingly receive ceramic support blocks including an inboard face thereon having a regenerator seal face bonded thereto. A pressurized leaf seal is interposed between the ceramic support block and the cast metal engine block to bias the seal wear face into sealing engagement with a hot side surface of a rotary regenerator matrix.

  12. Space Environment Effects on Silicone Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Daniels, Christopher C.; Dever, Joyce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A docking system is being developed by the NASA to support future space missions. It is expected to use redundant elastomer seals to help contain cabin air during dockings between two spacecraft. The sealing surfaces are exposed to the space environment when vehicles are not docked. In space, the seals will be exposed to temperatures between 125 to -75 C, vacuum, atomic oxygen, particle and ultraviolet radiation, and micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD). Silicone rubber is the only class of space flight-qualified elastomeric seal material that functions across the expected temperature range. NASA Glenn has tested three silicone elastomers for such seal applications: two provided by Parker (S0899-50 and S0383-70) and one from Esterline (ELA-SA-401). The effects of atomic oxygen (AO), UV and electron particle radiation, and vacuum on the properties of these three elastomers were examined. Critical seal properties such as leakage, adhesion, and compression set were measured before and after simulated space exposures. The S0899-50 silicone was determined to be inadequate for extended space seal applications due to high adhesion and intolerance to UV, but both S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 seals were adequate.

  13. Experimental stiffness of tapered bore seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness of tapered-bore ring seals was measured with air as the sealed fluid. Static stiffness agreed fairly well with results of a previous analysis. Cross-coupled stiffness due to shaft rotation was much less than predicted. It is suggested that part of the disparity may be due to simplifying assumptions in the analysis; however, these do not appear to account for the entire difference observed.

  14. Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, J. J.; Dunlap, P. H., Jr.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing advanced high temperature structural seals since the late 1980's and is currently developing seals for future space vehicles as part of the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. This includes control surface seals that seal the edges and hinge lines of movable flaps and elevons on future reentry vehicles. In these applications, the seals must operate at temperatures above 2000 F in an oxidizing environment, limit hot gas leakage to protect underlying structures, endure high temperature scrubbing against rough surfaces, and remain flexible and resilient enough to stay in contact with sealing surfaces for multiple heating and loading cycles. For this study, three seal designs were compared against the baseline spring tube seal through a series of compression tests at room temperature and 2000 F and flow tests at room temperature. In addition, canted coil springs were tested as preloaders behind the seals at room temperature to assess their potential for improving resiliency. Addition of these preloader elements resulted in significant increases in resiliency compared to the seals by themselves and surpassed the performance of the baseline seal at room temperature. Flow tests demonstrated that the seal candidates with engineered cores had lower leakage rates than the baseline spring tube design. However, when the seals were placed on the preloader elements, the flow rates were higher as the seals were not compressed as much and therefore were not able to fill the groove as well. High temperature tests were also conducted to asses the compatibility of seal fabrics against ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panels anticipated for use in next generation launch vehicles. These evaluations demonstrated potential bonding issues between the Nextel fabrics and CMC candidates.

  15. Dampers for Stationary Labyrinth Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Mitchell, William; Roberts, Lawrence; Montgomery, Stuart; Davis, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Vibration dampers have been invented that are incorporated as components within the stationary labyrinth seal assembly. These dampers are intended to supplement other vibration-suppressing features of labyrinth seals in order to reduce the incidence of high-cycle-fatigue failures, which have been known to occur in the severe vibratory environments of jet engines and turbopumps in which labyrinth seals are typically used. A vibration damper of this type includes several leaf springs and/or a number of metallic particles (shot) all held in an annular seal cavity by a retaining ring. The leaf springs are made of a spring steel alloy chosen, in conjunction with design parameters, to maintain sufficient preload to ensure effectiveness of damping at desired operating temperatures. The cavity is vented via a small radial gap between the retaining ring and seal housing. The damping mechanism is complex. In the case of leaf springs, the mechanism is mainly friction in the slippage between the seal housing and individual dampers. In the case of a damper that contains shot, the damping mechanism includes contributions from friction between individual particles, friction between particles and cavity walls, and dissipation of kinetic energy of impact. The basic concept of particle/shot vibration dampers has been published previously; what is new here is the use of such dampers to suppress traveling-wave vibrations in labyrinth seals. Damping effectiveness depends on many parameters, including, but not limited to, coefficient of friction, mode shape, and frequency and amplitude of vibrational modes. In tests, preloads of the order of 6 to 15 lb (2.72 to 6.8 kilograms) per spring damper were demonstrated to provide adequate damping levels. Effectiveness of shot damping of vibrations having amplitudes from 20 to 200 times normal terrestrial gravitational acceleration (196 to 1,960 meters per square second) and frequencies up to 12 kHz was demonstrated for shot sizes from 0.032 to

  16. Energy efficient face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehnal, J.; Sedy, J.; Etsion, I.; Zobens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Torque, face temperature, leakage, and wear of a flat face seal were compared with three coned face seals at pressures up to 2758 kPa and speeds up to 8000 rpm. Axial movement of the mating seal parts was recorded by a digital data acquisition system. The coning of the tungsten carbide primary ring ranged from .51 micro-m to 5.6 micro-m. The torque of the coned face seal balanced to 76.3% was an average 42% lower, the leakage eleven times higher, than that of the standard flat face seal. The reduction of the balance of the coned face seal to 51.3% resulted by decreasing the torque by an additional 44% and increasing leakage 12 to 230 times, depending on the seal shaft speed. No measurable wear was observed on the face of the coned seals.

  17. Sealed container sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Sampling device, by means of a tapered needle, pierces a sealed container while maintaining the seal and either evacuates or pressurizes the container. This device has many applications in the chemical, preservative and battery-manufacturing industries.

  18. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  19. Zink rotary kiln seal: Cam followers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.L.

    1994-12-09

    The CIF will treat hazardous and mixed low-level radioactive waste in a rotary kiln and secondary combustion chamber. A high efficiency air pollution control system follows the secondary chamber. The rotary kiln is designed with a gas seal at each end of its rotating barrel which provides a barrier between the interior of the kiln and outside air. The internal pressure of the rotary kiln will be maintained below atmospheric pressure, so exterior air passing the seals is forced into the kiln`s interior. Positive pressure may be applied in the seal labyrinth, adding a barrier to flow. Both CIF seals will be covered entirely with exhaust hoods, drawing air over the outside of the seal and into a HEPA filtered exhaust system. Cam follower misalignment on a John Zink rotary kiln seal caused damage to the seal`s rotor. The misalignment was quantified, corrected, and checked to verify straightness. The primary purpose of the correction was to allow seal testing 1 to continue, but the information is applicable to the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) since two large seals of similar design will be installed there. Cam follower straightness was off as much as 3.5{degrees}, causing followers to run untrue on the rotor. High contact forces resulted, removing flakes of metal from the rotor surface. The misalignment caused weight bearing followers on one side of the seal to back out of their threaded mounts. The root cause was poor machining of the follower mounting holes. Correction was accomplished by relieving the holes and installing machined spacers and retaining nuts. Cam followers on the CIF`s Zink seals should be inspected for straightness before the seals are installed.

  20. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-12-02

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

  1. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  2. Tamper-indicating seal

    DOEpatents

    Fiarman, Sidney; Degen, Michael F.; Peters, Henry F.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed a tamper-indicating seal that permits in the field inspection and detection of tampering. Said seal comprises a shrinkable tube having a visible pattern of markings which is shrunk over the item to be sealed, and a second transparent tube, having a second visible marking pattern, which is shrunk over the item and the first tube. The relationship between the first and second set of markings produces a pattern so that the seal may not be removed without detection.

  3. Security seal. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gobeli, G.W.

    1981-11-17

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to fingerprints are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  4. Turbomachine Interface Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Chupp, Raymond E.; Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2005-01-01

    Sealing interfaces and coatings, like lubricants, are sacrificial, giving up their integrity for the benefit of the component. Clearance control is a major issue in power systems turbomachine design and operational life. Sealing becomes the most cost-effective way to enhance system performance. Coatings, films, and combined use of both metals and ceramics play a major role in maintaining interface clearances in turbomachine sealing and component life. This paper focuses on conventional and innovative materials and design practices for sealing interfaces.

  5. Resilient Braided Rope Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Kren, Lawrence A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A resilient braided rope seal for use in high temperature applications. The resilient braided rope seal includes a center core of fibers, a resilient 5 member overbraided by at least one layer of braided sheath fibers tightly packed together. The resilient member adds significant stiffness to the seal while maintaining resiliency. Furthermore, the seal permanent set and hysteresis are greatly reduced. Finally, improved load capabilities are provided.

  6. Detection of seal contamination in heat-sealed food packaging based on active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'huys, Karlien; Saeys, Wouter; De Ketelaere, Bart

    2015-05-01

    In the food industry packaging is often applied to protect the product from the environment, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the material used and the closure (seal). The material is selected based on the specific needs of the food product to be wrapped. However, proper closure of the package is often harder to achieve. One problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of food particles between the seal. Seal contamination can cause a decreased seal strength and thus an increased packaging failure risk. It can also trigger the formation of microchannels through which air and microorganisms can enter and spoil the enclosed food. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal-contaminated packages from the production chain is essential. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heat of the sealing bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. The cooling profile of contaminated seals was recorded. The detection performance of four processing methods (based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profile, pulsed phase thermography and a matched filter) was compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify contamination. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter of 0.63 mm) and the lowest processing time (0.42 s per sample) were obtained for the method based on a single frame. Presumably, practical limitations in the recording stage prevented the added value of active thermography to be fully reflected in this application.

  7. Collapsable seal member

    DOEpatents

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  8. Skew resisting hydrodynamic seal

    DOEpatents

    Conroy, William T.; Dietle, Lannie L.; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.

    2001-01-01

    A novel hydrodynamically lubricated compression type rotary seal that is suitable for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion. Particularly, the seal geometry ensures constraint of a hydrodynamic seal in a manner preventing skew-induced wear and provides adequate room within the seal gland to accommodate thermal expansion. The seal accommodates large as-manufactured variations in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the sealing material, provides a relatively stiff integral spring effect to minimize pressure-induced shuttling of the seal within the gland, and also maintains interfacial contact pressure within the dynamic sealing interface in an optimum range for efficient hydrodynamic lubrication and environment exclusion. The seal geometry also provides for complete support about the circumference of the seal to receive environmental pressure, as compared the interrupted character of seal support set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,873,576 and 6,036,192 and provides a hydrodynamic seal which is suitable for use with non-Newtonian lubricants.

  9. Seals development and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Waddoups, I.G.; Horton, P.R.V.

    1994-08-01

    This paper discusses Sandia`s support of DOE`s domestic seals program. Testing was conducted on several pressure sensitive seals and a few wire loop seals currently in use as well as on a few new seals. The testing on new seals concentrated on loop seals and included two fiber optic seals and a recently available wire loop seal being considered for use. Environmental, handling and vulnerability testing were conducted. The standardized testing approach used and the results of the testing are summarized. The status of evaluations for using higher security active and passive seals for domestic applications is also presented. The conclusion of the testing -of seals currently in use is that, even though there is some variability in their ability to meet all the test criterion, they are all generally acceptable by the test standards used. The motivation for evaluating higher security seals is to ascertain if seals could be used in broader domestic environment and result in improved cost-effectiveness.

  10. Hydraulic System Seal Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    supplying the seal. Shamban, Fluorocarbon, Parker, Powty, Hercules, Disogrin, Bal Seal Engineering, American Variseal , Tetrafluor, Conover, and Greene...characteristics, as did the Variseal , but both caused minor rod scoring. The Greene Tweed llytrel seal was not considered for further testing becduse

  11. MICROBIAL LEAKAGE AND APICAL INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE IN DOG’S TEETH AFTER ROOT CANAL FILLING WITH DIFFERENT SEALERS, POST SPACE PREPARATION AND EXPOSURE TO THE ORAL ENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maximiliano Schünke; Barletta, Fernando Branco; Bona, Alvaro Della; Vanni, José Roberto; Pereira, Charles da Cunha; de Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli

    2007-01-01

    Coronal leakage is an important factor affecting the outcome of endodontic therapy. This study evaluated the microbial leakage (ML) and the apical inflammatory response (AIR) in dog’s teeth after root canal filling with three endodontic sealers, post preparation and exposure to the oral environment, testing the hypothesis that there is a positive correlation between these two histological parameters (ML and AIR). Sixty-four root canals of 8 mongrel dogs were cleaned, shaped and randomly distributed into groups according to the sealer to be used: Sealer 26 (n=18); AH Plus (n=18); RoekoSeal (n=19); no sealer – control group (n=9). Root canals were filled by the lateral condensation technique. Post space preparation left 4 mm of filling material in the apical root third, and specimens were exposed to the oral environment for 90 days. The dogs were killed and jaw blocks were histologically processed using Brown & Brenn and HE staining techniques. ML and AIR were scored from 1 to 4. Results were analyzed statistically using ANOVA, Duncan’s post-hoc test and Spearman’s correlation. ML and AIR score means were: Sealer 26 - 2.44±0.98 and 2.50±0.70; AH Plus - 2.50±0.78 and 2.22±0.54; RoekoSeal - 1.84±0.95 and 2.63±0.83; Control - 2.56±1.23 and 3.11±0.60. Statistically significant differences in AIR scores were found between the AH Plus and control groups (p<0.05). Although RoekoSeal had the lowest ML means, and AH Plus, the lowest AIR means after 90-day exposure to the oral environment, no statistically significant differences were found between the three sealers under study, and no correlation was found between ML and AIR. PMID:19089174

  12. Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced brush and finger seal technologies offer reduced leakage rates over conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines. To address engine manufacturers concerns about the heat generation and power loss from these contacting seals, brush, finger, and labyrinth seals were tested in the NASA High Speed, High Temperature Turbine Seal Test Rig. Leakage and power loss test results are compared for these competing seals for operating conditions up to 922 K (1200 F) inlet air temperature, 517 KPa (75 psid) across the seal, and surface velocities up to 366 m/s (1200 ft/s).

  13. Seal Investigations of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Taylor, Shawn; Oswald, Jay; DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to improve upon current thermal active clearance control methods, a first generation, fast-acting mechanically actuated, active clearance control system has been designed and installed into a non-rotating test rig. In order to harvest the benefit of tighter blade tip clearances, low-leakage seals are required for the actuated carrier segments of the seal shroud to prevent excessive leakage of compressor discharge (P3) cooling air. The test rig was designed and fabricated to facilitate the evaluation of these types of seals, identify seal leakage sources, and test other active clearance control system concepts. The objective of this paper is to present both experimental and analytical investigations into the nature of the face-seal to seal-carrier interface. Finite element analyses were used to examine face seal contact pressures and edge-loading under multiple loading conditions, varied E-seal positions and two new face seal heights. The analyses indicated that moving the E-seal inward radially and reducing face seal height would lead to more uniform contact conditions between the face seal and the carriers. Lab testing confirmed that moving the balance diameter inward radially caused a decrease in overall system leakage.

  14. Calculation Methods for Criteria Air Pollutant Emission Inventories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    Beach 6.4 Tampa 8.4 Montgomery 6.6 Los Angeles (City) 6.2 West Palm Beach 9.6 Los Angeles International Airport 7.5 Alaska Mount Shasta 5.1 Georgia...45 D-3 Rim Seal Loss Factor for a Welded Tank with a Vapor- Mounted , Resilient-Filled Primary Seal ...................................... 46...D-4 Rim Seal Loss Factor for a Welded Tank with a Liquid- Mounted , Resilient-Filled Primary Seal ..................................... 47 D-5 Rim Seal

  15. Fuel cell manifold sealing system

    DOEpatents

    Grevstad, Paul E.; Johnson, Carl K.; Mientek, Anthony P.

    1980-01-01

    A manifold-to-stack seal and sealing method for fuel cell stacks. This seal system solves the problem of maintaining a low leak rate manifold seal as the fuel cell stack undergoes compressive creep. The seal system eliminates the problem of the manifold-to-stack seal sliding against the rough stack surface as the stack becomes shorter because of cell creep, which relative motion destroys the seal. The seal system described herein utilizes a polymer seal frame firmly clamped between the manifold and the stack such that the seal frame moves with the stack. Thus, as the stack creeps, the seal frame creeps with it, and there is no sliding at the rough, tough to seal, stack-to-seal frame interface. Here the sliding is on a smooth easy to seal location between the seal frame and the manifold.

  16. Airtight metallic sealing at room temperature under small mechanical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen

    2013-10-01

    Metallic seals can be resistant to air leakage, resistant to degradation under heat, and capable of carrying mechanical loads. Various technologies - such as organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes - need, at least benefit from, such metallic seals. However, these technologies involve polymeric materials and can tolerate neither the high-temperature nor the high-pressure processes of conventional metallic sealing. Recent progress in nanorod growth opens the door to metallic sealing for these technologies. Here, we report a process of metallic sealing using small well-separated Ag nanorods; the process is at room temperature, under a small mechanical pressure of 9.0 MPa, and also in ambient. The metallic seals have an air leak rate of 1.1 × 10-3 cm3atm/m2/day, and a mechanical shear strength higher than 8.9 MPa. This leak rate meets the requirements of organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes.

  17. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  18. Tamper-indicating seal

    DOEpatents

    Fiarman, S.; Degen, M.F.; Peters, H.F.

    1982-08-13

    There is disclosed a tamper-indicating seal that permits in the field inspection and detection of tampering. Said seal comprises a shrinkable tube having a visible pattern of markings which is shrunk over th item to be sealed, and a second transparent tube, having a second visible marking pattern, which is shrunk over the item and the first tube. The relationship between the first and second set of markings produces a pattern so that the seal may not be removed without detection. The seal is particularly applicable to UF/sub 6/ cylinder valves.

  19. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  20. Adhesive sealing of the pulp chamber.

    PubMed

    Belli, S; Zhang, Y; Pereira, P N; Pashley, D H

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate quantitatively the ability of four different filling materials to seal the orifices of root canals as a secondary seal after root canal therapy. Forty extracted human molar teeth were used. The top of pulp chambers and distal halves of the roots were removed using an Isomet saw. The canal orifices were temporarily sealed with a gutta-percha master cone without sealer. The pulp chambers were then treated with a self-etching primer adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond), a wet bonding system (One-Step), a 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride adhesive system (C&B Metabond), or a reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol (IRM). The specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 10 each. A fluid filtration method was used for quantitative evaluation of leakage. Measurements of fluid movement were made at 2-min intervals for 8 min. The quality of the seal of each specimen was measured by fluid filtration immediately and after 1 day, 1 wk, and 1 month. Even after 1 month the resins showed an excellent seal. Zinc oxide-eugenol had significantly more leakage when compared with the resin systems (p < 0.05). Adhesive resins should be considered as a secondary seal to prevent intraorifice microleakage.

  1. Rotor and stator assembly configured as an aspirating face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnquist, Norman Arnold (Inventor); Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Inventor); Reluzco, George (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A rotor and stator assembly having a rotor and a stator with opposing surfaces defining an air bearing and an air dam of an aspirating face seal. In a first embodiment, the air bearing and the air dam are axially offset. In a second embodiment, the rotor has an axially extending protuberance located radially between the air bearing and the air dam. The axial offset and the protuberance each act to divert the air flow (e.g., compressed gas or combustion gases in a gas turbine or steam in a steam turbine) in a direction transverse to the air flow direction through the air bearing and the air dam, thus isolating the air flows from the air bearing and the air dam which improves seal performance.

  2. Areas of Seal R/D at GE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, A. Nelson

    1991-01-01

    About four years ago, work was completed on a 36 inch diameter gas to gas carbon ring seal used to buffer low pressure turbine air at the rim of the forward outer flowpath on the GE36 unducted fan (UDF) engine. At about the same time, we were developing a long life counter-rotating intershaft air-oil seal of approximately 7.6 inch diameter for operation at 800 fps, 800 F, and 50 psid. Although we were successful in meeting most program goals with a split ring seal of the axial bushing type, the seal with the greatest payoff in life and air leakage rates, bearing many features in common with the GE36 seal, could not be successfully tested because of the structural weakness of the primary seal ring carbon material. This was a split ring seal using a hybrid combination of orifice compensated hydrostatic and shrouded hydrodynamic gas bearings. We are presently working to develop this design in conjunction with high strength materials being developed by Pure Carbon Co. In the area of engine secondary gas flow path-sealing for performance improvement, we are currently working with carbon and all metal face seals. A 15 inch diameter all metal 'aspirating' face seal, using self-acting hydrostatic bearings, was successfully tested to 700 fps, 100 psid, and 1000 F, demonstrating long life at flow reduction of 86 percent compared to a 'best' labyrinth. This seal will be developed through 1400 F, 900 fps, and 350 psid. The seal 'aspirates' closed at about idle speed pressure during engine start and reopens at engine shutdown. A hydraulic thrust balance seal, currently using orifice compensated hydrostatics, is under development. Other aspects of these projects are briefly covered.

  3. Soil methane oxidation in both dry and wet temperate eucalypt forests shows a near-identical relationship with soil air-filled porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fest, Benedikt J.; Hinko-Najera, Nina; Wardlaw, Tim; Griffith, David W. T.; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2017-01-01

    Well-drained, aerated soils are important sinks for atmospheric methane (CH4) via the process of CH4 oxidation by methane-oxidising bacteria (MOB). This terrestrial CH4 sink may contribute towards climate change mitigation, but the impact of changing soil moisture and temperature regimes on CH4 uptake is not well understood in all ecosystems. Soils in temperate forest ecosystems are the greatest terrestrial CH4 sink globally. Under predicted climate change scenarios, temperate eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia are predicted to experience rapid and extreme changes in rainfall patterns, temperatures and wild fires. To investigate the influence of environmental drivers on seasonal and inter-annual variation of soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange, we measured soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange at high-temporal resolution (< 2 h) in a dry temperate eucalypt forest in Victoria (Wombat State Forest, precipitation 870 mm yr-1) and in a wet temperature eucalypt forest in Tasmania (Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site, 1700 mm yr-1). Both forest soil systems were continuous CH4 sinks of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Victoria and -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Tasmania. Soil CH4 uptake showed substantial temporal variation and was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both forest sites. Soil CH4 uptake increased when soil moisture decreased and this relationship explained up to 90 % of the temporal variability. Furthermore, the relationship between soil moisture and soil CH4 flux was near-identical at both forest sites when soil moisture was expressed as soil air-filled porosity (AFP). Soil temperature only had a minor influence on soil CH4 uptake. Soil nitrogen concentrations were generally low and fluctuations in nitrogen availability did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either forest site. Our data suggest that soil MOB activity in the two forests was similar and that differences in soil CH4 exchange between the two forests were related to differences in soil moisture and

  4. Develop Efficient Leak Proof M1 Abrams Plenum Seal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-07

    SBIR report, M1 Abrams, plenum seal, turbine blade wear, FOD leakage, turbine failure, air cleaner plenum box, seal design, efficient leak proof seal...premature and excessive turbine blade wear. This in turn leads to a reduced time interval between turbine rebuilds and an estimated $3-$4 million in...Comparison – As drawn vs. actual installation ........................................... 9 Figure 5: Assembly model of M1 Turbine and related components

  5. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sean; Berger, David; Harrington, Curtis

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Building America Team, Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a new construction multifamily building in Queens, New York. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before-and-after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of an apartment during sealing.

  6. Development of gas-to-gas lift pad dynamic seals, volumes 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, A. N.; Pugh, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed on self acting (hydrodynamic) carbon face rotary shaft seals to assess their potential, relative to presently used labyrinth seals, for improving performance of aircraft gas turbine engines by reducing air leakage flow rate at compressor end seal locations. Three self acting bearing configurations, designed to supply load support at the interface of the stationary carbon seal and rotating seal race, were tested. Two configurations, the shrouded taper and shrouded flat step, were incorporated on the face of the stationary carbon seal element. The third configuration, inward pumping spiral grooves, was incorporated on the hard faced surface of the rotating seal race. Test results demonstrated seal leakage air flow rates from 75 to 95% lower that can be achieved with best state-of-the-art labyrinth designs and led to identification of the need for a more geometrically stable seal design configuration which is presently being manufactured for subsequent test evaluation.

  7. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barrier Seals for Extreme Transient Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The assembly joints of modem solid rocket motor cases are generally sealed using conventional O-ring type seals. The 5500+ F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic insulation. Special compounds are used to fill insulation gaps leading up to the seals to prevent a direct flowpath to them. Design criteria require that the seals should not experience torching or charring during operation, or their sealing ability would be compromised. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the Space Shuttle solid rocket nozzle assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. NASA is investigating different approaches for preventing torching or charring of the primary O-rings. One approach is to implement a braided rope seal upstream of the primary O-ring to serve as a thermal barrier that prevents the hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals. This paper presents flow, resiliency, and thermal resistance for several types of NASA rope seals braided out of carbon fibers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the seals when exposed to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Rope seals braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over six minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Room and high temperature flow tests are presented for the carbon seals for different amounts of linear compression. Room temperature compression tests were performed to assess seal resiliency and unit preloads as a function of compression. The thermal barrier seal was tested in a subscale "char" motor test in which the seal sealed an intentional defect in the gap insulation. Temperature measurements indicated that the seal blocked 2500 F combustion gases on the upstream side with very little temperature

  8. COMPRESSION SEAL AND SEALING MATERIAL THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Branin, T.G.

    1962-05-29

    This patent relates to compression seal and more particularly to a seaiing material therefor. The sealing surface is a coating consisting of alternate layers of gold and of a non-gold metal having similar plastic flow properties under pressure as gold. The coating is substantially free from oxidation effects when exposed to ambient atmosphere and does not become brittle when worked, as in a valve. (AEC)

  9. Shaft seal system

    DOEpatents

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1985-01-01

    A shaft seal system is disclosed for isolating two regions of different fluid mediums through which a rotatable shaft extends. The seal system includes a seal housing through which the shaft extends and which defines an annular land and an annular labyrinth both of which face on the shaft so that each establishes a corresponding fluid sealing annulus. A collection cavity is formed in communication with the annular sealing spaces, and fluids compatible with the fluids in each of the two regions to be isolated are introduced, respectively, into the annular sealing spaces and collected in the collection cavity from which the fluid mixture is removed and passed to a separator which separates the fluids and returns them to their respective annular sealing spaces in a recycling manner. In the illustrated embodiment, the isolated fluid mediums comprise a liquid region and a gas region. Gas is removed from the gas region and passed through a purifier and a gas pump operative to introduce the purified gas through the labyrinth sealing annulus to the collection cavity. After passing to the separator, the separated gas is passed through a dryer from which the dried gas is caused to pass through the labyrinth sealing annulus into the collection cavity independently of the purified gas so as to insure isolation of the gas region in the event of sealing gas pump malfunction.

  10. Contracting/expanding self-sealing cryogenic tube seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Lin X. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Contracting/expanding self-sealing cryogenic tube seals are disclosed which use the different properties of thermal contraction and expansion of selected dissimilar materials in accord with certain design criteria to yield self-tightening seals via sloped-surface sealing. The seals of the subject invention are reusable, simple to assemble, and adaptable to a wide variety of cryogenic applications.

  11. 15. DETAIL OF HEATSEALING DEVICE USED TO SEAL PLASTIC WRAPPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF HEAT-SEALING DEVICE USED TO SEAL PLASTIC WRAPPING APPLIED TO CLEANED FAIRING ASSEMBLY. DEVICE LOCATED ON THE NORTH WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102) NEAR DOOR TO ASSEMBLY ROOM (101). - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. Layered seal for turbomachinery

    DOEpatents

    Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Morgan, Victor John; Weber, David Wayne

    2015-11-20

    The present application provides seal assemblies for reducing leakages between adjacent components of turbomachinery. The seal assemblies may include outer shims, and at least a portion of the outer shims may be substantially impervious. At least one of the outer shims may be configured for sealing engagement with seal slots of the adjacent components. The seal assemblies may also include at least one of an inner shim and a filler layer positioned between the outer shims. The at least one inner shim may be substantially solid and the at least one filler layer may be relatively porous. The seal assemblies may be sufficiently flexible to account for misalignment between the adjacent components, sufficiently stiff to meet assembly requirements, and sufficiently robust to operating meet requirements associated with turbomachinery.

  13. Seals Code Development Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Compiler); Liang, Anita D. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    Seals Workshop of 1995 industrial code (INDSEAL) release include ICYL, GCYLT, IFACE, GFACE, SPIRALG, SPIRALI, DYSEAL, and KTK. The scientific code (SCISEAL) release includes conjugate heat transfer and multidomain with rotordynamic capability. Several seals and bearings codes (e.g., HYDROFLEX, HYDROTRAN, HYDROB3D, FLOWCON1, FLOWCON2) are presented and results compared. Current computational and experimental emphasis includes multiple connected cavity flows with goals of reducing parasitic losses and gas ingestion. Labyrinth seals continue to play a significant role in sealing with face, honeycomb, and new sealing concepts under investigation for advanced engine concepts in view of strict environmental constraints. The clean sheet approach to engine design is advocated with program directions and anticipated percentage SFC reductions cited. Future activities center on engine applications with coupled seal/power/secondary flow streams.

  14. Dynamic sealing principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental principles governing dynamic sealing operation are discussed. Different seals are described in terms of these principles. Despite the large variety of detailed construction, there appear to be some basic principles, or combinations of basic principles, by which all seals function, these are presented and discussed. Theoretical and practical considerations in the application of these principles are discussed. Advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and application examples of various conventional and special seals are presented. Fundamental equations governing liquid and gas flows in thin film seals, which enable leakage calculations to be made, are also presented. Concept of flow functions, application of Reynolds lubrication equation, and nonlubrication equation flow, friction and wear; and seal lubrication regimes are explained.

  15. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1983-07-19

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces is described. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluid tight barrier. A counter rotation removes the barrier. 6 figs.

  16. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluidtight barrier. A counterrotation removes the barrier.

  17. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  18. Compliant Turbomachine Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Deng, D.; Hendricks, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Sealing interface materials and coatings are sacrificial, giving up their integrity for the benefit of the component. Seals that are compliant while still controlling leakage, dynamics, and coolant flows are sought to enhance turbomachine performance. Herein we investigate the leaf-seal configuration. While the leaf seal is classified as contacting, a ready modification using the leaf-housing arrangement in conjunction with an interface film rider (a bore seal, for example) provides for a film-riding noncontact seal. The leaf housing and leaf elements can be made from a variety of materials from plastic to ceramic. Four simplistic models are used to identify the physics essential to controlling leakage. Corroborated by CFD, these results provide design parameters for applications to within reasonable engineering certainty. Some potential improvements are proposed.

  19. Damped flexible seal

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, Neil J.; Amaral, Antonio M.

    1992-10-27

    A damped flexible seal assembly for a torpedo isolates the tailcone thereof rom vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly. A pair of outside flanges, each of which include an inwardly facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, provide a watertight seal against the outer non-rotating surface of the drive shaft assembly. An inside flange includes an outwardly-facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, and provides a watertight seal against the inner surface of the tail cone. Two cast-in-place elastomeric seals provide a watertight seal between the flanges and further provide a damping barrier between the outside flanges and the inside flanges for damping vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly before the energy can reach the tailcone through the seal assembly.

  20. Inflatable traversing probe seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An inflatable seal acts as a pressure-tight zipper to provide traversing capability for instrumentation rakes and probes. A specially designed probe segment with a teardrop cross-section in the vicinity of the inflatable seal minimizes leakage at the interface. The probe is able to travel through a lengthwise slot in a pressure vessel or wind tunnel section, while still maintaining pressure integrity. The design uses two commercially available inflatable seals, opposing each other, to cover the probe slot in a wind tunnel wall. Proof-of-concept tests were conducted at vessel pressures up to 30 psig, with seals inflated to 50 psig, showing no measurable leakage along the seal's length or around the probe teardrop cross-section. This seal concept can replace the existing technology of sliding face plate/O-ring systems in applications where lengthwise space is limited.

  1. Liquid Annular Seal Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Venkataraman, Balaji; Padavala, Sathya S.; Ryan, Steve; Vallely, Pat; Funston, Kerry

    1996-01-01

    This paper highlights the accomplishments on a joint effort between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center and Texas A and M University to develop accurate seal analysis software for use in rocket turbopump design, design audits and trouble shooting. Results for arbitrary clearance profile, transient simulation, thermal effects solution and flexible seal wall model are presented. A new solution for eccentric seals based on cubic spline interpolation and ordinary differential equation integration is also presented.

  2. Compliant seal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    The compliant metallic seal combines the noncontact feature of the labyrinth seal, the low leakage of a mechanical seal, and the compliant nature of the brush seal. It consists of several thin metallic elements or leaves mounted within a ring which is press fit into the housing, and in form, sort of resembles a lip seal sections wiping the shaft. A second set of overlapping cover leaves are placed on top of the shaft riding leaves which reduces leakage and provides stiffness. The leaves can be straight or angle cut. The shaft riding fingers are designed with mismatched curvature to provide lift off similar to the Rayleigh lift pads in mechanical seals with leading edge clearances nearly twice those of the trailing edge as as shown by Fleming to be optimal for gas flows in convergent seal passages. Leading edge clearances range from 300 to 500 microinches. Balance pockets beneath the leaves provide fluid film feed to the 'Rayleigh lift' surface and the proper balance ratio (mechanical seal) when combined with the static pressure and film pressure. The leaves flex in the radial direction and accommodate thermomechanical behavior as well as axial motion and angular misalignment. In the static mode, there is a net closing force on the leaves. The seals were tested to 70 psi at speeds to 16,000 rpm or surface speeds to 330 fps and temperatures from ambient to 440 F. A slow cycle through the rig critical at 10,000 rpm induced a radial vibration response of 0.004 to 0.005 inch were accommodated by the seal. Preliminary performance data are encouraging demonstrating hydrodynamic liftoff and noncontacting operation at pressure and speeds typical of gas turbine engines. The leakage performance data are significantly better than commercial labyrinth and brush seals which should be expected as this design incorporates the features of the low leakage face or mechanical seal along with the flexibility of the brush configuration.

  3. Seals Flow Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In recognition of a deficiency in the current modeling capability for seals, an effort was established by NASA to develop verified computational fluid dynamic concepts, codes, and analyses for seals. The objectives were to develop advanced concepts for the design and analysis of seals, to effectively disseminate the information to potential users by way of annual workshops, and to provide experimental verification for the models and codes under a wide range of operating conditions.

  4. Grayloc seal static tests

    SciTech Connect

    Leisher, W.B.; Biffle, J.H.

    1983-02-01

    A series of evaluation tests was performed on Grayloc seals. Helium service and standard seals, size 292, were used. Measurements were made of axial force and motion, diameter, hoop and axial strain, and helium leak rate. Leak rates were in the 10/sup -6/ atm cc/s range for the helium service seals. Pretest analytical calculations agreed reasonably well with measured makeup forces and deflections.

  5. Foil Face Seal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, John

    2009-01-01

    In the seal literature you can find many attempts by various researchers to adapt film riding seals to the gas turbine engine. None have been successful, potential distortion of the sealing faces is the primary reason. There is a film riding device that does accommodate distortion and is in service in aircraft applications, namely the foil bearing. More specifically a foil thrust bearing. These are not intended to be seals, and they do not accommodate large axial movement between shaft & static structure. By combining the 2 a unique type of face seal has been created. It functions like a normal face seal. The foil thrust bearing replaces the normal primary sealing surface. The compliance of the foil bearing allows the foils to track distortion of the mating seal ring. The foil seal has several perceived advantages over existing hydrodynamic designs, enumerated in the chart. Materials and design methodology needed for this application already exist. Also the load capacity requirements for the foil bearing are low since it only needs to support itself and overcome friction forces at the antirotation keys.

  6. Bidirectional Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Wilson, Jack; Wu, Tom; Flower, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    Presented is a study of the use of a set of I.D./O.D. bidirectional press seals to reduce the leakage losses in a wave rotor. Relative to the baseline configuration, data indicate the use of brush seals enhanced wave rotor efficiency from 36 to 45 percent at low leakages (small rotor endwall gap spacings) and from 15 to 33 percent at high leakages (larger endwall gap spacings). These brush seals are capable of sealing positive or negative pressure drops with respect to the axial direction. Surface tribology for these tests suggested little evidence of grooving although the bristles appeared polished.

  7. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  8. High Pressure Hydraulic Seals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    looked XV2690-18D Ring good, front seal XP2714-4 Backups, (ML1841) cracked. American Variseal /Shamban 100,493 110cc leakage on P/N AS-1272 rear seal...BACKUPS SEVERELY SEAL CEC 49S1C-214-DS DETERIORATED. 38. AMERICAN VARISEAL / TESTED THROUGH 100.493 CYCLES. EXCESSIVE LEAKAGE 110 CC SHAMBAN ON REAR SEAL...California 90230 Koppers Company, Inc. Baltimore, Maryland 21203 American Variseal Corp. Broomfield, Colorado 80020 The test actuator parts were serialized

  9. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Springer, David

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology. However, this technology is capable of bringing the air leakage of a building that was built with standard construction techniques and HERS-verified sealing down to levels that would meet DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes program requirements. When a developer is striving to meet a tighter envelope leakage specification, this technology could greatly reduce the cost to achieve that goal by providing a simple and relatively low cost method for reducing the air leakage of a building envelope with little to no change in their common building practices.

  10. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Developments for Seal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    This presentation discusses the goal, approach, foil air bearings, bearing characteristics, current practices, relevance to seals, recent work, test specimens, and test results of the oil-free turbomachinery program.

  11. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  12. Innovative Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Raj

    2008-06-30

    A functioning SOFC requires different type of seals such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600--900{sup o}C and in oxidizing and reducing environments of the fuels and air. Among the different type of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses require a significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This final report is prepared to describe the progress made in the program on the needs, approaches, and performance of high temperature seals for SOFC. In particular, a new concept of self-healing glass seals is pursued for making seals between metal-ceramic material combinations, including some with a significant expansion mismatch.

  13. Resilient Braided Rope Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Kren, Lawrence A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A resilient braided rope seal for use in high temperature applications includes a center core of fibers. a resilient canted spring member supporting the core and at least one layer of braided sheath fibers tightly packed together overlying the spring member. The seal provides both improved load bearing and resiliency. Permanent set and hysteresis are greatly reduced.

  14. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  15. Pneumatic stowing seals mines

    SciTech Connect

    Brezovec, D.

    1983-11-01

    A pneumatic stowing technique has been used in the US to seal entries to abandoned mines. Limestone mixed with dry cement or bentonite is blown into the opening. Sealing can be accomplished in much less time than with traditional concrete block/clay plug methods.

  16. Seals and Scrolls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2000-01-01

    Describes an art unit in which students sculpt a signature seal out of clay and use Chinese brush painting techniques to paint a scroll. Discusses the seal and its historical use in China. Lists materials needed and explains the procedure. (CMK)

  17. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  18. Seasonal energetics of northern phocid seals.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Acuña, Hugo G; McNab, Brian K; Miller, Edward H

    2009-03-01

    The metabolic rate of harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus), harbor (Phoca vitulina), and ringed seals (Pusa hispida) was measured at various temperatures in air and water to estimate basal metabolic rates (BMRs) in these species. The basal rate and body composition of three harp seals were also measured throughout the year to examine the extent to which they vary seasonally. Marine mammalian carnivores generally have BMRs that are over three times the rates expected from body mass in mammals generally, both as a response to a cold-water distribution and to carnivorous food habits with the basal rates of terrestrial carnivores averaging about 1.8 times the mean of mammals. Phocid seals, however, have basal rates of metabolism that are 30% lower than other marine carnivores. Captive seals undergo profound changes in body mass and food consumption throughout the year, and after accounting for changes in body mass, the lowest rate of food intake occurs in summer. Contrary to earlier observations, harp seals also have lower basal rates during summer than during winter, but the variation in BMR, relative to mass expectations, was not associated with changes in the size of fat deposits. The summer reduction in energy expenditure and food consumption correlated with a reduction in BMR. That is, changes in BMR account for a significant portion of the seasonal variation in energy expenditure in the harp seal. Changes in body mass of harp seals throughout the year were due not only to changes in the size of body fat deposits, but also to changes in lean body mass. These results suggest that bioenergetics models used to predict prey consumption by seals should include time-variant energy requirements.

  19. Sealing in Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Clearance control is of paramount importance to turbomachinery designers and is required to meet today's aggressive power output, efficiency, and operational life goals. Excessive clearances lead to losses in cycle efficiency, flow instabilities, and hot gas ingestion into disk cavities. Insufficient clearances limit coolant flows and cause interface rubbing, overheating downstream components and damaging interfaces, thus limiting component life. Designers have put renewed attention on clearance control, as it is often the most cost effective method to enhance system performance. Advanced concepts and proper material selection continue to play important roles in maintaining interface clearances to enable the system to meet design goals. This work presents an overview of turbomachinery sealing to control clearances. Areas covered include: characteristics of gas and steam turbine sealing applications and environments, benefits of sealing, types of standard static and dynamics seals, advanced seal designs, as well as life and limitations issues.

  20. Rotary shaft seal

    DOEpatents

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotary shaft seal assembly which provides positive-contact sealing when the shaft is not rotated and which operates with its sealing surfaces separated by a film of compressed ambient gas whose width is independent of the speed of shaft rotation. In a preferred embodiment, the assembly includes a disc affixed to the shaft for rotation therewith. Axially movable, non-rotatable plates respectively supported by sealing bellows are positioned on either side of the disc to be in sealing engagement therewith. Each plate carries piezoelectric transucer elements which are electrically energized at startup to produce films of compressed ambient gas between the confronting surfaces of the plates and the disc. Following shutdown of the shaft, the transducer elements are de-energized. A control circuit responds to incipient rubbing between the plate and either disc by altering the electrical input to the transducer elements to eliminate rubbing.

  1. Rotary shaft seal

    DOEpatents

    Langebrake, Clair O.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotary shaft seal assembly which provides positive-contact sealing when the shaft is not rotated and which operates with its sealing surfaces separated by a film of compressed ambient gas whose width is independent of the speed of shaft rotation. In a preferred embodiment, the assembly includes a disc affixed to the shaft for rotation therewith. Axially movable, non-rotatable plates respectively supported by sealing bellows are positioned on either side of the disc to be in sealing engagement therewith. Each plate carries piezoelectric transducer elements which are electrically energized at startup to produce films of compressed ambient gas between the confronting surfaces of the plates and the disc. Following shutdown of the shaft, the transducer elements are de-energized. A control circuit responds to incipient rubbing between the plate and either disc by altering the electrical input to the transducer elements to eliminate rubbing.

  2. Transmission seal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brien, M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was performed on a high-speed (72.9 m/s, 14,349 ft/min) transmission seal of the synergistic type. During testing of the seal, oil leakage occurred at positive bearing cavity pressures. Modifications were made in an attempt to eliminate the leakage but none were completely successful. Leakage appears to be the result of questionable positioning of the sealing elements resulting in inadequate shaft contact by the oil side sealing element. This condition may be related to the nonsymmetrical shape of the elastomeric retainer and to dimensional changes caused by swelling of the elastomeric retainer from exposure to the sealed fluid. Indications of a speed dependent leakage characteristic were also observed.

  3. SSME interstage seal research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Test results comprising direct and transverse force coefficients and leakage coefficients are reported for six seal configurations. All seals tested use the same smooth rotor and have the same constant minimum clearance. The following stator configurations were tested: (1) Smooth, (2) knurled pattern, (3) axially-grooved pattern with end seals, (4) diamond-grid roughened, (5) diamond-grid roughened with end seals, and (6) round-hole pattern. Comparison of the seals shows the Knurled-pattern stator to be the stiffest and the round-hole pattern stator to yield the largest net damping and the least leakage. The theory of reference is shown to substantially underestimate the stiffness and effective-added-mass coefficients, but do a reasonable job in predicting the net-damping-force coefficient.

  4. Insulator seal final test report, TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The program objective was to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and with a full-power life of 7 years. This report documents one portion of the testing program, that of the Insulator seals. The insulator seal isolates the space filled with gaseous fission products from the cesium filled interelectrode gap. It also assures that electrons flow from the collector of one cell to the emitter of an axially adjacent cell. Fabrication, materials and testing information are presented.

  5. Modeling and Full-Scale Testing of an Aspirating Face Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnquist, Norman A.

    2006-01-01

    A 36" diameter aspirating face seal for aircraft engine application has undergone extensive testing and analysis. Previous testing indicated that the seal tended to seek equilibrium at axial rotor clearances that were larger than expected. Parameter studies were conducted on several seal design parameters to evaluate effect on seal performance. Mixing of air flows from the air dam and air bearing regions of the seal was shown to have a significant impact on the seal's performance. Two methods of minimizing this flow interaction were studied both analytically and experimentally. The first method is to reduce the labyrinth tooth clearance, thereby limiting flow to the air dam itself. The second method involves utilizing a flow deflector between the air dam and air bearing regions of the seal in order to prevent radial flow from the air dam from disrupting the formation of a hydrostatic film at the air bearing. Both methods were shown to be effective design enhancements, allowing seal closure to be achieved. In both cases, the seal seeks an equilibrium position 0.0015" from the rotor surface, with corresponding low leakage rates.

  6. HSCT Anticipated Seal Needs Turbomachinery Seals Combustor Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, John

    2006-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) engine concept is a large mixed flow turbofan similar in construction to current military fighter engines. The mission, however, is quite different. The engine will operate for long periods of time at very high Mach numbers and high altitudes. The engine is required to have very low emissions and noise levels to be acceptable in commercial service. Current thrust levels are in the 55000 lb range. At the current supercruise speed requirement of Mach 2.4, the engine inlet temperature will be at least 380 F. This is the lowest cycle temperature expected anywhere in the propulsion system.Seals will be exposed to operate at this temperature and higher for thousands of hours without failure. Durability, cost, and weight will all be very important in determining the type of seals selected for a successful HSCT engine.

  7. The Measurement and Prediction of Rotordynamic Forces for Labyrinth Seals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Rhode prepared for Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base Washington, D. C. 20332 Contract F49620-82-K083’ DTIC ELECTE JUN 2 9...by D. W. Childs D. L. Rhode prepared for Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base Washington, D. C. 20332 Contract F49620-82...S. . -° .. :... &ii:~:--&.c..-:&. -~ , 4 TEST APPARATUS . The test results reported here were obtained using the Texas A&M Air Seal Test

  8. Innovations in polymer arrester moisture sealing testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.A.; Mackevich, J.P.; Mosso, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    The vast majority of porcelain distribution arrester failures are the result of moisture ingress. Standards lag technology and do not currently address the unique design aspects of polymer arresters. Traditional sealing test methods cannot be run on polymer arresters because of lack of internal air space. A novel design test is proposed which involves sensitive interfacial leakage current measurements as the diagnostic. Samples are thermally cycled in water to produce thermal excursions and aging, while encouraging water ingress, should the sealing system be compromised. The proposed test is a modification of a protocol established for polymer insulators, which has been correlated to field service.

  9. Innovation in polymer arrester moisture sealing testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.A.; Mackevich, J.P.; Mosso, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The vast majority of porcelain distribution arrester failures are the result of moisture ingress. Standards lag technology and do not currently address the unique design aspects of polymer arresters. Traditional sealing test methods cannot be run on polymer arresters because of lack of internal air space. A novel design test is proposed which involves sensitive interfacial leakage current measurements as the diagnostic. Samples are thermally cycled in water to produce thermal excursions and aging, while encouraging water ingress, should the sealing system be compromised. The proposed test is a modification of a protocol established for polymer insulators, which has been correlated to field service.

  10. Seals Flow Code Development 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Anita D. (Compiler); Hendricks, Robert C. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Seals Workshop of 1993 code releases include SPIRALI for spiral grooved cylindrical and face seal configurations; IFACE for face seals with pockets, steps, tapers, turbulence, and cavitation; GFACE for gas face seals with 'lift pad' configurations; and SCISEAL, a CFD code for research and design of seals of cylindrical configuration. GUI (graphical user interface) and code usage was discussed with hands on usage of the codes, discussions, comparisons, and industry feedback. Other highlights for the Seals Workshop-93 include environmental and customer driven seal requirements; 'what's coming'; and brush seal developments including flow visualization, numerical analysis, bench testing, T-700 engine testing, tribological pairing and ceramic configurations, and cryogenic and hot gas facility brush seal results. Also discussed are seals for hypersonic engines and dynamic results for spiral groove and smooth annular seals.

  11. Reactor cavity seal ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1986-04-22

    A hydrostatic seal is described for sealing an annular gap between two flat substantially horizontal coplanar surfaces comprising, in combination: a generally flat annular plate of a width sufficient to span a gap between two surfaces: compressible annular sealing means disposed on the bottom surface of the flat annular plate for sealingly engaging the two flat surfaces in response to a downward force exerted on the plate; and fastening means, distributed along the center line of the plate, for releasably fastening the plate in a position to span the gap to be sealed and exert a downward force on the plate, each fastening means including a pair of elongated members of a size to fit into the gap to be sealed, means for mounting the members on the bottom surface of the plate so that at least a portion of each member is radially moveable in a direction toward a respective one of the vertical side surfaces defining the gap to be sealed to engage same and so that the plate is moveable relative to the members in a downward direction in response to hydrostatic pressure applied to the upper surface of the plate when the members are engaging the vertical side surfaces of an annular gap, and an actuating means, mounted on the plate for movement therewith in response to hydrostatic pressure, for radially moving the members, the actuating means extending through a bore in the plate to the upper surface of the plate.

  12. Sealing device for providing a seal in a turbomachine

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu; Porter, Christopher Donald; Schick, David Edward; Weber, David Wayne

    2016-08-16

    Sealing device for providing seals between adjacent components, and turbomachines utilizing such sealing devices, are provided. A sealing device includes a seal plate insertable between the adjacent components, the seal plate comprising a first face and an opposing second face. The sealing device further includes a plurality of pins extending from one of the first face or the second face, the plurality of pins configured to space the one of the first face or the second face from contact surfaces of the adjacent components.

  13. Multilayer compressive seal for sealing in high temperature devices

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2007-08-21

    A mica based compressive seal has been developed exhibiting superior thermal cycle stability when compared to other compressive seals known in the art. The seal is composed of compliant glass or metal interlayers and a sealing (gasket) member layer composed of mica that is infiltrated with a glass forming material, which effectively reduces leaks within the seal. The compressive seal shows approximately a 100-fold reduction in leak rates compared with previously developed hybrid seals after from 10 to about 40 thermal cycles under a compressive stress of from 50 psi to 100 psi at temperatures in the range from 600.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C.

  14. Bellow seal and anchor

    DOEpatents

    Mansure, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    An annular seal is made of a collapsible bellows. The bellows can function as an anchor or a seal and is easily set into position using relative component movement. The bellows folds can be slanted and their outer sealing edges can have different profiles to meet expected conditions. The bellows is expanded for insertion to reduce its outer dimension and sets by compaction as a result of relative movement. The bellows can be straight or tapered and is settable with a minimal axial force.

  15. Gland With Cantilever Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B.

    1989-01-01

    Single-piece gland forms tight seal on probe or tube containing liquid or gas at high pressure. Gland and probe align as assembled by simple torquing procedure. Disconnected easily and reused at same site. Made from any of wide variety of materials so compatible with application. Cantilever ring at top of gland bites into wall of tube or probe, sealing it. Wall of tube or probe must be thick enough to accommodate deformation without rupturing. Maximum deformation designed in coordination with seating and deformation of boss or conical seal.

  16. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  17. Silicone-Rubber Stitching Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fabric products protected from raveling by coating threads and filling stitching holes with silicone rubber. Uncored silicone rubber applied to stitching lines with air-pressurized sealant gun. Next, plastic release film placed on coated side, and blanket flipped over so release film lies underneath. Blanket then bagged and adhesive cured under partial vacuum of about 3.5 psi or under pressure. Applications include balloons, parachutes, ultralight aircraft, sails, rescue harnesses, tents, or other fabric products highly stressed in use.

  18. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  19. Phocid seals, seal lice and heartworms: a terrestrial host-parasite system conveyed to the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Leidenberger, Sonja; Harding, Karin; Härkönen, Tero

    2007-10-15

    Adaptation of pinnipeds to the marine habitat imposed parallel evolutions in their parasites. Ancestral pinnipeds must have harboured sucking lice, which were ancestors of the seal louse Echinophthirius horridus. The seal louse is one of the few insects that successfully adjusted to the marine environment. Adaptations such as keeping an air reservoir and the ability to hold on to and move on the host were necessary, as well as an adjustment of their life cycle to fit the diving habits of their host. E. horridus are confined to the Northern Hemisphere and have been reported from 9 species of northern phocids belonging to 4 genera, including land-locked seal species. The transmission from seal to seal is only possible when animals are hauled-out on land or ice. Lice are rarely found on healthy adult seals, but frequently on weak and young animals. The seal louse is suggested to play an important role as an intermediate host transmitting the heartworm Acanthocheilonema spirocauda among seals. However, the evidence is restricted to a single study where the first 3 larval stages of the heartworm were shown to develop in the louse. The fourth-stage larvae develop in the blood system of seals and eventually transform into the adult stage that matures in the heart. Since all other studies failed to confirm the presence of heartworm larvae in seal lice, other unknown intermediate hosts could be involved in the transmission of the heartworm. Transplacental transmission of microfilariae in seals has been suggested as an additional possibility, but is not likely to be important since the occurrence of heartworms in adult seals is very rare compared with juveniles. Furthermore, there are no findings of the first 3 larval stages in seals. This review shows that the heartworm infects nearly the same species of seals as the seal louse, except for the grey seal Halichoerus grypus, where the heartworm is absent. Prevalence and intensity of infection differ among regions in the

  20. Overview of NASA Glenn Seal Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn hosted the Seals/Secondary Air System Workshop on November 14-15, 2006. At this workshop NASA and our industry and university partners shared their respective seal technology developments. We use these workshops as a technical forum to exchange recent advancements and "lessons-learned" in advancing seal technology and solving problems of common interest. As in the past we are publishing the presentations from this workshop in two volumes. Volume I will be publicly available and individual papers will be made available on-line through the web page address listed at the end of this presentation. Volume II will be restricted as Sensitive But Unclassified (SBU) under International Traffic and Arms Regulations (ITAR).

  1. Method and apparatus for in-situ densification of geomaterials for sealing applications

    DOEpatents

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus is described for forming improved seals in boreholes formed in host rock by using the apparatus to introduce a feedstock into the borehole and simultaneously subjecting the introduced feedstock to both compressive and shear stresses until the borehole becomes filled and sealed. 3 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for in-densification of geomaterials for sealing applications

    DOEpatents

    Finley, Ray E.; Zeuch, David H.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10) for forming improved seals in boreholes (101) formed in host rock (100) by using the apparatus (10) to introduce a feedstock (60) into the borehole (101) and simultaneously subject the introduced feedstock to both compressive and shear stresses until the borehole becomes filled and sealed.

  3. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662 F (-150 to 350 C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  4. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to +662F (-150 to +350C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  5. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on fullscale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662degF (-150 to 350degC), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  6. Engine sealing and lubrication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1975-01-01

    Engine sealing programs are discussed which are directed toward the two major classes of engine seals: engine shaft seals and primary gas path seals. In addition, some concepts and results from fundamental lubrication research, as it pertains to the lubrication of bearings, are presented.

  7. Tamper indicating seal

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Juan A [Albuquerque, NM; Walker, Charles A [Albuquerque, NM; Blair, Dianna S [Albuquerque, NM; Bodmer, Connie C [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-05-29

    Seals have a flexible wire that can be looped through a hasp-like device. The seals include a body having a recess, a plug insertable into the recess and a snap ring for fastening the plug to the body. The plug and/or body can have access holes for inserting the wire into the recess. "Teeth" on the outer diameter and through-holes through the thickness of the snap ring allow for passing the ends of the flexible wire from the recess through the snap ring. The ends of the wire can be folded back over the snap ring and into engagement with the teeth. Assembly of the seal causes the ends of the wire to be securely fastened between the teeth of the snap ring and the sidewall of the recess. Seals can include a plug and/or body made of a frangible material such as glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic or brittle polymer.

  8. Gas turbine sealing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John Joseph; Wessell, Brian J.; Liang, George

    2013-03-05

    A sealing apparatus in a gas turbine. The sealing apparatus includes a seal housing apparatus coupled to a disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable therewith during operation of the gas turbine. The seal housing apparatus comprises a base member, a first leg portion, a second leg portion, and spanning structure. The base member extends generally axially between forward and aft rows of rotatable blades and is positioned adjacent to a row of stationary vanes. The first leg portion extends radially inwardly from the base member and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The second leg portion is axially spaced from the first leg portion, extends radially inwardly from the base member, and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The spanning structure extends between and is rigidly coupled to each of the base member, the first leg portion, and the second leg portion.

  9. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Taura, J.C.; Aksit, M.F.; Demiroglu, M.; Predmore, D.R.

    1999-06-29

    A seal assembly is described having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch there between which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal. 7 figs.

  10. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Taura, Joseph Charles; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Demiroglu, Mehmet; Predmore, Daniel Ross

    1999-01-01

    A seal assembly having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch therebetween which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal.

  11. Turbine seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Little, David A.

    2013-04-16

    A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

  12. Ingestion resistant seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Little, David A

    2011-12-13

    A seal assembly limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a gas turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus associated with a blade structure including a row of airfoils. The seal apparatus includes an annular inner shroud associated with adjacent stationary components, a wing member, and a first wing flange. The wing member extends axially from the blade structure toward the annular inner shroud. The first wing flange extends radially outwardly from the wing member toward the annular inner shroud. A plurality of regions including one or more recirculation zones are defined between the blade structure and the annular inner shroud that recirculate working gas therein back toward the hot gas path.

  13. Conduit sealing system

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, R.A.

    1984-02-28

    The invention relates to an annular seal system designed for high pressure applications in subterranean wells. The annular seal system comprises a vertical stack of subassemblies. Each subassembly incorporates an annular sealing element formed from an elastomeric material, such as a perfluoroelastomer, which is provided with a truncated pear-shaped cross-sectional configuration having reversely curved axial side surfaces. The sealing element is abutted on each axial side by a uniform thickness annular bearing element formed from a thermoplastic such as a polyphenylene sulfide resin having good bearing properties. Each of the thermoplastic bearing elements is in turn abutted by an annular metallic restraining element having correspondingly shaped reversely curved axial side surfaces and defining an inverted truncated pear-shaped cross-sectional configuration.

  14. Current developments in brush seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Bob

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the brush seal development program is to develop a comprehensive design methodology for brush seals using application requirements from engine manufacturers and experimental characterization of seal design and tribological pairs. The goals are to substantially lower leakage compared to labyrinth seals, seal life consistent with man-rated mission requirements, to investigate single and multiple staged brush seals, temperature up to 1200 F and surface speed up to 900 fps, and pressure drop across the seal of 50 psid. Test results are presented in viewgraph format.

  15. Ultra high vacuum seal arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Arrangement for demountably sealing two concentric metallic tubes in an ultra high vacuum system which facilitates remote actuation. A tubular seal includes integral spaced lips which circumferentially engage the metallic tubes. The lips plastically deform the metallic tubes by mechanical forces resulting from a martensite to austenite transformation of the tubular seal upon application of a predetermined temperature. The sealing force is released upon application of another temperature which causes a transformation from the stronger austenite to the weaker martensite. Use of a dual acting sealing ring and driving ring circumferentially contacting the sealing ring is particularly applicable to sealing larger diameter concentric metallic members.

  16. Seal system with integral detector

    DOEpatents

    Fiarman, S.

    1982-08-12

    A seal system is disclosed for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials. The seal is tamper-indicating, indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to bypass the seal, is unique and cost effective. The seal system is comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

  17. Self-acting shaft seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Self-acting seals are described in detail. The mathematical models for obtaining a seal force balance and the equilibrium operating film thickness are outlined. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis reveals three different vibration models with secondary seal friction being an important parameter. Leakage flow inlet pressure drop and affects of axisymmetric sealing face deformations are discussed. Experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given. Also a spiral groove seal design operated to 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) is described.

  18. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for sealing the annulus defined within a substantially cylindrical rotatable riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor closure head. The apparatus comprises an inflatable sealing mechanism disposed in one portion of the riser assembly near the annulus such that upon inflation the sealing mechanism is radially actuated against the other portion of the riser assembly thereby sealing the annulus. The apparatus further comprises a connecting mechanism which places one end of the sealing mechanism in fluid communication with the reactor cover gas so that overpressurization of the reactor cover gas will increase the radial actuation of the sealing mechanism thus enhancing sealing of the annulus.

  19. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  20. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1989-01-24

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side. 5 figs.

  1. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  2. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-07-04

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  3. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  4. Liquid crystal modified photonic crystal fiber (LC-PCF) fabricated with an un-cured SU-8 photoresist sealing technique for electrical flux measurement.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Szu-Ming; Cheng, Wood-Hi; Lin, Che-Hsin

    2011-09-12

    The optical transmission properties of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) can be manipulated by modifying the pattern arrangement of the air channels within them. This paper presents a novel MEMS-based technique for modifying the optical transmission properties of commercial photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) by selectively filling the voids within the fiber structure with liquid crystals. In the proposed approach, an un-cured SU-8 ring pattern with a thickness of 5 μm is fabricated using a novel stamping method. The PCF is then brought into contact with the SU-8 pattern and an infra-red (IR) laser beam is passed through the fiber in order to soften the SU-8 surface; thereby selectively sealing some of the air channels with molten SU-8. Liquid crystals (LCs) are then infiltrated into the un-sealed holes in the PCF via capillary effects in order to modify the transmission properties of the PCF. Two selectively-filled PCFs are fabricated, namely an inner-ring LC-PCF and a single-line LC-PCF, respectively. It is shown that the two LC-PCFs exhibit significantly different optical behaviors. The practical applicability of the proposed selective-filling approach is demonstrated by fabricating an electric field sensor. The experimental results show that the sensor has the ability to measure electric fields with an intensity of up to 40 kV/cm.

  5. Aerothermal experiments in turbine rim seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Lionel Obadiah, Jr.

    Purge flows are necessary for ensuring that hot gasses do not penetrate the thermally sensitive rim seal and disk cavity regions of turbines. The temperature and mass flow rate of the purge air can affect the component life and aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Therefore it is of interest to understand the basic mechanisms that govern this complex flow problem. The present work focuses on two turbine rim seal investigations. The first focused on temperature measurements in the rim cavity region of a rotating, high-speed, low-pressure turbine as means to quantify a rim seal's effectiveness. The seal had a realistic geometry with a small axial overlap between the stationary and rotating components. The purge flow rate was varied from 0 to 1 percent of the core mass flow rate. The results will describe the temperatures as well as the seal's effectiveness as a function of the purge flow rate, and turbine operating point. The second was a study on the effect of purge flow on the aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Exit flow field surveys were taken in both a low pressure turbine stage and a high pressure turbine stage. Also a computational study was done on the low pressure turbine stage to add insight into the effect of purge flow on turbine stage performance. In addition, the computation results provide insight into the effect of purge flow on the low pressure turbine blade passage flow field.

  6. Applauding the performing seal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Whether the culprit is a pump, valve, compressor, or flanged pipe connection, the end result is the same: process-fluid leakage damages the environment and is costly to operators, in terms of lost product, lost production due to downtime, and the replacement of damaged process equipment. Hard-to-handle fluids, such as abrasive slurries of coal and flyash, can damage the seals that contain them, allowing potentially harmful fluids to escape. Even more insidious is the often-invisible escape of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from equipment that handles liquid petroleum, petroleum by-products and chemicals. This paper reports that seal manufacturers are using their ingenuity to minimize the escape of liquid and gaseous emissions. One approach uses the power of magnetic attraction to create a seal along a rotating pump shaft by positioning magnetic fluids there. Ferrofluidics Corp. starts by creating a magnetic fluid - essentially a colloidal suspension of ultrafine magnetic salts dispersed in a carrier fluid - which is then used as a liquid O-ring seal in conjunction with a mechanical seal. The seal apparatus consists of a doughnut-shaped sandwich (centered around the pump shaft), with a permanent magnet as the middle layer, and a washer of magnetically permeable material on either side.

  7. Nuclear instrumentation cable end seal

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Collins P.; Brown, Donald P.

    1979-01-01

    An improved coaxial end seal for hermetically sealed nuclear instrumentation cable exhibiting an improved breakdown pulse noise characteristic under high voltage, high temperature conditions. A tubular insulator body has metallized interior and exterior surface portions which are braze sealed to a center conductor and an outer conductive sheath. The end surface of the insulator body which is directed toward the coaxial cable to which it is sealed has a recessed surface portion within which the braze seal material terminates.

  8. Gelatin based on Power-gel.TM. as solders for Cr.sup.4+laser tissue welding and sealing of lung air leak and fistulas in organs

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Tang, Jing; Evans, Jonathan M.; Ho, Peng Pei

    2006-04-25

    Laser tissue welding can be achieved using tunable Cr.sup.4+ lasers, semiconductor lasers and fiber lasers, where the weld strength follows the absorption spectrum of water. The use of gelatin and esterified gelatin as solders in conjunction with laser inducted tissue welding impart much stronger tensile and torque strengths than albumin solders. Selected NIR wavelength from the above lasers can improve welding and avoid thermal injury to tissue when used alone or with gelatin and esterified gelatin solders. These discoveries can be used to enhance laser tissue welding of tissues such as skin, mucous, bone, blood vessel, nerve, brain, liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, lung, bronchus, respiratory track, urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, or gynecologic tract and as a sealant for pulmonary air leaks and fistulas such as intestinal, rectal and urinary fistulas.

  9. Pressure Actuated Leaf Seals for Improved Turbine Shaft Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grondahl, Clayton

    2006-01-01

    This presentation introduces a shaft seal in which leaf seal elements are constructed from slotted shim material formed and layered into a frusto-conical assembly. Limited elastic deflection of seal leaves with increasing system pressure close large startup clearance to a small, non-contacting, steady state running clearance. At shutdown seal elements resiliently retract as differential seal pressure diminishes. Large seal clearance during startup and shutdown provides a mechanism for rub avoidance. Minimum operating clearance improves performance and non-contacting operation promises long seal life. Design features of this seal, sample calculations at differential pressures up to 2400 psid and benefit comparison with brush and labyrinth seals is documented in paper, AIAA 2005 3985, presented at the Advanced Seal Technology session of the Joint Propulsion Conference in Tucson this past July. In this presentation use of bimetallic leaf material will be discussed. Frictional heating of bimetallic leaf seals during a seal rub can relieve the rub condition to some extent with a change in seal shape. Improved leaf seal rub tolerance is expected with bimetallic material.

  10. Spiral-wound gasket forms low-temperature seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irick, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Spiral-wound cryogenic gasket with one component requires no encapsulant and is easily produced with self-locking features. Seal either opens and closes or is fixed. It is made by skiving strip from circumference of disk of glass-filled material. Successive turns of strip are spirally wrapped in groove machined into one flange surface. Closing joint compresses gasket.

  11. Hot dynamic test rig for measuring hypersonic engine seal flow and durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1994-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts was developed. The test fixture was developed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C and air pressure differentials of to 0.7 MPa. Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or engine-simulated distorted walls. In the fixture, two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 0.3 m long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. The capabilities of this text fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling are covered.

  12. Serum chemistry and antibodies against pathogens in antarctic fur seals, Weddell seals, crabeater seals, and Ross seals.

    PubMed

    Tryland, Morten; Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Nielsen, Ole; Nordøy, Erling S; Kovacs, Kit M; Krafft, Bjørn A; Thoresen, Stein I; Åsbakk, Kjetil; Osterrieder, Klaus; Roth, Swaantje J; Lydersen, Christian; Godfroid, Jacques; Blix, Arnoldus S

    2012-07-01

    Information on health parameters, such as antibody prevalences and serum chemistry that can reveal exposure to pathogens, disease, and abnormal physiologic conditions, is scarce for Antarctic seal species. Serum samples from Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella, n=88) from Bouvetøya (2000-2001 and 2001-2002), and from Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii, n=20), Ross seals (Ommatophoca rossii, n=20), and crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophagus, n=9) from the pack-ice off Queen Maud Land, Antarctica (2001) were analyzed for enzyme activity, and concentrations of protein, metabolites, minerals, and cortisol. Adult Antarctic fur seal males had elevated levels of total protein (range 64-99 g/l) compared to adult females and pups (range 52-79 g/l). Antarctic fur seals had higher enzyme activities of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and amylase, compared to Weddell, Ross, and crabeater seals. Antibodies against Brucella spp. were detected in Weddell seals (37%), Ross seals (5%), and crabeater seals (11%), but not in Antarctic fur seals. Antibodies against phocine herpesvirus 1 were detected in all species examined (Antarctic fur seals, 58%; Weddell seals, 100%; Ross seals, 15%; and crabeater seals, 44%). No antibodies against Trichinella spp., Toxoplasma, or phocine distemper virus (PDV) were detected (Antarctic fur seals were not tested for PDV antibodies). Antarctic seals are challenged by reduced sea ice and increasing temperatures due to climate change, and increased anthropogenic activity can introduce new pathogens to these vulnerable ecosystems and represent a threat for these animals. Our data provide a baseline for future monitoring of health parameters of these Antarctic seal species, for tracking the impact of environmental, climatic, and anthropogenic changes in Antarctica over time.

  13. Development and Capabilities of Unique Structural Seal Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Breen, Daniel P.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2002-01-01

    High temperature structural seals are necessary in many aerospace and aeronautical applications to minimize any detrimental effects originating from undesired leakage. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been and continues to be a pioneer in the development and evaluation of these types of seals. The current focus for the development of structural seals is for the 3rd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), which is scheduled to replace the current space shuttle system around 2025. Specific areas of development under this program include seals for propulsion systems (such as the hypersonic air-breathing ISTAR engine concept based upon Rocket Based Combined Cycle technology) and control surface seals for spacecraft including the autonomous rescue X-38 Crew Return Vehicle and the X-37 Space Maneuver Vehicle.

  14. Development of self-acting seals for helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of a NASA-designed self-acting face seal for use in advanced gas turbine main shaft positions was conducted. The seal incorporated Rayleigh step pads (self-acting geometry) for lift augmentation. Satisfactory performance of the gas film seal was demonstrated in a 500-hour endurance test at speeds to 183 m/s (600 ft/sec, 54,000 rpm) and air pressure differential of 137 newtons per square centimeter (198.7 psi). Carbon wear was minor. Tests were also conducted with seal seat runout greater than that expected in engine operation and in a severe sand and dust environment. Seal operation was satisfactory in both these detrimental modes of operation.

  15. Hiatal hernia in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pup.

    PubMed

    Biancani, Barbara; Field, Cara L; Dennison, Sophie; Pulver, Robert; Tuttle, Allison D

    2012-06-01

    A 2-wk-old stranded harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) rescued by Mystic Aquarium showed signs of the presence of a hiatal hernia during rehabilitation. Contrast radiographs of esophagus and stomach revealed an intrathoracic radiodensity that contains filling defects typical of stomach, consistent with gastric rugal folds. Mural thickening was observed at the level of the cardia consistent with a diagnosis of a hiatal hernia. Although clinical improvement was noted with medical therapy and tube feeding, surgical correction of the hiatal hernia was considered necessary for full resolution. However, owing to the animal's low body weight, the corrective hernia surgery was postponed until the body condition improved. The seal needed to be surgically treated for a corneal ulcer, and while anesthetized with isoflurane, the seal became dyspneic and developed cardiac arrhythmias; ultimately cardiac arrest ensued. Resuscitation was unsuccessfully attempted and the seal was euthanized. Necropsy confirmed the radiographic diagnosis and further characterized a paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

  16. Thermal Barrier/Seal for Extreme Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Phelps, Jack; Bauer, Paul; Bond, Bruce; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors, as found on the Space Shuttle, are fabricated in segments for manufacturing considerations, bolted together, and sealed using conventional Viton O-ring seals. Similarly the nine large solid rocket motor nozzles are assembled from several different segments, bolted together, and sealed at six joint locations using conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases are generally kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic or rubber insulation. Joint-fill compounds, including RTV (room temperature vulcanized compound) and polysulfide filler, are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flow-path to the O-rings. Normally these two stages of protection are enough to prevent a direct flow-path of the 900-psi hot gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. However, in the current design 1 out of 15 Space Shuttle solid rocket motors experience hot gas effects on the Joint 6 wiper (sacrificial) O-rings. Also worrisome is the fact that joints have experienced heat effects on materials between the RTV and the O-rings, and in two cases O-rings have experienced heat effects. These conditions lead to extensive reviews of the post-flight conditions as part of the effort to monitor flight safety. We have developed a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier to replace the joint fill compounds in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzles to reduce the incoming 5500 F combustion gas temperature and permit only cool (approximately 100 F) gas to reach the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. Implementation of this thermal barrier provides more robust, consistent operation with shorter turn around times between Shuttle launches.

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. This research study by Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings demonstrated the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB demonstrated this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  18. Shaft seal assembly and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, John E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A pressure-actuated shaft seal assembly and associated method for controlling the flow of fluid adjacent a rotatable shaft are provided. The seal assembly includes one or more seal members that can be adjusted between open and closed positions, for example, according to the rotational speed of the shaft. For example, the seal member can be configured to be adjusted according to a radial pressure differential in a fluid that varies with the rotational speed of the shaft. In addition, in the closed position, each seal member can contact a rotatable member connected to the shaft to form a seal with the rotatable member and prevent fluid from flowing through the assembly. Thus, the seal can be closed at low speeds of operation and opened at high speeds of operation, thereby reducing the heat and wear in the seal assembly while maintaining a sufficient seal during all speeds of operation.

  19. Enhanced Sealing by Hydrophobic Modification of Alaska Pollock-Derived Gelatin-Based Surgical Sealants for the Treatment of Pulmonary Air Leaks.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Ryo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2016-11-15

    Pulmonary air leaks are medical complications of thoracic surgery for which fibrin sealant is the main treatment. In this study, innovative sealants based on hydrophobically modified Alaska pollock-derived gelatin (hm-ApGltn) and a poly(ethylene)glycol-based 4-armed cross-linker (4S-PEG) have been developed and their burst strengths have been evaluated using fresh rat lung. The developed sealants show higher lung burst strength compared with the nonmodified original ApGltn (Org-ApGltn)-based sealant and a commercial fibrin sealant. The maximum burst strength of the hm-ApGltn-based sealant is 1.6-fold higher than the Org-ApGltn-based sealant (n = 5, p < 0.05), and 2.1-fold higher than the commercial fibrin sealant (n = 5, p < 0.05). Cell culture experiments show that modification of ApGltn with cholesteryl or stearoyl groups effectively enhances anchoring to the cell surface. In addition, binding constants between hm-ApGltn and extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and fibrillin are increased. Therefore, the new hm-ApGltn/4S-PEG-based sealant has the potential for applications in thoracic surgery.

  20. Evaluation of the Flush/Fill and High-Pressure Air Purge Procedures for Converting Army Vehicles to Silicone Brake Fluid.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    dispersed spray/ fog . 4 100 Acetylene 50 The initial spray was ignited by the torch Torch and burned until the fluid/air ratio be- came too low to support... burning . 5 150 None 40 A spray ot large droplets followed by a very finely dispersed spray/ fog . 6 150 Acetylene 40 The initial spray was ignited by...Results ! 50 None 60 Initially a spray of large droplets followed by a very fine mist/ fog . 2 50 Acetylene 60 The initial mist was ignited by the torch

  1. Oil Saving Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Driven under difficult field conditions, the Army Jeep shown went more than 22,000 miles without an oil change in a test conducted by the U.S. Army Mobility Equipment Research and Development Command. Key to this exceptionally long oil life was a set of piston ring seals made of a new synthetic rubber formula called RC-34; the seal pictured, photographed after its arduous Army trial, shows no signs of deterioration. The seal and the RC-34 material, which may soon be available for use in the family auto, were developed by Ramsey Corporation, St. Louis, Missouri, a division of TRW Automotive Worldwide. The oil in an automobile engine must be I replaced every few thousand miles not because it wears out but because it becomes contaminated. The contamination sources are gasoline and combustion gases which blow by the piston rings to mix with the oil, reducing the oil's ability to lubricate properly. Seeking to prolong oil life by eliminating "blowby," Ramsey Corporation looked for a better way to seal piston rings and used NASA technology as a departure point. The parent company TRW, under contract to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, had developed seals and bladders from a type of material called elastomers which where designed to withstand the environmental extremes of interplanetary flight. That effort formed a knowledge base for research which culminated in Ramsey's RC-34 elastomer.

  2. Design guide for helicopter transmission seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, T. S.; Keller, C. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed approach for the selection and design of seals for helicopter transmissions is presented. There are two major types of seals presently being used and they are lip type seals and mechanical type seals. Lip type seals can be divided in conventional lip seals and hydrodynamic lip seals. Conventional lip seals can be used for slow-speed, low-pressure, low-temperature sealing. Hydrodynamic lip seals although they are as pressure and temperature limited as conventional lip seals, can operate at a higher speed. Mechanical types seals are comprised of face seals and circumferential seals. Face seals are capable of high speed, high pressure, and high temperature. Circumferential seals can be used in high-speed and high-temperature applications, but will leak excessively at moderate pressures. The performance goals of transmission seals are a life that is at least equal to the scheduled overhaul interval of the gearbox component and a leakage rate of near zero.

  3. Seal system with integral detector

    DOEpatents

    Fiarman, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed a seal system for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials, which is tamper-indicating, which indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to by-pass the seal, which is unique and cost effective, said seal system comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

  4. Advanced Bristle Seals for Gas Turbine Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-28

    test sequence I retained the .003 inch shim and added a positive seal between the shim stock and the housing using Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV...113.4 200 6 1.131 1.040 175.142 0.219 * STANDARD CUBIC FOOT PER MINUTE u FLOW(cfm) OF AIR 2 70F/14.7psil TABLE C-8. TESI SEQUENCE H DATA "H. STATIC

  5. Design analysis of a self-acting spiral-groove ring seal for counter-rotating shafts. [o ring seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Russo, EL

    1983-01-01

    A self-acting spiral groove inter-shaft ring seal of nominal 16.33 cm (6.43 in.) diameter for sealing fan bleed air between counter rotating shafts in advanced turbofan engines was analyzed. The analysis focused on the lift force characteristics of the spiral grooves. A NASA Lewis developed computer program for predicting the performance of gas lubricated face seals was used to optimize the spiral groove geometry to produce maximum lift force. Load capacity curves (lift force as function of film thickness) were generated for four advanced turbofan engine operating conditions at relative seal speeds ranging from 17,850 to 29,800 rpm, sealed air pressures from 6 to 42 N/sq cm (9 to 60 Psi) absolute and temperatures from 95 to 327 C (203 to 620 F). The relative seal sliding speed range was 152 to 255 m/sec (500 to 836 ft/sec). The analysis showed that the spiral grooves are capable of producing sufficient lift force such that the ring seal will operate in a noncontacting mode over the operating range of typical advanced turbofan engines. Previously announced in STAR as N83-23306

  6. Design analysis of a self-acting spiral-groove ring seal for counter-rotating shafts. [o ring seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirusso, E.

    1983-01-01

    A self-acting spiral groove inter-shaft ring seal of nominal 16.33 cm (6.43 in.) diameter for sealing fan bleed air between counter rotating shafts in advanced turbofan engines was analyzed. The analysis focused on the lift force characteristics of the spiral grooves. A NASA Lewis developed computer program for predicting the performance of gas lubricated face seals was used to optimize the spiral groove geometry to produce maximum lift force. Load capacity curves (lift force as function of film thickness) were generated for four advanced turbofan engine operating conditions at relative seal speeds ranging from 17,850 to 29,800 rpm, sealed air pressures from 6 to 42 N/sq cm (9 to 60 psi) absolute and temperatures from 95 to 327 C (203 to 620 F). The relative seal sliding speed range was 152 to 255 m/sec (500 to 836 ft/sec). The analysis showed that the spiral grooves are capable of producing sufficient lift force such that the ring seal will operate in a noncontacting mode over the operating range of typical advanced turbofan engines.

  7. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  8. Method of sealing

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; Cassidy, Dale A.

    1978-01-01

    A thermocouple lead or other small diameter wire, cable or tube is passed through a thin material such as sheet metal and sealed thereinto by drawing complementary longitudinally angled, laterally rounded grooves terminating at their base ends in a common plane in both sides of the thin material with shearing occuring at the deep end faces thereof to form a rounded opening in the thin material substantially perpendicular to the plane of the thin material, passing a thermocouple lead or similar object through the opening so formed and sealing the opening with a sealant which simultaneously bonds the lead to the thin material.

  9. Sealing coupling. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Rusnak, J.J.

    1982-09-20

    Disclosed is a remotely operable releasable sealing coupling which provides fluid-tight joinder of upper and a lower conduit sections. Each conduit section has a concave conical sealing surface adjacent its end portion. A tubular sleeve having convex spherical ends is inserted between the conduit ends to form line contact with the concave conical end portions. An inwardly projecting lip located at one end of the sleeve cooperates with a retaining collar formed on the upper pipe end to provide swivel capture for the sleeve. The upper conduit section also includes a tapered lower end portion which engages the inside surface of the sleeve to limit misalignment of the connected conduit sections.

  10. Getting a prescription filled

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescription filled; Drugs - how to get prescription filled; Pharmacy - mail order; Pharmacy - internet; Types of pharmacies ... paper prescription that you take to a local pharmacy Calling or e-mailing a pharmacy to order ...

  11. Structural Design and Sealing Performance Analysis of Biomimetic Sealing Ring

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chuanjun

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the failure probability of rubber sealing rings in reciprocating dynamic seal, a new structure of sealing ring based on bionics was designed. The biomimetic ring has three concave ridges and convex bulges on each side which are very similar to earthworms. Bulges were circularly designed and sealing performances of the biomimetic ring in both static seal and dynamic seal were simulated by FEM. In addition, effects of precompression, medium pressure, speed, friction coefficient, and material parameters on sealing performances were discussed. The results show that von Mises stress of the biomimetic sealing ring distributed symmetrically in no-pressure static sealing. The maximum von Mises stress appears on the second bulge of the inner side. High contact stress concentrates on left bulges. Von Mises stress distribution becomes uneven under medium pressure. Both von Mises stress and contact stress increase when precompression, medium pressure, and rubber hardness increase in static sealing. Biomimetic ring can avoid rolling and distortion in reciprocating dynamic seal, and its working life is much longer than O-ring and rectangular ring. The maximum von Mises stress and contact stress increase with the precompression, medium pressure, rubber hardness, and friction coefficient in reciprocating dynamic seal. PMID:27019582

  12. Tuberculosis in wild seals and characterisation of the seal bacillus.

    PubMed

    Cousins, D V; Williams, S N; Reuter, R; Forshaw, D; Chadwick, B; Coughran, D; Collins, P; Gales, N

    1993-03-01

    Tuberculosis was diagnosed in 3 otariid seals found dead on beaches at 3 locations on the south coast of Western Australian between May 1990 and March 1991. This confirms that tuberculosis is present in the 2 native seals (Neophoca cinerea and Arctocephalus forsteri) in Western Australian waters. Mycobacterium sp isolated from the lungs of 2 of the seals were studied to determine the similarity of the strains to each other, to the strains isolated during 1986 from Australian sea lions and New Zealand fur seals kept in captivity at a marine park near Perth, Western Australia, and to a strain isolated in 1988 from a seal trainer who worked with the infected captive seals for 3 years. After restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) with the endonucleases Bst EII, Bcl I and Pvu II, one of the wild seal strains appeared to have identical DNA fragment patterns to the strains from the captive seals and the seal trainer. The other wild seal isolate had identical REA profiles using Bst EII and Bcl I, but a minor difference was detected using Pvu II. Differences in these isolates were more clearly seen in restriction fragment length polymorphisms after hybridisation with two DNA probes. The secretory protein MPB70, present in M bovis, was not detected in wild seal isolates using sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting techniques. Analysis of protein and DNA fragment profiles indicated that seal tuberculosis isolates form a unique cluster within the M tuberculosis complex.

  13. Imaging After Nellix Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing: A Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Holden, Andrew; Savlovskis, Janis; Winterbottom, Andrew; van den Ham, Leo H; Hill, Andrew; Krievins, Dainis; Hayes, Paul D; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Böckler, Dittmar; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Carpenter, Jeffrey P; Thompson, Matt M

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) using the Nellix system is a new and different method of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Normal postoperative imaging has unique appearances that change with time; complications also have different and specific appearances. This consensus document on the imaging findings after Nellix EVAS is based on the collective experience of the sites involved in the Nellix EVAS Global Forward Registry and the US Investigational Device Exemption Trial. The normal findings on computed tomography (CT), duplex ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and plain radiography are described. With time, endobag appearances change on CT due to contrast migration to the margins of the hydrogel polymer within the endobag. Air within the endobag also has unique appearances that change over time. Among the complications after Nellix EVAS, type I endoleak usually presents as a curvilinear area of flow between the endobag and aortic wall, while type II endoleak is typically small and usually occurs where an aortic branch artery lies adjacent to an irregular aortic blood lumen that is not completely filled by the endobag. Procedural aortic injury is an uncommon but important complication that occurs as a result of overfilling of the endobags during Nellix EVAS. The optimum imaging surveillance algorithm after Nellix EVAS has yet to be defined but is largely CT-based, especially in the first year postprocedure. However, duplex ultrasound also appears to be a sensitive modality in identifying normal appearances and complications.

  14. Static seal for turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Salazar, Santiago; Gisch, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    A seal structure for a gas turbine engine, the seal structure including first and second components located adjacent to each other and forming a barrier between high and low pressure zones. A seal cavity is defined in the first and second components, the seal cavity extending to either side of an elongated gap extending generally in a first direction between the first and second components. A seal member is positioned within the seal cavity and spans across the elongated gap. The seal member includes first and second side edges extending into each of the components in a second direction transverse to the first direction, and opposing longitudinal edges extending between the side edges generally parallel to the first direction. The side edges include a groove formed therein for effecting a reduction of gas flow around the seal member at the side edges.

  15. Seal For Precooling A Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Samuel S.; Mulready, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Diaphragm reduces misalignment. Rotary seal retains precooling fluid in pump section of cryogenic turbopump, preventing fluid from entering turbine section. Precooling fluid held in pump section of turbopump by knife-edge labyrinth seal on diaphragm.

  16. Sealing micropores in thin castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mersereau, G. A.; Nitzschke, G. O.; Ochs, H. L.; Sutch, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Microscopic pores in thin-walled aluminum castings are sealed by impregnation pretreatment. Technique was developed for investment castings used in hermetically sealed chassic for electronic circuitry. Excessively high leakage rates were previously measured in some chassis.

  17. Coating for hot sliding seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.

    1979-01-01

    Heat resistant paint is effective surface coating for sliding seals that must operate at elevated temperatures. Economical paint is easy to apply, offers minimal friction, and improves reliability of seals.

  18. Feather seal slot for vanes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Mastro, B. P.; Eckart, F.

    1985-10-22

    The slots for accommodating feather seals in the turbine vanes of a gas turbine engine has the end thereof sealed off by use of weld wire inserted into the slot and simultaneously welded and cut to the required length.

  19. Self-stabilizing radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A self-stabilizing radial face seal comprises an axial member and a primary seal ring juxtapositioned to a seal seat. At least one primary seal ring and seal seat unit is affixed to the axial member so as to rotate with it. The primary seal ring has a front face which opposes a face of the seal seat. The seal has both high-pressure and low-pressure regions of fluid, and seal seat is provided with a porous ring-like circumferential structure in the face of the seal seat opposite the front face of the primary seal ring.

  20. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  1. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  2. "The Seventh Seal."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter M.

    1969-01-01

    The significance of Bergman's "Seventh Seal" lies not in the speeches nor in the actions of the central characters but rather in the film's form, its totality created by the emotive elements of imagery and sound together with the intellectual elements of actions and words. The scene-units are related to a central motif (the opening of…

  3. Gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Johnson, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A gas path seal suitable for use with a turbine engine or compressor is described. A shroud wearable or abradable by the abrasion of the rotor blades of the turbine or compressor shrouds the rotor bades. A compliant backing surrounds the shroud. The backing is a yieldingly deformable porous material covered with a thin ductile layer. A mounting fixture surrounds the backing.

  4. Composite seal for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A gas path seal suitable for use with a turbine engine or compressor is provided. A shroud wearable or abradable by the abrasion of the rotor blades of the turbine or compressor shrouds the rotor blades. A compliant backing surrounds the shroud. The backing is a compliant material covered with a thin ductile layer. A mounting fixture surrounds the backing.

  5. Composite seal for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A gas path seal suitable for use with a turbine engine or compressor is provided. A shroud wearable or abradable by the abrasion of the rotor blades of the turbine or compressor shrouds the rotor blades. A compliant backing surrounds the shroud. The backing is a yieldingly deformable porous material covered with a thin ductile layer. A mounting fixture surrounds the backing.

  6. Ceramic to metal seal

    DOEpatents

    Snow, Gary S.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  7. Seal for sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag; Minck, Robert W.; Williams, William J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  8. Rim-Supported Turbine Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longenecker, Kent O.

    1988-01-01

    Interstage seal accommodates large pressure drop across vane stage. Sealing surfaces close to inner diameter of gas-flow path. Two blade stages supported by single disk, broached over entire width of rim. Seal concept developed for small rocket turbines as liquid-oxygen pumps. Well suited to turbines with high pressure drops across vane stages.

  9. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Poindexter, Allan M.; Ricks, Herbert E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and or wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities.

  10. Ceramic-Cord Gas Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etzel, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    High-temperature gasket material seals at temperatures above 1,100 degrees C. Concentric exhaust pipes are typical of applications in which ceramic-cord seals might be used. Cord is crushed to form seal between inner and outer pipes when inner pipe is expanded into place. Typical applications include engine exhaust ducts or hot pipes passing through firewalls.

  11. Hermetic edge sealing of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlan, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electrostatic bonding (ESB) and ultrasonic welding process to produce hermetic edge seals on terrestrial solar cell modules was investigated. The fabrication sequence is to attach an aluminum foil "gasket' to the perimeter of a glass sheet. A cell circuit is next encapsulated inside the gasket, and its aluminum foil back cover is seam welded ultrasonically to the gasket. An ESB process for sealing aluminum to glass was developed in an ambient air atmosphere, which eliminates the requirement for a vacuum or pressure vessel. An ultrasonic seam welding process was also developed which did not degrade the quality of the ESB seal. Good quality welds with minimal deformation were produced. The effectiveness of the above described sealing techniques was tested by constructing 400 sq cm (8 x 8 s64 sq in) sample modules, and then subjecting them to nondestructive fine and gross leak tests. The gross leak tests identified several different causes of leaks which were then eliminated by modifying the assembly process.

  12. Advanced Seal Sessions I and II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Sarawate, Neelesh

    2013-01-01

    As aircraft operators continue to seek higher fuel efficiency, lower emissions, and longer on-wing performance, turbine engine designers are scrutinizing all components for areas of improvement. To achieve overall goals, turbine pressure ratios and by-pass ratios continue to climb. Also, designers are seeking to minimize parasitic and cooling flows to extract the most useful work out of the flow stream, placing a renewed interest on seal technology and secondary flow path management. In the area of future manned spacecraft, advancements are being examined for both habitat seals and re-entry thermal protection system thermal barrierseals. For long duration space craft, designers are continuing to look for savings in parasitic losses to reduce the amount of cabin re-supply air that needs to be brought along. This is placing greater demands on seal designs and materials to exhibit low leakage and be resistant to space environments. For future missions to and from distant planets, the re-entry heating will be higher than for low-earth orbit or lunar return motivating advanced thermal barrier development. This presentation will provide an overview of the seal challenges and opportunities in these diverse areas.

  13. Biocompatibility of root-end filling materials: recent update

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Newaskar, Vilas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of a root-end filling is to establish a seal between the root canal space and the periradicular tissues. As root-end filling materials come into contact with periradicular tissues, knowledge of the tissue response is crucial. Almost every available dental restorative material has been suggested as the root-end material of choice at a certain point in the past. This literature review on root-end filling materials will evaluate and comparatively analyse the biocompatibility and tissue response to these products, with primary focus on newly introduced materials. PMID:24010077

  14. High-Temperature Knitted Spring Tubes Improved for Structural Seal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2005-01-01

    To meet the needs of current and future space vehicles, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced control surface seals. These seals are used to fill the gaps surrounding actuated structures, such as rudders and body flaps, to shield underlying lower temperature structures, such as mechanical actuators, from the hot gases encountered during atmospheric reentry. During previous testing, the current baseline seal design, which is used on the space shuttle as a thermal barrier and was selected as the rudder-fin seal on the X-38 crew return vehicle, exhibited significant permanent set following compression at 1900 F (see the following photograph). Decreased resiliency (springback) could prevent the seal from contacting both of the opposing sealing surfaces and allow the ingestion of damaging hot gases during reentry, which could have detrimental effects on vehicle subsystems.

  15. Sealing Ability of MTA Used in Perforation Repair of Permanent Teeth; Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Samir, Samah

    2016-01-01

    There were several materials used to seal different types of perforation defects. MTA is one of these restorative materials that is considered the most effective, biocompatible, non-toxic, and non-irritant; promote bone healing and cementum regeneration. The objective of this article was to review and summarize the sealing ability of MTA compared with the other materials used for sealing different types of root perforations of permanent teeth. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2005 to 2015 searching for articles related to sealing ability of MTA. This study found that factors affecting prognosis are the size, site of the perforation and time elapsed as well as the repair material. MTA is an important filling material to be used for sealing different types of perforations when perforated sites sealed immediately with MTA. PMID:27347231

  16. Sealing Ability of MTA Used in Perforation Repair of Permanent Teeth; Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Kusai; Samir, Samah

    2016-01-01

    There were several materials used to seal different types of perforation defects. MTA is one of these restorative materials that is considered the most effective, biocompatible, non-toxic, and non-irritant; promote bone healing and cementum regeneration. The objective of this article was to review and summarize the sealing ability of MTA compared with the other materials used for sealing different types of root perforations of permanent teeth. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2005 to 2015 searching for articles related to sealing ability of MTA. This study found that factors affecting prognosis are the size, site of the perforation and time elapsed as well as the repair material. MTA is an important filling material to be used for sealing different types of perforations when perforated sites sealed immediately with MTA.

  17. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 percent with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  18. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  19. Steady-state and dynamic performance of a gas-lubricated seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colsher, R.; Shapiro, W.

    1972-01-01

    Steady-state and dynamic performance of a gas-lubricated, self-acting face seal was determined using numerical methods based on a variable grid, finite-difference, time-transient procedure. Results were obtained for a gas turbine main shaft seal operating at 206.9 newton per square centimeter (300 psi) sealed air pressure and 152.4 meters per second (500 ft/sec) sliding velocity. Analysis of the seal dynamics revealed that the response of the seal nosepiece to runout of the seat face is markedly affected by secondary seal friction and by nosepiece inertia. The nosepiece response was determined for various levels of secondary seal friction and seat face runout magnitudes.

  20. Improving Indoor Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Usually the most effective way to improve indoor air quality is to eliminate individual sources of pollution or to reduce their emissions. Some sources, like those that contain asbestos, can be sealed or enclosed.

  1. Liquid seal for temperature sensing with fiber-optic refractometers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ben; Li, Jianqing; Li, Yi; Xie, Jianglei; Dong, Xinyong

    2014-08-13

    Liquid sealing is an effective method to convert a fiber-optic refractometer into a simple and highly sensitive temperature sensor. A refractometer based on the thin-core fiber modal interferometer is sealed in a capillary tube filled with Cargille oil. Due to the thermo-optic effect of the sealing liquid, the high refractive-index sensitivity refractometer is subsequently sensitive to the ambient temperature. It is found that the liquid-sealed sensor produces a highest sensitivity of -2.30 nm/°C, which is over 250 times higher than its intrinsic sensitivity before sealing and significantly higher than that of a grating-based fiber sensors. The sensing mechanisms, including the incidental temperature-induced strain effect, are analyzed in detail both theoretically and experimentally. The liquid sealing technique is easy and low cost, and makes the sensor robust and insensitive to the surrounding refractive index. It can be applied to other fiber-optic refractometers for temperature sensing.

  2. Seals Having Textured Portions for Protection in Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher (Inventor); Garafolo, Nicholas (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A sealing construct for a space environment includes a seal-bearing object, a seal on the seal-bearing object, and a seal-engaging object. The seal includes a seal body having a sealing surface, and a textured pattern at the sealing surface, the textured pattern defining at least one shaded channel surface. The seal-engaging object is selectively engaged with the seal-bearing object through the seal. The seal-engaging object has a sealing surface, wherein, when the seal-engaging object is selectively engaged with the seal-bearing object, the sealing surface of the seal-engaging object engages the sealing surface of the seal, and the seal is compressed between the seal-bearing object and the seal-engaging object such that at least one shaded channel surface engages the sealing surface of the seal-engaging object.

  3. Hyperbaric computed tomographic measurement of lung compression in seals and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael John; Hammar, Terrence; Arruda, Julie; Cramer, Scott; Dennison, Sophie; Montie, Eric; Fahlman, Andreas

    2011-07-15

    Lung compression of vertebrates as they dive poses anatomical and physiological challenges. There has been little direct observation of this. A harbor and a gray seal, a common dolphin and a harbor porpoise were each imaged post mortem under pressure using a radiolucent, fiberglass, water-filled pressure vessel rated to a depth equivalent of 170 m. The vessel was scanned using computed tomography (CT), and supported by a rail and counterweighted carriage magnetically linked to the CT table movement. As pressure increased, total buoyancy of the animals decreased and lung tissue CT attenuation increased, consistent with compression of air within the lower respiratory tract. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the external surface of the porpoise chest showed a marked contraction of the chest wall. Estimation of the volumes of different body compartments in the head and chest showed static values for all compartments except the lung, which showed a pressure-related compression. The depth of estimated lung compression ranged from 58 m in the gray seal with lungs inflated to 50% total lung capacity (TLC) to 133 m in the harbor porpoise with lungs at 100% TLC. These observations provide evidence for the possible behavior of gas within the chest of a live, diving mammal. The estimated depths of full compression of the lungs exceeds previous indirect estimates of the depth at which gas exchange ceases, and concurs with pulmonary shunt measurements. If these results are representative for living animals, they might suggest a potential for decompression sickness in diving mammals.

  4. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  5. Glass composition and process for sealing void spaces in electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Kirby, Brent W [Kennewick, WA

    2012-05-01

    A glass foaming material and method are disclosed for filling void spaces in electrochemical devices. The glass material includes a reagent that foams at a temperature above the softening point of the glass. Expansion of the glass fills void spaces including by-pass and tolerance channels of electrochemical devices. In addition, cassette to cassette seals can also be formed while channels and other void spaces are filled, reducing the number of processing steps needed.

  6. Glass coated compressible solid oxide fuel cell seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautanen, M.; Thomann, O.; Himanen, O.; Tallgren, J.; Kiviaho, J.

    2014-02-01

    With the growing footprint of solid oxide fuel cell stacks, there is a need to extend the operating range of compressible gaskets towards lower stress levels. This article describes a method to manufacture SOFC seals by coating a compressible sealing material (Thermiculite 866) with glass to obtain good sealing performance even at compression stresses as low as 0.1 MPa. Glass layer can be coated using an organic carrier consisting of terpineol, ethanol and ethyl cellulose. The coated seals can be heat treated by simply ramping the temperature up to operating temperature at 60 Kh-1 and therefore no extra steps, which are typical to glass seals, are required. Coated seals were manufactured using this route and evaluated both ex-situ and in a real stack. Leak rates of 0.1-0.3 ml (m min)-1 were measured at 2-25 mbar overpressure using 50/50 H2/N2. A 30-cell stack was manufactured and tested using coated seals. At nominal operating conditions of 0.25 A cm-2 and 650 °C average cathode temperature, 46% fuel utilization and 20% air utilization the stack had a total hydrogen cross leak of 60 ml min-1 corresponding to 0.7% of the inlet hydrogen flow rate.

  7. Bellows sealed plug valve

    DOEpatents

    Dukas, Jr., Stephen J.

    1990-01-01

    A bellows sealed plug valve includes a valve body having an inlet passage and an outlet passage, a valve chamber between the inlet and outlet passages. A valve plug has substantially the same shape as the valve chamber and is rotatably disposed therein. A shaft is movable linearly in response to a signal from a valve actuator. A bellows is sealingly disposed between the valve chamber and the valve actuator and means are located between the bellows and the valve plug for converting linear movement of the shaft connected to the valve actuator to rotational movement of the plug. Various means are disclosed including helical thread mechanism, clevis mechanism and rack and pinion mechanism, all for converting linear motion to rotational motion.

  8. Gas turbine sealing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J; Wessell, Brian J; Ebert, Todd; Beeck, Alexander; Liang, George; Marussich, Walter H

    2013-02-19

    A gas turbine includes forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, a row of stationary vanes between the forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, an annular intermediate disc, and a seal housing apparatus. The forward and aft rows of rotatable blades are coupled to respective first and second portions of a disc/rotor assembly. The annular intermediate disc is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable with the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine. The annular intermediate disc includes a forward side coupled to the first portion of the disc/rotor assembly and an aft side coupled to the second portion of the disc/rotor assembly. The seal housing apparatus is coupled to the annular intermediate disc so as to be rotatable with the annular intermediate disc and the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine.

  9. Sealing Nitrogen Tetroxide Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, George G.; Houston, Donald W.; Scott, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    Use of Furmanite FSC-N-6B sealant in clam-shell sealing device makes it possible to stop leaks of nitrogen tetroxide through defective or improperly-seated plumbing fittings. Devised to stop leaks in vent line of small rocket motor on Space Shuttle. Also used on plumbing containing hydrazine and other hazardous fluids, and repair withstands severe temperature, vibration, and shock. Leaks stopped in place, without draining or replacement of leaking parts.

  10. Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Case Study: Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    D. Springer and C. Harrington

    2016-05-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak.

  11. The Mechanical Performance of Subscale Candidate Elastomer Docking Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing a Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) for future exploration missions. The mechanism is a new state-of-the-art device for in-space assembly of structures and rendezvous of vehicles. At the interface between two pressurized modules, each with a version of the LIDS attached, a composite elastomer-metal seal assembly prevents the breathable air from escaping into the vacuum of space. Attached to the active LIDS, this seal mates against the passive LIDS during docking operation. The main interface seal assembly must exhibit low leak and outgas values, must be able to withstand various harsh space environments, must remain operational over a range of temperatures from -50 C to 75 C, and perform after numerous docking cycles. This paper presents results from a comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of four candidate subscale seal assembly designs at -50, 23, 50, and 75 C test temperatures. In particular, the force required to fully compress the seal during docking, and that which is required for separation during the undocking operation were measured. The height of subscale main interface seal bulbs, as well as the test temperature, were shown to have a significant effect on the forces the main interface seal of the LIDS may experience during docking and undocking operations. The average force values required to fully compress each of the seal assemblies were shown to increase with test temperature by approximately 50% from -50 to 75 C. Also, the required compression forces were shown to increase as the height of the seal bulb was increased. The seal design with the tallest elastomer seal bulb, which was 31% taller than that with the shortest bulb, required force values approximately 45% higher than those for the shortest bulb, independent of the test temperature. The force required to separate the seal was shown to increase with decreasing temperature after 15 hours of simulated docking. No adhesion

  12. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  13. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The presentation will include a

  14. High temperature performance evaluation of a hypersonic engine ceramic wafer seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Leakage rates of an innovative hypersonic engine seal were measured using a specially developed static high temperature seal test fixture at NASA Lewis Research Center. The three foot long structural panel-edge seal is designed to minimize leakage of high temperature, high pressure gases past the movable panels of advanced ramjet/scramjet engines. The seal is made of a stack of precision machined ceramic wafer pieces that are inserted into a closely conforming seal channel in the movable engine panel. The wafer seal accommodates the significant distortions in the adjacent engine walls through relative sliding between adjacent wafers. Seal leakage rates are presented for engine simulated air temperatures up to 1350 F and for engine pressures up to 100 psi. Leakage rates are also presented for the seal, sealing both a flat wall condition, and an engine simulated distorted wall condition in which the distortion was 0.15 in. in only an 18 in. span. Seal leakage rates were low, meeting an industry-established tentative leakage limit for all combinations of temperature, pressure, and wall conditions considered. Comparisons are made between the measured leakage rates and leakage rates predicted using a seal leakage model developed from externally-pressurized gas film bearing theory.

  15. High temperature performance evaluation of a hypersonic engine ceramic wafer seal

    SciTech Connect

    Steinetz, B.M.

    1991-04-01

    Leakage rates of an innovative hypersonic engine seal were measured using a specially developed static high temperature seal test fixture at NASA Lewis Research Center. The three foot long structural panel-edge seal is designed to minimize leakage of high temperature, high pressure gases past the movable panels of advanced ramjet/scramjet engines. The seal is made of a stack of precision machined ceramic wafer pieces that are inserted into a closely conforming seal channel in the movable engine panel. The wafer seal accommodates the significant distortions in the adjacent engine walls through relative sliding between adjacent wafers. Seal leakage rates are presented for engine simulated air temperatures up to 1350F and for engine pressures up to 100 psi. Leakage rates are also presented for the seal, sealing both a flat wall condition, and an engine simulated distorted wall condition in which the distortion was 0.15 in. in only an 18 in. span. Seal leakage rates were low, meeting an industry-established tentative leakage limit for all combinations of temperature, pressure, and wall conditions considered. Comparisons are made between the measured leakage rates and leakage rates predicted using a seal leakage model developed from externally-pressurized gas film bearing theory.

  16. Canister, Sealing Method And Composition For Sealing A Borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2005-06-28

    Method and composition for sealing a borehole. A chemically bonded phosphate ceramic sealant for sealing, stabilizing, or plugging boreholes is prepared by combining an oxide or hydroxide and a phosphate with water to form slurry. The slurry is introduced into the borehole where the seal, stabilization or plug is desired, and then allowed to set up to form the high strength, minimally porous sealant, which binds strongly to itself and to underground formations, steel and ceramics.

  17. QwikSeal (registered trademark) Pre-Sealed Aerospace Fasteners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-29

    UV - curable and solvent-based systems being evaluated – New application methodology being integrated onto QwikSeal production machine Automated...materials with a wide range of viscosities – Solvent based and 100% solids UV - curable materials can both be sprayed with fine control • Bench top...Std Z39-18 Overview 2 Background Sealant Barrier Coat PCI ESTCP Program Integration • QwikSeal Background – Problem – QwikSeal Solution

  18. Brightness discrimination in the South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus).

    PubMed

    Scholtyssek, C; Dehnhardt, G

    2013-05-24

    Underwater, the contrast between object and background is much larger reduced with increasing distance between object and observer than in air. For marine predators, such as pinnipeds, it would therefore be advantageous to possess a high sensitivity for brightness differences, since this would increase the distance at which prey can be detected visually. Few studies have examined the brightness discrimination thresholds of pinnipeds. Two studies with phocid seals have confirmed low brightness discrimination thresholds in pinnipeds whereas the threshold obtained for the South African fur seal seems to be twice as high as that of the phocids. However, the experiments with the South African fur seal have been conducted under inadequate conditions which likely resulted in an underestimation of the brightness discrimination ability of this species. The study at hand reinvestigated the brightness discrimination threshold of the South African fur seal under well controlled conditions. In a two alternative forced choice task, one fur seal was trained to indicate the position of the brighter of two gray discs presented on a black background on a monitor. The thresholds were determined for 11 standard intensities each tested against 8 lower comparison intensities. It was found that the fur seal was able to perceive brightness differences of 8-10%, which is better than the phocid species tested so far. For low standard intensities, however, the threshold increased which could to be due to a relative slow dark adaptation rate of the fur seal. The results are discussed in terms of the relevance of visual information for pinnipeds during foraging dives and are directly compared to the results obtained for the harbor seal which has been tested under the same conditions as the fur seal in a previous study.

  19. High temperature braided rope seals for static sealing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Michael L.; Olsen, Andrew; Darolia, Ram; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    Achieving efficiency and performance goals of advanced aircraft and industrial systems are leading designers to implement high temperature materials such as ceramics and intermetallics. Generally these advanced materials are applied selectively in the highest temperature sections of the engine system including the combustor and high pressure turbine, amongst others. Thermal strains that result in attaching the low expansion-rate components to high expansion rate superalloy structures can cause significant life reduction in the components. Seals are being designed to both seal and to serve as compliant mounts allowing for relative thermal growths between high temperature but brittle primary structures and the surrounding support structures. Designers require high temperature, low-leakage, compliant seals to mitigate thermal stresses and control parasitic and cooling airflow between structures. NASA is developing high temperature braided rope seals in a variety of configurations to help solve these problems. This paper will describe the types of seals being developed, describe unique test techniques used to assess seal performance, and present leakage flow data under representative pressure, temperature and scrubbing conditions. Feasibility of the braided rope seals for both an industrial tube seal and a turbine vane seal application is also demonstrated.

  20. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  1. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  2. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  3. Flexible walled container having membrane fitment for use with aseptic filling apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Reiss, R.J.; Rica, A.F.

    1984-05-01

    There is disclosed an aseptic flexible walled container having a rigid fitment member cooperative with an aseptic filling apparatus and including a neck, outer flanges surrounding the neck, a frangible membrane and an outer end rim receptive of an hermetically sealed lid. The neck is formed with an internal chamferred seating shoulder for fluid-tight engagement with a fill tube. One outer flange cooperates with clamping jaws of the aseptic filling apparatus for detachably sealing the fitment to a sterilizing chamber and placing it in position for insertion of the filling tube which ruptures the membrane and permits the aseptic introduction of product to the container's interior. The other outer flange is secured to an opening in a wall of the flexible container. The joined fitment and container are presterilized prior to filling. Selected materials for the multi-ply container walls and the fitment permit the container to withstand gamma ray and other sterilization treatment, heat and pressure while maintaining required strength. After the container is aseptically filled, such as with flowable food product, the fill tube is withdrawn and a lid is hermetically sealed onto the rim of the fitment. A heat shield adjacent a container wall surrounds the fitment to protect the container from excessive heat generated by the associated filling apparatus during filling.

  4. Rim seal for turbine wheel

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, Boris; Boyd, Gary L.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine wheel assembly includes a disk having a plurality of blades therearound. A ceramic ring is mounted to the housing of the turbine wheel assembly. A labyrinth rim seal mounted on the disk cooperates with the ceramic ring to seal the hot gases acting on the blades from the disk. The ceramic ring permits a tighter clearance between the labyrinth rim seal and the ceramic ring.

  5. Immunogenetics of the Elephant Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garza, John Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The goals of this cooperative agreement fall into three categories: 1) A basic description of Immunogenetic variation in the northern elephant seal genome; 2) A basic genetic map of the northern elephant seal genome; 3). Microevolutionary forces in the northern elephant seal genome. The results described in this report were acquired using funds from this cooperative agreement together with funds from a National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant.

  6. Low-Torque Seal Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Borowski, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The EcoTurn Class K production prototypes have passed all AAR qualification tests and received conditional approval. The accelerated life test on the second set of seals is in progress. Due to the performance of the first set, no problems are expected.The seal has demonstrated superior performance over the HDL seal in the test lab with virtually zero torque and excellent contamination exclusion and grease retention.

  7. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seals. 113.25 Section 113.25 Customs Duties U.S... Bond Requirements § 113.25 Seals. When a seal is required, the seal shall be affixed adjoining the signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to...

  8. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Seals. 113.25 Section 113.25 Customs Duties U.S... Bond Requirements § 113.25 Seals. When a seal is required, the seal shall be affixed adjoining the signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to...

  9. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seals. 113.25 Section 113.25 Customs Duties U.S... Bond Requirements § 113.25 Seals. When a seal is required, the seal shall be affixed adjoining the signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to...

  10. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Seals. 113.25 Section 113.25 Customs Duties U.S... Bond Requirements § 113.25 Seals. When a seal is required, the seal shall be affixed adjoining the signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to...

  11. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seals. 113.25 Section 113.25 Customs Duties U.S... Bond Requirements § 113.25 Seals. When a seal is required, the seal shall be affixed adjoining the signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to...

  12. Borehole sealing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hartley, James N.; Jansen, Jr., George

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for sealing boreholes in the earth. The borehole is blocked at the sealing level, and a sealing apparatus capable of melting rock and earth is positioned in the borehole just above seal level. The apparatus is heated to rock-melting temperature and powdered rock or other sealing material is transported down the borehole to the apparatus where it is melted, pooling on the mechanical block and allowed to cool and solidify, sealing the hole. Any length of the borehole can be sealed by slowly raising the apparatus in the borehole while continuously supplying powdered rock to the apparatus to be melted and added to the top of the column of molten and cooling rock, forming a continuous borehole seal. The sealing apparatus consists of a heater capable of melting rock, including means for supplying power to the heater, means for transporting powdered rock down the borehole to the heater, means for cooling the apparatus and means for positioning the apparatus in the borehole.

  13. Electrodes for sealed secondary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boies, D. B.; Child, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    Self-supporting membrane electrode structures, in which active ingredients and graphite are incorporated in a polymeric matrix, improve performance of electrodes in miniature, sealed, alkaline storage batteries.

  14. Internal coaxial cable seal system

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Sneddon, Cameron; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-07-25

    The invention is a seal system for a coaxial cable and is placed within the coaxial cable and its constituent components. A series of seal stacks including load ring components and elastomeric rings are placed on load bearing members within the coaxial cable sealing the annular space between the coaxial cable and an electrical contact passing there through. The coaxial cable is disposed within drilling components to transmit electrical signals between drilling components within a drill string. The seal system can be used in a variety of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

  15. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Franklin R.

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  16. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  17. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  18. Film fill for power plant cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, G.R. ); Monjoie, M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on film fill, which is the use of flat or formed sheets to provide a surface upon which liquid and air come in contact with each other to affect the exchange of heat. The only other fill options available to a cooling tower designer is the use of splash fill or combinations whereby heat exchange occurs on the surface of water droplets, or both. As film fill allows the designer the opportunity to build a more compact, cost effective, energy efficient cooling tower; this type of fill material is receiving ever increasing acceptance and finding it way into more and more cooling tower applications. film fill is used to both counterflow and crossflow cooling towers, from small air conditioning applications to large natural draft towers serving 1300 to 1500 M.W. power plants around the world. It is being used in applications using unfiltered water high in suspended solids, high concentrations of dissolved salts, water carrying fibers, silt, mud, treated and untreated waste effluent, scale etc. These situations are caused by users who are: trying to reduce water make-up, using untreated or unfiltered water, or trying to save on the cost of chemical treatment.

  19. Theory versus experiment for the rotordynamic coefficients of annular gas seals. I - Test facility and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. E.; Nicks, C.; Scharrer, J.; Elrod, D.

    1985-01-01

    A facility and apparatus are described for determining the rotordynamic coefficients and leakage characteristics of annular gas seals. The coefficients and leakage characteristics of annular gas seals. The apparatus has a current top speed of 8000 cpm with a nominal seal diameter of 15.24 cmn (6 in.). The air supply unit yields a seal pressure ratio of approximately 7. An external shaker is used to excite the test rotor. The capability to independently calculate all rotordynamic coefficients at a given operating condition with one excitation frequency are discussed.

  20. High Temperature Hydraulic Seals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    test rods were made from PH13 - 8 Mo corrosion resistant steel, hardened to Rc=45. Two unsuccessful attempts were made to test the rod seals. In both...BARRELS MATERIAL AND HEAT TREAT NOTES: 1. Material shall be 2-3/ 8 inch diameter PH13 -8Mo stainless steel bars per AMS 5629, purchased in condition "A...s PE-62203 PR-3145 6. AUTHOR(S) TA- 30 K. R. Williams WU-45 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  1. Mechanical Face Seal Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Fig. 4(a)]. The axial runout at the tuter radius 6- TABLE 1: PARAMWtIER VALUlFS FOiR THE. SINtGt.t PER UtLRimAlTIN Scin.i’ IIN SCIIEI;Mt Mass, m,n kg...critical rotor runout are presented. It is shown that the more simple to use small perturbation analysis gives very good results for most practical...stiffness and damping coefficients i : are not constants. In the case of seal-rotor runout , the stiffness and damping coefficients of the elastomer are

  2. Edge seal for a porous gas distribution plate of a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Singh, Rajindar

    1984-01-01

    In an improved seal for a gas distribution plate of a fuel cell, a groove is provided extending along an edge of the plate. A member of resinous material is arranged within the groove and a paste comprising an immobilized acid is arranged surrounding the member and substantially filling the groove. The seal, which is impervious to the gas being distributed, is resistant to deterioration by the electrolyte of the cell.

  3. Building America Case Study: Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology, Clovis, California

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology. However, this technology is capable of bringing the air leakage of a building that was built with standard construction techniques and HERS-verified sealing down to levels that would meet DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes program requirements. When a developer is striving to meet a tighter envelope leakage specification, this technology could greatly reduce the cost to achieve that goal by providing a simple and relatively low cost method for reducing the air leakage of a building envelope with little to no change in their common building practices.

  4. High olfactory sensitivity for dimethyl sulphide in harbour seals

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewsky, Sylvia; Dambach, Martin; Mauck, Björn; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2005-01-01

    Productive areas are patchily distributed at sea and represent important feeding grounds for many marine organisms. Although pinnipeds are known to travel on direct routes and return regularly to particular feeding sites, the environmental information seals use to perform this navigation is as yet unknown. As atmospheric dimethyl sulphide (DMS) has been demonstrated to be a reliable indicator for profitable foraging areas, we tested seals for their ability to smell DMS at concentrations typical for the marine environment. Using a go/no-go response paradigm we determined the DMS detection threshold in two harbour seals (Phoca vitulina vitulina). DMS stimuli from 8.05×108 to 8 pmol (DMS) m−3(air) were tested against a control stimulus using a custom-made olfactometer. DMS-thresholds determined for both seals (20 and 13 pmol m−3) indicate that seals can detect ambient concentrations associated with high primary productivity, e.g. in the North Atlantic. Thus, seals possess an extraordinarily high olfactory sensitivity for DMS, which could provide a sensory basis for identifying or orienting to profitable foraging grounds. PMID:17148339

  5. Disperser seal and method

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R. T.

    1981-06-02

    A seal is described for a shaft of a disperser crusher, that pulverizes hot coal particles, maintains a higher than atmospheric pressure within a casing for the crusher, and is able to withstand elevated temperatures that are produced within the casing. The pressure and temperature result from hot gases that convey coal particles to the crusher. The seal includes self lubricating graphite packings that are urged in abutting relation with a smooth, ceramic sleeve on the shaft and are able to withstand the temperature on the shaft surface. A first, interior packing is on the inside of a wall of the casing while a second, exterior packing is outside of the wall. Superheated steam, a gas inert with the coal particles, is supplied to the interior packing with sufficient pressure to substantially prevent the migration of coal particles through the interior packing. The tendency of the coal particles to migrate from the container through the interior packing is further inhibited by providing a tortuous path from the casing to the interior packing.

  6. An In-Vitro Evaluation of Sealing Ability of Real Seal Using Fluid Filtration

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Naghavi, Neda; Roohani, Ehsan

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to compare the sealing ability of Real Seal (RS) and Gutta-percha (GP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty nine extracted human maxillary central incisors were used. The coronal part of each tooth was removed, the root canal was prepared using the crown down technique and apical enlargement to rotary file # 40. The specimens were randomly divided in to 3 groups of 15 each and two control groups of 2 each. Group 1, was obturated with RS and group 2 and 3 were obturated with GP and AH26 sealer by lateral condensation technique. In group 1 and 3 the smear layer was removed by 5mL of 5.25% NaOCl and 3mL of 17% EDTA. Leakage of the obturated roots was measured using the fluid filtration technique. This method was done at 2 min intervals for 8 min. data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests. RESULTS: Statistical analysis indicated significant differences between groups 2 with 1 and 3. The most leakage value was observed in the group 2. CONCLUSION: Root canal filling with RS or GP in combination with smear layer removal showed better sealing. Therefore the smear layer has more effect one apical leakage than the obturation system. PMID:24348652

  7. Development of circumferential seal for helicopter transmissions: Results of bench and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, T. N.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1975-01-01

    A modified circumferential segmented ring seal was designed for direct replacement of a helicopter transmission elastomeric lip seal operating on a shaft diameter of 13.91 centimeters (5.481 in.) at sliding velocities to 52.48 m/sec (10 330 ft/min). The modifications involved the garter spring tension, shaft roundness, seal housing flatness, and pumping grooves to inhibit leakage. Operation of the seals in bench tests under simulated helicopter transmission conditions revealed that the seal leakage rate was within acceptable limits and that the wear rate was negligible. The low leakage and wear rates were confirmed in flight tests of 600 and 175 hours (sliding speed, 48.11 m/sec (9470 ft/min)). An additional 200 hours of air worthiness qualification testing (aircraft tie down) demonstrated that the seal can operate at the advanced sliding conditions of 52.48 m/sec (10 330 ft/min).

  8. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  9. Case Study of Envelope Sealing in Existing Multiunit Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, Jordan; Conlin, Francis; Podorson, David

    2012-10-01

    This report describes envelope air sealing that was included in the retrofit of a 244 unit low-rise multifamily housing complex in Durham, N.C. On average, total leakage was reduced by nearly half, from 19.7 ACH50 to 9.4 ACH50. Important air leakage locations identified included plumbing and electrical penetrations, dropped ceilings/soffits, windows, ducts and wall-to-floor intersections. Specifications and a pictorial guide were developed for contractors performing the work.

  10. Seal between metal and ceramic conduits

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2015-02-03

    A seal between a ceramic conduit and a metal conduit of an ion transport membrane device consisting of a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a single gasket body, and a single compliant interlayer.

  11. Toward an Improved Hypersonic Engine Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange,Jeffrey J.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature, dynamic seals are required in advanced engines to seal the perimeters of movable engine ramps for efficient, safe operation in high heat flux environments at temperatures from 2000 to 2500 F. Current seal designs do not meet the demanding requirements for future engines, so NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing advanced seals to overcome these shortfalls. Two seal designs and two types of seal preloading devices were evaluated in a series of compression tests at room temperature and 2000 F and flow tests at room temperature. Both seals lost resiliency with repeated load cycling at room temperature and 2000 F, but seals with braided cores were significantly more flexible than those with cores composed of uniaxial ceramic fibers. Flow rates for the seals with cores of uniaxial fibers were lower than those for the seals with braided cores. Canted coil springs and silicon nitride compression springs showed promise conceptually as potential seal preloading devices to help maintain seal resiliency.

  12. Ceramic-to-metal vacuum seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackerlotzky, O. H.

    1979-01-01

    Knife-edge sealing technique forms reliable, vacuum-tight bonds between materials having very different thermal-expansion characteristics. Seal is thin and flexible and absorb shear, hoop, and bonding stresses at joint so that seal remains vacuum tight.

  13. Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Rynders, Steven Walton; Minford, Eric; Tressler, Richard Ernest; Taylor, Dale M.

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

  14. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results are included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approx. the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  15. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in.), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in.), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in. circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approximately the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  16. SSME seal test program: Test results for smooth, hole-pattern and helically-grooved stators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.

    1987-01-01

    All of the listed seals were tested in a liquid Halon test facility at high Reynolds numbers. In addition, a helically-grooved-stator seal was tested in an air seal facility. An analysis of the test results with comparisons to theoretical predictions supports the following conclusions: (1) For small seals, the Hirs' friction-factor model is more restricted than had been thought; (2) For smooth seals, predictions of stiffness and damping improve markedly as the radical clearance is reduced; (3) Friction-factor data for hole-pattern-seal stators frequently deviates from the Hirs model; (4) Predictions of stiffness and damping coefficients for hole-pattern-stator seals is generally reasonable; (5) Tests for the hole-pattern stators at reduced clearances show no clear optimum for hole-pattern seals with respect to either hole-area ratio or hole depth to minimum clearance ratios; (6) Tests of these hole-pattern stators show no significant advantage in net damping over smooth seals; (7) Tests of helically-grooved seal stators in Halon show reasonable agreement between theory and prediction for leakage and direct stiffness but poor agreement for the net damping coefficient.

  17. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  18. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  19. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, Jr., Gordon G.

    1984-01-01

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials which has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  20. Boltless Seal for Electronic Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawe, R. H.; Evans, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Spring clips seal housings for electronic circuitry, preventing electromagnetic interference from entering or leaving housings. Clips also keep dust out of housing. Since no bolts are used, housing can be opened quickly; unlike bolts, clips can be used on thin-walled housing. Seal was developed for an X-band array amplifier.

  1. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, G.G. Jr.

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  2. Seals. Grades 3-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Aquarium, Boston, MA.

    Explanations of a marine mammal rescue program and information on seals and sea lions are presented in this curriculum package for intermediate grade teachers. Activities are highlighted which focus on the natural history of harbor seals. This unit contains: (1) pre-trip activities (including fact sheets and worksheets on the different types of…

  3. Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-07-01

    One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

  4. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  5. Experimental Trichinella infection in seals.

    PubMed

    Kapel, C M O; Measures, L; Møller, L N; Forbes, L; Gajadhar, A

    2003-11-01

    The susceptibility of seals to infection with Trichinella nativa and the cold tolerant characteristics of muscle larvae in seal meat were evaluated. Two grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, were inoculated with 5000 (100 larvae/kg) T. nativa larvae and two grey seals with 50000 (1000 larvae/kg). One seal from each dose group and two control seals were killed at 5 and 10 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.). At 5 weeks p.i., infection was established in both low and high dose seals with mean larval densities of 68 and 472 larvae per gram (lpg), respectively, using eight different muscles for analyses. At 10 weeks p.i., mean larval densities were 531 and 2649 lpg, respectively, suggesting an extended persistence of intestinal worms. In seals with high larval density infections, the distribution of larvae in various muscles was uniform, but in one seal with a low larval density infection, predilection sites of larvae included muscle groups with a relative high blood flow, i.e. diaphragm, intercostal and rear flipper muscles. Trichinella-specific antibody levels, as measured by ELISA, increased during the 10 week experimental period. Infected seal muscle was stored at 5, -5 and -18 degrees C for 1, 4 and 8 weeks. Muscle larvae released from stored seal muscle by artificial digestion were inoculated into mice to assess viability and infectivity. Larvae from seal muscle 10 weeks p.i. tolerated -18 degrees C for 8 weeks but larvae from seal muscle 5 weeks p.i. tolerated only 1 week at -18 degrees C, supporting the hypothesis that freeze tolerance increases with the age of the host-parasite tissue complex. The expressed susceptibility to infection, extended production of larvae, antibody response and freeze tolerance of T. nativa in seals are new findings from the first experimental Trichinella infection in any marine mammal and suggest that pinnipeds (phocids, otariiids or walrus) may acquire Trichinella infection by scavenging even small amounts of infected tissue left by hunters or

  6. Method and device for filling the cells of a battery with electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    McManis, G.E.; Fletcher, A.N.; Bliss, D.E.

    1986-05-13

    A method is described of filling the cells of a battery with an electrolyte contained in a remote reservoir having partitioned dual chambers comprising application of heat to the reservoir. The reservoir and the battery are interconnected by a conduit having a frangible seal therein such that transference of electrolyte is occasioned by the heat induced contraction of the reservoir, rupturing of the seal under fluid pressure and flow of electrolyte from the reservoir into the battery cells.

  7. Metal seal for wellhead apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, R.A.

    1987-03-03

    A method is described of effecting a fluid-tight seal between a surface of an oil and/or gas well tubing or casing and a wellhead member, wherein the surface has been unprepared to form the seal, comprising the steps of: positioning the wellhead member circumferentially about a stub of the tubing or casing; positioning a metal-to-metal fluid-tight sealing means of the wellhead member adjacent the unprepared surface of the tubing or casing, the sealing means having at least one metallic projection positioned to extend toward the unprepared surface of the tubing or casing; and forcing the metallic projection into and penetrating the unprepared surface of the tubing or casing to form a seal therebetween.

  8. Sealed head access area enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.; Govi, Aldo R.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder power reactor is provided with a sealed head access area enclosure disposed above the reactor vessel head consisting of a plurality of prefabricated structural panels including a center panel removably sealed into position with inflatable seals, and outer panels sealed into position with semipermanent sealant joints. The sealant joints are located in the joint between the edge of the panels and the reactor containment structure and include from bottom to top an inverted U-shaped strip, a lower layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material, a separator strip defining a test space therewithin, and an upper layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material. The test space is tapped by a normally plugged passage extending to the top of the enclosure for testing the seal or introducing a buffer gas thereinto.

  9. Gas-path seal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Improved gas-path seals are needed for better fuel economy, longer performance retention, and lower maintenance, particularly in advanced, high-performance gas turbine engines. Problems encountered in gas-path sealing are described, as well as new blade-tip sealing approaches for high-pressure compressors and turbines. These include a lubricant coating for conventional, porous-metal, rub-strip materials used in compressors. An improved hot-press metal alloy shows promise to increase the operating surface temperatures of high-pressure-turbine, blade-tip seals to 1450 K (2150 F). Three ceramic seal materials are also described that have the potential to allow much higher gas-path surface operating temperatures than are possible with metal systems.

  10. Aerodynamic seals for rotary machine

    DOEpatents

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Cirri, Massimiliano; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Williams, John Robert

    2016-02-09

    An aerodynamic seal assembly for a rotary machine includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having multiple labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device segment also includes multiple flexures connected to the shoe plate and to a top interface element, wherein the multiple flexures are configured to allow the high pressure fluid to occupy a forward cavity and the low pressure fluid to occupy an aft cavity. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal attached to the top interface element at one first end and positioned about the flexures and the shoe plate at one second end.

  11. SEALING MEANS FOR RELATIVELY ROTATABLE MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.S.

    1960-10-25

    A sealing means is offered for maintaining a seal between a pair of relatively rotatable members, panticularly between a rotating shaft and a stationary member surrounding the shaft. The sealing is accomplished by means of a flange extending outward radially on each of a plurality of sealing rings mounted on the rotating member which fit into annular grooves in the stationary member and are held in sealing relation therewith by means of spring rings. In addition, means are provided for passing a sealing gas through the seal sunfaces to prevent accumulation of lubricant and for scavenging any gas which may have leaked from the internal member into the seal area.

  12. Development of partially fluorinated resin apex seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E. C.; Powell, S. H.; Yates, K.

    1984-01-01

    Partially fluorinated polyimides were prepared and molded in the form of discs and pins for test as potential apex seal materials for advanced rotary combustion engines. The polyimides were formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides of pyromellitic acid (PMDA) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). Tribological testing was performed at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of from 298K to 573K. It is shown that the carbon fiber filled polyimides, particularly the 80/20 compositions, have an excellent balance of wear/friction at 573K. The unfilled, 80/20 and 60/40 compositions indicate an unusual combination of high friction and low wear which may be advantageous in such applications as brakes and traction drives.

  13. The comparison of microbial leakage in roots filled with resilon and gutta-percha: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shashidhar, C; Shivanna, Vasundhara; Shivamurthy, GB; Shashidhar, Jyothi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: The objective of this study was to compare bacterial leakage using streptococcus mutans through gutta-percha and a thermoplastic synthetic polymer based root canal filling material (Resilon) using two filling techniques. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 single-rooted extracted human teeth were subjected for the study. Teeth were divided into 6 groups of 10 and 3 control groups of 10 teeth each. All the samples were decoronated and the coronal surfaces of the roots were prepared perpendicular to the long axis of the root with a high-speed handpiece and a multipurpose bur using air water spray. The length of all the roots was prepared approximately 16 mm from the coronal surface to the apex of the root. Roots were filled using lateral and vertical condensation techniques with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer (Group 1 and 2) or with gutta-percha and epiphany sealer (Group 3 and 4). Group 5 and 6 were filled with Resilon and epiphany sealer using the lateral and vertical condensation techniques. A split chamber microbial leakage model was used in which S. mutans placed in the upper chamber could reach the lower chamber only through the filled root canal. Group 7 and 8 (positive control) were filled with Resilon and gutta-percha without sealer and tested with bacteria, whereas Group 7 (negative control) was sealed with wax to test the seal between the chambers. Data were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U test. Results: All positive groups (Group 7 and 8) showed leakage within 1 hour of the start of the study (100%), whereas none of the negative control (Group 9) leaked. The roots obturated with Resilon and epiphany (Group 5 and 6) showed minimal leakage, i.e., each with 6 leakages, which was significantly less than gutta-percha (Group 1–4), in which approximately 80% of specimens with either sealer or techniques leaked. Kruskal–Wallis test showed statistical significance when all groups were compared (P<0.05). Mann

  14. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  15. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Fuson, Phillip L. (Inventor); Chickles, Colin D. (Inventor); Jones, Cherie A. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting, prior to swaging the fitting onto the tube. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, nickel, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After swaging, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as meaured using the Helium leak test.

  16. Tamper tape seals

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Undem, H.A.

    1994-07-01

    Tamper tapes are appealing for many applications due to their ease of use and relative robustness. Applications include seals for temporary area denial, protection of sensitive equipment, chain-of-custody audit trails, and inventory control practices. A next generation of adhesive tamper tapes is being developed that combines the best features of commercially available devices with additional state-of-the-art features in tamper indication, tamper-resistance, and counterfeit-resistance. The additional features are based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development (R&D) activities that were originally associated with preparations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). New features include rapid-set, chemical-cure adhesive systems that allow user-friendly application and layered levels of counterfeit-resistance based on unique {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} characteristics that can be accessed as desired.

  17. PREPP (Process Experimental Pilot Plant) rotary kiln seals: Problem and resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) is a facility designed to demonstrate processing of low level chemical and transuranic hazardous waste. The plant includes equipment for handling the incoming waste containers, shredding, incineration and cooling the waste, grouting the residue and scrubbing and filtration of the off gas. The process incinerator is a rotary kiln approximately 8-{1/2} ft diameter and 25 ft long with a rotary seal assembly at each end. Each seal assembly consists of a primary, secondary and tertiary seal, with a positive air pressure between primary and secondary seals to prevent out-leakage from the kiln. The kiln operates at 0.5 inch water negative pressure. From the very outset the kiln seals exhibited excessive drag which taxed the kiln drive capacity and excessive in-leakage which limited kiln temperature. An engineering evaluation concluded that the original seals supplied by the kiln vendor could not accommodate expansion and centerline shift of the kiln resulting from heatup of the kiln and its support system. A totally new concept kiln seal design has been generated to replace the (modified) original seals. This new seal system has been designed to provide a very tight long lasting seal which will accommodate the 1.5 inch axial shift and up to 1 inch radial movement of the kiln shell. Design lifetime of the seal is 10,000 operating hours between major maintenance services while maintaining an acceptable leak rate hot or cold, rotating or stopped. The design appears adaptable to any size kiln and is suitable for retrofit to existing kilns. A one-third scale prototype seal assembly is being built to verify the concept prior to construction of the 10 ft diameter seals for the PREPP rotary kiln. 4 figs.

  18. Cyclic tests of P-bulb end-seal designs for a shuttle-type wing-elevon cove membrane seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    Four P-bulb end seal designs were tested at room temperature in a cyclic seal test apparatus. Test results show that all the P-bulb end seals have the durability required for a 100 mission life (neglecting possible elevated-temperature effects) and three of the four P-bulbs provide an adequate seal against a 7.0-kPa air pressure differential. Antifriction material attached to the P-bulb rub surface reduced friction slightly but could degrade the sealing effectiveness. A flat rub surface molded into the P-bulb discouraged wrinkling and rolling and thereby reduced leakage. However, the P-bulbs lacked resilience, as indicated by increased leakage when P-bulb compression was reduced. The best P-bulb design tested included an antifriction interface bonded to a flat surface molded into the P-bulb.

  19. Temporal processing of low-frequency sounds by seals (L).

    PubMed

    Reichmuth, Colleen; Ghoul, Asila; Southall, Brandon L

    2012-10-01

    In a recent study, Kastelein et al. [(2010) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 1135-1145] reported auditory integration times for harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) exceeding 3000 ms for 200 Hz tonal signals. This finding is unexpected and potentially significant given that time constants measured in mammals for tones above 1 kHz are typically less than 500 ms. To further explore this result, the hearing of another harbor seal was measured in air and water for 200 Hz tones with durations of 500 and 2500 ms. Threshold comparisons, as well as reaction time measures, revealed no gain in audibility as signal duration increased above 500 ms.

  20. Effect of repeated vertical loads on microleakage of IRM and calcium sulfate-based temporary fillings.

    PubMed

    Liberman, R; Ben-Amar, A; Frayberg, E; Abramovitz, I; Metzger, Z

    2001-12-01

    Temporary fillings are commonly used to seal endodontic access cavities between visits. IRM and Cavidentin were selected to represent two widely used groups of temporary filling materials. The first is a reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol preparation that is mixed at chairside, whereas the second is a ready-to-use calcium sulfate-based material that gained popularity due to its convenience of application. The seal provided by the aforementioned materials was studied using a radioactive tracer quantitative assay. When compared as passive temporary filling, the two provided a similar quality of seal. However, when subjected to repetitive "occlusal" cyclic loading of 4 kg, IRM was clearly superior to the calcium sulfate-based material. Whereas IRM maintained a reasonable seal, the calcium sulfate-based fillings deteriorated and lost the ability to seal. These results suggest that even though calcium sulfate-based materials may be useful when not subjected to any occlusal forces, IRM should be preferred whenever occlusal loads may be applied. Furthermore it is demonstrated that testing such materials for microleakage with no reference to mastication forces may be of limited value.