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Sample records for sebastiania macrocarpa muell

  1. Secondary dispersal of bigcone Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga macrocarpa ) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Wall, Stephen B.; Borchert, Mark I.; Gworek, Jennifer R.

    2006-07-01

    Large-seeded pines ( Pinus spp.) are known to be dispersed by seed-caching corvids (i.e. jays and nutcrackers) and rodents (e.g. chipmunks and mice), with a concomitant decrease in seed dispersability by wind. We tested the idea that seeds of bigcone Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga macrocarpa), which are winged but larger than the seeds of other members of Pseudotsuga, are dispersed by a combination of wind and seed-caching rodents. We compared characteristics of seeds from P. macrocarpa in southern California (mean seed mass 132.6 mg) to seeds of a population of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) in northern California (24.8 mg). We also tested whether rodents would cache seeds of P. macrocarpa. Seeds of P. macrocarpa had greater wing loadings (1.37 mg/mm 2) and descent velocities (2.47 m/s) than those of P. menziesii (0.52 mg/mm 2 and 1.28 m/s, respectively). These data indicate that the wind dispersability of P. macrocarpa is likely to be less than that of P. menziesii, but this loss of wind dispersability is partially compensated for by secondary dispersal of seeds by rodents, which readily gathered and cached the larger seeds of P. macrocarpa up to 34 m from source trees. Large seed size confers several advantages to P. macrocarpa, most importantly attracting seed-caching animals that effectively bury seeds.

  2. Phytochemistry and medicinal properties of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl. extracts

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Rabia; Asmawi, Mohammad Zaini Bin; Dewa, Aidiahmad; Sadikun, Amirin; Umar, Muhammad Ihtisham

    2013-01-01

    Phaleria macrocarpa, commonly known as Mahkota dewa is a medicinal plant that is indigenous to Indonesia and Malaysia. Extracts of P. macrocarpa have been used since years in traditional medicine that are evaluated scientifically as well. The extracts are reported for a number of valuable medicinal properties such as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-oxidant and vasorelaxant effect. The constituents isolated from different parts of P. macrocarpa include Phalerin, gallic acid, Icaricide C, magniferin, mahkoside A, dodecanoic acid, palmitic acid, des-acetylflavicordin-A, flavicordin-A, flavicordin-D, flavicordin-A glucoside, ethyl stearate, lignans, alkaloids andsaponins. The present review is an up-to-date summary of occurrence, botanical description, ethnopharmacology, bioactivity and toxicological studies related to P. macrocarpa. PMID:23922460

  3. Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg).

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jayashree, Radha; Rekha, Karumamkandathil; Sushmakumari, Sreedharannair; Sobha, Sankaren; Kumari Jayasree, Parukkuttyamma; Kala, Radha Gopikkuttanunithan; Thulaseedharan, Arjunan

    2006-01-01

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) is an important industrial crop for natural rubber production. At present, more than 9.5 million hectares in about 40 countries are devoted to rubber tree cultivation with a production about 6.5 million tons of dry rubber each year. The world supply of natural rubber is barely keeping up with a global demand for 12 million tons of natural rubber in 2020. Tapping panel dryness (TPD) is a complex physiological syndrome widely found in rubber tree plantations, which causes severe yield and crop losses in natural rubber producing countries. Currently, there is no effective prevention or treatment for this serious malady. As it is a perennial tree crop, the integration of specific desired traits through conventional breeding is both time-consuming and labour-intensive. Genetic transformation with conventional breeding is certainly a more promising tool for incorporation of agronomically important genes that could improve existing Hevea genotype. This chapter provides an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol for rubber tree using immature anther-derived calli as initial explants. We have applied this protocol to generate genetically engineered plants from a high yielding Indian clone RRII 105 of Hevea brasiliensis (Hb). Calli were co-cultured with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring a plasmid vector containing the Hb superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene and the reporter gene used was beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (uidA). The selectable marker gene used was neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and kanamycin was used as selection agent. We found that a suitable transformation protocol for Hevea consists of a 3-d co-cultivation with Agrobacterium in the presence of 20 mM acetosyringone, 15 mM betaine HCl, and 11.55 mM proline followed by selection on medium containing 300 mg/L kanamycin. Transformed calli surviving on medium containing 300 mg/L kanamycin showed a strong GUS-positive reaction. Upon subsequent subculture into

  4. Silvical characteristics of bigcone Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa [Vasey] Mayr)

    Treesearch

    Gerald W. Gause

    1966-01-01

    Describes the climatic, edaphic, physiographic, and biotic habitat conditions of the natural range of bigcone Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa [Vasey] Mayr) and how this tree reproduces, grows, and dies.

  5. Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pterygota macrocarpa and Cola gigantea (Sterculiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Christian; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Boamah, Vivian Etsiapa; Adu, Francis; Mensah, Kwesi Boadu; Adu-Amoah, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Pterygota macrocarpa and Cola gigantea are African medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of sores, skin infections, and other inflammatory conditions including pains. This study therefore aims at investigating the antimicrobial properties of ethanol leaf and stem bark extracts of P. macrocarpa and C. gigantea using the agar diffusion and the micro-dilution techniques and also determining the anti-inflammatory properties of the extracts of these plants in carrageenan-induced foot edema in seven-day old chicks. The minimum inhibitory concentration of both ethanol leaf and bark extracts of P. macrocarpa against the test organisms was from 0.125 to 2.55 mg/mL and that of C. gigantea extracts was 0.125 to 2.75 mg/mL. Extracts with concentration of 50 mg/mL were most active against the test organisms according to the agar diffusion method. All the extracts of P. macrocarpa and C. gigantea at 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg body weight except ethanol leaf extract of C. gigantea exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effects (P ≤ 0.001). PMID:22690251

  6. Phytochemicals and Antioxidative Properties of Borneo Indigenous Liposu (Baccaurea lanceolata) and Tampoi (Baccaurea macrocarpa) Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Abu Bakar, Mohd Fadzelly; Ahmad, Nor Ezani; Abdul Karim, Fifilyana; Saib, Syazlina

    2014-01-01

    Two underutilized indigenous fruits of Borneo, Liposu (Baccaurea lanceolata) and Tampoi (Baccaurea macrocarpa) were investigated for their total phenolic (TPC), flavonoid (TFC), anthocyanin (TAC) and carotenoid (TCC) contents as well as antioxidant properties in vitro. The fruits were separated into three different parts (i.e., pericarp, flesh and seed) and extracted using 80% methanol. Antioxidant activity was determined using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging, ABTS decolorization and FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. The results showed that B. macrocarpa pericarp contained the highest amount of total phenolics, total flavonoid, total anthocyanin and total carotenoid with the values of 60.04 ± 0.53 mg GAE/g, 44.68 ± 0.67 mg CE/g, 1.23 ± 0.20 mg c-3-gE/100 g and 0.81 ± 0.14 mg BCE/g. Results from DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays also showed that the pericarp of B. macrocarpa displayed the highest antioxidant capacity. The antioxidant activity of the extract was significantly correlated with the total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with the carotenoid contents. In conclusion, B. macrocarpa displayed high potential as natural source of phytochemicals with antioxidant properties. PMID:26785068

  7. Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (Euphorbiaceae): Ethnopharmacology and Phytochemistry Review

    PubMed Central

    Gangwar, Mayank; Goel, R. K.; Nath, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (Euphorbiaceae) are widely distributed perennial shrub or small tree in tropical and subtropical region in outer Himalayas regions with an altitude below 1,000 m and are reported to have wide range of pharmacological activities. Mallotus philippinensis species are known to contain different natural compounds, mainly phenols, diterpenoids, steroids, flavonoids, cardenolides, triterpenoids, coumarins, isocoumarins, and many more especially phenols; that is, bergenin, mallotophilippinens, rottlerin, and isorottlerin have been isolated, identified, and reported interesting biological activities such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiviral, cytotoxicity, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory activity protein inhibition against cancer cell. We have selected all the pharmacological aspects and toxicological and all its biological related studies. The present review reveals that Mallotus philippinensis is a valuable source of medicinally important natural molecules and provides convincing support for its future use in modern medicine. However, the existing knowledge is very limited about Mallotus philippinensis and its different parts like steam, leaf, and fruit. Further, more detailed safety data pertaining to the acute and subacute toxicity and cardio- and immunotoxicity also needs to be generated for crude extracts or its pure isolated compounds. This review underlines the interest to continue the study of this genus of the Euphorbiaceae. PMID:25105119

  8. Furoquinoline alkaloids from Melicope bonwickii (F.Muell.) T.Hartley.

    PubMed

    Komala, Ismiarni; Rahmani, Mawardi; Sukari, Mohd Aspollah; Mohd Ismail, Hazar Bebe; Cheng Lian, Gwendoline Ee; Rahmat, Asmah

    2006-04-01

    Investigation on the leaves of Melicope bonwickii (F.Muell.) T.Hartley (Rutaceae) afforded a new 7-(2'-hydroxy-3'-chloroprenyloxy)-4-methoxyfuroquinoline (1) together with the known 7-(2',3'-epoxyprenyloxy)-4-methoxyfuroquinoline (2), evellerine (3) kokusaginine (4) and an amide aurantiamide acetate (5). Compounds 1 and 2 showed significant activity against cervical cell lines (Hela).

  9. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activities of Asplenium nidus, Phaleria macrocarpa and Eleusine indica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Mariya Mohd; Ibrahim, Nazlina; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad

    2014-09-01

    Three local medicinal plants namely Asplenium nidus (langsuyar), Eleusine indica (sambau) and Phaleria macrocarpa (mahkota dewa) were screened for the cytotoxicity and antiviral activities. Six plant extracts were prepared including the aqueous and methanol extracts from A. nidus leaf and root, aqueous extract from dried whole plant of E. indica and methanol extract from P. macrocarpa fruits. Cytotoxicity screening in Vero cell line by MTT assay showed that the CC50 values ranged from 15 to 60 mg/mL thus indicating the safety of the extracts even at high concentrations. Antiviral properties of the plant extracts were determined by plaque reduction assay. The EC50 concentrations were between 3.2 to 47 mg/mL. The selectivity indices (SI = CC50/EC50) of each tested extracts ranged from 4.3 to 63.25 indicating the usefulness of the extracts as potential antiviral agents.

  10. Phytochemical screening, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of hexane fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismaeel, Mahmud Yusef Yusef; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Tahir, Mariya Mohd.; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Phaleria macrocarpa fruits have been widely used in the traditional medicine for the treatment of several infections. The current study was done to determine the phytochemical content, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of the hexane fraction (HF) of P. macrocarpa fruits. In the hexane fraction of P. macarocarpa fruits, phytochemical screening showed the presence of terpenoids whereas saponins, alkaloids, tannins and anthraquinones were not present. Evaluation on Vero cell lines by using MTT assay showed that the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) value was 0.48 mg/mL indicating that the fraction is not cytotoxic. Antiviral properties of the plant extracts were determined by plaque reduction assay. The effective concentration (EC50) was 0.18 mg/mL. Whereas the selective index (SI = CC50/EC50) of hexane fraction is 2.6 indicating low to moderate potential as antiviral agent.

  11. Wound-healing potential of the fruit extract of Phaleria macrocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Abood, Walaa Najm; Al-Henhena, Nawal Ahmed; Abood, Ammar Najim; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M. Jamil; Ismail, Salmah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Batran, Rami Al

    2015-01-01

    The wound-healing potential of Phaleria macrocarpa was evaluated by monitoring the levels of inflammatory mediators, collagen, and antioxidant enzymes. Experimentally, two-centimeter-wide full-thickness-deep skin excision wounds were created on the posterior neck area of the rats. The wounds were topically treated with gum acacia as a vehicle in the control group, intrasite gel in the reference group, and 100 and 200 mg/mL P. macrocarpa fruit extract in the treatment group. Granulation tissues were excised on the 15th day and were further processed for histological and biochemical analyzes. Wound healing was evaluated by measuring the contractions and protein contents of the wounds. Cellular redistribution and collagen deposition were assessed morphologically using Masson’s trichrome stain. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, along with malondialdehyde (MDA) level were determined in skin tissue homogenates of the dermal wounds. Serum levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were evaluated in all the animals. A significant decrease in wound area was caused by a significant increase in TGF-β1 level in the treated groups. Decrease in TNF-α level and increase in the collagen formation were also observed in the treated groups. Topical treatment with P. macrocarpa fruit extract increased the SOD and CAT activities in the healing wounds, thereby significantly decreasing MDA level. The topical treatment with P. macrocarpa fruit extract showed significant healing effect on excision wounds and demonstrated an important role in the inflammation process by increasing antioxidant enzyme activities, thereby accelerating the wound healing process and reducing tissue injury. PMID:26042509

  12. Antioxidants, Phytochemicals, and Cytotoxicity Studies on Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Ma Ma; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Banisalam, Behrooz; Mohajer, Sadegh; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the utilization of certain medicinal plants as therapeutic agents has drastically increased. Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl is frequently used in traditional medicine. The present investigation was undertaken with the purpose of developing pharmacopoeial standards for this species. Nutritional values such as ash, fiber, protein, fat, and carbohydrate contents were investigated, and phytochemical screenings with different reagents showed the presence of flavonoids, glycosides, saponin glycosides, phenolic compounds, steroids, tannins, and terpenoids. Our results also revealed that the water fraction had the highest antioxidant activity compared to the methanol extract and other fractions. The methanol and the fractionated extracts (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and water) of P. macrocarpa seeds were also investigated for their cytotoxic effects on selected human cancer cells lines (MCF-7, HT-29, MDA-MB231, Ca Ski, and SKOV-3) and a normal human fibroblast lung cell line (MRC-5). Information from this study can be applied for future pharmacological and therapeutic evaluations of the species, and may assist in the standardization for quality, purity, and sample identification. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the phytochemical screening and cytotoxic effect of the crude and fractionated extracts of P. macrocarpa seeds on selected cells lines. PMID:24818141

  13. Salt tolerance of Beta macrocarpa is associated with efficient osmotic adjustment and increased apoplastic water content.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, I; Badri, M; Mejri, M; Cruz, C; Siddique, K H M; Hessini, K

    2016-05-01

    The chenopod Beta macrocarpa Guss (wild Swiss chard) is known for its salt tolerance, but the mechanisms involved are still debated. In order to elucidate the processes involved, we grew wild Swiss chard exposed to three salinity levels (0, 100 and 200 mm NaCl) for 45 days, and determined several physiological parameters at the end of this time. All plants survived despite reductions in growth, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in plants exposed to salinity (100 and 200 mm NaCl). As expected, the negative effects of salinity were more pronounced at 200 mm than at 100 mm NaCl: (i) leaf apoplastic water content was maintained or increased despite a significant reduction in leaf water potential, revealing the halophytic character of B. macrocarpa; (ii) osmotic adjustment occurred, which presumably enhanced the driving force for water extraction from soil, and avoided toxic build up of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the mesophyll apoplast of leaves. Osmotic adjustment mainly occurred through accumulation of inorganic ions and to a lesser extent soluble sugars; proline was not implicated in osmotic adjustment. Overall, two important mechanisms of salt tolerance in B. macrocarpa were identified: osmotic and apoplastic water adjustment.

  14. Isoform characterisation, heterologous expression and functional analysis of two lectins from Vatairea macrocarpa.

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, João Garcia; do Nascimento, Antonia Sâmia Fernandes; Gondim, Ana Cláudia Silva; Pereira, Ronniery Hilario; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2013-11-01

    VML is a lectin from Vatairea macrocarpa seeds that has various biological activities. Here, we describe three new lectin isoforms from V. macrocarpa identified through genomic DNA analysis. One of these isoforms has high similarity to VML, while another that has noteworthy differences. We have denoted the new isoforms as VML-2, VML-3 and VML-4. Recombinant VML (rVML) and VML-2 (rVML-2) were expressed in Escherichia coli and were anticipated to have similar biological activity compared to native VML. Recombinant lectins were produced using a synthetic gene strategy to improve the expression levels. We obtained two active recombinant lectin isoforms from V. macrocarpa, and there was no significant difference between their biological activities. The conservation between carbohydrate-binding sites of recombinant and native proteins was demonstrated by specific inhibition of hemagglutin activity by D-galactose and lactose. However, no inhibition was observed in the presence of glucose and mannose. Our data show that the recombinant lectins VML and VML-2 are active and capable of recognising D-galactose and lactose. Moreover, the absence of glycosylation does not interfere with their biological activity.

  15. Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory and Cytotoxicity of Phaleria macrocarpa (Boerl.) Scheff Fruit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl (Thymelaceae) originates from Papua Island, Indonesia and grows in tropical areas. The different parts of the fruit of P. macrocarpa were evaluated for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities. Methods Phaleria macrocarpa fruit were divided into pericarp, mesocarp and seed. All parts of the fruit were reflux extracted with methanol. The antioxidant activity of the extracts were characterized in various in vitro model systems such as FTC, TBA, DPPH radical, reducing power and NO radical. Anti-inflammatory assays were done by using NO production by macrophage RAW 264.7 cell lines induced by LPS/IFN-γ and cytotoxic activities were determined by using several cancer cell lines and one normal cell line Results The results showed that different parts (pericarp, mesocarp, and seed) of Phaleria macrocarpa fruit contain various amount of total phenolic (59.2 ± 0.04, 60.5 ± 0.17, 47.7 ± 1.04 mg gallic acid equivalent/g DW) and flavonoid compounds (161.3 ± 1.58, 131.7 ± 1.66, 35.9 ± 2.47 mg rutin equivalent/g DW). Pericarp and mesocarp showed high antioxidant activities by using DPPH (71.97%, 62.41%), ferric reducing antioxidant power (92.35%, 78.78%) and NO scavenging activity (65.68%, 53.45%). Ferric thiocyanate and thiobarbituric acid tests showed appreciable antioxidant activity in the percentage hydroperoxides inhibitory activity from pericarp and mesocarp in the last day of the assay. Similarly, the pericarp and mesocarp inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthesis with values of 63.4 ± 1.4% and 69.5 ± 1.4% in macrophage RAW 264.7 cell lines induced by LPS/IFN-γ indicating their notable anti-inflammatory potential. Cytotoxic activities against HT-29, MCF-7, HeLa and Chang cell lines were observed in all parts. Conclusions These results indicated the possible application of P. macrocarpa fruit as a source of bioactive compounds, potent as an antioxidant, anti inflammatory and cytotoxic agents. PMID

  16. The Operculina macrocarpa (l.) urb. (jalapa) tincture modulates human blood platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Pierdoná, Taiana Magalhães; Lima, Nathalia Rocha; Rodrigues, Raony Cássio Millet; Teixeira, Jonas Pires; Gonçalves, Romélia Pinheiro; Fontenele, Juvenia Bezerra; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Operculina macrocarpa is an ornamental climbing plant of the Northeastern Brazil extensively used in traditional medicine as depurative of the blood and for the treatment of thrombosis. To investigate the antiplatelet and anticoagulant potential of Operculina macrocarpa and to determine the possible mechanisms of action. The Operculina macrocarpa tincture (OMT) was characterized by the polyphenol content and chromatographic profile established by HPLC with detection and quantification of three phenol acids (caffeic, clorogenic and gallic acids). The human platelet aggregation was induced in vitro by the agonists ADP, collagen, thrombin, epinephrine or arachidonic acid, and the antiplatelet effect of OMT was evaluated in the presence or absence of aspirin (a nonselective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase), pentoxifylline (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), ticlopidine (a P2Y12 purinoceptor antagonist) or ODQ (a selective inhibitor of guanilate cyclase). The effect of OMT on the partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time and bleeding time were investigated on human or rat plasma. The strongest antiplatelet effect of OMT (50-400 µg/mL) was observed on the ADP- induced aggregation with inhibitions up to 55%, while among others agonists (epinephrine, collagen, thrombin and arachidonic acid) maximal inhibitions reached by OMT (200 µg/mL) were on platelet aggregation induced by collagen (18%) or epinephrine (20%). The antiplatelet effect of OMT (400 µg/mL) was comparable to aspirin, a nonspecific inhibitor of cyclooxygenase. The ticlopidine and pentoxifylline increased 5.1 and 3.8 fold the inhibitory effect of OMT on ADP-induced platelet aggregation, respectively. On the other hand, l-arginine, ODQ and aspirin showed a slightly or no effect on antiplatelet effect of OMT. The bleeding time in rats was significantly increased by OMT, but the tincture did not interfere on the activated partial thromboplastin or prothrombin time in human plasma. This study showed that the

  17. Duboscic acid: a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor with an unprecedented triterpenoidal carbon skeleton from Duboscia macrocarpa.

    PubMed

    Wafo, Pascal; Kamdem, Ramsay S T; Ali, Zulfiqar; Anjum, Shazia; Khan, Shamsun Nahar; Begum, Afshan; Krohn, Karsten; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-12-17

    Duboscic acid (1), a triterpenoid with a unique carbon backbone, was isolated from Duboscia macrocarpa Bocq. It is the first member of a new class of triterpenoids, for which the name "dubosane" is proposed. Duboscic acid has a potent α-glucosidase inhibition, and its structure was unambiguously deduced by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study.

  18. Testicular morphology of male rats exposed to Phaleria macrocarpa (Mahkota dewa) aqueous extract

    PubMed Central

    Parhizkar, Saadat; Zulkifli, Suriani Binti; Dollah, Mohammad Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): This study was designed to investigate the effect of Phaleria macrocarpa aqueous extract (PM) on spermatogenesis by observing the histological changes of testes in adult male rats. Materials and Methods: PM was prepared by boiling the dried slices of P. macrocarpa fruits followed by filtering, centrifugation and freeze-drying to obtain the powder form. Eighteen Sprague Dawley adult male rats were divided into three groups (six in each group), designated as treatment (240 mg/kg PM), negative control (distilled water) and positive control (4mg/kg testosterone) and administered via intragastric gavage for seven weeks. In the sixth week of supplementation period, each male rat was introduced to five female rats. Afterward, all rats were sacrificed and the testes were removed for histological studies. Results: PM significantly increased the number of cell and the thickness of seminiferous tubules of male rats (P<0.05). However, there was no significant effect on the volume and size of testes. The mean of spermatogonia cells numbers of PM groups differed significantly from the negative and positive groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: PM showed potential value as an attractive alternative for improving sexual strength by increasing the number of spermatogonia cell and the thickness of the seminiferous tubules. Perhaps, PM could be suggested to be one of the herbal remedies that can improve men fertility. The results may have some clinical implication in the management of infertility. PMID:24967068

  19. Effects of pre-treatments and temperature on seed viability and germination of Juniperus macrocarpa Sm.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Maria Silvia; Mattana, Efisio; Cañadas, Eva Maria; Bacchetta, Gianluigi

    2014-05-01

    The effects of collecting season, collection site, laboratory pre-treatments and temperatures on seed viability and germination of Juniperus macrocarpa were investigated. Ripe cones were collected in four Sardinian dune systems, in two seasons, from plant and soil. Warm (W) and cold (C) stratifications, two combinations of them (W+C, C+W), and no pre-treatment (0) were applied. Seeds were incubated in a range of constant (10-25°C) and an alternating (25/10°C) temperature regime. Seed viability was low (ca. 40%) and varied significantly according to the collecting season. Seed germination was also low (ca. 10%), the 0 and W were the most effective pre-treatments on stimulating germination. The best germination temperature, without any pre-treatment, was 15°C (ca. 20%). J. macrocarpa seeds are dormant and the achieved results suggested that the presence of secondary dormancy is induced by cold stratification. Spring appeared to be the best season for seed collecting, whereas autumn was the best for sowing. These results give new findings for restoration activities on this species. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Antiproliferative evaluation of terpenoids and terpenoid coumarins from Ferulago macrocarpa (Fenzl) Boiss. fruits

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Seyed-Ebrahim; Jamali, Maryam; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Abdi, Gisya; Shahbazi, Behzad; Fattahi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ferulago macrocarpa is a plant used as flavoring agent and protectant in the food industry and as a folk medicinal plant in Iran with no available information on its chemical identity. Ferulago spp. showed to contain biologically terpenoids and coumarins. Objective: The objective was to isolate and characterize terpenoids and coumarins from the acetone extract of F. macrocarpa fruits and to evaluate their antiproliferative effects on several cell lines. Materials and Methods: A series of normal and reverse phase gravity and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses were used to purify constituents. Compounds 1–5 and 7 were evaluated for their cytotoxic effects on MCF-7, HT-29 and H-1299 cell lines. Results: Six compounds including bornyl acetate (1), 1,10-di-epi-cubenol (2), stigmasterol (3) and three coumarins grandivittin (4), prantschimgin (5) and 4”-hydroxygrandivittin (7) along with mixtures of feruloyl derivatives (6a-6c) have been purified. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods including nuclear magnetic resonance and MS analyses. Compound 2 showed moderate cytotoxicity effect with IC50 values of 5.0 and 6.7 mM on MCF-7 and HT-29, respectively. Conclusion: 1,10-di-epi-Cubenol could be considered as a potential proliferation inhibitor of MCF-7 and HT-29 cell lines. PMID:26692745

  1. Sex-related growth and secondary compounds in Juniperus oxycedrus macrocarpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massei, Giovanna; Watkins, Richard; Hartley, Susan E.

    2006-03-01

    Gender-related differences in growth and concentration of secondary metabolites have been documented in dioecious plants. Males usually grow faster than females, whilst females allocate more resources to reproduction and chemical defences than males, hence their growth is reduced. This hypothesis was tested on prickly juniper ( Juniperus oxycedrus macrocarpa), a Mediterranean evergreen tree. The results showed that males grew faster than females but also had higher concentrations of both phenolics and terpenoids. However, neither phenolic nor terpenoid concentrations were correlated with growth in either sex, nor with a "reproductive effort" index in female trees. No browsing occurred on any of the trees sampled. Contrary to predictions, this study suggests that allocation of resources to reproduction in plants may reduce the resources available to both growth and secondary compounds. This might be particularly pronounced in plants with "expensive" fruits, such as prickly juniper, characterised by relatively large, long-lived fruits.

  2. Mechanism of anti-hyperglycemic action of Vatairea macrocarpa (Leguminosae): investigation in peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Baviloni, Paula Domingues; dos Santos, Maísa Pavani; Aiko, Gustavo Mitsuo; Reis, Silvia Regina de Lima; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; da Silva, Virginia Claudia; Dall'Oglio, Evandro Luiz; de Sousa, Paulo Teixeira; Lopes, Carbene França; Baviera, Amanda Martins; Kawashita, Nair Honda

    2010-08-19

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the treatment of diabetic rats during 21 days with V. macrocarpa stem-bark ethanolic extract (VmE), reduced glycemia, urinary glucose and urea, increased liver glycogen content and improved other parameters diabetes related. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the anti-hyperglycemic mechanisms of VmE could be caused by improvement in the insulin signaling pathway in the peripheral tissues (liver, adipose and skeletal muscle). Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were separated into two groups: diabetic control (DC) and diabetic treated with VmE (DT) during 21 days. The alterations on the insulin signaling in liver, retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RET) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were investigated through determination of insulin receptor (IR), protein kinase B/AKT content and AKT phosphorylation levels using Western blotting analysis. This same methodology was used to evaluate the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) levels in the liver from these animals. The treatment with the extract increased the content of IR and the basal phosphorylation of AKT in the three tissues. In the liver from diabetic treated group, the insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation was higher and the PEPCK protein levels were reduced. Data from this work suggest that the anti-hyperglycemic activity of stem-bark extract of V. macrocarpa can occur through stimulation of insulin signaling pathways in peripheral tissues from diabetic rats, mainly in liver and adipose tissue, probably promoting increase in the glucose uptake and liver glycogen synthesis. The concomitant decreasing in hepatic PEPCK levels could be associated to inhibition of gluconeogenesis, which can also contribute to glycemia reduction. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modulation of the Antibiotic Activity by Extracts from Amburana cearensis A. C. Smith and Anadenanthera macrocarpa (Benth.) Brenan

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo, Fernando G.; Ferreira, Emerson O.; Lucena, Bruno F. F.; Torres, Cícero M. G.; Lucetti, Daniel L.; Lucetti, Elaine C. P.; Silva, João Marcos F. L.; Santos, Francisco A. V.; Medeiros, Cássio R.; Oliveira, Gardênia M. M.; Colares, Aracélio V.; Costa, José G. M.; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.; Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Silva, Júlio C. F.; Kerntopf, Marta R.; Figueiredo, Patrícia R. L.; Matias, Edinardo F. F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the possible interactions between ethanol extracts of Amburana cearensis A. C. Smith and Anadenanthera macrocarpa (Benth.) Brenan, combined with six antimicrobial drugs against multiresistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli isolated from humans. The antibacterial activity of the extracts was determined using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The microdilution assay was performed to verify the interactions between the natural products and the antibiotics using a subinhibitory concentration. The activity of amikacin associated with the extract of Anadenanthera macrocarpa against EC 27 was enhanced, demonstrating an MIC reduction from 128 to 4 μg/mL. Among the β-lactams, no potentiation on its activity was observed, with exception to the antagonism of the natural products with ampicillin against S. aureus 358. PMID:23509756

  4. Chemosystematic value of flavonoids from Crataegus x macrocarpa (Rosaceae) with special emphasis on (R)- and (S)-eriodictyol-7-O-glucuronide and luteolin-7-O-glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Ringl, Alexandra; Prinz, Sonja; Huefner, Antje; Kurzmann, Michael; Kopp, Brigitte

    2007-02-01

    The chemotaxonomic investigation of Crataegus x macrocarpa, a hybrid of C. laevigata and C. rhipidophylla, presents the qualitative and quantitative composition of its flavonoid pattern in relationship to its parent species for the first time. Six flavonoids were identified as vitexin-2''-O-rhamnoside (1), vitexin (2), isovitexin (3), rutin (4), hyperoside (5), and isoquercitrin (6). Furthermore, two flavonoids were isolated from C. x macrocarpa and identified as a diastereoisomeric mixture of (R)- and (S)-eriodictyol-7-O-beta-D-glucuronide (7) and luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronide (8) by means of 1D- and 2D-NMR, MS, and UV experiments. Compounds 7 and 8 were isolated for the first time from Crataegus species. While missing in C. laevigata, their occurrence in C. rhipidophylla additionally emphasizes its chemotaxonomic relationship to C. x macrocarpa.

  5. Antiproliferative and Antiestrogenic Activities of Bonediol an Alkyl Catechol from Bonellia macrocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Moo-Puc, Rosa; Caamal-Fuentes, Edgar; Peraza-Sánchez, Sergio R.; Slusarz, Anna; Jackson, Glenn; Drenkhahn, Sara K.; Lubahn, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate antiproliferative activity of bonediol, an alkyl catechol isolated from the Mayan medicinal plant Bonellia macrocarpa. Bonediol was assessed for growth inhibition of androgen-sensitive (LNCaP), androgen-insensitive (PC-3), and metastatic androgen-insensitive (PC-3M) human prostate tumor cells; toxicity on normal cell line (HEK 293) was also evaluated. Hedgehog pathway was evaluated and competitive 3H-estradiol ligand binding assay was performed. Additionally, antioxidant activity on Nrf2-ARE pathway was evaluated. Bonediol induced a growth inhibition on prostate cancer cell lines (IC50 from 8.5 to 20.6 µM). Interestingly, bonediol binds to both estrogen receptors (ERα (2.5 µM) and ERβ (2.1 µM)) and displaces the native ligand E2 (17β-estradiol). No significant activity was found in the Hedgehog pathway. Additionally, activity of bonediol on Nrf2-ARE pathway suggested that bonediol could induce oxidative stress and activation of detoxification enzymes at 1 µM (3.8-fold). We propose that the compound bonediol may serve as a potential chemopreventive treatment with therapeutic potential against prostate cancer. PMID:26557704

  6. Seasonally dynamic fungal communities in the Quercus macrocarpa phyllosphere differ between urban and nonurban environments.

    PubMed

    Jumpponen, A; Jones, K L

    2010-04-01

    *The fungal richness, diversity and community composition in the Quercus macrocarpa phyllosphere were compared across a growing season in trees located in six stands within and outside a small urban center using 454-sequencing and DNA tagging. The approaches did not differentiate between endophytic and epiphytic fungal communities. *Fungi accumulated in the phyllosphere rapidly and communities were temporally dynamic, with more than a third of the analyzed operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and half of the BLAST-inferred genera showing distinct seasonal patterns. The seasonal patterns could be explained by fungal life cycles or environmental tolerances. *The communities were hyperdiverse and differed between the urban and nonurban stands, albeit not consistently across the growing season. Foliar macronutrients (nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and sulfur (S)), micronutrients (boron (B), manganese (Mn) and selenium (Se)) and trace elements (cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn)) were enriched in the urban trees, probably as a result of anthropogenic activities. Because of correlations with the experimental layout, these chemical elements should not be considered as community drivers without further empirical studies. *We suggest that a combination of mechanisms leads to differences between urban and nonurban communities. Among those are stand isolation and size, nutrient and pollutant accumulation plus stand management, including fertilization and litter removal.

  7. Antitrypanosomal Acetylene Fatty Acid Derivatives from the Seeds of Porcelia macrocarpa (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    de Á Santos, Luciana; Cavalheiro, Alberto J; Tempone, Andre G; Correa, Daniela S; Alexandre, Tatiana R; Quintiliano, Natalia F; Rodrigues-Oliveira, André F; Oliveira-Silva, Diogo; Martins, Roberto Carlos C; Lago, João Henrique G

    2015-05-07

    Chagas' disease is caused by a parasitic protozoan and affects the poorest population in the world, causing high mortality and morbidity. As a result of the toxicity and long duration of current treatments, the discovery of novel and more efficacious drugs is crucial. In this work, the hexane extract from seeds of Porcelia macrocarpa R.E. Fries (Annonaceae) displayed in vitro antitrypanosomal activity against trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi by the colorimetric MTT assay (IC50 of 65.44 μg/mL). Using chromatographic fractionation over SiO2, this extract afforded a fraction composed by one active compound (IC50 of 10.70 µg/mL), which was chemically characterized as 12,14-octadecadiynoic acid (macrocarpic acid). Additionally, two new inactive acetylene compounds (α,α'-dimacro-carpoyl-β-oleylglycerol and α-macrocarpoyl-α'-oleylglycerol) were also isolated from the hexane extract. The complete characterization of the isolated compounds was performed by analysis of NMR and MS data as well as preparation of derivatives.

  8. An evaluation of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) decline in the urban forest of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catton, H.A.; St., George; Remphrey, W.R.

    2007-01-01

    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, has a large, indigenous population of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.). In the 1980s, many of these trees were showing signs of decline, a disease caused by a complex of abiotic and secondary biotic stressing agents. Potential causal factors were investigated by comparing various aspects of 120 bur oaks visually rated as healthy or declined based on crown dieback levels. The results indicated that many selected bur oak trees predated surrounding urban development and that declined trees were significantly older with more severe stem wounds and competition from surrounding trees than healthy specimens. Average annual growth ring widths of healthy and declined trees were similar in the early part of the 20th century. However, decline actually began decades before symptoms were noticed, coinciding with a period of in tense city-wide urban development, as growth of declined trees was slower than that of healthy trees beginning sporadically in the 1940s and consistently from 1974 to 2001. During the early years of decline, the year-by-year separation in ring width between the two categories was significantly positively related to precipitation levels. This suggested that in wet years, declined trees may have been surrounded by unfavorable water-logged soils, possibly as a result of natural drainage patterns being impeded by urban development. ?? 2007 International Society of Arboriculture.

  9. Phytochemical constituents, nutritional values, phenolics, flavonols, flavonoids, antioxidant and cytotoxicity studies on Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl fruits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The edible fruits of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl are widely used in traditional medicine in Indonesia. It is used to treat a variety of medical conditions such as - cancer, diabetes mellitus, allergies, liver and heart diseases, kidney failure, blood diseases, high blood pressure, stroke, various skin diseases, itching, aches, and flu. Therefore, it is of great interest to determine the biochemical and cytotoxic properties of the fruit extracts. Methods The methanol, hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and water extracts of P. macrocarpa fruits were examined for phytochemicals, physicochemicals, flavonols, flavonoids and phenol content. Its nutritional value (A.O.A.C method), antioxidant properties (DPPH assay) and cytotoxicity (MTT cell proliferation assay) were also determined. Results A preliminary phyotochemical screening of the different crude extracts from the fruits of P. macrocarpa showed the presence secondary metabolites such as of flavonoids, phenols, saponin glycosides and tannins. The ethyl acetate and methanol extracts displayed high antioxidant acitivity (IC50 value of 8.15±0.02 ug/mL) in the DPPH assay comparable to that of the standard gallic acid (IC50 value of 10.8±0.02 ug/mL). Evaluation of cytotoxic activity showed that the crude methanol extract possessed excellent anti-proliferative activity against SKOV-3 (IC50 7.75±2.56 μg/mL) after 72 hours of treatment whilst the hexane and ethyl acetate extracts displayed good cytotoxic effect against both SKOV-3 and MDA-MB231 cell lines. The chloroform extract however, showed selective inhibitory activity in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231 (IC50 7.80±1.57 μg/mL) after 48 hours of treatment. There was no cytotoxic effect observed in the Ca Ski cell line and the two normal cell lines (MRC-5 and WRL-68). Conclusion The methanol extract and the ethyl acetate fraction of P. macrocarpa fruits exhibited good nutritional values, good antioxidant and cytotoxic activities, and merits

  10. Light response of hydraulic conductance in bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) leaves.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Mihaela C; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Tyree, Melvin T

    2008-07-01

    A four- to seven-fold enhancement of leaf hydraulic conductance by light has been reported in three temperate tree species. The enhancement occurs in the liquid-flow pathway between the petiole and the site of water evaporation. The enhancement occurs within 1 h, and dissipates in darkness over a period of 1 to 10 h depending on species. Here we report light-induced enhancement of leaf hydraulic conductance in a fourth species, bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.), the dependence of the effect on light flux and color, its absence in leaves of seedlings, and the impact on the response of leaf vein severance and several metabolic inhibitors. The light response of leaf hydraulic conductance approached saturation at a photosynthetic photon flux of 150 mumol m(-2) s(-1). Hydraulic enhancement was greater in response to blue and green light than to visible radiation of longer wavelengths, although at the same irradiance, the response to white light was greater than to light of any single color. Atrazine (a photosystem II inhibitor), fusicoccin (which stimulates plasma membrane-bound H(+)-ATPase) and HgCl(2) (an aquaporin blocker) reduced the light response of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance. When 2-mercaptoethanol was added following mercury treatment, the light response was totally suppressed. Our results are consistent with the notion that the effect of light on leaf lamina hydraulic conductance is controlled by factors acting outside the leaf veins, possibly through light-induced changes in membrane permeability of either mesophyll or bundle sheath cells, or both.

  11. The role of prescribed burning in regenerating Quercus macrocarpa and associated woody plants in stringer woodlands in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Henry A. Wright

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the range of Quercus macrocarpa, fire historically played an important role in maintaining Quercus stands. However, little is known about the role of fire in maintaining stringer Quercus stands on the western edge of its distribution. This research suggests that prescribed burning could be used to rejuvenate woody plants...

  12. Drivers of radial growth and carbon isotope discrimination of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) across continental gradients in precipitation, vapour pressure deficit and irradiance

    Treesearch

    Steven L. Voelker; Frederick C. Meinzer; Barbara Lachenbruch; J. Renee Brooks; Richard P. Guyette

    2014-01-01

    Tree-ring characteristics are commonly used to reconstruct climate variables, but divergence from the assumption of a single biophysical control may reduce the accuracy of these reconstructions. Here, we present data from bur oaks (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) sampled within and beyond the current species bioclimatic envelope to identify the primary...

  13. Grandivittin as a natural minor groove binder extracted from Ferulago macrocarpa to ct-DNA, experimental and in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, F; Valadbeigi, S; Sajjadi, S E; Shokoohinia, Y; Azizian, H; Taheripak, G

    2016-10-25

    Ferulago macrocarpa (Fenzl) Boiss., is an endemic medicinal herb of Iran. In this study a dihydrofuranocoumarin called grandivittin (GRA) was separate and purified from Ferulago macrocarpa (Fenzl) Boiss, and characterized by (1)H NMR and Mass spectroscopic methods. The electrochemical behavior of GRA was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The interaction of GRA with calf thymus double strand deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA), was evaluated by CV, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), fluorescence, UV-Vis, FT-IR and molecular modeling methods. The thermodynamic parameters of GRA-DNA complex were measured and reported as: ΔH = 15.04 kJ mol(-1), ΔS = 105.54 J mol(-1) and ΔG = -15.62 kJ mol(-1). Docking simulation was performed to investigate the probable binding mode of GRA to various DNA, too. The polymerase extension study was performed using real-time PCR to confirm the inhibitory effect of GRA on polymerase extension activity as a mirror of binding to ct-DNA. However, all data showed that the grooves binding especially minor groove between GRA and ct-DNA is more predominant rather than other binding modes.

  14. Management of Madhumehajanya Vrana (diabetic wound) with Katupila (Securinega leucopyrus [Willd] Muell.) Kalka

    PubMed Central

    Ajmeer, Ahamed Shahan; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Prevalence of diabetes and its complications have been a burden to the society from the ancient times, in the present and also will be in the future unless proper measures are taken to prevent its manifestation. There have been an increasing number of death associated-amputation cases which are mainly caused by nonhealing wounds. These facts urge researchers to develop new, more effective wound treatments for diabetic patients. Aim: To evaluate and compare the effect of Katupila Kalka (Securinega leucopyrus [Willd.] Muell. leaf paste) and Tila Taila (Sesamum indicum oil) in Madhumehajanya Vrana (diabetic wounds/ulcers) with Betadine ointment. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 patients of Madhumehajanya Vrana were chosen and randomly divided into two groups (Group A and B). Patients of Group A were treated with local application of Katupila Kalka with Tila Taila, whereas, in Group B, Betadine ointment was applied on the affected parts, once a day in the morning for 30 days. The relief in signs and symptoms were assessed on scoring pattern. Results: In Group A, diabetic wounds treated with Katupila paste got healed within 28 days with minimal scar formation without any complications, whereas in Group B, wound was healed completely only in two patients within 28 days. In both the groups, no patients reported any adverse drug reaction during the entire course of treatment as well as in follow-up period. Conclusion: Study concluded that the drug Katupila Kalka possesses Vrana Ropana (wound healing) activity with fine scaring. PMID:27313426

  15. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Leaf Extract of Mallotus repandus (Willd.) Muell. Arg.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Mahadi; Uddin, Nizam; Hasan, Md. Rakib; Islam, A. F. M. Mahmudul; Hossain, Md. Monir; Rahman, Akib Bin; Hossain, Md. Sazzad; Chowdhury, Ishtiaque Ahmed; Rana, Md. Sohel

    2014-01-01

    In folk medicine Mallotus repandus (Willd.) Muell. Arg. is used to treat muscle pain, itching, fever, rheumatic arthritis, snake bite, hepatitis, and liver cirrhosis. This study aimed to evaluate the antinociceptive as well as the anti-inflammatory activities of the methanol extract of leaf. The leaves were extracted with methanol following hot extraction and tested for the presence of phytochemical constituents. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated using acetic acid induced writhing test, xylene induced ear edema, cotton pellet induced granuloma, and tail immersion methods at doses of 500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg body weight. The presence of flavonoids, saponins, and tannins was identified in the extract. The extract exhibited considerable antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities against four classical models of pain. In acetic acid induced writhing, xylene induced ear edema, and cotton pellet granuloma models, the extract revealed dose dependent activity. Additionally, it increased latency time in tail immersion model. It can be concluded that M. repandus possesses significant antinociceptive potential. These findings suggest that this plant can be used as a potential source of new antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory candidates. The activity of methanol extract is most likely mediated through central and peripheral inhibitory mechanisms. This study justified the traditional use of leaf part of this plant. PMID:25629031

  16. Hybanthus enneaspermus (L.) F. Muell: a concise report on its phytopharmacological aspects.

    PubMed

    Patel, D K; Kumar, R; Sairam, K; Hemalatha, S

    2013-05-01

    Hybanthus enneaspermus (L.) F. Muell belonging to the family Violaceae, popularly known as Ratanpurus (Hindi) is a herb or a shrub distributed in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. In the Ayurvedic literature, the plant is reported to cure conditions of "Kapha" and "Pitta", urinary calculi, strangury, painful dysentery, vomiting, burning sensation, wandering of the mind, urethral discharge, blood trouble, asthma, epilepsy, cough, and to give tone to the breasts. Phytochemically, the plant contains a considerable amount of dipeptide alkaloids, aurantiamide acetate, isoarborinol, and β-sitosterol, sugars, flavonoids, steroids, triterpenes, phenols, flavones, catachins, tannins, anthraquinones and amino acids. Pharmacologically, the plant is reported to possess antidiabetic, antiplasmodial, antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, nephroprotective, aphrodisiac, hepatoprotective, antiinflammatory, aldose reductase inhibitory and free radical scavenging activities. The information provided in this review will be worthwhile to know the applicability of H. enneaspermus for the treatment of various acute or chronic diseases with a diverse nature of phytoconstituents. The overall data in this review article were collected from various scientific sources on the research of H. enneaspermus. Copyright © 2013 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hexane soluble extract of Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Muell. Arg. root possesses anti-leukaemic activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Muell. Arg. is a well known medicinal plant of Asia and Australia. Various compounds from different aerial parts of the plant have been reported possessing potent pharmacological, antiviral, antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. We were interested to determine the effects of some root extracts from M. philippensis on human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cell proliferation, cell cycle regulators and apoptosis in order to investigate its anti-leukemic potential. Results Root extract of M. philippensis was initially extracted in organic solvents, hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The hexane extract showed highest toxicity against p53-deficient HL-60 cells (IC50 1.5 mg dry roots equivalent/ml medium) after 72 h and interestingly, inhibition of cell proliferation was preceded by the upregulation of the proto-oncogenes Cdc25A and cyclin D1 within 24 h. The hexane extract induced 18% apoptosis after 48 h of treatment. Chemical composition of the hexane extract was analyzed by GC-MS and the 90% fragments were matched with polyphenolic compounds. Conclusions The present study confirms that the hexane fraction of M. philippensis root extract possesses anti-leukemic activity in HL-60 cells. The polyphenols were the main compounds of the hexane extract that inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis. PMID:24041220

  18. Identification of antibacterial constituents from the indigenous Australian medicinal plant Eremophila duttonii F. Muell. (Myoporaceae).

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua E; Tucker, David; Watson, Kenneth; Jones, Graham Lloyd

    2007-06-13

    This paper reports on the isolation and identification of antibacterial constituents from the indigenous Australian medicinal plant Eremophila duttonii F. Muell. (Myoporaceae). Preparations derived from this plant are used by indigenous populations in the topical treatment of minor wounds, otitis and ocular complaints, and as a gargle for sore throat. Several authors have reported extracts of this plant to effect rapid bacteriolysis and inhibit growth of a wide range of Gram-positive micro-organisms. In other studies involving screening of native medicinal plants for antibacterial activity, extracts of Eremophila duttonii have been reported to consistently exhibit the highest potency amongst all species included. From a hexane extract, we identified two diterpenes of the serrulatane class, the principal constituents responsible for antibacterial activity and present as major constituents of the resinous leaf cuticle: serrulat-14-en-7,8,20-triol (1) and serrulat-14-en-3,7,8,20-tetraol (2). In addition, a hydroxylated furanosesquiterpene with mild antibacterial activity which appeared to be a novel compound was isolated from the extract and tentatively identified as 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-1-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-5-methyl[2,3'-bifuran]-5-yl) pentan-2-one. Minimum inhibitory concentrations for each of the compounds against three Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213), Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (ARL 10582), were determined using a micro-titre plate broth dilution assay.

  19. Chemical composition and biological activities of trans-Himalayan alga Spirogyra porticalis (Muell.) Cleve.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jatinder; Dhar, Priyanka; Tayade, Amol B; Gupta, Damodar; Chaurasia, Om P; Upreti, Dalip K; Toppo, Kiran; Arora, Rajesh; Suseela, M R; Srivastava, Ravi B

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater alga Spirogyra porticalis (Muell.) Cleve, a filamentous charophyte, collected from the Indian trans-Himalayan cold desert, was identified on the basis of morpho-anatomical characters. Extracts of this alga were made using solvents of varying polarity viz. n-hexane, acetonitrile, methanol and water. The antioxidant capacities and phenolic profile of the extracts were estimated. The methanol extract showing highest antioxidant capacity and rich phenolic attributes was further investigated and phytochemical profiling was conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) hyphenated technique. The cytotoxic activity of methanol extract was evaluated on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and colon carcinoma RKO cell lines. The anti-hypoxic effect of methanol extract of the alga was tested on in vivo animal system to confirm its potential to ameliorate oxidative stress. The antioxidant assays viz. ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging capacities, β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching property and lipid peroxidation exhibited analogous results, wherein the algal extracts showed significantly high antioxidant potential. The extracts were also found to possess high content of total proanthocyanidin, flavonoid and polyphenol. GC/MS analysis revealed the presence of thirteen chemotypes in the methanol extract representing different phytochemical groups like fatty acid esters, sterols, unsaturated alcohols, alkynes etc. with substantial phyto-pharmaceutical importance. The methanol extract was observed to possess anticancer activity as revealed from studies on HepG2 and RKO cell lines. In the present study, S. porticalis methanol extract also provided protection from hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and accelerated the onset of adaptative changes in rats during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The

  20. Recent trends in phytochemistry, ethnobotany and pharmacological significance of Alchornea cordifolia (Schumach. & Thonn.) Muell. Arg.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Pone Kamdem; Ferreira, Sabrina Baptista; Kaiser, Carlos Roland

    2016-09-15

    Alchornea cordifolia (Schumach. & Thonn.) Muell. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) (A. cordifolia) is widely distributed throughout tropical Africa, where it is used extensively in traditional medicine. Conditions for which the plant has enjoyed wide use are: coughs, gonorrhoea, infertility, prostatitis, bacterial infections, diarrhoea, ulcers, pain, inflammation, fever and bronchial troubles. This review summarizes the achievements of the investigations in traditional uses, ethnobotany, phytochemistry, biological activities and toxicological profile of A. cordifolia; this review also describes the shortcomings of studies on this herbal drug and thus serves as the basis of further scientific research and development of this traditional herbal drug. A. cordifolia-related information was collected from various resources including published articles in peer-reviewed journals, unpublished materials, textbooks, government survey reports and scientific databases such as Scifinder®, Pubmed, Science Direct, Wiley, Springer, ACS, Scielo, Web of Science and other web search instruments (Google, Yahoo), published on the subject from 1950 to 2016. 'The Plant List' (www.theplantlist.org) and 'Kew Royal Botanic Gardens' (mpns.kew.org) were used to validate the scientific name of the plant. The literature revealed several reports on traditional uses, biological activities, chemical constituents and toxicological evaluation of A. cordifolia. The phytochemical information indicates identification of 95 compounds including fatty acids, terpenoids, flavonoids, phenolic acids, alkaloids, which exhibited various pharmacological activities such as wound healing, anti-inflammation, anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulation, antidiarrhoeal, antimicrobial, antidepressant, hepatoprotective, antiplasmodial and anxiolytic. However, there are still significant gaps in the completeness of our understanding of A. cordifolia bioactivity, therapeutic value, and roles played by each of the numerous

  1. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Trans-Himalayan Alga Spirogyra porticalis (Muell.) Cleve

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jatinder; Dhar, Priyanka; Tayade, Amol B.; Gupta, Damodar; Chaurasia, Om P.; Upreti, Dalip K.; Toppo, Kiran; Arora, Rajesh; Suseela, M. R.; Srivastava, Ravi B.

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater alga Spirogyra porticalis (Muell.) Cleve, a filamentous charophyte, collected from the Indian trans-Himalayan cold desert, was identified on the basis of morpho-anatomical characters. Extracts of this alga were made using solvents of varying polarity viz. n-hexane, acetonitrile, methanol and water. The antioxidant capacities and phenolic profile of the extracts were estimated. The methanol extract showing highest antioxidant capacity and rich phenolic attributes was further investigated and phytochemical profiling was conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) hyphenated technique. The cytotoxic activity of methanol extract was evaluated on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and colon carcinoma RKO cell lines. The anti-hypoxic effect of methanol extract of the alga was tested on in vivo animal system to confirm its potential to ameliorate oxidative stress. The antioxidant assays viz. ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging capacities, β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching property and lipid peroxidation exhibited analogous results, wherein the algal extracts showed significantly high antioxidant potential. The extracts were also found to possess high content of total proanthocyanidin, flavonoid and polyphenol. GC/MS analysis revealed the presence of thirteen chemotypes in the methanol extract representing different phytochemical groups like fatty acid esters, sterols, unsaturated alcohols, alkynes etc. with substantial phyto-pharmaceutical importance. The methanol extract was observed to possess anticancer activity as revealed from studies on HepG2 and RKO cell lines. In the present study, S. porticalis methanol extract also provided protection from hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and accelerated the onset of adaptative changes in rats during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The

  2. Growth response of bigcone Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa) to long-term ozone exposure in southern California.

    PubMed

    Peterson, D L; Silsbee, D G; Poth, M; Arbaugh, M J; Biles, F E

    1995-01-01

    Long-term radial growth of bigcone Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa) was studied throughout its range in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California, where ambient ozone has been high for approximately the past 40 years. A gradient of both ozone concentration and precipitation exists from west (high) to east (low). Growth rates of bigcone Douglas fir are considerably lower since 1950 throughout the San Bernardino Mountains, with the largest growth reductions in the western part of the range where ozone exposure is highest. Needle retention is also somewhat lower at high ozone sites. Lower annual precipitation since 1950 may have some impact on long-term growth reductions, and short-term growth reductions induced by drought are an important component of long-term growth reductions at sites with high ozone exposure. An ozone-climate stress complex may be responsible for recent reductions in the growth of bigcone Douglas fir.

  3. Evaluation of antipyretic activity of leaf extracts of Mallotus peltatus (Geist) Muell. arg. var acuminatus: a folk medicine.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, D; Arunachalam, G; Mandal, A B; Mandal, S C

    2002-12-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the anti-pyretic potential of the methanol extract of Mallotus peltatus (Geist) Muell. Arg. var acuminatus leaf, a folk medicine of Onge tribes of Bay Islands, on normal body temperature and yeast-induced pyrexia in Wister albino rats. The leaf extract at oral doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg kg(-1), p.o., showed significant reduction in normal body temperature and yeast-provoked elevated temperature in a dose-dependent manner and the anti-pyretic effect was comparable to that of standard anti-pyretic agent paracetamol (150 mg kg(-1), p.o.). The effect also extended up to 5 hours after the drug administration.

  4. Vessel anomalies in Quercus macrocarpa tree rings associated with recent floods along the Red River of the North, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, Erika L.; St. George, Scott; Zeleznik, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of future flood risks are based on the observations of past floods, but instrumental records of basin hydrology are often too short to assess potential changes in the frequency or magnitude of extreme floods over time. In this study, we show that bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) growing along the Red River of the North in North Dakota and Minnesota preserve evidence of past floods within their annual growth rings. Rings formed during major floods often displayed (i) marked reductions in the size of their earlywood vessels or (ii) a more diffuse distribution of vessels throughout the increment. Because of the correspondence between major floods and widespread anatomical anomalies within riparian oaks, we suggest that these features can be described as "flood rings." The frequency of flood-ring formation varied substantially along the river, which implies that this evidence can only provide an accurate estimate of flood history when it is obtained from many trees sampled across a dense network of sites. The rate of flood-ring formation is primarily influenced by flood magnitude but is also controlled by the timing and duration of inundation relative to the period of cambial growth. Although flood-affected oaks are imperfect recorders of past floods, this approach offers significant potential as a means to estimate the preinstrumental flood history of the Red River within the United States.

  5. Physiological and biochemical changes attenuate the effects of drought on the Cerrado species Vatairea macrocarpa (Benth.) Ducke.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Evandro Alves; Silva, Maria das Graças; Moro, Camila Fernandes; Laura, Valdemir Antônio

    2017-06-01

    Drought is considered the main abiotic stress because it influences the distribution of plant species and limits the productivity of ecosystems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought on physiological and biochemical parameters during the initial development of Vatairea macrocarpa, a native cerrado species. Plants were subjected to daily watering (control); suppression of watering during 90 days with field capacity (fc) 50% and 25% and then followed by rewatering. Relative leaf water content (RWC), gas exchange, photosynthetic pigments content, carbohydrate and amino acids content, antioxidant activities and growth were recorded. The RWC decreased according to the soil water restriction, causing reduction in stomatal conductance and decrease of 76.4% in net photosynthesis in plants submitted to 25% fc. Water restriction decreased the chlorophyll content, however increased carotenoid content and also improved the antioxidant activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT). In addition, high levels of sugars (sucrose, raffinose) and amino acids (proline, tryptophan, valine, glutamine and GABA) were detected in drought stressed plants, contributing to osmoregulation and as sources of carbon and nitrogen after rehydration. Decreases in carbon assimilation promoted a reduction of the leaf area, however an increase in the root surface area was observed. After rewatering, the analized parameters became similar to the control plants indicating that the severe water stress did not impair the survival of young plants. Instead, adjustments were made to protect them against drought such as the maintenance of the assimilatory metabolism at minimal levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl fruit aqueous extract enhances LDL receptor and PCSK9 expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chong, Soo Ching; Dollah, Mohamad Aziz; Chong, Pei Pei; Maha, Abdullah

    2011-09-01

    Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl (Pm) has been shown to reduce cholesterol level in vitro and in vivo experiment. This study investigated the effects of Pm fruit on weight control and mechanistic basis of its anti-hypercholesterolemic effect in both in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo study, thirty six male Sprague Dawley were randomized to six groups. Five groups were induced into hypercholesterolemia by giving 3% cholesterol enriched-diet for 52 days while one group acted as control. The rats were then treated with Pm extract (0, 20, 30 and 40 mg/ml) or simvastatin for 84 days. The following parameters were determined: (1) body weight, (2) blood lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDL) and (3) hepatic LDL receptor (160 kDa and 120 kDa) and PCSK9 proteins. In the in vitro study, HepG2 cells were cultured in serum-free RPMI supplemented with 0.2% BSA with or without LDL and in the presence of Pm extract (0, 0.1, 2, 40 and 1,000 μg/ml) or simvastatin (4.60 μg/ml) for 24h. The abundance of both LDL receptor and PCSK9 proteins and mRNA were investigated. Pm extract significantly (P<0.05) reduced body weight gain, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL LDL levels and upregulated hepatic LDL receptor as well as PCSK9 proteins of hypercholesterolemic rats. These results were supported by studies in HepG2 cells whereby Pm extract also significantly upregulated both LDL receptor and PCSK9 at protein and mRNA levels. This study enhances the potential usage of Pm fruit for controlling the body weight of obese people and for treating hypercholesterolemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phytochemical analysis of the ethanolic extract of Agathis robusta (C. Moore ex F. Muell.) F.M. Bailey.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Alessandro; Frezza, Claudio; Campanelli, Chiara; Foddai, Sebastiano; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Serafini, Mauro

    2017-02-08

    This work reports the phytochemical analysis of the ethanolic extract obtained from the leaves of Agathis robusta (C. Moore ex F. Muell.) F.M. Bailey. The methodology utilised during this study comprised classical chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Six compounds were identified: agathisflavone (1), 7″-O-methyl-agathisflavone (2), cupressuflavone (3), rutin (4), shikimic acid (5) and (2S)-1,2-Di-O-[(9Z,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoyl]-3-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl glycerol (6). These belong to four major classes of natural compounds: bi-flavonoids (1-3); diglycosidic flavonoids (4); cycloexen-carboxylic acids (5); glycerol-glycolipids (6). To the best of our knowledge, compounds (3-6) were identified for the first time in this study as constituents of A. robusta. Anyway, the majority of these compounds has chemotaxonomic relevance and is mostly in accordance with the current botanical classification of this species. Moreover, they also present several pharmacological properties among which, the antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and protective ones are the most important and may explain why this species is used in the ethno-medicinal field.

  8. Assessment of haemolytic, cytotoxic and free radical scavenging activities of an underutilized fruit, Baccaurea ramiflora Lour. (Roxb.) Muell. Arg.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manas Ranjan; Dey, Priyankar; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar; Goyal, Arvind Kr; Sarker, Dilip De; Sen, Arnab

    2016-02-01

    Baccaurea ramiflora Lour. (Roxb.) Muell. Arg. is an underutilized juicy fruit bearing plant found in sub-Himalayan area, South China, Indo-Burma region, etc. The fruit is considered to be nutritive, and in this study, we evaluated its antioxidant, haemolytic and cytotoxic properties. The juice was examined for the quenching activity of hydroxyl radical, nitric oxide, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, total antioxidant activity (TAA), erythrocyte membrane stabilizing activity (EMSA) along with quantification of phenolic and flavonoid contents and also tested for its potential activity as iron chelator, inhibitor of lipid peroxidation and total reducing power. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were also performed to correlate antioxidant capacities with the phenolic and flavonoid content. Haemolytic activity on murine erythrocyte and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) cytotoxic test was performed on murine splenocytes, thymocytes, hepatocytes and peritoneal exudates macrophage to examine the cytotoxic effect of its juice. The result exhibited its potent free radical scavenging activity. In case of TAA, DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), EMSA and lipid peroxidation, the fruit juice was found to have significant (P < 0.001) antioxidant capacity, which is evident from low IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) value. Results obtained from haemolytic inhibition assay and MTT cytotoxic test confirms that the juice does not contain any cytotoxic effect and the fruit is safe for consumption. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra analysis exhibited high possibility of presence of flavonoid compounds in the juice.

  9. Evaluation of phytochemical and antioxidant activities of the different fractions of Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn.) F. Muell. (Violaceae).

    PubMed

    Patel, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Laloo, Damiki; Hemalatha, Siva

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the naturally occurring antioxidant for the first time from the different solvent fractions of Hybanthus enneaspermus (H. enneaspermus) Linn F. Muell. family (Violaceae). Different fractions of H. enneaspermus were tested for total phenolic content, and in vitro antioxidant activity was measured by total antioxidant assay, DPPH assay, reducing power, nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenging assays. The ethyl acetate (EA) fraction was found to have high levels of phenolic content [(212.15±0.79) mg GAE/g]. The EA fraction exhibited higher total antioxidant capacity, higher percentage of DPPH radical scavenging activity [(127.07±2.29) μg/mL], nitric oxide [(245.16±1.44) μg/mL], hydrogen peroxide [(227.38±7.18) μg/mL], deoxyribose [(270.61±8.72) μg/mL] and higher reducing power. There was a significant correlation between total phenolic content and total antioxidant activity (r(2)=0.972). These results reveal that EA fraction of H. enneaspermus has strong antioxidant potential compared with other fractions. Our further study has been extended to the isolation of the possible compound that is responsible for having antioxidant property. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In situ morphological assessment of apoptosis induced by Phaleria macrocarpa (Boerl.) fruit ethyl acetate fraction (PMEAF) in MDA-MB-231 cells by microscopy observation.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Nowroji; Chen, Yeng; Kanwar, Jagat R; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2017-03-01

    Phaleria macrocarpa (Boerl.) is a well-known medicinal plant and have been extensively used as traditional medicine for ages in treatment of various diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the in situ cytotoxicity effect P. macrocarpa fruit ethyl acetate fraction (PMEAF) by using various conventional and modern microscopy techniques. The cytotoxicity of PMEAF treated MDA-MB-231 cells was determined through the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cytotoxicity assay and CyQuant Cell Proliferation Assay after 24h of treatment. Both results were indicated that the PMEAF is a potential anticancer agent with the average IC50 values of 18.10μg/mL by inhibiting the MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation. Various conventional and modern microscopy techniques such as light microscopy, holographic microscopy, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscope were used for the observation of morphological changes in PMEAF treated MDA-MB-231cells for 24h. The characteristic of apoptotic cell death includes cell shrinkage, membrane blebs, chromatin condensation and the formation of apoptotic bodies were observed. PMEAF might be the best candidate for developing more potent anticancer drugs or chemo-preventive supplements.

  11. In vitro and in vivo apoptosis-inducing antileukemic effects of Mucuna macrocarpa stem extract on HL-60 human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kuan-Hung; Chang, Yuh-Fang; Yin, Pen-Hui; Chen, Ting-Ting; Ho, Yu-Ling; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Chi, Chin-Wen

    2010-09-01

    Mucuna macrocarpa Wallich (Leguminosae) is believed to hold blood circulation activating effects, and has been used as a folk remedy in Southeast Asia for the treatment of various hematologic and circulatory-related ailments. The objective of this study was to investigate whether crude methanolic extract of M macrocarpa (CMEMM) possessed antileukemic effects on HL-60, human leukemia cells. CMEMM was prepared from dried stems of this plant, and its apoptosis-inducing effects were investigated using HL-60 cells in vitro and in vivo. With treatment of 25 to 75 μg/mL CMEMM, the in vitro antiproliferative effect on HL-60 cells increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner during the 72-hour treatment period. The concentration of CMEMM that exhibited a 50% growth inhibition (IC(50)) for 72-hour exposure was 36.4 μg/mL. Apoptosis triggered by CMEMM in HL-60 cells was confirmed by the following observations: ( a) characteristic apoptotic nuclear fragmentation, (b) dose-dependent accumulation of sub-G(1) phase in cell cycle analyses, (c) increased percentages of annexin V-positive apoptotic cells, and (d) dose-dependent elevation of active caspase-3. Furthermore, an in vivo tumor growth suppression effect by CMEMM (500 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally) was observed in mouse xenografts. The results suggest that CMEMM exerts antileukemic effects via an apoptotic pathway in HL-60 cells, and could be a candidate for developing antileukemic agents in the future.

  12. Symptomatic treatment of premenstrual syndrome and/or primary dysmenorrhea with DLBS1442, a bioactive extract of Phaleria macrocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Nofiarny, Dwi; Susanto, Liana W; Hendri, Prihatini; Clarissa, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    Background: DLBS1442, a proprietary and standardized semipolar bioactive extract of the fruit Phaleria macrocarpa, is preclinically proven to have anti-inflammatory properties. The current clinical study evaluated the efficacy and safety of DLBS1442 in alleviating symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and primary dysmenorrhea. Methods: This was an open study over four menstrual cycles (with two control cycles, followed by two treatment cycles). Women with premenstrual syndrome and/or primary dysmenorrhea, 18–40 years of age, and with a regular menstrual cycle were included in the study. In the treatment cycles, DLBS1442 extract was given as a 100 mg capsule two or three times daily (for those with mild and moderate-to-severe baseline abdominal pain, respectively), for an average of six days, ie, three days before until the end of the first three days of the menstrual period. Throughout all four study cycles, daily self-assessment of symptoms related to premenstrual syndrome was made by each subject using a visual analog scale (VAS). Data were descriptively analyzed and profiled in curves of VAS score versus time point evaluation starting from day 5 before menstruation to day 5 of menstruation. Results: Twenty-three subjects of mean age 27.35 ± 5.73 years were evaluable for the intention to treat analysis. Most subjects experienced the primary efficacy variable (abdominal pain), peaking on days 1–2 of the menstrual phase, with a mean VAS score of 36.8 ± 24.3 mm and 30.0 ± 29.6 mm, respectively, during control cycles. DLBS1442 markedly reduced VAS scores by 13.76 ± 28.27 mm (37.46%) and 13.28 ± 29.06 mm (44.28%), respectively. Other symptoms of premenstrual syndrome were also markedly alleviated by DLBS1442. Some mild adverse events were observed and resolved by the end of the study. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicates the effectiveness of DLBS1442 in alleviating primary dysmenorrhea and abdominal pain, as well as other symptoms related to premenstrual

  13. Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg fruit glandular hairs extract promotes wound healing on different wound model in rats.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Mayank; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Ghildiyal, Shivani; Nath, Gopal; Goel, Raj Kumar

    2015-04-17

    Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (MP, Euphorbiaceae) are widely distributed perennial shrub or small tree in tropical and subtropical region in outer Himalayas regions. Since, Mallotus philippinensis have been shown to have a number of medicinal values. Hence our present study was to investigate the healing potential of fruit extract in rat wound models. The study includes acute toxicity and wound healing potential of 50% ethanol extract of MP fruit glandular hair (MPE). MPE (200 mg/kg) was administered orally, once daily for 10 days (incision and dead space wound) and 22 days (excision wound). MPE was found safe when given to rats upto 10 times of optimal effective dose. Wound breaking strength (WBS) in Incision wound and rate of contraction, period of epithelization and scar area in Excision wound were evaluated. Granulation tissue free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation), antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and reduced glutathione), acute inflammatory marker (myeloperoxidase), connective tissue markers (hydroxyproline, hexosamine, and hexuronic acid), and deep connective tissue histology were studied in Dead space wound. MPE significantly increased WBS and enhanced wound contraction, and decreased both epithelization period and scar area compared with control group. MPE was found to decrease free radicals (50.8 to 55.2%, P<0.001) and myeloperoxidase (44.0%, P<0.001) but enhanced antioxidants (41.1 to 54.5%, P<0.05 to P<0.001) and connective tissue markers (39.5 to 67.3%, P<0.05 to P<0.01). Histopathological evaluation revealed more density of collagen formation with minimal inflammatory cells in deeper tissues. Thus, the study revealed Mallotus philippinensis fruit hair extract, safe and effective in wound healing and the healing effects seemed to be due to decrease in free radical generated tissue damage, promoting effects on antioxidant status and faster collagen deposition as evidenced biochemically and histology.

  14. Spatial genetic structure in Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa reveals the effect of contrasting mating system, influence of marine currents, and footprints of postglacial recolonization routes.

    PubMed

    Leys, Marie; Petit, Eric J; El-Bahloul, Yasmina; Liso, Camille; Fournet, Sylvain; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to population genetic divergence across a species' range is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology and ecological genetics. We examined the relative importance of historical and ecological features in shaping the present-day spatial patterns of genetic structure in two related plant species, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we surveyed 93 populations from Brittany (France) to Morocco - the southern limit of their species' range distribution. Whereas B. macrocarpa showed a genotypic structure and a high level of genetic differentiation indicative of selfing, the population genetic structure of B. vulgaris subsp. maritima was consistent with an outcrossing mating system. We further showed (1) a strong geographic clustering in coastal B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that highlighted the influence of marine currents in shaping different lineages and (2) a peculiar genetic structure of inland B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that could indicate the admixture of distinct evolutionary lineages and recent expansions associated with anthropogenic disturbances. Spatial patterns of nuclear diversity and differentiation also supported a stepwise recolonization of Europe from Atlantic-Mediterranean refugia after the last glacial period, with leading-edge expansions. However, cytoplasmic diversity was not impacted by postglacial recolonization: stochastic long-distance seed dispersal mediated by major oceanic currents may mitigate the common patterns of reduced cytoplasmic diversity observed for edge populations. Overall, the patterns we documented here challenge the general view of reduced genetic diversity at the edge of a species' range distribution and provide clues for understanding how life-history and major geographic features interact to shape the distribution of genetic diversity.

  15. Effect of the plant Cupressus macro-carpa (Cupressacea) on some haematolo-gical and biochemical parameters of Biomphalaria alexandrina snails.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Kamelia A

    2006-12-01

    The dry powder of the plant aereal part; Cupressus macro-carpa (Cupressacea) was tested against Biomphalaria alexandrina. LC50 & LC90 values were 59.5 & 98.8 ppm, respec-tively. Exposure of B. alexandrina to sublethal concentrations (LC0, LC10 & LC25) of C. macrocarpa for three weeks signi-ficantly decreased the number of circulating hemocytes. The magnitude of reduction was increased with increasing of the tested concentration. The main type of cell in the hemolymph of B. alexandrina was the granulocyte (71.8%), followed by large round cells or hyalinocytes (19.0%) and small round cells or undifferentiate cells (9.2%). The percentage of different hemocyte categories was changed in treated snails. In snails maintained at LC25, showed significantly higher percentages of small round cells than controls, 56.2% & 9.2% respectively. Maintainence of B. alexandrina in sublethal concentrations for three weeks significantly reduced protein & hemoglobin content in the hemolymph. Reduction in enzyme activities occurred in the hemolymph and tissues of treated snails. The enzymes were pyruvate kinase (PK), lactat dehydrogenase (LDH), hexokinase (HK) and phosphoenol pyruvate carboxy kinase (PEPCK) which are very important in metabolism of the protein and carbohydrate. The infectivity of Schistosoma mansoni miracidia was greatly reduced by exposure to the sublethal concentrations (LC0, LC10 & LC25) of Cupressus. Infection rate of B. alexandrina reached to 54.5%, 37.5% & 16.7%, respectively compared to control (81.25%). Duration of cercarial shedding and the total periodic cercarial production/snail showed significant reduction while the parasite incubation period was significantly longer (p<0.05).

  16. Spatial genetic structure in Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa reveals the effect of contrasting mating system, influence of marine currents, and footprints of postglacial recolonization routes

    PubMed Central

    Leys, Marie; Petit, Eric J; El-Bahloul, Yasmina; Liso, Camille; Fournet, Sylvain; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to population genetic divergence across a species' range is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology and ecological genetics. We examined the relative importance of historical and ecological features in shaping the present-day spatial patterns of genetic structure in two related plant species, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we surveyed 93 populations from Brittany (France) to Morocco – the southern limit of their species' range distribution. Whereas B. macrocarpa showed a genotypic structure and a high level of genetic differentiation indicative of selfing, the population genetic structure of B. vulgaris subsp. maritima was consistent with an outcrossing mating system. We further showed (1) a strong geographic clustering in coastal B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that highlighted the influence of marine currents in shaping different lineages and (2) a peculiar genetic structure of inland B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that could indicate the admixture of distinct evolutionary lineages and recent expansions associated with anthropogenic disturbances. Spatial patterns of nuclear diversity and differentiation also supported a stepwise recolonization of Europe from Atlantic-Mediterranean refugia after the last glacial period, with leading-edge expansions. However, cytoplasmic diversity was not impacted by postglacial recolonization: stochastic long-distance seed dispersal mediated by major oceanic currents may mitigate the common patterns of reduced cytoplasmic diversity observed for edge populations. Overall, the patterns we documented here challenge the general view of reduced genetic diversity at the edge of a species' range distribution and provide clues for understanding how life-history and major geographic features interact to shape the distribution of genetic diversity. PMID:24963380

  17. The seasonal variation of the chemical composition of essential oils from Porcelia macrocarpa R.E. Fries (Annonaceae) and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Erica Biolcati P; Soares, Marisi G; Mariane, Bruna; Vallim, Marcelo A; Pascon, Renata C; Sartorelli, Patricia; Lago, João Henrique G

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the impact of seasonal variation on the chemical composition of essential oils from the leaves of Porcelia macrocarpa (Annonaceae) obtained over the course of one year (January-December 2011) and the chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from the ripe fruits of the same plant. Furthermore, the essential oils of the leaves were investigated with respect to their antimicrobial activity. The essential oils of the leaves contain a mixture of monoterpenes, one diterpene and several sesquiterpenes. The main components were identified as the sesquiterpenes germacrene D (29%-50%) and bicyclogermacrene (24%-37%). No significant variation was observed for the composition of the essential oil of the leaves over the course of the year, except for the month of November, when the ripe fruit were collected. In this month, substantially decreased concentrations of germacrene D (28.8 ± 0.8%) and bicyclogermacrene (23.9 ± 0.6%) were measured and the emergence of spathulenol (10.4 ± 0.2%) was observed. The essential oils extracted from the ripe fruit revealed the presence of a variety of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and hydrocarbons. The main constituents of these oils were neryl (8.8 ± 0.2%) and geranyl (27.3 ± 0.7%) formates, γ-muurolene (10.3 ± 0.9%) and dendrolasin (8.23 ± 0.06%). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil obtained from the leaves of P. macrocarpa towards a range of bacterial and yeast strains was examined. In order to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of essential oils obtained from the January collection of the leaves, broth microdilution assays were carried out, which showed a significant antimicrobial activity towards Cryptococcus neoformans serotypes A and D as well as C. gattii serotypes B and C.

  18. Synergistic Apoptosis-Inducing Antileukemic Effects of Arsenic Trioxide and Mucuna macrocarpa Stem Extract in Human Leukemic Cells via a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lee, Hui-Ju; Huang, Min-Li; Lai, Shang-Chih; Ho, Yu-Ling; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Chi, Chin-Wen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of enhancing the antileukemic activity of arsenic trioxide (ATO) by combining it with a folk remedy, crude methanolic extract of Mucuna macrocarpa (CMEMM). Human leukemia cells HL-60, Jurkat, and Molt-3 were treated with various doses of ATO, CMEMM, and combinations thereof for 24 and 48 h. Results indicated that the combination of 2.5 μM ATO and 50 μg/mL CMEMM synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in HL-60 and Jurkat cell lines. Apoptosis triggered by ATO/CMEMM treatment was confirmed by accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase in cell cycle analyses, characteristic apoptotic nuclear fragmentation, and increased percentage of annexin V-positive apoptotic cells. Such combination treatments also led to elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), butylated hydroxytoluene, and α-tocopherol prevented cells from ATO/CMEMM-induced apoptosis. The ATO/CMEMM-induced activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 can be blocked by NAC. In summary, these results suggest that ATO/CMEMM combination treatment exerts synergistic apoptosis-inducing effects in human leukemic cells through a ROS-dependent mechanism and may provide a promising antileukemic approach in the future. PMID:21826188

  19. High-resolution structure of a new Tn antigen-binding lectin from Vatairea macrocarpa and a comparative analysis of Tn-binding legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Bruno Lopes; Silva Filho, José Caetano; Kumar, Prashant; Pereira, Ronniery Ilário; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Delatorre, Plínio; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Gruber, Karl; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2015-02-01

    Plant lectins have been studied as histological markers and promising antineoplastic molecules for a long time, and structural characterization of different lectins bound to specific cancer epitopes has been carried out successfully. The crystal structures of Vatairea macrocarpa (VML) seed lectin in complex with GalNAc-α-O-Ser (Tn antigen) and GalNAc have been determined at the resolution of 1.4Å and 1.7Å, respectively. Molecular docking analysis of this new structure and other Tn-binding legume lectins to O-mucin fragments differently decorated with this antigen provides a comparative binding profile among these proteins, stressing that subtle alterations that may not influence monosaccharide binding can, nonetheless, directly impact the ability of these lectins to recognize naturally occurring antigens. In addition to the specific biological effects of VML, the structural and binding similarities between it and other lectins commonly used as histological markers (e.g., VVLB4 and SBA) strongly suggest VML as a candidate tool for cancer research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of precipitation and ozone on radial growth of bigcone douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa) in the San Bernardino Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Silsbee, D.G.; Peterson, D.L.; Poth, M. USDA Forest Service, Riverside, CA )

    1993-06-01

    Radial growth of bigcone Douglas-fir (Pseudoisuga macrocarpa) was examined along an ozone concentration gradient in the San Bernardino Mountains, California. Growth during the period 1951-88 was compared with growth from 1913-50 to evaluate the effects of increased concentrations of ozone on radial growth. Average growth declined 28 percent at the high ozone sites, 18 percent at the medium ozone sites, and 16 percent at the low ozone sites. Thirty percent of the trees at the high ozone sites declined in growth by more than 50 percent compared to 19 and 3 percent at the medium and low ozone sites respectively. The east-to-west gradient in ozone concentration corresponded to a strong precipitation gradient with higher ozone sites also having higher precipitation. Precipitation during the 1951-88 period was both lower and more variable than during the 1913-50 reference period. Some of the reduced growth was likely due to reduced precipitation, and at least part of the difference between high and low ozone sites appeared to be a result of differences in sensitivity to drought.

  1. Elemental composition and fatty acid profile of the edible fruits of Amatungula (Carissa macrocarpa) and impact of soil quality on chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Roshila; Koorbanally, Neil; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2012-06-12

    The Amatungula fruit, from Carissa macrocarpa, is commonly consumed by the local people of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. Levels of elements in the fruit were determined to assess if they conform to recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) and to assess for potential toxicities. Soils and fruit samples from nine sites in eastern KZN were investigated. Concentrations of elements in the fruit were found to be in the order of Ca>Mg>Fe>Mn≈Cu≈Pb>Se>Cr>Ni>Zn. For the elements in focus, except for Pb, all of the elements found in the fruit contribute significantly towards the RDAs. Lipid profiling was also done to determine the fruits potential as a source of essential fatty acids. The fruit was rich in monounsaturated and essential fatty acids with the linoleic acid to α-linolenic acid ratio conforming to the recommended range for cardiac health. Concentrations of elements in soil had no significant effect on plant concentrations, but competition between elements in soil influenced their availability. Total soil concentrations of most metals studied have significantly correlated Pb availability, indicating the impact of these metals on Pb availability. The Amatungula fruit showed tendency to accumulate Pb, with Pb levels in fruit at all sites being toxic to human health. Site location had a major effect on plant concentrations however uptake and distribution was primarily dependent on the plants inherent controls, as evidenced by the accumulation and exclusion of elements, to meet its physiological requirements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. oxycedrus and Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. macrocarpa (Sibth. & Sm.) Ball. "berries" from Turkey: comparative evaluation of phenolic profile, antioxidant, cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Taviano, Maria Fernanda; Marino, Andreana; Trovato, Ada; Bellinghieri, Valentina; Melchini, Antonietta; Dugo, Paola; Cacciola, Francesco; Donato, Paola; Mondello, Luigi; Güvenç, Ayşegül; De Pasquale, Rita; Miceli, Natalizia

    2013-08-01

    This work aimed to evaluate and compare the phenolic profile and some biological properties of the ripe "berries" methanol extracts of Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. oxycedrus (Joo) and Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. macrocarpa (Sibth. & Sm.) Ball. (Jom) from Turkey. The total phenolic content resulted about 3-fold higher in Jom (17.89±0.23 mg GAE/g extract) than in Joo (5.14±0.06 mg GAE/g extract). The HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS analysis revealed a similar flavonoid fingerprint in Joo and Jom, whereas a difference in their quantitative content was found (4632 μg/g extract and 12644 μg/g extract). In addition, three phenolic acids were detected in Jom only (5765 μg/g extract), and protocatechuic acid was the most abundant one. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was evaluated by different in vitro assays: in the DPPH and in the TBA tests a stronger activity in Jom was highlighted, while Joo exhibited higher reducing power and metal chelating activity. Joo and Jom did not affect HepG2 cell viability and both extracts resulted virtually non-toxic against Artemia salina. The extracts were also studied for their antimicrobial potential, displaying efficacy against Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Phaleria macrocarpa (Boerl.) fruit induce G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Nowroji; Ein Oon, Chern; Chen, Yeng; Kanwar, Jagat R; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2017-04-06

    Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl, is a well-known folk medicinal plant in Indonesia. Traditionally, P. macrocarpa has been used to control cancer, impotency, hemorrhoids, diabetes mellitus, allergies, liver and hearth disease, kidney disorders, blood diseases, acne, stroke, migraine, and various skin diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the in situ cytotoxicity effect P. macrocarpa fruit ethyl acetate fraction (PMEAF) and the underlying molecular mechanism of cell death. MDA-MB-231 cells were incubated with PMEAF for 24h. Cell cycle and viability were examined using flow cytometry analysis. Apoptosis was determined using the Annexin V assay and also by fluorescence microscopy. Apoptosis protein profiling was detected by RayBio® Human Apoptosis Array. The AO/PI staining and flow cytometric analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells treated with PMEAF were showed apoptotic cell death. The cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry analysis revealed that the accumulation of PMEAF treated MDA-MB-231 cells in G0/G1 and G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, the PMEAF exert cytotoxicity by increased the ROS production in MDA-MB-231 cells consistently stimulated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm) and induced apoptosis cell death by activation of numerous signalling proteins. The results from apoptosis protein profiling array evidenced that PMEAF stimulated the expression of 9 pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bid, caspase 3, caspase 8, cytochrome c, p21, p27, p53 and SMAC) and suppressed the 4 anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-w, XIAP and survivin) in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results indicated that PMEAF treatment induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells through intrinsic mitochondrial related pathway with the participation of pro and anti-apoptotic proteins, caspases, G0/G1 and G2/M-phases cell cycle arrest by p53-mediated mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential Activity of Fevicordin-A from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. Seeds as Estrogen Receptor Antagonist Based on Cytotoxicity and Molecular Modelling Studies

    PubMed Central

    Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Yusuf, Muhammad; Diantini, Ajeng; Choi, Sy Bing; Al-Najjar, Belal O.; Manurung, Jerry V.; Subarnas, Anas; Achmad, Tri H.; Wardhani, Savitri R.; Wahab, Habibah A.

    2014-01-01

    Fevicordin-A (FevA) isolated from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. seeds was evaluated for its potential anticancer activity by in vitro and in silico approaches. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that FevA was selective against cell lines of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) with an IC50 value of 6.4 μM. At 11.2 μM, FevA resulted in 76.8% cell death of T-47D human breast cancer cell lines. Critical pharmacophore features amongst human Estrogen Receptor-α (hERα) antagonists were conserved in FevA with regard to a hypothesis that they could make notable contributions to its pharmacological activity. The binding stability as well as the dynamic behavior of FevA towards the hERα receptor in agonist and antagonist binding sites were probed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach. Analysis of MD simulation suggested that the tail of FevA was accountable for the repulsion of the C-terminal of Helix-11 (H11) in both agonist and antagonist receptor forms. The flexibility of loop-534 indicated the ability to disrupt the hydrogen bond zipper network between H3 and H11 in hERα. In addition, MM/GBSA calculation from the molecular dynamic simulations also revealed a stronger binding affinity of FevA in antagonistic action as compared to that of agonistic action. Collectively, both the experimental and computational results indicated that FevA has potential as a candidate for an anticancer agent, which is worth promoting for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:24776765

  5. Potential activity of fevicordin-A from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. seeds as estrogen receptor antagonist based on cytotoxicity and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Yusuf, Muhammad; Diantini, Ajeng; Choi, Sy Bing; Al-Najjar, Belal O; Manurung, Jerry V; Subarnas, Anas; Achmad, Tri H; Wardhani, Savitri R; Wahab, Habibah A

    2014-04-25

    Fevicordin-A (FevA) isolated from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. seeds was evaluated for its potential anticancer activity by in vitro and in silico approaches. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that FevA was selective against cell lines of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) with an IC50 value of 6.4 µM. At 11.2 µM, FevA resulted in 76.8% cell death of T-47D human breast cancer cell lines. Critical pharmacophore features amongst human Estrogen Receptor-α (hERα) antagonists were conserved in FevA with regard to a hypothesis that they could make notable contributions to its pharmacological activity. The binding stability as well as the dynamic behavior of FevA towards the hERα receptor in agonist and antagonist binding sites were probed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach. Analysis of MD simulation suggested that the tail of FevA was accountable for the repulsion of the C-terminal of Helix-11 (H11) in both agonist and antagonist receptor forms. The flexibility of loop-534 indicated the ability to disrupt the hydrogen bond zipper network between H3 and H11 in hERα. In addition, MM/GBSA calculation from the molecular dynamic simulations also revealed a stronger binding affinity of FevA in antagonistic action as compared to that of agonistic action. Collectively, both the experimental and computational results indicated that FevA has potential as a candidate for an anticancer agent, which is worth promoting for further preclinical evaluation.

  6. Genome-wide identification of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) aquaporin genes and their response to ethephon stimulation in the laticifer, a rubber-producing tissue.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi; Gong, Jun; An, Feng; Xie, Guishui; Wang, Jikun; Mo, Yeyong; Yang, Lifu

    2015-11-25

    Natural rubber, an important industrial raw material, is specifically synthesized in laticifers located inside the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) trunk. Due to the absence of plasmodesmata, the laticifer water balance is mediated by aquaporins (AQPs). However, to date, the characterization of H. brasiliensis AQPs (HbAQPs) is still in its infancy. In this study, 51 full-length AQP genes were identified from the rubber tree genome. The phylogenetic analysis assigned these AQPs to five subfamilies, including 15 plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), 17 tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), 9 NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), 4 small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) and 6 X intrinsic proteins (XIPs). Functional prediction based on the analysis of the aromatic/arginine (ar/R) selectivity filter, Froger's positions and specificity-determining positions (SDPs) showed a remarkable difference in substrate specificity among subfamilies. Homology analysis supported the expression of 44 HbAQP genes in at least one of the examined tissues. Furthermore, deep sequencing of the laticifer transcriptome in the form of latex revealed a key role of several PIP subfamily members in the laticifer water balance, and qRT-PCR analysis showed diverse expression patterns of laticifer-expressed HbAQP genes upon ethephon treatment, a widely-used practice for the stimulation of latex yield. This study provides an important genetic resource of HbAQP genes, which will be useful to improve the water use efficiency and latex yield of Hevea.

  7. The use of cycleave PCR for the differentiation of the rejuvenating herb species Pueraria candollei (White Kwao Khruea), Butea superba (Red Kwao Khruea), and Mucuna macrocarpa (Black Kwao Khruea), and the simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets in a DNA admixture.

    PubMed

    Wiriyakarun, Suchaya; Zhu, Shu; Komatsu, Katsuko; Sukrong, Suchada

    2014-01-01

    Kwao Khruea, the tuberous roots of Pueraria candollei Graham ex Benth. (White Kwao Khruea), Butea superba Roxb. (Red Kwao Khruea), and Mucuna macrocarpa Wall. (Black Kwao Khruea), are used as rejuvenating herbs in traditional medicine in many tropical countries. Although Kwao Khruea has attracted strong interest because of its rejuvenation properties, each species is used for specific purposes and effects. P. candollei shows estrogenic effects in females. In contrast, B. superba and M. macrocarpa show androgenic effects in males. The potential misidentification of dried tuberous roots of various Kwao Khruea species might cause problems in the drug market, especially when they are reduced into powders. A cycleave PCR, which is based on the sequence of chloroplast matK gene, was developed to differentiate P. candollei, B. superba, and M. macrocarpa. The results showed that cycleave PCR is able to identify specific Kwao Khruea species. A multiplex cycleave PCR was optimized for the simultaneous detection of two different DNA targets in a DNA admixture. The specificity of this technique was confirmed by its ability to distinguish M. macrocarpa from five related Mucuna species. Cycleave PCR can be a specific, sensitive, and rapid method for the identification of medicinal plants and crude plant samples.

  8. Chemical composition of the essential oils of the berries of Juniperus oxycedrus L. ssp. rufescens (L. K.) and Juniperus oxycedrus L. ssp. macrocarpa (S. & m.) Ball. and their antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Hanène, Medini; Ameur, Elaissi; Larbi, Khouja Med; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Falconieri, Danilo; Marongiu, Bruno; Farhat, Farhat; Chemli, Rachid

    2012-01-01

    This study is outlined to probe the chemical composition of essential oil and in vitro antioxidant activity of Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. macrocarpa (S. & m.) Ball. and Juniperus oxycedrus L. ssp. rufescens (L. K.) berries, collected from four sites, according to their maturity phase. The chemical composition of the hydrodistilled essential oil was analysed by GC-MS. Forty-eight compounds were identified, accounting for approximately 79.8-98.9% of the oil. The main constituents were α-pinene, germacrene D, myrcene, abietadiene and cis-calamenene, their mean percentage vary according to their phenological stage. The antioxidant activity of the samples was determined by the ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging activities. Hawaria essential oil extracted from mature berries showed the highest antioxidant capacity.

  9. Effects of Condensed Tannins in Mao (Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg.) Seed Meal on Rumen Fermentation Characteristics and Nitrogen Utilization in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Gunun, P.; Wanapat, M.; Gunun, N.; Cherdthong, A.; Sirilaophaisan, S.; Kaewwongsa, W.

    2016-01-01

    Mao seed is a by-product of the wine and juice industry, which could be used in animal nutrition. The current study was designed to determine the effect of supplementation of mao (Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg.) seed meal (MOSM) containing condensed tannins (CT) on rumen fermentation, nitrogen (N) utilization and microbial protein synthesis in goats. Four crossbred (Thai Native×Anglo Nubian) goats with initial body weight (BW) 20±2 kg were randomly assigned to a 4×4 Latin square design. The four dietary treatments were MOSM supplementation at 0%, 0.8%, 1.6%, and 2.4% of total dry matter (DM) intake, respectively. During the experimental periods, all goats were fed a diet containing roughage to concentrate ratio of 60:40 at 3.0% BW/d and pangola grass hay was used as a roughage source. Results showed that supplementation with MOSM did not affect feed intake, nutrient intakes and apparent nutrient digestibility (p>0.05). In addition, ruminal pH and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) were not influenced by MOSM supplementation, whilst blood urea nitrogen was decreased quadraticly (p<0.05) in goats supplemented with MOSM at 2.4% of total DM intake. Propionate was increased linearly with MOSM supplementation, whereas acetate and butyrate were remained the same. Moreover, estimated ruminal methane (CH4) was decreased linearly (p<0.05) when goats were fed with MOSM at 1.6% and 2.4% of total DM intake. Numbers of bacteria and protozoa were similar among treatments (p>0.05). There were linear decreases in urinary N (p<0.01) and total N excretion (p<0.01) by MOSM supplementation. Furthermore, N retention was increased linearly (p<0.05) when goats were fed with MOSM supplementation at 1.6% and 2.4% of total DM intake. Microbial protein synthesis were not significantly different among treatments (p>0.05). From the current study, it can be concluded that supplementation of MOSM at 1.6% to 2.4% of total DM intake can be used to modify ruminal fermentation, especially propionate

  10. Effects of Condensed Tannins in Mao (Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg.) Seed Meal on Rumen Fermentation Characteristics and Nitrogen Utilization in Goats.

    PubMed

    Gunun, P; Wanapat, M; Gunun, N; Cherdthong, A; Sirilaophaisan, S; Kaewwongsa, W

    2016-08-01

    Mao seed is a by-product of the wine and juice industry, which could be used in animal nutrition. The current study was designed to determine the effect of supplementation of mao (Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg.) seed meal (MOSM) containing condensed tannins (CT) on rumen fermentation, nitrogen (N) utilization and microbial protein synthesis in goats. Four crossbred (Thai Native×Anglo Nubian) goats with initial body weight (BW) 20±2 kg were randomly assigned to a 4×4 Latin square design. The four dietary treatments were MOSM supplementation at 0%, 0.8%, 1.6%, and 2.4% of total dry matter (DM) intake, respectively. During the experimental periods, all goats were fed a diet containing roughage to concentrate ratio of 60:40 at 3.0% BW/d and pangola grass hay was used as a roughage source. Results showed that supplementation with MOSM did not affect feed intake, nutrient intakes and apparent nutrient digestibility (p>0.05). In addition, ruminal pH and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) were not influenced by MOSM supplementation, whilst blood urea nitrogen was decreased quadraticly (p<0.05) in goats supplemented with MOSM at 2.4% of total DM intake. Propionate was increased linearly with MOSM supplementation, whereas acetate and butyrate were remained the same. Moreover, estimated ruminal methane (CH4) was decreased linearly (p<0.05) when goats were fed with MOSM at 1.6% and 2.4% of total DM intake. Numbers of bacteria and protozoa were similar among treatments (p>0.05). There were linear decreases in urinary N (p<0.01) and total N excretion (p<0.01) by MOSM supplementation. Furthermore, N retention was increased linearly (p<0.05) when goats were fed with MOSM supplementation at 1.6% and 2.4% of total DM intake. Microbial protein synthesis were not significantly different among treatments (p>0.05). From the current study, it can be concluded that supplementation of MOSM at 1.6% to 2.4% of total DM intake can be used to modify ruminal fermentation, especially propionate

  11. Wound-Healing potential of Sebastiania hispida (Mart.) Pax (Euphorbiaceae) ointment compared to low power laser in rats.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, E S; Dourado, D M; Matias, R; Muller, J A I; Guilhermino, J F; Guerrero, A T G; Moreira, D L; Silva, B A K; Barbosa-Ferreira, M

    2017-01-01

    Impaired wound healing represents a serious complication in some pathologies and the use of plant extracts has proved to improve tissue repair. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the healing potential of the ointment of Sebastiana hispida compared with Aluminum-Gallium Indium-Phosphide Laser (InGaAlP) in surgically induced wounds in rats and to perform the phytochemical analysis. The phytochemical analysis was performed in the classic way and also by HPLC. A controlled study was developed with 80 rats (200-250 g) in which a linear excision was performed in the dorsal region after shaving, measuring 2 cm × 1 cm (epidermis and dermis) exposing the muscle fascia. The rats were randomly divided into four groups of twenty animals each. The experimental groups (n = 5) were G1 (Saline); G2 (crude methanol plant extract 2% + Carbopol Gel 98%); G3 (crude methanol plant extract 2% + lanolin/vaseline) and G4 (laser). The incision healing processes were monitored during 3, 7, 14 and until 21 days after excision. The histologic parameters evaluated were Collagen fiber types, microscopic examination and neovascularization. There was a significant increase in the deposition of collagen fibers, as evidenced by a better organized epithelial tissue, keratinized and showing greater proliferation of new blood vessels in the inflammatory phase in the group treated with both the extract and laser. The results were correlated to the phenolic derivatives found after qualitative and quantitative analysis. These compounds were considered responsible for the healing process. The topical treatment with S. hispida leaves, in the two different formulations, was more effective than the application of the laser (Ingan ALP) 660 nm in the model used.

  12. Allelopathic potential of Macaranga tanarius (L.) muell.-arg.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Mei-Huims; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chen, Yih-Ming; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2003-05-01

    Macaranga tanarius is widely distributed in the abandoned lowlands of Taiwan where substantial amounts of leaves accumulate on the ground. A unique pattern of weed exclusion underneath trees is often found and thought to result from allelopathic interactions. Density-dependent phytotoxicity analysis of Lactuca sativa L. (lettuce) growing in soil mixed with the powder of M. tanarius leaves showed a significant deviation from the expected yield-density relationship. Lettuce growth was most suppressed in the low seed density experiment suggesting that the phytotoxins produced during leaf decomposition inhibit the growth of lettuce seedlings. Bidens pilosa and Leucaena leucocephala, growing in soil mixed with the leaf powder of M. tanarius were also suppressed. Aqueous leaf extracts were bioassayed against lettuce and B. pilosa, and exhibited a significant suppression in radicle growth. Compounds identified from leaves included nymphaeol-A (1), nymphaeol-B (2), nymphaeol-C (3), quercetin (4), abscisic acid (ABA) (5), blumenol A (6), blumenol B (7), roseoside II (8), tanariflavanone A (9), and tanariflavanone B (10), ABA was the major growth inhibitor. At concentrations of 20 ppm, ABA suppressed lettuce germination, while at 120 ppm it inhibited the growth of Miscanthus floridulus, Chloris barbata, and Bidens pilosa. At 600 ppm, quercetin, blumenol A, and blumenol B, caused 20-25% inhibition of radicle and shoot growth of M. floridulus. The amount of ABA in M. tanarius leaves was approximately 3-5 microg g(-1) dry weight, significantly higher than previously reported. We conclude that the pattern of weed exclusion underneath stands of M. tanarius and its invasion into its adjacent grassland vegetation results from allelopathic interactions.

  13. Microdistribution of chromated copper arsenate preservative in rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusoh, Ismail Bin

    2000-08-01

    Rubberwood is popular for making indoor furniture since rubberwood is relatively abundant and sustainable. Currently more than 60% of the total annual rubberwood produced by rubber plantation is used as fuelwood. Rubberwood has the potential for both indoor and outdoor application. For exterior applications, preservative treatment is needed to extend the service life of rubberwood. The objectives of this study are to (1) assess treatability of rubberwood with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) preservative, (2) evaluate the natural decay resistance and efficacy of CCA on rubberwood, and (3) study the microdistribution of CCA components in rubberwood cells. The treatability of rubberwood was determined by measuring the penetration and retention of CCA type C preservative after a full-cell treatment. Natural decay resistance and efficacy of CCA treatment on rubberwood was estimated using a laboratory soilblock test according to AWPA E 10-91. The microdistribution of chromium, copper and arsenic in CCA-treated rubberwood was studied using scanning electron microscope in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (SEM-EDXA). As expected, longitudinal permeability was found to be better than the radial and the tangential permeability. The penetration and retention in the radial direction was about 3 times better than in the tangential direction. Longer pressure period increased penetration and retention of CCA type C in rubberwood. Complete penetration was achieved after 4 hours of pressure (1240 kPa) treatment. A pre-treatment steaming improved the treatability of rubberwood regardless of the anatomical direction. The average weight loss by white rot and brown rot was about 1.5 times higher than that of soft rot. A linear relationship was found between the weight loss and the incubation period for all the six test fungi. A CCA retention of 4.1 kg/m3 reduced weight loss to about 10% and retention of 14.5 kg/m3 reduced the weight loss of all test fungi at less than 2%. Vessels contained high level of chromium, copper, and arsenic compared to fibers. Chromium level was the highest, followed by arsenic and then copper in rubberwood cells. After the full cell treatment, fibers contained about 0.42%, 0.63%, and 1.02% of copper after treatment with 4.1 kg/m3, 10.5 kg/m 3, and 14.5 kg/m3 of CCA, respectively. Highest levels of Cr, Cu, and As were recorded in fiber-to-vessel cell corner (FVCC ) and Fiber-to-vessel middle lamella (FVML) and the lowest was recorded in S2 layer of fiber. Linescan analyses showed that higher count rates of carbon, oxygen, chromium, copper, and arsenic were found in the middle lamella compared to the fiber S2 layer in CCA-treated rubberwood. The increase of the solution strength in chromium, copper, and arsenic corresponds to an increase in Cr, Cu, and As level in wood cells.

  14. Physiological and Molecular Responses to Variation of Light Intensity in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-feng

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of most important factors to plants because it is necessary for photosynthesis. In this study, physiological and gene expression analyses under different light intensities were performed in the seedlings of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) clone GT1. When light intensity increased from 20 to 1000 µmol m−2 s−1, there was no effect on the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Fv/Fm), indicating that high light intensity did not damage the structure and function of PSII reaction center. However, the effective photochemical quantum yield of PSII (Y(II)), photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), electron transfer rate (ETR), and coefficient of photochemical fluorescence quenching assuming interconnected PSII antennae (qL) were increased significantly as the light intensity increased, reached a maximum at 200 µmol m−2 s−1, but decreased from 400 µmol m−2 s−1. These results suggested that the PSII photochemistry showed an optimum performance at 200 µmol m−2 s−1 light intensity. The chlorophyll content was increased along with the increase of light intensity when it was no more than 400 µmol m−2 s−1. Since increasing light intensity caused significant increase in H2O2 content and decreases in the per unit activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and POD, but the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was preserved at a low level even under high light intensity of 1000 µmol m−2 s−1, suggesting that high light irradiation did not induce membrane lipid peroxidation in rubber tree. Moreover, expressions of antioxidant-related genes were significantly up-regulated with the increase of light intensity. They reached the maximum expression at 400 µmol m−2 s−1, but decreased at 1000 µmol m−2 s−1. In conclusion, rubber tree could endure strong light irradiation via a specific mechanism. Adaptation to high light intensity is a complex process by regulating antioxidant enzymes activities, chloroplast formation, and related genes expressions in rubber tree. PMID:24586839

  15. L-Dopa production and antioxidant activity in Hybanthus enneaspermus (L.) F. Muell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Vasudevan, Venkatachalam; Selvaraj, Natesan; Lim, Yong Pyo; Ganapathi, Andy

    2015-07-01

    Hybanthus enneaspermus is an ethanobotanical plant extensively used in Indian traditional medicine. Quick and efficient in vitro mass propagation of this plant species was established for commercial utilization from leaf and node explants using various concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators and polyamines. The maximum number of multiple shoots per leaf explant (40 shoots) was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 20 mg/l spermidine in combination with 4 mg/l BA+1.5 mg/l IAA after 8 weeks of culture. The elongated shoots were rooted (16 roots/shoot) on MS medium with the best concentration of IBA (1.5 mg/l) and in combination with 20 mg/l putrescine after 5 weeks of culture. The plants were successfully acclimatized (98 %) in the sand: soil: vermiculite mixture (1:1:1 v/v/v) in the greenhouse. An increased antioxidant activity was recorded in vitro regenerated shoots when compared to in vitro-induced roots. L-Dopa content was recorded higher in leaves (8.31 mg/g DW) followed by stem (6.22 mg/g DW) and root (3.22 mg/g DW) of leaf-derived plants than the field-grown parent plant after 5 weeks. By adopting this protocol, the regenerated-plants could be used for drug production and pharmacology work with as an alternative to field-grown plants.

  16. Recent advances in anther culture of Hevea brasiliensis (Muell.-Arg.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Qian, C; Qin, M; Xu, X; Xiao, Y

    1982-06-01

    The yield of pollen embryoids from cultured Hevea anthers was increased 4 fold by optimizing the proportion of ammonium nitrate to potassium nitrate in the dedifferentiation medium. For optimal differentiation of pollen embryoids, kinetin, 2,4-D and α-naphtalene acetic acid are required. Anther culture for 50 days on the dedifferentiation medium is a prerequisite for the selective development of calli and embryoids from microspores.The determination of chromosome numbers in embryoids, plantlets and regenerated trees reveals that they originate from (poly)haploid pollen grains (n=2x=18). Aneuploid, triploid (3x=27) and tetraploid (4x=36) cells were encountered in increasing frequencies as the embryoids and plants developed. A few haploid cells with 9 chromosomes were consistently observed. Buds from shoots with mixoploid chromosome numbers can be grafted and the change in the chromosome constitution of the developing new shoots followed.

  17. Pharmacognostical studies on orilaitamarai -hybanthus enneaspermus (L) f. Muell-(violaceae).

    PubMed

    Shantha, T R; Pashupathy, S; Shetty, J K; Vijayalakshmi, B; Kandavel, P; Bikshapathy, T

    2001-07-01

    The paper deals with the detailed pharmacognosy of the whole plant of Orilaitamarai (Hybanthus enneasperms) sold in the local market under the name Purusharatna, Ratanpursuha. The studies include macro, microscopical, histochemical and diagnostic characters of the root, stem and leaf. The physical constants, fluorescence characteristics and chromatographic studies of the whole plant are also presented.

  18. Physiological and molecular responses to variation of light intensity in rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-feng

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of most important factors to plants because it is necessary for photosynthesis. In this study, physiological and gene expression analyses under different light intensities were performed in the seedlings of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) clone GT1. When light intensity increased from 20 to 1000 µmol m(-2) s(-1), there was no effect on the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Fv/Fm), indicating that high light intensity did not damage the structure and function of PSII reaction center. However, the effective photochemical quantum yield of PSII (Y(II)), photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), electron transfer rate (ETR), and coefficient of photochemical fluorescence quenching assuming interconnected PSII antennae (qL) were increased significantly as the light intensity increased, reached a maximum at 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1), but decreased from 400 µmol m(-2) s(-1). These results suggested that the PSII photochemistry showed an optimum performance at 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity. The chlorophyll content was increased along with the increase of light intensity when it was no more than 400 µmol m(-2) s(-1). Since increasing light intensity caused significant increase in H2O2 content and decreases in the per unit activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and POD, but the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was preserved at a low level even under high light intensity of 1000 µmol m(-2) s(-1), suggesting that high light irradiation did not induce membrane lipid peroxidation in rubber tree. Moreover, expressions of antioxidant-related genes were significantly up-regulated with the increase of light intensity. They reached the maximum expression at 400 µmol m(-2) s(-1), but decreased at 1000 µmol m(-2) s(-1). In conclusion, rubber tree could endure strong light irradiation via a specific mechanism. Adaptation to high light intensity is a complex process by regulating antioxidant enzymes activities, chloroplast formation, and related genes expressions in rubber tree.

  19. Pharmacological Proprieties of the Ethanol Extract of Muehlenbeckia platyclada (F. Muell.) Meisn. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes, Leopoldina Leonor; Vieira, Glauciemar Del-Vechio; de Pinho, José de Jesus R. G.; Yamamoto, Célia Hitomi; Alves, Maria Silvana; Stringheta, Paulo César; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira

    2010-01-01

    Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the Muehlenbeckia platyclada leaves’ ethanol extract were investigated in animal models. The extract (p.o.) reduced the number of abdominal contortions induced by acetic acid by 21.57% (400 mg/kg). After intraplantar injection of formalin, a dose of 400 mg/kg (p.o.) inhibited the time spent paw licking in the first phase (26.43%), while the second phase was inhibited by 10.90 and 36.65% at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. The extract (p.o.) increased the reaction time on a hot plate at a dose of 400 mg/kg (32.68 and 40.30%) after 60 and 90 minutes of treatment, respectively. The paw edema was reduced by extract (p.o.) at doses of 100 (15.46 and 16.67%), 200 (22.68 and 25.64%) and 400 mg/kg (29.50 and 37.33%) after 3 to 4 h of carrageenan application, respectively. Doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.), administered 4 h after the carrageenan injection, reduced the exudate volume (11.28, 21.54 and 45.13%), while leukocyte migration was reduced by 21.21 and 29.70% at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. These results indicate that the ethanol extract from M. platyclada may constitute a potential target for the discovery of new molecules with antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities that can be explored for their therapeutic use. PMID:21152311

  20. Multi-element fingerprinting and high throughput sequencing identify multiple elements that affect fungal communities in Quercus macrocarpa foliage.

    PubMed

    Jumpponen, Ari; Keating, Karen; Gadbury, Gary; Jones, Kenneth L; Mattox, J David

    2010-09-01

    Diverse fungal mutualists, pathogens and saprobes colonize plant leaves. These fungi face a complex environment, in which stochastic dispersal interplays with abiotic and biotic filters. However, identification of the specific factors that drive the community assembly seems unattainable. We mined two broad data sets and identified chemical elements, to which dominant molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the foliage of a native tree respond most extremely. While many associations could be identified, potential complicating issues emerged. Those were related to unevenly distributed OTU frequency data, a large number of potentially explanatory variables, and the disproportionate effects of outlier observations.

  1. Multi-element fingerprinting and high throughput sequencing identify multiple elements that affect fungal communities in Quercus macrocarpa foliage

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Karen; Gadbury, Gary; Jones, Kenneth L; Mattox, J David

    2010-01-01

    Diverse fungal mutualists, pathogens and saprobes colonize plant leaves. These fungi face a complex environment, in which stochastic dispersal interplays with abiotic and biotic filters. However, identification of the specific factors that drive the community assembly seems unattainable. We mined two broad data sets and identified chemical elements, to which dominant molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the foliage of a native tree respond most extremely. While many associations could be identified, potential complicating issues emerged. Those were related to unevenly distributed OTU frequency data, a large number of potentially explanatory variables and the disproportionate effects of outlier observations. PMID:21490423

  2. Evaluation of in vitro aldose reductase inhibitory potential of different fraction of Hybanthus enneaspermus Linn F. Muell

    PubMed Central

    Patel, DK; Kumar, R; Kumar, M; Sairam, K; Hemalatha, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the aldose reductase inhibitory (ARI) activity of different fractions of Hybanthus enneaspermus for potential use in diabetic cataract. Methods Total phenol and flavonoid content of different fractions was determined. ARI activity of different fractions in rat lens was investigated in vitro. Results The results showed significant level of phenolic and flavonoid content in ethyl acetate fraction [total phenol (212.15±0.79 mg/g), total flavonoid (39.11±2.27 mg/g)] and aqueous fraction [total phenol (140.62±0.57 mg/g), total flavonoid (26.07±1.49 mg/g)] as compared with the chloroform fraction [total phenol (68.56±0.51 mg/g), total flavonoid (13.41±0.82 mg/g)] and petrolium ether fraction [total phenol (36.68±0.43 mg/g), total flavonoid (11.55±1.06 mg/g)]. There was a significant difference in the ARI activity of each fraction, and it was found to be the highest in ethyl acetate fraction [IC50 (49.26±1.76 µg/mL)] followed by aqueous extract [IC50 (70.83±2.82 µg/mL)] and it was least in the petroleum ether fraction [IC50 (118.89±0.71 µg/mL)]. Chloroform fraction showed moderate activity [IC50 (98.52±1.80 µg/mL)]. Conclusions Different fractions showed significanct amount of ARI activity, where in ethyl acetate fraction it was found to be maximum which may be due to its high phenolic and flavonoid content. The extract after further evaluation may be used in the treatment of diabetic cataract. PMID:23569883

  3. Evaluation of in vitro aldose reductase inhibitory potential of different fraction of Hybanthus enneaspermus Linn F. Muell.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dk; Kumar, R; Kumar, M; Sairam, K; Hemalatha, S

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the aldose reductase inhibitory (ARI) activity of different fractions of Hybanthus enneaspermus for potential use in diabetic cataract. Total phenol and flavonoid content of different fractions was determined. ARI activity of different fractions in rat lens was investigated in vitro. The results showed significant level of phenolic and flavonoid content in ethyl acetate fraction [total phenol (212.15±0.79 mg/g), total flavonoid (39.11±2.27 mg/g)] and aqueous fraction [total phenol (140.62±0.57 mg/g), total flavonoid (26.07±1.49 mg/g)] as compared with the chloroform fraction [total phenol (68.56±0.51 mg/g), total flavonoid (13.41±0.82 mg/g)] and petrolium ether fraction [total phenol (36.68±0.43 mg/g), total flavonoid (11.55±1.06 mg/g)]. There was a significant difference in the ARI activity of each fraction, and it was found to be the highest in ethyl acetate fraction [IC50 (49.26±1.76 µg/mL)] followed by aqueous extract [IC50 (70.83±2.82 µg/mL)] and it was least in the petroleum ether fraction [IC50 (118.89±0.71 µg/mL)]. Chloroform fraction showed moderate activity [IC50 (98.52±1.80 µg/mL)]. Different fractions showed significanct amount of ARI activity, where in ethyl acetate fraction it was found to be maximum which may be due to its high phenolic and flavonoid content. The extract after further evaluation may be used in the treatment of diabetic cataract.

  4. Chemical and biological characterization of novel essential oils from Eremophila bignoniiflora (F. Muell) (Myoporaceae): a traditional Aboriginal Australian bush medicine.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Nicholas John; Hitchcock, Maria; Watson, Kenneth; Jones, Graham Lloyd

    2013-10-01

    Essential oils were extracted by hydrodistillation from the traditional Australian medicinal plant Eremophila bignoniiflora, characterized chemically and then screened for bioactivity. Characterization and quantification were completed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-flame ionization detection, respectively. Antimicrobial capacity was assessed using disc diffusion and micro-titre plate broth dilution and further characterized using thin layer chromatography followed by bioautography to assign activity to separated individual active components. Antifungal capacity was investigated using micro-titre plate broth dilution against pathogenic Trichophyton species. Free radical scavenging ability was assessed using the diphenylpicrylhydradyl reaction in methanol. The predominant components of the essential oil were fenchyl-acetate and bornyl-acetate. However, bioautography indicated antimicrobial ability to be largely linked to the less abundant, more polar constituents. Oils displayed only modest antifungal ability against pathogenic Trichophyton species associated with dermatophytosis, but moderate to high antimicrobial activity, particularly against the yeast Candida albicans and the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis. Essential oils exhibited relatively low free radical scavenging ability. Speculation over the role of essential oils in the traditional medicinal applications of E. bignoniiflora follows, exploring correlations between traditional use and investigated bioactivities. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Antidiabetic and in vitro antioxidant potential of Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn) F. Muell in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, D K; Kumar, R; Prasad, S K; Sairam, K; Hemalatha, S

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of Hybanthus enneaspermus in different models. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and normoglycemic effect of alcoholic extract of Hybanthus enneaspermus (AHE) were evaluated at a dose of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg p.o. while hypoglycemic activity and effect on body weight were tested at 250 and 500 mg/kg p.o. per day for 21 days in Streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Further, glucose uptake by hemidiaphram was also evaluated. The total polyphenolic and flavonoid were determined and their correlation with various antioxidant assays was also determined. The results showed high level of phenolic content in AHE. AHE also exhibited higher total antioxidant capacity, good reducing power and a significant scavenger of reactive oxygen species like DPPH radical, nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide and deoxyribose. Furthermore there was a significant increase in the body weight and decrease in the blood glucose level on treatment with the AHE. AHE increased glucose uptake on isolated rat hemi-diaphragm compared to control group. AHE reduce blood glucose level in STZ-induced diabetic model. It does not show significant effect in normoglycemic study but showes significant effect in OGT. AHE has significant antioxidant activity, which may be attributed to high phenolic content.

  6. Effects of Sangre de Drago from Croton lechleri Muell.-Arg. on the production of active oxygen radicals.

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, C; Witting Schaus, F; Coussio, J; Cicca, G

    1997-10-01

    The total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP) of 'Sangre de Drago' from Croton lechleri (Euphorbiaceae) was determined by monitoring the intensity of luminol enhanced chemiluminescence enhanced by peroxyl radicals derived from thermolysis of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane). The TRAP index was calculated as 935.4 +/- 141 microM, measured as equivalents of Trolox concentration. On the other hand, the additive incorporation of lower concentrations yielded an instantaneous increase in chemiluminescence, suggesting a prooxidant activity at these levels. DNA sugar damage induced by Fe(II) salts was also used to determine the capacity of the latex to suppress hydroxyl radical-mediated degradation of DNA. As in the case of luminol enhanced chemiluminescence, Sangre de Drago was highly effective in reducing oxidation of DNA at higher concentrations, but showed an increase in the production of TBARS at lower doses, as compared to the control. Finally, antioxidant activity was tested using hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence in rat liver homogenates, and the latex showed an increase in light emission, suggesting the presence of prooxidant compounds.

  7. Characterisation and evaluation of a novel feedstock, Manihot glaziovii, Muell. Arg, for production of bioenergy carriers: Bioethanol and biogas.

    PubMed

    Moshi, Anselm P; Crespo, Carla F; Badshah, Malik; Hosea, Ken M M; Mshandete, Anthony Manoni; Elisante, Emrode; Mattiasson, Bo

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise and evaluate a wild inedible cassava species, Manihot glaziovii as feedstock for bioenergy production. Tubers obtained from 3 different areas in Tanzania were characterised and evaluated for bioethanol and biogas production. These bioenergy carriers were produced both separately and sequentially and their energy values evaluated based on these two approaches. Composition analysis demonstrated that M. glaziovii is a suitable feedstock for both bioethanol and biogas production. Starch content ranged from 77% to 81%, structural carbohydrates 3-16%, total crude protein ranged from 2% to 8%. Yeast fermentation achieved ethanol concentration of up to 85g/L at a fermentation efficiency of 89%. The fuel energy of the bioethanol and methane from flour-peels mix ranged from 5 to 13 and 11 to 14MJ/kgVS, respectively. Co-production of bioethanol and biogas in which the peels were added to the fermentation residue prior to anaerobic digestion produced maximum fuel energy yield of (15-23MJ/kgVS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptome sequencing and analysis of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.) to discover putative genes associated with tapping panel dryness (TPD).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Ping; Xia, Zhi-Qiang; Tian, Xiao-Yan; Li, Yi-Jian

    2015-05-21

    Tapping panel dryness (TPD) involves in the partial or complete cessation of latex flow thus seriously affect latex production in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). Numerous studies have been conducted to define its origin and nature, but the molecular nature and mechanism of TPD occurrence remains unknown. This study is committed to de novo sequencing and comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of healthy (H) and TPD-affected (T) rubber trees to identify the genes and pathways related to the TPD. Total raw reads of 34,632,012 and 35,913,020 bp were obtained from H and T library, respectively using Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing technology. De novo assemblies yielded 141,456 and 169,285 contigs, and 96,070 and 112,243 unigenes from H and T library, respectively. Among 73597 genes, 22577 genes were identified as differential expressed genes between H and T library via comparative transcript profiling. A majority of genes involved in natural rubber biosynthesis and jasmonate synthesis with most potential relevance in TPD occurrence were found to be differentially expressed. In TPD-affected trees, the expression of most genes related to the latex biosynthesis and jasmonate synthesis was severely inhibited and is probably the direct cause of the TPD. These new de novo transcriptome data sets provide a significant resource for the discovery of genes related to TPD and improve our understanding of the occurrence and maintainace of TPD.

  9. Antidiabetic and in vitro antioxidant potential of Hybanthus enneaspermus (Linn) F. Muell in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, DK; Kumar, R; Prasad, SK; Sairam, K; Hemalatha, S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of Hybanthus enneaspermus in different models. Methods The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and normoglycemic effect of alcoholic extract of Hybanthus enneaspermus (AHE) were evaluated at a dose of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg p.o. while hypoglycemic activity and effect on body weight were tested at 250 and 500 mg/kg p.o. per day for 21 days in Streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Further, glucose uptake by hemidiaphram was also evaluated. The total polyphenolic and flavonoid were determined and their correlation with various antioxidant assays was also determined. Results The results showed high level of phenolic content in AHE. AHE also exhibited higher total antioxidant capacity, good reducing power and a significant scavenger of reactive oxygen species like DPPH radical, nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide and deoxyribose. Furthermore there was a significant increase in the body weight and decrease in the blood glucose level on treatment with the AHE. AHE increased glucose uptake on isolated rat hemi-diaphragm compared to control group. Conclusions AHE reduce blood glucose level in STZ-induced diabetic model. It does not show significant effect in normoglycemic study but showes significant effect in OGT. AHE has significant antioxidant activity, which may be attributed to high phenolic content. PMID:23569783

  10. Drivers of radial growth and carbon isotope discrimination of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) across continental gradients in precipitation, vapour pressure deficit and irradiance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tree-ring characteristics including stable isotope composition are commonly used to reconstruct climate variables and establish mechanisms that underlie oscillations in modes of climate variability. However, divergence from the assumption of a single, primary biophysical control ...

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis between Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and Wild Cabbage (Brassica macrocarpa Guss.) in Response to Plasmodiophora brassicae during Different Infection Stages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Yumei; Fang, Zhiyuan; Li, Zhansheng; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, one of the most devastating diseases to the Brassicaceae family, is caused by the obligate biotrophic pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae. However, studies of the molecular basis of disease resistance are still poor especially in quantitative resistance. In the present paper, two previously identified genotypes, a clubroot-resistant genotype (wild cabbage, B2013) and a clubroot-susceptible genotype (broccoli, 90196) were inoculated by P. brassicae for 0 (T0), 7 (T7), and 14 (T14) day after inoculation (DAI). Gene expression pattern analysis suggested that response changes in transcript level of two genotypes under P. brassicae infection were mainly activated at the primary stage (T7). Based on the results of DEGs functional enrichments from two infection stages, genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis, glucosinolate biosynthesis, and plant hormone signal transduction showed down-regulated at T14 compared to T7, indicating that defense responses to P. brassicae were induced earlier, and related pathways were repressed at T14. In addition, the genes related to NBS-LRR proteins, SA signal transduction, cell wall and phytoalexins biosynthesis, chitinase, Ca(2+) signals and RBOH proteins were mainly up-regulated in B2013 by comparing those of 90196, indicating the pathways of response defense to clubroot were activated in the resistant genotype. This is the first report about comparative transcriptome analysis for broccoli and its wild relative during the different stages of P. brassicae infection and the results should be useful for molecular assisted screening and breeding of clubroot-resistant genotypes.

  12. Drivers of radial growth and carbon isotope discrimination of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) across continental gradients in precipitation, vapour pressure deficit and irradiance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tree-ring characteristics including stable isotope composition are commonly used to reconstruct climate variables and establish mechanisms that underlie oscillations in modes of climate variability. However, divergence from the assumption of a single, primary biophysical control ...

  13. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis between Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and Wild Cabbage (Brassica macrocarpa Guss.) in Response to Plasmodiophora brassicae during Different Infection Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Yumei; Fang, Zhiyuan; Li, Zhansheng; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, one of the most devastating diseases to the Brassicaceae family, is caused by the obligate biotrophic pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae. However, studies of the molecular basis of disease resistance are still poor especially in quantitative resistance. In the present paper, two previously identified genotypes, a clubroot-resistant genotype (wild cabbage, B2013) and a clubroot-susceptible genotype (broccoli, 90196) were inoculated by P. brassicae for 0 (T0), 7 (T7), and 14 (T14) day after inoculation (DAI). Gene expression pattern analysis suggested that response changes in transcript level of two genotypes under P. brassicae infection were mainly activated at the primary stage (T7). Based on the results of DEGs functional enrichments from two infection stages, genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis, glucosinolate biosynthesis, and plant hormone signal transduction showed down-regulated at T14 compared to T7, indicating that defense responses to P. brassicae were induced earlier, and related pathways were repressed at T14. In addition, the genes related to NBS-LRR proteins, SA signal transduction, cell wall and phytoalexins biosynthesis, chitinase, Ca2+ signals and RBOH proteins were mainly up-regulated in B2013 by comparing those of 90196, indicating the pathways of response defense to clubroot were activated in the resistant genotype. This is the first report about comparative transcriptome analysis for broccoli and its wild relative during the different stages of P. brassicae infection and the results should be useful for molecular assisted screening and breeding of clubroot-resistant genotypes. PMID:28066482

  14. Synopsis: the role of prescribed burning in regenerating Quercus macrocarpa and associated woody plants in stringer woodlands in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Henry A. Wright

    1998-01-01

    Poor tree reproduction, sparse shrub cover, and increasing amounts of exotic species such as Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) are common problems in woody draws in the Northern Great Plains. Although the historic role of fire in maintaining woody draws is unclear, it is likely that these woodlands burned periodically, especially in dry years on hot...

  15. A possible role of partially pyrolysed essential oils in Australian Aboriginal traditional ceremonial and medicinal smoking applications of Eremophila longifolia (R. Br.) F. Muell (Scrophulariaceae).

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, N J; Jones, G L

    2013-06-03

    Eremophila longifolia is one of the most respected of the traditional medicines used by Australian Aboriginal people. Customary use involves smoldering the leaves over hot embers of a fire to produce an acrid smoke, believed to have therapeutic effects broadly consistent with antimicrobial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory capacity. The current study aims to examine the contribution of partially pyrolysed and non-pyrolysed essential oils in traditional usage of Eremophila longifolia. Non-pyrolysed and partially pyrolysed essential oils were produced by hydrodistillation and part-wet/part-dry distillation, respectively. All samples were tested for antimicrobial activity by broth dilution. Some of these samples were further treated to an incrementally stepped temperature profile in a novel procedure employing a commercial thermocycler in an attempt to mimic the effect of temperature gradients produced during smoking ceremonies. Components from the pyrodistilled oils were compared with the non-pyrodistilled oils, using GC-MS, GC-FID and HPLC-PAD. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method, was used to compare free radical scavenging ability. Partially pyrolysed oils had approximately three or more times greater antimicrobial activity, enhanced in cultures warmed incrementally to 60°C and held for 30s and further enhanced if held for 2 min. Partially pyrolysed oils showed a radical scavenging capacity 30-700 times greater than the corresponding non-pyrolysed oils. HPLC-PAD revealed the presence of additional constituents not present in the fresh essential oil. These results, by showing enhanced antimicrobial and antioxidant activities, provide the first known Western scientific justification for the smoking ceremonies involving leaves of Eremophila longifolia. During customary use, both partially pyrolysed as well as non-pyrolysed essential oils may contribute significantly to the overall intended medicinal effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cloning and characterization of HbMT2a, a metallothionein gene from Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg differently responds to abiotic stress and heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Chen, Yue Yi; Yang, Shu Guang; Tian, Wei Min

    2015-05-22

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are of low molecular mass, cysteine-rich proteins. They play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metals and homeostasis of intracellular metal ions, and protecting against intracellular oxidative damages. In this study a full-length cDNA of type 2 plant metallothioneins, HbMT2a, was isolated from 25 mM Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) stressed leaves of Hevea brasiliensis by RACE. The HbMT2a was 372 bp in length and had a 237 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding for a protein of 78 amino acid residues with molecular mass of 7.772 kDa. The expression of HbMT2a in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone RY7-33-97 was up-regulated by Me-JA, ABA, PEG, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}, but down-regulated by water. The role of HbMT2a protein in protecting against metal toxicity was demonstrated in vitro. PET-28a-HbMT2-beared Escherichia coli. Differential expression of HbMT2a upon treatment with 10 °C was observed in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone 93-114 which is cold-resistant and Reken501 which is cold-sensitive. The expression patterns of HbMT2a in the two rubber tree clones may be ascribed to a change in the level of endogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Cloning an HbMT2a gene from rubber tree. • Analyzing expression patterns of HbMT2a upon abiotic stress and heavy metal stress. • Finding different expression patterns of HbMT2a among two Hevea germplasm. • The expressed protein of HbMT2a enhances copper and zinc tolerance in Escherichia coli.

  17. Cloning and characterization of HbMT2a, a metallothionein gene from Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg differently responds to abiotic stress and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Yue Yi; Yang, Shu Guang; Tian, Wei Min

    2015-05-22

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are of low molecular mass, cysteine-rich proteins. They play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metals and homeostasis of intracellular metal ions, and protecting against intracellular oxidative damages. In this study a full-length cDNA of type 2 plant metallothioneins, HbMT2a, was isolated from 25 mM Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) stressed leaves of Hevea brasiliensis by RACE. The HbMT2a was 372bp in length and had a 237bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding for a protein of 78 amino acid residues with molecular mass of 7.772 kDa. The expression of HbMT2a in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone RY7-33-97 was up-regulated by Me-JA, ABA, PEG, H2O2, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), but down-regulated by water. The role of HbMT2a protein in protecting against metal toxicity was demonstrated in vitro. PET-28a-HbMT2-beared Escherichia coli. Differential expression of HbMT2a upon treatment with 10 °C was observed in the detached leaves of rubber tree clone 93-114 which is cold-resistant and Reken501 which is cold-sensitive. The expression patterns of HbMT2a in the two rubber tree clones may be ascribed to a change in the level of endogenous H2O2.

  18. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a cyanogenic β-glucosidase in the inner bark tissues of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Min; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Shu-Guang; Shi, Min-Jing; Wang, Xu-Chu; Dai, Long-Jun; Chen, Yue-Yi

    2013-05-15

    Tapping causes the loss of large amounts of latex from laticifers and subsequently enhances latex regeneration, a high carbon- and nitrogen-cost activity in rubber tree. It is suggested that a 67 kDa protein associated with protein-storing cells in the inner bark tissues of rubber tree plays an important role in meeting the nitrogen demand for latex regeneration. Here, the 67 kDa protein was further characterized by a combination of cell biological, molecular biological and biochemical techniques. Immunogold labeling showed that the 67 kDa protein was specifically localized in the central vacuole of protein-storing cells. A full-length cDNA, referred to as HbVSP1, was cloned. The HbVSP1 contained a 1584 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 527 amino acids. The putative protein HbVSP1 shared high identity with the P66 protein from rubber tree and proteins of the linamarase, and bg1A from cassava (Manihot esculenta). HbVSP1 contained the active site sequences of β-glucosidase, TFNEP and I/VTENG. In vitro analysis showed that the 67 kDa protein exhibited the activity of both β-glucosidase and linamarase and was thus characterized as a cyanogenic β-glucosidase. Proteins immuno-related to the 67 kDa protein were present in leaves and lutoids of laticifers. Tapping down-regulated the expression of HbVSP1, but up-regulated the expression of genes encoding the key enzymes for rubber biosynthesis, while the effect of resting from tapping was the reverse. Taken together, the results suggest that the 67 kDa protein is a vacuole-localized cyanogenic β-glucosidase encoded by HbVSP1 and may have a role in nitrogen storage in inner bark tissues of trunk during the leafless periods when rubber tree is rested from tapping.

  19. Essential Oils from Different Plant Parts of Eucalyptus cinerea F. Muell. ex Benth. (Myrtaceae) as a Source of 1,8-Cineole and Their Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sayonara Mendes; Abe, Simone Yae; Murakami, Fábio Seigi; Frensch, Gustavo; Marques, Francisco A.; Nakashima, Tomoe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus cinerea, known as silver dollar tree, has few descriptions in traditional medicine. Chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oils of leaves, flowers and fruits, collected seasonally, were determined by GC/MS and disk diffusion/MIC, respectively. 1,8-Cineole was the main compound, particularly in fresh leaves—Spring (74.98%), dried leaves—Spring (85.32%), flowers—Winter (78.76%) and fruits—Winter (80.97%). Other compounds were found in the aerial parts in all seasons: α-pinene (2.41% to 10.13%), limonene (1.46% to 4.43%), α-terpineol (1.73% to 11.72%), and α-terpinyl acetate (3.04% to 20.44%). The essential oils showed antimicrobial activities against bacteria and yeasts, with the best results being found for the dried autumn and winter leaves oils (MIC < 0.39 mg/mL) against Streptococcus pyogenes. For the other tested microorganisms the following MIC results were found: Staphylococcus aureus— Dried leaves oil from summer (0.78 mg/mL), Pseudomonas aeruginosa—Flowers oil from autumn and fruits oil from winter (1.56 mg/mL) and Candida albicans—Flowers oil from autumn and fruits oils from winter and spring (0.78 mg/mL). PMID:26791641

  20. De novo assembly and characterization of bark transcriptome using Illumina sequencing and development of EST-SSR markers in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In rubber tree, bark is one of important agricultural and biological organs. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the bark formation and development in rubber tree remains largely unknown, which is at least partially due to lack of bark transcriptomic and genomic information. Therefore, it is necessary to carried out high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of rubber tree bark to generate enormous transcript sequences for the functional characterization and molecular marker development. Results In this study, more than 30 million sequencing reads were generated using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In total, 22,756 unigenes with an average length of 485 bp were obtained with de novo assembly. The similarity search indicated that 16,520 and 12,558 unigenes showed significant similarities to known proteins from NCBI non-redundant and Swissprot protein databases, respectively. Among these annotated unigenes, 6,867 and 5,559 unigenes were separately assigned to Gene Ontology (GO) and Clusters of Orthologous Group (COG). When 22,756 unigenes searched against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway (KEGG) database, 12,097 unigenes were assigned to 5 main categories including 123 KEGG pathways. Among the main KEGG categories, metabolism was the biggest category (9,043, 74.75%), suggesting the active metabolic processes in rubber tree bark. In addition, a total of 39,257 EST-SSRs were identified from 22,756 unigenes, and the characterizations of EST-SSRs were further analyzed in rubber tree. 110 potential marker sites were randomly selected to validate the assembly quality and develop EST-SSR markers. Among 13 Hevea germplasms, PCR success rate and polymorphism rate of 110 markers were separately 96.36% and 55.45% in this study. Conclusion By assembling and analyzing de novo transcriptome sequencing data, we reported the comprehensive functional characterization of rubber tree bark. This research generated a substantial fraction of rubber tree transcriptome sequences, which were very useful resources for gene annotation and discovery, molecular markers development, genome assembly and annotation, and microarrays development in rubber tree. The EST-SSR markers identified and developed in this study will facilitate marker-assisted selection breeding in rubber tree. Moreover, this study also supported that transcriptome analysis based on Illumina paired-end sequencing is a powerful tool for transcriptome characterization and molecular marker development in non-model species, especially those with large and complex genomes. PMID:22607098

  1. Identification of expression profiles of tapping panel dryness (TPD) associated genes from the latex of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Perumal; Thulaseedharan, Arjunan; Raghothama, Kashchandra

    2007-07-01

    Tapping panel dryness (TPD) occurrence in high latex yielding rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is characterized by the partial or complete cessation of latex flow upon tapping leading to severe loss in natural rubber production around the world. The goal of this study was to identify genes whose mRNA transcript levels are differentially regulated in rubber tree during the onset of TPD. To isolate TPD responsive genes, two cDNA libraries (forward and reverse) from total RNA isolated from latex of healthy and TPD trees were constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. In total, 1,079 EST clones were obtained from two cDNA libraries and screened by reverse Northern blot analysis. Screening results revealed that about 352 clones were differentially regulated and they were selected for sequencing. Based on the nucleotide sequence data, the putative functions of cDNA clones were predicted by BLASTX/BLASTN analysis. Among these, 64 were genes whose function had been previously identified while the remaining clones were genes with either unknown protein function or insignificant similarity to other protein/DNA/EST sequences in existing databases. RT-PCR analysis was carried out to validate the up-regulated genes from both the libraries. Among them, two genes were strongly down-regulated in TPD trees. The level of mRNA transcripts of these two genes was further examined by conventional Northern and RT-PCR analysis. Results indicated that the expression level of two genes was significantly lower in TPD trees compared to healthy trees. Many TPD associated genes were also up-regulated in TPD trees suggesting that they may be involved in triggering programmed cell death (PCD) during the onset of TPD syndrome. The results presented here demonstrate that SSH technique provides a powerful complementary approach for the identification of TPD related genes from rubber tree.

  2. Evaluation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis of the Gene Expression in Laticifers on the Basis of Latex Flow in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    PubMed

    Chao, Jinquan; Yang, Shuguang; Chen, Yueyi; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Latex exploitation-caused latex flow is effective in enhancing latex regeneration in laticifer cells of rubber tree. It should be suitable for screening appropriate reference gene for analysis of the expression of latex regeneration-related genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). In the present study, the expression stability of 23 candidate reference genes was evaluated on the basis of latex flow by using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Ubiquitin-protein ligase 2a (UBC2a) and ubiquitin-protein ligase 2b (UBC2b) were the two most stable genes among the selected candidate references in rubber tree clones with differential duration of latex flow. The two genes were also high-ranked in previous reference gene screening across different tissues and experimental conditions. By contrast, the transcripts of latex regeneration-related genes fluctuated significantly during latex flow. The results suggest that screening reference gene during latex flow should be an efficient and effective clue for selection of reference genes in qRT-PCR.

  3. Ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): an Hev b 7-like protein acts as a universal antagonist of rubber particle aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min-Jing; Cai, Fu-Ge; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-02-01

    Ethrel is the most effective stimuli in prolonging the latex flow that consequently increases yield per tapping. This effect is largely ascribed to the enhanced lutoid stability, which is associated with the decreased release of initiators of rubber particle (RP) aggregation from lutoid bursting. However, the increase in both the bursting index of lutoids and the duration of latex flow after applying ethrel or ethylene gas in high concentrations suggests that a new mechanism needs to be introduced. In this study, a latex allergen Hev b 7-like protein in C-serum was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). In vitro analysis showed that the protein acted as a universal antagonist of RP aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum. Ethrel treatment obviously weakened the effect of C-serum on RP aggregation, which was closely associated with the increase in the level of the Hev b 7-like protein and the decrease in the level of the 37 kDa protein, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting analysis and antibody neutralization. Thus, the increase of the Hev b 7-like protein level or the ratio of the Hev b 7-like protein to the 37 kDa protein in C-serum should be primarily ascribed to the ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow duration.

  4. Evaluation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis of the Gene Expression in Laticifers on the Basis of Latex Flow in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jinquan; Yang, Shuguang; Chen, Yueyi; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Latex exploitation-caused latex flow is effective in enhancing latex regeneration in laticifer cells of rubber tree. It should be suitable for screening appropriate reference gene for analysis of the expression of latex regeneration-related genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). In the present study, the expression stability of 23 candidate reference genes was evaluated on the basis of latex flow by using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Ubiquitin-protein ligase 2a (UBC2a) and ubiquitin-protein ligase 2b (UBC2b) were the two most stable genes among the selected candidate references in rubber tree clones with differential duration of latex flow. The two genes were also high-ranked in previous reference gene screening across different tissues and experimental conditions. By contrast, the transcripts of latex regeneration-related genes fluctuated significantly during latex flow. The results suggest that screening reference gene during latex flow should be an efficient and effective clue for selection of reference genes in qRT-PCR. PMID:27524995

  5. Molecular identification and characterization of a gene associated with the onset of tapping panel dryness (TPD) syndrome in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.) by mRNA differential display.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Perumal; Thulaseedharan, Arjunan; Raghothama, Kashchandra

    2009-01-01

    In rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), tapping panel dryness (TPD) syndrome is considered as a complex physiological disorder which affects latex biosynthesis. To identify differentially expressed genes between healthy and TPD-affected trees, mRNA differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) analysis was performed. We isolated 10 differentially expressed cDNA fragments of which one cDNA encoding a putative TOM20 like protein was identified. The cDNA (1,024 bp), corresponding to the HbTOM20 gene (H evea b rasiliensis Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane), contained an open reading frame to code for 202 amino acid protein with a theoretical pI value of 9.5 and the calculated protein M (W) was 23.5 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence contained conserved domains of TOM20 like proteins in the N-terminal. The protein HbTOM20 has 32% and 27% similarity to Populus TOM20 and Solanum TOM20, respectively. Both semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Northern blot results revealed that the HbTOM20 expression was significantly down-regulated in TPD-affected trees compared to healthy one. Accumulation of HbTOM20 mRNA transcripts was significantly higher in the bark tissues collected from healthy region than that of partially affected by TPD (partially dried) while barely detectable in completely TPD-affected area. Differential expression pattern was noticed in three rubber clones representing various degrees of TPD tolerance. These results suggest that down-regulation of HbTOM20 in TPD-affected trees may play an important role in alteration of mitochondrial metabolism resulting in impaired latex biosynthesis.

  6. Regulation of HbPIP2;3, a Latex-Abundant Water Transporter, Is Associated with Latex Dilution and Yield in the Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiuqing; Wang, Jin; Rookes, James; Lin, Weifu; Cahill, David; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-01-01

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) latex, the source of natural rubber, is synthesised in the cytoplasm of laticifers. Efficient water inflow into laticifers is crucial for latex flow and production since it is the determinant of the total solid content of latex and its fluidity after tapping. As the mature laticifer vessel rings are devoid of plasmodesmata, water exchange between laticifers and surrounding cells is believed to be governed by plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs). To identify the most important PIP aquaporin in the water balance of laticifers, the transcriptional profiles of ten-latex-expressed PIPs were analysed. One of the most abundant transcripts, designated HbPIP2;3, was characterised in this study. When tested in Xenopus laevis oocytes HbPIP2;3 showed a high efficiency in increasing plasmalemma water conductance. Expression analysis indicated that the HbPIP2;3 gene was preferentially expressed in latex, and the transcripts were up-regulated by both wounding and exogenously applied Ethrel (a commonly-used ethylene releaser). Although regular tapping up-regulated the expression of HbPIP2;3 during the first few tappings of the virginal rubber trees, the transcriptional kinetics of HbPIP2;3 to Ethrel stimulation in the regularly tapped tree exhibited a similar pattern to that of the previously reported HbPIP2;1 in the virginal rubber trees. Furthermore, the mRNA level of HbPIP2;3 was associated with clonal yield potential and the Ethrel stimulation response. Together, these results have revealed the central regulatory role of HbPIP2;3 in laticifer water balance and ethylene stimulation of latex production in Hevea. PMID:25927524

  7. Ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): an Hev b 7-like protein acts as a universal antagonist of rubber particle aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min-Jing; Cai, Fu-Ge; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Ethrel is the most effective stimuli in prolonging the latex flow that consequently increases yield per tapping. This effect is largely ascribed to the enhanced lutoid stability, which is associated with the decreased release of initiators of rubber particle (RP) aggregation from lutoid bursting. However, the increase in both the bursting index of lutoids and the duration of latex flow after applying ethrel or ethylene gas in high concentrations suggests that a new mechanism needs to be introduced. In this study, a latex allergen Hev b 7-like protein in C-serum was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). In vitro analysis showed that the protein acted as a universal antagonist of RP aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum. Ethrel treatment obviously weakened the effect of C-serum on RP aggregation, which was closely associated with the increase in the level of the Hev b 7-like protein and the decrease in the level of the 37 kDa protein, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting analysis and antibody neutralization. Thus, the increase of the Hev b 7-like protein level or the ratio of the Hev b 7-like protein to the 37 kDa protein in C-serum should be primarily ascribed to the ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow duration. PMID:26381537

  8. Regulation of HbPIP2;3, a Latex-Abundant Water Transporter, Is Associated with Latex Dilution and Yield in the Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    PubMed

    An, Feng; Zou, Zhi; Cai, Xiuqing; Wang, Jin; Rookes, James; Lin, Weifu; Cahill, David; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-01-01

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) latex, the source of natural rubber, is synthesised in the cytoplasm of laticifers. Efficient water inflow into laticifers is crucial for latex flow and production since it is the determinant of the total solid content of latex and its fluidity after tapping. As the mature laticifer vessel rings are devoid of plasmodesmata, water exchange between laticifers and surrounding cells is believed to be governed by plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs). To identify the most important PIP aquaporin in the water balance of laticifers, the transcriptional profiles of ten-latex-expressed PIPs were analysed. One of the most abundant transcripts, designated HbPIP2;3, was characterised in this study. When tested in Xenopus laevis oocytes HbPIP2;3 showed a high efficiency in increasing plasmalemma water conductance. Expression analysis indicated that the HbPIP2;3 gene was preferentially expressed in latex, and the transcripts were up-regulated by both wounding and exogenously applied Ethrel (a commonly-used ethylene releaser). Although regular tapping up-regulated the expression of HbPIP2;3 during the first few tappings of the virginal rubber trees, the transcriptional kinetics of HbPIP2;3 to Ethrel stimulation in the regularly tapped tree exhibited a similar pattern to that of the previously reported HbPIP2;1 in the virginal rubber trees. Furthermore, the mRNA level of HbPIP2;3 was associated with clonal yield potential and the Ethrel stimulation response. Together, these results have revealed the central regulatory role of HbPIP2;3 in laticifer water balance and ethylene stimulation of latex production in Hevea.

  9. A new Australian species of Luffa (Cucurbitaceae) and typification of two Australian Cucumis names, all based on specimens collected by Ferdinand Mueller in 1856

    PubMed Central

    Telford, Ian R. H.; Schaefer, Hanno; Greuter, Werner; Renner, Susanne S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract As a result of his botanical explorations in northern Australia, Ferdinand von Mueller named several Cucurbitaceae that molecular data now show to be distinct, requiring their resurrection from unjustified synonymy. We here describe and illustrate Luffa saccata F. Muell. ex I.Telford, validating a manuscript name listed under Luffa graveolens Roxb. since 1859, and we lectotypify Cucumis picrocarpus F. Muell. and Cucumis jucundus F. Muell. The lectotype of the name Cucumis jucundus, a synonym of Cucumis melo, is mounted on the same sheet as the lectotype of Cucumis picrocarpus, which is the sister species of the cultivated Cucumis melo as shown in a recent publication. PMID:22171190

  10. Antiviral activity in Argentine medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kott, V; Barbini, L; Cruañes, M; Muñoz, J D; Vivot, E; Cruañes, J; Martino, V; Ferraro, G; Cavallaro, L; Campos, R

    1999-01-01

    In an ethnopharmacological screening of selected medicinal plants used in Argentina for the treatment of infectious diseases, aqueous extracts of five species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenovirus serotype 7 (ADV-7). Polygonum punctatum, Lithraea molleoides, Sebastiania brasiliensis and Sebastiania klotzschiana but not Myrcianthes cisplatensis showed in vitro antiherpetic activity with 50% effective dose (ED50) ranging from 39 to 169 microg/ml. P. punctatum, L. molleoides and M. cisplatensis showed antiviral activity against RSV with ED50 ranging from 78 to 120 microg/ml. None of the extracts had antiviral activity against ADV-7. The differences between their maximal non cytotoxic concentration and their antiviral activity values were high enough to justify further analysis.

  11. Evaluating the flood tolerance of bottomland hardwood artificial reproduction

    Treesearch

    John M. Kabrick; Daniel C. Dey; Jonathan R. Motsinger

    2007-01-01

    We experimentally compared the survival and growth after flooding of six bottomland species: eastern cottonwood (cuttings) (Populus deltoides Bartr. Ex Marsh.), pin oak (Quercus palustris Muenchh.), swamp white oak (Q. bicolor Willd.), bur oak (Q. macrocarpa Michx.), black walnut (...

  12. Seasonal variations in phosphorus fractions in semiarid sandy soils under different vegetation types

    Treesearch

    Qiong Zhao; Dehui Zeng; Zhiping Fan; Zhanyuan Yu; Yalin Hu; Jianwei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the seasonal patterns of soil phosphorus (P) fractions under five vegetation types – Ulmus macrocarpa savanna, grassland, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica plantation, Pinus tabulaeformis plantation, and Populus simonii plantation ...

  13. Characteristics of ten tropical hardwoods from certified forests in Bolivia. Part I, Weathering characteristics and dimensional change

    Treesearch

    R. Sam Williams; Regis Miller; John Gangstad

    2001-01-01

    Ten tropical hardwoods from Bolivia were evaluated for weathering performance (erosion rate, dimensional stability, warping, surface checking, and splitting). The wood species were Amburana cearensis (roble), Anadenanthera macrocarpa (curupau), Aspidosperma cylindrocarpon (jichituriqui), Astronium urundeuva (cuchi), Caesalpinia cf. pluviosa (momoqui), Diplotropis...

  14. Insects of bur oak acorns

    Treesearch

    Lester P. Gibson

    1971-01-01

    During 1961-1969, the insects found damaging acorns of bur oak, Quercus macrocarpa Michauxii, in their order of importance were the weevils: Curculio pardalis (Chittenden), C. strictus (Casey), C. sulcatulus (Casey), C. iowensis (Casey), C. proboscideus...

  15. Lac Qui Parle Flood Control Project Master Plan for Public Use Development and Resource Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    project. 43 TABLE 8 RECOMMENDED PLANT LIST Coumon Name Botanical Name Trees *Soft Maple Acer saccharinum Box Elder Acer negundo *Green (Red) Ash Fraxinus...pennsylvanica Basswood Tilia americana Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa *Swamp White Oak Quercus bicolor * Cottonwood Salix alba *River Birch Betula nutra

  16. RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF PCR-AMPLIFIED NIFH SEQUENCES FROM WETLAND PLANT RHIZOSPHERE COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method to assess the community structure of N2-fixing bacteria in the rhizosphere. Total DNA was extracted from Spartina alterniflora and Sesbania macrocarpa root zones by bead-beating and purified by CsCl-EtBr gradient centrifugation. The average DNA yield was 5.5 ...

  17. Spring temperature responses of oaks are synchronous with North Atlantic conditions during the last deglaciation

    Treesearch

    Steven L. Voelker; Paul-Emile Noirot-Cosson; Michael C. Stambaugh; Erin R. McMurry; Frederick C. Meinzer; Barbara Lachenburch; Richard P. Guyette

    2012-01-01

    Paleoclimate proxies based on the measurement of xylem cell anatomy have rarely been developed across the temperature range of a species or applied to wood predating the most recent millennium. Here we describe wood anatomy-based proxies for spring temperatures in central North America from modern bur oaks (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.). The strong...

  18. RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF PCR-AMPLIFIED NIFH SEQUENCES FROM WETLAND PLANT RHIZOSPHERE COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method to assess the community structure of N2-fixing bacteria in the rhizosphere. Total DNA was extracted from Spartina alterniflora and Sesbania macrocarpa root zones by bead-beating and purified by CsCl-EtBr gradient centrifugation. The average DNA yield was 5.5 ...

  19. Maximum crown area equation for open-grown bur oak

    Treesearch

    M.C. Demchik; S.M. Virden; Z.L. Buchanan; A.M. Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) is a classic savanna species with a range that covers much of the eastern United States. Because savannas are an endangered habitat in North America, significant restoration efforts are in progress across much of the range of bur oak. For open sites being planted with bur oaks as well as fully stocked sites that...

  20. Variation in flood tolerance of container-grown seedlings of swamp white oak, bur oak, and white oak

    Treesearch

    Michael P. Walsh; J.W. Van Sambeek; Mark V. Coggeshall

    2008-01-01

    How much variation in flood tolerance exists among seedlings within oak species, given the flood frequency of sites from which acorns are collected, has been largely unexplored. Our studies examined initial growth and flood tolerance for seedlings of swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor Willd.), bur oak (Q. macrocarpa L.), and white...

  1. Forest vegetation of the Black Hills National Forest of South Dakota and Wyoming: A habitat type classification

    Treesearch

    George R. Hoffman; Robert R. Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A vegetation classification based on concepts and methods developed by Daubenmire was used to identify 12 forest habitat types and one shrub habitat type in the Black Hills. Included were two habitat types in the Quercus macrocarpa series, seven in the Pinus ponderosa series, one in the Populus tremuloides series, two in the Picea glaucci series, and one in the...

  2. Central Radar System, Over-the-Horizon Backscatter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-09

    maintained mosaics of open prairies, sedge meadows, shrub thickets, and groves of small trees. Shrub species include pussy -willow, hazel-nut...balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera), and bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa). Shrub species common in the region include pussy willow (Salix discolor

  3. Environmental Assessment of Construction of a Security Perimeter Road and Fence at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    macrocarpa), green ash, basswood ( Tilia americana), and common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) are dominant in the canopy. The understory in this...crabapple (Malus sp.), and Redmond linden ( Tilia americana ‘Redmond’). Eighty percent of the poplars, which tend to have less than a 20-year

  4. Developing clones of Eucalyptus cloeziana resistant to rust (Puccinia psidii)

    Treesearch

    Rafael F. Alfenas; Marcelo M. Coutinho; Camila S. Freitas; Rodrigo G. Freitas; Acelino C. Alfenas

    2012-01-01

    Besides its high resistance to Chrysoporthe cubensis canker, Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell. is a highly valuable tree species for wood production. It can be used for furniture, electric poles, fence posts, and charcoal. Nevertheless, it is highly susceptible to the rust caused by Puccinia psidii, which...

  5. Variation in volatile leaf oils of twelve eucalyptus species harvested from Hajeb Layoun arboreta (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Elaissi, Ameur; Medini, Hanène; Marzouki, Hanène; Larbi Khouja, Mohamed; Lynene, Fréderic; Chemli, Rachid; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2010-03-01

    Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of twelve species of the genus Eucalyptus L' Hér., i.e., E. brockwayi C. A. Gardn., E. gracilis F. Muell., E. gillii Maiden, E. largiflorens F. Muell., E. loxophleba Benth., E. occidentalis Endl., E. oldfieldii F. Muell., E. salmonophloia F. Muell., E. sargentii Maiden, E. stricklandii Maiden, E. torquata Luehm., and E. woodwardii Maiden, harvested from Hajeb Layoun arboreta (region of Kairouan, central Tunisia) in January 2005, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.5+/-0.1 to 5.7+/-0.5%, dependent on the species. E. sargentii and E. brockwayi provided the highest and the lowest percentage of essential oil amongst all the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 133 components, representing 92.9-98.8% of the total oil. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole, terpinen-4-ol, alpha-pinene (2), p-cymene, aromadendrene (1), globulol (5), trans-pinocarveol (6), spathulenol (7), beta-eudesmol, torquatone (3), and 4-methylpentan-2-yl acetate (8). The principal component analysis and the hierarchical clustering indicated that the volatile leaf oil composition of the twelve Eucalyptus species could be clearly differentiated.

  6. Variation in volatile leaf oils of 13 Eucalyptus species harvested from Souinet arboreta (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Elaissi, Ameur; Marzouki, Hanène; Medini, Hanène; Larbi Khouja, Mohamed; Farhat, Farhat; Lynene, Fréderic; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia; Chemli, Rachid

    2010-04-01

    Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of 13 species of the genus Eucalyptus L' Hér., viz., E. bicostata Maiden, Blakely & Simmonds, E. cinerea F. Muell. ex Benth., E. exerta F. Muell., E. gigantea Hook. f., E. gunnii Hook. f., E. macarthurii Deane & Maiden., E. macrorrhyncha F. Muell., E. maidenii F. Muell., E. odorata Behr., E. pauciflora Sieber ex Sprengel, E. sideroxylon A. Cunn. ex Woolls, E. tereticornis Sm., and E. viminalis Labill., harvested from Souinet arboreta (region of Ain Draaham, north of Tunisia) in June 2006, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.5+/-0.2 to 3.9+/-0.4%, dependent on the species. E. cinerea and E. exerta provided the highest and the lowest percentage of essential oil amongst all the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 142 components, representing 81.5 to 98.9% of the total oil. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole (1), followed by cryptone, spathulenol (4), p-cymene (2), viridiflorol (6), globulol (7), beta-eudesmol, alpha-terpineol (5), limonene (8), D-piperitone, alpha-pinene (3), cuminal, and gamma-eudesmol. The principal component and the hierarchical cluster analyses separated the 13 Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into three groups, each constituting a chemotype.

  7. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... utilis (Mart.) Muell. Arg. Moraceae: Leche de vaca Brosimum utile (H.B.K.) Pittier and Poulsenia spp... Complying with § 172.886. Petroleum wax synthetic Complying with § 172.888. Polyethylene Molecular weight 2... weight, minimum 2,000. Plasticizing Materials (Softeners) Glycerol ester of partially dimerized...

  8. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... utilis (Mart.) Muell. Arg. Moraceae: Leche de vaca Brosimum utile (H.B.K.) Pittier and Poulsenia spp... Complying with § 172.886. Petroleum wax synthetic Complying with § 172.888. Polyethylene Molecular weight 2... weight, minimum 2,000. Plasticizing Materials (Softeners) Glycerol ester of partially dimerized...

  9. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... utilis (Mart.) Muell. Arg. Moraceae: Leche de vaca Brosimum utile (H.B.K.) Pittier and Poulsenia spp... Complying with § 172.886. Petroleum wax synthetic Complying with § 172.888. Polyethylene Molecular weight 2... weight, minimum 2,000. Plasticizing Materials (Softeners) Glycerol ester of partially dimerized...

  10. First report of Orange Rust of Sugarcane Caused by Puccinia kuehnii in Costa Rica and Nicaragua

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Symptoms of orange rust of sugarcane were observed in Costa Rica at Coopeagri Sugar Mill located in Pérez Zeledón, San José, during July 2007 on (a complex hybrid of Saccharum L. species) cultivar, SP 71-5574, and at Providencia Sugar Mill near Muelle and at Cutris Sugar Mill near Los Chiles, in Aug...

  11. Comparative study on the technological properties of latex and natural rubber from Hancornia speciosa Gomes and Hevea brasiliensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This work reports a systematic comparative study of the properties of natural lattices and rubbers extracted from Hancornia speciosa Gomes and Hevea brasiliensis [(Willd. ex Adr. de Juss.) Muell.-Arg.] (clone RRIM 600) trees from 11 collections in Brazil throughout 2004. Natural rubber latex particl...

  12. Parameters affecting the early seedling development of four neotropical trees under oxygen deprivation stress.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Rosana Marta; Rawyler, André; Braendle, Roland

    2002-05-01

    Some of the parameters that determine flooding resistance-and consequently habitat zonation-were investigated in four neotropical trees (Schizolobium parahyba, Sebastiania commersoniana, Erythrina speciosa and Sesbania virgata). The constitutive parameters of seeds (size, nature and amount of reserves) only partly influenced resistance to flooding, mainly through a high carbohydrate : size ratio. Parameters describing metabolic efficiency under stress conditions were more important. Among them, fermentation capacity and levels of ATP and of total adenylates played a key role. The highest resistance to anoxia was associated with increased availability of free sugars, elevated alcohol dehydrogenase activity and corresponding mRNA levels, more efficient removal of ethanol and lactate, and higher adenylate levels. Finally, as a lethal consequence of energy shortage, free fatty acids were released on a massive scale in the flooding-sensitive species Schizolobium parahyba, whereas lipid hydrolysis did not occur in the most resistant species Sesbania virgata.

  13. A full-length infectious clone of beet soil-borne virus indicates the dispensability of the RNA-2 for virus survival in planta and symptom expression on Chenopodium quinoa leaves.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, François; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Gilmer, David; Bragard, Claude

    2009-12-01

    For a better understanding of the functionality and pathogenicity of beet soil-borne virus (BSBV), full-length cDNA clones have been constructed for the three genomic RNAs. With the aim of assessing their effectiveness and relative contribution to the virus housekeeping functions, transcripts were inoculated on Chenopodium quinoa and Beta macrocarpa leaves using five genome combinations. Both RNAs-1 (putative replicase) and -3 (putative movement proteins) proved to be essential for virus replication in planta and symptom production on C. quinoa, whereas RNA-2 (putative coat protein, CP, and a read-through domain, RT) was not. No symptoms were recorded on B. macrocarpa, but viral RNAs were detected. In both host plants, the 19 kDa CP was detected by Western blotting as well as a 115 kDa protein corresponding to the CP-RT.

  14. Essential Oils Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Six Conifers Harvested in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Layal; Khoury, Madona; Stien, Didier; Ouaini, Naïm; Eparvier, Véronique; El Beyrouthy, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils (EOs) of six conifers harvested in Lebanon, Abies cilicica, Cupressus sempervirens, Juniperus excelsa, Juniperus oxycedrus, Cedrus libani and Cupressus macrocarpa gold crest, were investigated. The EOs were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus and characterized by GC and GC/MS analyses. A principal components analysis based on Pearson correlation between essential oils chemical analyses was also conducted. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of these essentials oils were determined against a range of bacteria and fungi responsible for cutaneous infections in human, using the broth microdilution technique. The EOs showed the most interesting bioactivity on the dermatophytes species (MIC values 32 - 64 μg/ml). Each of the major compounds of C. macrocarpa as well as an artificial reconstructed EO were tested on Trichophyton rubrum showing a contribution of the minor components to the overall activity.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal barks used in Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Kloucek, P; Svobodova, B; Polesny, Z; Langrova, I; Smrcek, S; Kokoska, L

    2007-05-04

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of six barks traditionally used in Callería District (Ucayali Department, Peru) for treating conditions likely to be associated with microorganisms. Ethanol extracts of stem barks of Abuta grandifolia (Menispermaceae), Dipteryx micrantha (Leguminosae), Cordia alliodora (Boraginaceae), Naucleopsis glabra (Moraceae), Pterocarpus rohrii (Leguminosae), and root bark of Maytenus macrocarpa (Celastraceae) were tested against nine bacteria and one yeast using the broth microdilution method. All plants possessed significant antimicrobial effect, however, the extract of Naucleopsis glabra exhibited the strongest activity against Gram-positive bacteria (MICs ranging from 62.5 to 125 microg/ml), while the broadest spectrum of action was shown by the extract of Maytenus macrocarpa, which inhibited all the strains tested with MICs ranging from 125 to 250 microg/ml.

  16. Influence of conspecific and heterospecific adults on riparian tree species establishment during encroachment of a humid palm savanna.

    PubMed

    Rolhauser, Andrés G; Chaneton, Enrique J; Batista, William B

    2011-09-01

    Woody plant encroachment of savanna ecosystems has been related to altered disturbance regimes, mainly fire suppression and herbivore exclusion. In contrast, neighbourhood interactions among resident and colonising woody species have received little attention, despite their likely influence on the pattern and rate of tree establishment. We examined how resident palm trees (Butia yatay) and established adults of two riparian forest tree species (Allophylus edulis and Sebastiania commersoniana) influenced seed arrival and seedling performance of the latter two species in a humid savanna of east-central Argentina. Seed traps and seedlings of both riparian species were placed in herbaceous openings, and beneath palm, conspecific and heterospecific adult trees in two unburned savanna patches, and were monitored for 2 years. Only seeds of the bird-dispersed Allophylus arrived in palm microsites, yet survival of Allophylus seedlings near adult palms was limited by animal damage through trampling and burrowing, a non-trophic mechanism of apparent competition. Seeds of both riparian species dispersed into conspecific microsites, although adult trees selectively reduced growth of conspecific seedlings, a pattern consistent with the "escape hypothesis". Further, survival of Sebastiania increased in the moister Allophylus microsites, suggesting a one-way facilitative interaction between woody colonisers. Our results indicate that dispersal facilitation by resident savanna trees may be critical to riparian species invasion after fire suppression. Distance-dependent effects of conspecific and heterospecific adult trees could contribute to shape the subsequent dynamics of woody seedling establishment. Overall, we show that indirect interactions can play a prominent role in savanna encroachment by non-resident woody species.

  17. Direct-seeding of commercial trees on surface-mine spoil. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, D.H.; Carpenter, S.B.; Wittwer, R.F.

    1980-04-01

    Two small-seeded species, Paulownia (Paulownia tomentosa), and European alder (Alnus glutinosa) and three large seeded species, northern red oak (Quercus rubra), pin oak (Quercus palustris), and bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) were direct-seeded on three aspects on minesoil in eastern Kentucky. Treatments included four mulch applications--water-borne fiber mulch, hardwood bark, bark and manure, and composted municipal waste; and two fertilizer applications. Growth and survival were evaluated during two consecutive growing seasons.

  18. A Comparative Antimicrobial Study on the Essential Oil of the Leaves of Various Species of Cupressus

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, R.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Jawahar, N.; Ganesh, E. Sai; Jubie, S.

    2005-01-01

    The essential oil of leaves of various cupressus species Viz., C.glauca, C.funebris, C.lawsonia, C. macrocarpa & C. sempervirens have been studied for their antimicrobial activity against certain gram positive [B. substilis, S.aureus], gram negative [E.coli, P.aeruginesa] and fungi (A.niger, A.flavus, C.albicans & A. fumigatus) using two fold serial dilution technique. Our results revealed that, all the species possess significant antibacterial & antifungal activities. PMID:22557167

  19. Environmental Impact Research Program. Common Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana). Section 7.5.4, US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources Management Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    maple (A. glabrum), bigtooth maple (A. grandidentatum), serviceberries (Amelanchier spp.), pinyon (Pinus edulis), and ponderosa pine (P. ponderosa ...bur oak (Q. macrocarpa) and usually has an overstory of ponderosa pine (Thilenius 1972). In southeastern Montana, choke- cherry is a common shrub...vegetation type; this association also occurs in the more mesic coulees that dissect the ponderosa pine types at higher elevations (Batson and Elliott

  20. Essential oil composition, adult repellency and larvicidal activity of eight Cupressaceae species from Greece against Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Giatropoulos, Athanassios; Pitarokili, Danae; Papaioannou, Fotini; Papachristos, Dimitrios P; Koliopoulos, George; Emmanouel, Nickolaos; Tzakou, Olga; Michaelakis, Antonios

    2013-03-01

    The present study evaluated leaf essential oils from eight Cupresaceae species; Cupressus arizonica, Cupressus benthamii, Cupressus macrocarpa, Cupressus sempervirens, Cupressus torulosa, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, Juniperus phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata for their larvicidal and repellent properties against Aedes albopictus, a mosquito of great ecological and medical importance. Based on the LC(50) values, C. benthamii essential oil was the most active (LC(50) = 37.5 mg/L) while the other tested Cupressaceae essential oils provided rather moderate toxicity against larvae (LC(50) = 47.9 to 70.6 mg/L). Under the used laboratory conditions, three of the essential oils (C. benthamii, C. lawsoniana, and C. macrocarpa) provided sufficient protection against mosquito adults, equivalent to the standard repellent "Deet" in the 0.2 mg/cm(2) dose, while C. macrocarpa assigned as the superior repellent oil in the 0.08 mg/cm(2) dose. Chemical analysis of the essential oils using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of 125 components.

  1. Growth of tropical tree species and absorption of copper in soil artificially contaminated.

    PubMed

    Silva, R F; Andreazza, R; Da Ros, C; Dellai, A; Jacques, R J S; Scheid, D

    2015-11-01

    Reclamation of copper contaminated sites using forest species may be an efficient alternative to reduce the negative impact. The aim of this study was to quantify the growth and evaluate the quality of seedlings of native species at different doses of copper in the soil. The experimental design was completely randomized, with seven replications in a factorial arrangement (3×9), using three indigenous species of plants (Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa scabrella and Apuleia leiocarpa) and nine doses of copper in the soil (0, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, 420 and 480 mg kg-1).The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse which the seedlings were grown for 180 days. The experimental units were plastic pots of 125 cm3 filled with Oxisol. The results indicated that the levels of copper applied to the soil decreased the quality of seedlings and growth of Apuleia leiocarpato a lesser extent compared with Mimosa scabrella and Anadenanthera macrocarpa. Anadenanthera macrocarpa was the forest species that resulted in the lowest copper translocation from roots to shoots. In addition, the Apuleia leiocarpa exhibited high resistance and tolerance for copper in the soil and also, it is highlighted an ability for copper phytoremediation.

  2. Systematics of Juniperus section Juniperus based on leaf essential oils and random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs).

    PubMed

    Adams

    2000-07-01

    The composition of the leaf essential oils of all the species of Juniperus in sect. Juniperus (=sect. Oxycedrus) are reported and compared (J. brevifolia, J. cedrus, J. communis, J. c. var. saxatilis, J. c. var. oblonga, J. formosana, J. oxycedrus, J. o. subsp. badia, J. o. subsp. macrocarpa, J. o. subsp. transtagana, J. rigida, J. r. subsp. conferta, J. sibirica, J. taxifolia and J. t. var. lutchuensis). In addition, DNA fingerprinting by RAPDs was utilized. Based on these data, several taxa remained at the same taxonomic level: J. brevifolia, J. cedrus, J. communis, J. c. var. saxatilis, J. formosana, J. oxycedrus, J. rigida, J. r. var. conferta, and J. taxifolia. However, several taxa exhibited considerable differentiation that warranted their recognition at the specific level: J. oblonga M.-Bieb. (=J. communis var. oblonga), J. badia H. Gay (=J. oxycedrus subsp. badia), J. macrocarpa Sibth. and Sm. (=J. oxycedrus subsp. macrocarpa), J. navicularis Gand. (=J. oxycedrus subsp. transtagana), J. sibirica Brugsd. (=J. communis var. saxatilis in part), and J. lutchuensis Koidz. (= J. taxifolia var. lutchuensis).

  3. Air pollution induced changes in the photosynthetic pigments of selected plant species.

    PubMed

    Joshi, P C; Swami, Abhishek

    2009-03-01

    Changes in the concentration of different photosynthetic pigments (Chlorophyll and carotenoids) were determined in the leaves of six tree species exposed to air pollution due to vehicular emissions. The six tree species, which are all economically important because of their being fruit bearers, used for timber fodder and as road side trees on the basis of their air pollution tolerance index. These included Mangifera indica L., Tectona grandis Linn.f , Shorea robusta Gaertn.f., Holoptelea integrifolia (Roxb.) Planch, Eucalyptus citridora Hook. Syn. and Mallotus philippinensis Muell-Arg. Reduction in chlorophyll 'a', 'b' and carotenoid was recorded in the leaf samples collected from polluted areas when compared with samples from control areas. The highest reduction in total chlorophyll was observed in Holoptelea integrifolia (Roxb.) (48.73%) Planch whereas, the lowest reduction (17.84 %) was recorded in Mallotus philippinensis Muell-Arg. Similarly in case of carotenoid contents, highest reduction (43.02%) was observed in Eucalyptus citridora, and lowest in Mallotus philippinensis Muell-Arg (19.31%). The data obtained were further analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a significant change was recorded in the studied parameters. These studies clearly indicate that the vehicular induced air pollution reduces the concentration of photosynthetic pigments in the trees exposed to road side pollution.

  4. Sources of antioxidant activity in Australian native fruits. Identification and quantification of anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Netzel, Michael; Netzel, Gabriele; Tian, Qingguo; Schwartz, Steven; Konczak, Izabela

    2006-12-27

    Selected native Australian fruits, muntries (Kunzea pomifera F. Muell., Myrtaceae), Tasmanian pepper berry (Tasmanian lanceolata R. Br., Winteraceae), Illawarra plum (Podocarpus elatus R. Br. ex Endl., Podocarpaceae), Burdekin plum (Pleiogynium timorense DC. Leenh, Anacardiaceae), Cedar Bay cherry (Eugenia carissoides F. Muell., Myrtaceae), Davidson's plum (Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell. var. pruriens, Davidsoniaceae), and Molucca raspberry (Rubus moluccanus var. austropacificus van Royen, Rosaceae), were evaluated as sources of antioxidants by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power assays and compared with blueberry (Vaccinum spp. cv. Biloxi). The total reducing capacity of five fruits was 3.5-5.4-fold higher than that of blueberry, and the radical scavenging activities of muntries and Burdekin plum were 1.5- and 2.6-fold higher, respectively. The total phenolic level by Folin-Ciocalteu assay highly correlated with the antioxidant activity. Therefore, systematic research was undertaken to identify and characterize phenolic complexes. In the present study we report on the levels and composition of anthocyanins. The HPLC-DAD and HPLC/ESI-MS-MS (ESI = electrospray ionization) analyses revealed simple anthocyanin profiles of one to four individual pigments, with cyanidin as the dominating type. This is the first evaluation of selected native Australian fruits aiming at their utilization for the development of novel functional food products.

  5. Variation in volatile leaf oils of seven eucalyptus species harvested from Zerniza arboreta (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Elaissi, Ameur; Medini, Hanène; Simmonds, Monique; Lynen, Frederic; Farhat, Farhat; Chemli, Rachid; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi

    2011-02-01

    Leaves of seven species of the genus Eucalyptus L'Hér., viz., E. cladocalyx F. Muell., E. citriodora Hook., E. diversicolor F. Muell., E. fasciculosa F. Muell., E. grandis W. Hill, E. ovata Labill., and E. botryoides Sm., were harvested from Zerniza arboreta (region of Sejnene, northwest of Tunisia) in June 2007. Of the latter species, leaves were collected from trees having two origins, Morocco and Italy. Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves provided essential oils in yields varying from 0.4±0.0 to 3.3±0.1%, according to the species. E. citriodora had the highest mean percentage of essential oil amongst the species examined, whereas the lowest one was obtained for E. botryoides originating from Morocco. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 140 compounds, representing 92.5 to 99.4% of the total oil composition. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole (2), followed by α-pinene (1), p-cymene, borneol, α-terpineol, cryptone, spathulenol, trans-pinocarveol (4), bicyclogermacrene (5), caryophyllene oxide, and β-phellandrene. Principal components analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis separated the eight Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into five groups, each constituting a chemotype.

  6. Differences in plastic responses to defoliation due to variation in the timing of treatments for two species of Sesbania (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Marshall, Diane L; Abrahamson, Nathan J; Avritt, Joy J; Hall, Paula M; Medeiros, Juliana S; Reynolds, Jerusha; Shaner, Marieken G M; Simpson, Healther L; Trafton, Alea N; Tyler, Anna P; Walsh, Sharon

    2005-05-01

    Plastic responses to stress in components of reproduction can have important effects on plant fitness and can vary both within and between species. Responses may also depend on when in the life cycle stress occurs. Here, it is predicted that the timing of initiation of a stress, defoliation, would affect the pattern of plastic responses. These differences should occur because some components of reproduction, such as flower number, are determined earlier in a plant's life than others, such as individual seed mass. To test this prediction, 50 % artificial defoliation treatments were initiated at four different times for Sesbania macrocarpa and S. vesicaria. Responses were measured in plant size, number of flowers, number of flowers/plant size, fruit set, number of seeds per fruit, individual seed mass and total seed mass per plant. For S. vesicaria, changes in the timing of stress changed the severity, but not the pattern of response. For S. macrocarpa, plastic responses to defoliation varied strikingly between early and late treatments. Late treatments resulted in over-compensation in this species. Sesbania macrocarpa was generally more plastic than S. vesicaria and the species showed opposite responses for most components of reproduction. While there were effects of timing of defoliation and differences between species, the nature of these effects did not precisely fit our predictions. Our results suggest that differences in the length and flexibility of the life cycles of the two species allowed for unexpected variation in responses. For example, because flower production continued after the last treatment in S. vesicaria, responses were not constrained to reductions in individual seed mass.

  7. Carl L. Estes Lake. Sabine River, Texas. Draft Environmental Statement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    hawthorn, ,reen ash, black willow, pecan , honey locust (Gleditsia triancanthos), and bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa). Sullivan and Nixon’s (40...project area is dominated by postoak, blackjack oak, and hickory on the drier sites with water oak, pecan and cedar elm along the tributary drainages...Iiisv. lie t tlrn, pie . * nt istsis.Iss.hoi-.o p .s.s- .t1tt. senieti It tos thn Chserokt’e Nntiort.. S~til i Ihe ’(i’-sr-ra i se~s’~ Tsstity this gift 0

  8. The uleine-rich fraction of Himatanthus lancifolius blocks proliferative responses of human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Nardin, Jeanine Marie; Lima, Melissa Pires; Machado, Julio Cesar; Hilst, Luciana Farhat; Santos, Cid Aimbiré de Moraes; Weffort-Santos, Almeriane Maria

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to report the effects shown by the uleine-rich fraction extracted from the barks of Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson (Apocynaceae) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in which we were able to inhibit the proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes by blocking their transformation into blast-dividing cells. Furthermore, it inhibited the proliferation of Daudi and Reh cells, two leukemic cell lines of lymphoid origin. The present study widens the biological applications of H. lancifolius' alkaloids to include its possible use as a modulator of the immune system.

  9. Composition and chemical variability of Eucalyptus bosistoana essential oil from Algerian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Bouzabata, Amel; Bighelli, Ange; Abed, Lahouari; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix

    2014-05-01

    The composition of eight oil samples isolated from leaves of Eucalyptus bosistoana F. Muell., acclimatized in Tamanrasset (southern Algeria, Saharan climate), has been investigated by GC (retention indices), GC-MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy. T wo groups may be distinguished. The five samples of group I have their composition dominated by p-cymene (32.0-39.5%), cryptone (11.5-15.6%), 1,8-cineole (7.8-10.5%) and spathulenol (6.8-16.5%). The three oil samples of group II contained mainly 1,8-cineole (55.3-63.9%) and alpha-pinene (11.6-12.1%).

  10. Presence of aromatase inhibitors in cycads.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M T; Itzhak, Y; Puett, D

    1995-07-28

    Cycads, the most primitive of the living gymnosperms, have been used and continue to be used for food and medicinal purposes by many cultures, although toxins must be removed before ingestion. In our quest to identify tropical plants that contain inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450 aromatase and thus may be efficacious in treating estrogen-dependent tumors, we have screened extracts from 5 species of cycad folia encompassing 3 genera: Cycas cairnsiana F. Muell., Cycas revoluta Thunb., Cycas rumphii Miq., Dioon spinulosum Dyer and Encephalartos ferox Bertol. All extracts were found to contain inhibitors of the human enzyme.

  11. A new whitefly genus and species, Himalayaleyrodes sarcococcae Dubey (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) infesting Christmas box (Buxaceae) in Western Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Anil Kumar; Singh, Sudhir

    2017-05-24

    Puparia, immatures and adults of a new whitefly genus and species, Himalayaleyrodes sarcococcae Dubey are described from the Western Himalaya, India. The new species was found feeding on leaves as well as on green stems of Sarcococca saligna (D. Don) Muell. Biological information, habitus, line arts, photomicrographs of holotype and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images are given for this new taxon. Also, we discuss similarities and dissimilarities of puparia of the new genus with its closely related genus Bemisia Quaintance & Baker. Feeding behaviour is discussed.

  12. Effects of a clean coal-fired power generating station on four common Wisconsin lichen species

    SciTech Connect

    Will-Wolf, S.

    1980-01-01

    Algal plasmolysis percentages and other morphological characteristics of Parmelia bolliana Muell. Arg., P. caperata (L.) Ach., P. rudecta Ach., and Physcia millegrana Degel. were compared for specimens growing near to and far from a rural coal-fired generating station in south central Wisconsin. SO/sup 2/ levels were 389 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, maximum 1 hr level, and 5-9 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, annual averages. Parmelia bolliana and P. caperata showed evidence of morphological alterations near the station; P. rudecta and Physcia millegrana did not.

  13. Tandem repeat DNA localizing on the proximal DAPI bands of chromosomes in Larix, Pinaceae.

    PubMed

    Hizume, Masahiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Matsumoto, Ayako; Maruyama, Yukie; Hayashi, Eiji; Kondo, Teiji; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Shozo; Hong, Deyuan

    2002-08-01

    Repetitive DNA was cloned from HindIII-digested genomic DNA of Larix leptolepis. The repetitive DNA was about 170 bp long, had an AT content of 67%, and was organized tandemly in the genome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and subsequent DAPI banding, the repetitive DNA was localized in DAPI bands at the proximal region of one arm of chromosomes in L. leptolepis and Larix chinensis. Southern blot hybridization to genomic DNA of seven species and five varieties probed with cloned repetitive DNA showed that the repetitive DNA family was present in a tandem organization in genomes of all Larix taxa examined. In addition to the 170-bp sequence, a 220-bp sequence belonging to the same DNA family was also present in 10 taxa. The 220-bp repeat unit was a partial duplication of the 170-bp repeat unit. The 220-bp repeat unit was more abundant in L. chinensis and Larix potaninii var. macrocarpa than in other taxa. The repetitive DNA composed 2.0-3.4% of the genome in most taxa and 0.3 and 0.5% of the genome in L. chinensis and L. potaninii var. macrocarpa, respectively. The unique distribution of the 220-bp repeat unit in Larix indicates the close relationship of these two species. In the family Pinaceae, the LPD (Larix proximal DAPI band specific repeat sequence family) family sequence is widely distributed, but their amount is very small except in the genus Larix. The abundant LPD family in Larix will occur after its speciation.

  14. Anthocyanin composition of wild Colombian fruits and antioxidant capacity measurement by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Liliana; Carriazo, José G; Almanza, Ovidio; Osorio, Coralia

    2012-02-15

    The qualitative and quantitative anthocyanin composition of four wild tropical fruits from Colombia was studied. Compounds of "mora pequeña" ( Rubus megalococcus Focke.), "uva de árbol" ( Myrciaria aff. cauliflora O. Berg), coral, and motilón ( Hyeronima macrocarpa Mull. Arg.) fruits were separately extracted with methanol-acetic acid (95:5, v/v). The anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) were obtained by selective adsorption on Amberlite XAD-7. Each extract was analyzed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-HRESI-MS(n) with LCMS-IT-TOF equipment in order to characterize the anthocyanin pigments and the coinjection in HPLC using standards allowed identifying the major constituents in each extract. The antioxidant activity was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis spectroscopy, using ABTS and DPPH free radicals. The ARE of motilón ( H. macrocarpa Müll. Arg) exhibited the highest radical scavenging activity in comparison to the other extracts. A second-order kinetic model was followed in all of the cases. These results suggested that the studied fruits are promising not only as source of natural pigments but also as antioxidant materials for food industry.

  15. Seedlings of subtropical rainforest species from similar successional guild show different photosynthetic and morphological responses to varying light levels.

    PubMed

    Lestari, D Puji; Nichols, J Doland

    2017-02-01

    Restoration using rainforest species in Australia and elsewhere has been limited to a small number of widely known species, mainly pioneer or early successional species, Using the presumed successional status as a guideline for species selection in reforestation should be taken with a caveat since a species' capacity to adjust to light gradients is not easily predicted. This study examined the photosynthetic and growth responses of four Australian subtropical rainforest species in the context of using late successional species in restoration programs. Since the selected species [Sloanea australis ((Benth.) F. Muell.), Cinnamomum oliveri (F. M. Bailey),Caldcluvia paniculosa ((F. Muell.) Hoogland) and Geissois benthamiana (F. Muell.)] are considered late-successional species, this study also discussed the possibility of separating these species according to their acclimation level towards light gradients. Seedlings of four species were grown under four light treatments using neutral density shade cloth (5, 33, 64 and 80% irradiance) during summer November 2014 to February 2015. All species demonstrated a narrow range of photosynthetic acclimation to different light levels, experienced photoinhibition and photodamage in 80% irradiance and allocated more biomass to leaves in 5% irradiance, supporting their classification as late successional species. Cinnamomum oliveri was the only species able to utilize higher irradiance, with a higher light saturated rate of photosynthesis than the other species. Canonical analysis of principal coordinates revealed that the degree of plasticity of each species in response to contrasting irradiance levels varied. This analysis separated the species into three light tolerance classes: obligate shade-adapted species (S. australis and G. benthamiana), high light-adapted species (C. paniculosa) and the generalist (C. oliveri). Overall, this study suggests that the four species can be planted and will grow well under 33-64% irradiance

  16. Does leaf water efficiency vary among eucalypts in water-limited environments?

    PubMed

    Hatton, Tom; Reece, Peter; Taylor, Peter; McEwan, Kerryn

    1998-01-01

    There is a need to generalize water use behavior of eucalypts to facilitate bioengineering and landscape remediation programs in a wide range of Australian environments. A critical question can be stated as a null hypothesis: tree water use per unit leaf area (leaf efficiency) is independent of eucalypt species. This is implicitly equivalent to the hydrological equilibrium hypothesis that states that leaf area is a function of climate, at least in cases where transpiration and growth are limited by soil water. Failure to reject this null hypothesis simplifies (a) the selection of tree species for water balance management, (b) the generation of regional-scale expectations of leaf area index, and (c) the estimation (monitoring) of the effectiveness of plantations in controlling site water balance. The hypothesis was tested with tree water use data collected in natural multi-species stands across Australia, including sites in the wet-dry season tropical woodlands of the Northern Territory, the Mediterranean climate forests of Western Australia, and a woodland system in southern New South Wales receiving an even distribution of rainfall throughout the year. We also tested the hypothesis in a multi-species tree plantation growing on a saline gradient. In each case, we could not reject the hypothesis of constant leaf efficiency among eucalypts. In every case there was a common, strong, linear relationship among tree leaf area and mean daily water use by all tree species in a sample. Single factor (species) analysis of variance did not detect significant differences between leaf water efficiencies of species. For the jarrah forest (Eucalyptus marginata J. Donn ex Sm., E. calophylla R. Br. ex Lindl.), the null hypothesis held in both spring (wet) and autumn (dry) conditions. The null hypothesis held in the mixed species woodland of New South Wales (E. macrorhynca F.J. Muell. ex Benth., E. blakelyi Maiden., E. polyanthemos Schauer.) under summer and autumn conditions, and

  17. A Viral Noncoding RNA Complements a Weakened Viral RNA Silencing Suppressor and Promotes Efficient Systemic Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flobinus, Alyssa; Hleibieh, Kamal; Klein, Elodie; Ratti, Claudio; Bouzoubaa, Salah; Gilmer, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta macrocarpa depends on viral RNA3, whereas in Nicotiana benthamiana this RNA is dispensable. RNA3 contains a coremin motif of 20 nucleotides essential for the stabilization of noncoding RNA3 (ncRNA3) and for long-distance movement in Beta species. Coremin mutants that are unable to accumulate ncRNA3 also do not achieve systemic movement in Beta species. A mutant virus carrying a mutation in the p14 viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR), unable to move long distances, can be complemented with the ncRNA3 in the lesion phenotype, viral RNA accumulation, and systemic spread. Analyses of the BNYVV VSR mechanism of action led to the identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) pathway as a target of the virus VSR and the assignment of a VSR function to the ncRNA3. PMID:27782046

  18. A new species of Alsodes (Anura: Alsodidae) from Altos de Cantillana, central Chile.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Andrés; Correa, Claudio; Castro, Camila; Méndez, Marco A

    2015-02-05

    Based on morphological and molecular evidence (mitochondrial and nuclear sequences) we describe a new species of spiny-chest frog, Alsodes cantillanensis, from central Chile (around 34°S). The type locality, Quebrada Infiernillo, is located in the Coastal Range at approximately 65 km from Santiago (Metropolitan Region), the capital of Chile. The distribution of the new species is included entirely in that of A. nodosus (32-36°S approximately), which was identified as the sister taxon according to molecular phylogenetic analyses. Moreover, both species are sympatric in the type locality. The new species was found in a Nothofagus macrocarpa relict forest potentially threatened by gold mining activities. We identify other threats for its conservation and some biological data needed for understanding the evolution of this species. This discovery reveals the scarce knowledge about biogeography, evolution and ecology of spiny-chest frogs from central Chile. 

  19. A Viral Noncoding RNA Complements a Weakened Viral RNA Silencing Suppressor and Promotes Efficient Systemic Host Infection.

    PubMed

    Flobinus, Alyssa; Hleibieh, Kamal; Klein, Elodie; Ratti, Claudio; Bouzoubaa, Salah; Gilmer, David

    2016-10-04

    Systemic movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta macrocarpa depends on viral RNA3, whereas in Nicotiana benthamiana this RNA is dispensable. RNA3 contains a coremin motif of 20 nucleotides essential for the stabilization of noncoding RNA3 (ncRNA3) and for long-distance movement in Beta species. Coremin mutants that are unable to accumulate ncRNA3 also do not achieve systemic movement in Beta species. A mutant virus carrying a mutation in the p14 viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR), unable to move long distances, can be complemented with the ncRNA3 in the lesion phenotype, viral RNA accumulation, and systemic spread. Analyses of the BNYVV VSR mechanism of action led to the identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) pathway as a target of the virus VSR and the assignment of a VSR function to the ncRNA3.

  20. Bioactive Compounds from Plants Used in Peruvian Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lock, Olga; Perez, Eleucy; Villar, Martha; Flores, Diana; Rojas, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that there are as many as 1400 plant species currently used in traditional Peruvian medicine; however, only a few have undergone scientific investigation. In this paper, we make a review of the botanical, chemical, pharmacological and clinical propierties of the most investigated Peruvian medicinal plants. The plant species selected for this review are: Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon), Croton lechleri (sangre de grado), Uncaria tomentosa/U. guianensis (uña de gato), Lepidium meyenii (maca), Physalis peruviana (aguaymanto), Minthostachys mollis (muña), Notholaena nivea (cuti-cuti), Maytenus macrocarpa (chuchuhuasi), Dracontium loretense (jergon sacha), Gentianella nitida (hercampuri), Plukenetia volubilis (sacha inchi) and Zea mays (maiz morado). For each of these plants, information about their traditional uses and current commercialization is also included.

  1. Leguminous lectins as tools for studying the role of sugar residues in leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, N M; Teixeira, E H; Assreuy, A M; Cavada, B S; Flores, C A; Ribeiro, R A

    1999-01-01

    The natural physiological ligands for selectins are oligosaccharides found in glycoprotein or glycolipid molecules in cell membranes. In order to study the role of sugar residues in the in vivo lectin anti-inflammatory effect, we tested three leguminous lectins with different carbohydrate binding affinities in the peritonitis and paw oedema models induced by carrageenin in rats. L. sericeus lectin was more anti-inflammatory than D. virgata lectin, the effects being reversed by their specific binding sugars (N-acetylglucosamine and alpha-methylmannoside, respectively). However, V. macrocarpa, a galactose-specific lectin, was not anti-inflammatory. The proposed anti-inflammatory activity of lectins could be due to a blockage of neutrophil-selectin carbohydrate ligands. Thus, according to the present data, we suggest an important role for N-acetylglucosamine residue as the major ligand for selectins on rat neutrophil membranes. PMID:10704148

  2. Antibacterial screening of some Peruvian medicinal plants used in Callería District.

    PubMed

    Kloucek, P; Polesny, Z; Svobodova, B; Vlkova, E; Kokoska, L

    2005-06-03

    Nine ethanol extracts of Brunfelsia grandiflora (Solanaceae), Caesalpinia spinosa (Caesalpiniaceae), Dracontium loretense (Araceae), Equisetum giganteum (Equisetaceae), Maytenus macrocarpa (Celastraceae), Phyllanthus amarus (Euphorbiaceae), Piper aduncum (Piperaceae), Terminalia catappa (Combretaceae), and Uncaria tomentosa (Rubiaceae), medicinal plants traditionally used in Calleria District for treating conditions likely to be associated with microorganisms, were screened for antimicrobial activity against nine bacterial strains using the broth microdilution method. Among the plants tested, Phyllanthus amarus and Terminalia catappa showed the most promising antibacterial properties, inhibiting all of the strains tested with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0.25 to 16 mg/ml. The extract from aerial part of Piper aduncum was significantly more active against Gram-positive (MICs ranging from 1 to 2 mg/ml) than against Gram-negative bacteria (MICs > 16 mg/ml).

  3. The ethnopharmacology of Madeira and Porto Santo Islands, a review.

    PubMed

    Rivera, D; Obón, C

    1995-05-01

    The ethnopharmacology of Madeira and Porto Santo Islands is extremely interesting because of the cultural and biogeographic features of this region, which make it a centre of medicinal plant diversity (richness of endemic flora, geographical isolation in the Atlantic sea, crosscultural influences, and past abundance of local healers). The medicinal flora of Madeira is composed of 259 species. Some noteworthy medicinal taxa, endemic or locally relevant, are: Acanthus mollis, Aeonium glandulosum, Aeonium glutinosum, Bidens pilosa, Borago officinalis, Chamaemelum nobile var. discoideum, Culcita macrocarpa, Echium nervosum, Euphorbia platiphylla, Helichrysum melaleucum, Helichrysum obconicum, Hypericum glandulosum, Hypericum humifussum, Kleinia repens, Laurus azorica, Monizia edulis, Ocotea foetens, Psoralea bituminosa, Rubus bollei, Rumex maderensis, Sambucus lanceolata, Scilla maderensis, Sedum brissemoretii, Sedum farinosum, Sedum nudum, Sibthorpia peregrina, Teucrium betonicum, Thymus caespititius, Trifolium squamosum and Vaccinium padifolium. Among the medicinal cryptogams, one can underline the parasitic fungus Laurobasidium lauri, which grows on the stems of Laurus azorica and is used as an antirheumatic, haemostatic, emmenagogue, insecticide and analeptic.

  4. Responses of wetland plants to effluents in water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Weber, D.E.; Nguyen, M.T.; Esry, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    Responses of two wetland vascular plants, Echinochloa crusgalli and Sesbania macrocarpa, exposed to effluents from a coke plant, a pulp mill, a wastewater treatment plant, and the herbicide, hexazinone, were measured in three types of tests: seed germination and early growth, seedling survival and growth in hydroponic culture, and seedling survival and growth in sand and synthetic sediments with clay, silt, and sand, 3, 5, 7.5, or 10% organic contents. There was no effect of effluents or herbicide on germination and survival was affected only by the herbicide. When compared to controls, growth rates were reduced significantly in all tests except for E. crusgalli exposed to effluent from a wastewater treatment plant. There, the effluent stimulated growth in sediments. Increasing concentrations of organic matter in sediments had little effect on toxicity of effluents, but did cause reduced effects of hexazinone.

  5. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of uleine from Himatanthus lancifolius.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Cláudia; Correia, Beatriz L; Stinghen, Andréa E M; Santos, Cid A M

    2010-01-01

    Application of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors is the primary treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Alkaloids, such as physostigmine, galanthamine, and huperzine A, play an important role as AChE inhibitors. The aim of this work was to evaluate Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson, a Brazilian species of Apocynaceae, and its main indole alkaloid uleine, in order to identify new AChE inhibitors. The plant fluid extract, fractions, and uleine were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's colorimetric method for thin-layer chromatography (TLC), 96-well microplates, and also Marston's TLC colorimetric method. Both TLC assays showed similar results. At 5 mg/mL, the fluid extract inhibited the AChE enzyme by (50.71 +/- 8.2)%. The ethyl acetate fraction exhibited the highest level of AChE inhibition, followed by the dichloromethane fraction. The isolated alkaloid uleine displayed an IC50 value of 0.45 microM.

  6. Flavan-3-ols isolated from some medicinal plants inhibiting COX-1 and COX-2 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Y; Serrano, G; Perera, P; Bohlin, L

    1998-08-01

    Extracts from the four plant species Atuna racemosa Raf. ssp. racemosa, Syzygium corynocarpum (A. Gray) C. Muell., Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & Perry and Vantanea peruviana Macbr., traditionally used for inflammatory conditions, were fractionated using a cyclooxygenase-1 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis in vitro assay. The flavan-3-ol derivatives (+)-catechin, (+)-gallocatechin, 4'-O-Me-ent-gallocatechin, ouratea-catechin and ouratea-proanthocynidin A were isolated as active principles. The IC50 values ranged from 3.3 microM to 138 microM whilst indomethacin under the same test conditions had an IC50 value of 1.1 microM. The flavonol rhamnosides mearnsitrin, myricitrin and quercitrin were also isolated. When further tested for inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase-2 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis, the five flavan-3-ol derivatives exhibited from equal to weaker inhibitory potencies, as compared to their cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitory effects. The flavonol rhamnosides were inactive towards both enzymes.

  7. Effects of Himatanthus lancifolius on human leukocyte chemotaxis and their adhesion to integrins.

    PubMed

    Nardin, Jeanine Marie; de Souza, Wesley Maurício; Lopes, Juliano Ferreira; Florão, Angela; de Moraes Santos, Cid Aimbiré; Weffort-Santos, Almeriane Maria

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the anti-inflammatory activities of the uleine-rich fraction extracted from the barks of Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson (Apocynaceae). To achieve this, we focused on its in vitro effects on some steps of the inflammatory response using peripheral human leukocytes. The results presented herein show that the uleine-rich fraction significantly inhibits the migration of casein-induced granulocytes and their adhesion to fibronectin and vitronectin, along with mononuclear cells, by down-regulating the expression of alpha 4beta1 and alpha5beta1 integrins. The data suggest that H. LANCIFOLIUS has the potential of interferring with leukocyte trafficking through its uleine-rich fraction, emphasizing its usefulness in inflammatory conditions. DEXA:dexamethasone disodium phosphate FN:fibronectin PMN:polymorphonuclear URF:uleine-rich fraction VN:vitronectin.

  8. Tree-ring stable isotope and growth impacts of climate variability: future implications for prairie-forest ecotones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Alexis S.; Billings, Sharon A.

    2010-05-01

    Shifts in prairie-forest ecotones are expected with forecasted global climate change. Understanding how co-occurring tree species respond to environmental variability may help in understanding species responses and potential retraction of tree species under future climate conditions. Contrasting growth-climate relationships derived from tree-rings among co-occurring Quercus macrocarpa, a predominant tree species along the North American prairie-forest ecotone, and Q. rubra, a species generally found in more mesic conditions, suggests a constant growth-climate relationship throughout the life of the tree. For example, no significant difference (P> 0.05) was found between residuals from regression of tree-ring basal area increments and Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) in early or later years of either species, as derived from increment cores. These findings contrast with recent evidence of declines in drought sensitivity in Q. macrocarpa as this species ages, which may be linked to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and emphasize the need for further understanding of prairie-forest ecotone dynamics. Utilization of δ13C data from α-cellulose will provide further insight into the changing water-use and carbon dynamics in response to climate variability. Used in conjunction with growth-climate relationships, δ13C data may also assist in predicting future drought sensitivity and forest retraction in trees in prairie-forest ecotones. Continued sensitivity to drought regardless of the age of a tree remains an important concern in predicting future species ranges and prairie-forest species composition in the future.

  9. Inorganic profile of some Brazilian medicinal plants obtained from ethanolic extract and ''in natura'' samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.O.M.; de Sousa, P.T.; Salvador, V.L.R.; Sato, I.M.

    2004-10-03

    The Anadenathera macrocarpa, Schinus molle, Hymenaea courbaril, Cariniana legalis, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnodendron barbatiman, were collected ''in natura'' samples (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) from different commercial suppliers. The pharmaco-active compounds in ethanolic extracts had been made by the Mato Grosso Federal University (UFMT). The energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry was used for the elemental analysis in different parts of the plants and respective ethanolic extracts. The Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Rb, S, Sr and Zn concentrations were determined by the fundamental parameters method. Some specimens showed a similar inorganic profile for ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples and some ones showed a distinct inorganic profile. For example, the Anadenathera macrocarpa showed a similar concentration in Mg, P, Cu, Zn and Rb elements in ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples; however very different concentration in Na, S, Cl, K , Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr was observed in distinctive samples. The Solidago microglossa showed the K, Ca, Cl, S, Mg, P and Fe elements as major constituents in both samples, suggesting that the extraction process did not affect in a considerable way the ''in natura'' inorganic composition. The elemental composition of the different parts of the plants (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) has been also determined. For example, the Schinus molle specimen showed P, K, Cl and Ca elements as major constituents in the seeds, Mg, K and Sr in the barks and Mg, S, Cl and Mn in the leaves, demonstrating a differentiated elementary distribution. These inorganic profiles will contribute to evaluate the quality control of the Brazilian herbaceous trade and also will assist to identify which parts of the medicinal plants has greater therapeutic effect.

  10. Reconstructing relative humidity from plant delta18O and deltaD as deuterium deviations from the global meteoric water line.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Steven L; Brooks, J Renée; Meinzer, Frederick C; Roden, John; Pazdur, Anna; Pawelczyk, Slawomira; Hartsough, Peter; Snyder, Keirith; Plavcová, Lenka; Santrůcek, Jirí

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose delta18O and deltaD can provide insights on climates and hydrological cycling in the distant past and how these factors differ spatially. However, most studies of plant cellulose have used only one isotope, most commonly delta18O, resulting in difficulties partitioning variation in delta18O of precipitation vs. evaporative conditions that affect leaf water isotopic enrichment. Moreover, observations of pronounced diurnal differences from conventional steady-state model predictions of leaf water isotopic fractionation have cast some doubt on single isotope modeling approaches for separating precipitation and evaporation drivers of cellulose delta18O or deltaD. We explore a dual isotope approach akin to the concept of deuterium-excess (d), to establish deuterium deviations from the global meteoric water line in leaf water (deltad(l)) as driven by relative humidity (RH). To demonstrate this concept, we survey studies of leaf water delta18O and deltaD in hardwood vs. conifer trees. We then apply the concept to cellulose delta18O and deltaD using a mechanistic model of cellulose delta18O and deltaD to reconstruct deuterium deviations from the global meteoric water line (deltad(c)) in Quercus macrocarpa, Q. robur, and Pseudotsuga menziesii. For each species, deltad(c) showed strong correlations with RH across sites. deltad(c) agreed well with steady-state predictions for Q. macrocarpa, while for Q. robur, the relationship with RH was steeper than expected. The slope of deltad(c) vs. RH of P. menziesii was also close to steady-state predictions, but deltad(c) were more enriched than predicted. This is in agreement with our leaf water survey showing conifer deltad(l) was more enriched than predicted. Our data reveal that applications of this method should be appropriate for reconstructing RH from cellulose delta18O and deltaD after accounting for differences between hardwoods and conifers. Hence, deltad(c) should be useful for understanding variability in RH

  11. Vulnerability of native savanna trees and exotic Khaya senegalensis to seasonal drought.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Stefan K; Sanders, Gregor J; Bristow, Mila; Hutley, Lindsay B; Beringer, Jason; Livesley, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Seasonally dry ecosystems present a challenge to plants to maintain water relations. While native vegetation in seasonally dry ecosystems have evolved specific adaptations to the long dry season, there are risks to introduced exotic species. African mahogany, Khaya senegalensis Desr. (A. Juss.), is an exotic plantation species that has been introduced widely in Asia and northern Australia, but it is unknown if it has the physiological or phenotypic plasticity to cope with the strongly seasonal patterns of water availability in the tropical savanna climate of northern Australia. We investigated the gas exchange and water relations traits and adjustments to seasonal drought in K. senegalensis and native eucalypts (Eucalyptus tetrodonta F. Muell. and Corymbia latifolia F. Muell.) in a savanna ecosystem in northern Australia. The native eucalypts did not exhibit any signs of drought stress after 3 months of no rainfall and probably had access to deeper soil moisture late into the dry season. Leaf water potential, stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthesis all remained high in the dry season but osmotic adjustment was not observed. Overstorey leaf area index (LAI) was 0.6 in the native eucalypt savanna and did not change between wet and dry seasons. In contrast, the K. senegalensis plantation in the wet season was characterized by a high water potential, high stomatal conductance and transpiration and a high LAI of 2.4. In the dry season, K. senegalensis experienced mild drought stress with a predawn water potential -0.6 MPa. Overstorey LAI was halved, and stomatal conductance and transpiration drastically reduced, while minimum leaf water potentials did not change (-2 MPa) and no osmotic adjustment occurred. Khaya senegalensis exhibited an isohydric behaviour and also had a lower hydraulic vulnerability to cavitation in leaves, with a P50 of -2.3 MPa. The native eucalypts had twice the maximum leaf hydraulic conductance but a much higher P50 of -1.5 MPa

  12. Superhydrophobic nature of nanostructures on an indigenous Australian eucalyptus plant and its potential application

    PubMed Central

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Le, Xuan Thi; Fawcett, Derek

    2011-01-01

    In this preliminary study, the morphology and nanostructured features formed by the epicuticular waxes of the mottlecah (Eucalyptus macrocarpa) leaf were investigated and quantified. The surface features formed by the waxes give the leaf remarkable wetting and self-cleaning properties that enhance the plant’s survival in an arid climate. This paper also provides experimental evidence of the self-assembly properties of the epicuticular waxes. Analysis of the water contact angle measurements gave a mean static contact angle of 162.00 ± 6.10 degrees, which clearly indicated that the mottlecah’s leaf surface was superhydrophobic. Detailed field emission scanning electron microscopy examination revealed that the surface was covered by bumps approximately 20 μm in diameter and regularly spaced at a distance of around 26 μm. The bumps are capped by nanotubules/pillars with an average diameter of 280 nm at the tips. Self-cleaning experiments indicated that the mottlecah’s leaf could be effectively cleaned by a fine spray of water droplets that rolled over the surface picking up contaminants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy investigation of extracted epicuticular waxes revealed that the waxes were capable of self-reassembly and formed features similar to those of the original leaf surface. Furthermore, also reported is a simple technique for surface treating one side of a planar surface to produce a superhydrophobic surface that can be used as a planar floatation platform for microdevices. PMID:24198490

  13. Vegetation of eastern Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, Stephen S.; Schofield, Wilfred B.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Daniëls, Fred J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Plant communities of Unalaska Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands of western Alaska, and their relationship to environmental variables, were studied using a combined Braun-Blanquet and multivariate approach. Seventy relevés represented the range of structural and compositional variation in the matrix of vegetation and landform zonation. Eleven major community types were distinguished within six physiognomic–ecological groups: I. Dry coastal meadows: Honckenya peploides beach meadow, Leymus mollis dune meadow. II. Mesic meadows: Athyrium filix-femina – Aconitum maximum meadow, Athyrium filix-femina – Calamagrostis nutkaensis meadow, Erigeron peregrinus – Thelypteris quelpaertensis meadow. III. Wet snowbed meadow: Carex nigricans snowbed meadow. IV. Heath: Linnaea borealis – Empetrum nigrum heath, Phyllodoce aleutica heath, Vaccinium uliginosum – Thamnolia vermicularis fellfield. V. Mire: Carex pluriflora – Plantago macrocarpa mire. VI. Deciduous shrub thicket: Salix barclayi – Athyrium filix-femina thicket. These were interpreted as a complex gradient primarily influenced by soil moisture, elevation, and pH. Phytogeographical and syntaxonomical analysis of the plant communities indicated that the dry coastal meadows, most of the heaths, and the mire vegetation belonged, respectively, to the widespread classes Honckenyo–Elymetea, Loiseleurio–Vaccinietea, and Scheuchzerio–Caricetea, characterized by their circumpolar and widespread species. Amphi-Beringian species were likely diagnostic of amphi-Beringian syntaxa, many of these yet to be described.

  14. Matrix Effect on the Spray Drying Nanoencapsulation of Lippia sidoides Essential Oil in Chitosan-Native Gum Blends.

    PubMed

    Paula, Haroldo C B; Oliveira, Erick F; Carneiro, Maria J M; de Paula, Regina C M

    2017-03-01

    Essential oils have many applications in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and food fields, however, their use is limited to the fact that they are very labile, requiring their a priori encapsulation, aiming to preserve their properties.This work reports on the preparation of chitosan-gum nanoparticles loaded with thymol containing Lippia sidoides essential oil, using exudates of Anacardium Occidentale (cashew gum), Sterculia striata (chichá gum), and Anadenanthera macrocarpa trees (angico gum). Nanoparticles were produced by spray drying an emulsion of L. sidoides essential oil and aqueous solution of gums with different chitosan : gum ratios. Samples were characterized by FTIR and UV/VIS spectroscopy, particle size, volume distribution, and zeta potential. The FTIR spectrum showed the main signals of chitosan and the gums. Data obtained revealed that the samples had sizes in the nano range, varying from 17 nm to 800 nm. The zeta potential varied from + 30 mV to - 40 mV. Nanoparticle loading values varied from 6.7 % to 15.6 %, with an average encapsulating efficiency of 62 %, where the samples with high ratios of cashew gum and chichá gum presented high oil loading values. The data revealed that both the chitosan : gum ratio and polysaccharide characteristics play major roles in nanoencapsulation processes.

  15. Effect of leguminous lectins on the growth of Rhizobium tropici CIAT899.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Cunha, Cláudio Oliveira; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Bastos, Rafaela Mesquita; Mercante, Fábio Martins; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2013-05-17

    Rhizobium tropici is a Gram-negative bacterium that induces nodules and fixed atmospheric nitrogen in symbiotic association with Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and some other leguminous species. Lectins are proteins that specifically bind to carbohydrates and, consequently, modulate different biological functions. In this study, the d-glucose/ d-mannose-binding lectins (from seeds of Dioclea megacarpa, D. rostrata and D. violacea) and D-galactose-binding lectins (from seeds of Bauhinia variegata, Erythina velutina and Vatairea macrocarpa) were purified using chromatographic techniques and evaluated for their effect on the growth of R. tropici CIAT899. All lectins were assayed with a satisfactory degree of purity according to SDS-PAGE analysis, and stimulated bacterial growth; in particular, the Dioclea rostrata lectin was the most active among all tested proteins. As confirmed in the present study, both d-galactose- and d-glucose/d-mannose-binding lectins purified from the seeds of leguminous plants may be powerful biotechnological tools to stimulate the growth of R. tropici CIAT99, thus improving symbiotic interaction between rhizobia and common bean and, hence, the production of this field crop.

  16. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  17. Comparison of wood-inhabiting myxomycetes in subalpine and montane coniferous forests in the Yatsugatake Mountains of Central Japan.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunari; Harakon, Yuichi

    2012-05-01

    To demonstrate altitudinal gradients (and resulting temperatures) that affect myxomycete biodiversity and species composition, we statistically compared myxomycete assemblages between a subalpine coniferous forest and a montane pine forest within the region of the Yatsugatake Mountains, Nagano Prefecture, Central Japan. In summer and autumn field surveys during 2003-2010, 53 myxomycete taxa (with varieties treated as species) were observed from 639 records of fruiting bodies in the subalpine forest and 32 taxa were detected from 613 records in the montane forest. There were 20 species in common between the assemblages and the percentage similarity index was 0.400. Myxomycete biodiversity was higher in the subalpine than in the montane forest. Nine myxomycete species were statistically frequent occurrences in the subalpine forest and appeared in autumn: Lamproderma columbinum, Cribraria macrocarpa, Trichia botrytis, Physarum newtonii, Diderma ochraceum, Enteridium splendens, Elaeomyxa cerifera, Trichia verrucosa, and Colloderma oculatum. Five species were restricted to appear in the subalpine forest: Cribraria purpurea, Cribraria rufa, Cribraria ferruginea, Cribraria piriformis, and Lepidoderma tigrinum. Dead wood in the subalpine forest provided a breeding habitat for specific myxomycetes that inhabit cold areas; that is those areas having geographical features of decreasing temperature and increasing elevation, such as the temperate area of Central Japan.

  18. Contribution of the carbohydrate-binding ability of Vatairea guianensis lectin to induce edematogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Marques, Gabriela F O; Osterne, Vinicius J S; Almeida, Livia M; Oliveira, Messias V; Brizeno, Luiz A C; Pinto-Junior, Vanir R; Santiago, Mayara Q; Neco, Antonio H B; Mota, Mario R L; Souza, Luiz A G; Nascimento, Kyria S; Pires, Alana F; Cavada, Benildo S; Assreuy, Ana M S

    2017-09-01

    Vatairea guianensis lectin (VGL), Dalbergiae tribe, is a N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc)/Galactose (Gal) lectin previously purified and characterized. In this work, we report its structural features, obtained from bioinformatics tools, and its inflammatory effect, obtained from a rat paw edema model. The VGL model was obtained by homology with the lectin of Vatairea macrocarpa (VML) as template, and we used it to demonstrate the common characteristics of legume lectins, such as the jellyroll motif and presence of a metal-binding site in the vicinity of the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD). Protein-ligand docking revealed favorable interactions with N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, d-galactose and related sugars as well as several biologically relevant N- and O-glycans. In vivo testing of paw edema revealed that VGL induces edematogenic effect involving prostaglandins, interleukins and VGL CRD. Taken together, these data corroborate with previous reports showing that VGL interacts with N- and/or O-glycans of molecular targets, particularly in those presenting galactosides in their structure, contributing to the lectin inflammatory effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  19. Microbial Decomposition of Elm and Oak Leaves in a Karst Aquifer †

    PubMed Central

    Eichem, Angela C.; Dodds, Walter K.; Tate, Cathy M.; Edler, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Dry Chinquapin oak (Quercus macrocarpa) and American elm (Ulmus americana) leaves were placed in four microcosms fed by groundwater springs to monitor changes in dry mass, ash-free dry mass, and microbial activity over a 35-day period. Oxygen microelectrodes were used to measure microbial activity and to estimate millimeter-scale heterogeneity in that activity. Oak leaves lost mass more slowly than elm leaves. Generally, there was a decrease in total dry weight over the first 14 days, after which total dry weight began to increase. However, there were consistent decreases in ash-free dry mass over the entire incubation period, suggesting that the material remaining after initial leaf decomposition trapped inorganic particles. Microbial activity was higher on elm leaves than on oak leaves, with peak activity occurring at 6 and 27 days, respectively. The level of oxygen saturation on the bottom surface of an elm leaf ranged between 0 and 75% within a 30-mm2 area. This spatial heterogeneity in O2 saturation disappeared when the water velocity increased from 0 to 6 cm s-1. Our results suggest that as leaves enter the groundwater, they decompose and provide substrate for microorganisms. The rate of decomposition depends on leaf type, small-scale variations in microbial activity, water velocity, and the length of submersion time. During the initial stages of decomposition, anoxic microzones are formed that could potentially be important to the biogeochemistry of the otherwise oxic aquifer. PMID:16349078

  20. Asháninka Palm Management and Domestication in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Sosnowska, Joanna; Walanus, Adam; Balslev, Henrik

    Palms are a natural resource that has been abundantly used by Amerindians for centuries. Only a few palm domestications have been reported in the American tropics, where there is great diversity of the Arecaceae family. We report the results of a survey combining ethnobotanical and ecological methods to study the past and present management and distribution of palms by the Asháninka indigenous people from the Tambo river region in the Peruvian Amazon. Our objectives were to document palm-related traditional ecological knowledge, to examine correlation between palm abundance and Asháninka management practices and social exchange of palm resources, and to address the question of how the Asháninka have modified palm diversity and distribution in their territory. We found that most palm species have multiple uses; the most intensively managed were palms that provide thatch, notably Attalea phalerata, Oenocarpus mapora and Phytelephas macrocarpa. Of these, Attalea phalerata was the most commonly cultivated and was found only in cultivated stands. Our results have implications for understanding the domestication of Attalea weberbaueri, which is a landrace within the Attalea phalerata complex. A closer understanding of this process would require morphometric and genetic methods to compare wild and managed populations.

  1. Induction of Apoptosis of 2,4′,6-Trihydroxybenzophenone in HT-29 Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Ma Ma; Karsani, Saiful Anuar

    2014-01-01

    2,4′,6-Trihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl. fruits. It was found to inhibit cell proliferation in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line but caused little damage to WRL-68 normal human liver and MRC-5 normal human fibroblast lung cell lines. The compound was found to sharply affect the viability of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HT-29 cells treated with the compound showed morphological changes under microscopic examination such as cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, DNA fragmentation, and the occurrence of apoptotic nuclei. The percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, and dead or necrotic cells was determined by flow cytometry using annexin V-FTIC/PI staining. In addition, flow cytometry showed that, when the HT-29 cells were treated with 115 µM of the compound, it resulted in G0/G1 phase arrest in a time-dependent manner. Western blot revealed an upregulation of PUMA, Bak, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 proteins suggesting that the compound induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells by regulating these proteins. PMID:24579081

  2. Transient response of sap flow to wind speed.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia R; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Wu, Shen-Yuang; Phillips, Nathan G

    2009-01-01

    Transient responses of sap flow to step changes in wind speed were experimentally investigated in a wind tunnel. A Granier-type sap flow sensor was calibrated and tested in a cylindrical tube for analysis of its transient time response. Then the sensor was used to measure the transient response of a well-watered Pachira macrocarpa plant to wind speed variations. The transient response of sap flow was described using the resistance-capacitance model. The steady sap flow rate increased as the wind speed increased at low wind speeds. Once the wind speed exceeded 8.0 m s(-1), the steady sap flow rate did not increase further. The transpiration rate, measured gravimetrically, showed a similar trend. The response of nocturnal sap flow to wind speed variation was also measured and compared with the results in the daytime. Under the same wind speed, the steady sap flow rate was smaller than that in the daytime, indicating differences between diurnal and nocturnal hydraulic function, and incomplete stomatal closure at night. In addition, it was found that the temporal response of the Granier sensor is fast enough to resolve the transient behaviour of water flux in plant tissue.

  3. In vitro effect of branch extracts of Juniperus species from Turkey on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Marino, Andreana; Bellinghieri, Valentina; Nostro, Antonia; Miceli, Natalizia; Taviano, Maria Fernanda; Güvenç, Ayşegül; Bisignano, Giuseppe

    2010-08-01

    Methanol and aqueous branch extracts of five Juniperus species were examined for their effects on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P and S. aureus 810 biofilm. The Turkish plant material was Juniperus communis L. var. communis, J. communis L. var. saxatilis Pall., Juniperus drupacea Labill., Juniperus oxycedrus L. ssp. oxycedrus, J. oxycedrus L. ssp. macrocarpa (Sibth. & Sm.) Ball. The Juniperus extracts were subjected to preliminary phytochemical analysis by thin-layer chromatography. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The effects of the extracts on biofilm formation and preformed biofilm were quantified by both biomass OD and the CFU counting method. The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of polyphenols, coumarins, lignans, steroids, alkaloids and terpenes. For both strains, the MICs of all extracts were in the range of 4.88-78.12 microg mL(-1). On S. aureus ATCC 6538P, the effects of subinhibitory concentration (0.5 MIC) of the extracts were minimal on planktonic growth and on adhering cells, whereas they were greater on biofilm formation. Differently, on S. aureus 810, they showed only a rather low efficacy on biofilm formation. The extracts at 2 MIC demonstrated a good activity on a preformed biofilm of S. aureus ATCC 6538P.

  4. Usefulness of sediment toxicity tests with estuarine plants and animals to indicate municipal and industrial effluent impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Weber, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The environmental impact of municipal and industrial effluents has been predicted from results from single species toxicity tests. The goal of these tests is to ensure that water quality criteria and the designated use of the waterbody is not impacted. Recently, the focus of some effluent toxicity evaluation has centered on determining the effluent impact on the sediment in the receiving water. This study evaluated the toxicities of several sediment samples collected above and below six outfalls to the Pensacola Bay system. Toxicities were determined using three macrophytic plants and four animal species. The sediments, with few exceptions, exhibited a low level of toxicity. The mysid shrimp was more sensitive than Ampelisca, Leptocheirus and the sheepshead minnow. The sensitivities of the plants, Echinochloa crusgalli, Scirpus robustus and Sesbania macrocarpa, were comparable to those of the animal species. The toxicity of time sediment, when compared to that of the effluent, determined using standard single species of plants and animals was less. Overall, the sediment toxicity tests were useful in providing insight on the impact of effluents. However, the application and usefulness of this assessment tool is highly dependent upon a variety of factors, including the geomorphological characteristics of the receiving waters.

  5. Superhydrophobic nature of nanostructures on an indigenous Australian eucalyptus plant and its potential application.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Le, Xuan Thi; Fawcett, Derek

    2011-01-01

    In this preliminary study, the morphology and nanostructured features formed by the epicuticular waxes of the mottlecah (Eucalyptus macrocarpa) leaf were investigated and quantified. The surface features formed by the waxes give the leaf remarkable wetting and self-cleaning properties that enhance the plant's survival in an arid climate. This paper also provides experimental evidence of the self-assembly properties of the epicuticular waxes. Analysis of the water contact angle measurements gave a mean static contact angle of 162.00 ± 6.10 degrees, which clearly indicated that the mottlecah's leaf surface was superhydrophobic. Detailed field emission scanning electron microscopy examination revealed that the surface was covered by bumps approximately 20 μm in diameter and regularly spaced at a distance of around 26 μm. The bumps are capped by nanotubules/pillars with an average diameter of 280 nm at the tips. Self-cleaning experiments indicated that the mottlecah's leaf could be effectively cleaned by a fine spray of water droplets that rolled over the surface picking up contaminants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy investigation of extracted epicuticular waxes revealed that the waxes were capable of self-reassembly and formed features similar to those of the original leaf surface. Furthermore, also reported is a simple technique for surface treating one side of a planar surface to produce a superhydrophobic surface that can be used as a planar floatation platform for microdevices.

  6. The Distribution of Anacardiaceae in Teluk Bahang Forest Reserve, Pulau Pinang

    PubMed Central

    Juperi, Shaodah; Zakaria, Rahmad; Mansor, Asyraf

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of Anacardiaceae in Teluk Bahang Permanent Forest Reserve (TBPFR) in Pulau Pinang, all trees with a diameter at breast high (DBH) ≥ 5 cm were enumerated in a study site constituting 0.4 ha of the reserve. Seventy five individuals of Anacardiaceae (14% of all trees) are recorded. These individuals represent 4 genera and 5 species, namely, Mangifera pentandra, Mangifera macrocarpa, Gluta elegans, Campnosperma auriculatum and Swintonia floribunda. The mean density of Anacardiaceae within the study plots is 7.50±8.14 (mean±S.D.) per ha whereas the basal area (BA) calculated is 0.97 m2/0.40 ha. The importance value (IVi) for Anacardiaceae is 81%. The estimated total aboveground biomass (TAGB) for Anacardiaceae is 24.24 ton/0.40 ha. A total of 333 Anacardiaceae saplings with a DBH < 5 cm are recorded. These saplings have been identified as juveniles of the genera Gluta (9.99%), Swintonia (84.90%) and Mangifera (5.11%). PMID:24575224

  7. Multiple Timescale Comparison of the Aggregate Drought Index (ADI), the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), and Tree Rings in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyantash, J.; Sakata, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Aggregate Drought Index (ADI) [Keyantash and Dracup, 2004] is a drought index computed using the principal components of selected hydrological variables such as precipitation, evaporation, streamflow, reservoir storage, soil moisture, and alpine snowpack. Like the widely-used Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the ADI possesses the ability to simultaneously assess the shortage/abundance of water over a variety of desired timescales (e.g., 1 month, 12 month, 24 month, etc.). In this paper, the ADI is compared against the SPI, over multiple timescales, in the San Jacinto and Santa Ana River basins of Southern California. The comparisons occur between water years 1962 and 2011, an interval which spans three historic Southern California droughts (1976-77, 1987-1992, and 2007-2009). In both river basins, the drought indices are also compared against tree ring reconstructions of Big Cone Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa), during a common crossover period in the latter 20th century. For historical perspective, the oldest tree ring reconstruction extends back to the year 1375.

  8. The distribution of anacardiaceae in teluk bahang forest reserve, pulau pinang.

    PubMed

    Juperi, Shaodah; Zakaria, Rahmad; Mansor, Asyraf

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the distribution of Anacardiaceae in Teluk Bahang Permanent Forest Reserve (TBPFR) in Pulau Pinang, all trees with a diameter at breast high (DBH) ≥ 5 cm were enumerated in a study site constituting 0.4 ha of the reserve. Seventy five individuals of Anacardiaceae (14% of all trees) are recorded. These individuals represent 4 genera and 5 species, namely, Mangifera pentandra, Mangifera macrocarpa, Gluta elegans, Campnosperma auriculatum and Swintonia floribunda. The mean density of Anacardiaceae within the study plots is 7.50±8.14 (mean±S.D.) per ha whereas the basal area (BA) calculated is 0.97 m(2)/0.40 ha. The importance value (IVi) for Anacardiaceae is 81%. The estimated total aboveground biomass (TAGB) for Anacardiaceae is 24.24 ton/0.40 ha. A total of 333 Anacardiaceae saplings with a DBH < 5 cm are recorded. These saplings have been identified as juveniles of the genera Gluta (9.99%), Swintonia (84.90%) and Mangifera (5.11%).

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity in Mucuna species of India using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and inter simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ravishankar R; Pawar, Kiran D; Rane, Manali R; Yadav, Shrirang R; Bapat, Vishwas A; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2016-04-01

    Genus Mucuna which is native to China and Eastern India comprises of perennial climbing legume with long slender branches, trifoliate leaves and bear green or brown pod covered with soft or rigid hairs that cause intense irritation. The plants of this genus are agronomically and economically important and commercially cultivated in India, China and other regions of the world. The high degrees of taxonomical confusions exist in Mucuna species that make authentic identification and classification difficult. In the present study, the genetic diversity among the 59 accessions of six species and three varieties of M. pruriens has been assessed using DNA fingerprinting based molecular markers techniques namely randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and combined dataset of RAPD and ISSR. Also, genetic relationship among two endemic species of Mucuna namely M. imbricata and M. macrocarpa and two varieties namely IIHR hybrid (MHR) and Dhanwantari (MD) with other species under study was investigated by using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis. The cluster analysis of RAPD, ISSR and combined dataset of RAPD and ISSR clearly demonstrated the existence of high interspecific variation than intra-specific variation in genus Mucuna. The utility and efficacy of RAPD and ISSR for the study of intra species and interspecies genetic diversity was evident from AMOVA and PCoA analysis. This study demonstrates the genetic diversity in Mucuna species and indicates that these markers could be successfully used to assess genetic variation among the accessions of Mucuna species.

  10. Insecticidal properties of essential oils against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) and their inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase and adenosine triphosphatases.

    PubMed

    Abou-Taleb, Hamdy K; Mohamed, Magdy I E; Shawir, Mohamed S; Abdelgaleil, Samir A M

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils from 20 Egyptian plants were obtained by using hydrodistillation. The chemical composition of the isolated oils was identified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. Fumigant and contact toxicities of the essential oils were evaluated against the adults of Tribolium castaneum. In fumigation assays, the oil of Origanum vulgare (LC50 = 9.97 mg/L air) displayed the highest toxicity towards the adults of T. castaneum. In contact assays, the oils of Artemisia monosperma (LC50 = 0.07 mg/cm(2)) and O. vulgare (LC50 = 0.07 mg/cm(2)) were the most potent toxicants against the adults of T. castaneum. Biochemical studies showed that the tested oils caused pronounced inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) isolated from the larvae of T. castaneum. The oil Cupressus macrocarpa (IC50 = 12.3 mg/L) was the most potent inhibitor of AChE, while the oil of Calistemon viminals (IC50 = 4.4 mg/L) was the most potent inhibitor of ATPases.

  11. Long-term burning interacts with herbivory to slow decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kay, Adam D; Mankowski, Josh; Hobbie, Sarah E

    2008-05-01

    Fires can generate spatial variation in trophic interactions such as insect herbivory. If trophic interactions mediated by fire influence nutrient cycling, they could feed back on the more immediate consequences of fire on nutrient dynamics. Here we consider herbivore-induced effects on oak litter quality and decomposition within a long-term manipulation of fire frequency in central Minnesota, USA. We focused on bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) trees, which are common across the fire frequency gradient and are often heavily infested with either lace bugs (Corythuca arcuata) or aphids (Hoplochaithropsus quercicola). We used targeted exclusion to test for herbivore-specific effects on litter chemistry and subsequent decomposition rates. Lace bug exclusion led to lower lignin concentrations in litterfall and subsequently accelerated decomposition. In contrast, aphid exclusion had no effect on litterfall chemistry or on decomposition rate, despite heavy infestation levels. Effects of lace bug herbivory on litterfall chemistry and decomposition were similar in burned and unburned areas. However, lace bug herbivory was much more common in burned than in unburned areas, whereas aphid herbivory was more common in unburned areas. These results suggest that frequent fires promote oak-herbivore interactions that decelerate decomposition. This effect should amplify other influences of fire that slow nitrogen cycling.

  12. Taxonomy of prickly juniper (Juniperus oxycedrus group): A phytochemical-morphometric combined approach at the contact zone of two cryptospecies.

    PubMed

    Roma-Marzio, Francesco; Najar, Basma; Alessandri, John; Pistelli, Luisa; Peruzzi, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Based on different essential oil composition paralleling different genotypes, Juniperus deltoides was recently segregated from Juniperus oxycedrus. Despite a clear phytochemical and molecular differentiation, J. deltoides resulted not clearly morphologically discernible from J. oxycedrus, so that it was defined as a cryptospecies. Italy represents the contact zone of their distribution, but the ranges of the two species are not sufficiently known, due to unsatisfactory morphological characterisation. To further complicate the picture, a third closely related species (ecotype), J. macrocarpa, occurs all across the Mediterranean coasts. After a preliminary phytochemical analysis to ascertain the (chemo-)identities of the studied populations, we performed a morphometric investigation to test the degree of morphological distinctiveness among the taxa. According to our analysis, some character (e.g. leaf mucro length, leaf width, seed-cone size and seed size) resulted useful to discriminate these cryptic taxa. Finally, based on these characters, an extensive revision of herbarium specimens allowed us to redefine the distribution pattern of the investigated species in the Central Mediterranean area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fatty acid composition of Juniperus species (Juniperus section) native to Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güvenç, Aysegül; Küçükboyaci, Nurgün; Gören, Ahmet Ceyhan

    2012-07-01

    Fatty acid compositions of seeds of five taxa of the Juniperus section of the genus Juniperus L. (Cupressaceae), i. e. J. drupacea Lab., J. communis L. var. communis, J. communis var. saxatilis Pall., J. oxycedrus L. subsp. oxycedrus, and J. oxycedrus subsp. macrocarpa (Sibth. & Sm.) Ball, were investigated. Methyl ester derivatized fatty acids of the lipophylic extracts of the five species were comparatively analyzed by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Juniperus taxa showed uniform fatty acid patterns, among which linoleic (25.8 - 32.5%), pinolenic (11.9 - 24.1%) and oleic acids (12.4 - 17.2%) were determined to be the main fractions in the seed oils. Juniperonic acid was found to be remarkably high in J. communis var. saxatilis (11.4%), J. oxycedrus subsp. oxycedrus (10.4%), and J. communis var. communis (10.1%). To the best of our knowledge, the present work discloses the first report on the fatty acid compositions of seeds of this Juniperus section grown in Turkey.

  14. Induction of apoptosis of 2,4',6-trihydroxybenzophenone in HT-29 colon carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Lay, Ma Ma; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2014-01-01

    2,4',6-Trihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl. fruits. It was found to inhibit cell proliferation in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line but caused little damage to WRL-68 normal human liver and MRC-5 normal human fibroblast lung cell lines. The compound was found to sharply affect the viability of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HT-29 cells treated with the compound showed morphological changes under microscopic examination such as cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, DNA fragmentation, and the occurrence of apoptotic nuclei. The percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, and dead or necrotic cells was determined by flow cytometry using annexin V-FTIC/PI staining. In addition, flow cytometry showed that, when the HT-29 cells were treated with 115 µM of the compound, it resulted in G0/G1 phase arrest in a time-dependent manner. Western blot revealed an upregulation of PUMA, Bak, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 proteins suggesting that the compound induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells by regulating these proteins.

  15. Essential oil of Croton argyrophylloides: toxicological aspects and vasorelaxant activity in rats.

    PubMed

    de França-Neto, Aldair; Cardoso-Teixeira, Ana Carolina; Medeiros, Thiago Coutinho; Quinto-Farias, Maria do Socorro; Sampaio, Celia Maria de Souza; Coelho-de-Souza, Andrelina Noronha; Lahlou, Saad; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique

    2012-10-01

    Croton argyrophylloides Muell. Arg. is widely used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat diabetes and venereal diseases. This study examined the acute toxicity and cytotoxicity of the essential oil of C. argyrophylloides (EOCA). In addition, vascular effects of the EOCA have been examined. In mice, an oral acute toxicity test revealed that EOCA could be considered as a non toxic essential oil since it showed a very high LD50 (9.84 +/- 0.01 g/kg). In the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) cytotoxic assay, the LC50 value of EOCA was 275 [165-534] microg/mL. EOCA (1-1000 microg/mL) relaxed isolated endothelium-intact aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine with an IC50 value of 126.7 [89.8-163.7] microg/mL. In rat mesenteric bed preparations precontracted with phenylephrine, EOCA (1-300 microg/mL) also induced a reversible, vasodilator effect with an IC50 value of 46.0 [33.3-58.7] micro/mL. It is concluded that EOCA is a very interesting agent from the point of view of the possibility of therapeutic application. This is because, whilst showing a very small acute toxicity, EOCA also showed maximal efficacy as a vascular antispasmodic agent with a pharmacological potency similar to that of other Croton species essential oils.

  16. Analyzing the Light Energy Distribution in the Photosynthetic Apparatus of C4 Plants Using Highly Purified Mesophyll and Bundle-Sheath Thylakoids.

    PubMed Central

    Pfundel, E.; Nagel, E.; Meister, A.

    1996-01-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of mesophyll and bundle-sheath thylakoids from plant species with the C4 dicarboxylic acid pathway of photosynthesis were investigated using flow cytometry. Ten species with the NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) biochemical type of C4 photosynthesis were tested: Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop., Euphorbia maculata L., Portulaca grandiflora Hooker, Saccharum officinarum L., Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv., Zea mays L., and four species of the genus Flaveria. This study also included three species with NAD-ME biochemistry (Atriplex rosea L., Atriplex spongiosa F. Muell., and Portulaca oleracea L.). Two C4 species of unknown biochemical type were investigated: Cyperus papyrus L. and Atriplex tatarica L. Pure mesophyll and bundle-sheath thylakoids were prepared by flow cytometry and characterized by low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. In pure bundle-sheath thylakoids from many species with C4 photosynthesis of the NADP-ME type, significant amounts of photosystem II (PSII) emission can be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. Simulation of fluorescence excitation spectra of these thylakoids showed that PSII light absorption contributes significantly to the apparent excitation spectrum of photosystem I. Model calculations indicated that the excitation energy of PSII is efficiently transferred to photosystem I in bundle-sheath thylakoids of many NADP-ME species. PMID:12226432

  17. Antiviral activity of some Tunisian medicinal plants against Herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sassi, A Ben; Harzallah-Skhiri, F; Bourgougnon, N; Aouni, M

    2008-01-10

    Fifteen species of Tunisian traditional medicinal plants, belonging to 10 families, were selected for this study. They were Inula viscosa (L.) Ait and Reichardia tingitana (L.) Roth ssp. discolor (Pom.) Batt. (Asteraceae), Mesembryanthemum cristallinum L. and M. nodiflorum L. (Aizoaceae), Arthrocnemum indicum (Willd.) Moq., Atriplex inflata Muell., A. parvifolia Lowe var. ifiniensis (Caball) Maire, and Salicornia fruticosa L. (Chenopodiaceae), Cistus monspeliensis L. (Cistaceae), Juniperus phoenicea L. (Cupressaceae), Erica multiflora L. (Ericaceae), Frankenia pulverulenta L. (Frankeniaceae), Hypericum crispum L. (Hypericaceae), Plantago coronopus L. ssp. eu-coronopus Pilger var. vulgaris G.G. (Plantaginaceae) and Zygophyllum album L. (Zygophyllaceae). Fifty extracts prepared from those plants were screened in order to assay their antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), using neutral red incorporation. Extracts from eight plants among these 15 showed some degree of antiviral activity, while the methanolic extract of E. multiflora was highly active with EC(50) of 132.6 microg mL(-1). These results corroborate that medicinal plants from Tunisia can be a rich source of potential antiviral compounds.

  18. Solanum jobsonii, a novel andromonoecious bush tomato species from a new Australian national park.

    PubMed

    Lacey, L Mae; Cantley, Jason T; Martine, Christopher T

    2017-01-01

    A new species of Solanum from the Australian "andromonoecious bush tomato clade" of Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum is described. Solanum jobsonii Martine, J.Cantley, & L.M.Lacey, sp. nov. is part of the S. eburneum Symon species group. It most closely resembles S. eburneum and S. watneyi Martine & Frawley of the northwestern part of the Northern Territory, but is separated geographically from them by the Sturt Plateau. Morphometric analyses show that S. jobsonii differs statistically from S. eburneum, S. watneyi, and S. diversiflorum F.Muell. - a similar species in habit and leaf characters - in several key reproductive and vegetative characters. We provide morphometric evidence for the recognition of S. jobsonii, a complete description, a table of comparisons within its species group, and a map showing species group distributions. One of the first new species to be described from Limmen National Park (established 2012), S. jobsonii is a testament to the value of designating and protecting public lands, as well as supporting science relating to them.

  19. Topical application of Katupila (Securinega leucopyrus) in Dushta Vrana (chronic wound) showing excellent healing effect: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Ajmeer, Ahamed Shahan; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Mahanta, Vyasadeva

    2014-01-01

    Securinega leucopyrus (Willd.) Muell. is known as Humari in India, Katupila in Sri Lanka and Spinous fluggea in English. It is a desert climatic plant used topically in paste form for healing of chronic and non-healing wounds. Application of Katupila Kalka (paste) is used commonly in the management of acute as well as chronic wounds in Sri Lanka as a folklore medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of herbal paste of Katupila in the treatment of Dushta Vrana (chronic wound). It is a single observational innovative case study. A female aged 40 years presented with a non-healing infected wound on her right buttock with a history of 2 months. On examination, there was a rounded wound having black color necrosed tissue and slough with foul smelling, measuring about 3 inch × 3 inch × 1 inch in diameter caused by pyogenic local infection. The routine laboratory investigations were within normal limit except hemoglobin and the swab culture test of the wound bed was reported infection of Staphylococcus aureus. This case study showed effective wound healing by topical application of Katupila paste and sesame oil. PMID:25558163

  20. The rubber tree genome shows expansion of gene family associated with rubber biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nyok-Sean; Makita, Yuko; Kawashima, Mika; Taylor, Todd D.; Kondo, Shinji; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Matsui, Minami

    2016-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg, a member of the family Euphorbiaceae, is the sole natural resource exploited for commercial production of high-quality natural rubber. The properties of natural rubber latex are almost irreplaceable by synthetic counterparts for many industrial applications. A paucity of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of rubber biosynthesis in high yield traits still persists. Here we report the comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the widely planted H. brasiliensis clone, RRIM 600. The genome was assembled based on ~155-fold combined coverage with Illumina and PacBio sequence data and has a total length of 1.55 Gb with 72.5% comprising repetitive DNA sequences. A total of 84,440 high-confidence protein-coding genes were predicted. Comparative genomic analysis revealed strong synteny between H. brasiliensis and other Euphorbiaceae genomes. Our data suggest that H. brasiliensis’s capacity to produce high levels of latex can be attributed to the expansion of rubber biosynthesis-related genes in its genome and the high expression of these genes in latex. Using cap analysis gene expression data, we illustrate the tissue-specific transcription profiles of rubber biosynthesis-related genes, revealing alternative means of transcriptional regulation. Our study adds to the understanding of H. brasiliensis biology and provides valuable genomic resources for future agronomic-related improvement of the rubber tree. PMID:27339202

  1. Genetic Diversity in Musa acuminata Colla and Musa balbisiana Colla and some of their natural hybrids using AFLP Markers.

    PubMed

    Ude, G.; Pillay, M.; Nwakanma, D.; Tenkouano, A.

    2002-06-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships were assessed in 28 accessions of Musa acuminata (AA) Colla and Musa balbisiana (BB) Colla, and some of their natural hybrids, using the amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) technique. Fifteen AFLP +3 primer pairs produced 527 polymorphic bands among the accessions. Neighbor-joining and principal co-ordinate (PCO) analyses using Jaccard's similarity coefficient produced four major clusters that closely corresponded with the genome composition of the accessions (AA, BB, AAB and ABB). The AFLP data distinguished between the wild diploid accessions and suggested new subspecies relationships in the M. acuminata complex that are different from those based on morphological data. The data suggested that there are three subspecies within the M. acuminata complex (ssp. burmannica Simmonds, malaccensis Simmonds, and microcarpa Simmonds). 'Tjau Lagada' (ssp. microcarpa), 'Truncata' [ssp truncata (Ridl.) Shepherd] and 'SF247' [ssp. banksii (F.Muell) Simmonds] clustered very closely with 'Gros Michel' and 'Km 5', indicating that more than one M. acuminata subspecies may be involved in the origin of triploid AAA bananas. 'Calcutta 4' (ssp. burmannicoides De Langhe & Devreux) and 'Long Tavoy' (ssp. burmannica) were closely related and could be together in the same subspecies. This study also showed that there is much more genetic diversity within M. balbisiana that was split into two groups: (1) 'I-63' and 'HND' and (2) 'Los Banos', 'MPL' (Montpellier), '10852', 'Singapuri', 'Etikehel', and 'Butohan 1' as the other.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of the Signalling Networks in Coronatine-Induced Secondary Laticifer Differentiation from Vascular Cambia in Rubber Trees

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaohua; Zhang, Shixin; Chao, Jinquan; Deng, Xiaomin; Chen, Yueyi; Shi, Minjing; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    The secondary laticifer in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) is a specific tissue within the secondary phloem. This tissue differentiates from the vascular cambia, and its function is natural rubber biosynthesis and storage. Given that jasmonates play a pivotal role in secondary laticifer differentiation, we established an experimental system with jasmonate (JA) mimic coronatine (COR) for studying the secondary laticifer differentiation: in this system, differentiation occurs within five days of the treatment of epicormic shoots with COR. In the present study, the experimental system was used to perform transcriptome sequencing and gene expression analysis. A total of 67,873 unigenes were assembled, and 50,548 unigenes were mapped at least in one public database. Of these being annotated unigenes, 15,780 unigenes were differentially expressed early after COR treatment, and 19,824 unigenes were differentially expressed late after COR treatment. At the early stage, 8,646 unigenes were up-regulated, while 7,134 unigenes were down-regulated. At the late stage, the numbers of up- and down-regulated unigenes were 7,711 and 12,113, respectively. The annotation data and gene expression analysis of the differentially expressed unigenes suggest that JA-mediated signalling, Ca2+ signal transduction and the CLAVATA-MAPK-WOX signalling pathway may be involved in regulating secondary laticifer differentiation in rubber trees. PMID:27808245

  3. In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Eucalyptus torelliana

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Christiana Bola A.; Lawal, Temitope Olufunmilayo; Mahady, Gail B.

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. and Eucalyptus torelliana F. Muell. (Myrtaceae), Nigerian medicinal plants, was investigated in six strains of H. pylori, namely, ATCC 4504, ATCC 47619, A2, TI8984, 019A, and A6. The susceptibility of these strains was determined using a standardized agar dilution method (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines) with Mueller–Hinton agar, supplemented with defibrinated horse blood. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts against all the tested strains ranged from 12.5 to 400 μg/mL. Phytochemical screening of the plant extracts revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, and cardenolides. The anti-H. pylori activities demonstrated by these plants may be attributed to their chemical constituents, and explain their reported traditional uses, as well as their gastroprotective properties as demonstrated previously in experimental animals. The results of this work suggest that, in accordance with their traditional medical use in Nigeria, E. camaldalensis and E. torelliana have some therapeutic potential against H. pylori, and thus are of interest for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:20396588

  4. Impacts of fire on forest age and runoff in mountain ash forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, S.A.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L.B.; McGuire, A.D.; Van Dijk, A.; Kilinc, M.

    2008-01-01

    Runoff from mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans F.Muell.) forested catchments has been shown to decline significantly in the few decades following fire - returning to pre-fire levels in the following centuries - owing to changes in ecosystem water use with stand age in a relationship known as Kuczera's model. We examined this relationship between catchment runoff and stand age by measuring whole-ecosystem exchanges of water using an eddy covariance system measuring forest evapotranspiration (ET) combined with sap-flow measurements of tree water use, with measurements made across a chronosequence of three sites (24, 80 and 296 years since fire). At the 296-year old site eddy covariance systems were installed above the E. regnans overstorey and above the distinct rainforest understorey. Contrary to predictions from the Kuczera curve, we found that measurements of whole-forest ET decreased by far less across stand age between 24 and 296 years. Although the overstorey tree water use declined by 1.8 mm day-1 with increasing forest age (an annual decrease of 657 mm) the understorey ET contributed between 1.2 and 1.5 mm day-1, 45% of the total ET (3 mm day-1) at the old growth forest. ?? CSIRO 2008.

  5. Impacts of forest age on water use in Mountain ash forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Stephen A.; Beringer, Jason; Hutley, Lindsay B.; McGuire, A. David; Van Dijk, Albert; Kilinc, Musa

    2008-01-01

    Runoff from mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans F.Muell.) forested catchments has been shown to decline significantly in the few decades following fire returning to pre-fire levels in the following centuries owing to changes in ecosystem water use with stand age in a relationship known as Kuczera's model. We examined this relationship between catchment runoff and stand age by measuring whole-ecosystem exchanges of water using an eddy covariance system measuring forest evapotranspiration (ET) combined with sap-flow measurements of tree water use, with measurements made across a chronosequence of three sites (24, 80 and 296 years since fire). At the 296-year old site eddy covariance systems were installed above the E. regnans overstorey and above the distinct rainforest understorey. Contrary to predictions from the Kuczera curve, we found that measurements of whole-forest ET decreased by far less across stand age between 24 and 296 years. Although the overstorey tree water use declined by 1.8mmday-1 with increasing forest age (an annual decrease of 657mm) the understorey ET contributed between 1.2 and 1.5mmday-1, 45% of the total ET (3mmday-1) at the old growth forest.

  6. Protein dynamics in thylakoids of the desiccation-tolerant plant Boea hygroscopica during dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Navari-Izzo, F; Quartacci, M F; Pinzino, C; Rascio, N; Vazzana, C; Sgherri, C L

    2000-11-01

    Plants of Boea hygroscopica F. Muell were dehydrated to 9% relative water content (RWC) by withholding water for 26 d, and afterward the plants were rehydrated. Leaves were taken from control plants after 7, 12, and 26 d from the beginning of dehydration, and after 6 and 48 h from rehydration. The RWC decreased by 80% during dehydration, but the leaves regained RWC with rehydration. Dehydrated plants showed lesser amounts of proteins, lipids, and chlorophyll, all of which increased following rewatering. The lipid-to-protein ratio, which decreased during dehydration, returned to control level after 48 h of rehydration. Thylakoid lipids were more unsaturated when RWC reached the value of 9%. EPR measurements of spin-labeled proteins showed the presence of three different groups of proteins with different mobility in thylakoid membranes. The rotational correlation time of groups 1 and 2 increased with dehydration and decreased upon rehydration, whereas group 3 showed little changes. Desiccation did not cause thylakoid swelling or breakage, but the membrane system assemblage showed changes in thylakoid stacking. After 48 h of rehydration the membrane system recovered completely the organization of the fully hydrated state, showing several well-defined and regularly distributed grana.

  7. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Coronatine-Induced Laticifer Differentiation in the Rubber Tree by Subtractive Hybridization Suppression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Xin; Wu, Shao-Hua; Chen, Yue-Yi; Tian, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    The secondary laticifer in the secondary phloem is differentiated from the vascular cambia of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). The number of secondary laticifers is closely related to the rubber yield potential of Hevea. Pharmacological data show that jasmonic acid and its precursor linolenic acid are effective in inducing secondary laticifer differentiation in epicormic shoots of the rubber tree. In the present study, an experimental system of coronatine-induced laticifer differentiation was developed to perform SSH identification of genes with differential expression. A total of 528 positive clones were obtained by blue-white screening, of which 248 clones came from the forward SSH library while 280 clones came from the reverse SSH library. Approximately 215 of the 248 clones and 171 of the 280 clones contained cDNA inserts by colony PCR screening. A total of 286 of the 386 ESTs were detected to be differentially expressed by reverse northern blot and sequenced. Approximately 147 unigenes with an average length of 497 bp from the forward and 109 unigenes with an average length of 514 bp from the reverse SSH libraries were assembled and annotated. The unigenes were associated with the stress/defense response, plant hormone signal transduction and structure development. It is suggested that Ca2+ signal transduction and redox seem to be involved in differentiation, while PGA and EIF are associated with the division of cambium initials for COR-induced secondary laticifer differentiation in the rubber tree.

  8. Solanum jobsonii, a novel andromonoecious bush tomato species from a new Australian national park

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, L. Mae; Cantley, Jason T.; Martine, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Solanum from the Australian “andromonoecious bush tomato clade” of Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum is described. Solanum jobsonii Martine, J.Cantley, & L.M.Lacey, sp. nov. is part of the S. eburneum Symon species group. It most closely resembles S. eburneum and S. watneyi Martine & Frawley of the northwestern part of the Northern Territory, but is separated geographically from them by the Sturt Plateau. Morphometric analyses show that S. jobsonii differs statistically from S. eburneum, S. watneyi, and S. diversiflorum F.Muell. – a similar species in habit and leaf characters – in several key reproductive and vegetative characters. We provide morphometric evidence for the recognition of S. jobsonii, a complete description, a table of comparisons within its species group, and a map showing species group distributions. One of the first new species to be described from Limmen National Park (established 2012), S. jobsonii is a testament to the value of designating and protecting public lands, as well as supporting science relating to them. PMID:28794678

  9. Enhancing Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Potentials of Antidesma thwaitesianum by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction.

    PubMed

    Poontawee, Warut; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Wongmekiat, Orawan

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has increasingly gained attention as an alternative technique for extraction of natural products without leaving toxic residues in extracts. Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg. (Phyllanthaceae), or ma mao, has been reported to exhibit antioxidant health benefits due to its phenolic constituents. To determine whether SFE technique could impact on phenolic contents and associated antioxidant potentials, ripe fruits of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae) were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and conventional solvents (ethanol, water). The results showed that the SC-CO2 extract contained significantly higher yield, total phenolic, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents than those obtained from ethanol and water. It also demonstrated the greatest antioxidant activities as assessed by ABTS radical cation decolorization, DPPH radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Further analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD/MSD) revealed the presence of catechin as a major phenolic compound of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae), with the maximum amount detected in the SC-CO2 extract. These data indicate that SFE technology improves both quantity and quality of Antidesma thwaitesianum fruit extract. The findings added more reliability of using this technique to produce high added value products from this medicinal plant.

  10. Soil water deficits decrease the internal conductance to CO2 transfer but atmospheric water deficits do not.

    PubMed

    Warren, C R

    2008-01-01

    The internal conductance to CO2 supply from substomatal cavities to sites of carboxylation poses a large limitation to photosynthesis. It is known that internal conductance is decreased by soil water deficits, but it is not known if it is affected by atmospheric water deficits (i.e. leaf to air vapour pressure deficit, VPD). The aim of this paper was to examine the responses of internal conductance to atmospheric and soil water deficits in seedlings of the evergreen perennial Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell and the herbaceous plants Solanum lycopersicum (formerly Lycopersicon esculentum) Mill. and Phaseolus vulgaris L. Internal conductance was estimated with the variable J method from concurrent measurements of gas exchange and fluorescence. In all three species steady-state stomatal conductance decreased by approximately 30% as VPD increased from 1 kPa to 2 kPa. In no species was internal conductance affected by VPD despite large effects on stomatal conductance. In contrast, soil water deficits decreased stomatal conductance and internal conductance of all three species. Decreases in stomatal and internal conductance under water deficit were proportional, but this proportionality differed among species, and thus the relationship between stomatal and internal conductance differed among species. These findings indicate that soil water deficits affect internal conductance while atmospheric water deficits do not. The reasons for this distinction are unknown but are consistent with soil and atmospheric water deficits having differing effects on leaf physiology and/or root-shoot communication.

  11. Variation in volatile leaf oils of eleven eucalyptus species harvested from korbous arboreta (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Elaissi, Ameur; Medini, Hanène; Larbi Khouja, Mohamed; Simmonds, Monique; Lynene, Fréderic; Farhat, Farhat; Chemli, Rachid; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2010-07-01

    Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of eleven species of the genus Eucalyptus L'Hér., i.e., E. astringens Maiden, E. camaldulensis Dehnh., E. diversifolia Bonpl., E. falcata Turcz., E. ficifolia F. Muell., E. gomphocephala DC., E. lehmannii (Schauer) Benth., E. maculata Hook., E. platypus Hook., E. polyanthemos Schauer, and E. rudis Endl., harvested from Korbous arboreta (region of Nabeul, northeast of Tunisia) in April 2006, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.1+/-0.1 to 3.8+/-0.1%, dependent on the species. E. astringens and E. ficifolia showed the highest and the lowest mean percentage of essential oil amongst all the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 138 components, representing 74.0 to 99.1% of the total oil. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole, followed by trans-pinocarveol (1), spathulenol (2), alpha-pinene, p-cymene, (E,E)-farnesol, cryptone, globulol (3), beta-phellandrene, alpha-terpineol, viridiflorol, and alpha-eudesmol. The principal-component and the hierarchical-cluster analyses separated the eleven Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into seven groups, each constituting a chemotype.

  12. Contact sensitization to calocephalin, a sesquiterpene lactone of the guaianolide type from cushion bush (Leucophyta brownii, Compositae).

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Hindsén, Monica; Andersen, Klaus E

    2013-11-01

    Cushion bush [Leucophyta brownii Cass. = Calocephalus brownii (Cass.) F. Muell.] is an Australian Compositae shrub that has been introduced into Scandinavia as a pot plant. The first case of sensitization occurred in a gardener, and the main allergen was identified as the guaianolide calocephalin. To present the identification of the main allergen, and to assess the prevalence of sensitization to calocephalin in Compositae-allergic patients. Calocephalin was isolated from a dichloromethane extract of aerial parts of cushion bush. Calocephalin 0.1% ethanol was included in the plant series in Malmö, Sweden, and Odense, Denmark. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of calocephalin resulted in a revision of its chemical structure to 4α-acetoxy-1α,2α-epoxy-5α,10αH-guai-11(13)-en-12,8β-olide. The prevalence of patch test positivity was up to 28% in aimed patch testing. Despite strongly positive patch test reactions, the relevance was unknown in the majority of cases, and only 1 person was occupationally sensitized. Calocephalin is a potent contact allergen, but, as cushion bush is a low-maintenance pot plant, primary sensitization is most likely to occur through occupational exposure. Positive reactions in Compositae-sensitive persons probably occur because of cross-reactivity, and patients should be warned about contact with cushion bush plants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Direct proof by 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance of semi-purified extract and isolation of ent-Catechin from leaves of Eucalyptus cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sayonara Mendes; Abe, Simone Yae; Bueno, Fernanda Giacomini; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakashima, Tomoe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Eucalyptus cinerea F. Muell. ex Benth. is native to Australia and acclimatized to Southern Brazil. Its aromatic leaves are used for ornamental purposes and have great potential for essential oil production, although reports of its use in folk medicine are few. Objective: This study evaluated the composition of E. cinerea leaves using the solid state 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isolation of the compound from the semipurified extract (SE). Materials and Methods: The SE of E. cinerea leaves was evaluated in the solid state by 13C-NMR spectrum, and the SE was chromatographed on a Sephadex LH-20 column, followed by high-speed counter-current chromatography to isolate the compound. The SE was analyzed by 13C-NMR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight spectra. Results: Flavan-3-ol units were present, suggesting the presence of proanthocyanidins as well as a gallic acid unit. The uncommon ent-catechin was isolated. Conclusion: The presence of ent-catechin is reported for the first time in this genus and species. PMID:25210302

  14. Antifilarial activity of Mallotus philippensis Lam. on Setaria cervie (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Singhal, K C; Khan, N U

    1997-10-01

    The effect of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the leaves of Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Muell. Arg. was studied on the spontaneous movements of the whole worm and nerve-muscle (n.m.) preparation of Setaria cervi and on the survival of microfilariae in vitro. Both the extracts caused inhibition of spontaneous motility of whole worm and the n.m. preparation of S. Cervi characterized by initial stimulation followed by depression in amplitude. The tone and rate of contractions remained visibly unaffected. Aqueous extract at higher concentration showed immediate reduction in tone. The concentration required to inhibit the movements of n.m. preparation was 1/5th for aqueous and 1/11th for alcoholic extract compared to that for the whole worm, suggesting a cuticular permeability barrier. The stimulatory response of acetylcholine was blocked by aqueous extract on whole worm movements. On the microfilariae the LC50 and LC90 were 18 and 20 ng/ml for aqueous and 12 and 15 ng/ml for alcoholic extracts respectively.

  15. Reproduction diversity of Enteromorpha prolifera.

    PubMed

    Lin, Apeng; Shen, Songdong; Wang, Jianwei; Yan, Binlun

    2008-05-01

    Enteromorpha prolifera (Muell.) J. Agardh (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae), which is distributed widely in the inter-tidal zone of the ocean, is one of the most common fouling green algae. However, the present understandings of the life history of E. prolifera have been insufficient to explain their seasonal abundances. Thus it is essential to investigate how many reproductive strategies are likely to contribute to the successful colonization and flourishing of the green alga. In the present study the reproduction diversity of E. prolifera was observed and studied systematically by culturing chopped tissues. Our results showed that there are in total seven pathways of reproduction for E. prolifera including sexual, asexual and vegetative reproduction. It was indicated that the variety of the reproductive ways and the large quantity of reproductive cells produced and released during the reproductive season are the two key factors that facilitate colonization of E. prolifera. The reproduction of the alga E. prolifera mainly depends on asexual methods. The results presented here contribute to increasing our understanding about how the opportunistic macroalgae successfully maintain colonization and excessive growth.

  16. Quantitative elemental localisation in leaves and stems of nickel hyperaccumulating shrub Hybanthusfloribundus subsp. floribundus using micro-PIXE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachenko, Anthony G.; Singh, Balwant; Bhatia, Naveen P.; Siegele, Rainer

    2008-02-01

    Hybanthusfloribundus (Lindl.) F.Muell. subsp. floribundus is a native Australian nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulating shrub and a promising species for rehabilitation and phytoremediation of Ni tailings. Spatial localisation and quantification of Ni in leaf and stem tissues of H.floribundus subsp. floribundus was studied using micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectroscopy. Young plants, grown in a potting mix under controlled glasshouse conditions were exposed to Ni concentrations of 0 and 26 mM kg-1 for 20 weeks. Leaf and stem samples were hand-sectioned and freeze-dried prior to micro-PIXE analysis. Elemental distribution maps of leaves revealed Ni concentration of 7800 mg kg-1 dry weight (DW) in whole leaf sections, which was identical to the bulk tissue analysis. Elemental maps showed that Ni was preferentially localised in the adaxial epidermis (10,000 mg kg-1 DW) and reached a maximum of up to 10,000 mg kg-1 DW in the leaf margin. Freeze-dried stem sections from the same plants contained lower Ni than leaf tissues (1800 mg kg-1 versus 7800 mg kg-1 DW, respectively), however did not resolve a clear pattern of compartmentalisation across different anatomical regions. Our results suggest localisation in epidermal cells is an important physiological mechanism involved in Ni accumulation and tolerance in leaves of H.floribundus subsp. floribundus.

  17. Multiple photosynthetic transitions, polyploidy, and lateral gene transfer in the grass subtribe Neurachninae

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The Neurachninae is the only grass lineage known to contain C3, C4, and C3–C4 intermediate species, and as such has been suggested as a model system for studies of photosynthetic pathway evolution in the Poaceae; however, a lack of a robust phylogenetic framework has hindered this possibility. In this study, plastid and nuclear markers were used to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among Neurachninae species. In addition, photosynthetic types were determined with carbon isotope ratios, and genome sizes with flow cytometry. A high frequency of autopolyploidy was found in the Neurachninae, including in Neurachne munroi F.Muell. and Paraneurachne muelleri S.T.Blake, which independently evolved C4 photosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that following their separate C4 origins, these two taxa exchanged a gene encoding the C4 form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The C3–C4 intermediate Neurachne minor S.T.Blake is phylogenetically distinct from the two C4 lineages, indicating that intermediacy in this species evolved separately from transitional stages preceding C4 origins. The Neurachninae shows a substantial capacity to evolve new photosynthetic pathways repeatedly. Enablers of these transitions might include anatomical pre-conditions in the C3 ancestor, and frequent autopolyploidization. Transfer of key C4 genetic elements between independently evolved C4 taxa may have also facilitated a rapid adaptation of photosynthesis in these grasses that had to survive in the harsh climate appearing during the late Pliocene in Australia. PMID:23077201

  18. In vitro physicochemical, phytochemical and functional properties of fiber rich fractions derived from by-products of six fruits.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Sangeeta; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2016-03-01

    A comparative study was done on the health promoting and functional properties of the fibers obtained as by-products from six fruits viz., pomace of carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr), peels of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), Burmese grape (Baccurea sapida Muell. Arg) and Khasi mandarin orange (Citrus reticulata Blanco), and blossom of seeded banana (Musa balbisiana, ABB). Highest yield of fiber was obtained from Burmese grape peel (BGPL, 79.94 ± 0.41 g/100 g) and seeded banana blossom (BB 77.18 ± 0.20 g/100 g). The total dietary fiber content (TDF) was highest in fiber fraction derived from pineapple pomace (PNPM, 79.76 ± 0.42 g/100 g) and BGPL (67.27 ± 0.39 g/100 g). All the samples contained insoluble dietary fiber as the major fiber fraction. The fiber samples showed good water holding, oil holding and swelling capacities. The fiber samples exhibited antioxidant activity. All the samples showed good results for glucose adsorption, amylase activity inhibition, glucose diffusion rate and glucose diffusion reduction rate index.

  19. Pentalinon andrieuxii root extract is effective in the topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Lezama-Dávila, Claudio M.; Pan, Li; Isaac-Márquez, Angelica P.; Terrazas, Cesar; Oghumu, Steve; Isaac-Márquez, Ricardo; Pech-Dzib, MY; Barbi, Joseph; Calomeni, Edward; Parinandi, Narasimham; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) manifests as localized skin lesions, which lead to significant tissue destruction and disfigurement. In the Yucatan Peninsula, Mayan traditional healers use Pentalinon andrieuxii Muell.-Arg. (Apocynaceae) roots for the topical treatment of CL. Here, we studied the effect of P. andrieuxii root hexane extract (PARE) on the parasites and host cells in vitro and examined its efficacy in the topical treatment of CL caused by L. mexicana. PARE exhibited potent antiparasitic activity in vitro against promastigotes as well as amastigotes residing in macrophages. Electron microscopy of PARE-treated parasites revealed direct membrane damage. PARE also activated NF-κB and enhanced IFN-γR and MHC class II expression and TNF-α production in macrophages. In addition, PARE induced production of the Th1 promoting cytokine IL-12 in dendritic cells as well as enhanced expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86. In vivo studies showed that L. mexicana-infected mice treated by topical application of PARE resulted in the significant reduction in lesion size and parasite burden compared to controls. These findings indicate that PARE could be used as an alternative therapy for the topical treatment of CL. PMID:24347110

  20. Cardiovascular Effects of the Essential Oil of Croton argyrophylloides in Normotensive Rats: Role of the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Santos, Thayane Rebeca; de Siqueira, Rodrigo José Bezerra; Duarte, Gloria Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of the essential oil of Croton argyrophylloides Muell. Arg. (EOCA) were investigated in normotensive rats. In saline-pretreated anesthetized or conscious rats, intravenous (i.v.) injection of the EOCA induced dose-dependent hypotension. Dose-dependent tachycardia was observed only in conscious rats. In anesthetized rats, cervical bivagotomy failed to enhance EOCA-induced hypotension but unmasked significant bradycardia. In conscious rats, i.v. pretreatment with methylatropine, but not with atenolol or L-NAME, reduced both hypotensive and tachycardiac responses to EOCA. However, hexamethonium pretreatment reverted the EOCA-induced tachycardia into significant bradycardia without affecting the hypotension. In aortic ring preparations precontracted with phenylephrine, EOCA induced a concentration-dependent relaxation that was significantly reduced by vascular endothelium removal and pretreatment with atropine, indomethacin, or glibenclamide but remained unaffected by pretreatment with L-NAME or TEA. It is concluded that i.v. treatment with EOAC decreased blood pressure probably through an active vascular relaxation rather than withdrawal of sympathetic tone. Muscarinic receptor stimulation, liberation of the endothelium-derived prostacyclin, and opening KATP channels are partially involved in the aortic relaxation induced by EOCA and in turn in the mediation of EOCA-induced hypotension. EOCA-induced tachycardia in conscious rats appears to be mediated reflexly through inhibition of vagal drive to the heart. PMID:27956919

  1. The rubber tree genome shows expansion of gene family associated with rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Nyok-Sean; Makita, Yuko; Kawashima, Mika; Taylor, Todd D; Kondo, Shinji; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Matsui, Minami

    2016-06-24

    Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg, a member of the family Euphorbiaceae, is the sole natural resource exploited for commercial production of high-quality natural rubber. The properties of natural rubber latex are almost irreplaceable by synthetic counterparts for many industrial applications. A paucity of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of rubber biosynthesis in high yield traits still persists. Here we report the comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the widely planted H. brasiliensis clone, RRIM 600. The genome was assembled based on ~155-fold combined coverage with Illumina and PacBio sequence data and has a total length of 1.55 Gb with 72.5% comprising repetitive DNA sequences. A total of 84,440 high-confidence protein-coding genes were predicted. Comparative genomic analysis revealed strong synteny between H. brasiliensis and other Euphorbiaceae genomes. Our data suggest that H. brasiliensis's capacity to produce high levels of latex can be attributed to the expansion of rubber biosynthesis-related genes in its genome and the high expression of these genes in latex. Using cap analysis gene expression data, we illustrate the tissue-specific transcription profiles of rubber biosynthesis-related genes, revealing alternative means of transcriptional regulation. Our study adds to the understanding of H. brasiliensis biology and provides valuable genomic resources for future agronomic-related improvement of the rubber tree.

  2. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Coronatine-Induced Laticifer Differentiation in the Rubber Tree by Subtractive Hybridization Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Xin; Wu, Shao-Hua; Chen, Yue-Yi; Tian, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    The secondary laticifer in the secondary phloem is differentiated from the vascular cambia of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). The number of secondary laticifers is closely related to the rubber yield potential of Hevea. Pharmacological data show that jasmonic acid and its precursor linolenic acid are effective in inducing secondary laticifer differentiation in epicormic shoots of the rubber tree. In the present study, an experimental system of coronatine-induced laticifer differentiation was developed to perform SSH identification of genes with differential expression. A total of 528 positive clones were obtained by blue-white screening, of which 248 clones came from the forward SSH library while 280 clones came from the reverse SSH library. Approximately 215 of the 248 clones and 171 of the 280 clones contained cDNA inserts by colony PCR screening. A total of 286 of the 386 ESTs were detected to be differentially expressed by reverse northern blot and sequenced. Approximately 147 unigenes with an average length of 497 bp from the forward and 109 unigenes with an average length of 514 bp from the reverse SSH libraries were assembled and annotated. The unigenes were associated with the stress/defense response, plant hormone signal transduction and structure development. It is suggested that Ca2+ signal transduction and redox seem to be involved in differentiation, while PGA and EIF are associated with the division of cambium initials for COR-induced secondary laticifer differentiation in the rubber tree. PMID:26147807

  3. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of the Essential Oils from Three Melaleuca Species Grown in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Ismail; Mancini, Emilia; De Martino, Laura; Marandino, Aurelio; Lamia, Hamrouni; Mohsen, Hanana; Bassem, Jamoussi; Scognamiglio, Mariarosa; Reverchon, Ernesto; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils of Melaleuca armillaris Sm., Melaleuca styphelioides Sm. and Melaleuca acuminata F. Muell., collected in Tunisia, was studied by means of GC and GC-MS analysis. In all, 46 compounds were identified, 38 for M. armillaris, 20 for M. acuminata and eight for M. styphelioides, respectively. The presence of a sesquiterpenic fraction (52.2%) characterized the oil from M. armillaris; M. sthypheliodes oil was rich in methyl eugenol, a phenolic compound (91.1%), while M. acuminata oil is mainly constituted by oxygenated monoterpenoids (95.6%). The essential oils were evaluated for their in vitro potentially phytotoxic activity against germination and initial radicle growth of Raphanus sativus L., Lepidium sativum L., Sinapis arvensis L., Triticum durum L. and Phalaris canariensis L. seeds. The radicle elongation of five seeds was inhibited at the highest doses tested, while germination of all seeds was not affected. Moreover, the essential oils showed low antimicrobial activity against eight selected microorganisms. PMID:23443119

  4. An ethnopharmacological approach to the preliminary screening of native Australian herbal medicines for anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aaron C; Konczak, Izabela; Li, George; Roufogalis, Basil D; Sekhon, Bhagwant; Sze, Daniel M-Y

    2015-09-01

    Five plants used traditionally by Australian Aboriginals and two edible native Australian fruits have been investigated for anticancer activity. The aim was to identify native Australian herbal medicines which displayed anticancer activity, with cytotoxicity to cancer cells but sparing or even proliferating normal immunological cells, and subsequently provide potentially new anticancer drug leads. Extracts and derived fractions were assayed for cell viability against a multiple myeloma cell line, RPMI-8226, in comparison to the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) representing normal human immunological cells. None of the crude extracts exhibited the desirable differential activity; however, following further fractionation of the Eremophila duttonii F. Muell. (Myoporaceae) extract, one fraction (termed F01) exhibited a greater cytotoxicity to the cancer cell line than to the normal cells. One fraction may potentially contain valuable compounds which may be useful for further investigation. This may focus on the identification of the bioavailable purified compounds present within these fractions or by detailed delineation of the related mechanisms of action.

  5. Enhancing Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Potentials of Antidesma thwaitesianum by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Poontawee, Warut; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Wongmekiat, Orawan

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has increasingly gained attention as an alternative technique for extraction of natural products without leaving toxic residues in extracts. Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg. (Phyllanthaceae), or ma mao, has been reported to exhibit antioxidant health benefits due to its phenolic constituents. To determine whether SFE technique could impact on phenolic contents and associated antioxidant potentials, ripe fruits of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae) were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and conventional solvents (ethanol, water). The results showed that the SC-CO2 extract contained significantly higher yield, total phenolic, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents than those obtained from ethanol and water. It also demonstrated the greatest antioxidant activities as assessed by ABTS radical cation decolorization, DPPH radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Further analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD/MSD) revealed the presence of catechin as a major phenolic compound of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae), with the maximum amount detected in the SC-CO2 extract. These data indicate that SFE technology improves both quantity and quality of Antidesma thwaitesianum fruit extract. The findings added more reliability of using this technique to produce high added value products from this medicinal plant. PMID:25977832

  6. Hydrology, vegetation, and soils of four north Florida River flood plains with an evaluation of state and federal wetland determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, H.M.; Darst, M.R.; MacLaughlin, M.T.; Sprecher, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    available. In this study, plots were located near long-term gaging stations, thus wetland determinations based on plant and soil characteristics could be evaluated at sites where long-term hydrologic conditions were known. Inconsistencies among hydrology, vegetation, and soil determinations were greatest on levee communities of the Ochlockonee and Aucilla River flood plains. Duration of average annual longest flood was almost 2 weeks for both plots. The wetland species list currently used (1991) by the State lacks many ground-cover species common to forested flood plains of north Florida rivers. There were 102 ground-cover species considered upland plants by the State that were present on the nine annually flooded plots of this study. Among them were 34 species that grew in areas continuously flooded for an average of 5 weeks or more each year. Common flood-plain species considered upland plants by the State were: Hypoxis leptocarpa (yellow star-grass), and two woody vines, Brunnichia ovata (ladies' eardrops) and Campsis radicans (trumpet-creeper), which were common in areas flooded continuously for 6 to 9 weeks a year; Sebastiania fruticosa (Sebastian-bush), Chasmanthium laxum (spikegrass), and Panicum dichotomum (panic grass), which typically grew in areas flooded an average of 2 to 3 weeks or more per year; Vitis rotundifolia (muscadine) and Toxicodendron radicans (poison-ivy), usually occurring in areas flooded an average of 1 to 2 weeks a year; and Quercus virginiana (live oak) present most often in areas flooded approximately 1 week a year. Federal wetland regulations (1989) limited wetland jurisdiction to only those areas that are inundated or saturated during the growing season. However, year-round hydrologic records were chosen in this report to describe the influence of hydrology on vegetation, because saturation, inundation, or flowing water can have a variety of both beneficial and adverse effects on flood-plain vegetation at any time of the

  7. Initial formation of an indigenous crop complex in eastern North America at 3800 B.P

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce D.; Yarnell, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Although geneticists and archaeologists continue to make progress world-wide in documenting the time and place of the initial domestication of a growing number of plants and animals, far less is known regarding the critically important context of coalescence of various species into distinctive sets or complexes of domesticates in each of the world's 10 or more independent centers of agricultural origin. In this article, the initial emergence of a crop complex is described for one of the best-documented of these independent centers, eastern North America (ENA). Before 4000 B.P. there is no indication of a crop complex in ENA, only isolated evidence for single indigenous domesticate species. By 3800 B.P., however, at least 5 domesticated seed-bearing plants formed a coherent complex in the river valley corridors of ENA. Accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates and reanalysis of archaeobotanical assemblages from a short occupation of the Riverton Site in Illinois documents the contemporary cultivation at 3800 B.P. of domesticated bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria), marshelder (Iva annua var. macrocarpa), sunflower (Helianthus annuus var. macrocarpus), and 2 cultivated varieties of chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), as well as the possible cultivation of Cucurbita pepo squash and little barley (Hordeum pusillum). Rather than marking either an abrupt developmental break or a necessary response to population-packing or compressed resource catchments, the coalescence of an initial crop complex in ENA appears to reflect an integrated expansion and enhancement of preexisting hunting and gathering economies that took place within a context of stable long-term adaptation to resource-rich river valley settings. PMID:19366669

  8. Tree shelter and interplanted n-fixing shrub effects on crop tree growth on a calcareous minesoil

    SciTech Connect

    Kost, D.A.; Larson, M.M.; Vimmerstedt, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    In southeastern Ohio, we installed three studies to test the effects of plastic tube tree shelters and interplanted N-fixing shrubs on crop tree survival and growth. Study 1 on graded gray cast overburden used white ash (Fraxinus Americana L.) and a hybrid willow (Salix matsudana x alba, or Austree) as crop trees. These were tested in factorial combination with 1.2 m tall tree shelters (present or absent) and N-fixing shrubs [none, bristly locust (Robinia fertilis Ashe), or Siberian peashrub (Caragana arborescens Lam. )]. Study 2 evaluated growth of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) as affected by soil surf ace (graded cast overburden or ripped topsoil), presence of tree shelters, and presence of interplanted Siberian peashrub. Study 3 tested Austree growth as affected by soil surf ace and presence of tree shelters. After four or five growing seasons, overall crop tree survivals were white ash (80%), bur oak (52%), and Austree (10% in study 1 and 25% in study 3). All crop tree species tended to survive better with tree shelters but only Austree in study 3 (36% with shelter vs. 14% without shelter) showed a significant difference. Tree shelters increased heights of white ash (102 cm with shelter vs. 21 cm without shelter) and bur oak (84 cm vs. 27 cm). Crop tree survival and growth were not affected significantly by interplanted N-fixing shrubs or by soil surface. In study 1 (cast overburden only), peashrub (64%) survived better than bristly locust (31%) but locust was taller (74 cm vs. 45 cm). In study 2, peashrub survived better on ripped topsoil (53%) than cast overburden (17%), but height was not impressive on either soil (41{+-}11 cm).

  9. Comparison of root-associated communities of native and non-native ectomycorrhizal hosts in an urban landscape.

    PubMed

    Lothamer, K; Brown, S P; Mattox, J D; Jumpponen, A

    2014-05-01

    Non-native tree species are often used as ornamentals in urban landscapes. However, their root-associated fungal communities remain yet to be examined in detail. Here, we compared richness, diversity and community composition of ectomycorrhizosphere fungi in general and ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi in particular between a non-native Pinus nigra and a native Quercus macrocarpa across a growing season in urban parks using 454-pyrosequencing. Our data show that, while the ectomycorrhizosphere community richness and diversity did not differ between the two host, the EcM communities associated with the native host were often more species rich and included more exclusive members than those of the non-native hosts. In contrast, the ectomycorrhizosphere communities of the two hosts were compositionally clearly distinct in nonmetric multidimensional ordination analyses, whereas the EcM communities were only marginally so. Taken together, our data suggest EcM communities with broad host compatibilities and with a limited numbers of taxa with preference to the non-native host. Furthermore, many common fungi in the non-native Pinus were not EcM taxa, suggesting that the fungal communities of the non-native host may be enriched in non-mycorrhizal fungi at the cost of the EcM taxa. Finally, while our colonization estimates did not suggest a shortage in EcM inoculum for either host in urban parks, the differences in the fungi associated with the two hosts emphasize the importance of using native hosts in urban environments as a tool to conserve endemic fungal diversity and richness in man-made systems.

  10. Contribution of Soil Fauna to Foliar Litter-Mass Loss in Winter in an Ecotone between Dry Valley and Montane Forest in the Upper Reaches of the Minjiang River

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Yang, Wanqin; Li, Jun; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Chuan; Yue, Kai; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition during winter can provide essential nutrients for plant growth in the subsequent growing season, which plays important role in preventing the expansion of dry areas and maintaining the stability of ecotone ecosystems. However, limited information is currently available on the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition during winter in such ecosystems. Therefore, a field experiment that included litterbags with two different mesh sizes (0.04 mm and 3 mm) was conducted to investigate the contribution of soil fauna to the loss of foliar litter mass in winter from November 2013 to April 2014 along the upper reaches of the Minjiang River. Two litter types of the dominant species were selected in each ecosystem: cypress (Cupressus chengiana) and oak (Quercus baronii) in ecotone; cypress (Cupressus chengiana) and clovershrub (Campylotropis macrocarpa) in dry valley; and fir (Abies faxoniana) and birch (Betula albosinensis) in montane forest. Over one winter incubation, foliar litter lost 6.0%-16.1%, 11.4%-26.0%, and 6.4%-8.5% of initial mass in the ecotone, dry valley and montane forest, respectively. Soil fauna showed obvious contributions to the loss of foliar litter mass in all of the ecosystems. The highest contribution (48.5%-56.8%) was observed in the ecotone, and the lowest contribution (0.4%-25.8%) was observed in the montane forest. Compared with other winter periods, thawing period exhibited higher soil fauna contributions to litter mass loss in ecotone and dry valley, but both thawing period and freezing period displayed higher soil fauna contributions in montane forest. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the contribution of soil fauna was significantly correlated with temperature and soil moisture during the winter-long incubation. These results suggest that temperature might be the primary control factor in foliar litter decomposition, but more active soil fauna in the ecotone could contribute more in litter decomposition and

  11. Initial formation of an indigenous crop complex in eastern North America at 3800 B.P.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bruce D; Yarnell, Richard A

    2009-04-21

    Although geneticists and archaeologists continue to make progress world-wide in documenting the time and place of the initial domestication of a growing number of plants and animals, far less is known regarding the critically important context of coalescence of various species into distinctive sets or complexes of domesticates in each of the world's 10 or more independent centers of agricultural origin. In this article, the initial emergence of a crop complex is described for one of the best-documented of these independent centers, eastern North America (ENA). Before 4000 B.P. there is no indication of a crop complex in ENA, only isolated evidence for single indigenous domesticate species. By 3800 B.P., however, at least 5 domesticated seed-bearing plants formed a coherent complex in the river valley corridors of ENA. Accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates and reanalysis of archaeobotanical assemblages from a short occupation of the Riverton Site in Illinois documents the contemporary cultivation at 3800 B.P. of domesticated bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria), marshelder (Iva annua var. macrocarpa), sunflower (Helianthus annuus var. macrocarpus), and 2 cultivated varieties of chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), as well as the possible cultivation of Cucurbita pepo squash and little barley (Hordeum pusillum). Rather than marking either an abrupt developmental break or a necessary response to population-packing or compressed resource catchments, the coalescence of an initial crop complex in ENA appears to reflect an integrated expansion and enhancement of preexisting hunting and gathering economies that took place within a context of stable long-term adaptation to resource-rich river valley settings.

  12. Thirteen-year hardwood tree performance on a Midwest surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, W.C.; Kolar, C.A.

    1998-12-31

    Black walnut (Juglans nigra L.), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), bur oak (Q. macrocarpa Michx.), and pin oak (Q. palustris Muenchh.) seedlings were planted both fall 1980 and spring 1981 on mixed overburden strip-mining banks (ungraded), mixed overburden graded to approximate original contour (AOC) (graded), mixed overburden graded to AOC wit h 60 cm of replaced pre-mining surface soil materials (topsoil), and on old fields near the strip-mine (unmined). Black walnut and pin oak were also planted as seed, with a total of 6000 seedlings/seed spots in the study. Initial species field viability ranged from 86 to 100%. With one exception, after 3 growing seasons oak seedlings had 50% or greater survival. Survival was mostly lower after 3 years with some additional mortality by years 8 and 13. Height and diameter breast height were measured after 13 years. Survival and growth of trees planted fall or spring was similar overall with variable performance by species. Seedlings of several species on the ungraded site had over 50% survival after 13 years, with fewer trees where planted as seed. Mean height of all species combined was significantly greater on the ungraded than on any other site and was lowest on the topsoil site. The unmined sites had high variability in species survival and height. Better reclamation with trees resulted from a deep, well-drained rooting medium with minimal compaction and a mineral-rich surface soil including coarse fragments over 2 mm in size for long-term productivity.

  13. Comparative chloroplast genomes of pinaceae: insights into the mechanism of diversified genomic organizations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Lin, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Chi-Yao; Wang, Rui-Jiang; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2011-01-01

    Pinaceae, the largest family of conifers, has diversified organizations of chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) with the two typical inverted repeats (IRs) highly reduced. To unravel the mechanism of this genomic diversification, we examined the cpDNA organizations from 53 species of the ten Pinaceous genera, including those of Larix decidua (122,474 bp), Picea morrisonicola (124,168 bp), and Pseudotsuga wilsoniana (122,513 bp), which were firstly elucidated. The results uncovered four distinct cpDNA forms (A-C and P) that are due to rearrangements of two ∼20 and ∼21 kb specific fragments. The C form was documented for the first time and the A form might be the most ancestral one. In addition, only the individuals of Ps. macrocarpa and Ps. wilsoniana were detected to have isomeric cpDNA forms. Three types (types 1-3) of Pinaceae-specific repeats situated nearby the rearranged fragments were found to be syntenic. We hypothesize that type 1 (949 ± 343 bp) and type 3 (608 ± 73 bp) repeats are substrates for homologous recombination (HR), whereas type 2 repeats are likely inactive for HR because of their relatively short sizes (151 ± 30 bp). Conversions among the four distinct forms may be achieved by HR and mediated by type 1 or 3 repeats, thus resulting in increased diversity of cpDNA organizations. We propose that in the Pinaceae cpDNAs, the reduced IRs have lost HR activity, then decreasing the diversity of cpDNA organizations, but the specific repeats that the evolution endowed Pinaceae complement the reduced IRs and increase the diversity of cpDNA organizations.

  14. Fungal Planet description sheets: 371-399.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J; Le Roux, J J; Richardson, D M; Strasberg, D; Shivas, R G; Alvarado, P; Edwards, J; Moreno, G; Sharma, R; Sonawane, M S; Tan, Y P; Altés, A; Barasubiye, T; Barnes, C W; Blanchette, R A; Boertmann, D; Bogo, A; Carlavilla, J R; Cheewangkoon, R; Daniel, R; de Beer, Z W; de Jesús Yáñez-Morales, M; Duong, T A; Fernández-Vicente, J; Geering, A D W; Guest, D I; Held, B W; Heykoop, M; Hubka, V; Ismail, A M; Kajale, S C; Khemmuk, W; Kolařík, M; Kurli, R; Lebeuf, R; Lévesque, C A; Lombard, L; Magista, D; Manjón, J L; Marincowitz, S; Mohedano, J M; Nováková, A; Oberlies, N H; Otto, E C; Paguigan, N D; Pascoe, I G; Pérez-Butrón, J L; Perrone, G; Rahi, P; Raja, H A; Rintoul, T; Sanhueza, R M V; Scarlett, K; Shouche, Y S; Shuttleworth, L A; Taylor, P W J; Thorn, R G; Vawdrey, L L; Solano-Vidal, R; Voitk, A; Wong, P T W; Wood, A R; Zamora, J C; Groenewald, J Z

    2015-12-01

    Novel species of fungi described in the present study include the following from Australia: Neoseptorioides eucalypti gen. & sp. nov. from Eucalyptus radiata leaves, Phytophthora gondwanensis from soil, Diaporthe tulliensis from rotted stem ends of Theobroma cacao fruit, Diaporthe vawdreyi from fruit rot of Psidium guajava, Magnaporthiopsis agrostidis from rotted roots of Agrostis stolonifera and Semifissispora natalis from Eucalyptus leaf litter. Furthermore, Neopestalotiopsis egyptiaca is described from Mangifera indica leaves (Egypt), Roussoella mexicana from Coffea arabica leaves (Mexico), Calonectria monticola from soil (Thailand), Hygrocybe jackmanii from littoral sand dunes (Canada), Lindgomyces madisonensis from submerged decorticated wood (USA), Neofabraea brasiliensis from Malus domestica (Brazil), Geastrum diosiae from litter (Argentina), Ganoderma wiiroense on angiosperms (Ghana), Arthrinium gutiae from the gut of a grasshopper (India), Pyrenochaeta telephoni from the screen of a mobile phone (India) and Xenoleptographium phialoconidium gen. & sp. nov. on exposed xylem tissues of Gmelina arborea (Indonesia). Several novelties are introduced from Spain, namely Psathyrella complutensis on loamy soil, Chlorophyllum lusitanicum on nitrified grasslands (incl. Chlorophyllum arizonicum comb. nov.), Aspergillus citocrescens from cave sediment and Lotinia verna gen. & sp. nov. from muddy soil. Novel foliicolous taxa from South Africa include Phyllosticta carissicola from Carissa macrocarpa, Pseudopyricularia hagahagae from Cyperaceae and Zeloasperisporium searsiae from Searsia chirindensis. Furthermore, Neophaeococcomyces is introduced as a novel genus, with two new combinations, N. aloes and N. catenatus. Several foliicolous novelties are recorded from La Réunion, France, namely Ochroconis pandanicola from Pandanus utilis, Neosulcatispora agaves gen. & sp. nov. from Agave vera-cruz, Pilidium eucalyptorum from Eucalyptus robusta, Strelitziana syzygii from

  15. Tree and stand transpiration in a Midwestern bur oak savanna after elm encroachment and restoration thinning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asbjornsen, H.; Tomer, M.D.; Gomez-Cardenas, M.; Brudvig, L.A.; Greenan, C.M.; Schilling, K.

    2007-01-01

    Oak savannas, once common in the Midwest, are now isolated remnants within agricultural landscapes. Savanna remnants are frequently encroached by invasive trees to become woodlands. Thinning and prescribed burning can restore savanna structure, but the ecohydrological effects of managing these remnants are poorly understood. In this study, we measured sap flow (Js) to quantify transpiration in an Iowa bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) savanna woodland encroached by elms (Ulmus americana), and in an adjacent restored savanna after thinning to remove elms, during summer 2004. Savanna oaks had greater mean daily Js (35.9 L dm-2 day-1) than woodland oaks (20.7 L dm-2 day-1) and elms (12.4 L dm-2 day-1). The response of Js to vapor pressure deficit (D) was unexpectedly weak, although oaks in both stands showed negative correlation between daily Js and D for D > 0.4 kPa. An earlier daily peak in Js in the elm trees showed a possible advantage for water uptake. As anticipated, the woodland's stand transpiration was greater (1.23 mm day-1) than the savanna's (0.35 mm day-1), yet the savanna achieved 30% of the woodland's transpiration with only 11% of its sapwood area. The difference in transpiration influenced water table depths, which were 2 m in the savanna and 6.5 m in the woodland. Regionally, row-crop agriculture has increased groundwater recharge and raised water tables, providing surplus water that perhaps facilitated elm encroachment. This has implications for restoration of savanna remnants. If achieving a savanna ecohydrology is an aim of restoration, then restoration strategies may require buffers, or targeting of large or hydrologically isolated remnants. ?? 2007.

  16. Seasonal habitat preference by the flagship species Testudo hermanni: Implications for the conservation of coastal dunes.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Fabiana; Carranza, Maria Laura; Frate, Ludovico; Stanisci, Angela; Loy, Anna

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we explored if, how, and when the European Union habitats (EU sensu Habitats Directive 92/43/CEE) are used by the flagship species Testudo hermanni in a well-preserved coastal dune system of the Italian peninsula. Radio telemetry data and fine-scale vegetation habitat mapping were used to address the following questions: (a) is each EU habitat used differentially by Hermann's tortoises? (b) is there any seasonal variation in this utilization pattern? (c) how does each habitat contribute to the ecological requirements of the tortoises? Nine tortoises were fitted with transmitters and monitored for the entire season of activity. The eight EU habitats present in the study area were surveyed and mapped using GIS. The seasonal preferential use or avoidance of each habitat was tested by comparing, through bootstrap tests, the proportion of habitat occupied (piTh) with the proportion of available habitat in the entire landscape (piL). The analysis of 340 spatial locations showed a marked preference for the Cisto-Lavanduletalia dune sclerophyllous scrubs (EU code 2260) and a seasonal selection of Juniperus macrocarpa bushes (EU code 2250(*)), wooded dunes with Pinus (EU code 2270) and mosaic of dune grasslands and sclerophyllous scrubs (EU codes 2230, 2240, 2260). Seasonal variation of habitat preference was interpreted in light of the different feeding, thermoregulation and reproductive needs of the tortoises. Our results stress the ecological value of EU coastal dune habitats and suggest prioritization of conservation efforts in these ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Biodiversity in the Cladosporium herbarum complex (Davidiellaceae, Capnodiales), with standardisation of methods for Cladosporium taxonomy and diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, K.; Groenewald, J. Z.; Braun, U.; Dijksterhuis, J.; Starink, M.; Hill, C.F.; Zalar, P.; de Hoog, G.S.; Crous, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    The Cladosporium herbarum complex comprises five species for which Davidiella teleomorphs are known. Cladosporium herbarum s. str. (D. tassiana), C. macrocarpum (D. macrocarpa) and C. bruhnei (D. allicina) are distinguishable by having conidia of different width, and by teleomorph characters. Davidiella variabile is introduced as teleomorph of C. variabile, a homothallic species occurring on Spinacia, and D. macrospora is known to be the teleomorph of C. iridis on Iris spp. The C. herbarum complex combines low molecular distance with a high degree of clonal or inbreeding diversity. Entities differ from each other by multilocus sequence data and by phenetic differences, and thus can be interpreted to represent individual taxa. Isolates of the C. herbarum complex that were formerly associated with opportunistic human infections, cluster with C. bruhnei. Several species are newly described from hypersaline water, namely C. ramotenellum, C. tenellum, C. subinflatum, and C. herbaroides. Cladosporium pseudiridis collected from Iris sp. in New Zealand, is also a member of this species complex and shown to be distinct from C. iridis that occurs on this host elsewhere in the world. A further new species from New Zealand is C. sinuosum on Fuchsia excorticata. Cladosporium antarcticum is newly described from a lichen, Caloplaca regalis, collected in Antarctica, and C. subtilissimum from grape berries in the U.S.A., while the new combination C. ossifragi, the oldest valid name of the Cladosporium known from Narthecium in Europe, is proposed. Standard protocols and media are herewith proposed to facilitate future morphological examination of Cladosporium spp. in culture, and neotypes or epitypes are proposed for all species treated. PMID:18490998

  18. Use of species other than oak to flavor wine: an exploratory survey.

    PubMed

    Young, O A; Kaushal, M; Robertson, J D; Burns, H; Nunns, S J

    2010-01-01

    The concept of geographical exclusivity prompted an exploratory survey with toasted woods other than oak to flavor wine. A total of 11 woods and oak (Quercus alba) were cut into chips 20 × 10 × 2.5 mm and toasted at 200 °C for 2 h (light toast) or 210 °C for 3 h (dark). Weight losses and changes in CIE color space were monitored. The toasted chips were infused in unoaked chardonnay (5 g L(-1)) for 2 wk. Parallel infusions were done with model wine (water, ethanol, tartaric acid) adjusted to pH 3.5. Ultraviolet absorbances due to infusion were recorded on the basis that that lignin compounds and their potential pyrolysates are based on phenolic structures that absorb in the ultraviolet range. Weight losses on light and dark toasting were highly variable between species as were color changes, suggesting potential for different flavor outcomes from chemical changes. Ultraviolet absorbance curves were also highly variable showing that different species yielded different quantities of potentially flavor-active phenolic compounds in real and model wine. More absorbing matter was extracted from the light toast treatments, and light toast oak, which demonstrated the greatest weight loss on light toasting, yielded the widest range of ultraviolet-absorbing matter. In an informal sensory trial with the 24 species/toast combinations infused in chardonnay all but one wood, Cupressus macrocarpa, resulted in flavors reminiscent of oaked wines. A hedonic consumer trial with 4 species and oak compared with uninfused chardonnay showed that each of the 4 had potential as a flavorant. Thus, woods unsuited to barrel construction could provide unrealized flavor opportunities in the wine industry, and could extend to flavoring spirits. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Contribution of Soil Fauna to Foliar Litter-Mass Loss in Winter in an Ecotone between Dry Valley and Montane Forest in the Upper Reaches of the Minjiang River.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Yang, Wanqin; Li, Jun; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Chuan; Yue, Kai; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition during winter can provide essential nutrients for plant growth in the subsequent growing season, which plays important role in preventing the expansion of dry areas and maintaining the stability of ecotone ecosystems. However, limited information is currently available on the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition during winter in such ecosystems. Therefore, a field experiment that included litterbags with two different mesh sizes (0.04 mm and 3 mm) was conducted to investigate the contribution of soil fauna to the loss of foliar litter mass in winter from November 2013 to April 2014 along the upper reaches of the Minjiang River. Two litter types of the dominant species were selected in each ecosystem: cypress (Cupressus chengiana) and oak (Quercus baronii) in ecotone; cypress (Cupressus chengiana) and clovershrub (Campylotropis macrocarpa) in dry valley; and fir (Abies faxoniana) and birch (Betula albosinensis) in montane forest. Over one winter incubation, foliar litter lost 6.0%-16.1%, 11.4%-26.0%, and 6.4%-8.5% of initial mass in the ecotone, dry valley and montane forest, respectively. Soil fauna showed obvious contributions to the loss of foliar litter mass in all of the ecosystems. The highest contribution (48.5%-56.8%) was observed in the ecotone, and the lowest contribution (0.4%-25.8%) was observed in the montane forest. Compared with other winter periods, thawing period exhibited higher soil fauna contributions to litter mass loss in ecotone and dry valley, but both thawing period and freezing period displayed higher soil fauna contributions in montane forest. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the contribution of soil fauna was significantly correlated with temperature and soil moisture during the winter-long incubation. These results suggest that temperature might be the primary control factor in foliar litter decomposition, but more active soil fauna in the ecotone could contribute more in litter decomposition and

  20. Evidence for community structure and habitat partitioning in coastal dune stiletto flies at the Guadalupe-Nipomo dunes system, California.

    PubMed

    Holston, Kevin C

    2005-12-22

    This study provides empirical evidence for habitat selection by North American species of stiletto flies (Diptera: Therevidae), based on local distributions of adults and immatures, and the first hypothesis of community assemblages proposed for a stiletto fly community. Sites at three localities within the Guadalupe-Nipomo dune system were sampled for stiletto flies in 1997 and 2001 by sifting sand, malaise trapping, and hand netting. Nine species were collected from four ecological zones and three intermediate ecological zones: Acrosathe novella (Coquillett), Brachylinga baccata (Loew), Nebritus powelli (Webb and Irwin), Ozodiceromyia sp., Pherocera sp., Tabudamima melanophleba (Loew), Thereva comata Loew, Thereva elizabethae Holston and Irwin, and Thereva fucata Loew. Species associations of adults and larvae with habitats and ecological zones were consistent among sites, suggesting that local distributions of coastal dune stiletto fly species are influenced by differences in habitat selection. In habitats dominated by the arroyo willow,Salix lasiolepsis, stiletto fly larvae of three species were collected in local sympatry, demonstrating that S. lasiolepsis stands along stabilized dune ridges can provide an intermediate ecological zone linking active dune and riparian habitat in the Guadalupe-Nipomo dune system. Sites dominated by European beach grass, Ammophilia arenaria, blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus, and Monterey cypress, Cupressus macrocarpa, are considered unsuitable for stiletto flies, which emphasizes the importance of terrestrial habitats with native vegetation for stiletto fly species. The local distributions of stiletto fly species at the Guadalupe-Nipomo dune system allow the community to be divided into three assemblages; active dune, pioneer scrub, and scrub-riparian. These assemblages may be applicable to other coastal dune stiletto fly communities, and may have particular relevance to stiletto fly species collected in European coastal dunes. The

  1. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of branches extracts of five Juniperus species from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Taviano, Maria Fernanda; Marino, Andreana; Trovato, Ada; Bellinghieri, Valentina; La Barbera, Tommaso Massimo; Güvenç, Ayşegül; Hürkul, Muhammed Mesud; Pasquale, Rita De; Miceli, Natalizia

    2011-10-01

    Several Juniperus species (Cupressaceae) are utilized in folk medicine in the treatment of infections and skin diseases. This work was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial potential of methanol and water branches extracts of Juniperus species from Turkey: Juniperus communis L. var. communis (Jcc), Juniperus communis L. var. saxatilis Pall. (Jcs), Juniperus drupacea Labill. (Jd), Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. oxycedrus (Joo), Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. macrocarpa (Sibth. & Sm.) Ball. (Jom). Total phenolics, total flavonoids and condensed tannins were spectrophotometrically determined. The antioxidant properties were examined using different in vitro systems. The toxicity was assayed by Artemia salina lethality test. The antimicrobial potential against bacteria and yeasts was evaluated using minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC) measurements. The effect on bacteria biofilms was tested by microtiter plate assay. Both in the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and TBA (thiobarbituric acid) test Jom resulted the most active (IC(50) = 0.034 ± 0.002 mg/mL and 0.287 ± 0.166 µg/mL). Joo exhibited the highest reducing power (1.78 ± 0.04 ASE/mL) and Fe(2+) chelating activity (IC(50) = 0.537 ± 0.006 mg/mL). A positive correlation between primary antioxidant activity and phenolic content was found. The extracts were potentially non-toxic against Artemia salina. They showed the best antimicrobial (MIC = 4.88-30.10 µg/mL) and anti-biofilm activity (60-84%) against S. aureus. The results give a scientific basis to the traditional utilization of these Juniperus species, also demonstrating their potential as sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  2. Invasive rats alter woody seedling composition on seabird-dominated islands in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Grant-Hoffman, Madeline N; Mulder, Christa P; Bellingham, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    Invasive rats (Rattus rattus, R. norvegicus, R. exulans) have large impacts on island habitats through both direct and indirect effects on plants. Rats affect vegetation by extirpating burrowing seabirds through consumption of eggs, chicks, and adults. These seabirds serve as ecosystem engineers, affecting plant communities by burying and trampling seeds and seedlings, and by altering microclimate. Rats also directly affect plant communities by consuming seeds and seedlings. We studied the direct and indirect impacts of rats on the seedlings of woody plants on 21 islands in northern New Zealand. We compared seedling densities and richness on islands which differed in status with respect to rats: nine islands where rats never invaded, seven islands where rats were present at the time of our study, and five islands where rats were either eradicated or where populations were likely to be small as a result of repeated eradications and re-invasions. In addition, we compared plots from a subset of the 21 islands with different burrow densities to examine the effects of burrowing seabirds on plants while controlling for other factors that differ between islands. We categorized plant communities by species composition and seedling density in a cluster analysis. We found that burrow densities explained more variation in seedling communities than rat status. In areas with high seabird burrow density seedling densities were low, especially for the smallest seedlings. Species richness and diversity of seedlings, but not seedling density, were most influenced by changes in microclimate induced by seabirds. Islands where rats had been eradicated or that had low rat populations had the lowest diversity and richness of seedlings (and adults), but the highest seedling density. Seedling communities on these islands were dominated by Pseudopanax lessonii and Coprosma macrocarpa. This indicates lasting effects of rats that may prevent islands from returning to pre-invasion states.

  3. Complex facilitation and competition in a temperate grassland: loss of plant diversity and elevated CO2 have divergent and opposite effects on oak establishment.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexandra; Schnitzer, Stefan A; Dickie, Ian A; Gunderson, Alex R; Pinter, Gabriella A; Mangan, Scott A; Reich, Peter B

    2013-02-01

    Encroachment of woody vegetation into grasslands is a widespread phenomenon that alters plant community composition and ecosystem function. Woody encroachment is often the result of fire suppression, but it may also be related to changes in resource availability associated with global environmental change. We tested the relative strength of three important global change factors (CO(2) enrichment, nitrogen deposition, and loss of herbaceous plant diversity) on the first 3 years of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) seedling performance in a field experiment in central Minnesota, USA. We found that loss of plant diversity decreased initial oak survival but increased overall oak growth. Conversely, elevated CO(2) increased initial oak seedling survival and reduced overall growth, especially at low levels of diversity. Nitrogen deposition surprisingly had no net effect on survival or growth. The magnitude of these effects indicates that long-term woody encroachment trends may be most strongly associated with those few individuals that survive, but grow much larger in lower diversity patches. Further, while the CO(2) results and the species richness results appear to describe opposing trends, this is due only to the fact that the natural drivers are moving in opposite directions (decreasing species richness and increasing CO(2)). Interestingly, the mechanisms that underlie both patterns are very similar, increased CO(2) and increased species richness both increase herbaceous biomass which (1) increases belowground competition for resources and (2) increases facilitation of early plant survival under a more diverse plant canopy; in other words, both competition and facilitation help determine community composition in these grasslands.

  4. Experimental investigation of the modification of the flow field, past instream vegetation elements, for distinct bedsurface roughness.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Yagci, Oral; Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Koursari, Eftychia

    2015-04-01

    The presence of vegetation in rivers and estuaries has important implications for the modification of the flow field and sediment transport. In-stream vegetation has the potential to regulate the morphology and ecological health of a surface water body, and as such it finds a wide range of applications. Even though a number of controls influencing the local flow field past aquatic vegetation elements or patches of instream vegetation have been identified (such as shape, areal density, size and flexibility), conclusive evidence is lacking, particularly on how sediment transport processes are affected. Here, an experimental study is designed to identify how the flow field past different types of elements simulating in-stream emergent vegetation is modified. Two sets of experiments are conducted, each with a distinct value of high and low hydraulic roughness for the bed surface. In both experiments a rigid cylindrical element, a patch of rigid tubes and a plant shaped element (Cupressus Macrocarpa), simulating instream emergent vegetation are utilized. The flow field is measured at various locations downstream the element and average and turbulent flow statistics are obtained at near bed, mid-flow depth and near the water surface regions. It is found that different structural aspects of the elements, particularly the geometry, can significantly affect the flow field downstream the elements. Specifically, the average flow profiles are practically restored to near ambient flow conditions at about 5 diameters downstream the rigid element, while this happens at longer distances for the other elements. The flow structures shed past the elements are also very distinct, as confirmed via appropriately designed fluorescent dye flow visualizations. Potential ecosystem feedbacks and implications for formation of geospatial patterns are also discussed.

  5. Potential of Multiple Dendroclimatic Proxies for the Prairies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanstone, J. R.; Sauchyn, D. J.

    2009-05-01

    Concern to establish the nature and rate of climatic changes, should serve to reinforce our determination to understand similar details of the 'natural' (i.e. non-anthropogenic) variability of climate. Dendrochronology offers great potential for studying climatic and environmental variability at local and regional levels, because of the wide geographical distribution of suitable sites, high temporal resolution (annual or even seasonal), continuous and relatively long, absolutely-dated, well replicated and environmentally sensitive (i.e. accurate) characteristics of tree rings. Patterns within the annual rings of Quercus (oak) species, suggest that environmental factors influence the size and density of vessels within the ring, either by acting as a limiting factor for growth or through fine tuning of the wood structure to environmental factors. The purpose of this study is to investigate growth responses (annual, early- and late-wood widths) of Q. macrocarpa to regional climatic variability affecting the Canadian Prairies. Results indicate that annual ring widths, as well as early- and late- wood chronologies from southeastern Saskatchewan capture regional signals related to moisture and drought conditions. Correlations suggest that late-wood measurements are more strongly representative of annual ring-widths, than are early-wood widths, and can therefore be applied for investigating seasonal fluctuations in climatic data. Correlations with precipitation and PDSI values indicate that annual, early- and latewood chronologies are useful proxies for investigating large scale climatic fluctuations, and present the opportunity for further investigation of the effects of indices that represent major modes of climate variability, such as the effects of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) patterns that are thought to influence climate within the Prairie region. This study is novel in terms of sub-annual analysis of tree-rings in a

  6. A comparative study on the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of five Juniperus taxa.

    PubMed

    Akkol, Esra Küpeli; Güvenç, Ayşegül; Yesilada, Erdem

    2009-09-07

    Juniperus L. (Cupressaceae) species have been used to various inflammatory and infectious diseases such as bronchitis, colds, cough, fungal infections, hemorrhoids, gynecological diseases, and wounds in Turkish folk medicine. To evaluate this traditional information, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the methanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts (stem, fruit and leaves) of the five Turkish taxa under Juniperus section of the gender; J. drupacea, J. communis var. communis, J. communis var. saxatilis, J. oxycedrus subsp. oxycedrus, and J. oxycedrus subsp. macrocarpa growing were investigated. For the anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced and PGE(2)-induced hind paw edema models, and for the antinociceptive activity p-benzoquinone-induced writhing and hot plate tests in mice were employed. The methanolic extracts of fruit and leaves from J. oxycedrus subsp. oxycedrus and J. communis var. saxatilis exhibited notable inhibition in carrageenan-induced edema model at a dose of 100mg/kg. The same extracts also displayed significant activity against PGE(2)-induced edema model. While, the remaining extracts were found inactive against these edema models. A similar activity pattern was observed against p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal constriction test without inducing any gastric damage or apparent acute toxicity, whereas all extracts were inactive in hot plate test. The experimental data demonstrated that J. oxycedrus subsp. oxycedrus and J. communis var. saxatilis displayed remarkable anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities; however, further studies are warranted to define and isolate the active anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive components from these active species which may yield safe and effective agents to be used in the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  7. Foliar delta(13)C and delta(18)O reveal differential physiological responses of canopy foliage to pre-planting weed control in a young spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subsp. Variegata) plantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiqun; Xu, Zhihong; Blumfield, Timothy J; Bubb, Ken

    2008-10-01

    Weed control may improve the growth of forest plantations by influencing soil water and nutrient availability, but our knowledge of leaf-level physiological responses to weed control at different within-canopy positions is limited for tropical and subtropical plantations. Foliar carbon (delta(13)C) and oxygen (delta(18)O) isotope compositions, gas exchange, and nitrogen (N(mass)) and phosphorus (P(mass)) concentrations at four canopy positions were assessed in a young spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subsp. Variegata (F. Muell.) A.R. Bean & M.W. McDonald) plantation subjected to either weed control or no weed control treatment, to test if leaves at different positions within the tree canopy had the same physiological responses to the weed control treatment. Weed control increased foliar delta(13)C but lowered delta(18)O in the upper-outer and upper-inner canopy, indicating that weed control resulted in a higher foliar photosynthetic capacity at upper-canopy positions, a conclusion confirmed by gas exchange measurements. The increased photosynthetic capacity resulting from weed control can be explained by an increase in foliar N(mass). In the lower-outer canopy, weed control reduced foliar delta(13)C while lowering delta(18)O even more than in the upper-canopy, suggesting strong enhancement of the partial pressure of CO(2) in the leaf intercellular spaces and of foliar stomatal conductance in lower-canopy foliage. This conclusion was supported by gas exchange measurements. Foliar photosynthesis in the lower-inner canopy showed no significant response to weed control. The finding that leaves at different canopy positions differ in their physiological responses to weed control highlights the need to consider the canopy position effect when examining competition for soil nutrient and water resources between weeds and trees.

  8. Variation in pollinator assemblages in a fragmented landscape and its effects on reproductive stages of a self-incompatible treelet, Psychotria suterella (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Luciano E; Buzato, Silvana

    2007-11-01

    Few studies of plant-pollinator interactions in fragmented landscapes evaluate the consequences of floral visitor variation on multiple stages of plant reproduction. Given that fragmentation potentially has positive or negative effects on different organisms, and that self-incompatible plant species depend on pollinators for sexual reproduction, differences in floral visitor assemblages may affect certain plant reproductive stages. We evaluated how pollinator assemblage, availability of floral resources, pollination, reproductive output, and seed and seedling performance of Psychotria suterella Muell. Arg. varied among three fragmentation categories: non-fragmented habitats, fragments connected by corridors, and isolated fragments. Richness and frequency of floral visitors were greater in fragments than in non-fragmented sites, resulting mainly from the addition of species typically found in disturbed areas. Although 24 species visited Psychotria suterella flowers, bumblebees were considered the most important pollinators, because they showed the highest frequency of visits and were present in eight out of ten sites. Additionally, the number of pollen tubes per flower per visit was lower in areas without bumblebees. The increased visitation in fragments seemed to enhance pollination slightly. However, fruit and seed output, germination, and seed and seedling mass were similar in non-fragmented sites, connected sites, and isolated fragments. Our results suggested that, even for a self-incompatible species, responses to habitat fragmentation at different stages of plant reproduction might be decoupled from the responses observed in floral visitors, if fruit set is not pollen limited. If all reproductive stages were considered, variation on the small scale was more important than the variation explained by fragmentation category. In spite of its self-incompatible breeding system, this plant-pollinator system showed resilience to habitat fragmentation, mainly as a

  9. Antithrombotic and cytotoxic activities of four Bangladeshi plants and PASS prediction of their isolated compounds.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Mohammad Shah Hafez; Mahamoud, Md Sofi; Chakrabarty, Nishan; Ahmad, Shabbir; Masum, Md Abdullah Al; Hoque, Md Akramul; Hossain, Mohammed Munawar; Rahman, Md Mominur; Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to investigate whether tested organic extracts possess antithrombotic properties with minimal or no toxicity and to predict the activity of some of their isolated compounds. An in vitro thrombolytic model was used to check the clot lysis effect of four Bangladeshi herbal extracts viz., roots of Curculigo recurvata W.T. Aiton (Satipata), leaf of Amorphophallus bulbifer Roxb. (Olkachu), leaf of Phyllanthus sikkimensis Muell. Arg., and whole plant of Thunbergia grandiflora Roxb. (Nillata) using streptokinase as a positive control and water as a negative control. Cytotoxicity was screened by brine shrimp lethality bioassay using vincristine sulfate as positive control. In silico prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS) prediction was applied for phytoconstituents, namely, nyasicoside, glucomannan, grandifloric acid, serine, and alanine. Using an in vitro thrombolytic model, C. recurvata, A. bulbifer, P. sikkimensis, and T. grandiflora showed 28.10±1.64%, 42.47±1.96%, 32.86±1.92%, and 25.51±1.67% of clot lysis, respectively. Reference drug streptokinase exhibited 75.00±3.04% clot lysis. Examined herbs showed significant (p<0.001) percentage (%) of clot lysis compared to negative control. In brine shrimp cytotoxic assay, C. recurvata, A. bulbifer, P. sikkimensis, and T. grandiflora showed LC50 values 210.64±3.44, 98.51±1.47, 187.29±2.01, and 386.43±3.02 μg/mL, respectively, with reference to vincristine sulfate (LC50 0.76±0.04). PASS predicted that examined phytoconstituents have a wide range of biological activity. Through our study it was found that A. bulbifer and P. sikkimensis could be considered as very promising and beneficial thrombolytic agents.

  10. Gastroprotective mechanisms of indole alkaloids from Himatanthus lancifolius.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; De Martini Otofuji, Glaucia; de Souza, Wesley Mauricio; de Moraes Santos, Cid Aimbiré; Torres, Luce Maria Brandao; Rieck, Lia; de Andrade Marques, Maria Consuelo; Mesia-Vela, Sonia

    2005-08-01

    The indole alkaloids mixture (AlkF) obtained from the barks of Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson was evaluated for gastroprotective properties in rodents. The AlkF potently protected rats from experimentally induced gastric lesions by ethanol (ED (50) = 30 mg/kg, p. o.) and reduced gastric acid hypersecretion induced by pylorus ligature (ED (50) = 82 mg/kg, i. d.). Protective effects of the AlkF in the ethanol and hypersecretion models included increase of GSH levels of gastric mucosa indicating activation of GSH-dependent cytoprotective mechanisms. Also, an increase of the antioxidant capacity as measured through glutathione S-transferase activity was observed in the hypersecretory but not in the ulcerative model. Furthermore, the amount of nitric oxide derivatives (NO (3) + NO (2)) in the forestomach was increased while the amount released into the gastric juice during pylorus ligature was decreased by the AlkF suggesting an alteration of NO-related mechanisms. Reduction of gastric acid hypersecretion induced by pylorus ligature seems to correlate with the blockade of H (+),K (+)-ATPase activity as determined in vitro by the capacity of the AlkF mix to decrease the hydrolysis of ATP by the ATPase isolated from dog gastric mucosa (EC (50) = 212 microg/mL). Cholinergic mechanisms can be excluded since intestinal transit was not modified with doses up to 100 mg/kg ( p. o.). GC-MS investigation of components of the AlkF resulted in the identification of 3 main indole alkaloids, uleine (53 %), its isomer (13 %), demethoxyaspidormine (23.8 %) and traces of at least other five alkaloids. Collectively, the results show the novel gastroprotective properties of the indole AlkF of H. lancifolius through a variety of mechanisms.

  11. Stand-level variation in evapotranspiration in non-water-limited eucalypt forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyon, Richard G.; Nolan, Rachael H.; Hawthorn, Sandra N. D.; Lane, Patrick N. J.

    2017-08-01

    To better understand water and energy cycles in forests over years to decades, measurements of spatial and long-term temporal variability in evapotranspiration (Ea) are needed. In mountainous terrain, plot-level measurements are important to achieving this. Forest inventory data including tree density and size measurements, often collected repeatedly over decades, sample the variability occurring within the geographic and topographic range of specific forest types. Using simple allometric relationships, tree stocking and size data can be used to estimate variables including sapwood area index (SAI), which may be strongly correlated with annual Ea. This study analysed plot-level variability in SAI and its relationship with overstorey and understorey transpiration, interception and evaporation over a 670 m elevation gradient, in non-water-limited, even-aged stands of Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. to determine how well spatial variation in annual Ea from forests can be mapped using SAI. Over the 3 year study, mean sap velocity in five E. regnans stands was uncorrelated with overstorey sapwood area index (SAI) or elevation: annual transpiration was predicted well by SAI (R2 0.98). Overstorey and total annual interception were positively correlated with SAI (R2 0.90 and 0.75). Ea from the understorey was strongly correlated with vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and net radiation (Rn) measured just above the understorey, but relationships between understorey Ea and VPD and Rn differed between understorey types and understorey annual Ea was not correlated with SAI. Annual total Ea was also strongly correlated with SAI: the relationship being similar to two previous studies in the same region, despite differences in stand age and species. Thus, spatial variation in annual Ea can be reliably mapped using measurements of SAI.

  12. De novo assembly and transcriptome analysis of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) and SNP markers development for rubber biosynthesis pathways.

    PubMed

    Mantello, Camila Campos; Cardoso-Silva, Claudio Benicio; da Silva, Carla Cristina; de Souza, Livia Moura; Scaloppi Junior, Erivaldo José; de Souza Gonçalves, Paulo; Vicentini, Renato; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. Ex Adr. Juss.) Muell.-Arg. is the primary source of natural rubber that is native to the Amazon rainforest. The singular properties of natural rubber make it superior to and competitive with synthetic rubber for use in several applications. Here, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of H. brasiliensis bark on the Illumina GAIIx platform, which generated 179,326,804 raw reads on the Illumina GAIIx platform. A total of 50,384 contigs that were over 400 bp in size were obtained and subjected to further analyses. A similarity search against the non-redundant (nr) protein database returned 32,018 (63%) positive BLASTx hits. The transcriptome analysis was annotated using the clusters of orthologous groups (COG), gene ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and Pfam databases. A search for putative molecular marker was performed to identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In total, 17,927 SSRs and 404,114 SNPs were detected. Finally, we selected sequences that were identified as belonging to the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways, which are involved in rubber biosynthesis, to validate the SNP markers. A total of 78 SNPs were validated in 36 genotypes of H. brasiliensis. This new dataset represents a powerful information source for rubber tree bark genes and will be an important tool for the development of microsatellites and SNP markers for use in future genetic analyses such as genetic linkage mapping, quantitative trait loci identification, investigations of linkage disequilibrium and marker-assisted selection.

  13. Genetic Diversity Strategy for the Management and Use of Rubber Genetic Resources: More than 1,000 Wild and Cultivated Accessions in a 100-Genotype Core Collection

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernardo Moreno; Silva, Carla Cristina; Mantello, Camila Campos; Conson, Andre Ricardo Oliveira; Vianna, João Paulo Gomes; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Scaloppi Junior, Erivaldo José; Fialho, Josefino de Freitas; de Moraes, Mario Luis Teixeira; Gonçalves, Paulo de Souza; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2015-01-01

    The rubber tree [Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. ex Adr. de Juss.) Muell. Arg.] is the only plant species worldwide that is cultivated for the commercial production of natural rubber. This study describes the genetic diversity of the Hevea spp. complex that is available in the main ex situ collections of South America, including Amazonian populations that have never been previously described. Genetic data were analyzed to determine the genetic structure of the wild populations, quantify the allelic diversity and suggest the composition of a core collection to capture the maximum genetic diversity within a minimal sample size. A total of 1,117 accessions were genotyped with 13 microsatellite markers. We identified a total of 408 alleles, 319 of which were shared between groups and 89 that were private in different groups of accessions. In a population structure and principal component analysis, the level of clustering reflected a primary division into the following two subgroups: cluster 1, which consisted of varieties from the advanced breeding germplasm that originated from the Wickham and Mato Grosso accessions; and cluster 2, which consisted of the wild germplasm from the Acre, Amazonas, Pará and Rondônia populations and Hevea spp. The analyses revealed a high frequency of gene flow between the groups, with the genetic differentiation coefficient (GST) estimated to be 0.018. Additionally, no distinct separation among the H. brasiliensis accessions and the other species from Amazonas was observed. A core collection of 99 accessions was identified that captured the maximum genetic diversity. Rubber tree breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Furthermore, such a core collection could provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate traits with agronomic and commercial importance. Our study generated a molecular database that should facilitate the management of the Hevea germplasm and its use for subsequent genetic

  14. Variation in volatile leaf oils of five Eucalyptus species harvested from Jbel Abderrahman arboreta (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Elaissi, Ameur; Medini, Hanène; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi; Simmonds, Monique; Lynen, Frederic; Farhat, Farhat; Chemli, Rachid; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2011-02-01

    Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of five species of the genus Eucalyptus L' Hér., viz., E. dundasii Maiden, E. globulus Labill., E. kitsoniana Maiden, E. leucoxylon F. Muell., and E. populifolia Hook., harvested from Jbel Abderrahman arboreta (region of Nabeul, northeast of Tunisia) in April 2006, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.9±0.3 to 3.8±0.6%, dependent on the species. E. globulus and E. Kitsoniana provided the highest and the lowest percentage of essential oil amongst the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 127 compounds, representing 93.8 to 98.7% of the total oil composition. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole (2; 4.7-59.2%), followed by α-pinene (1; 1.9-23.6%), trans-pinocarveol (6; 3.5-21.6%), globulol (8; 4.3-12.8%), p-cymene (3; 0.5-6.7%), α-terpineol (1.5-4.5%), borneol (0.2-4.4%), pinocarvone (1.1-3.8%), aromadendrene (1.4-3.4%), isospathulenol (0.0-1.9%), fenchol (4; 0.1-2.5%), limonene (1.0-2.4%), epiglobulol (0.6-2.1%), viridiflorol (9; 0.8-1.8%), and spathulenol (0.1-1.6%). E. leucoxylon was the richest species in 2. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) separated the five Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into four groups, each constituting a chemotype.

  15. Nitrogen uptake by Eucalyptus regnans and Acacia spp. - preferences, resource overlap and energetic costs.

    PubMed

    Pfautsch, Sebastian; Rennenberg, Heinz; Bell, Tina L; Adams, Mark A

    2009-03-01

    In southeastern Australia, the overstory species Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. commonly grows with either of the two leguminous understory trees, Acacia melanoxylon (R. Br. Ex Ait. f.) or Acacia dealbata (Link.). Our objective was to elucidate interactions between the dominant eucalypt and its companion acacias for nitrogen (N) sources. Use of stable N isotopes as tracers revealed that ammonium was the preferred soil N source for all species, nevertheless, total N uptake varied greatly among species. Studies with double-labeled ((13)C/(15)N) glutamine indicated the uptake of this form of organic N in small amounts by both E. regnans and the Acacia spp. These and other data imply that, in contrast to boreal forests, organic N is not a significant component of N nutrition in mountain ash forests. Field and laboratory studies provided evidence that N(2)-fixation capacity of acacias varies with stand development, with N-fixing species playing an important role in N nutrition during the early but not the mature stages of forest growth. An index of N-uptake efficiency - the amount of oxygen consumed per unit N taken up - was compared across four N sources and three species. Nitrate uptake was the least efficient form of N acquisition, especially compared with ammonium uptake which was up to 30-fold less costly. Efficiency of glutamine uptake was intermediate between that of ammonium and nitrate. Differences in uptake efficiency among N forms were most pronounced for the Acacia spp. and least for E. regnans. We conclude that an overlap in requirements among sympatric Acacia spp. and E. regnans for specific soil N sources can be bypassed because of changes in biochemical strategies of Acacia spp. triggered by increasing soil N concentrations during stand development. Further studies might elucidate whether this is a common feature of complex forest ecosystems, or a specialty of the interaction between eucalypts and acacias.

  16. Resistance to the Whitefly, Aleurotrachelus socialis, in Wild Populations of Cassava, Manihot Tristis

    PubMed Central

    Carabalí, A.; Bellotti, A. C.; Montoya-Lerma, J.; Fregene, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The levels of resistance in the wild species of cassava, Manihot tristis Muell-Arg. (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae), to the whitefly, Aleurotrachelus socialis Bondar (Hemiptera: Alelyrodidae), the most important economic pest in cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae) crops in South America, were estimated under glasshouse conditions. The parameters of the life history of A. socialis were studied on TST-26 and TST-18 accessions of the wild parent and compared with the susceptible (CMC-40) and resistant (MEcu-72) cultivars. The average longevity on the wild accessions (TST-26, 4.1; TST-18, 4.6 days) and oviposition rates (TST-26, 2.0; TST-18, 1.6 eggs/female/2 days) of the A. socialis females were not significantly different from those of MEcu-72 (5.1 days and 3.4 eggs/female/2days). The longevity and oviposition rates on CMC-40 were highest (11 days and 8.6 eggs/female/2days). Analyses of the demographic parameters (Ro, rm; DT) showed a significant impact of the M. tristis accessions on the potential growth of A. socialis. The average survival time of adults that fed on TST-26, TST-18, and MEcu-72 were significantly different from those recorded on the susceptible genotype. Results from this study revealed important levels of resistance to the whitefly A. socialis on the TST-26 and TST-18 accessions due to the marked differences found for longevity and reproduction, which influenced and were consistent with the differences found in the net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic growth rate (rm) and population doubling time (DT). The combined effect of these parameters indicated that M. tristis accessions were inappropriate hosts for A. socialis. PMID:21062208

  17. Fumigant and repellent properties of essential oils and component compounds against permethrin-resistant Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Toloza, Ariel Ceferino; Zygadlo, Julio; Cueto, Gastón Mougabure; Biurrun, Fernando; Zerba, Eduardo; Picollo, María Inés

    2006-09-01

    The repeated use of permethrin and other insecticides for the control of head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Anoplura: Pediculidae), during past decades has resulted in the development of marked levels of resistance. Thus, new alternative insecticides are needed for the control of head lice. We studied the fumigant and repellent properties of essential oils from 16 native and exotic plants in Argentina, and 21 chemical components against permethrin-resistant head lice from Argentina. With a direct vapor-exposure bioassay, the most effective oil was from the native Myrcianthes cisplatensis Cambess (Myrtaceae) with a time to 50% knockdown (KT50) of 1.3 min, followed by exotic species, Eucalyptus cinerea F.V. Muell., Eucalyptus viminalis Labill., and Eucalyptus saligna Smith. with KT50 values of 12.0, 14.9, and 17.4 min, respectively. The most effective components were 1,8-cineole and anisole, with KT50 values of 11.1 and 12.7 min, respectively. Regression analysis of KT50 values and vapor pressures and water-partition coefficients for the essential oil components revealed that the most effective fumigants were among the more volatile components. Repellency assays indicated that the essential oil from Mentha pulegium L. and its benzyl alcohol component were the most effective repellents, having repellency indices of 75.5 and 57.8%, respectively. Thus, some Argentinean plants contain essential oils and components that function as fumigants or as repellents and thereby show potential for development of new control products for head lice.

  18. Changes in sapwood permeability and anatomy with tree age and height in the broad-leaved evergreen species Eucalyptus regnans.

    PubMed

    England, Jacqueline R; Attiwill, Peter M

    2007-08-01

    Increases in plant size and structural complexity with increasing age have important implications for water flow through trees. Water supply to the crown is influenced by both the cross-sectional area and the permeability of sapwood. It has been hypothesized that hydraulic conductivity within sapwood increases with age. We investigated changes in sapwood permeability (k) and anatomy with tree age and height in the broad-leaved evergreen species Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. Sapwood was sampled at breast height from trees ranging from 8 to 240 years old, and at three height positions on the main stem of 8-year-old trees. Variation in k was not significant among sampling height positions in young trees. However, k at breast height increased with tree age. This was related to increases in both vessel frequency and vessel diameter, resulting in a greater proportion of sapwood being occupied by vessel lumina. Sapwood hydraulic conductivity (the product of k and sapwood area) also increased with increasing tree age. However, at the stand level, there was a decrease in forest sapwood hydraulic conductivity with increasing stand age, because of a decrease in the number of trees per hectare. Across all ages, there were significant relationships between k and anatomy, with individual anatomical characteristics explaining 33-62% of the variation in k. There was also strong agreement between measured k and permeability predicted by the Hagen-Poiseuille equation. The results support the hypothesis of an increase in sapwood permeability at breast height with age. Further measurements are required to confirm this result at other height positions in older trees. The significance of tree-level changes in sapwood permeability for stand-level water relations is discussed.

  19. Comparative transcriptome analysis of latex from rubber tree clone CATAS8-79 and PR107 reveals new cues for the regulation of latex regeneration and duration of latex flow.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jinquan; Chen, Yueyi; Wu, Shaohua; Tian, Wei-Min

    2015-04-18

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) is the primarily commercial source of natural rubber in the world. Latex regeneration and duration of latex flow after tapping are the two factors that determine rubber yield of rubber tree, and exhibit a huge variation between rubber tree clones CATAS8-79 and PR107. To dissect the molecular mechanism for the regulation of latex regeneration and duration of latex flow, we sequenced and comparatively analyzed latex of rubber tree clone CATAS8-79 and PR107 at transriptome level. More than 26 million clean reads were generated in each pool and 51,829 all-unigenes were totally assembled. A total of 6,726 unigenes with differential expression patterns were detected between CATAS8-79 and PR107. Functional analysis showed that genes related to mass of categories were differentially enriched between the two clones. Expression pattern of genes which were involved in latex regeneration and duration of latex flow upon successive tapping was analyzed by quantitative PCR. Several genes related to rubber biosynthesis, cellulose and lignin biosynthesis and rubber particle aggregation were differentially expressed between CATAS8-79 and PR107. This is the first report about probing latex regeneration and duration of latex flow by comparative transcriptome analysis. Among all the suggested factors, it is more important that the level of endogenous jasmonates, carbohydrate metabolism, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) and Hevea rubber transferase (HRT) in mevalonate (MVA) parthway for latex regeneration while the level of endogenous ethylene (ETH), lignin content of laticifer cell wall, antioxidants and glucanases for the duration of latex flow. These data will provide new cues for understanding the molecular mechanism for the regulation of latex regeneration and duration of latex flow in rubber tree.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification of Jatropha curcas Aquaporin Genes and the Comparative Analysis Provides Insights into the Gene Family Expansion and Evolution in Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Gong, Jun; Mo, Yeyong; Wang, Jikun; Cao, Jianhua; An, Feng; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are channel-forming integral membrane proteins that transport water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Despite the vital role of AQPs, to date, little is known in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), an important non-edible oilseed crop with great potential for the production of biodiesel. In this study, 32 AQP genes were identified from the physic nut genome and the family number is relatively small in comparison to 51 in another Euphorbiaceae plant, rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the JcAQPs were assigned to five subfamilies, i.e., nine plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), nine tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), eight NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), two X intrinsic proteins (XIPs), and four small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs). Like rubber tree and other plant species, functional prediction based on the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter, Froger's positions, and specificity-determining positions showed a remarkable difference in substrate specificity among subfamilies of JcAQPs. Genome-wide comparative analysis revealed the specific expansion of PIP and TIP subfamilies in rubber tree and the specific gene loss of the XIP subfamily in physic nut. Furthermore, by analyzing deep transcriptome sequencing data, the expression evolution especially the expression divergence of duplicated HbAQP genes was also investigated and discussed. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of Jc/HbAQP genes, but also provide a useful reference to survey the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceae plants and other plant species. PMID:27066041

  1. Genetic Diversity Strategy for the Management and Use of Rubber Genetic Resources: More than 1,000 Wild and Cultivated Accessions in a 100-Genotype Core Collection.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Livia Moura; Le Guen, Vincent; Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernardo Moreno; Silva, Carla Cristina; Mantello, Camila Campos; Conson, Andre Ricardo Oliveira; Vianna, João Paulo Gomes; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Scaloppi Junior, Erivaldo José; Fialho, Josefino de Freitas; de Moraes, Mario Luis Teixeira; Gonçalves, Paulo de Souza; Souza, Anete Pereira de

    2015-01-01

    The rubber tree [Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. ex Adr. de Juss.) Muell. Arg.] is the only plant species worldwide that is cultivated for the commercial production of natural rubber. This study describes the genetic diversity of the Hevea spp. complex that is available in the main ex situ collections of South America, including Amazonian populations that have never been previously described. Genetic data were analyzed to determine the genetic structure of the wild populations, quantify the allelic diversity and suggest the composition of a core collection to capture the maximum genetic diversity within a minimal sample size. A total of 1,117 accessions were genotyped with 13 microsatellite markers. We identified a total of 408 alleles, 319 of which were shared between groups and 89 that were private in different groups of accessions. In a population structure and principal component analysis, the level of clustering reflected a primary division into the following two subgroups: cluster 1, which consisted of varieties from the advanced breeding germplasm that originated from the Wickham and Mato Grosso accessions; and cluster 2, which consisted of the wild germplasm from the Acre, Amazonas, Pará and Rondônia populations and Hevea spp. The analyses revealed a high frequency of gene flow between the groups, with the genetic differentiation coefficient (GST) estimated to be 0.018. Additionally, no distinct separation among the H. brasiliensis accessions and the other species from Amazonas was observed. A core collection of 99 accessions was identified that captured the maximum genetic diversity. Rubber tree breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Furthermore, such a core collection could provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate traits with agronomic and commercial importance. Our study generated a molecular database that should facilitate the management of the Hevea germplasm and its use for subsequent genetic

  2. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of the Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis) and SNP Markers Development for Rubber Biosynthesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mantello, Camila Campos; Cardoso-Silva, Claudio Benicio; da Silva, Carla Cristina; de Souza, Livia Moura; Scaloppi Junior, Erivaldo José; de Souza Gonçalves, Paulo; Vicentini, Renato; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. Ex Adr. Juss.) Muell.-Arg. is the primary source of natural rubber that is native to the Amazon rainforest. The singular properties of natural rubber make it superior to and competitive with synthetic rubber for use in several applications. Here, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of H. brasiliensis bark on the Illumina GAIIx platform, which generated 179,326,804 raw reads on the Illumina GAIIx platform. A total of 50,384 contigs that were over 400 bp in size were obtained and subjected to further analyses. A similarity search against the non-redundant (nr) protein database returned 32,018 (63%) positive BLASTx hits. The transcriptome analysis was annotated using the clusters of orthologous groups (COG), gene ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and Pfam databases. A search for putative molecular marker was performed to identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In total, 17,927 SSRs and 404,114 SNPs were detected. Finally, we selected sequences that were identified as belonging to the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways, which are involved in rubber biosynthesis, to validate the SNP markers. A total of 78 SNPs were validated in 36 genotypes of H. brasiliensis. This new dataset represents a powerful information source for rubber tree bark genes and will be an important tool for the development of microsatellites and SNP markers for use in future genetic analyses such as genetic linkage mapping, quantitative trait loci identification, investigations of linkage disequilibrium and marker-assisted selection. PMID:25048025

  3. Resistance to the whitefly, Aleurotrachelus socialis, in wild populations of cassava, Manihot tristis.

    PubMed

    Carabalí, A; Bellotti, A C; Montoya-Lerma, J; Fregene, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The levels of resistance in the wild species of cassava, Manihot tristis Muell-Arg. (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae), to the whitefly, Aleurotrachelus socialis Bondar (Hemiptera: Alelyrodidae), the most important economic pest in cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae) crops in South America, were estimated under glasshouse conditions. The parameters of the life history of A. socialis were studied on TST-26 and TST-18 accessions of the wild parent and compared with the susceptible (CMC-40) and resistant (MEcu-72) cultivars. The average longevity on the wild accessions (TST-26, 4.1; TST-18, 4.6 days) and oviposition rates (TST-26, 2.0; TST-18, 1.6 eggs/female/2 days) of the A. socialis females were not significantly different from those of MEcu-72 (5.1 days and 3.4 eggs/female/2 days). The longevity and oviposition rates on CMC-40 were highest (11 days and 8.6 eggs/female/2 days). Analyses of the demographic parameters (Ro, r(m); DT) showed a significant impact of the M. tristis accessions on the potential growth of A. socialis. The average survival time of adults that fed on TST-26, TST-18, and MEcu-72 were significantly different from those recorded on the susceptible genotype. Results from this study revealed important levels of resistance to the whitefly A. socialis on the TST-26 and TST-18 accessions due to the marked differences found for longevity and reproduction, which influenced and were consistent with the differences found in the net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic growth rate (r(m)) and population doubling time (DT). The combined effect of these parameters indicated that M. tristis accessions were inappropriate hosts for A. socialis.

  4. Influence of copigment derived from Tasmannia pepper leaf on Davidson's plum anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Morten Busch; López-de-Dicastillo Bergamo, Carolina Ana; Payet, René Marc; Liu, Xueming; Konczak, Izabela

    2011-04-01

    Davidson's plum (Davidsonia pruriens, F. Muell.), a native to Australian rainforests, large, crimson-red fruit, which superficially resembles plum, has been commercially cultivated in Australia since 1990s. The current production volume exceeds market demands therefore this study was designed to evaluate the suitability of Davidson's plum extract as a source of anthocyanin-based food colorant. The stability of the Davidson's plum extract towards heat treatment at 95 °C was higher than that of commercial mulberry colorant, but inferior to colorants derived from red cabbage and purple sweetpotato. An addition of a variety of phenolic acids significantly increased color intensity indicating the formation of copigmentation complexes. Commercial chlorogenic acid as well as extract from a native Australian herb rich in chlorogenic acid, Tasmannia pepper leaf (Tasmannia lanceolata, R. Br.), were both tested in model soft drink solutions subjected to light irradiation and heat treatment. In both cases, the addition of the copigment resulted in a lasting increase in color intensity. In conclusion, Davidson's plum extract can successfully be utilized as a source of natural food color. Extract from Tasmania pepper leaf can be used as a co-pigment for Davidson's plum anthocyanins.   The color properties of an anthocyanin colorant derived from the native Australian fruit Davidson's plum are comparable to those of mulberry, which is currently applied as a food colorant in Australian food products. Utilization of Davidson's plum fruit as a source of natural color will allow the industry to increase the range of natural pigments and will create new opportunities for the emerging native food industry.

  5. The influence of distinct types of aquatic vegetation on the flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Barcroft, Stephen; Yagci, Oral

    2014-05-01

    The Sustainable management of fluvial systems dealing with flood prevention, erosion protection and restoration of rivers and estuaries requires implementation of soft/green-engineering methods. In-stream aquatic vegetation can be regarded as one of these as it plays an important role for both river ecology (function) and geomorphology (form). The goal of this research is to offer insight gained from pilot experimental studies on the effects of a number of different elements modeling instream, aquatic vegetation on the local flow field. It is hypothesized that elements of the same effective "blockage" area but of distinct characteristics (structure, porosity and flexibility), will affect both the mean and fluctuating levels of the turbulent flow to a different degree. The above hypothesis is investigated through a set of rigorous set of experimental runs which are appropriately designed to assess the variability between the interaction of aquatic elements and flow, both quantitatively and qualitatively. In this investigation three elements are employed to model aquatic vegetation, namely a rigid cylinder, a porous but rigid structure and a flexible live plant (Cupressus Macrocarpa). Firstly, the flow field downstream each of the mentioned elements was measured under steady uniform flow conditions employing acoustic Doppler velocimetry. Three-dimensional flow velocities downstream the vegetation element are acquired along a measurement grid extending about five-fold the element's diameter. These measurements are analyzed to develop mean velocity and turbulent intensity profiles for all velocity components. A detailed comparison between the obtained results is demonstrative of the validity of the above hypothesis as each of the employed elements affects in a different manner and degree the flow field. Then a flow visualization technique, during which fluorescent dye is injected upstream of the element and images are captured for further analysis and comparison, was

  6. Physiological Responses to Prolonged Drought Differ Among Three Oak (Quercus) Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. E.; Moore, G. W.; Vogel, J. G.; Muir, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The physiological response of plants to water stress provides insights into which species may survive in exceptional drought conditions. This study conducted on a remnant post oak savanna site in College Station, Texas, examined how drought affected the physiology of three native oak species. In June 2014, after a period of equal watering, we subjected three year old Quercus shumardii (Shumard oak; SO), Q. virginiana (live oak; LO), and Q. macrocarpa (bur oak; BO) saplings to one of two watering treatments: 1) watered, receiving the equivalent of theaverage precipitation rate and 2) droughted, receiving a 100% reduction in precipitation. We measured predawn (ΨPD) and midday (ΨMD) leaf water potential; midday gas exchange (MGE) parameters including photosynthesis (Al), transpiration (T), stomatal conductance (gsw); and leaf soluble (SS) and non-soluble sugar (NSS) concentrations monthly between June and October 2014. Drought stress responses were evident after only one month of induced drought. Droughted saplings showed reduced ΨPD, ΨMD, and MGE (P ≤ 0.05) in comparison to watered saplings of the same species. LO saplings exhibited greater MGE (P ≤ 0.05) while maintaining similar LWP to their respective watered and droughted BO and SO counterparts. Droughted LO exhibited MGE rates similar to those of watered BO and SO (P ≤ 0.05), while watered LO adjusted its MGE rates to changes in water availability better than BO and LO during short-term drought. Compared to water saplings, droughted saplings had greater leaf SS (P = 0.08) and lower NSS concentrations (P = 0.10), possibly due to the conversion of NSS to SS and other simple compounds and reduced consumption of SS for growth by the droughted saplings. Although SO and BO exhibited similar photosynthesis rates, leaf total sugar (SS+NSS) concentration was greater in SO (P ≤ 0.05). By displaying the greatest average photosynthesis rate (P ≤ 0.05), LO should have accumulated the greatest amount of carbon

  7. Ethnoveterinary medicines in four districts of Jimma zone, Ethiopia: cross sectional survey for plant species and mode of use

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional medicines have been used for nearly 90% of livestock populations in Ethiopia where complimentary remedies are required to the modern health care system. All plants with pharmacological activity complimentarily prescribed as best choice against livestock diseases. A community based cross - sectional survey was conducted to investigate ethno-veterinary knowledge and practices of study area by purposive sampling techniques. The data from respondents were collected through face-to face interview using pre-tested semi-structured questionnaires, which was further accompanied by field observations of the medicinal plants. The vast majority of the statistics were analyzed descriptively by SPSS 16 Windows version to extrapolate our findings in ethno-botanical knowledge. Results In the study, a total of 74 species of ethnoveterinary medicinal plant species from 31 families have been identified for treating 22 different livestock ailments. The three families: Asteraceae, Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae make up larger proportion of reported medicinal plants which accounted for 10.41%, 8.33% and 6.25%, respectively. Of reported medicinal plants, 16.7% informant consensus was recorded for the species Croton macrostachyus Del., 10.7% for Nicotiana tabacum L. and 9.5% for Olea capensis L.Subsp. macrocarpa (C.H. Wright) I.Verd. in treatment of one or more veterinary ailments. The greater varieties of medicinal plant species that accounted for 28.2% were used against management of blackleg which was common livestock diseases in the study area. The findings showed, trees accounted for 43.24%, followed by shrubs (33.78%) and herbs (14.86%). Eighty one percent of medicinal plants reported by respondents were collected from wild habitats, and leaves reported to be used by 68% of the informants for ethnoveterinary medicines preparations. The preparations were applied through different routes of administration; oral administration accounted for (76.2%), followed by

  8. Microhabitats and canopy cover moderate high summer temperatures in a fragmented Mediterranean landscape

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sharolyn; Williams, Craig; Kleindorfer, Sonia; O’Connell, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Extreme heat events will become more frequent under anthropogenic climate change, especially in Mediterranean ecosystems. Microhabitats can considerably moderate (buffer) the effects of extreme weather events and hence facilitate the persistence of some components of the biodiversity. We investigate the microclimatic moderation provided by two important microhabitats (cavities formed by the leaves of the grass-tree Xanthorrhoea semiplana F.Muell., Xanthorrhoeaceae; and inside the leaf-litter) during the summer of 2015/16 on the Fleurieu Peninsula of South Australia. We placed microsensors inside and outside these microhabitats, as well as above the ground below the forest canopy. Grass-tree and leaf-litter microhabitats significantly buffered against high temperatures and low relative humidity, compared to ground-below-canopy sensors. There was no significant difference between grass-tree and leaf-litter temperatures: in both microhabitats, daily temperature variation was reduced, day temperatures were 1–5°C cooler, night temperatures were 0.5–3°C warmer, and maximum temperatures were up to 14.4°C lower, compared to ground-below-canopy sensors. Grass-tree and leaf-litter microhabitats moderated heat increase at an average rate of 0.24°C temperature per 1°C increase of ambient temperature in the ground-below-canopy microhabitat. The average daily variation in temperature was determined by the type (grass-tree and leaf-litter versus ground-below-canopy) of microhabitat (explaining 67%), the amount of canopy cover and the area of the vegetation fragment (together explaining almost 10% of the variation). Greater canopy cover increased the amount of microclimatic moderation provided, especially in the leaf-litter. Our study highlights the importance of microhabitats in moderating macroclimatic conditions. However, this moderating effect is currently not considered in species distribution modelling under anthropogenic climate change nor in the management of

  9. Evaluation of anti-hypertensive activity of Ulmus wallichiana extract and fraction in SHR, DOCA-salt- and L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Syed, Anees A; Lahiri, Shibani; Mohan, Divya; Valicherla, Guru R; Gupta, Anand P; Riyazuddin, Mohammed; Kumar, Sudhir; Maurya, Rakesh; Hanif, Kashif; Gayen, Jiaur R

    2016-12-04

    Ulmus wallichiana Planchon (Himalayan Elm), a traditional medicinal plant, used in fracture healing in folk tradition of Uttarakhand, Himalaya, India. It is also used as diuretic. U. rhynchophylla, native to China, known as Gou Teng in Chinese medicine, is used for hypertension (WHO). U. macrocarpa has antihypertensive and vasorelaxant activity. However, no detailed studies related to hypertension have been reported previously, so we have explored the antihypertensive activity of U. wallichiana. To investigate the pharmacological effect of ethanolic extract (EE) and butanolic fraction (BF) of U. wallichiana in hypertensive rats. SHR, DOCA-salt- and L-NAME-induced hypertension models were used. Treatment was performed by oral administration of EE and BF of U. wallichiana (500mg/kg/day and 50mg/kg/day) for 14 days. Then blood pressure was measured by non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurement technique. Invasive blood pressure (IBP) was also reported to support the NIBP data. Concentrations of plasma renin, angiotensin II (Ang II), nitrate/nitrite (NO), cGMP were estimated. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and ROS activity were also estimated. Blood pressure was significantly higher in SHR as compared to normotensive wistar group (170.59±0.83mmHg vs 121.54±1.24mmHg, respectively). SBP was increased in DOCA-salt induced group compared to their control (132.77±3.90mmHg vs 107.85±5.95mmHg, respectively) and L-NAME-induced group compared to their control (168.55±5.07mmHg vs 113.03±4.13mmHg, respectively). The treatment of extract and fraction of U. wallichiana significantly decreased the blood pressure in SHR+EE (151.26±1.85mmHg, p<0.001), SHR+BF (140.44±1.16mmHg, p<0.001); DOCA+EE (113.43±5.44mmHg, p<0.05), DOCA+BF (105.09±5.12mmHg, p<0.05) and L-NAME+EE (119.76±4.39mmHg, p<0.001), L-NAME+BF (117.50±7.27mmHg, p<0.001) compared to their respective diseased control groups. The plasma renin, Ang II and ACE activity were also significantly

  10. Applicability of Landsat TM data for inventorying and monitoring of rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations in Selangor, Malaysia: Linkages to policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, Mohd Nazip

    2003-06-01

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis (Wild ex Adr. De Juss) Muell Arg.) plantations in Malaysia are important sources of natural rubber and wood products. Effective management and appropriate policy for these resources require reliable information on resource dynamics and forecasts of resource availability. The need for inventories and monitoring systems prompted this research into utilising ground information and satellite imagery for developing methods for forest plantation inventory. Monitoring procedures were developed using three dates of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. The specific objectives of the research were: (1) to develop an effective method for inventorying rubber tree plantations using an appropriate combination of satellite imagery and ground sampling in the State of Selangor, Malaysia; (2) to demonstrate the application of a Landsat TM-based rubber volume model in an extended area of rubber plantations south of Kuala Lumpur (KL), Malaysia; (3) to develop an operational methodology for monitoring land use/cover change, with a primary focus on rubber plantations; and (4) to identify relationships between the primary drivers of resource change and policies, and examine the evidence of policies---rubber area change linkages in the study area. Reasonably accurate predictions of the volume, age, and area of rubber plantations were obtained from Landsat TM data. The use of supervised image classification and an image segmentation approach for rubber volume model application showed better performance for volume prediction than a combined land use/cover and rubber volume classification technique, thus providing a useful tool for displaying rubber stand volume within segments or spatial units across the landscape. The combined use of a time series of Landsat TM imagery, modified postclassification change detection, and geographic information system (GIS) techniques made it possible to produce land use/cover change matrices and rubber area change information