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Sample records for seca2-dependent secretory protein

  1. Expression of LAP, a SecA2-dependent secretory protein, is induced under anaerobic environment.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Kristin M; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Mishra, Krishna K; Medina, Sarimar; Hahm, Byoung-Kwon; Kim, Hyochin; Bhunia, Arun K

    2009-09-01

    Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), an alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase homolog (lmo1634) in Listeria monocytogenes, promotes bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Investigation of the effect of anaerobiosis, an intrinsic gastrointestinal condition, on LAP expression and LAP-mediated infection should elucidate its significance during intestinal infection. The influence of anaerobiosis on LAP expression was determined by growing L. monocytogenes wild type (WT), and lap-deficient (KB208) and -complemented (CKB208) strains anaerobically and monitoring LAP in secreted, cell wall, and whole-cell protein fractions. The effect of anaerobiosis on LAP-mediated infection was evaluated in cell culture adhesion assays and mouse infection models. Additionally, the role of secretory system SecA2 in LAP secretion was investigated. Anaerobic growth induced significant increases in level of lap transcript and protein secretion, and secretion was SecA2-dependent. Anaerobiosis facilitated greater LAP-mediated adhesion of L. monocytogenes to cultured intestinal cells. Oral administration of WT, KB208 and CKB208 to mice confirmed that LAP is essential for full virulence, and anaerobically-grown WT exhibited greater translocation to liver and spleen relative to aerobically-grown organisms. LAP, a SecA2-dependent secreted virulence factor, plays an important role during intestinal infection, particularly when L. monocytogenes is subjected to an anaerobic environment.

  2. Using enrichment index for quality control of secretory protein sample and identification of secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Gu, Bei; Wu, Shuzhen; Sun, Wei; Ma, Sucan; Liu, Yuqin; Gao, Youhe

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of secretory proteins is an important area in proteomic research. We propose that a good secretory protein sample should be enriched with known secretory proteins, and a secretory protein should be enriched in the secretory protein sample compared with its corresponding soluble cell lysate. Positive identifications of proteins were subjected to quantitation of spectral counts, which reflect relative protein abundance. Enrichment index of the sample (EIS) and the enrichment index for protein (EIP) were obtained by comparing proteins identified in the secretory protein sample and those in the soluble cell lysate sample. The quality of the secretory protein sample can be represented by EIS. EIP was used to identify the secretory proteins.The secretory proteins from mouse dendritic cell sarcoma (DCS) were analyzed by MS. The EISs of two samples were 75.4 and 84.65, respectively. 72 proteins were significantly enriched in secretory protein samples, of which 42 proteins were either annotated in Swiss-Prot and/or predicted by signal peptides to be secretory. In the remaining 30 proteins, 12 and 15 proteins were positively predicted by SecretomeP and ProP, respectively, and 5 proteins were positive by both methods. Furthermore, 11 proteins were found to be present in exosome in other studies that involved mice dendritic cell lines. We suggest that this assessment method is helpful for systemic research of secretory proteins and biomarker discovery for diseases such as cancer. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Protein Mobility within Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A.; Holz, Ronald W.; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10−10 cm2/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  4. RFP tags for labeling secretory pathway proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Liyang; Zhao, Yanhua; Xu, Pingyong; Huan, Shuangyan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Membrane protein Orai1 can be used to report the fusion properties of RFPs. • Artificial puncta are affected by dissociation constant as well as pKa of RFPs. • Among tested RFPs mOrange2 is the best choice for secretory protein labeling. - Abstract: Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are useful tools for live cell and multi-color imaging in biological studies. However, when labeling proteins in secretory pathway, many RFPs are prone to form artificial puncta, which may severely impede their further uses. Here we report a fast and easy method to evaluate RFPs fusion properties by attaching RFPs to an environment sensitive membrane protein Orai1. In addition, we revealed that intracellular artificial puncta are actually colocalized with lysosome, thus besides monomeric properties, pKa value of RFPs is also a key factor for forming intracellular artificial puncta. In summary, our current study provides a useful guide for choosing appropriate RFP for labeling secretory membrane proteins. Among RFPs tested, mOrange2 is highly recommended based on excellent monomeric property, appropriate pKa and high brightness.

  5. Secretory Granule Membrane Protein Recycles Through Multivesicular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Bäck, Nils; Rajagopal, Chitra; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    The recycling of secretory granule membrane proteins that reach the plasma membrane following exocytosis is poorly understood. As a model, peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), a granule membrane protein that catalyzes a final step in peptide processing was examined. Ultrastructural analysis of antibody internalized by PAM and surface biotinylation demonstrated efficient return of plasma membrane PAM to secretory granules. Electron microscopy revealed the rapid movement of PAM from early endosomes to the limiting membranes of multivesicular bodies and then into intralumenal vesicles. Wheat germ agglutinin and PAM antibody internalized simultaneously were largely segregated when they reached multivesicular bodies. Mutation of basally phosphorylated residues (Thr946, Ser949) in the cytoplasmic domain of PAM to Asp (TS/DD) substantially slowed its entry into intralumenal vesicles. Mutation of the same sites to Ala (TS/AA) facilitated the entry of internalized PAM into intralumenal vesicles and its subsequent return to secretory granules. Entry of PAM into intralumenal vesicles is also associated with a juxtamembrane endoproteolytic cleavage that releases a 100 kDa soluble PAM fragment that can be returned to secretory granules. Controlled entry into the intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular bodies plays a key role in the recycling of secretory granule membrane proteins. PMID:20374556

  6. AP-1A controls secretory granule biogenesis and trafficking of membrane secretory granule proteins.

    PubMed

    Bonnemaison, Mathilde; Bäck, Nils; Lin, Yimo; Bonifacino, Juan S; Mains, Richard; Eipper, Betty

    2014-10-01

    The adaptor protein 1A complex (AP-1A) transports cargo between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In professional secretory cells, AP-1A also retrieves material from immature secretory granules (SGs). The role of AP-1A in SG biogenesis was explored using AtT-20 corticotrope tumor cells expressing reduced levels of the AP-1A μ1A subunit. A twofold reduction in μ1A resulted in a decrease in TGN cisternae and immature SGs and the appearance of regulated secretory pathway components in non-condensing SGs. Although basal secretion of endogenous SG proteins was unaffected, secretagogue-stimulated release was halved. The reduced μ1A levels interfered with the normal trafficking of carboxypeptidase D (CPD) and peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase-1 (PAM-1), integral membrane enzymes that enter immature SGs. The non-condensing SGs contained POMC products and PAM-1, but not CPD. Based on metabolic labeling and secretion experiments, the cleavage of newly synthesized PAM-1 into PHM was unaltered, but PHM basal secretion was increased in sh-μ1A PAM-1 cells. Despite lacking a canonical AP-1A binding motif, yeast two-hybrid studies demonstrated an interaction between the PAM-1 cytosolic domain and AP-1A. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with PAM-1 mutants revealed an influence of the luminal domains of PAM-1 on this interaction. Thus, AP-1A is crucial for normal SG biogenesis, function and composition.

  7. Approaches to imaging unfolded secretory protein stress in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Patrick; Fazio, Elena N.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the point of entry of proteins into the secretory pathway. Nascent peptides interact with the ER quality control machinery that ensures correct folding of the nascent proteins. Failure to properly fold proteins can lead to loss of protein function and cytotoxic aggregation of misfolded proteins that can lead to cell death. To cope with increases in the ER unfolded secretory protein burden, cells have evolved the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR is the primary signaling pathway that monitors the state of the ER folding environment. When the unfolded protein burden overwhelms the capacity of the ER quality control machinery, a state termed ER stress, sensor proteins detect accumulation of misfolded peptides and trigger the UPR transcriptional response. The UPR, which is conserved from yeast to mammals, consists of an ensemble of complex signaling pathways that aims at adapting the ER to the new misfolded protein load. To determine how different factors impact the ER folding environment, various tools and assays have been developed. In this review, we discuss recent advances in live cell imaging reporters and model systems that enable researchers to monitor changes in the unfolded secretory protein burden and activation of the UPR and its associated signaling pathways. PMID:25419521

  8. Genome-scale modeling of the protein secretory machinery in yeast.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Amir; Österlund, Tobias; Petranovic, Dina; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The protein secretory machinery in Eukarya is involved in post-translational modification (PTMs) and sorting of the secretory and many transmembrane proteins. While the secretory machinery has been well-studied using classic reductionist approaches, a holistic view of its complex nature is lacking. Here, we present the first genome-scale model for the yeast secretory machinery which captures the knowledge generated through more than 50 years of research. The model is based on the concept of a Protein Specific Information Matrix (PSIM: characterized by seven PTMs features). An algorithm was developed which mimics secretory machinery and assigns each secretory protein to a particular secretory class that determines the set of PTMs and transport steps specific to each protein. Protein abundances were integrated with the model in order to gain system level estimation of the metabolic demands associated with the processing of each specific protein as well as a quantitative estimation of the activity of each component of the secretory machinery.

  9. Sorting of the Neuroendocrine Secretory Protein Secretogranin II into the Regulated Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Courel, Maïté; Vasquez, Michael S.; Hook, Vivian Y.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Taupenot, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Secretogranin II (SgII) belongs to the granin family of prohormones widely distributed in dense-core secretory granules (DCGs) of endocrine, neuroendocrine, and neuronal cells, including sympathoadrenal chromaffin cells. The mechanisms by which secretory proteins, and granins in particular, are sorted into the regulated secretory pathway are unsettled. We designed a strategy based on novel chimeric forms of human SgII fused to fluorescent (green fluorescent protein) or chemiluminescent (embryonic alkaline phosphatase) reporters to identify trafficking determinants mediating DCG targeting of SgII in sympathoadrenal cells. Three-dimensional deconvolution fluorescence microscopy and secretagogue-stimulated release studies demonstrate that SgII chimeras are correctly targeted to DCGs and released by exocytosis in PC12 and primary chromaffin cells. Results from a Golgi-retained mutant form of SgII suggest that sorting of SgII into DCGs depends on a saturable sorting machinery at the trans-Golgi/trans-Golgi network. Truncation analyses reveal the presence of DCG-targeting signals within both the N- and C-terminal regions of SgII, with the putative α-helix-containing SgII-(25-41) and SgII-(334-348) acting as sufficient, independent sorting domains. This study defines sequence features of SgII mediating vesicular targeting in sympathoadrenal cells and suggests a mechanism by which discrete domains of the molecule function in sorting, perhaps by virtue of a particular arrangement in tertiary structure and/or interaction with a specific component of the DCG membrane. PMID:18299326

  10. Progressive quality control of secretory proteins in the early secretory compartment by ERp44

    PubMed Central

    Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Degano, Massimo; Fagioli, Claudio; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    ERp44 is a pH-regulated chaperone of the secretory pathway. In the acidic milieu of the Golgi, its C-terminal tail changes conformation, simultaneously exposing the substrate-binding site for cargo capture and the RDEL motif for ER retrieval via interactions with cognate receptors. Protonation of cysteine 29 in the active site allows tail movements in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that also conserved histidines in the C-terminal tail regulate ERp44 in vivo. Mutants lacking these histidines are hyperactive in retaining substrates. Surprisingly, they are also O-glycosylated and partially secreted. Co-expression of client proteins prevents secretion of the histidine mutants, forcing tail opening and RDEL accessibility. Client-induced RDEL exposure allows retrieval of proteins from distinct stations along the secretory pathway, as indicated by the changes in O-glycosylation patterns upon over-expression of different partners. The ensuing gradients may help optimising folding and assembly of different cargoes. Endogenous ERp44 is O-glycosylated and secreted by human primary endometrial cells, suggesting possible pathophysiological roles of these processes. PMID:25097228

  11. Progressive quality control of secretory proteins in the early secretory compartment by ERp44.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Degano, Massimo; Fagioli, Claudio; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    ERp44 is a pH-regulated chaperone of the secretory pathway. In the acidic milieu of the Golgi, its C-terminal tail changes conformation, simultaneously exposing the substrate-binding site for cargo capture and the RDEL motif for ER retrieval through interactions with cognate receptors. Protonation of cysteine 29 in the active site allows tail movements in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that conserved histidine residues in the C-terminal tail also regulate ERp44 in vivo. Mutants lacking these histidine residues retain substrates more efficiently. Surprisingly, they are also O-glycosylated and partially secreted. Co-expression of client proteins prevents secretion of the histidine mutants, forcing tail opening and RDEL accessibility. Client-induced RDEL exposure allows retrieval of proteins from distinct stations along the secretory pathway, as indicated by the changes in O-glycosylation patterns upon overexpression of different partners. The ensuing gradients might help to optimize folding and assembly of different cargoes. Endogenous ERp44 is O-glycosylated and secreted by human primary endometrial cells, suggesting possible pathophysiological roles of these processes.

  12. Secretory proteins as potential semiochemical carriers in the horse.

    PubMed

    D'Innocenzo, Barbara; Salzano, Anna Maria; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Gazzano, Angelo; Niccolini, Alberto; Sorce, Carlo; Dani, Francesca Romana; Scaloni, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo

    2006-11-14

    Two soluble proteins were isolated as major secretory products of horse sweat and of the parotid gland and characterized for structural and functional properties. The first protein, lipocalin allergen EquC1, was characterized for its glycosylation sites and bound glycosidic moieties. Only one (Asn53) of the two putative glycosylation sites within the sequence was post-translationally modified; a different glycosylation pattern was determined with respect to data previously reported. When purified from horse sweat, this protein contained oleamide and other organic molecules as natural ligands. Ligand binding experiments indicated good protein selectivity toward volatile compounds having a straight chain structure of 9-11 carbon atoms, suggesting a role of this lipocalin in chemical communication. The second protein, here reported for the first time in the horse, belongs to the group of parotid secretory proteins, part of a large superfamily of binding proteins whose function in most cases is still unclear. This protein was sequenced and characterized for its post-translational modifications. Of the three cysteine residues present, two were involved in a disulfide bridge (Cys155-Cys198). A model, built up on the basis of similar proteins, indicated a general fold characterized by the presence of a long hydrophobic barrel. Binding experiments performed with a number of different organic compounds failed to identify ligands for this protein with a well-defined physiological role.

  13. In vitro aggregation of the regulated secretory protein chromogranin A.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Renu K; Chang, Wen Tzu; Geetha, Chitta; Joyce, Paul B M; Gorr, Sven-Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    Aggregation chaperones, consisting of secretory proteins that contain a hexa-histidine epitope tag, enhance the calcium-induced aggregation of regulated secretory proteins and their sorting to secretory granules. The goal of this study was to gain a better understanding of this unusual aggregation mechanism. Hexa-histidine-epitope-tagged secreted alkaline phosphatase, an aggregation chaperone, enhanced the in vitro aggregation of chromogranin A in the presence of calcium, but not in the presence of magnesium or other divalent cations. As an exception, chromogranin was completely aggregated by zinc, even in the absence of the aggregation chaperone. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of the aggregation reaction mixture showed an increase in fluorescence intensity consistent with the formation of protein aggregates. The calcium-induced aggregation of chromogranin A was completely inhibited by 0.2% Triton X-100, suggesting that it involves hydrophobic interactions. In contrast, the detergent did not affect chaperone-enhanced aggregation, suggesting that this aggregation does not depend on hydrophobic interactions. EDTA-treated chaperone did not enhance chromogranin A aggregation, indicating that divalent cations are necessary for chaperone action. Although the structure of the aggregation chaperone was not important, the size of the chaperone was. Thus the free His-hexapeptide could not substitute for the aggregation chaperone. Based on these results, we propose that the hexa-histidine tag, in the context of a polypeptide, acts as a divalent cation-dependent nucleation site for chromogranin A aggregation. PMID:12175332

  14. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  15. Orchestration of secretory protein folding by ER chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Stevens, Fred; Argon, Yair

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a major compartment of protein biogenesis in the cell, dedicated to production of secretory, membrane and organelle proteins. The secretome has distinct structural and post-translational characteristics, since folding in the ER occurs in an environment that is distinct in terms of its ionic composition, dynamics and requirements for quality contol. The folding machinery in the ER therefore includes chaperones and folding enzymes that introduce, monitor and react to disulfide bonds, glycans, and fluctuations of luminal calcium. We describe the major chaperone networks in the lumen and discuss how they have distinct modes of operation that enable cells to accomplish highly efficient production of the secretome. PMID:23507200

  16. Video rate bioluminescence imaging of secretory proteins in living cells: localization, secretory frequency, and quantification.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Kondo, Chihiro; Kanamori, Takao; Inouye, Satoshi

    2011-08-15

    We have developed a method of video rate bioluminescence imaging to investigate protein secretion from a single mammalian cell and analyzed the localization, secretory frequency, and quantification of secreted protein. By detecting the luminescence signals from the Gaussia luciferase (GLase) reaction using a high-speed electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EM-CCD) camera, video rate imaging was performed with a time resolution within 500 ms/image over 30 min in living cells. As a model study, we applied the method to visualize the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from clustered pancreatic MIN6 β cells using the fused protein of GLase with preproinsulin. High-quality video images clearly showed that the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the clustered MIN6 β cells oscillated within a period of a few minutes over 10 min. In addition, the glibenclamide-induced insulin secretion from the clustered MIN6 β cells was visualized, suggesting that bioluminescence video rate imaging is a useful method for validating drug action in living cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The secretory carrier membrane protein family: structure and membrane topology.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, C; Singleton, D; Rauch, M; Jayasinghe, S; Cafiso, D; Castle, D

    2000-09-01

    Secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are integral membrane proteins found in secretory and endocytic carriers implicated to function in membrane trafficking. Using expressed sequence tag database and library screens and DNA sequencing, we have characterized several new SCAMPs spanning the plant and animal kingdoms and have defined a broadly conserved protein family. No obvious fungal homologue has been identified, however. We have found that SCAMPs share several structural motifs. These include NPF repeats, a leucine heptad repeat enriched in charged residues, and a proline-rich SH3-like and/or WW domain-binding site in the N-terminal domain, which is followed by a membrane core containing four putative transmembrane spans and three amphiphilic segments that are the most highly conserved structural elements. All SCAMPs are 32-38 kDa except mammalian SCAMP4, which is approximately 25 kDa and lacks most of the N-terminal hydrophilic domain of other SCAMPs. SCAMP4 is authentic as determined by Northern and Western blotting, suggesting that this portion of the larger SCAMPs encodes the functional domain. Focusing on SCAMP1, we have characterized its structure further by limited proteolysis and Western blotting with the use of isolated secretory granules as a uniformly oriented source of antigen and by topology mapping through expression of alkaline phosphatase gene fusions in Escherichia coli. Results show that SCAMP1 is degraded sequentially from the N terminus and then the C terminus, yielding an approximately 20-kDa membrane core that contains four transmembrane spans. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to the three conserved amphiphilic segments of the membrane core, we have demonstrated their binding to phospholipid membranes and shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy that the central amphiphilic segment linking transmembrane spans 2 and 3 is alpha-helical. In the intact protein, these segments are likely to reside in the cytoplasm-facing membrane

  18. Proteomic analysis of Toxocara canis excretory and secretory (TES) proteins.

    PubMed

    Sperotto, Rita Leal; Kremer, Frederico Schmitt; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Costa de Avila, Luciana F; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Caumo, Karin Silva; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Berne, Natália; Borsuk, Sibele

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a neglected disease, and its main etiological agent is the nematode Toxocara canis. Serological diagnosis is performed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using T. canis excretory and secretory (TES) antigens produced by in vitro cultivation of larvae. Identification of TES proteins can be useful for the development of new diagnostic strategies since few TES components have been described so far. Herein, we report the results obtained by proteomic analysis of TES proteins using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach. TES fractions were separated by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The MS/MS spectra were compared with a database of protein sequences deduced from the genome sequence of T. canis, and a total of 19 proteins were identified. Classification according to the signal peptide prediction using the SignalP server showed that seven of the identified proteins were extracellular, 10 had cytoplasmic or nuclear localization, while the subcellular localization of two proteins was unknown. Analysis of molecular functions by BLAST2GO showed that the majority of the gene ontology (GO) terms associated with the proteins present in the TES sample were associated with binding functions, including but not limited to protein binding (GO:0005515), inorganic ion binding (GO:0043167), and organic cyclic compound binding (GO:0097159). This study provides additional information about the exoproteome of T. canis, which can lead to the development of new strategies for diagnostics or vaccination.

  19. Regulating Secretory Proteostasis through the Unfolded Protein Response: From Function to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Plate, Lars; Wiseman, R Luke

    2017-10-01

    Imbalances in secretory proteostasis induced by genetic, environmental, or aging-related insults are pathologically associated with etiologically diverse protein misfolding diseases. To protect the secretory proteome from these insults, organisms evolved stress-responsive signaling pathways that regulate the composition and activity of biologic pathways involved in secretory proteostasis maintenance. The most prominent of these is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR), which functions to regulate ER proteostasis in response to ER stress. While the signaling mechanisms involved in UPR activation are well defined, the impact of UPR activation on secretory proteostasis is only now becoming clear. Here, we highlight recent reports defining how activation of select UPR signaling pathways influences proteostasis within the ER and downstream secretory environments. Furthermore, we describe recent evidence that highlights the therapeutic potential for targeting UPR signaling pathways to correct pathologic disruption in secretory proteostasis associated with diverse types of protein misfolding diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Brevibacillus expression system: host-vector system for efficient production of secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Makoto; Hanagata, Hiroshi; Miyauchi, Akira

    2010-04-01

    Brevibacillus expression system is an effective bacterial expression system for secretory proteins. The host bacterium, Brevibacillus choshinensis, a gram-positive bacterium, has strong capacity to secrete a large amount of proteins (approximately 30 g/L), which mostly consist of cell wall protein. A host-vector system that utilizes such high expression capacity has been constructed for the production of secretory proteins and tested for various heterologous proteins, including cytokines, enzymes, antigens, and adjuvants.

  1. Cysteine rich secretory proteins in reproduction and venom.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerard M; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2007-01-01

    The cysteine rich secretory proteins (Crisp) are predominantly found in the mammalian male reproductive tract and in the venom of reptiles. Crisps are two domain proteins with a structurally similar yet evolutionarily diverse N-terminal domain and a characteristic cysteine rich C-terminal domain which we refer to as the Crisp domain. Since their identification 30 years ago Crisp research in mammals has focused on the characterisation of their expression localization to infer function. While no doubt important observations, these have not substantially led to an understanding of the biochemical activity of the Crisps and their role in sperm function or fertilisation. Recently, we demonstrated that the Crisp-2 Crisp domain has a structure similar to ion channel toxins ShK and BgK and was itself able to regulate Ca2+ flux through ryanodine receptors. These data build upon the previous characterizations of reptile venom Crisps as regulators of several types of ion channels and permits for the first time a dissection of the biochemical activity of mammalian Crisps.

  2. Lumenal protein within secretory granules affects fusion pore expansion.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Anantharam, Arun; Bittner, Mary A; Axelrod, Daniel; Holz, Ronald W

    2014-07-01

    It is often assumed that upon fusion of the secretory granule membrane with the plasma membrane, lumenal contents are rapidly discharged and dispersed into the extracellular medium. Although this is the case for low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters and some proteins, there are numerous examples of the dispersal of a protein being delayed for many seconds after fusion. We have investigated the role of fusion-pore expansion in determining the contrasting discharge rates of fluorescent-tagged neuropeptide-Y (NPY) (within 200 ms) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (over many seconds) in adrenal chromaffin cells. The endogenous proteins are expressed in separate chromaffin cell subpopulations. Fusion pore expansion was measured by two independent methods, orientation of a fluorescent probe within the plasma membrane using polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and amperometry of released catecholamine. Together, they probe the continuum of the fusion-pore duration, from milliseconds to many seconds after fusion. Polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that 71% of the fusion events of tPA-cer-containing granules maintained curvature for >10 s, with approximately half of the structures likely connected to the plasma membrane by a short narrow neck. Such events were not commonly observed upon fusion of NPY-cer-containing granules. Amperometry revealed that the expression of tPA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) prolonged the duration of the prespike foot ∼2.5-fold compared to NPY-GFP-expressing cells and nontransfected cells, indicating that expansion of the initial fusion pore in tPA granules was delayed. The t1/2 of the main catecholamine spike was also increased, consistent with a prolonged delay of fusion-pore expansion. tPA added extracellularly bound to the lumenal surface of fused granules. We propose that tPA within the granule lumen controls its own discharge. Its intrinsic biochemistry determines not only

  3. Modulation of Sertoli cell secretory function by rat round spermatid protein(s).

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Djakiew, D

    1990-10-01

    The influence of rat round spermatid protein(s) (RSP) on protein synthesis and secretory function of Sertoli cells was used in the bicameral chamber system. Round spermatids (RS) were purified from 90-day-old rats by centrifugal elutriation. RS were incubated in a supplement-enriched culture medium that lacked exogenous proteins. The RS-conditioned media were dialysed and lyophilized to obtain RSP. Most de novo protein synthesized under basal conditions by Sertoli cells (18-day-old) was secreted into the apical chamber (apical/basal ratio: 3.42). Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, 100 ng/ml) stimulated total protein secretion from Sertoli cells by a factor of 1.54. The RSP (100 micrograms/ml) stimulated total protein secretion from Sertoli cells by a factor of 2.33. The enhancement of total Sertoli cell protein secretion by FSH and RSP additively increased by a factor of 2.82. The combined effect of FSH and RSP on total protein secretion from Sertoli cells was dose dependent and saturated at approximately 200 micrograms/ml of RSP. Polarity of total protein secretion from Sertoli cells (apical/basal ratio: 3.42) was stimulated by RSP predominantly in the apical direction (apical/basal ratio: 8.48). The modulation of radiolabeled Sertoli cell secretory proteins (ceruloplasmin, CP; sulfated glycoprotein-2, SGP-2; testins and transferrin, Tf) by cold (non-labeled) RSP was investigated by immunoprecipitation followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The secretion of CP, SGP-2 and Tf was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of RSP up to a saturating concentration of between 200 and 300 micrograms/ml, whereas the secretion of Sertoli cell testins did not reach saturation at 300 micrograms/ml RSP. These results indicate that FSH and RSP independently modulate Sertoli cell protein secretion, and that Sertoli cell secretory proteins may differentially respond to RSP stimulation.

  4. Calsyntenins are secretory granule proteins in anterior pituitary gland and pancreatic islet alpha cells.

    PubMed

    Rindler, Michael J; Xu, Chong-Feng; Gumper, Iwona; Cen, Chuan; Sonderegger, Peter; Neubert, Thomas A

    2008-04-01

    Calsyntenins are members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. They are present in postsynaptic membranes of excitatory neurons and in vesicles in transit to neuronal growth cones. In the current study, calsyntenin-1 (CST-1) and calsyntenin-3 (CST-3) were identified by mass spectrometric analysis (LC-MS/MS) of integral membrane proteins from highly enriched secretory granule preparations from bovine anterior pituitary gland. Immunofluorescence microscopy on thin frozen sections of rat pituitary revealed that CST-1 was present only in gonadotropes where it colocalized with follicle-stimulating hormone in secretory granules. In contrast, CST-3 was present not only in gonadotrope secretory granules but also in those of somatotropes and thyrotropes. Neither protein was detected in mammatropes. In addition, CST-1 was also localized to the glucagon-containing secretory granules of alpha cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Results indicate that calsyntenins function outside the nervous system and potentially are modulators of endocrine function.

  5. Secretory autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ponpuak, Marisa; Mandell, Michael A; Kimura, Tomonori; Chauhan, Santosh; Cleyrat, Cédric; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy, once viewed exclusively as a cytoplasmic auto-digestive process, has its less intuitive but biologically distinct non-degradative roles. One manifestation of these functions of the autophagic machinery is the process termed secretory autophagy. Secretory autophagy facilitates unconventional secretion of the cytosolic cargo such as leaderless cytosolic proteins, which unlike proteins endowed with the leader (N-terminal signal) peptides cannot enter the conventional secretory pathway normally operating via the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Secretory autophagy may also export more complex cytoplasmic cargo and help excrete particulate substrates. Autophagic machinery and autophagy as a process also affect conventional secretory pathways, including the constitutive and regulated secretion, as well as promote alternative routes for trafficking of integral membrane proteins to the plasma membrane. Thus, autophagy and autophagic factors are intimately intertwined at many levels with secretion and polarized sorting in eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. N-glycosylation Triggers a Dual Selection Pressure in Eukaryotic Secretory Proteins.

    PubMed

    Medus, Máximo Lopez; Gomez, Gabriela E; Zacchi, Lucía F; Couto, Paula M; Labriola, Carlos A; Labanda, María S; Bielsa, Rodrigo Corti; Clérico, Eugenia M; Schulz, Benjamin L; Caramelo, Julio J

    2017-08-18

    Nearly one third of the eukaryotic proteome traverses the secretory pathway and most of these proteins are N-glycosylated in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. N-glycans fulfill multiple structural and biological functions, and are crucial for productive folding of many glycoproteins. N-glycosylation involves the attachment of an oligosaccharide to selected asparagine residues in the sequence N-X-S/T (X ≠ P), a motif known as an N-glycosylation'sequon'. Mutations that create novel sequons can cause disease due to the destabilizing effect of a bulky N-glycan. Thus, an analogous process must have occurred during evolution, whenever ancestrally cytosolic proteins were recruited to the secretory pathway. Here, we show that during evolution N-glycosylation triggered a dual selection pressure on secretory pathway proteins: while sequons were positively selected in solvent exposed regions, they were almost completely eliminated from buried sites. This process is one of the sharpest evolutionary signatures of secretory pathway proteins, and was therefore critical for the evolution of an efficient secretory pathway.

  7. Multiplex Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Radiolabeled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabeling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for tracking the biosynthesis of proteins. Specific proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analyzed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labeling of pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine, followed by multiplex sequential immunoprecipitation of insulin and three other secretory granule accessory proteins. This provided a means of distinguishing those pancreatic islet proteins with different biosynthetic rates in response to the media glucose concentrations.

  8. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a chimeric protein. The chimera contains a signal sequence fused to histidinol dehydrogenase. A strain with a defect in the translocation of secretory proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) accumulates sufficient histidinol dehydrogenase in the cytoplasm to grow on media lacking histidine. In contrast, yeast proficient for secretion, or yeast with secretion defects later in the pathway, are unable to grow on media lacking histidine. Student analysis of the experimental yeast transformants and appropriate controls allows investigation into the effects of conditional defects in the secretory pathway on both cell viability and protein localization. The exercise is usually performed in a manner that allows students to execute a number of techniques common in molecular biology laboratories, including plasmid minipreps, restriction digestions, and Southern blots. Student understanding and enjoyment of the exercise was assessed by laboratory reports, oral and written examinations, and questionnaires. After completion of these experiments, students can describe the utility of protein fusions, the roles of mutant analysis in cell biology, and the steps taken by proteins transiting the secretory pathway. PMID:12669100

  9. Regulated phosphorylation of secretory granule membrane proteins of the rat parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, C.R.; Castle, J.D.; Gorelick, F.S. )

    1990-07-01

    An antiserum raised against purified rat parotid secretory granule membrane proteins has been used to identify organelle-specific protein phosphorylation events following stimulation of intact cells from the rat parotid gland. After lobules were prelabeled with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and exposed to secretagogues, phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated with the granule membrane protein antiserum, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography. Parallel studies of stimulated amylase release were performed. Isoproterenol treatment of parotid lobules resulted in an increase in the phosphate content of immunoprecipitable 60- and 72-kDa proteins that correlated with amylase release in a time-dependent manner. Forskolin addition mimicked these effects, but only the isoproterenol effects were reversed by propranolol treatment. To confirm the specificity of the antiserum to the secretory granule membrane fraction, subcellular isolation techniques were employed following in situ phosphorylation. The 60- and 72-kDa phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated from both a particulate fraction and a purified secretory granule fraction. Furthermore, the extraction properties of both species suggest that they are integral membrane proteins. These findings support the possibility that stimulus-regulated secretion may involve phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins of the exocrine secretory granule.

  10. Recent Advances in Understanding the Control of Secretory Proteins by the Unfolded Protein Response in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shimpei; Wakasa, Yuhya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    The membrane transport system is built on the proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER lumen (ER stress) disrupts ER homeostasis and disturbs the transport system. In response to ER stress, eukaryotic cells activate intracellular signaling (named the unfolded protein response, UPR), which contributes to the quality control of secretory proteins. On the other hand, the deleterious effects of UPR on plant health and growth characteristics have frequently been overlooked, due to limited information on this mechanism. However, recent studies have shed light on the molecular mechanism of plant UPR, and a number of its unique characteristics have been elucidated. This study briefly reviews the progress of understanding what is happening in plants under ER stress conditions. PMID:23629671

  11. Secretory COPII Protein SEC31B Is Required for Pollen Wall Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bingchun; Shi, Haidan; Wang, Wanlei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Hui; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yinghui; Yang, Meidi; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The pollen wall protects pollen grains from abiotic and biotic stresses. During pollen wall development, tapetal cells play a vital role by secreting proteins, signals, and pollen wall material to ensure microspore development. But the regulatory mechanism underlying the secretory pathway of the tapetum is largely unknown. Here, we characterize the essential role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) COPII protein SECRETORY31B (SEC31B) in pollen wall development and the secretory activity of tapetal cells. The sporophyte-controlled atsec31b mutant exhibits severe pollen and seed abortion. Transmission electron microscopy observation indicates that pollen exine formation in the atsec31b mutant is disrupted significantly. AtSEC31B is a functional COPII protein revealed by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit site localization, interaction with AtSEC13A, and retarded ER-Golgi protein trafficking in the atsec31b mutant. A genetic tapetum-specific rescue assay indicates that AtSEC31B functions primarily in the tapetum. Moreover, deletion of AtSEC31B interrupted the formation of the ER-derived tapetosome and altered the location of the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTER9 protein in the tapetum. Therefore, this work demonstrates that AtSEC31B plays a vital role in pollen wall development by regulating the secretory pathway of the tapetal cells. PMID:27634427

  12. Cellular responses to the expression of unstable secretory proteins in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Jun-Ichi; Shiro, Daisuke; Tanaka, Mizuki; Onozaki, Yasumichi; Mizutani, Osamu; Kakizono, Dararat; Ichinose, Sakurako; Shintani, Tomoko; Gomi, Katsuya; Shintani, Takahiro

    2017-03-01

    Filamentous fungi are often used as cell factories for recombinant protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of hydrolytic enzymes. However, even using strong transcriptional promoters, yields of nonfungal proteins are generally much lower than those of fungal proteins. Recent analyses revealed that expression of certain nonfungal secretory proteins induced the unfolded protein response (UPR), suggesting that they are recognized as proteins with folding defects in filamentous fungi. More recently, however, even highly expressed endogenous secretory proteins were found to evoke the UPR. These findings raise the question of whether the unfolded or misfolded state of proteins is selectively recognized by quality control mechanisms in filamentous fungi. In this study, a fungal secretory protein (1,2-α-D-mannosidase; MsdS) with a mutation that decreases its thermostability was expressed at different levels in Aspergillus oryzae. We found that, at moderate expression levels, wild-type MsdS was secreted to the medium, while the mutant was not. In the strain with a deletion for the hrdA gene, which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway, mutant MsdS had specifically increased levels in the intracellular fraction but was not secreted. When overexpressed, the mutant protein was secreted to the medium to a similar extent as the wild-type protein; however, the mutant underwent hyperglycosylation and induced the UPR. Deletion of α-amylase (the most abundant secretory protein in A. oryzae) alleviated the UPR induction by mutant MsdS overexpression. These findings suggest that misfolded MsdS and unfolded species of α-amylase might act synergistically for UPR induction.

  13. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallen, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a…

  14. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallen, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a…

  15. Loss of BiP/GRP78 function blocks translocation of secretory proteins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    BiP/GRP78 is an essential member of the HSP70 family that resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, BiP/GRP78 is encoded by the KAR2 gene. A temperature sensitive mutation was isolated in KAR2 and found to cause a rapid block in protein secretion. Secretory precursors of a number of proteins (invertase, carboxypeptidase Y, alpha-factor, and BiP) accumulated that were characteristic of a block in translocation into the lumen of the ER. Protease protection experiments confirmed that the precursors accumulated on the cytoplasmic side of the ER membrane. Moreover, depletion of wild-type KAR2 protein also resulted in a block in translocation of secretory proteins. These results implicate BiP/GRP78 function in the continued translocation of proteins into the lumen of the ER. PMID:2190988

  16. Regulated and constitutive protein targeting can be distinguished by secretory polarity in thyroid epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have studied concurrent apical/basolateral and regulated/constitutive secretory targeting in filter-grown thyroid epithelial monolayers in vitro, by following the exocytotic routes of two newly synthesized endogenous secretory proteins, thyroglobulin (Tg) and p500. Tg is a regulated secretory protein as indicated by its acute secretory response to secretagogues. Without stimulation, pulse-labeled Tg exhibits primarily two kinetically distinct routes: less than or equal to 80% is released in an apical secretory phase which is largely complete by 6-10 h, with most of the remaining Tg retained in intracellular storage from which delayed apical discharge is seen. The rapid export observed for most Tg is unlikely to be because of default secretion, since its apical polarity is preserved even during the period (less than or equal to 10 h) when p500 is released basolaterally by a constitutive pathway unresponsive to secretagogues. p500 also exhibits a second, kinetically distinct secretory route: at chase times greater than 10 h, a residual fraction (less than or equal to 8%) of p500 is secreted with an apical preponderance similar to that of Tg. It appears that this fraction of p500 has failed to be excluded from the regulated pathway, which has a predetermined apical polarity. From these data we hypothesize that a targeting hierarchy may exist in thyroid epithelial cells such that initial sorting to the regulated pathway may be a way of insuring apical surface delivery from one of two possible exocytotic routes originating in the immature storage compartment. PMID:1991788

  17. Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Secretory Vesicle Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for studying the biosynthesis of proteins. The labelled proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analysed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labelling and immunoprecipitation of pancreatic islet proteins which are known to be affected in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  18. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins are not exclusively expressed in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Thulasimala; Gibbs, Gerard M; Merriner, D Jo; Kerr, Jeffrey B; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2008-11-01

    The Cysteine-RIch Secretory Proteins (CRISPs) are abundantly produced in the male reproductive tract of mammals and within the venom of reptiles and have been shown to regulate ion channel activity. CRISPs, along with the Antigen-5 proteins and the Pathogenesis related-1 (Pr-1) proteins, form the CAP superfamily of proteins. Analyses of EST expression databases are increasingly suggesting that mammalian CRISPs are expressed more widely than in the reproductive tract. We, therefore, conducted a reverse transcription PCR expression profile and immunohistochemical analyses of 16 mouse tissues to define the sites of production of each of the four murine CRISPs. These data showed that each of the CRISPs have distinct and sometimes overlapping expression profiles, typically associated with the male and female reproductive tract, the secretory epithelia of exocrine glands, and immune tissues including the spleen and thymus. These investigations raise the potential for a role for CRISPs in general mammalian physiology.

  19. Nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms: Transcriptional profiling of secretory proteins and the implication for the protein corona.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Engelmann, Péter; Autrup, Herman; Sutherland, Duncan S; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J

    2016-01-01

    Previously we have identified lysenin as a key protein constituent of the secretome from Eisenia fetida coelomocytes and revealed its critical importance in priming interactions between the cells and the protein corona around nanosilver. As alterations of the protein environment can directly affect the corona composition, the extent to which nanoparticles influence the cells' protein secretion profile is of remarkable interest that has rarely acquired attention. Here, we have probed transcriptional responses of E. fetida coelomocytes to the representative nanosilver NM-300K (15 nm) in a time-dependent manner (2, 4, 8 and 24 h at a low-cytotoxic concentration), and examined the implication of the temporal changes in transcriptional profiles of secretory proteins with a particular reference to that of lysenin. NM-300K was accumulated in/at the cells and lysenin was, after transient induction, gradually suppressed over time indicating a negative feedback cycle. This may limit further enrichment of lysenin in the corona and thereby decrease the lysenin-assisted uptake of the nanoparticles. Other differentially expressed genes were those involved in metal stress (likewise in AgNO3-stressed cells) and in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. This offers an intriguing perspective of the nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms, in which the conserved pattern recognition receptor TLRs may play an effector role.

  20. Intracellular and transcellular transport of secretory and membrane proteins in the rat hepatocyte

    SciTech Connect

    Sztul, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    The intra- and transcellular transport of hepatic secretory and membrane proteins was studied in rats in vivo using (/sup 3/H)fucose and (/sup 35/S)cyteine as metabolic precursors. Incorporated radioactivity in plasma, bile, and liver subcellular fractions was measured and the labeled proteins of the Golgi complex, bile and plasma were separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by fluorography. /sup 3/H-radioactivity in Golgi fractions peaked at 10 min post injection (p.i.) and then declined concomitantly with the appearance of labeled glycoproteins in plasma. Maximal secretion of secretory fucoproteins from the Golgi complex occurred between 10 and 20 min p.i. In contrast, the clearance of labeled proteins from Golgi membrane subfractions occurred past 30 min p.i., indicating that membrane proteins leave the Golgi complex at least 10 min later than the bulk of content proteins. A major 80K form of Secretory Component (SC) was identified in the bile by precipitation with an anti IgA antibody. A comparative study of kinetics of transport of /sup 35/S-labeled SC and /sup 35/S-labeled albumin showed that albumin peaked in bile at approx.45 min p.i., whereas the SC peak occurred at 80 min p.i., suggesting that the transit time differs for plasma and membrane proteins which are delivered to the bile canaliculus (BC).

  1. 2D Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids such is a common method for investigating the biosynthetic rates of proteins. In this way, the abundance of newly synthesized proteins can be determined by several proteomic techniques including 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter describes a protocol for labelling pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of low and high concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation enrichment of secretory granule proteins and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This demonstrated that the biosynthetic rates of most of the granule proteins are co-ordinately regulated in the presence of stimulatory glucose concentrations.

  2. Brucella Modulates Secretory Trafficking via Multiple Type IV Secretion Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Myeni, Sebenzile; Child, Robert; Ng, Tony W.; Kupko, John J.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Celli, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular pathogenic bacterium Brucella generates a replicative vacuole (rBCV) derived from the endoplasmic reticulum via subversion of the host cell secretory pathway. rBCV biogenesis requires the expression of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB, which is thought to translocate effector proteins that modulate membrane trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways. To date, only a few T4SS substrates have been identified, whose molecular functions remain unknown. Here, we used an in silico screen to identify putative T4SS effector candidate proteins using criteria such as limited homology in other bacterial genera, the presence of features similar to known VirB T4SS effectors, GC content and presence of eukaryotic-like motifs. Using β-lactamase and CyaA adenylate cyclase reporter assays, we identified eleven proteins translocated into host cells by Brucella, five in a VirB T4SS-dependent manner, namely BAB1_0678 (BspA), BAB1_0712 (BspB), BAB1_0847 (BspC), BAB1_1671 (BspE) and BAB1_1948 (BspF). A subset of the translocated proteins targeted secretory pathway compartments when ectopically expressed in HeLa cells, and the VirB effectors BspA, BspB and BspF inhibited protein secretion. Brucella infection also impaired host protein secretion in a process requiring BspA, BspB and BspF. Single or combined deletions of bspA, bspB and bspF affected Brucella ability to replicate in macrophages and persist in the liver of infected mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Brucella modulates secretory trafficking via multiple T4SS effector proteins that likely act coordinately to promote Brucella pathogenesis. PMID:23950720

  3. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker's yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities.

  4. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker’s yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities. PMID:27441920

  5. Selective Targeting of Proteins within Secretory Pathway for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vecchi, Lara; Petris, Gianluca; Bestagno, Marco; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) is a cellular quality control mechanism to dispose of misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway via proteasomal degradation. SEL1L is an ER-resident protein that participates in identification of misfolded molecules as ERAD substrates, therefore inducing their ER-to-cytosol retrotranslocation and degradation. We have developed a novel class of fusion proteins, termed degradins, composed of a fragment of SEL1L fused to a target-specific binding moiety located on the luminal side of the ER. The target-binding moiety can be a ligand of the target or derived from specific mAbs. Here, we describe the ability of degradins with two different recognition moieties to promote degradation of a model target. Degradins recognize the target protein within the ER both in secretory and membrane-bound forms, inducing their degradation following retrotranslocation to the cytosol. Thus, degradins represent an effective technique to knock-out proteins within the secretory pathway with high specificity. PMID:22523070

  6. Cysteine-Rich Atrial Secretory Protein from the Snail Achatina achatina: Purification and Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Shabelnikov, Sergey; Kiselev, Artem

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of cardiac bioactive peptides and their functions in molluscs, soluble proteins expressed in the heart and secreted into the circulation have not yet been reported. In this study, we describe an 18.1-kDa, cysteine-rich atrial secretory protein (CRASP) isolated from the terrestrial snail Achatina achatina that has no detectable sequence similarity to any known protein or nucleotide sequence. CRASP is an acidic, 158-residue, N-glycosylated protein composed of eight alpha-helical segments stabilized with five disulphide bonds. A combination of fold recognition algorithms and ab initio folding predicted that CRASP adopts an all-alpha, right-handed superhelical fold. CRASP is most strongly expressed in the atrium in secretory atrial granular cells, and substantial amounts of CRASP are released from the heart upon nerve stimulation. CRASP is detected in the haemolymph of intact animals at nanomolar concentrations. CRASP is the first secretory protein expressed in molluscan atrium to be reported. We propose that CRASP is an example of a taxonomically restricted gene that might be responsible for adaptations specific for terrestrial pulmonates. PMID:26444993

  7. Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are essential for pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Tse, Yu C; Law, Angus H Y; Sun, Samuel S M; Sun, Yong-Bin; Xu, Zeng-Fu; Hillmer, Stefan; Robinson, David G; Jiang, Liwen

    2010-03-01

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are type-I integral membrane proteins that mediate biosynthetic protein traffic in the secretory pathway to the vacuole, whereas secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are type-IV membrane proteins localizing to the plasma membrane and early endosome (EE) or trans-Golgi network (TGN) in the plant endocytic pathway. As pollen tube growth is an extremely polarized and highly dynamic process, with intense anterograde and retrograde membrane trafficking, we have studied the dynamics and functional roles of VSR and SCAMP in pollen tube growth using lily (Lilium longiflorum) pollen as a model. Using newly cloned lily VSR and SCAMP cDNA (termed LIVSR and LISCAMP, respectively), as well as specific antibodies against VSR and SCAMP1 as tools, we have demonstrated that in growing lily pollen tubes: (i) transiently expressed GFP-VSR/GFP-LIVSR is located throughout the pollen tubes, excepting the apical clear-zone region, whereas GFP-LISCAMP is mainly concentrated in the tip region; (ii) VSRs are localized to the multivesicular body (MVB) and vacuole, whereas SCAMPs are localized to apical endocytic vesicles, TGN and vacuole; and (iii) microinjection of VSR or SCAMP antibodies and LlVSR small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced the growth rate of the lily pollen tubes. Taken together, both VSR and SCAMP are required for pollen tube growth, probably working together in regulating protein trafficking in the secretory and endocytic pathways, which need to be coordinated in order to support pollen tube elongation.

  8. A Critical Role for Toxoplasma gondii Vacuolar Protein Sorting VPS9 in Secretory Organelle Biogenesis and Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakura, Takaya; Sindikubwabo, Fabien; Oesterlin, Lena K.; Bousquet, Hugo; Slomianny, Christian; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Langsley, Gordon; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sorting of proteins to the three types of parasite-specific secretory organelles namely rhoptry, microneme and dense granule in Toxoplasma gondii is crucial for successful host cell invasion by this obligate intracellular parasite. Despite its tiny body architecture and limited trafficking machinery, T. gondii relies heavily on transport of vesicles containing proteins, lipids and important virulence-like factors that are delivered to these secretory organelles. However, our understanding on how trafficking of vesicles operates in the parasite is still limited. Here, we show that the T. gondii vacuolar protein sorting 9 (TgVps9), has guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity towards Rab5a and is crucial for sorting of proteins destined to secretory organelles. Our results illuminate features of TgVps9 protein as a key trafficking facilitator that regulates protein maturation, secretory organelle formation and secretion, thereby ensuring a primary role in host infection by T. gondii. PMID:27966671

  9. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) might contaminate murine monoclonal antibodies after purification on protein G.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Jörg A; Fettke, Joerg; Lenz, Christine; Albers, Katharina; Mallwitz, Frank; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Kusch, Emely; Sellrie, Frank

    2012-03-31

    The large scale production of a monoclonal anti-progesterone antibody in serum free medium followed by affinity chromatography on protein G lead to a contamination of the antibody sample with a protein of about 14 kDa. This protein was identified by mass spectrometry as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). This SLPI contamination lead to a failure of the fiber-optic based competitive fluorescence assay to detect progesterone in milk. Purification of the monoclonal antibody using protein A columns circumvented this problem.

  10. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  11. Ranking Gene Ontology terms for predicting non-classical secretory proteins in eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Lin

    2012-11-07

    Protein secretion is an important biological process for both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several sequence-based methods mainly rely on utilizing various types of complementary features to design accurate classifiers for predicting non-classical secretory proteins. Gene Ontology (GO) terms are increasing informative in predicting protein functions. However, the number of used GO terms is often very large. For example, there are 60,020 GO terms used in the prediction method Euk-mPLoc 2.0 for subcellular localization. This study proposes a novel approach to identify a small set of m top-ranked GO terms served as the only type of input features to design a support vector machine (SVM) based method Sec-GO to predict non-classical secretory proteins in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. To evaluate the Sec-GO method, two existing methods and their used datasets are adopted for performance comparisons. The Sec-GO method using m=436 GO terms yields an independent test accuracy of 96.7% on mammalian proteins, much better than the existing method SPRED (82.2%) which uses frequencies of tri-peptides and short peptides, secondary structure, and physicochemical properties as input features of a random forest classifier. Furthermore, when applying to Gram-positive bacterial proteins, the Sec-GO with m=158 GO terms has a test accuracy of 94.5%, superior to NClassG+ (90.0%) which uses SVM with several feature types, comprising amino acid composition, di-peptides, physicochemical properties and the position specific weighting matrix. Analysis of the distribution of secretory proteins in a GO database indicates the percentage of the non-classical secretory proteins annotated by GO is larger than that of classical secretory proteins in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Of the m top-ranked GO features, the top-four GO terms are all annotated by such subcellular locations as GO:0005576 (Extracellular region). Additionally, the method Sec-GO is easily implemented and its web tool of

  12. Human protein secretory pathway genes are expressed in a tissue-specific pattern to match processing demands of the secretome.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Amir; Gatto, Francesco; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Protein secretory pathway in eukaryal cells is responsible for delivering functional secretory proteins. The dysfunction of this pathway causes a range of important human diseases from congenital disorders to cancer. Despite the piled-up knowledge on the molecular biology and biochemistry level, the tissue-specific expression of the secretory pathway genes has not been analyzed on the transcriptome level. Based on the recent RNA-sequencing studies, the largest fraction of tissue-specific transcriptome encodes for the secretome (secretory proteins). Here, the question arises that if the expression levels of the secretory pathway genes have a tissue-specific tuning. In this study, we tackled this question by performing a meta-analysis of the recently published transcriptome data on human tissues. As a result, we detected 68 as called "extreme genes" which show an unusual expression pattern in specific gene families of the secretory pathway. We also inspected the potential functional link between detected extreme genes and the corresponding tissues enriched secretome. As a result, the detected extreme genes showed correlation with the enrichment of the nature and number of specific post-translational modifications in each tissue's secretome. Our findings conciliate both the housekeeping and tissue-specific nature of the protein secretory pathway, which we attribute to a fine-tuned regulation of defined gene families to support the diversity of secreted proteins and their modifications.

  13. Multi-step down-regulation of the secretory pathway in mitosis: A fresh perspective on protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, Foong May

    2013-01-01

    The secretory pathway delivers proteins synthesized at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) to various subcellular locations via the Golgi apparatus. Currently, efforts are focused on understanding the molecular machineries driving individual processes at the RER and Golgi that package, modify and transport proteins. However, studies are routinely performed using non-dividing cells. This obscures the critical issue of how the secretory pathway is affected by cell division. Indeed, several studies have indicated that protein trafficking is down-regulated during mitosis. Moreover, the RER and Golgi apparatus exhibit gross reorganization in mitosis. Here I provide a relatively neglected perspective of how the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK1) could regulate various stages of the secretory pathway. I highlight several aspects of the mitotic control of protein trafficking that remain unresolved and suggest that further studies on how the mitotic CDK1 influences the secretory pathway are necessary to obtain a deeper understanding of protein transport. PMID:23494566

  14. Structure and function of snake venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Morita, Takashi

    2004-09-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are primarily found in the epididymis of mammals and are expressed in diverse organisms. However, the functions of most CRISPs remain unknown. Recent studies reveal that CRISPs are widely distributed in snake venoms and that they inhibit smooth muscle contraction and cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels. In this review, we discuss recent findings on several snake venom-derived CRISPs.

  15. Human axillary apocrine glands: proteins involved in the apocrine secretory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Schubert, Christoph; Kesting, Marco R; Loeffelbein, Denys J; Nieberler, Markus; Koehler, Claudia; Welsch, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    The apocrine secretory mechanism is a mode of secretion by which the apical part of the cell cytoplasm is pinched off, which leads to the formation of an aposome. The distinct mechanism of formation and decapitation of the aposome is not well investigated. Only few proteins are known that are involved in this secretory mechanism. We studied the human axillary apocrine gland and looked at proteins associated with cytokinesis, a process that is comparable to the pinching-off mechanism of apocrine glandular cells. By immunohistochemistry, we detected actin, myosin II, cytokeratin 7 and 19, α- and β-tubulin, anillin, cofilin, syntaxin 2, vamp8/endobrevin and septin 2. In highly active glandular cells, these proteins are located at the base of the apical protrusion when the aposome is in the process of being released or are concentrated in the cap of the apical protrusion. These findings demonstrate new insights on apocrine secretory mechanisms and point to similarities to the terminal step of cytokinesis, which is regulated by a SNARE-mediated membrane fusion event.

  16. Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically-Labeled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse-chase radiolabeling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for tracking the biosynthesis of proteins. Radiolabeled newly synthesized proteins can be analyzed by a number of techniques such as two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labeling of pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of basal and stimulatory concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation to produce a secretory granule fraction and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This provides a means of determining whether or not the biosynthetic rates of the entire granule constituents are coordinately regulated.

  17. Alteration in Endometrial Proteins during Early- and Mid-Secretory Phases of the Cycle in Women with Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Khan, Huma; Sirohi, Vijay Kumar; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita; Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad; Dwivedi, Anila

    2014-01-01

    Background Compromised receptivity of the endometrium is a major cause of unexplained infertility, implantation failure and subclinical pregnancy loss. In order to investigate the changes in endometrial protein profile as a cause of unexplained infertility, the current study was undertaken to analyze the differentially expressed proteins of endometrium from early-secretory (LH+2) to mid-secretory phase (LH+7), in women with unexplained infertility. Methods 2-D gel electrophoresis was performed to analyze the proteomic changes between early- (n = 8) and mid-secretory (n = 8) phase endometrium of women with unexplained infertility. The differentially expressed protein spots were identified by LC-MS analysis and validated by immunoblotting and immuno-histochemical analysis in early- (n = 4) and mid-secretory (n = 4) phase endometrium of infertile women. Validated proteins were also analyzed in early- (n = 4) and mid-secretory (n = 4) phase endometrium of fertile women. Results Nine proteins were found to be differentially expressed between early- and mid- secretory phases of endometrium of infertile women. The expression of Ras-related protein Rap-1b, Protein disulfide isomerase A3, Apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), Cofilin-1 and RAN GTP-binding nuclear protein (Ran) were found to be significantly increased, whereas, Tubulin polymerization promoting protein family member 3, Superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn], Sorcin, and Proteasome subunit alpha type-5 were significantly decreased in mid- secretory phase endometrium of infertile women as compared to early-secretory phase endometrium of infertile women. Validation of 4 proteins viz. Sorcin, Cofilin-1, Apo-A1 and Ran were performed in separate endometrial biopsy samples from infertile women. The up-regulated expression of Sorcin and down-regulated expression of Cofilin-1 and Apolipoprotein-A1, were observed in mid-secretory phase as compared to early-secretory phase in case of fertile women. Conclusions De

  18. Alteration in endometrial proteins during early- and mid-secretory phases of the cycle in women with unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Murli; Khan, Huma; Sirohi, Vijay Kumar; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita; Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad; Dwivedi, Anila

    2014-01-01

    Compromised receptivity of the endometrium is a major cause of unexplained infertility, implantation failure and subclinical pregnancy loss. In order to investigate the changes in endometrial protein profile as a cause of unexplained infertility, the current study was undertaken to analyze the differentially expressed proteins of endometrium from early-secretory (LH+2) to mid-secretory phase (LH+7), in women with unexplained infertility. 2-D gel electrophoresis was performed to analyze the proteomic changes between early- (n = 8) and mid-secretory (n = 8) phase endometrium of women with unexplained infertility. The differentially expressed protein spots were identified by LC-MS analysis and validated by immunoblotting and immuno-histochemical analysis in early- (n = 4) and mid-secretory (n = 4) phase endometrium of infertile women. Validated proteins were also analyzed in early- (n = 4) and mid-secretory (n = 4) phase endometrium of fertile women. Nine proteins were found to be differentially expressed between early- and mid- secretory phases of endometrium of infertile women. The expression of Ras-related protein Rap-1b, Protein disulfide isomerase A3, Apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), Cofilin-1 and RAN GTP-binding nuclear protein (Ran) were found to be significantly increased, whereas, Tubulin polymerization promoting protein family member 3, Superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn], Sorcin, and Proteasome subunit alpha type-5 were significantly decreased in mid- secretory phase endometrium of infertile women as compared to early-secretory phase endometrium of infertile women. Validation of 4 proteins viz. Sorcin, Cofilin-1, Apo-A1 and Ran were performed in separate endometrial biopsy samples from infertile women. The up-regulated expression of Sorcin and down-regulated expression of Cofilin-1 and Apolipoprotein-A1, were observed in mid-secretory phase as compared to early-secretory phase in case of fertile women. De-regulation of the expression of Sorcin

  19. Avl9p, a Member of a Novel Protein Superfamily, Functions in the Late Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schekman, Randy

    2007-01-01

    The branching of exocytic transport routes in both yeast and mammalian cells has complicated studies of the late secretory pathway, and the mechanisms involved in exocytic cargo sorting and exit from the Golgi and endosomes are not well understood. Because cargo can be sorted away from a blocked route and secreted by an alternate route, mutants defective in only one route do not exhibit a strong secretory phenotype and are therefore difficult to isolate. In a genetic screen designed to isolate such mutants, we identified a novel conserved protein, Avl9p, the absence of which conferred lethality in a vps1Δ apl2Δ strain background (lacking a dynamin and an adaptor-protein complex 1 subunit). Depletion of Avl9p in this strain resulted in secretory defects as well as accumulation of Golgi-like membranes. The triple mutant also had a depolarized actin cytoskeleton and defects in polarized secretion. Overexpression of Avl9p in wild-type cells resulted in vesicle accumulation and a post-Golgi defect in secretion. Phylogenetic analysis indicated evolutionary relationships between Avl9p and regulators of membrane traffic and actin function. PMID:17229886

  20. Investigation of the protein-peptide composition of the secretory granules of bovine lactogenic hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Nagornaya, L.V.; Kizim, E.A.; Kravtsov, G.M.; Tsibezov, V.V.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1987-02-20

    By a combination of methods of gel chromatography, fluorometric analysis, and electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel with immunochemical identification, they investigated the protein-peptide composition of the secretory granules of lactogenic hormone (LTH), isolated from the bovine anterior pituitary. It was established that the content of peptides in the granules is less than 3% of the content of immunoreactive LTH. Using gel chromatography, the monomer of the hormone and two immunoreactive forms with molecular weight 42 and 65 kilodaltons were detected in the secondary granules. The content of the forms with respect to immunoreactivity was 90, 3, and 7%, respectively. Four immunoreactive forms of LTH were detected in the secretory granules by the method of electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel followed by immunochemical identification.

  1. Antigenic homogeneity of male Müllerian gland (MG) secretory proteins of a caecilian amphibian with secretory proteins of the mammalian prostate gland and seminal vesicles: evidence for role of the caecilian MG as a male accessory reproductive gland.

    PubMed

    Radha, Arumugam; Sree, Sreesha; Faisal, Kunnathodi; Kumar, G Pradeep; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2014-10-01

    Whereas in all other vertebrates the Müllerian ducts of genetic males are aborted during development, under the influence of Müllerian-inhibiting substance, in the caecilian amphibians they are retained as a pair of functional glands. It has long been speculated that the Müllerian gland might be the male accessory reproductive gland but there has been no direct evidence to this effect. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the caecilian Müllerian gland secretory proteins would bear antigenic similarity to secretory proteins of the prostate gland and/or the seminal vesicles of a mammal. The secretory proteins of the Müllerian gland of Ichthyophis tricolor were evaluated for cross-reactivity with antisera raised against rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle secretory proteins, adopting SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblot techniques. Indeed there was a cross-reaction of five Müllerian gland secretory protein fractions with prostatic protein antiserum and of three with seminal vesicle protein antiserum. A potential homology exists because in mammals the middle group of the prostate primordia is derived from a diverticulum of the Müllerian duct. Thus this study, by providing evidence for expression of prostatic and seminal vesicle proteins in the Müllerian gland, substantiates the point that in caecilians the Müllerian glands are the male accessory reproductive glands.

  2. Bacterial mimetics of endocrine secretory granules as immobilized in vivo depots for functional protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Fernández, Yolanda; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mendoza, Rosa; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejando; Álamo, Patricia; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Schwartz, Simó; Abasolo, Ibane; Corchero, José Luis; Mangues, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In the human endocrine system many protein hormones including urotensin, glucagon, obestatin, bombesin and secretin, among others, are supplied from amyloidal secretory granules. These granules form part of the so called functional amyloids, which within the whole aggregome appear to be more abundant than formerly believed. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are non-toxic, nanostructured functional amyloids whose biological fabrication can be tailored to render materials with defined biophysical properties. Since under physiological conditions they steadily release their building block protein in a soluble and functional form, IBs are considered as mimetics of endocrine secretory granules. We have explored here if the in vivo implantation of functional IBs in a given tissue would represent a stable local source of functional protein. Upon intratumoral injection of bacterial IBs formed by a potent protein ligand of CXCR4 we have observed high stability and prevalence of the material in absence of toxicity, accompanied by apoptosis of CXCR4+ cells and tumor ablation. Then, the local immobilization of bacterial amyloids formed by therapeutic proteins in tumors or other tissues might represent a promising strategy for a sustained local delivery of protein drugs by mimicking the functional amyloidal architecture of the mammals’ endocrine system. PMID:27775083

  3. Bacterial mimetics of endocrine secretory granules as immobilized in vivo depots for functional protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Fernández, Yolanda; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mendoza, Rosa; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejando; Álamo, Patricia; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Schwartz, Simó; Abasolo, Ibane; Corchero, José Luis; Mangues, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-10-24

    In the human endocrine system many protein hormones including urotensin, glucagon, obestatin, bombesin and secretin, among others, are supplied from amyloidal secretory granules. These granules form part of the so called functional amyloids, which within the whole aggregome appear to be more abundant than formerly believed. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are non-toxic, nanostructured functional amyloids whose biological fabrication can be tailored to render materials with defined biophysical properties. Since under physiological conditions they steadily release their building block protein in a soluble and functional form, IBs are considered as mimetics of endocrine secretory granules. We have explored here if the in vivo implantation of functional IBs in a given tissue would represent a stable local source of functional protein. Upon intratumoral injection of bacterial IBs formed by a potent protein ligand of CXCR4 we have observed high stability and prevalence of the material in absence of toxicity, accompanied by apoptosis of CXCR4(+) cells and tumor ablation. Then, the local immobilization of bacterial amyloids formed by therapeutic proteins in tumors or other tissues might represent a promising strategy for a sustained local delivery of protein drugs by mimicking the functional amyloidal architecture of the mammals' endocrine system.

  4. Subcellular location of secretory proteins retained in the liver during the ethanol-induced inhibition of hepatic protein secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Volentine, G.D.; Tuma, D.J.; Sorrell, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol administration inhibits the secretion of proteins by the liver, resulting in their hepatocellular retention. Experiments were designed in this study to determine the subcellular location of the retained secretory proteins. Ethanol was administered acutely to nonfasted rats by gastric intubation, whereas control animals received an isocaloric dose of glucose. Two hours after intubation, when maximum blood ethanol levels (45 mM) were observed, (/sup 3/H)leucine and (/sup 14/C)fucose were injected simultaneously into the dorsal vein of the penis. The labelling of secretory proteins was determined in the liver and plasma at various time periods after label injection. Ethanol treatment decreased the secretion of both leucine- and fucose-labeled proteins into the plasma. This inhibition of secretion was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the hepatic retention of both leucine- and fucose-labeled immunoprecipitable secretory proteins. At the time of maximum inhibition of secretion, leucine labeled secretory proteins located in the Golgi apparatus represented about 50% of the accumulated secretory proteins in the livers of the ethanol-treated rats, whereas the remainder was essentially equally divided among the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol. Because fucose is incorporated into secretory proteins almost exclusively in the Golgi complex, fucose-labeled proteins accumulated in the livers of the ethanol-treated rats mainly in the Golgi apparatus, with the remainder located in the cytosol. These results show that ethanol administration causes an impaired movement of secretory proteins along the secretory pathway, and that secretory proteins accumulate mainly, but not exclusively, in the Golgi apparatus.

  5. Overproduction of a Model Sec- and Tat-Dependent Secretory Protein Elicits Different Cellular Responses in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Gullón, Sonia; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an efficient host for the secretory production of homologous and heterologous proteins. To identify possible bottlenecks in the protein production process, a comparative transcriptomic approach was adopted to study cellular responses during the overproduction of a Sec-dependent model protein (alpha-amylase) and a Tat-dependent model protein (agarase) in Streptomyces lividans. The overproduction of the model secretory proteins via the Sec or the Tat route in S. lividans does elicit a different major cell response in the bacterium. The stringent response is a bacterial response to nutrients' depletion, which naturally occurs at late times of the bacterial cell growth. While the induction of the stringent response at the exponential phase of growth may limit overall productivity in the case of the Tat route, the induction of that response does not take place in the case of the Sec route, which comparatively is an advantage in secretory protein production processes. Hence, this study identifies a potential major drawback in the secretory protein production process depending on the secretory route, and provides clues to improving S. lividans as a protein production host.

  6. Overproduction of a Model Sec- and Tat-Dependent Secretory Protein Elicits Different Cellular Responses in Streptomyces lividans

    PubMed Central

    Gullón, Sonia; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an efficient host for the secretory production of homologous and heterologous proteins. To identify possible bottlenecks in the protein production process, a comparative transcriptomic approach was adopted to study cellular responses during the overproduction of a Sec-dependent model protein (alpha-amylase) and a Tat-dependent model protein (agarase) in Streptomyces lividans. The overproduction of the model secretory proteins via the Sec or the Tat route in S. lividans does elicit a different major cell response in the bacterium. The stringent response is a bacterial response to nutrients’ depletion, which naturally occurs at late times of the bacterial cell growth. While the induction of the stringent response at the exponential phase of growth may limit overall productivity in the case of the Tat route, the induction of that response does not take place in the case of the Sec route, which comparatively is an advantage in secretory protein production processes. Hence, this study identifies a potential major drawback in the secretory protein production process depending on the secretory route, and provides clues to improving S. lividans as a protein production host. PMID:26200356

  7. Secretion of sulfated and nonsulfated forms of parathyroid chromogranin A (secretory protein-I)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorr, S.U.; Cohn, D.V. )

    1990-02-25

    Chromogranin A (secretory protein-I) is an acidic, sulfated glycoprotein found in secretory granules of most endocrine cells but not in exocrine or epithelial cells. Parathyroid chromogranin A is sulfated on tyrosine residues, whereas adrenal chromogranin A appears to be sulfated mainly on oligosaccharide residues. Chromogranin B, on the other hand, is tyrosine-sulfated in the bovine adrenal whereas this protein is absent from the parathyroid. The role of this tissue- or species-specific sulfation of chromogranin is not known. Tyrosine sulfation is a common post-translational modification of proteins in the exocytotic pathway and has been suggested to play a role in the sorting or intracellular transport of secretory proteins. To test this, porcine parathyroid tissue slices were metabolically labeled with 35SO4 and (3H)Lys, and the tissue and incubation medium analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and immunoprecipitation with chromogranin A-specific antiserum or by radioimmunoassay for parathormone. Secretion of total and 3H-labeled chromogranin A was about 3- and 7-fold higher, respectively, at 0.5 mM than at 3.0 mM Ca2+, and secretion of 35SO4-labeled chromogranin A was 67-fold higher. This indicates that either sulfated chromogranin A is directed primarily to the Ca2+-regulated pathway or that sulfation occurs following sorting to this pathway. Sodium chlorate (1-10 mM) inhibited sulfation in a dose-dependent manner by up to 95% but it had no effect on the onset or rate of chromogranin A secretion. These data indicate that regulated secretion of parathyroid chromogranin A does not require sulfation of tyrosine residues.

  8. Protein secretory patterns of rat Sertoli and peritubular cells are influenced by culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kierszenbaum, A.L.; Crowell, J.A.; Shabanowitz, R.B.; DePhilip, R.M.; Tres, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    An approach combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography was used to correlate patterns of secretory proteins in cultures of Sertoli and peritubular cells with those observed in the incubation medium from segments of seminiferous tubules. Sertoli cells in culture and in seminiferous tubules secreted three proteins designated S70 (Mr 72,000-70,000), S45 (Mr 45,000), and S35 (Mr 35,000). Cultured Sertoli and peritubular cells and incubated seminiferous tubules secreted two proteins designated SP1 (Mr 42,000) and SP2 (Mr 50,000). SP1 and S45 have similar Mr but differ from each other in isoelectric point (pI). Cultured peritubular cells secreted a protein designated P40 (Mr 40,000) that was also seen in intact seminiferous tubules but not in seminiferous tubules lacking the peritubular cell wall. However, a large number of high-Mr proteins were observed only in the medium of cultured peritubular cells but not in the incubation medium of intact seminiferous tubules. Culture conditions influence the morphology and patterns of protein secretion of cultured peritubular cells. Peritubular cells that display a flat-stellate shape transition when placed in culture medium free of serum (with or without hormones and growth factors), accumulate various proteins in the medium that are less apparent when these cells are maintained in medium supplemented with serum. Two secretory proteins stimulated by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (designated SCm1 and SCm2) previously found in the medium of cultured Sertoli cells, were also observed in the incubation medium of seminiferous tubular segments stimulated by FSH. Results of this study show that, although cultured Sertoli and peritubular cells synthesize and secrete proteins also observed in segments of incubated seminiferous tubules anther group of proteins lacks seminiferous tubular correlates.

  9. Identification of routing determinants in the cytosolic domain of a secretory granule-associated integral membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Milgram, S L; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    1996-07-19

    We have investigated the trafficking of integral membrane peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) in the neuroendocrine AtT-20 cell line. This bifunctional enzyme has two domains which together catalyze the COOH-terminal alpha-amidation of peptidylglycine substrates yielding amidated products stored in secretory granules. As soluble proteins, both catalytic domains were independently targeted to secretory granules. In contrast, membrane PAM was largely localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Upon truncation of its cytoplasmic COOH-terminal domain, membrane PAM was less efficiently cleaved by secretory granule enzymes and accumulated on the plasma membrane. When transferred to the lumenal domain of the interleukin 2 receptor alpha-chain (Tac protein), the cytoplasmic domain of PAM caused rerouting of Tac from the surface to the TGN and supported internalization of Tac antibody from the plasma membrane. To define sequences in the cytoplasmic domain of integral membrane PAM involved in its trafficking, we expressed PAM proteins containing truncations, deletions, or point mutations in the COOH-terminal cytoplasmic domain. PAM proteins were not retained in the TGN when half of the cytoplasmic domain was deleted; such proteins accumulated on the plasma membrane, were not efficiently internalized, and were cleaved to generate a bifunctional PAM protein that was not stored in secretory granules. A tyrosine-based internalization motif was identified, which was not required for efficient cleavage of full-length integral membrane PAM by secretory granule enzymes. Deletion of an 18-amino acid domain surrounding this Tyr residue both diminished cleavage of membrane PAM by secretory granule enzymes and eliminated internalization of PAM from the plasma membrane. The cytoplasmic domain is responsible for retaining membrane PAM in the TGN and for retrieving membrane PAM from the cell surface, while the lumenal catalytic domains of PAM appear to be responsible for

  10. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R.; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  11. Cobra venom contains a pool of cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey V; Levashov, Mikhail Yu; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2005-03-04

    A large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) includes proteins of different origin, the function of the majority of CRISPs being unknown. For CRISPs isolated from snake venom, two types of activities were found: two proteins blocked cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, several others blocked potassium-stimulated smooth muscle contraction. Thus, snake CRISPs represent potentially valuable tools for studies of ion channels, which makes promising a search for new CRISPs. Here we report on the isolation of several novel CRISPs from the venoms of Asian cobra Naja kaouthia and African cobra Naja haje using a combination of different types of liquid chromatography. Four CRISP variants were identified in N. kaouthia venom and three proteins, one of them acidic, were found in N. haje venom. Acidic CRISP was found in a reptilian venom for the first time. Our data suggest that each cobra venom contains a pool of different CRISPs.

  12. The Arf family G protein Arl1 is required for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Isabel L.; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Munro, Sean

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small G protein Arf like 1 (Arl1) is found at the Golgi complex, and its GTP-bound form recruits several effectors to the Golgi including GRIP-domain-containing coiled-coil proteins, and the Arf1 exchange factors Big1 and Big2. To investigate the role of Arl1, we have characterised a loss-of-function mutant of the Drosophila Arl1 orthologue. The gene is essential, and examination of clones of cells lacking Arl1 shows that it is required for recruitment of three of the four GRIP domain golgins to the Golgi, with Drosophila GCC185 being less dependent on Arl1. At a functional level, Arl1 is essential for formation of secretory granules in the larval salivary gland. When Arl1 is missing, Golgi are still present but there is a dispersal of adaptor protein 1 (AP-1), a clathrin adaptor that requires Arf1 for its membrane recruitment and which is known to be required for secretory granule biogenesis. Arl1 does not appear to be required for AP-1 recruitment in all tissues, suggesting that it is crucially required to enhance Arf1 activation at the trans-Golgi in particular tissues. PMID:24610947

  13. A parafusin-related Toxoplasma protein in Ca2+-regulated secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, S H; Shenoy, S M; Kim, K; Singer, R H; Satir, B H

    2001-12-01

    We cloned a gene, PRPI, of Toxoplasma gondii encoding a 637-amino-acids protein having a calculated mass of 70 kDa. The sequence showed high homology to parafusin, a protein that in Paramecium tetraurelia participates in Ca2+-regulated exocytosis and is a paralog of phosphoglucomutase. We show that Toxoplasma gondii homogenate and an expressed recombinant PRP1 fusion protein cross-react with a specific peptide-derived antibody to parafusin in Western blots. Antibodies to the recombinant PRP1 showed cross-reaction with parafusin and recognized PRP1, as bands at M, 63 x 10(3) and 68 x 10(3), respectively. PRP1 is labeled when Toxoplasma gondii cells are incubated with inorganic 32P and appears as the major band on autoradiograms of SDS-PAGE gels. The localization of PRP1 was examined in secretory organelles of Toxoplasma gondii by deconvolution light microscopy followed by three dimensional reconstruction using pairwise combinations of specific antibodies. PRP1 localized to the apical third of the cell. It co-localized with micronemes, the only secretory organelle the secretion of which is Ca2+ dependent. Quantification of the co-localized stain suggests that only mature micronemes ready for exocytosis have PRP1. These findings suggest that PRP1, parafusin and other members of the phosphoglucomutase superfamily have a conserved role in Ca2+-regulated exocytic processes.

  14. Expression of transcripts for cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) in the murine lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Haendler, B; Toda, I; Sullivan, D A; Schleuning, W D

    1999-03-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) represent a family of evolutionarily conserved proteins which may play a role in the innate immune system and are transcriptionally regulated by androgens in several tissues. Transcripts for all three members of the CRISP family have now been identified in the murine lacrimal gland. RT-PCR using primers able to discriminate between the related CRISP forms allowed the amplification of fragments with the expected length. DNA sequencing revealed a complete identity with the hitherto characterized epididymal CRISP-1, testicular CRISP-2, and salivary gland CRISP-3. An analysis of several mouse strains indicated that all expressed the three CRISP forms, but in differing amounts. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from acinar cells of lacrimal glands revealed that they expressed CRISP-1 and CRISP-2. Semiquantitative and quantitative analyses furthermore showed higher CRISP-1 and CRISP-3 mRNA levels in the lacrimal glands of male BALB/c and NOD mice when compared to females. Testosterone treatment of C3H/HeJ female mice was followed by an upregulation of the steady-state CRISP-1 but not CRISP-2 transcript levels. A comparable stimulation was observed for the mRNAs coding for parotid secretory protein (PSP), a factor previously shown to exhibit sexual dimorphism in the murine lacrimal gland. The expression of CRISP transcripts in the lacrimal gland is consistent with a function in the innate immune system.

  15. Secretory delivery of recombinant proteins in attenuated Salmonella strains: potential and limitations of Type I protein transporters.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Heinz P; von Specht, Bernd Ulrich

    2003-07-15

    Live attenuated Salmonella strains have been extensively explored as oral delivery systems for recombinant vaccine antigens and effector proteins with immunoadjuvant and immunomodulatory potential. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in human vaccination trials for various antigens. However, immunization efficiencies with live vaccines are generally significantly lower compared to those monitored in parenteral immunizations with the same vaccine antigen. This is, at least partly, due to the lack of secretory expression systems, enabling large-scale extracellular delivery of vaccine and effector proteins by these strains. Because of their low complexity and the terminal location of the secretion signal in the secreted protein, Type I (ATP-binding cassette) secretion systems appear to be particularly suited for development of such recombinant extracellular expression systems. So far, the Escherichia coli hemolysin system is the only Type I secretion system, which has been adapted to recombinant protein secretion in Salmonella. However, this system has a number of disadvantages, including low secretion capacity, complex genetic regulation, and structural restriction to the secreted protein, which eventually hinder high-level in vivo delivery of recombinant vaccines and effector proteins. Thus, the development of more efficient recombinant protein secretion systems, based on Type I exporters can help to improve efficacies of live recombinant Salmonella vaccines. Type I secretion systems, mediating secretion of bacterial surface layer proteins, such as RsaA in Caulobacter crescentus, are discussed as promising candidates for improved secretory delivery systems.

  16. SPRED: A machine learning approach for the identification of classical and non-classical secretory proteins in mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Moeller, Steffen; Suganthan, P.N.; Martinetz, Thomas

    2010-01-15

    Eukaryotic protein secretion generally occurs via the classical secretory pathway that traverses the ER and Golgi apparatus. Secreted proteins usually contain a signal sequence with all the essential information required to target them for secretion. However, some proteins like fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1, FGF-2), interleukins (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta), galectins and thioredoxin are exported by an alternative pathway. This is known as leaderless or non-classical secretion and works without a signal sequence. Most computational methods for the identification of secretory proteins use the signal peptide as indicator and are therefore not able to identify substrates of non-classical secretion. In this work, we report a random forest method, SPRED, to identify secretory proteins from protein sequences irrespective of N-terminal signal peptides, thus allowing also correct classification of non-classical secretory proteins. Training was performed on a dataset containing 600 extracellular proteins and 600 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. The algorithm was tested on 180 extracellular proteins and 1380 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. We obtained 85.92% accuracy from training and 82.18% accuracy from testing. Since SPRED does not use N-terminal signals, it can detect non-classical secreted proteins by filtering those secreted proteins with an N-terminal signal by using SignalP. SPRED predicted 15 out of 19 experimentally verified non-classical secretory proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified 566 protein sequences potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. The dataset and standalone version of the SPRED software is available at (http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/spred/spred).

  17. The role of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Koppers, Adam J; Reddy, Thulasimala; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a subgroup of the CRISP, antigen 5 and Pr-1 (CAP) protein superfamily, and are found only in vertebrates. They show a strong expression bias to the mammalian male reproductive tract and the venom of poisonous reptiles. Within the male reproductive tract CRISPs have been implicated in many aspects of male germ cell biology spanning haploid germ cell development, epididymal maturation, capacitation, motility and the actual processes of fertilization. At a structural level, CRISPs are composed of two domains, a CAP domain, which has been implicated in cell-cell adhesion, and a CRISP domain, which has been shown to regulate several classes of ion channels across multiple species. Herein, we will review the current literature on the role of CRISPs in male fertility, and by inference to related non-mammalian protein, infer potential biochemical functions.

  18. The role of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Koppers, Adam J; Reddy, Thulasimala; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a subgroup of the CRISP, antigen 5 and Pr-1 (CAP) protein superfamily, and are found only in vertebrates. They show a strong expression bias to the mammalian male reproductive tract and the venom of poisonous reptiles. Within the male reproductive tract CRISPs have been implicated in many aspects of male germ cell biology spanning haploid germ cell development, epididymal maturation, capacitation, motility and the actual processes of fertilization. At a structural level, CRISPs are composed of two domains, a CAP domain, which has been implicated in cell–cell adhesion, and a CRISP domain, which has been shown to regulate several classes of ion channels across multiple species. Herein, we will review the current literature on the role of CRISPs in male fertility, and by inference to related non-mammalian protein, infer potential biochemical functions. PMID:20972450

  19. Glucosidase II and MRH-domain containing proteins in the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Cecilia; Dahms, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    N -glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of the transfer of a pre-assembled glycan conserved among species (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid donor to a consensus sequence within a nascent protein that is entering the ER. The protein-linked glycans are then processed by glycosidases and glycosyltransferases in the ER producing specific structures that serve as signalling molecules for the fate of the folding glycoprotein: to stay in the ER during the folding process, to be retrotranslocated to the cytosol for proteasomal degradation if irreversibly misfolded, or to pursue transit through the secretory pathway as a mature glycoprotein. In the ER, each glycan signalling structure is recognized by a specific lectin. A domain similar to that of the mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs) has been identified in several proteins of the secretory pathway. These include the beta subunit of glucosidase II (GII), a key enzyme in the early processing of the transferred glycan that removes middle and innermost glucoses and is involved in quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER (QC), the lectins OS-9 and XTP3-B, proteins involved in the delivery of ER misfolded proteins to degradation (ERAD), the gamma subunit of the Golgi GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in generating the mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) signal for sorting acidic hydrolases to lysosomes, and finally the MPRs that deliver those hydrolytic enzymes to the lysosome. Each of the MRH-containing proteins recognizes a different signalling N-glycan structure. Three-dimensional structures of some of the MRH domains have been solved, providing the basis to understand recognition mechanisms. PMID:25692846

  20. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  1. A pH-regulated quality control cycle for surveillance of secretory protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Vavassori, Stefano; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Caserta, Imma R; Fagioli, Claudio; Mossuto, Maria F; Fornili, Arianna; van Anken, Eelco; Degano, Massimo; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2013-06-27

    To warrant the quality of the secretory proteome, stringent control systems operate at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi interface, preventing the release of nonnative products. Incompletely assembled oligomeric proteins that are deemed correctly folded must rely on additional quality control mechanisms dedicated to proper assembly. Here we unveil how ERp44 cycles between cisGolgi and ER in a pH-regulated manner, patrolling assembly of disulfide-linked oligomers such as IgM and adiponectin. At neutral, ER-equivalent pH, the ERp44 carboxy-terminal tail occludes the substrate-binding site. At the lower pH of the cisGolgi, conformational rearrangements of this peptide, likely involving protonation of ERp44's active cysteine, simultaneously unmask the substrate binding site and -RDEL motif, allowing capture of orphan secretory protein subunits and ER retrieval via KDEL receptors. The ERp44 assembly control cycle couples secretion fidelity and efficiency downstream of the calnexin/calreticulin and BiP-dependent quality control cycles.

  2. A pH-Regulated Quality Control Cycle for Surveillance of Secretory Protein Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vavassori, Stefano; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Caserta, Imma R.; Fagioli, Claudio; Mossuto, Maria F.; Fornili, Arianna; van Anken, Eelco; Degano, Massimo; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary To warrant the quality of the secretory proteome, stringent control systems operate at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi interface, preventing the release of nonnative products. Incompletely assembled oligomeric proteins that are deemed correctly folded must rely on additional quality control mechanisms dedicated to proper assembly. Here we unveil how ERp44 cycles between cisGolgi and ER in a pH-regulated manner, patrolling assembly of disulfide-linked oligomers such as IgM and adiponectin. At neutral, ER-equivalent pH, the ERp44 carboxy-terminal tail occludes the substrate-binding site. At the lower pH of the cisGolgi, conformational rearrangements of this peptide, likely involving protonation of ERp44’s active cysteine, simultaneously unmask the substrate binding site and −RDEL motif, allowing capture of orphan secretory protein subunits and ER retrieval via KDEL receptors. The ERp44 assembly control cycle couples secretion fidelity and efficiency downstream of the calnexin/calreticulin and BiP-dependent quality control cycles. PMID:23685074

  3. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qi; Yuan, Xiongying; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Changning; Lv, Zhiyue; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2011-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES) proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  4. Secretory fluorescent protein, a secretion green fluorescent fusion protein with alkaline phosphatase activity as a sensitive and traceable reporter in baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chao-Yi; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The advantages of using traceable fluorescent protein (enhanced green fluorescent protein; EGFP) and a secretory alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) have been used to generate a reporter gene: the secretory fluorescent protein (SEFP). Sf21 cells, infected with the recombinant baculovirus containing the SEFP gene, revealed both traceable fluorescence and easily detectable alkaline phosphatase activity in the culture medium. The distribution of SEFP within the cells revealed that it was excluded from the nucleus, implying that the accumulation of SEFP in a secretory pathway, similar to that of the secretion signal-tagged FPs. Furthermore, the time- and dose-dependent release from the blockage of brefeldin A (BFA) confirmed that the secretion of SEFP was mediated by the secretion pathway and excluded leakage from viral infection. This SEFP reporter gene with traceable fluorescence and alkaline phosphatase activity may become a useful tool for studies on secretory protein production.

  5. Speed Controls in Translating Secretory Proteins in Eukaryotes - an Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mahlab, Shelly; Linial, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Protein translation is the most expensive operation in dividing cells from bacteria to humans. Therefore, managing the speed and allocation of resources is subject to tight control. From bacteria to humans, clusters of relatively rare tRNA codons at the N′-terminal of mRNAs have been implicated in attenuating the process of ribosome allocation, and consequently the translation rate in a broad range of organisms. The current interpretation of “slow” tRNA codons does not distinguish between protein translations mediated by free- or endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes. We demonstrate that proteins translated by free- or ER-bound ribosomes exhibit different overall properties in terms of their translation efficiency and speed in yeast, fly, plant, worm, bovine and human. We note that only secreted or membranous proteins with a Signal peptide (SP) are specified by segments of “slow” tRNA at the N′-terminal, followed by abundant codons that are considered “fast.” Such profiles apply to 3100 proteins of the human proteome that are composed of secreted and signal peptide (SP)-assisted membranous proteins. Remarkably, the bulks of the proteins (12,000), or membranous proteins lacking SP (3400), do not have such a pattern. Alternation of “fast” and “slow” codons was found also in proteins that translocate to mitochondria through transit peptides (TP). The differential clusters of tRNA adapted codons is not restricted to the N′-terminal of transcripts. Specifically, Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are unified by clusters of low adapted tRNAs codons at the C′-termini. Furthermore, selection of amino acids types and specific codons was shown as the driving force which establishes the translation demands for the secretory proteome. We postulate that “hard-coded” signals within the secretory proteome assist the steps of protein maturation and folding. Specifically, “speed control” signals for delaying the translation

  6. Immunohistochemical expression of neuroendocrine secretory protein-55 (NESP-55) in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mamta; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Tischler, Arthur S; Dayal, Yogeshwar

    2011-09-01

    Neuroendocrine secretory protein-55 (NESP-55) is a recently described member of the chromogranin family and appears to be a marker of the constitutive secretory pathway in certain neural, neuroendocrine, and endocrine cell types. It has been shown to be selectively expressed in tumors differentiating towards the adrenal chromaffin and pancreatic islet cell phenotypes. The highest levels of NESP-55 expression, at least in animals, appear to be in the adrenal medulla and the pituitary gland. However, very little is known about the status of NESP-55 expression in pituitary adenomas. We therefore studied the immunohistochemical profile of NESP-55 expression in a series of 30 well-characterized pituitary adenomas (five each of FSH/LH and ACTH, four GH, three TSH, seven prolactin, and six null cells). All tumors were positive for one or more generic marker(s) (chromogranin A, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase) of neuroendocrine differentiation. All pituitary adenomas selected for study were stained for NESP-55 with appropriate positive and negative controls. NESP-55 immunoreactivity, seen as brown finely granular cytoplasmic staining of the tumor cells with prominent perinuclear accentuation, was graded as focal (<10% tumor cells staining), moderate (10-50% tumor cells staining), and diffuse (>50% tumor cell staining). Four of seven prolactinomas were positive for NESP-55 (one focal, two moderate, and one diffuse). Two of four GH adenomas were also positive (one focal and one diffuse) while only 1/5 FSH tumors showed a moderately intense immunoreactivity. All other pituitary adenomas were completely negative for NESP-55. Our results indicate that, in human pituitary adenomas, NESP-55 has a more restricted pattern of expression than that of chromogranins A and B. Since immunohistochemical expression of NESP-55 is largely confined to prolactinomas and GH adenomas, it raises the possibility that NESP-55 may somehow be involved in the secretory pathways of these

  7. Androgen-dependent synthesis of basic secretory proteins by the rat seminal vesicle.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, S J; Burchell, J M; Mainwaring, W I

    1976-01-01

    1. Two basic proteins were purified from secretions of rat seminal vesicles by using Sephadex G-200 chromatography and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. 2. It is not certain that these two proteins are distinct species and not subunits of a larger protein, but their properties are similar. Highly basic (pI = 9.7), they migrate to the cathode at high pH and their amino acid composition shows them to be rich in basic residues and serine. Threonine and hydrophobic residues are few. Both proteins are glycoproteins and have mol.wts. of 17000 and 18500. 3. Together these two proteins account for 25-30% of the protein synthesized by the vesicles, but they are absent from other tissues. 4. Changes in androgen status of the animal markedly affect these proteins. After castration, a progressive decrease in the basic proteins is observed and the synthesis of the two proteins as measured by [35S]methionine incorporation in vitro is is decreased. Testosterone administration in vivo rapidly restores their rates of synthesis. 5. These effects on specific protein synthesis are also observed for total cellular protein, and it is suggested that testosterone acts generally on the total protein-synthetic capacity of the cell and not specifically on individual proteins. Proliferative responses in the secretory epithelium may also be involved. 6. The extreme steroid specificity of the induction process suggests that the synthesis of these basic proteins is mediated by the androgen-receptor system. 7. The biological function of these proteins is not clear, but they do not appear to be involved in the formation of the copulatory plug. Images PLATE 1(a) PLATES 1(b), 1(c) AND 1(d) PLATE 2 PMID:985427

  8. Sorting of the neuroendocrine secretory protein Secretogranin II into the regulated secretory pathway: role of N- and C-terminal alpha-helical domains.

    PubMed

    Courel, Maïté; Vasquez, Michael S; Hook, Vivian Y; Mahata, Sushil K; Taupenot, Laurent

    2008-04-25

    Secretogranin II (SgII) belongs to the granin family of prohormones widely distributed in dense-core secretory granules (DCGs) of endocrine, neuroendocrine, and neuronal cells, including sympathoadrenal chromaffin cells. The mechanisms by which secretory proteins, and granins in particular, are sorted into the regulated secretory pathway are unsettled. We designed a strategy based on novel chimeric forms of human SgII fused to fluorescent (green fluorescent protein) or chemiluminescent (embryonic alkaline phosphatase) reporters to identify trafficking determinants mediating DCG targeting of SgII in sympathoadrenal cells. Three-dimensional deconvolution fluorescence microscopy and secretagogue-stimulated release studies demonstrate that SgII chimeras are correctly targeted to DCGs and released by exocytosis in PC12 and primary chromaffin cells. Results from a Golgi-retained mutant form of SgII suggest that sorting of SgII into DCGs depends on a saturable sorting machinery at the trans-Golgi/trans-Golgi network. Truncation analyses reveal the presence of DCG-targeting signals within both the N- and C-terminal regions of SgII, with the putative alpha-helix-containing SgII-(25-41) and SgII-(334-348) acting as sufficient, independent sorting domains. This study defines sequence features of SgII mediating vesicular targeting in sympathoadrenal cells and suggests a mechanism by which discrete domains of the molecule function in sorting, perhaps by virtue of a particular arrangement in tertiary structure and/or interaction with a specific component of the DCG membrane.

  9. Secretagogue-triggered transfer of membrane proteins from neuroendocrine secretory granules to synaptic-like microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Strasser, J E; Arribas, M; Blagoveshchenskaya, A D; Cutler, D F

    1999-08-01

    The membrane proteins of all regulated secretory organelles (RSOs) recycle after exocytosis. However, the recycling of those membrane proteins that are targeted to both dense core granules (DCGs) and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) has not been addressed. Since neuroendocrine cells contain both RSOs, and the recycling routes that lead to either organelle overlap, transfer between the two pools of membrane proteins could occur during recycling. We have previously demonstrated that a chimeric protein containing the cytosolic and transmembrane domains of P-selectin coupled to horseradish peroxidase is targeted to both the DCG and the SLMV in PC12 cells. Using this chimera, we have characterized secretagogue-induced traffic in PC12 cells. After stimulation, this chimeric protein traffics from DCGs to the cell surface, internalizes into transferrin receptor (TFnR)-positive endosomes and thence to a population of secretagogue-responsive SLMVs. We therefore find a secretagogue-dependent rise in levels of HRP within SLMVs. In addition, the levels within SLMVs of the endogenous membrane protein, synaptotagmin, as well as a green fluorescent protein-tagged version of vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin, also show a secretagogue-dependent increase.

  10. Secretagogue-triggered Transfer of Membrane Proteins from Neuroendocrine Secretory Granules to Synaptic-like Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Jane E.; Arribas, Monica; Blagoveshchenskaya, Anastasia D.; Cutler, Daniel F.

    1999-01-01

    The membrane proteins of all regulated secretory organelles (RSOs) recycle after exocytosis. However, the recycling of those membrane proteins that are targeted to both dense core granules (DCGs) and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) has not been addressed. Since neuroendocrine cells contain both RSOs, and the recycling routes that lead to either organelle overlap, transfer between the two pools of membrane proteins could occur during recycling. We have previously demonstrated that a chimeric protein containing the cytosolic and transmembrane domains of P-selectin coupled to horseradish peroxidase is targeted to both the DCG and the SLMV in PC12 cells. Using this chimera, we have characterized secretagogue-induced traffic in PC12 cells. After stimulation, this chimeric protein traffics from DCGs to the cell surface, internalizes into transferrin receptor (TFnR)-positive endosomes and thence to a population of secretagogue-responsive SLMVs. We therefore find a secretagogue-dependent rise in levels of HRP within SLMVs. In addition, the levels within SLMVs of the endogenous membrane protein, synaptotagmin, as well as a green fluorescent protein-tagged version of vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin, also show a secretagogue-dependent increase. PMID:10436017

  11. Immunoproteomic Analysis of the Excretory-Secretory Proteins from Spirometra mansoni Sparganum

    PubMed Central

    HU, Dan Dan; CUI, Jing; WANG, Li; LIU, Li Na; WEI, Tong; WANG, Zhong Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background Sparganosis is caused by the invasion of Spirometra sparganum into various tissues/organs. Subcutaneous sparganosis can be diagnosed by biopsy, while visceral/cerebral sparganosis is not easy to be diagnosed. The diagnosis depends largely on the detection of specific anti-sparganum antibodies. The specificity of the ELISA could be increased by using S. mansoni sparganum excretory–secretory (ES) antigens, but it also had the cross-reactions with sera of patients with cysticercosis or paragonimiasis. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens in S. mansoni sparganum ES proteins. Methods The sparganum ES proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blot probed with early sera from infected mice at 14 days post-infection. The immunoreactive protein spots were characterized by MALDI-TOF/ TOF-MS. Results A total of approximately 149 proteins spots were detected with isoelectric point (pI) varying from 3 to 7.5 and molecular weight from 20 to 115 kDa and seven protein spots with molecular weight of 23-31 kDa were recognized by the infection sera. Three of seven spots were successfully identified and characterized as the same S. mansoni protein (cysteine protease), and the proteins of other 4 spots were not included in the databases. Conclusion The cysteine protease from S. mansoni ES proteins recognized by early infection sera might be the early diagnostic antigens for sparganosis. PMID:24454434

  12. A Dynamic Study of Protein Secretion and Aggregation in the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Sannino, Sara; Mazza, Davide; Fagioli, Claudio; Vitale, Milena; Yoboue, Edgar Djaha; Anelli, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination of protein biogenesis, traffic and homeostasis within the early secretory compartment (ESC) is key for cell physiology. As a consequence, disturbances in these processes underlie many genetic and chronic diseases. Dynamic imaging methods are needed to follow the fate of cargo proteins and their interactions with resident enzymes and folding assistants. Here we applied the Halotag labelling system to study the behavior of proteins with different fates and roles in ESC: a chaperone, an ERAD substrate and an aggregation-prone molecule. Exploiting the Halo property of binding covalently ligands labelled with different fluorochromes, we developed and performed non-radioactive pulse and chase assays to follow sequential waves of proteins in ESC, discriminating between young and old molecules at the single cell level. In this way, we could monitor secretion and degradation of ER proteins in living cells. We can also follow the biogenesis, growth, accumulation and movements of protein aggregates in the ESC. Our data show that protein deposits within ESC grow by sequential apposition of molecules up to a given size, after which novel seeds are detected. The possibility of using ligands with distinct optical and physical properties offers a novel possibility to dynamically follow the fate of proteins in the ESC. PMID:25279560

  13. A dynamic study of protein secretion and aggregation in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Sannino, Sara; Mazza, Davide; Fagioli, Claudio; Vitale, Milena; Yoboue, Edgar Djaha; Sitia, Roberto; Anelli, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination of protein biogenesis, traffic and homeostasis within the early secretory compartment (ESC) is key for cell physiology. As a consequence, disturbances in these processes underlie many genetic and chronic diseases. Dynamic imaging methods are needed to follow the fate of cargo proteins and their interactions with resident enzymes and folding assistants. Here we applied the Halotag labelling system to study the behavior of proteins with different fates and roles in ESC: a chaperone, an ERAD substrate and an aggregation-prone molecule. Exploiting the Halo property of binding covalently ligands labelled with different fluorochromes, we developed and performed non-radioactive pulse and chase assays to follow sequential waves of proteins in ESC, discriminating between young and old molecules at the single cell level. In this way, we could monitor secretion and degradation of ER proteins in living cells. We can also follow the biogenesis, growth, accumulation and movements of protein aggregates in the ESC. Our data show that protein deposits within ESC grow by sequential apposition of molecules up to a given size, after which novel seeds are detected. The possibility of using ligands with distinct optical and physical properties offers a novel possibility to dynamically follow the fate of proteins in the ESC.

  14. Translational regulation of viral secretory proteins by the 5' coding regions and a viral RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nordholm, Johan; Petitou, Jeanne; Östbye, Henrik; da Silva, Diogo V; Dou, Dan; Wang, Hao; Daniels, Robert

    2017-08-07

    A primary function of 5' regions in many secretory protein mRNAs is to encode an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting sequence. In this study, we show how the regions coding for the ER-targeting sequences of the influenza glycoproteins NA and HA also function as translational regulatory elements that are controlled by the viral RNA-binding protein (RBP) NS1. The translational increase depends on the nucleotide composition and 5' positioning of the ER-targeting sequence coding regions and is facilitated by the RNA-binding domain of NS1, which can associate with ER membranes. Inserting the ER-targeting sequence coding region of NA into different 5' UTRs confirmed that NS1 can promote the translation of secretory protein mRNAs based on the nucleotides within this region rather than the resulting amino acids. By analyzing human protein mRNA sequences, we found evidence that this mechanism of using 5' coding regions and particular RBPs to achieve gene-specific regulation may extend to human-secreted proteins. © 2017 Nordholm et al.

  15. A novel secretory pathway for interleukin-1 beta, a protein lacking a signal sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Rubartelli, A; Cozzolino, F; Talio, M; Sitia, R

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is a major soluble mediator of inflammation. Two human IL-1 genes, alpha and beta, have been isolated, which encode polypeptides with only 20-30% amino acid sequence homology. Unlike most secreted proteins, the two cytokines do not have a signal sequence, an unexpected finding in view of their biological role. Here we show that IL-1 beta is actively secreted by activated human monocytes via a pathway of secretion different from the classical endoplasmic reticulum--Golgi route. Drugs which block the intracellular transport of IL-6, of tumour necrosis factor alpha and of other secretory proteins do not inhibit secretion of IL-1 beta. Secretion of IL-1 beta is blocked by methylamine, low temperature or serum free medium, and is increased by raising the culture temperature to 42 degrees C or by the presence of calcium ionophores, brefeldin A, monensin, dinitrophenol or carbonyl cyanide chlorophenylhydrazone. IL-1 beta is contained in part within intracellular vesicles which protect it from protease digestion. In U937 cells large amounts of IL-1 beta are made but none is secreted. In these cells IL-1 beta is not found in the vesicular fraction, and all the protein is accessible to protease digestion. This suggests that intracellular vesicles that contain IL-1 beta are part of the protein secretory pathway. We conclude that IL-1 beta is released by activated monocytes via a novel mechanism of secretion which may involve translocation of intracellular membranes and is increased by stress conditions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:2328723

  16. Persistent dominant follicle alters pattern of oviductal secretory proteins from cows at estrus.

    PubMed

    Binelli, M; Hampton, J; Buhi, W C; Thatcher, W W

    1999-07-01

    The experimental objective was to compare synthesis of oviductal secretory proteins of dairy cows bearing a persistent dominant follicle (PDF) versus a fresh dominant follicle (FDF) at estrus. On Day 7 after synchronized estrus (Day 0), cows received an intravaginal progesterone device and injection of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). On Day 9, cows received an injection of a GnRH agonist (FDF group; n = 3) or received no injection (PDF group, n = 3). On Day 16, all cows received PGF2alpha, and progesterone devices were removed. At slaughter on Day 18 or Day 19, oviducts ipsilateral and contralateral to the dominant follicle were divided into infundibulum, ampulla, and isthmus regions. Explants from oviductal regions were cultured in minimal essential medium supplemented with [3H]leucine for 24 h. Two-dimensional fluorographs of proteins in conditioned media were analyzed by densitometry. Rate of incorporation of [3H]leucine into macromolecules was greater in the infundibulum, ampulla, and isthmus of FDF cows (p < 0.01). Overall, intensities of radiolabeled secretory protein (P) 2 and P13 were greater for FDF than for PDF. In the ampulla, P14 was more intense for FDF while P7 was more intense for PDF. Abundance of P1 in the isthmus was greater for PDF cows. Across regions, P5, P6, P8, P9, and P11 were more intense for PDF than for FDF in the ipsilateral side. In the contralateral side, P19 was more intense for PDF than for FDF, whereas P6, P8, P9, and P11 were more intense for FDF. Differences in biosynthetic activity and in secreted oviductal proteins from cows bearing a PDF may contribute to the decrease in fertility associated with a PDF.

  17. Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory proteins (HcESPs) suppress functions of goat PBMCs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Yongqian, Bu; Ehsan, Muhammad; Zhang, Zhen Chao; Wang, Shuai; Yan, Ruo Feng; Song, Xiao Kai; Xu, Li Xin; Li, Xiang Rui

    2016-06-14

    Excretory and secretory products (ESPs) of nematode contain various proteins which are capable of inducing the instigation or depression of the host immune response and are involved in the pathogenesis of the worms. In the present study, Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) were collected from the adult worms. Binding of HcESPs to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confirmed by immune-fluorescence assay. Effects of the HcESPs on cytokine production, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide (NO) production of PBMCs were checked by co-incubation of HcESPs with goat PBMCs. The results indicated that the production of IL-4 and IFN-γ were significantly decreased by HcESPs in dose dependent manner. On the contrary, the production of IL-10 and IL-17 were increased. Cell migration was significantly enhanced by HcESPs, whereas, HcESPs treatment significantly suppressed the cell proliferation and NO production. These results indicated that the HcESPs played important suppressive regulatory roles on PBMCs and provided highlights to the understanding of the host-parasite interactions.

  18. Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory proteins (HcESPs) suppress functions of goat PBMCs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Yongqian, Bu; Ehsan, Muhammad; Zhang, Zhen Chao; Wang, Shuai; Yan, Ruo Feng; Song, Xiao Kai; Xu, Li Xin; Li, Xiang Rui

    2016-01-01

    Excretory and secretory products (ESPs) of nematode contain various proteins which are capable of inducing the instigation or depression of the host immune response and are involved in the pathogenesis of the worms. In the present study, Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) were collected from the adult worms. Binding of HcESPs to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confirmed by immune-fluorescence assay. Effects of the HcESPs on cytokine production, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide (NO) production of PBMCs were checked by co-incubation of HcESPs with goat PBMCs. The results indicated that the production of IL-4 and IFN-γ were significantly decreased by HcESPs in dose dependent manner. On the contrary, the production of IL-10 and IL-17 were increased. Cell migration was significantly enhanced by HcESPs, whereas, HcESPs treatment significantly suppressed the cell proliferation and NO production. These results indicated that the HcESPs played important suppressive regulatory roles on PBMCs and provided highlights to the understanding of the host-parasite interactions. PMID:27229536

  19. Proteomic analysis of Trichinella spiralis adult worm excretory-secretory proteins recognized by early infection sera.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruo Dan; Qi, Xin; Sun, Ge Ge; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Li Ang; Liu, Xiao Lin; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2016-11-15

    At the intestinal stage of a Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) infection, the excretory-secretory (ES) antigens produced by adult worms (AWs) result in an early exposure to the host's immune system and elicit the production of specific antibodies; the AW ES proteins might provide early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to identify early serodiagnostic markers from T. spiralis AW ES antigens. T. spiralis AWs were collected at 72h post infection, and their ES antigens were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Then, the immunoreactive bands were subjected to shotgun LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics analyses. Our results showed that only one protein band (33kDa) was recognized by the sera of mice infected with T. spiralis at 8 days after infection. The shotgun LC-MS/MS analysis identified 23 proteins that were then clustered into 10 types; these proteins had molecular weights of 28.13-71.62kDa and pI 5.05-9.20. Certain enzymes (e.g., serine protease, adult-specific deoxyribonuclease [DNase] II, peptidase S1A subfamily, and multi cystatin-like domain protein) were found to be highly represented. The functions of the 10 proteins were further analysed: of the 6 annotated proteins, 3 had serine hydrolase activity and 2 had DNase II activity. These results provide a valuable basis for identifying early diagnostic antigens and vaccine candidates for trichinellosis.

  20. Purification of Toxoplasma dense granule proteins reveals that they are in complexes throughout the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Braun, Laurence; Travier, Laetitia; Kieffer, Sylvie; Musset, Karine; Garin, Jérôme; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2008-01-01

    Dense granules are Apicomplexa specific secretory organelles. In Toxoplasma gondii, the dense granules proteins, named GRA proteins, are massively secreted into the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) shortly after invasion. Despite the presence of hydrophobic membrane segments, they are stored as both soluble and aggregated forms within the dense granules and are secreted as soluble forms into the vacuolar space where they further stably associate with PV membranes. In this study, we explored the unusual biochemical behavior of GRA proteins during their trafficking. Conventional chromatography indicated that the GRA proteins form high globular weight complexes within the parasite. To confirm these results, DeltaGRA knocked-out parasites were stably complemented with their respective HA-FLAG tagged GRA2 or GRA5. Purification of the tagged proteins by affinity chromatography showed that within the parasite and the PV soluble fraction, both the soluble GRA2-HA-FLAG and GRA5-HA-FLAG associate with several GRA proteins, the major ones being GRA3, GRA6 and GRA7. Following their insertion into the PV membranes, GRA2-HA-FLAG associated with GRA5 and GRA7 while GRA5-HA-FLAG associated with GRA7 only. Taken together, these data suggest that the GRA proteins form oligomeric complexes that may explain their solubility within the dense granules and the vacuolar matrix by sequestering their hydrophobic domains within the interior of the complex. Insertion into the PV membranes correlates with the decrease of the GRA partners number.

  1. Secretory pathway antagonism by calicivirus homologues of Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is restricted to noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Tyler M; Crawford, Sue E; Ajami, Nadim J; Neill, Frederick H; Atmar, Robert L; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Utama, Budi; Estes, Mary K

    2012-09-03

    Our previous report that the Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is an antagonist of the cellular secretory pathway suggests a new aspect of norovirus/host interaction. To explore conservation of function of this highly divergent calicivirus protein, we examined the effects of p22 homologues from four human and two murine noroviruses, and feline calicivirus on the secretory pathway. All human noroviruses examined induced Golgi disruption and inhibited protein secretion, with the genogroup II.4 Houston virus being the most potent antagonist. Genogroup II.6 viruses have a conserved mutation in the mimic of an Endoplasmic Reticulum export signal (MERES) motif that is highly conserved in human norovirus homologues of p22 and is critical for secretory pathway antagonism, and these viruses had reduced levels of Golgi disruption and inhibition of protein secretion. p22 homologues from both persistent and nonpersistent strains of murine norovirus induced Golgi disruption, but only mildly inhibited cellular protein secretion. Feline calicivirus p30 did not induce Golgi disruption or inhibit cellular protein secretion. These differences confirm a norovirus-specific effect on host cell secretory pathway antagonism by homologues of p22, which may affect viral replication and/or cellular pathogenesis.

  2. Secretory pathway antagonism by calicivirus homologues of Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is restricted to noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous report that the Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is an antagonist of the cellular secretory pathway suggests a new aspect of norovirus/host interaction. To explore conservation of function of this highly divergent calicivirus protein, we examined the effects of p22 homologues from four human and two murine noroviruses, and feline calicivirus on the secretory pathway. Findings All human noroviruses examined induced Golgi disruption and inhibited protein secretion, with the genogroup II.4 Houston virus being the most potent antagonist. Genogroup II.6 viruses have a conserved mutation in the mimic of an Endoplasmic Reticulum export signal (MERES) motif that is highly conserved in human norovirus homologues of p22 and is critical for secretory pathway antagonism, and these viruses had reduced levels of Golgi disruption and inhibition of protein secretion. p22 homologues from both persistent and nonpersistent strains of murine norovirus induced Golgi disruption, but only mildly inhibited cellular protein secretion. Feline calicivirus p30 did not induce Golgi disruption or inhibit cellular protein secretion. Conclusions These differences confirm a norovirus-specific effect on host cell secretory pathway antagonism by homologues of p22, which may affect viral replication and/or cellular pathogenesis. PMID:22943503

  3. The novel secretory protein CGREF1 inhibits the activation of AP-1 transcriptional activity and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwei; Wang, Lan; Xiong, Ying; Li, Jing; Wang, Ying; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2015-08-01

    The transcription factor AP-1 plays an important role in inflammation and cell survival. Using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system and a library of 940 candidate human secretory protein cDNA clones, we identified that CGREF1 can inhibit the transcriptional activity of AP-1. We demonstrated that CGREF1 is secreted via the classical secretory pathway through the ER-to-Golgi apparatus. Functional investigations revealed that overexpression of CGREF1 can significantly inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, and suppress the proliferation of HEK293T and HCT116 cells. Conversely, specific siRNAs against CGREF1 can increase the transcriptional activity of AP-1. These results clearly indicated that CGREF1 is a novel secretory protein, and plays an important role in regulation of AP-1 transcriptional activity and cell proliferation.

  4. Absence of E protein arrests transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus maturation in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ortego, Javier; Ceriani, Juan E.; Patino, Cristina; Plana, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2007-11-25

    A recombinant transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (rTGEV) in which E gene was deleted (rTGEV-{delta}E) has been engineered. This deletion mutant only grows in cells expressing E protein (E{sup +} cells) indicating that E was an essential gene for TGEV replication. Electron microscopy studies of rTGEV-{delta}E infected BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells showed that only immature intracellular virions were assembled. These virions were non-infectious and not secreted to the extracellular medium in BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells. RNA and protein composition analysis by RNase-gold and immunoelectron microscopy showed that rTGEV-{delta}E virions contained RNA and also all the structural TGEV proteins, except the deleted E protein. Nevertheless, full virion maturation was blocked. Studies of the rTGEV-{delta}E subcellular localization by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy in infected E{sup -} cells showed that in the absence of E protein virus trafficking was arrested in the intermediate compartment. Therefore, the absence of E protein in TGEV resulted in two actions, a blockade of virus trafficking in the membranes of the secretory pathway, and prevention of full virus maturation.

  5. Apocrine Secretion in Drosophila Salivary Glands: Subcellular Origin, Dynamics, and Identification of Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Farkaš, Robert; Ďatková, Zuzana; Mentelová, Lucia; Löw, Péter; Beňová-Liszeková, Denisa; Beňo, Milan; Sass, Miklós; Řehulka, Pavel; Řehulková, Helena; Raška, Otakar; Kováčik, Lubomír; Šmigová, Jana; Raška, Ivan; Mechler, Bernard M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the well defined mechanism of merocrine exocytosis, the mechanism of apocrine secretion, which was first described over 180 years ago, remains relatively uncharacterized. We identified apocrine secretory activity in the late prepupal salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster just prior to the execution of programmed cell death (PCD). The excellent genetic tools available in Drosophila provide an opportunity to dissect for the first time the molecular and mechanistic aspects of this process. A prerequisite for such an analysis is to have pivotal immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, biochemical and proteomic data that fully characterize the process. Here we present data showing that the Drosophila salivary glands release all kinds of cellular proteins by an apocrine mechanism including cytoskeletal, cytosolic, mitochondrial, nuclear and nucleolar components. Surprisingly, the apocrine release of these proteins displays a temporal pattern with the sequential release of some proteins (e.g. transcription factor BR-C, tumor suppressor p127, cytoskeletal β-tubulin, non-muscle myosin) earlier than others (e.g. filamentous actin, nuclear lamin, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase). Although the apocrine release of proteins takes place just prior to the execution of an apoptotic program, the nuclear DNA is never released. Western blotting indicates that the secreted proteins remain undegraded in the lumen. Following apocrine secretion, the salivary gland cells remain quite vital, as they retain highly active transcriptional and protein synthetic activity. PMID:24732043

  6. Determination of the electrophoretic pattern of somatic and excretory-secretory proteins of Ligula intestinalis parasite in spirlin (Alburnoides bipunctatus).

    PubMed

    Youssefi, M R; Hosseinifard, S M; Halimi, M; Kordafshari, S

    2012-12-01

    Ligula intestinalis parasite is a cestodes that causes remarkable damages to fish. It is also of prime importance in economic and hygienic aspects. SDS-PAGE and western blotting are the methods that can be used to determine the electerophoretic pattern of somatic and excretory-secretory proteins of parasites. In this study, after obtaining the plerocercoidal stage of this parasite from the spirlin (Alburnoides bipunctatus), its somatic proteins were prepared using ultrasonicae, and excretory-secretory proteins were prepared using the PBS solution. After protein assay, which included using the Bradford method and then SDS-PAGE on these two antigenic solutions, 5 protein bands of 26, 33, 38, 58, 70kDa in somatic antigens, and 7 bands of 25, 28, 33, 43, 49, 60, 70kDa in excretory-secretory antigens were observed. After western blotting on both antigens and adding the primary antibody (the sera of infected fish) and then the secondary antibody (Rabbit Anti-fish Polyclonal Antibody Conjugated from Abnova Corporation) no band was seen in excretory-secretory antigen. And only in the 55kDa band of somatic antigen, a positive response, in comparison of fish positive serum was observed.

  7. [Changes in biliary secretory immunoglobulins A in mice fed whey proteins].

    PubMed

    Costantino, A M; Balzola, F; Bounous, G

    1989-01-01

    A whey protein diet has been shown to enhance splenic immune response to sheep red blood cells (SBRC) in mice. This study was designed to investigate the influence of the type of dietary protein on the biliary secretory IgA. A/J mice were fed defined formula diets containing either 20% whey protein, or 20% casein. Another group was fed Purina mouse chow. After 3 weeks of dietary treatment the body weight of each mouse was recorded and the gall-bladder was removed and its whole content analyzed by ELISA to determine S-IgA secretion. Body weight curves were similar in all dietary groups; higher biliary levels of S-IgA appeared in the whey protein fed mice than in the casein (p less than 0.025) or purine (p less than 0.025) fed mice. Dietary protein type may have a direct influence on the immune response in the gastrointestinal tract, without affecting body weight.

  8. New Class of Cargo Protein in Tetrahymena thermophila Dense Core Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Alex; Bowman, Grant R.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.

    2002-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis of dense core secretory granules releases biologically active proteins in a stimulus-dependent fashion. The packaging of the cargo within newly forming granules involves a transition: soluble polypeptides condense to form water-insoluble aggregates that constitute the granule cores. Following exocytosis, the cores generally disassemble to diffuse in the cell environment. The ciliates Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia have been advanced as genetically manipulatable systems for studying exocytosis via dense core granules. However, all of the known granule proteins in these organisms condense to form the architectural units of lattices that are insoluble both before and after exocytosis. Using an approach designed to detect new granule proteins, we have now identified Igr1p (induced during granule regeneration). By structural criteria, it is unrelated to the previously characterized lattice-forming proteins. It is distinct in that it is capable of dissociating from the insoluble lattice following secretion and therefore represents the first diffusible protein identified in ciliate granules. PMID:12456006

  9. Improved Secretory Production of the Sweet-Tasting Protein, Brazzein, in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Cho-Rong; Kong, Ji-Na; Chung, Ju-Hee; Kim, Myung-Chul; Kong, Kwang-Hoon

    2016-08-17

    Brazzein is an intensely sweet protein with high stability over a wide range of pH values and temperatures, due to its four disulfide bridges. Recombinant brazzein production through secretory expression in Kluyveromyces lactis is reported, but is inefficient due to incorrect disulfide formation, which is crucial for achieving the final protein structure and stability. Protein disulfide bond formation requires protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and Ero1p. Here, we overexpressed KlPDI in K. lactis or treated the cells with dithiothreitol to overexpress KlERO1 and improve brazzein secretion. KlPDI and KlERO1 overexpression independently increased brazzein secretion in K. lactis by 1.7-2.2- and 1.3-1.6-fold, respectively. Simultaneous overexpression of KlPDI and KlERO1 accelerated des-pE1M-brazzein secretion by approximately 2.6-fold compared to the previous system. Moreover, intracellular misfolded/unfolded recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein was significantly decreased. In conclusion, increased KlPDI and KlERO1 expression favors brazzein secretion, suggesting that correct protein folding may be crucial to brazzein secretion in K. lactis.

  10. Structural insights into a secretory abundant heat-soluble protein from an anhydrobiotic tardigrade, Ramazzottius varieornatus.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Miura, Yoshimasa; Mizohata, Eiichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Upon stopping metabolic processes, some tardigrades can undergo anhydrobiosis. Secretory abundant heat-soluble (SAHS) proteins have been reported as candidates for anhydrobiosis-related proteins in tardigrades, which seem to protect extracellular components and/or secretory organelles. We determined structures of a SAHS protein from Ramazzottius varieornatus (RvSAHS1), which is one of the toughest tardigrades. RvSAHS1 shows a β-barrel structure similar to fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), in which hydrophilic residues form peculiar hydrogen bond networks, which would provide RvSAHS1 with better tolerance against dehydration. We identified two putative ligand-binding sites: one that superimposes on those of some FABPs and the other, unique to and conserved in SAHS proteins. These results indicate that SAHS proteins constitute a new FABP family. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Isolation, identification and characterization of secretory proteins of IVMFC embryos and blood circulation of estrus and early pregnant goat.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Dhruba; Majumdar, A C

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to isolate, identify and characterize the secretory proteins of IVM oocytes and IVMFC embryos to evaluate its immunogenecity. and identify of such proteins if any, in blood circulation of estrus and early pregnant goats. Oocytes were matured in TCM-199 with 1 microg/ml, estradiol-17beta; 0.5 microg/ml, FSH; 100 IU/ml, LH and 10% FCS on granulosa cell monolayer. After 18 hr of maturation, oocytes were further cultured in maturation medium containing 3 mg/ml polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) without serum and BSA for 12 hr and medium was collected. The IVF embryos of 4-8 cell stage were cultured in medium containing PVA without serum and BSA. Embryo culture medium was collected after 24 hr of culture and was pooled. The proteins were analyzed on SDS-PAGE (12.5%). Four secretory proteins of oocytes with approximately molecular weight of 45, 55, 65 and 95 kDa and three secretory proteins of embryos 45, 55 and 65 kDa were obtained on SDS-PAGE in silver staining. The protein profile of midluteal, estrus and early pregnant goat serum was similar and no variation was observed among the proteins on SDS-PAGE. Two secretory proteins of 55 and 65 kDa of both IVM oocytes and IVMFC embryos were observed on Western analysis. None of such proteins was observed in midluteal, estrus and early pregnant goat serum on western blotting. It can be concluded that IVM oocytes and IVMFC embryos secrete proteins in medium and two of them can develop antibody. The proteins secreted from embryos till morula stage was similar to that of oocytes. None of these oocyte/embryo released proteins were observed in blood circulation of estrus and early pregnant goats.

  12. Two secretory protein genes in Chironomus tentans have arisen by gene duplication and exhibit different developmental expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Galli, J; Wieslander, L

    1993-05-20

    The salivary gland cells in the dipteran Chironomus tentans produce approximately 15 different secretory proteins, with relative molecular masses ranging between 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(6). Together these proteins form two types of extra corporal tubes, a larval protective housing and feeding tube or a pupation tube. The developmental change in tube formation is accompanied by a switch in production from one combination of secretory proteins to another. Here we characterize two genes, the sp38-40.A and B genes, which encode secretory proteins with relative molecular masses of 38,000 to 40,000. The two genes are located 346 base-pairs apart in the same orientation and have presumably arisen by gene duplication as the result of an illegitimate recombination event. Both genes contain two regions with cysteine codons, surrounded by regions with short repeats coding for proline and charged amino acid residues. The two genes and alleles of the genes differ in their number of repeats. This structure resembles the structure of the Balbiani ring (BR) genes, which encode the four largest salivary gland secretory proteins. The sp38-40.A and B genes are therefore likely to belong to a BR multigene family containing all or most of the 15 salivary gland secretory protein genes. The expression of the sp38-40.A and B genes are different: the A gene is expressed throughout the larval fourth instar but considerably less in the prepupal stage, while the B gene shows the opposite expression pattern. The developmental regulation of the expression of the two genes has therefore diverged after the gene duplication event.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Danielsen, E Michael

    2009-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study in closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep into the crypts. This cell population was also positive for lysozyme and alpha-defensin 4, identifying Paneth cells as the main intestinal LBP-producing cells. By immunogold electron microscopy, intense labeling was observed in the secretory granules of these cells. We conclude that Paneth cells express LBP together with other proteins acting in the innate immune response of the gut, such as lysozyme, defensins and intelectin.

  14. Structural divergence of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yukiko; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Hyodo, Fumiko; Sugiyama, Yusuke; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Morita, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are expressed in spermatocytes and granules of neutrophils in mammals, and are associated with sperm maturation and host defense. Related proteins have recently been recovered in snake venoms, and some of the snake venom-derived CRISPs exhibit ion channel blocking activity. Here we isolated and identified two novel CRISPs (kaouthin-1 and kaouthin-2) from the venom of Naja kaouthia (Elapidae), and cloned the encoding cDNAs. Kaouthin-1 and kaouthin-2 were classified into two broad sister groups of Elapidae, the Asian species and the marine/Australian species, respectively. Sequence comparisons reveal that the high-frequency variable regions among snake venom CRISPs define a continuous line on the molecular surface of the N-terminal pathogenesis-related protein-1 (PR-1) domain and the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Snake venom proteins generally display efficient molecular diversity around functionally key regions, suggesting that the PR-1 domain of CRISPs is important for the recognition of target molecules.

  15. Purification and characterization of a cysteine-rich secretory protein from Philodryas patagoniensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María E; Mackessy, Stephen P; Teibler, Pamela; Tavares, Flávio L; Burckhardt, Paula L; Breno, María C; Acosta, Ofelia; Santoro, Marcelo L

    2009-07-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRiSPs) are widespread in reptile venoms, but most have functions that remain unknown. In the present study we describe the purification and characterization of a CRiSP (patagonin) from the venom of the rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and demonstrate its biological activity. Patagonin is a single-chain protein, exhibiting a molecular mass of 24,858.6 Da, whose NH(2)-terminal and MS/MS-derived sequences are nearly identical to other snake venom CRiSPs. The purified protein hydrolyzed neither azocasein nor fibrinogen, and it could induce no edema, hemorrhage or inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. In addition, patagonin did not inhibit contractions of rat aortic smooth muscle induced by high K(+). However, it caused muscular damage to murine gastrocnemius muscle, an action that has not been previously described for any snake venom CRiSPs. Thus, patagonin will be important for studies of the structure-function and evolutionary relationships of this family of proteins that are widely distributed among snake venoms.

  16. Single GDP-dissociation Inhibitor Protein regulates endocytic and secretory pathways in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Senthil kumar; Kumar, Kamal; Singh, Pawan Kishor; Rastogi, Ruchir; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    The role of GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) protein in regulation of Rab cycle in Leishmania is not known. Here, we have cloned and characterized the functions of GDI homologue in vivo in Leishmania. Our results have shown that LdGDI:WT along with GDP removes the Rab5 from purified endosomes and inhibits the homotypic fusion between early endosomes. Whereas, LdGDI:R239A, a dominant negative mutant of GDI, under the same condition neither removes the Rab5 from endosome nor inhibits fusion. To determine the role of Ld-GDI in vivo, transgenic parasites overexpressing GFP-LdGDI:WT or GFP-LdGDI:R239A, are co-expressed with RFP-LdRab5:WT, RFP-LdRab7:WT or RFP-LdRab1:WT. Our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdGDI:WT extracts the RFP-LdRab5, RFP-LdRab7 or RFP-LdRab1 from their discrete endomembrane predominantly into cytosol. No change in the distribution of indicated Rabs is detected with overexpression of GFP-LdGDI:R239A. To determine the functional significance, we have used hemoglobin as an endocytic marker and gp63 as a marker for secretory pathway. We have found that overexpression of GFP-LdGDI:WT enhances the lysosomal targeting of internalized hemoglobin and the secretion of gp63 in the parasites possibly by triggering Rab cycle. This is the first demonstration of a single GDI ubiquitously regulating both endocytic and secretory pathways in Leishmania. PMID:27841328

  17. Tailoring Escherichia coli for the l-Rhamnose PBAD Promoter-Based Production of Membrane and Secretory Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, Anna; Karyolaimos, Alexandros; Zhang, Zhe; Rujas, Edurne; Vikström, David; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-03-03

    Membrane and secretory protein production in Escherichia coli requires precisely controlled production rates to avoid the deleterious saturation of their biogenesis pathways. On the basis of this requirement, the E. coli l-rhamnose PBAD promoter (PrhaBAD) is often used for membrane and secretory protein production since PrhaBAD is thought to regulate protein production rates in an l-rhamnose concentration-dependent manner. By monitoring protein production in real-time in E. coli wild-type and an l-rhamnose catabolism deficient mutant, we demonstrate that the l-rhamnose concentration-dependent tunability of PrhaBAD-mediated protein production is actually due to l-rhamnose consumption rather than regulating production rates. Using this information, a RhaT-mediated l-rhamnose transport and l-rhamnose catabolism deficient double mutant was constructed. We show that this mutant enables the regulation of PrhaBAD-based protein production rates in an l-rhamnose concentration-dependent manner and that this is critical to optimize membrane and secretory protein production yields. The high precision of protein production rates provided by the PrhaBAD promoter in an l-rhamnose transport and catabolism deficient background could also benefit other applications in synthetic biology.

  18. Serodiagnosis of fasciolosis by fast protein liquid chromatography-fractionated excretory/secretory antigens.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarian, Kobra; Akhlaghi, Lame; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Razmjou, Elham; Manouchehri Naeini, Kourosh; Gholami, Samaneh; Najafi Samei, Masoomeh; Falak, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In several studies, different antigenic preparations and diverse immunological tests were applied for serodiagnosis of Fasciola hepatica infections. Most of these preparations showed cross-reactivity with proteins of other parasites. Application of purified antigens might reduce these cross-reactivities. Here, we used fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-fractionated extracts of F. hepatica excretory/secretory antigens (E/S Ags) for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis. To develop an improved diagnostic method, we fractionated F. hepatica E/S Ags by anion exchange chromatography on a Sepharose CL-6B column and then tested the serodiagnostic values of the fractions. We used sera from F. hepatica-infected human and sheep as positive controls. Sera from patients with hydatidosis and strongyloidiasis were used for cross-reactivity studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) of the second FPLC peak, containing 20, 25, and 70 kDa proteins, discriminated between F. hepatica-infected and uninfected human and sheep samples. Fractionation of F. hepatica E/S Ags by FPLC is a fast and reproducible way of obtaining antigens useful for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  19. Altered synthesis of some secretory proteins in pancreatic lobules isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, R.D.; Erlanson-Albertsson, C. )

    1990-03-01

    The in vitro incorporation of (35S)cysteine into lipase, colipase, amylase, procarboxypeptidase A and B, and the serine proteases and total proteins was studied in pancreatic lobules isolated from normal and diabetic rats with or without insulin treatment. The incorporation of (35S)cysteine into total proteins was 65% greater in pancreatic lobules from diabetic animals than from normal rats. The increased incorporation was partly reversed by insulin treatment (2 U/100 g/day for 5 days) of diabetic rats. The relative rates of biosynthesis for amylase and the procarboxypeptidases in diabetic pancreatic lobules were decreased by 75 and 25%, respectively, after 1 h of incubation, while those for lipase, colipase, and the serine proteases were increased by 90, 85, and 35%, respectively. The absolute rates of synthesis for these enzymes changed in the same direction as the relative rates in diabetic lobules, except that for the procarboxypeptidases, which did not change. The changed rates of biosynthesis for the pancreatic enzymes were reversed by insulin treatment of the diabetic rats. Kinetic studies showed that the incorporation of (35S)cysteine into amylase, lipase, and colipase was linear until up to 2 h of incubation in normal pancreatic lobules, while in the diabetic lobules the incorporation into lipase and colipase was accelerated, reaching a plateau level already after 1 h of incubation. It is concluded that the biosynthesis of pancreatic secretory proteins in diabetic rats is greatly changed both in terms of quantity and kinetics.

  20. Immune response to Candida albicans is preserved despite defect in O-mannosylation of secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, Cristina; Cenci, Elio; Skrzypek, Franck; Gabrielli, Elena; Mosci, Paolo; Ernst, Joachim F; Bistoni, Francesco; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2007-12-01

    The PMT gene family in Candida albicans encodes five isoforms of the protein mannosyltransferases that initiate O-mannosylation of secretory proteins. Mutations at the Pmt level have been associated with differences in pathogenicity, e.g. in contrast to pmt5/pmt5, pmt2/PMT2 mutants showed poor virulence. Our objective was to determine whether these differences were related to the capacity of pmt2/PMT2 and pmt5/pmt5 to (i) express differences in selected virulence factors, and (ii) stimulate the natural immune system. The results show that pmt mutants (i) form hyphae in serum, (ii) show defective production of proteases but not of phospholipases with respect to the parental strain, (iii) undergo mycelial transition in the kidneys of hematogenously infected animals, (iv) are phagocytosed and killed by macrophages similar to the parental strain, although neutrophils are unable to destroy pmt5/pmt5, (v) engage TLR4 and stimulate MyD88 leading to NF-kappaB activation, and (vi) stimulate cytokine production by macrophages. Collectively our findings suggest that the defect in protein O-mannosylation in C. albicans cause attenuation of the virulence although the antigenic factors that retain the capacity to stimulate an efficient immune response are preserved.

  1. Sterols regulate ER-export dynamics of secretory cargo protein ts-O45-G

    PubMed Central

    Runz, Heiko; Miura, Kota; Weiss, Matthias; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cholesterol are fundamental for a variety of cellular processes such as the regulation of lipid homeostasis or efficient protein degradation. We show that reduced levels of cellular sterols cause a delayed ER-to-Golgi transport of the secretory cargo membrane protein ts-O45-G and a relocation to the ER of an endogenous protein cycling between the ER and the Golgi complex. Transport inhibition is characterized by a delay in the accumulation of ts-O45-G in ER-exit sites (ERES) and correlates with a reduced mobility of ts-O45-G within ER membranes. A simple mathematical model describing the kinetics of ER-exit predicts that reduced cargo loading to ERES and not the reduced mobility of ts-O45-G accounts for the delayed ER-exit and arrival at the Golgi. Consistent with this, membrane turnover of the COPII component Sec23p is delayed in sterol-depleted cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate the importance of sterol levels in COPII mediated ER-export. PMID:16794576

  2. Analysis of mRNA With Microsomal Fractionation Using a SAGE-Based DNA Microarray System Facilitates Identification of the Genes Encoding Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda , Nobuaki; Nagai, Shigenori; Terashima, Yuya; Motomura, Kazushi; Haino, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Takizawa, Hajime; Matsushima, Kouji

    2003-01-01

    In the regulation of host defense responses such as inflammation and immunity, the secretory proteins, including membrane proteins, play central roles. Although many secretory proteins have been identified by using methods such as differential display, random screening, or the signal sequence trap method, each method suffers from poor reproducibility, low sensitivity, or time-consuming or laborious work. Therefore, the strategy for facilitating the selection of the genes encoding the secretory proteins is desired. In this paper, we describe a system for isolating the genes encoding secretory proteins by analyzing mRNAs with microsomal fractionation on serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)–based DNA microarray system. This system succeeded in discriminating the genes encoding secretory proteins from ones encoding nonsecretory proteins with 80% accuracy. We applied this system to human T lymphocytes. As a result, we were able to identify the genes that are not only encoding secretory proteins but also expressing selectively in a specific subset of T lymphocytes. The SAGE-based DNA microarray system is a promising system to identify the genes encoding specific secretory proteins. PMID:12805275

  3. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  4. Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Naegleria fowleri Induce Inflammatory Responses in BV-2 Microglial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyoung; Kang, Jung-Mi; Kim, Tae Im; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2017-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba that is found in diverse environmental habitats, can cause a type of fulminating hemorrhagic meningoencephalitis, primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), in humans. The pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, but it is likely to be primarily caused by disruption of the host's nervous system via a direct phagocytic mechanism by the amoeba. Naegleria fowleri trophozoites are known to secrete diverse proteins that may indirectly contribute to the pathogenic function of the amoeba, but this factor is not clearly understood. In this study, we analyzed the inflammatory responses in BV-2 microglial cells induced by excretory and secretory proteins of N. fowleri (NfESP). Treatment of BV-2 cells with NfESP induced the expression of various cytokines and chemokines, including the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α and TNF-α. NfESP-induced IL-1α and TNF-α expression in BV-2 cells were regulated by p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. NfESP-induced IL-1α and TNF-α production in BV-2 cells were effectively downregulated by inhibition of NF-kB and AP-1. These results collectively suggest that NfESP stimulates BV-2 cells to release IL-1α and TNF-α via NF-kB- and AP-1-dependent MAPK signaling pathways. The released cytokines may contribute to inflammatory responses in microglia and other cell types in the brain during N. fowleri infection.

  5. Human Eosinophil Leukocytes Express Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Secretory Granules and Vesicles: Ultrastructural Studies.

    PubMed

    Dias, Felipe F; Amaral, Kátia B; Carmo, Lívia A S; Shamri, Revital; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-06-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has fundamental roles in the oxidative folding of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells. The study of this molecule has been attracting considerable attention due to its association with other cell functions and human diseases. In leukocytes, such as neutrophils, PDI is involved with cell adhesion, signaling and inflammation. However, the expression of PDI in other leukocytes, such as eosinophils, important cells in inflammatory, allergic and immunomodulatory responses, remains to be defined. Here we used different approaches to investigate PDI expression within human eosinophils. Western blotting and flow cytometry demonstrated high PDI expression in both unstimulated and CCL11/eotaxin-1-stimulated eosinophils, with similar levels in both conditions. By using an immunogold electron microscopy technique that combines better epitope preservation and secondary Fab-fragments of antibodies linked to 1.4-nm gold particles for optimal access to microdomains, we identified different intracellular sites for PDI. In addition to predictable strong PDI labeling at the nuclear envelope, other unanticipated sites, such as secretory granules, lipid bodies and vesicles, including large transport vesicles (eosinophil sombrero vesicles), were also labeled. Thus, we provide the first identification of PDI in human eosinophils, suggesting that this molecule may have additional/specific functions in these leukocytes.

  6. Secretory Carrier Membrane Protein (SCAMP) deficiency influences behavior of adult flies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, JiaLin C.; Tham, Chook Teng; Keatings, Kathleen; Fan, Steven; Liou, Angela Yen-Chun; Numata, Yuka; Allan, Douglas; Numata, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Secretory Carrier Membrane Proteins (SCAMPs) are a group of tetraspanning integral membrane proteins evolutionarily conserved from insects to mammals and plants. Mammalian genomes contain five SCAMP genes SCAMP1-SCAMP5 that regulate membrane dynamics, most prominently membrane-depolarization and Ca2+-induced regulated secretion, a key mechanism for neuronal and neuroendocrine signaling. However, the biological role of SCAMPs has remained poorly understood primarily owing to the lack of appropriate model organisms and behavior assays. Here we generate Drosophila Scamp null mutants and show that they exhibit reduced lifespan and behavioral abnormalities including impaired climbing, deficiency in odor associated long-term memory, and a susceptibility to heat-induced seizures. Neuron-specific restoration of Drosophila Scamp rescues all Scamp null behavioral phenotypes, indicating that the phenotypes are due to loss of neuronal Scamp. Remarkably, neuronal expression of human SCAMP genes rescues selected behavioral phenotypes of the mutants, suggesting the conserved function of SCAMPs across species. The newly developed Drosophila mutants present the first evidence that genetic depletion of SCAMP at the organismal level leads to varied behavioral abnormalities, and the obtained results indicate the importance of membrane dynamics in neuronal functions in vivo. PMID:25478561

  7. Secretory Carrier Membrane Protein (SCAMP) deficiency influences behavior of adult flies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, JiaLin C; Tham, Chook Teng; Keatings, Kathleen; Fan, Steven; Liou, Angela Yen-Chun; Numata, Yuka; Allan, Douglas; Numata, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Secretory Carrier Membrane Proteins (SCAMPs) are a group of tetraspanning integral membrane proteins evolutionarily conserved from insects to mammals and plants. Mammalian genomes contain five SCAMP genes SCAMP1-SCAMP5 that regulate membrane dynamics, most prominently membrane-depolarization and Ca(2+)-induced regulated secretion, a key mechanism for neuronal and neuroendocrine signaling. However, the biological role of SCAMPs has remained poorly understood primarily owing to the lack of appropriate model organisms and behavior assays. Here we generate Drosophila Scamp null mutants and show that they exhibit reduced lifespan and behavioral abnormalities including impaired climbing, deficiency in odor associated long-term memory, and a susceptibility to heat-induced seizures. Neuron-specific restoration of Drosophila Scamp rescues all Scamp null behavioral phenotypes, indicating that the phenotypes are due to loss of neuronal Scamp. Remarkably, neuronal expression of human SCAMP genes rescues selected behavioral phenotypes of the mutants, suggesting the conserved function of SCAMPs across species. The newly developed Drosophila mutants present the first evidence that genetic depletion of SCAMP at the organismal level leads to varied behavioral abnormalities, and the obtained results indicate the importance of membrane dynamics in neuronal functions in vivo.

  8. Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor Binds to Neisseria gonorrhoeae Outer Membrane Opacity Protein and is Bactericidal

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Morris D.; Roberts, Melissa H.; Barauskas, Ona L.; Jarvis, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is an innate immune peptide present on the genitourinary tract mucosa which has antimicrobial activity. In this study, we investigated the interaction of SLPI with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Method of study ELISA and far-western blots were used to analyze binding of SLPI to gonococci. The binding site for SLPI was identified by tryptic digests and mass spectrometry. Antimicrobial activity of SLPI for gonococci was determined using bactericidal assays. SLPI protein levels in cell supernatants were measured by ELISA, and SLPI mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results SLPI bound directly to the gonococcal Opa protein and was bactericidal. Epithelial cells from the reproductive tract constitutively expressed SLPI at different levels. Gonococcal infection of cells did not affect SLPI expression. Conclusion We conclude that SLPI is bactericidal for gonococci and is expressed by reproductive tract epithelial cells and thus is likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of gonococcal infection. PMID:22537232

  9. A Dynamic Analysis of Secretory Granules Containing Proteins Involved In Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Louis; Simon, Alex; Jacobs, Conor; Fulwiler, Audrey; Hilken, Lindsay; Scalettar, Bethe; Lochner, Janis

    2010-10-01

    Formation and encoding of long-term memories requires a series of structural changes at synapses, or sites of neuronal communication, in the hippocampus; these changes are mediated by neuromodulatory proteins and serve to strengthen synapses to improve communication. Two prominent neuromodulators, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are copackaged into secretory granules (SGs) in the body of nerve cells and are transported to distal synapses by motor proteins. At synapses, particularly presynaptic sites, the fate of tPA and BDNF is largely unknown. Motivated by this, and by recent data implicating presynaptic BDNF in early phases of learning, we used fluorescence microscopy to elucidate dynamic properties of presynaptic tPA and BDNF. We find that presynaptic SGs containing tPA and/or BDNF undergo Brownian and anomalous diffusive motion that, in 75% of cases, is so slow that it typically would be classified as immobility. These results suggest that tPA and BDNF are retained at presynaptic sites to facilitate their corelease and role in learning.

  10. The effect of total starvation and very low energy diet in lean men on kinetics of whole body protein and five hepatic secretory proteins.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is unclear whether the rate of weight loss, independent of magnitude, affects whole body protein metabolism and the synthesis and plasma concentrations of specific hepatic secretory proteins. We examined 1) whether lean men losing weight rapidly (starvation) show greater changes in whole body pro...

  11. Cysteine string protein (CSP) is an insulin secretory granule-associated protein regulating beta-cell exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Larsson, O; Bränström, R; Yang, S N; Leibiger, B; Leibiger, I; Fried, G; Moede, T; Deeney, J T; Brown, G R; Jacobsson, G; Rhodes, C J; Braun, J E; Scheller, R H; Corkey, B E; Berggren, P O; Meister, B

    1998-01-01

    Cysteine string proteins (CSPs) are novel synaptic vesicle-associated protein components characterized by an N-terminal J-domain and a central palmitoylated string of cysteine residues. The cellular localization and functional role of CSP was studied in pancreatic endocrine cells. In situ hybridization and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated CSP mRNA expression in insulin-producing cells. CSP1 mRNA was present in pancreatic islets; both CSP1 and CSP2 mRNAs were seen in insulin-secreting cell lines. Punctate CSP-like immunoreactivity (CSP-LI) was demonstrated in most islets of Langerhans cells, acinar cells and nerve fibers of the rat pancreas. Ultrastructural analysis showed CSP-LI in close association with membranes of secretory granules of cells in the endo- and exocrine pancreas. Subcellular fractionation of insulinoma cells showed CSP1 (34/36 kDa) in granular fractions; the membrane and cytosol fractions contained predominantly CSP2 (27 kDa). The fractions also contained proteins of 72 and 70 kDa, presumably CSP dimers. CSP1 overexpression in INS-1 cells or intracellular administration of CSP antibodies into mouse ob/ob beta-cells did not affect voltage-dependent Ca2+-channel activity. Amperometric measurements showed a significant decrease in insulin exocytosis in individual INS-1 cells after CSP1 overexpression. We conclude that CSP is associated with insulin secretory granules and that CSP participates in the molecular regulation of insulin exocytosis by mechanisms not involving changes in the activity of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. PMID:9724640

  12. Protease nexin-1 promotes secretory granule biogenesis by preventing granule protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoon; Loh, Y Peng

    2006-02-01

    Dense-core secretory granule (DCG) biogenesis is a prerequisite step for the sorting, processing, and secretion of neuropeptides and hormones in (neuro)endocrine cells. Previously, chromogranin A (CgA) has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of DCG biogenesis in vitro and in vivo. However, the underlying mechanism of CgA-mediated DCG biogenesis has not been explored. In this study, we have uncovered a novel mechanism for the regulation of CgA-mediated DCG biogenesis. Transfection of CgA into endocrine 6T3 cells lacking CgA and DCGs not only recovered DCG formation and regulated secretion but also prevented granule protein degradation. Genetic profiling of CgA-expressing 6T3 versus CgA- and DCG-deficient 6T3 cells, followed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analyses, revealed that a serine protease inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), was significantly up-regulated in CgA-expressing 6T3 cells. Overexpression of PN-1 in CgA-deficient 6T3 cells prevented degradation of DCG proteins at the Golgi apparatus, enhanced DCG biogenesis, and recovered regulated secretion. Moreover, depletion of PN-1 by antisense RNAs in CgA-expressing 6T3 cells resulted in the specific degradation of DCG proteins. We conclude that CgA increases DCG biogenesis in endocrine cells by up-regulating PN-1 expression to stabilize granule proteins against degradation.

  13. Protease Nexin-1 Promotes Secretory Granule Biogenesis by Preventing Granule Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeyoon; Loh, Y. Peng

    2006-01-01

    Dense-core secretory granule (DCG) biogenesis is a prerequisite step for the sorting, processing, and secretion of neuropeptides and hormones in (neuro)endocrine cells. Previously, chromogranin A (CgA) has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of DCG biogenesis in vitro and in vivo. However, the underlying mechanism of CgA-mediated DCG biogenesis has not been explored. In this study, we have uncovered a novel mechanism for the regulation of CgA-mediated DCG biogenesis. Transfection of CgA into endocrine 6T3 cells lacking CgA and DCGs not only recovered DCG formation and regulated secretion but also prevented granule protein degradation. Genetic profiling of CgA-expressing 6T3 versus CgA- and DCG-deficient 6T3 cells, followed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analyses, revealed that a serine protease inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), was significantly up-regulated in CgA-expressing 6T3 cells. Overexpression of PN-1 in CgA-deficient 6T3 cells prevented degradation of DCG proteins at the Golgi apparatus, enhanced DCG biogenesis, and recovered regulated secretion. Moreover, depletion of PN-1 by antisense RNAs in CgA-expressing 6T3 cells resulted in the specific degradation of DCG proteins. We conclude that CgA increases DCG biogenesis in endocrine cells by up-regulating PN-1 expression to stabilize granule proteins against degradation. PMID:16319172

  14. Secretory pathway-dependent localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho GTPase-activating protein Rgd1p at growth sites.

    PubMed

    Lefèbvre, Fabien; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Hugues, Michel; Crouzet, Marc; Vieillemard, Aurélie; McCusker, Derek; Thoraval, Didier; Doignon, François

    2012-05-01

    Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in eukaryotes depends upon the regulation of Rho GTPases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) Rgd1p stimulates the GTPase activities of Rho3p and Rho4p, which are involved in bud growth and cytokinesis, respectively. Consistent with the distribution of Rho3p and Rho4p, Rgd1p is found mostly in areas of polarized growth during cell cycle progression. Rgd1p was mislocalized in mutants specifically altered for Golgi apparatus-based phosphatidylinositol 4-P [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis and for PtdIns(4,5)P(2) production at the plasma membrane. Analysis of Rgd1p distribution in different membrane-trafficking mutants suggested that Rgd1p was delivered to growth sites via the secretory pathway. Rgd1p may associate with post-Golgi vesicles by binding to PtdIns(4)P and then be transported by secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. In agreement, we show that Rgd1p coimmunoprecipitated and localized with markers specific to secretory vesicles and cofractionated with a plasma membrane marker. Moreover, in vivo imaging revealed that Rgd1p was transported in an anterograde manner from the mother cell to the daughter cell in a vectoral manner. Our data indicate that secretory vesicles are involved in the delivery of RhoGAP Rgd1p to the bud tip and bud neck.

  15. Bone morphogenetic protein- and mating-dependent secretory cell growth and migration in the Drosophila accessory gland

    PubMed Central

    Leiblich, Aaron; Marsden, Luke; Gandy, Carina; Corrigan, Laura; Jenkins, Rachel; Hamdy, Freddie; Wilson, Clive

    2012-01-01

    The paired male accessory glands of Drosophila melanogaster enhance sperm function, stimulate egg production, and reduce female receptivity to other males by releasing a complex mixture of glycoproteins from a secretory epithelium into seminal fluid. A small subpopulation of about 40 specialized secretory cells, called secondary cells, resides at the distal tip of each gland. We show that these cells grow via mechanisms promoted by mating. If aging males mate repeatedly, a subset of these cells delaminates from and migrates along the apical surface of the glandular epithelium toward the proximal end of the gland. Remarkably, these secretory cells can transfer to females with sperm during mating. The frequency of this event increases with age, so that more than 50% of triple-mated, 18-d-old males transfer secondary cells to females. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling specifically in secondary cells is needed to drive all of these processes and is required for the accessory gland to produce its normal effects on female postmating behavior in multiply mated males. We conclude that secondary cells are secretory cells with unusual migratory properties that can allow them to be transferred to females, and that these properties are a consequence of signaling that is required for secondary cells to maintain their normal reproductive functions as males age and mate. PMID:23129615

  16. Bone morphogenetic protein- and mating-dependent secretory cell growth and migration in the Drosophila accessory gland.

    PubMed

    Leiblich, Aaron; Marsden, Luke; Gandy, Carina; Corrigan, Laura; Jenkins, Rachel; Hamdy, Freddie; Wilson, Clive

    2012-11-20

    The paired male accessory glands of Drosophila melanogaster enhance sperm function, stimulate egg production, and reduce female receptivity to other males by releasing a complex mixture of glycoproteins from a secretory epithelium into seminal fluid. A small subpopulation of about 40 specialized secretory cells, called secondary cells, resides at the distal tip of each gland. We show that these cells grow via mechanisms promoted by mating. If aging males mate repeatedly, a subset of these cells delaminates from and migrates along the apical surface of the glandular epithelium toward the proximal end of the gland. Remarkably, these secretory cells can transfer to females with sperm during mating. The frequency of this event increases with age, so that more than 50% of triple-mated, 18-d-old males transfer secondary cells to females. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling specifically in secondary cells is needed to drive all of these processes and is required for the accessory gland to produce its normal effects on female postmating behavior in multiply mated males. We conclude that secondary cells are secretory cells with unusual migratory properties that can allow them to be transferred to females, and that these properties are a consequence of signaling that is required for secondary cells to maintain their normal reproductive functions as males age and mate.

  17. Secretory Pathway-Dependent Localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Rgd1p at Growth Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, Fabien; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Hugues, Michel; Crouzet, Marc; Vieillemard, Aurélie; McCusker, Derek; Thoraval, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in eukaryotes depends upon the regulation of Rho GTPases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) Rgd1p stimulates the GTPase activities of Rho3p and Rho4p, which are involved in bud growth and cytokinesis, respectively. Consistent with the distribution of Rho3p and Rho4p, Rgd1p is found mostly in areas of polarized growth during cell cycle progression. Rgd1p was mislocalized in mutants specifically altered for Golgi apparatus-based phosphatidylinositol 4-P [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis and for PtdIns(4,5)P2 production at the plasma membrane. Analysis of Rgd1p distribution in different membrane-trafficking mutants suggested that Rgd1p was delivered to growth sites via the secretory pathway. Rgd1p may associate with post-Golgi vesicles by binding to PtdIns(4)P and then be transported by secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. In agreement, we show that Rgd1p coimmunoprecipitated and localized with markers specific to secretory vesicles and cofractionated with a plasma membrane marker. Moreover, in vivo imaging revealed that Rgd1p was transported in an anterograde manner from the mother cell to the daughter cell in a vectoral manner. Our data indicate that secretory vesicles are involved in the delivery of RhoGAP Rgd1p to the bud tip and bud neck. PMID:22447923

  18. A Coronavirus E Protein Is Present in Two Distinct Pools with Different Effects on Assembly and the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Westerbeck, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble by budding into the lumen of the early Golgi complex prior to exocytosis. The small CoV envelope (E) protein plays roles in assembly, virion release, and pathogenesis. CoV E has a single hydrophobic domain (HD), is targeted to Golgi complex membranes, and has cation channel activity in vitro. However, the precise functions of the CoV E protein during infection are still enigmatic. Structural data for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV E protein suggest that it assembles into a homopentamer. Specific residues in the HD regulate the ion-conducting pore formed by SARS-CoV E in artificial bilayers and the pathogenicity of the virus during infection. The E protein from the avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) has dramatic effects on the secretory system which require residues in the HD. Here, we use the known structural data from SARS-CoV E to infer the residues important for ion channel activity and the oligomerization of IBV E. We present biochemical data for the formation of two distinct oligomeric pools of IBV E in transfected and infected cells and the residues required for their formation. A high-order oligomer of IBV E is required for the production of virus-like particles (VLPs), implicating this form of the protein in virion assembly. Additionally, disruption of the secretory pathway by IBV E correlates with a form that is likely monomeric, suggesting that the effects on the secretory pathway are independent of E ion channel activity. IMPORTANCE CoVs are important human pathogens with significant zoonotic potential, as demonstrated by the emergence of SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV. Progress has been made toward identifying potential vaccine candidates in mouse models of CoV infection, including the use of attenuated viruses that lack the CoV E protein or express E-protein mutants. However, no approved vaccines or antiviral therapeutics exist. We previously reported that the

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and tumor necrosis factor-alpha attenuate Clara cell secretory protein promoter function.

    PubMed

    Harrod, Kevin S; Jaramillo, Richard J

    2002-02-01

    The Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP, also CC-10/uterglobin) is a 16-kD homodimeric protein abundantly expressed in the airways of mammals. Although the molecular function is unknown, gene-targeting studies indicate CCSP as a regulator of lung inflammation following acute respiratory infection or injury. CCSP is decreased in the lungs of mice following acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) infection. In the present study, the role of decreased promoter function in the regulation of CCSP by P.a. was assessed using an in vitro co-culture system and in vivo studies of transgenic mice. CCSP promoter activity in lung epithelial cells was markedly decreased by P.a. or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in a dose-dependent manner. Regulation of CCSP promoter function by either P.a. or TNF-alpha was localized to the proximal 166 bp flanking region of the CCSP promoter activity. Decreased regulation of the CCSP promoter by P.a. or TNF-alpha was specific to CCSP, as human surfactant protein D (SP-D) promoter activity was unaffected or increased by P.a. or TNF-alpha, respectively. A neutralizing antibody against human TNF-alpha was able to reverse both the TNF-alpha- mediated as well as P.a.-mediated decrease in CCSP promoter function in lung epithelial cells. TNF-alpha secretion by lung epithelial cells coincided with the decrease in CCSP promoter function following P.a. administration. Using a transgenic mouse model, P.a. administration to the lung markedly attenuated CCSP promoter-conferred gene expression in vivo. The attenuation of CCSP promoter activity in lung epithelial cells by P.a. involves, in part, autocrine/paracrine secretion of TNF-alpha, which in turn regulates CCSP transcription through cis-active elements in the proximal promoter region.

  20. Purification and assay of secretory lithostathine in human pancreatic juice by fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, A; Mezzi, G; Malesci, A

    1995-01-01

    Impaired secretion of lithostathine, a pancreatic glycoprotein capable of inhibiting the growth of CaCO3 crystals, has been reported in chronic calcifying pancreatitis. Controversial results were obtained, however, using immunoassays with different antibodies. The aim of this study was to purify and to measure juice lithostathine by a non-immunological method. Fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a cation exchange column eluted by a sodium chloride gradient, was used. The conditions appropriate to separate secretory (S) from hydrolysed (H) isoforms of immunopurified lithostathine were also used for juice analysis. Pancreatic juice was collected by endoscopic cannulation of the major pancreatic duct, after secretin stimulation, from eight patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and from eight controls. In all samples, S-isoforms of lithostathine (ranging from 16 to 19 Mr at SDS-PAGE) were the only constituent of two of the 15 peaks in which FPLC resolved the pancreatic proteins. The nature of these two peaks was confirmed by their coelution with immunopurified S-lithostathine and by immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-lithostathine antibodies. The ratio between the area of S-lithostathine peaks and the total area of proteic eluates, was always lower in CP patients (5.3 micrograms/mg of protein, median value; 0.2-15.4, range) than in controls (35.2 micrograms/mg; 16.6-55.9). It is concluded that lithostathine can be purified and measured in pancreatic juice by FPLC. Our results with a nonimmunological assay confirm a reduced secretion of lithostathine in patients with CP. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7737574

  1. Highly Sensitive Quenched Fluorescent Substrate of Legionella Major Secretory Protein (Msp) Based on Its Structural Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Poras, Hervé; Duquesnoy, Sophie; Dange, Emilie; Pinon, Anthony; Vialette, Michèle; Fournié-Zaluski, Marie-Claude; Ouimet, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been shown to secrete a protease termed major secretory protein (Msp). This protease belongs to the M4 family of metalloproteases and shares 62.9% sequence similarity with pseudolysin (EC 3.4.24.26). With the aim of developing a specific enzymatic assay for the detection and quantification of Msp, the Fluofast substrate library was screened using both enzymes in parallel. Moreover, based on the crystal structure of pseudolysin, a model of the Msp structure was built. Screening of the peptide library identified a lead substrate specifically cleaved by Msp that was subsequently optimized by rational design. The proposed model for Msp is consistent with the enzymatic characteristics of the studied peptide substrates and provides new structural information useful for the characterization of the protease. This study leads to the identification of the first selective and high affinity substrate for Msp that is able to detect picomolar concentrations of the purified enzyme. The identified substrate could be useful for the development of a novel method for the rapid detection of Legionella. PMID:22528499

  2. Clara cell secretory protein. Levels in BAL fluid after smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, O; Cassel, T N; Sköld, C M; Eklund, A; Lund, J; Nord, M

    2000-07-01

    The bronchiolar Clara cell is a major target for tobacco smoke exposure. To improve our understanding of the putative regenerative/repair mechanism(s) in the bronchiolar epithelium, we measured the levels of the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) in BAL fluid in healthy volunteers following smoking cessation. BAL was performed before smoking cessation, and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 15 months following smoking cessation, in eight healthy volunteers with a previous mean cigarette consumption of 19 pack-years. The levels of CCSP in BAL fluid were assessed in immunoblotting experiments using an antibody against human CCSP. Significantly (p < 0.05) higher levels of CCSP in BAL fluid were observed at 3, 6, and 9 months after smoking cessation, while the levels of CCSP in BAL fluid at 15 months after smoking cessation were the same as those before smoking cessation. Despite the long history of smoking among patients in the present study group, signs of early regeneration in the bronchiolar epithelium were noted, in that the levels of CCSP in BAL fluid were elevated at the indicated time points following smoking cessation. Furthermore, we propose that the insult to the bronchiolar epithelium made by cigarette smoking caused the levels of CCSP in the BAL fluid at 15 months after smoking cessation to return to the levels noted before smoking cessation. The present study suggests a role for CCSP as a marker for nonciliated bronchiolar cell function.

  3. Proteomics of regulated secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Yannick; Schvartz, Domitille; Couté, Yohann; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2009-01-01

    Regulated secretory organelles are important subcellular structures of living cells that allow the release in the extracellular space of crucial compounds, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. Therefore, the regulation of biogenesis, trafficking, and exocytosis of regulated secretory organelles has been intensively studied during the last 30 years. However, due to the large number of different regulated secretory organelles, only a few of them have been specifically characterized. New insights into regulated secretory organelles open crucial perspectives for a better comprehension of the mechanisms that govern cell secretion. The combination of subcellular fractionation, protein separation, and mass spectrometry is also possible to study regulated secretory organelles at the proteome level. In this review, we present different strategies used to isolate regulated secretory organelles, separate their protein content, and identify the proteins by mass spectrometry. The biological significance of regulated secretory organelles-proteomic analysis is discussed as well. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Secretory proteins characteristic of environmental changes in cellular signal transduction: Expression in oral fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Burke, J. C.; Sivakumar, T. P.; Hand, A. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Past studies have shown that both hypo- and hyper-gravity have significant consequences on a variety of tissues and organ systems. It is not known if the effects of environmental stimuli such as altered gravity are beneficial or detrimental, and if the effects can be prevented or reversed. Animal experiments from the Space Lab and Cosmos missions indicate that events that are mediated by cyclic AMP, such as cellular responses to catecholamine and peptide hormone action, are significantly altered in a number of tissues as a consequence of space flight. A secretory cyclic AMP-receptor protein (cARP), is present in saliva, and can serve as an indicator of individual responses to physiologic and environmental stress. Animal experiments have shown that the hypergravity component of space flight is a significant stress factor. In humans, cARP levels in each individual are constant under normal conditions, but elevated after acute stress. Additionally, the levels of cARP in secreted saliva can be compared to those in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), which reflects the protein composition of serum. The ratio of cARP in saliva to that in GCF can be used as a measure of basal compared to hyper-or hypo-gravity values. An ultimate goal is to test hyper and zero G responses in human saliva to determine if cARP is a suitable index of acute and chronic stress. A miniaturized test kit for saliva collection has been designed. Samples can be collected and stored till analyses are carried out that will distinguish the effects of increased gravity from those of one and zero G. Such tests can serve as an individualized monitoring system for physiologic responses either in space or on earth. .

  5. Altered pulmonary response to hyperoxia in Clara cell secretory protein deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C J; Mango, G W; Finkelstein, J N; Stripp, B R

    1997-08-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) is an abundant component of the extracellular lining fluid of airways. Even though the in vivo function of CCSP is unknown, in vitro studies support a potential role of CCSP in the control of inflammatory responses. CCSP-deficient mice (CCSP -/-) were generated to investigate the in vivo function of this protein (13). In this study, we used hyperoxia exposure as a model to investigate phenotypic consequences of CCSP deficiency following acute lung injury. The pathologic response of the mouse lung to hyperoxia, and recovery of the lung, include inflammatory cell infiltrate and edema. Continuous exposure to > 95% O2 was associated with significantly reduced survival time among CCSP -/- mice as compared with strain-, age-, and sex-matched wild-type control mice. Differences in survival were associated with early onset of lung edema in CCSP -/- mice as compared with wild-type controls. To further investigate these differences in response, mice were exposed to > 95% O2 for either 48 h or 68 h with one group receiving 68 h of hyperoxia followed by room-air recovery. Lung RNA was characterized for changes in the abundance of cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) using a ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay. After 68 h of hyperoxia, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1beta, and IL-3 mRNAs were 14-, 3-, and 2.5-fold higher, respectively, in CCSP -/- mice than in similarly exposed wild-type control mice. Increased expression of IL-1beta mRNA in hyperoxia-exposed CCSP -/- mice was localized principally within the lung parenchyma, suggesting that the effects of CCSP deficiency were not confined to the airway epithelium. We conclude that CCSP deficiency results in increased sensitivity to hyperoxia-induced lung injury as measured by increased mortality, early onset of lung edema, and induction of proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs.

  6. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding protein enters the regulated secretory pathway in neuroendocrine cells and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elías H; Zúñiga, Juan Pablo; Andrés, María Estela; Alvarez, Alejandra R; Gysling, Katia

    2011-08-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor binding protein (CRF-BP) is a 37kDa glycoprotein that binds CRF with high affinity. CRF-BP controls CRF levels within plasma during human pregnancy. It has also been shown that CRF-BP is expressed in various brain nuclei. Main actions that have been proposed for brain CRF-BP are either decreasing available CRF or facilitating CRF ligand-induced activation of CRF-R2 receptors. For both actions, it is necessary the release of CRF-BP from CRF-BP expressing neurons. However, the secretion mode of CRF-BP is currently unknown. We used heterologous expression of CRF-BP-Flag in PC12 cells and in primary culture of rat cortical neurons to study CRF-BP secretion mode. We observed that CRF-BP-Flag immunoreactivity presents the typical cytoplasmatic punctuate pattern that has been described for neuropeptides and proteins that enter the regulated secretory pathway in PC12 cells. Quantitative analysis of double immunofluorescence confocal images showed that CRF-BP-Flag colocalizes with secretogranin II, marker of secretory granules, both in PC12 and in primary-cultured rat neurons. Furthermore, CRF-BP-Flag is released from PC12 cells upon high K(+)-depolarization. Thus, our results show that CRF-BP is efficiently sorted to the regulated secretory pathway in two cellular contexts, suggesting that the extracellular levels of CRF-BP in the central nervous system depends on neuronal activity.

  7. Male accessory gland secretory protein polymorphism in natural populations of Drosophila nasuta nasuta and Drosophila sulfurigaster neonasuta.

    PubMed

    Ravi Ram, K; Ramesh, S R

    2007-12-01

    Male accessory gland secretory protein polymorphism was analysed in natural populations of Drosophila nasuta nasuta and D. sulfurigaster neonasuta for the first time, using SDS-PAGE to score polymorphism of these proteins in 2788 individuals of D. n. nasuta and 2232 individuals of D. s. neonasuta from 12 different populations from southern India. A total of 25 and 18 variant protein phenotypes were identified in D. n. nasuta and D. s. neonasuta, respectively. Protein fractions of group III were more polymorphic than those from groups I and II. The results show that accessory gland secretory proteins show high levels of polymorphism, irrespective of species or habitat. Moreover, we have used the variation in the accessory gland proteins to assess the extent of divergence between the species and to infer their population structure. The study suggests that though both D. n. nasuta and D. s. neonasuta belong to the same subgroup, they differ in population structure, as far as accessory gland protein polymorphism is concerned.

  8. Secretory proteins are delivered to the septin-organized penetration interface during root infection by Verticillium dahliae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Yun-Long

    2017-01-01

    Successful infection of the host requires secretion of effector proteins to evade or suppress plant immunity. Secretion of effectors in root-infecting fungal pathogens, however, remains unexplored. We previously reported that Verticillium dahliae, a root-infecting phytopathogenic fungus, develops a penetration peg from a hyphopodium to infect cotton roots. In this study, we report that a septin ring, requiring VdSep5, partitions the hyphopodium and the invasive hypha and form the specialized fungus-host interface. The mutant strain, VdΔnoxb, in which NADPH oxidase B (VdNoxB) is deleted, impaired formation of the septin ring at the hyphal neck, indicating that NADPH oxidases regulate septin ring organization. Using GFP tagging and live cell imaging, we observed that several signal peptide containing secreted proteins showed ring signal accumulation/secretion at the penetration interface surrounding the hyphal neck. Targeted mutation for VdSep5 reduced the delivery rate of secretory proteins to the penetration interface. Blocking the secretory pathway by disrupting the vesicular trafficking factors, VdSec22 and VdSyn8, or the exocyst subunit, VdExo70, also arrested delivery of the secreted proteins inside the hyphopodium. Reduced virulence was observed when cotton roots were infected with VdΔsep5, VdΔsec22, VdΔsyn8 and VdΔexo70 mutants compared to infection with the isogenic wild-type V592. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the hyphal neck is an important site for protein secretion during plant root infection, and that the multiple secretory routes are involved in the secretion. PMID:28282450

  9. A type II protein secretory pathway required for levansucrase secretion by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Juan G; Sotolongo, Mailin; Menéndez, Carmen; Alfonso, Dubiel; Trujillo, Luis E; Soto, Melvis; Ramírez, Ricardo; Hernández, Lázaro

    2004-08-01

    The endophytic diazotroph Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus secretes a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA, EC 2.4.1.10) to utilize plant sucrose. LsdA, unlike other extracellular levansucrases from gram-negative bacteria, is transported to the periplasm by a signal-peptide-dependent pathway. We identified an unusually organized gene cluster encoding at least the components LsdG, -O, -E, -F, -H, -I, -J, -L, -M, -N, and -D of a type II secretory system required for LsdA translocation across the outer membrane. Another open reading frame, designated lsdX, is located between the operon promoter and lsdG, but it was not identified in BLASTX searches of the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank databases. The lsdX, -G, and -O genes were isolated from a cosmid library of strain SRT4 by complementation of an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant unable to transport LsdA across the outer membrane. The downstream genes lsdE, -F, -H, -I, -J, -L, -M, -N, and -D were isolated through chromosomal walking. The high G+C content (64 to 74%) and the codon usage of the genes identified are consistent with the G+C content and codon usage of the standard G. diazotrophicus structural gene. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster indicated that a polycistronic transcript is synthesized. Targeted disruption of lsdG, lsdO, or lsdF blocked LsdA secretion, and the bacterium failed to grow on sucrose. Replacement of Cys(162) by Gly at the C terminus of the pseudopilin LsdG abolished the protein functionality, suggesting that there is a relationship with type IV pilins. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed conservation of the type II secretion operon downstream of the levansucrase-levanase (lsdA-lsdB) locus in 14 G. diazotrophicus strains representing 11 genotypes recovered from four different host plants in diverse geographical regions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a type II pathway for protein secretion in the Acetobacteraceae.

  10. Surfactant protein B inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Bonnie L.; Waite, B. Moseley; Veldhuizen, Ruud A.; Possmayer, Fred; Yao, Li-Juan; Seeds, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids (PL) by secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) contributes to surfactant damage in inflammatory airway diseases such as acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We and others have reported that each sPLA2 exhibits specificity in hydrolyzing different PLs in pulmonary surfactant and that the presence of hydrophilic surfactant protein A (SP-A) alters sPLA2-mediated hydrolysis. This report tests the hypothesis that hydrophobic SP-B also inhibits sPLA2-mediated surfactant hydrolysis. Three surfactant preparations were used containing varied amounts of SP-B and radiolabeled tracers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (PG): 1) washed ovine surfactant (OS) (pre- and postorganic extraction) compared with Survanta (protein poor), 2) Survanta supplemented with purified bovine SP-B (1–5%, wt/wt), and 3) a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (DPPC:POPC:POPG, 40:40:20) prepared as vesicles and monomolecular films in the presence or absence of SP-B. Hydrolysis of PG and PC by Group IB sPLA2 (PLA2G1A) was significantly lower in the extracted OS, which contains SP-B, compared with Survanta (P = 0.005), which is SP-B poor. Hydrolysis of PG and PC in nonextracted OS, which contains all SPs, was lower than both Survanta and extracted OS. When Survanta was supplemented with 1% SP-B, PG and PC hydrolysis by PLA2G1B was significantly lower (P < 0.001) than in Survanta alone. When supplemented into pure lipid vesicles and monomolecular films composed of PG and PC mixtures, SP-B also inhibited hydrolysis by both PLA2G1B and Group IIA sPLA2 (PLA2G2A). In films, PLA2G1B hydrolyzed surfactant PL monolayers at surface pressures ≤30 mN/m (P < 0.01), and SP-B lowered the surface pressure range at which hydrolysis can occur. These results suggest the hydrophobic SP, SP-B, protects alveolar surfactant PL from

  11. Partial amino acid sequence of human pancreatic stone protein, a novel pancreatic secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, G; Bonicel, J; Multigner, L; Rovery, M; Sarles, H; De Caro, A

    1986-01-01

    Pancreatic stone protein (PSP) is the major organic component of human pancreatic stones. With the use of monoclonal antibody immunoadsorbents, five immunoreactive forms (PSP-S) with close Mr values (14,000-19,000) were isolated from normal pancreatic juice. By CM-Trisacryl M chromatography the lowest-Mr form (PSP-S1) was separated from the others and some of its molecular characteristics were investigated. The Mr of the PSP-S1 polypeptide chain calculated from the amino acid composition was about 16,100. The N-terminal sequences (40 residues) of PSP and PSP-S1 are identical, which suggests that the peptide backbone is the same for both of these polypeptides. The PSP-S1 sequence was determined up to residue 65 and was found to be different from all other known protein sequences. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3541906

  12. Mutant torsinA interferes with protein processing through the secretory pathway in DYT1 dystonia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Jeffrey W.; Tannous, Bakhos; Niland, Brian P.; Nery, Flavia C.; Zeng, Juan; Li, Yuqing; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2007-01-01

    TorsinA is an AAA+ protein located predominantly in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nuclear envelope responsible for early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1). Most cases of this dominantly inherited movement disorder are caused by deletion of a glutamic acid in the carboxyl terminal region of torsinA. We used a sensitive reporter, Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) to evaluate the role of torsinA in processing proteins through the ER. In primary fibroblasts from controls and DYT1 patients most Gluc activity (95%) was released into the media and processed through the secretory pathway, as confirmed by inhibition with brefeldinA and nocodazole. Fusion of Gluc to a fluorescent protein revealed coalignment and fractionation with ER proteins and association of Gluc with torsinA. Notably, fibroblasts from DYT1 patients were found to secrete markedly less Gluc activity as compared with control fibroblasts. This decrease in processing of Gluc in DYT1 cells appear to arise, at least in part, from a loss of torsinA activity, because mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking torsinA also had reduced secretion as compared with control cells. These studies demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of this reporter system for quantitation of processing through the secretory pathway and support a role for torsinA as an ER chaperone protein. PMID:17428918

  13. Different redox sensitivity of endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation clients suggests a novel role for disulphide bonds in secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Medraño-Fernandez, Iria; Fagioli, Claudio; Mezghrani, Alexandre; Otsu, Mieko; Sitia, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    To maintain proteostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), terminally misfolded secretory proteins must be recognized, partially unfolded, and dislocated to the cytosol for proteasomal destruction, in a complex process called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Dislocation implies reduction of inter-chain disulphide bonds. When in its reduced form, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) can act not only as a reductase but also as an unfoldase, preparing substrates for dislocation. PDI oxidation by Ero1 favours substrate release and transport across the ER membrane. Here we addressed the redox dependency of ERAD and found that DTT stimulates the dislocation of proteins with DTT-resistant disulphide bonds (i.e., orphan Ig-μ chains) but stabilizes a ribophorin mutant (Ri332) devoid of them. DTT promotes the association of Ri332, but not of Ig-µ, with PDI. This discrepancy may suggest that disulphide bonds in cargo proteins can be utilized to oxidize PDI, hence facilitating substrate detachment and degradation also in the absence of Ero1. Accordingly, Ero1 silencing retards Ri332 degradation, but has little if any effect on Ig-µ. Thus, some disulphides can increase the stability and simultaneously favour quality control of secretory proteins.

  14. α1-antitrypsin Deficiency: A Misfolded Secretory Protein Variant with Unique Effects on the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, David H

    2016-01-01

    In the classical form of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) a point mutation leads to accumulation of a misfolded secretory glycoprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of liver cells and so ATD has come to be considered a prototypical ER storage disease. It is associated with two major types of clinical disorders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by loss-of-function mechanisms and hepatic cirrhosis and carcinogenesis by gain-of-function mechanisms. The lung disease predominantly results from proteolytic damage to the pulmonary connective tissue matrix because of reduced levels of protease inhibitor activity of α1-anitrypsin (AT) in the circulating blood and body fluids. Cigarette smoking is a powerful disease-promoting modifier but other modifiers are known to exist because variation in the lung disease phenotype is still found in smoking and non-smoking homozygotes. The liver disease is highly likely to be caused by the proteotoxic effects of intracellular misfolded protein accumulation and a high degree of variation in the hepatic phenotype among affected homozygotes has been hypothetically attributed to genetic and environmental modifiers that alter proteostasis responses. Liver biopsies of homozygotes show intrahepatocytic inclusions with dilation and expansion of the ER and recent studies of iPS-derived hepatocyte-like cells from individuals with ATD indicate that the changes in the ER directly vary with the hepatic phenotype i.e there is much lesser alteration in the ER in cells derived from homozygotes that do not have clinically significant liver disease. From a signaling perspective, studies in mammalian cell line and animal models expressing the classical α1-antitrypsin Z variant (ATZ) have found that ER signaling is perturbed in a relatively unique way with powerful activation of autophagy and the NFκB pathway but relatively limited, if any, UPR signaling. It is still not known how much these unique structural and functional changes and

  15. Four distinct secretory pathways serve protein secretion, cell surface growth, and peroxisome biogenesis in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Titorenko, V I; Ogrydziak, D M; Rachubinski, R A

    1997-01-01

    We have identified and characterized mutants of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica that are deficient in protein secretion, in the ability to undergo dimorphic transition from the yeast to the mycelial form, and in peroxisome biogenesis. Mutations in the SEC238, SRP54, PEX1, PEX2, PEX6, and PEX9 genes affect protein secretion, prevent the exit of the precursor form of alkaline extracellular protease from the endoplasmic reticulum, and compromise peroxisome biogenesis. The mutants sec238A, srp54KO, pex2KO, pex6KO, and pex9KO are also deficient in the dimorphic transition from the yeast to the mycelial form and are affected in the export of only plasma membrane and cell wall-associated proteins specific for the mycelial form. Mutations in the SEC238, SRP54, PEX1, and PEX6 genes prevent or significantly delay the exit of two peroxisomal membrane proteins, Pex2p and Pex16p, from the endoplasmic reticulum en route to the peroxisomal membrane. Mutations in the PEX5, PEX16, and PEX17 genes, which have previously been shown to be essential for peroxisome biogenesis, affect the export of plasma membrane and cell wall-associated proteins specific for the mycelial form but do not impair exit from the endoplasmic reticulum of either Pex2p and Pex16p or of proteins destined for secretion. Biochemical analyses of these mutants provide evidence for the existence of four distinct secretory pathways that serve to deliver proteins for secretion, plasma membrane and cell wall synthesis during yeast and mycelial modes of growth, and peroxisome biogenesis. At least two of these secretory pathways, which are involved in the export of proteins to the external medium and in the delivery of proteins for assembly of the peroxisomal membrane, diverge at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:9271399

  16. The Emerging Roles of Early Protein Folding Events in the Secretory Pathway in the Development of Neurodegenerative Maladies

    PubMed Central

    Dubnikov, Tatyana; Cohen, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Although, protein aggregation and deposition are unifying features of various neurodegenerative disorders, recent studies indicate that different mechanisms can lead to the development of the same malady. Among these, failure in early protein folding and maturation emerge as key mechanistic events that lead to the manifestation of a myriad of illnesses including Alzheimer's disease and prion disorders. Here we delineate the cascade of maturation steps that nascent polypeptides undergo in the secretory pathway to become functional proteins, and the chaperones that supervise and assist this process, focusing on the subgroup of proline cis/trans isomerases. We also describe the chaperones whose failure was found to be an underlying event that initiates the run-up toward neurodegeneration as well as chaperones whose activity impairs protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and thus, promotes the manifestation of these maladies. Finally, we discuss the roles of aggregate deposition sites in the cellular attempt to maintain proteostasis and point at potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:28223916

  17. The Emerging Roles of Early Protein Folding Events in the Secretory Pathway in the Development of Neurodegenerative Maladies.

    PubMed

    Dubnikov, Tatyana; Cohen, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Although, protein aggregation and deposition are unifying features of various neurodegenerative disorders, recent studies indicate that different mechanisms can lead to the development of the same malady. Among these, failure in early protein folding and maturation emerge as key mechanistic events that lead to the manifestation of a myriad of illnesses including Alzheimer's disease and prion disorders. Here we delineate the cascade of maturation steps that nascent polypeptides undergo in the secretory pathway to become functional proteins, and the chaperones that supervise and assist this process, focusing on the subgroup of proline cis/trans isomerases. We also describe the chaperones whose failure was found to be an underlying event that initiates the run-up toward neurodegeneration as well as chaperones whose activity impairs protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and thus, promotes the manifestation of these maladies. Finally, we discuss the roles of aggregate deposition sites in the cellular attempt to maintain proteostasis and point at potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  18. The Tobacco etch virus P3 protein forms mobile inclusions via the early secretory pathway and traffics along actin microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Wei, Taiyun; Chowda-Reddy, R V; Sun, Guangyu; Wang, Aiming

    2010-02-05

    Plant potyviruses encode two membrane proteins, 6K and P3. The 6K protein has been shown to induce virus replication vesicles. However, the function of P3 remains unclear. In this study, subcellular localization of the Tobacco etch virus (TEV) P3 protein was investigated in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells. The TEV P3 protein localized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and formed punctate inclusions in association with the Golgi apparatus. The trafficking of P3 to the Golgi was mediated by the early secretory pathway. The Golgi-associated punctate structures originated from the ER exit site (ERES). Deletion analyses identified P3 domains required for the retention of P3 at the Golgi. Moreover, the P3 punctate structure was found to traffic along the actin filaments and colocalize with the 6K-containing replication vesicles. Taken together, these data support previous suggestions that P3 may play dual roles in virus movement and replication.

  19. Primary structure of bovine pituitary secretory protein I (chromogranin A) deduced from the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.G.; Cohn, D.V.; Gorr, S.U.; Ornstein, D.L.; Kashdan, M.A.; Levine, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Secretory protein I (SP-I), also referred to as chromogranin A, is an acidic glycoprotein that has been found in every tissue of endocrine and neuroendocrine origin examined but never in exocrine or epithelial cells. Its co-storage and co-secretion with peptide hormones and neurotransmitters suggest that it has an important endocrine or secretory function. The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a bovine pituitary lambdagt11 expression library using an antiserum to parathyroid SP-I. The largest clone (SP4B) hybridized to a transcript of 2.1 kilobases in RNA from parathyroid, pituitary, and adrenal medulla. Immunoblots of bacterial lysates derived from SP4B lysognes demonstrated specific antibody binding to an SP4B/..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein (160 kDa) with a cDNA-derived component of 46 kDa. Radioimmunoassay of the bacterial lystates with SP-I antiserum yielded parallel displacement curves of /sup 125/I-labeled SP-I by the SP4B lysate and authentic SP-I. SP4B contains a cDNA of 1614 nucleotides that encodes a 449-amino acid protein (calculated mass, 50 kDa). The nucleotide sequences of the pituitary SP-I cDNA and adrenal medullary SP-I cDNAs are nearly identical. Analysis of genomic DNA suggests that pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid SP-I are products of the same gene.

  20. Secretory expression of a novel human spermatozoa antigen in E. coli and its application to a protein chip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Zhu; Qiu, Zhuo-Lin; Cai, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Jing-Jing; She, Miao-Qin; Xu, Yuan-Feng; Wu, Ying-Song

    2017-06-09

    To produce a recombinant spermatozoa antigen peptide using the E. coli: PhoA system on a protein chip for screening anti-sperm antibodies (ASA). The purity of the recombinant spermatozoa antigen exceeded 95% after two-step purification, as assessed using SDS-PAGE and HPLC. The diagnostic performance of a protein chip coated with the recombinant antigen peptide was evaluated by examining ASA in 51 infertile patients in comparison with a commercial ELISA kit. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.944, which indicated that the protein chip coated with recombinant spermatozoa antigen peptide was consistent with ELISA for ASA detection. A recombinant spermatozoa antigen was expressed in the E. coli PhoA secretory expression system and its potential application for clinical ASA detection was validated.

  1. A 24,500 Da protein derived from rat germ cells is associated with sertoli cell secretory function.

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Djakiew, D

    1993-12-15

    A function and identify of a 24,500 Da protein derived from round spermatids of the rat testis was investigated with a specific polyclonal antiserum raised against RSP-24.5. The proteins released from cultured round spermatids significantly stimulated the secretion of de novo synthesized protein from cultured immature rat Sertoli cells 2.4-fold above control levels. Immunoprecipitation of RSP-24.5 from round spermatid protein further enhanced the stimulation of Sertoli cell protein secretion up to 3.1-fold above control levels, indicating that RSP-24.5 plays a role in the down regulation of Sertoli cell secretion. The antiserum recognized the 24,500 Da protein in Western blots of round spermatid protein, pachytene spermatoctye protein, Sertoli cell lysate and peritubular myoid cell lysate. A 40 amino acid sequence of a cyanogen bromide cleaved internal fragment of RSP-24.5 showed 80.5% homology to a phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein. These results suggest that phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein participates in the negative regulation of Sertoli cell secretory function during spermatogenesis.

  2. High abundance of Serine/Threonine-rich regions predicted to be hyper-O-glycosylated in the secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background O-glycosylation of secretory proteins has been found to be an important factor in fungal biology and virulence. It consists in the addition of short glycosidic chains to Ser or Thr residues in the protein backbone via O-glycosidic bonds. Secretory proteins in fungi frequently display Ser/Thr rich regions that could be sites of extensive O-glycosylation. We have analyzed in silico the complete sets of putatively secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes (Botrytis cinerea, Magnaporthe grisea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ustilago maydis, Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma reesei, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in search of Ser/Thr-rich regions as well as regions predicted to be highly O-glycosylated by NetOGlyc (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk). Results By comparison with experimental data, NetOGlyc was found to overestimate the number of O-glycosylation sites in fungi by a factor of 1.5, but to be quite reliable in the prediction of highly O-glycosylated regions. About half of secretory proteins have at least one Ser/Thr-rich region, with a Ser/Thr content of at least 40% over an average length of 40 amino acids. Most secretory proteins in filamentous fungi were predicted to be O-glycosylated, sometimes in dozens or even hundreds of sites. Residues predicted to be O-glycosylated have a tendency to be grouped together forming hyper-O-glycosylated regions of varying length. Conclusions About one fourth of secretory fungal proteins were predicted to have at least one hyper-O-glycosylated region, which consists of 45 amino acids on average and displays at least one O-glycosylated Ser or Thr every four residues. These putative highly O-glycosylated regions can be found anywhere along the proteins but have a slight tendency to be at either one of the two ends. PMID:22994653

  3. Antibody and cytokine responses to Giardia excretory/secretory proteins in Giardia intestinalis-infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan C; Fontaine, Josette; Creusy, Colette; Fleurisse, Laurence; Grzych, Jean-Marie; Capron, Monique; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    The humoral and cellular responses against excretory/secretory proteins and soluble extracts of Giardia intestinalis were evaluated in the course of experimental G. intestinalis infection in BALB/c mice. Production of IgG1, IgG2a, IgA, and IgE antibodies against excreted/secreted proteins and soluble extract was detected after infection by G. intestinalis. Specific IgA antibody against E/S proteins and soluble extract form intestinal fluids in infected mice was detected by ELISA. The Western blotting identified proteins of 30, 58, 63, and 83 kDa for IgA and IgG, respectively. High proliferation rate in vitro of spleen cell and secretion of interleukin-4 (IL-4) at 21 days p.i. after stimulation with excreted/secreted proteins and low proliferative response in the presence of soluble extract in infected BALB/c mice was observed. High production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) at the time of decreasing cyst output (14-21 days p.i.) in infected mice was recorded, suggesting the important role of these cytokines in the control of the infection. Interestingly, progressive and gradual increase of the interleukin-10 after stimulation with both preparations was recorded from 7 days until 28 days after infection, indicating the possible regulatory effect of these antigens on the immune response during Giardia infection. Therefore, the infection by Giardia duodenalis stimulates a mixed response Th1 and Th2, mainly stimulated by excretory/secretory antigens. The immunogenicity of these antigens may be a suitable for identification of the proteins related with the effective immune response in the course of infection by G. duodenalsis.

  4. Inhibitors of the V0 subunit of the vacuolar H+-ATPase prevent segregation of lysosomal- and secretory-pathway proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sobota, Jacqueline A.; Bäck, Nils; Eipper, Betty A.; Mains, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) establishes pH gradients along secretory and endocytic pathways. Progressive acidification is essential for proteolytic processing of prohormones and aggregation of soluble content proteins. The V-ATPase V0 subunit is thought to have a separate role in budding and fusion events. Prolonged treatment of professional secretory cells with selective V-ATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1, concanamycin A) was used to investigate its role in secretory-granule biogenesis. As expected, these inhibitors eliminated regulated secretion and blocked prohormone processing. Drug treatment caused the formation of large, mixed organelles, with components of immature granules and lysosomes and some markers of autophagy. Markers of the trans-Golgi network and earlier secretory pathway were unaffected. Ammonium chloride and methylamine treatment blocked acidification to a similar extent as the V-ATPase inhibitors without producing mixed organelles. Newly synthesized granule content proteins appeared in mixed organelles, whereas mature secretory granules were spared. Following concanamycin treatment, selected membrane proteins enter tubulovesicular structures budding into the interior of mixed organelles. shRNA-mediated knockdown of the proteolipid subunit of V0 also caused vesiculation of immature granules. Thus, V-ATPase has a role in protein sorting in immature granules that is distinct from its role in acidification. PMID:19737820

  5. Kinetic Analysis of Secretory Protein Traffic and Characterization of Golgi to Plasma Membrane Transport Intermediates in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, Koret; Miller, Chad M.; Ellenberg, Jan; Presley, John F.; Siggia, Eric D.; Phair, Robert D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative time-lapse imaging data of single cells expressing the transmembrane protein, vesicular stomatitis virus ts045 G protein fused to green fluorescent protein (VSVG–GFP), were used for kinetic modeling of protein traffic through the various compartments of the secretory pathway. A series of first order rate laws was sufficient to accurately describe VSVG–GFP transport, and provided compartment residence times and rate constants for transport into and out of the Golgi complex and delivery to the plasma membrane. For ER to Golgi transport the mean rate constant (i.e., the fraction of VSVG–GFP moved per unit of time) was 2.8% per min, for Golgi to plasma membrane transport it was 3.0% per min, and for transport from the plasma membrane to a degradative site it was 0.25% per min. Because these rate constants did not change as the concentration of VSVG–GFP in different compartments went from high (early in the experiment) to low (late in the experiment), secretory transport machinery was never saturated during the experiments. The processes of budding, translocation, and fusion of post-Golgi transport intermediates carrying VSVG– GFP to the plasma membrane were also analyzed using quantitative imaging techniques. Large pleiomorphic tubular structures, rather than small vesicles, were found to be the primary vehicles for Golgi to plasma membrane transport of VSVG–GFP. These structures budded as entire domains from the Golgi complex and underwent dynamic shape changes as they moved along microtubule tracks to the cell periphery. They carried up to 10,000 VSVG–GFP molecules and had a mean life time in COS cells of 3.8 min. In addition, they fused with the plasma membrane without intersecting other membrane transport pathways in the cell. These properties suggest that the post-Golgi intermediates represent a unique transport organelle for conveying large quantities of protein cargo from the Golgi complex directly to the plasma membrane. PMID:9852146

  6. Maurer's clefts of Plasmodium falciparum are secretory organelles that concentrate virulence protein reporters for delivery to the host erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Souvik; van Ooij, Christiaan; Balu, Bharath; Adams, John H.

    2008-01-01

    In blood-stage infection by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, export of proteins from the intracellular parasite to the erythrocyte is key to virulence. This export is mediated by a host-targeting (HT) signal present on a “secretome” of hundreds of parasite proteins engaged in remodeling the erythrocyte. However, the route of HT-mediated export is poorly understood. Here we show that minimal soluble and membrane protein reporters that contain the HT motif and mimic export of endogenous P falciparum proteins are detected in the lumen of “cleft” structures synthesized by the pathogen. Clefts are efficiently targeted by the HT signal. Furthermore, the HT signal does not directly translocate across the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) surrounding the parasite to deliver protein to the erythrocyte cytoplasm, as suggested by current models of parasite protein trafficking to the erythrocyte. Rather, it is a lumenal signal that sorts protein into clefts, which then are exported beyond the PVM. These data suggest that Maurer's clefts, which are unique to the virulent P falciparum species, are pathogen-induced secretory organelles that concentrate HT-containing soluble and membrane parasite proteins in their lumen for delivery to the host erythrocyte. PMID:18057226

  7. Modulating secretory pathway pH by proton channel co-expression can increase recombinant protein stability in plants.

    PubMed

    Jutras, Philippe V; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Couture, Manon M-J; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique; Sainsbury, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Eukaryotic expression systems are used for the production of complex secreted proteins. However, recombinant proteins face considerable biochemical challenges along the secretory pathway, including proteolysis and pH variation between organelles. As the use of synthetic biology matures into solutions for protein production, various host-cell engineering approaches are being developed to ameliorate host-cell factors that can limit recombinant protein quality and yield. We report the potential of the influenza M2 ion channel as a novel tool to neutralize the pH in acidic subcellular compartments. Using transient expression in the plant host, Nicotiana benthamiana, we show that ion channel expression can significantly raise pH in the Golgi apparatus and that this can have a strong stabilizing effect on a fusion protein separated by an acid-susceptible linker peptide. We exemplify the utility of this effect in recombinant protein production using influenza hemagglutinin subtypes differentially stable at low pH; the expression of hemagglutinins prone to conformational change in mildly acidic conditions is considerably enhanced by M2 co-expression. The co-expression of a heterologous ion channel to stabilize acid-labile proteins and peptides represents a novel approach to increasing the yield and quality of secreted recombinant proteins in plants and, possibly, in other eukaryotic expression hosts. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Immunoprotection in sheep against Haemonchus contortus using its thiol-purified excretory/secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Selvarayar

    2012-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory antigen was prepared by culturing live adult worms of Haemonchus contortus in RPMI 1640 medium at a concentration of 50 worms per mL in a culture-flask at 37 ˚C for 24 hr and the culture supernatant was used as antigen. The E/S antigen was purified by thiol-sepharose affinity chromatography. On western blot analysis, it was demonstrated that thiol-purified antigen showed a single reactive band at 66 kDa. In immunization trial, sheep were administered intramuscularly with 500 µg of thiol-purified excretory/secretory antigen along with montanide as adjuvant on day 0, 30 and 60. On ELISA, it was observed that the mean absorbance values were significantly (p ≤ 0.01) higher up to 20 weeks post immunization in Group-I (purified antigen) compared to Group- II (unimmunized control). Further, the mean EPG values was lower in Group I (200.00 ± 40.82 to 400.00 ± 91.29) than Group II (2200.00 ± 108.01 to 5100.00 ± 169.56) and the percentage reduction in mean fecal egg counts was 88.50%. Similarly, the mean abomasal worm counts was lower in Group I (808.33 ± 78.29) than Group II (3280.00 ± 147.19) and the percentage reduction in mean abomasal worm count was 75.40%.

  9. Secretory mechanism of fibroin, a silk protein, in the posterior silk gland cells of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Nakagaki, I

    1980-01-01

    There are two microtubule-microfilament systems in the posterior silk gland cells of Bombyx mori. One is a radial microtubule system; the other is a circular microtubule-microfilament system. These two systems are presumably concerned with the intracellular transport of secretory granules of fibroin and the secretion of fibroin into the lumen, respectively. Conventional and scanning electron microscopic observations of the two microtubule-microfilament systems in the posterior silk gland cells are reported. Scanning electron micrographs showed that a number of parallel linear cytoplasmic processes ran circularly on the luminal surface of the posterior silk gland cells. These processes were assumed to correspond to the circular microtubule-microfilament systems. The effects of cytochalasin (B or D), a secretion stimulating agent of fibroin, on the intracellular recording of membrane potential from the posterior silk gland cells are also reported. Exposure to cytochalasin resulted in depolarization of the membrane potential of the gland cells. Possible functional roles of the two microtubule-microfilament systems in the secretory mechanism of fibroin are discussed with reference to the effects of antimitotic reagents and cytochalasin on these two systems.

  10. The v-sis/PDGF-2 transforming gene product localizes to cell membranes but is not a secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, K C; Leal, F; Pierce, J H; Aaronson, S A

    1985-01-01

    The v-sis transforming gene encodes the woolly monkey homologue of human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) polypeptide 2. After its synthesis on membrane bound polyribosomes, the glycosylated precursor dimerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum and travels through the Golgi apparatus. At the cell periphery, the precursor is processed to yield a dimer structurally analogous to biologically active PDGF. Small amounts of two incompletely processed forms are detectable in tissue culture fluids of simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformants. However, the vast majority remains cell associated. Thus, this growth factor-related transforming gene product is not a classical secretory protein. These findings define possible cellular locations where the transforming activity of the sis-PDGF-2 protein may be exerted. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 11. PMID:2992941

  11. Elevation of susceptibility to ozone-induced acute tracheobronchial injury in transgenic mice deficient in Clara cell secretory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Plopper, C.G. . E-mail: cgplopper@ucdavis.edu; Mango, G.W.; Hatch, G.E.; Wong, V.J.; Toskala, E.; Reynolds, S.D.; Tarkington, B.K.; Stripp, B.R.

    2006-05-15

    Increases in Clara cell abundance or cellular expression of Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) may cause increased tolerance of the lung to acute oxidant injury by repeated exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}). This study defines how disruption of the gene for CCSP synthesis affects the susceptibility of tracheobronchial epithelium to acute oxidant injury. Mice homozygous for a null allele of the CCSP gene (CCSP-/-) and wild type (CCSP+/+) littermates were exposed to ozone (0.2 ppm, 8 h; 1 ppm, 8 h) or filtered air. Injury was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the abundance of necrotic, ciliated, and nonciliated cells was estimated by morphometry. Proximal and midlevel intrapulmonary airways and terminal bronchioles were evaluated. There was no difference in airway epithelial composition between CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice exposed to filtered air, and exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone caused little injury to the epithelium of both CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice. After exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone, CCSP-/- mice suffered from a greater degree of epithelial injury throughout the airways compared to CCSP+/+ mice. CCSP-/- mice had both ciliated and nonciliated cell injury. Furthermore, lack of CCSP was associated with a shift in airway injury to include proximal airway generations. Therefore, we conclude that CCSP modulates the susceptibility of the epithelium to oxidant-induced injury. Whether this is due to the presence of CCSP on the acellular lining layer surface and/or its intracellular distribution in the secretory cell population needs to be defined.

  12. Secretory protein decondensation as a distinct, Ca2+-mediated event during the final steps of exocytosis in Paramecium cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The contents of secretory vesicles ("trichocysts") were isolated in the condensed state from Paramecium cells. It is well known that the majority portion of trichocysts perform a rapid decondensation process during exocytosis, which is visible in the light microscope. We have analyzed this condensed leads to decondensed transition in vitro and determined some relevant parameters. In the condensed state, free phosphate (and possibly magnesium) ions screen local surplus charges. This is supported by x-ray spectra recorded from individual trichocysts (prepared by physical methods) in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Calcium, as well as other ions that eliminate phosphate by precipitation, produces decondensation in vitro. Under in vivo conditions, Ca2+ enters the vesicle lumen from the outside medium, once an exocytic opening has been formed. Consequently, within the intact cell, membrane fusion and protein decondensation take place with optimal timing. Ca2+ might then trigger decondensation in the same way by precipitating phosphate ions (as it does in vitro) and, indeed, such precipitates (again yielding Ca and P signals in x-ray spectra) can be recognized in situ under trigger conditions. As decondensation is a unidirectional, rapid process in Paramecium cells, it would contribute to drive the discharge of the secretory contents to the outside. Further implications on the energetics of exocytosis are discussed. PMID:7204486

  13. Protein disulphide isomerase of Ostertagia ostertagi: an excretory-secretory product of L4 and adult worms?

    PubMed

    Geldhof, P; Vercauteren, I; Knox, D; Demaere, V; Van Zeveren, A; Berx, G; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E

    2003-02-01

    A pepstatin A-agarose column was used in an attempt to purify a previously described antibody-degrading aspartyl proteinase from excretory-secretory material from the L4 and the adult stages of the bovine abomasal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi. However, no aspartyl proteinase activity was detected in the eluted fractions (L4Pepst and AdPepst). Screening of cDNA libraries with polyclonal antibodies raised against L4Pepst and AdPepst showed that a protein disulphide isomerase (Ost-PDI2) was present in both antigen fractions. This multifunctional enzyme was detected in extracts of L3, L4 and adult parasites and, interestingly, also in excretory-secretory material of L4 and adult O. ostertagi. By immunohistochemistry, the Ost-PDI2 enzyme was localised in some parts of the hypodermis of L4 and adult worms and in the intestinal cells of all three parasitic life stages. Two-dimensional Western blot analysis indicated that Ost-PDI2 is recognised by calves during a natural O. ostertagi infection, which suggests that Ost-PDI2 could be used for immunological control of ostertagiosis.

  14. Elevation of susceptibility to ozone-induced acute tracheobronchial injury in transgenic mice deficient in Clara cell secretory protein.

    PubMed

    Plopper, C G; Mango, G W; Hatch, G E; Wong, V J; Toskala, E; Reynolds, S D; Tarkington, B K; Stripp, B R

    2006-05-15

    Increases in Clara cell abundance or cellular expression of Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) may cause increased tolerance of the lung to acute oxidant injury by repeated exposure to ozone (O3). This study defines how disruption of the gene for CCSP synthesis affects the susceptibility of tracheobronchial epithelium to acute oxidant injury. Mice homozygous for a null allele of the CCSP gene (CCSP-/-) and wild type (CCSP+/+) littermates were exposed to ozone (0.2 ppm, 8 h; 1 ppm, 8 h) or filtered air. Injury was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the abundance of necrotic, ciliated, and nonciliated cells was estimated by morphometry. Proximal and midlevel intrapulmonary airways and terminal bronchioles were evaluated. There was no difference in airway epithelial composition between CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice exposed to filtered air, and exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone caused little injury to the epithelium of both CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice. After exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone, CCSP-/- mice suffered from a greater degree of epithelial injury throughout the airways compared to CCSP+/+ mice. CCSP-/- mice had both ciliated and nonciliated cell injury. Furthermore, lack of CCSP was associated with a shift in airway injury to include proximal airway generations. Therefore, we conclude that CCSP modulates the susceptibility of the epithelium to oxidant-induced injury. Whether this is due to the presence of CCSP on the acellular lining layer surface and/or its intracellular distribution in the secretory cell population needs to be defined.

  15. Identification of early diagnostic antigens from major excretory-secretory proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae using immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cui, Jing; Hu, Dan Dan; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan

    2014-01-22

    The excretory-secretory (ES) proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) come mainly from the excretory granules of the stichosome and the cuticles (membrane proteins), are directly exposed to the host's immune system, and are the main target antigens, which induce the immune responses. Although the ES proteins are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, their main disadvantage are the false negative results during the early stage of infection. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with Western blot were used to screen the early diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. The protein spots recognized by the sera from BALB/c mice infected with T. spiralis at 18 days post-infection (dpi) were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and putatively annotated using GO terms obtained from the InterPro databases. The ES proteins were analyzed by 2-DE, and more than 33 protein spots were detected with molecular weight varying from 40 to 60 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) from 4 to 7. When probed with the sera from infected mice at 18 dpi, 21 protein spots were recognized and then identified, and they were characterized to correlate with five different proteins of T. spiralis, including two serine proteases, one deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II, and two kinds of trypsin. The five proteins were functionally categorized into molecular function and biological process according to GO hierarchy. 2-DE and Western blot combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS were used to screen the diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. The five proteins of T. spiralis identified (two serine proteases, DNase II and two kinds of trypsin) might be the early specific diagnostic antigens of trichinellosis.

  16. CELLULAR AND SECRETORY PROTEINS OF THE SALIVARY GLANDS OF SCIARA COPROPHILA DURING THE LARVAL-PUPAL TRANSFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Been, Anita C.; Rasch, Ellen M.

    1972-01-01

    The cellular and secretory proteins of the salivary gland of Sciara coprophila during the stages of the larval-pupal transformation were examined by electrophoresis in 0.6 mm sheets of polyacrylamide gel with both SDS-continuous and discontinuous buffer systems. After SDS-electrophoresis, all electrophoretograms of both reduced and nonreduced proteins from single glands stained with Coomassie brilliant blue revealed a pattern containing the same 25 bands during the stages of the larval-pupal transformation. With the staining procedures used in this study, qualitative increases and decreases were detected in existing proteins and enzymes. There was no evidence, however, for the appearance of new protein species that could be correlated with the onset of either pupation or gland histolysis. Electrophoretograms of reduced samples of anterior versus posterior gland parts indicated that no protein in the basic pattern of 25 bands was unique to either the anterior or posterior gland part. Electrophoretograms of reduced samples of secretion collected from either actively feeding or "cocoon"-building animals showed an electrophoretic pattern containing up to six of the 25 protein fractions detected in salivary gland samples, with varied amounts of these same six proteins in electrophoretograms of secretion samples from a given stage. Zymograms of non-specific esterases in salivary gland samples revealed a progressive increase in the amount of esterase reaction produce in one major band and some decrease in the second major band during later stages of the larval-pupal transformation. PMID:4116523

  17. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  18. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  19. The interplay of Hrd3 and the molecular chaperone system ensures efficient degradation of malfolded secretory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Martin; Sommermeyer, Franziska; Berger, Maren; Kumar Lakshmipathy, Sathish; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus; Jarosch, Ernst; Sommer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway are extracted from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), polyubiquitylated by a protein complex termed the Hmg-CoA reductase degradation ligase (HRD-ligase), and degraded by cytosolic 26S proteasomes. This process is termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). We previously showed that the membrane protein Der1, which is a subunit of the HRD-ligase, is involved in the export of aberrant polypeptides from the ER. Unexpectedly, we also uncovered a close spatial proximity of Der1 and the substrate receptor Hrd3 in the ER lumen. We report here on a mutant Hrd3KR that is selectively defective for ERAD of soluble proteins. Hrd3KR displays subtle structural changes that affect its positioning toward Der1. Furthermore, increased quantities of the ER-resident Hsp70-type chaperone Kar2 and the Hsp40-type cochaperone Scj1 bind to Hrd3KR. Of note, deletion of SCJ1 impairs ERAD of model substrates and causes the accumulation of client proteins at Hrd3. Our data imply a function of Scj1 in the removal of malfolded proteins from the receptor Hrd3, which facilitates their delivery to downstream-acting components like Der1. PMID:25428985

  20. Dirofilaria immitis exhibits sex- and stage-specific differences in excretory/secretory miRNA and protein profiles.

    PubMed

    Tritten, Lucienne; Clarke, Damian; Timmins, Scott; McTier, Tom; Geary, Timothy G

    2016-12-15

    The canine heartworm Dirofilaria immitis releases excretory/secretory molecules into its host and in culture. We report analyses of the types, amounts and stage-dependence of microRNAs and proteins found in D. immitis culture media recovered after incubating 800,000 microfilariae for 6days, 500L3 and 500L4 for 7days, as well as 40 adult females and 40 adult males for 48h, all separately. In addition, the presence of exosome-like particles was established by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Our results are in concordance with the D. immitis molecules previously detected in dog blood and in culture medium, but add additional insight into the sex- and stage-specificity of these processes. Of 131 miRNA candidates analyzed, none of the most abundant sequences was exclusively associated with one stage. Several isoforms of the nematode miR-100 family, miR-279, miR-71, were highly represented and overlapped substantially with the profile of heartworm miRNAs described from infected dog blood. lin-4 was primarily associated with males. We also report 4, 27 and 72 proteins in media from microfilariae, females and males, respectively. The only protein in common to all samples was actin, and only 9/88 proteins with a gene ontology description had not been reported in other studies of filarial secretomes. Exosomal proteins were well represented, dominated by cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes, zeta polypeptide, and chaperones.

  1. The effect of total starvation and very low energy diet in lean men on kinetics of whole body protein and five hepatic secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Paul R; Jahoor, Farook; Jackson, Alan A; Stubbs, James; Johnstone, Alexander M; Faber, Peter; Lobley, Gerald; Gibney, Eileen; Elia, Marinos

    2007-12-01

    It is unclear whether the rate of weight loss, independent of magnitude, affects whole body protein metabolism and the synthesis and plasma concentrations of specific hepatic secretory proteins. We examined 1) whether lean men losing weight rapidly (starvation) show greater changes in whole body protein kinetics, synthesis, and circulating concentrations of selected hepatic secretory proteins than those losing the same amount of weight more slowly [very low energy diet (VLED)]; and 2) whether plasma concentrations and synthetic rates of these proteins are related. Whole body protein kinetics were measured using [1-(13)C]leucine in 11 lean men (6 starvation, 5 VLED). Fractional and absolute synthetic rates of HDL-apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), retinol binding protein, transthyretin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT), and transferrin were measured using a prime-constant intravenous infusion of [(13)C(2)]glycine. Compared with VLED group, the starvation group showed greater increases (at a 5% weight loss) in whole body protein oxidation (P < 0.05); fractional synthetic rates of HDL-apoA1 (25.3 vs. -1.52%; P = 0.003) and retinol binding protein (30.6 vs. 7.1%; P = 0.007); absolute synthetic rates of HDL-apoA1 (7.1 vs. -3.8 mg.kg(-1).day(-1); P = 0.003) and alpha(1)-AT (17.8 vs. 3.6 mg.kg(-1).day(-1); P = 0.02); and plasma concentration of alpha(1)-AT (P = 0.025). Relationships between synthetic rates and plasma concentrations varied between the secreted proteins. It is concluded that synthetic rates of hepatic secreted proteins in lean men are more closely related to the rate than the magnitude of weight loss. Changes in concentration of these secreted proteins can occur independently of changes in synthetic rates, and vice versa.

  2. The 70-Kilodalton Heat Shock Cognate Can Act as a Molecular Chaperone during the Membrane Translocation of a Plant Secretory Protein Precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Miernyk, JA; Duck, NB; Shatters, RG; Folk, WR

    1992-01-01

    When a model secretory precursor was synthesized in vitro and analyzed by rate-zonal sedimentation, it appeared to be associated with other proteins present in a wheat germ extract. At least one of the associated proteins is a member of the 70-kD family of stress proteins. It was possible to immunoprecipitate the secretory precursor with anti-heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) antibodies in the absence but not in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the association was specific. ATP-sensitive association is one diagnostic characteristic of molecular chaperone-type proteins. Increasing incubation temperature decreased the amount of precursor associated with Hsc70. A method was developed for the removal of Hsc70 from a wheat germ in vitro translation mixture by immunoprecipitation. Cotranslational translocation and processing of the secretory precursor by maize endosperm microsomes were inefficient in the Hsc70-depleted system but were greatly stimulated by addition of purified preparations of various heat shock 70 proteins (Hsp70s). Cytosolic Hsc70 from maize endosperm was capable of autophosphorylation in vitro. Phosphorylated Hsc70 was much less efficient in promoting membrane translocation of the secretory precursor. These results suggest that chaperone function in vivo could be regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:12297663

  3. Changes in protein expression after treatment with Ancylostoma caninum excretory/secretory products in a mouse model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Sotillo, Javier; Ferreira, Ivana; Potriquet, Jeremy; Laha, Thewarach; Navarro, Severine; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason

    2017-02-13

    Different reports have highlighted the potential use of helminths and their secretions in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) conditions; however, no reports have investigated their effects at a proteome level. Herein, we characterise the protein expression changes that occur in lamina propria (LP) and the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) of mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis treated with Ancylostoma caninum excretory/secretory (ES) products using a quantitative proteomic approach. We have shown how parasite products can significantly alter the expression of proteins involved in immune responses, cell death and with an antioxidant activity. Interestingly, significant changes in the expression levels of different mucins were observed in this study. MUC13, a mucin implicated in gastrointestinal homeostasis, was upregulated in the LP of mice with DSS-induced colitis treated with ES, while MUC2, a major component of mucus, was upregulated in the IEC. In addition, A. caninum proteins have an important effect on proteins with antioxidant functions and proteins involved in intestinal homeostasis and tissue integrity and regeneration. Understanding how parasites can ameliorate IBD pathogenesis can help us design novel treatments for autoimmune diseases.

  4. Changes in protein expression after treatment with Ancylostoma caninum excretory/secretory products in a mouse model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sotillo, Javier; Ferreira, Ivana; Potriquet, Jeremy; Laha, Thewarach; Navarro, Severine; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Different reports have highlighted the potential use of helminths and their secretions in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) conditions; however, no reports have investigated their effects at a proteome level. Herein, we characterise the protein expression changes that occur in lamina propria (LP) and the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) of mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis treated with Ancylostoma caninum excretory/secretory (ES) products using a quantitative proteomic approach. We have shown how parasite products can significantly alter the expression of proteins involved in immune responses, cell death and with an antioxidant activity. Interestingly, significant changes in the expression levels of different mucins were observed in this study. MUC13, a mucin implicated in gastrointestinal homeostasis, was upregulated in the LP of mice with DSS-induced colitis treated with ES, while MUC2, a major component of mucus, was upregulated in the IEC. In addition, A. caninum proteins have an important effect on proteins with antioxidant functions and proteins involved in intestinal homeostasis and tissue integrity and regeneration. Understanding how parasites can ameliorate IBD pathogenesis can help us design novel treatments for autoimmune diseases. PMID:28191818

  5. A computational method for prediction of saliva-secretory proteins and its application to identification of head and neck cancer biomarkers for salivary diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Du, Wei; Zhou, Chunguang; Zhou, You; Cao, Zhongbo; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Human saliva is rich in proteins, which have been used for disease detection such as oral diseases and systematic diseases. In this paper, we present a computational method for predicting secretory proteins in human saliva based on two sets of human proteins from published literatures and public databases. One set contains known proteins which can be secreted into saliva, and the other contains the proteins that are deemed to be not extracellular secretion. The protein features with discerning power between two sets were firstly gathered. Then a classifier was trained based on the identified features to predict whether a protein was saliva-secretory one or not. The average values of the sensitivity, specificity, precision, accuracy, and Matthews correlation coefficient value by 10-fold cross validation repeated 100 times were 80.67%, 90.56%, 90.09%, 85.53%, and 0.7168, respectively. These results indicated that our selected features are informative. We applied the classifier for prediction saliva-secretory proteins out of all human proteins, if a known biomarker was likely to enter into saliva, and the potential salivary biomarkers for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We also compared the top 1000 proteins predicted by computational methods in different kind of fluids. This work provided a useful tool for effectively identifying the salivary biomarkers for various human diseases and facilitate the development of salivary diagnosis.

  6. Identification of Regulatory and Cargo Proteins of Endosomal and Secretory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by Proteomic Dissection*

    PubMed Central

    Heard, William; Sklenář, Jan; Tomé, Daniel F. A.; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Alexandra M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The cell's endomembranes comprise an intricate, highly dynamic and well-organized system. In plants, the proteins that regulate function of the various endomembrane compartments and their cargo remain largely unknown. Our aim was to dissect subcellular trafficking routes by enriching for partially overlapping subpopulations of endosomal proteomes associated with endomembrane markers. We selected RABD2a/ARA5, RABF2b/ARA7, RABF1/ARA6, and RABG3f as markers for combinations of the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), early endosomes (EE), secretory vesicles, late endosomes (LE), multivesicular bodies (MVB), and the tonoplast. As comparisons we used Golgi transport 1 (GOT1), which localizes to the Golgi, clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) labeling clathrin-coated vesicles and pits and the vesicle-associated membrane protein 711 (VAMP711) present at the tonoplast. We developed an easy-to-use method by refining published protocols based on affinity purification of fluorescent fusion constructs to these seven subcellular marker proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We present a total of 433 proteins, only five of which were shared among all enrichments, while many proteins were common between endomembrane compartments of the same trafficking route. Approximately half, 251 proteins, were assigned to one enrichment only. Our dataset contains known regulators of endosome functions including small GTPases, SNAREs, and tethering complexes. We identify known cargo proteins such as PIN3, PEN3, CESA, and the recently defined TPLATE complex. The subcellular localization of two GTPase regulators predicted from our enrichments was validated using live-cell imaging. This is the first proteomic dataset to discriminate between such highly overlapping endomembrane compartments in plants and can be used as a general proteomic resource to predict the localization of proteins and identify the components of regulatory complexes and provides a useful tool for the identification of new protein

  7. iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis of excretory-secretory proteins of schistosomula and adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Min; Han, Yanhui; Han, Hongxiao; Han, Qian; Lu, Ke; Hong, Yang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-04-14

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with 200 million people infected and 779 million people at risk worldwide. The schistosomulum and adult worm are two stages of the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma japonicum and excretory/secretory proteins (ESPs) play a major role in host-parasite interactions. In this study, iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS was used to investigate the proteome of ESPs obtained from schistosomula and adult worms of S. japonicum, and 298 differential ESPs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of differential ESPs in the two developmental stages showed that 161 ESPs upregulated in schistosomula were associated with stress responses, carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation, whereas ESPs upregulated in adult worms were mainly related to immunoregulation and purine metabolism. Recombinant heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), two differential proteins identified in this study, were expressed. Further studies showed that rSjHSP70 and rSjTPx stimulated macrophages expressing high levels of the anti-inflammatory factors TGF-β, IL-10 and Arg-1, and suppressed the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and iNOS in LPS-induced macrophages. This study provides new insights into the survival and development of schistosomes in the final host and helps identify vaccine candidates or new diagnostic reagents for schistosomiasis.

  8. Protein Domain of Unknown Function 3233 is a Translocation Domain of Autotransporter Secretory Mechanism in Gamma proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S.; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3rd of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system. PMID:22073138

  9. Protein domain of unknown function 3233 is a translocation domain of autotransporter secretory mechanism in gamma proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3(rd) of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system.

  10. Immunocytochemical localization of secretory phospholipase A(2)-like protein in the pituitary gland and surrounding tissue of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Y; Kikuyama, S; Hayashi, H; Hanaoka, Y; Sakai, M; Tanaka, S

    2001-05-01

    Previously, we obtained a protein that has considerable amino acid sequence homology with secretory phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) from a bullfrog pituitary fraction obtained during the purification of thyrotropin (TSH). Subsequently, partial amino acid sequence (N-terminal 45 amino acid residues) analysis revealed this protein to be identical to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of otoconin-22, the major protein of aragonitic otoconia in the Xenopus saccule. In this study we developed an antibody against the N-terminal peptide of the bullfrog protein and applied it for immunocytochemical study of the pituitary and its surrounding tissue. Western blotting analysis showed that this antibody recognizes a 20.4-kD protein that has a molecular mass close to that of otoconin-22. Immunohistochemical reaction with the antibody was not found in any anterior pituitary cells but was intense in the monolayer epithelial cells of the endolymphatic sac surrounding the pituitary gland, which is a major storage site of calcium carbonate in amphibians. An electron microscopic study revealed that the cuboidal cells in the endolymphatic sac contained large, polymorphic secretory granules in their apical cytoplasm. Immunogold particles indicating the presence of a PLA(2)-like protein were observed predominately in these secretory granules. These findings support the view that this PLA(2)-like protein obtained during purification of TSH was derived from the endolymphatic sac adhering to the pituitary and that this protein is a bullfrog otoconin. (J Histochem Cytochem 49:631-637, 2001)

  11. Brugia malayi soluble and excretory-secretory proteins attenuate development of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Amdare, N; Khatri, V; Yadav, R S P; Tarnekar, A; Goswami, K; Reddy, M V R

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the modulation of the host-immune system by pathogens-like filarial parasites offers an alternate approach to prevent autoimmune diseases. In this study, we have shown that treatment with filarial proteins prior to or after the clinical onset of streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetes (T1D) can ameliorate the severity of disease in BALB/c mice. Pre-treatment with Brugia malayi adult soluble (Bm A S) or microfilarial excretory-secretory (Bm mf ES) or microfilarial soluble (Bm mf S) antigens followed by induction of diabetes led to lowering of fasting blood glucose levels with as many as 57.5-62.5% of mice remaining nondiabetic. These proteins were more effective when they were used to treat the mice with established T1D as 62.5-71.5% of the mice turned to be nondiabetic. Histopathological examination of pancreas of treated mice showed minor inflammatory changes in pancreatic islet cell architecture. The therapeutic effect was found to be associated with the decreased production of cytokines TNF-α & IFN-γ and increased production of IL-10 in the culture supernatants of splenocytes of treated mice. A switch in the production of anti-insulin antibodies from IgG2a to IgG1 isotype was also seen. Together these results provide a proof towards utilizing the filarial derived proteins as novel anti-diabetic therapeutics.

  12. Tissue-engineered tear secretory system: functional lacrimal gland acinar cells cultured on matrix protein-coated substrata.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Shivaram; Thomas, Padmaja B; Trousdale, Melvin D; Stevenson, Douglas; Schechter, Joel E; Mircheff, Austin K; Jacob, Jean T; Smith, Ronald E; Yiu, Samuel C

    2007-01-01

    Dry eye is a general term that refers to a myriad of ophthalmic disorders resulting in the inadequate wetting of the corneal surface by the tear film. Dry eyes are typically treated by the application of artificial tears. However, patients with lacrimal insufficiencies such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, chemical and thermal injuries, or ocular cicatricial pemphigoid have very limited options because of the short duration and action of lubricating agents. As a therapeutic strategy, we are working to develop a bioengineered tear secretory system for such patients. This article describes the growth and physiological properties of purified rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells (pLGACs) on several matrix protein-coated polymers such as silicone, collagen I, copolymers of poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA; 85:15 and 50:50), poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), and Thermanox plastic cell culture coverslips. Monolayers of acinar cells were established on all of the polymeric substrata. An assay of beta-hexosaminidase activity in the supernatant medium showed significant increases in protein secretion, following stimulation with 100 microM carbachol on matrix protein-coated and uncoated polymers such as silicone, PLGA 85:15, and PLLA. Our study demonstrates that PLLA supported the morphological and physiological properties of purified rabbit lacrimal gland epithelial cells more successfully than the others. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Protein Disulfide Isomerase-2 of Arabidopsis Mediates Protein Folding and Localizes to Both the Secretory Pathway and Nucleus, Where It Interacts with Maternal Effect Embryo Arrest Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Ju; Yuen, Christen Y.L.; Kang, Byung-Ho; Ondzighi, Christine A.; Staehelin, L. Andrew; Christopher, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a thiodisulfide oxidoreductase that catalyzes the formation, reduction and rearrangement of disulfide bonds in proteins of eukaryotes. The classical PDI has a signal peptide, two CXXCcontaining thioredoxin catalytic sites (a,a′), two noncatalytic thioredoxin fold domains (b,b′), an acidic domain (c) and a C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Although PDI resides in the ER where it mediates the folding of nascent polypeptides of the secretory pathway, we recently showed that PDI5 of Arabidopsis thaliana chaperones and inhibits cysteine proteases during trafficking to vacuoles prior to programmed cell death of the endothelium in developing seeds. Here we describe Arabidopsis PDI2, which shares a primary structure similar to that of classical PDI. Recombinant PDI2 is imported into ER-derived microsomes and complements the E. coli protein- folding mutant, dsbA. PDI2 interacted with proteins in both the ER and nucleus, including ER-resident protein folding chaperone, BiP1, and nuclear embryo transcription factor, MEE8. The PDI2-MEE8 interaction was confirmed to occur in vitro and in vivo. Transient expression of PDI2- GFP fusions in mesophyll protoplasts resulted in labeling of the ER, nucleus and vacuole. PDI2 is expressed in multiple tissues, with relatively high expression in seeds and root tips. Immunoelectron microscopy with GFP- and PDI2-specific antisera on transgenic seeds (PDI2-GFP) and wild type roots demonstrated that PDI2 was found in the secretory pathway (ER, Golgi, vacuole, cell wall) and the nuclei. Our results indicate that PDI2 mediates protein folding in the ER and has new functional roles in the nucleus. PMID:21909944

  14. Therapeutic potential of larval excretory/secretory proteins of the pig whipworm Trichuris suis in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Ebner, F; Hepworth, M R; Rausch, S; Janek, K; Niewienda, A; Kühl, A; Henklein, P; Lucius, R; Hamelmann, E; Hartmann, S

    2014-11-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are currently being evaluated as a novel therapeutic in the treatment of chronic human inflammatory disorders, due to their unique ability to induce immunoregulatory pathways in their hosts. In particular, administration of ova from the pig whipworm Trichuris suis (T. suis; TSO) has been proposed for the treatment of allergic, inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Despite these advances, the biological pathways through which TSO therapy modulates the host immune system in the context of human disease remain undefined. We characterized the dominant proteins present in the excretory/secretory (E/S) products of first-stage (L1) T. suis larvae (Ts E/S) using LC-MS/MS analysis and examined the immunosuppressive properties of whole larval Ts E/S in vitro and in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Administration of larval Ts E/S proteins in vivo during the allergen sensitization phase was sufficient to suppress airway hyperreactivity, bronchiolar inflammatory infiltrate and allergen-specific IgE production. Three proteins in larval Ts E/S were unambiguously identified. The immunomodulatory function of larval Ts E/S was found to be partially dependent on the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the released proteins of larval T. suis have significant immunomodulatory capacities and efficiently dampen allergic airway hyperreactivity. Thus, the therapeutic potential of defined larval E/S proteins should be exploited for the treatment of human allergic disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Secretory carrier membrane proteins interact and regulate trafficking of the organellar (Na+,K+)/H+ exchanger NHE7.

    PubMed

    Lin, Paulo J C; Williams, Warren P; Luu, Yvonne; Molday, Robert S; Orlowski, John; Numata, Masayuki

    2005-05-01

    The mammalian (Na(+),K(+))/H(+) exchanger NHE7 resides chiefly in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and post-Golgi vesicles where it is thought to contribute to organellar pH homeostasis. However, the mechanisms that underlie the targeting and regulation of NHE7 are unknown. To gain insight into these processes, yeast two-hybrid methodology was used to screen a human brain cDNA library for proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic C-terminus of NHE7. One binding partner we identified was SCAMP2, a member of the secretory carrier membrane protein (SCAMP) gene family. Direct association of these two proteins was further supported by co-immunolocalization and co-immunoprecipitation analyses using transfected cells, by their co-sedimentation in membrane fractions resolved on sucrose density gradients, and by in vitro protein binding assays. Other members of the SCAMP family, such as SCAMP1 and SCAMP5, also associated with NHE7. The majority of the NHE7-SCAMP complexes accumulated at the TGN, but a minor fraction also resided in recycling vesicles. Biochemical analyses indicated that the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of NHE7 bound preferentially to a highly conserved cytoplasmic loop between the second and the third transmembrane segments (TM2-TM3 loop) of SCAMP2. A deletion mutant of SCAMP2 lacking this region (SCAMP2/Delta184-208) bound weakly to NHE7, but caused a significant fraction of NHE7 and wild-type SCAMP2 to redistribute to a pool of scattered recycling vesicles without noticeably affecting the location of other resident TGN (syntaxin 6) or Golgi cisternae (GM130) proteins. Conversely, a GFP-tagged TM2-TM3 construct of SCAMP2 interacted with NHE7, but also led to the redistribution of NHE7 to dispersed vesicular structures. We propose a model wherein SCAMPs participate in the shuttling of NHE7 between recycling vesicles and the TGN.

  16. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms form high affinity complexes with human and porcine beta-microseminoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Karin; Kjellberg, Margareta; Fernlund, Per

    2009-08-01

    BETA-microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10 kDa protein in human seminal plasma, binds human cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) with high affinity. CRISP-3 is a member of the family of CRISPs, which are widespread among animals. In this work we show that human as well as porcine MSP binds catrin, latisemin, pseudecin, and triflin, which are CRISPs present in the venoms of the snakes Crotalus atrox, Laticauda semifasciata, Pseudechis porphyriacus, and Trimeresurus flavoviridis, respectively. The CRISPs were purified from the venoms by affinity chromatography on a human MSP column and their identities were settled by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their interactions with human and porcine MSPs were studied with size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance measurements. The binding affinities at 25 degrees C were between 10(-10)M and 10(-7)M for most of the interactions, with higher affinities for the interactions with porcine MSP compared to human MSP and with Elapidae CRISPs compared to Viperidae CRISPs. The high affinities of the bindings in spite of the differences in amino acid sequence between the MSPs as well as between the CRISPs indicate that the binding is tolerant to amino acid sequence variation and raise the question how universal this cross-species reaction between MSPs and CRISPs is.

  17. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 55 (NESP55) immunoreactivity in male and female rat superior cervical ganglion and other sympathetic ganglia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongling; Wang, Zhanyou; Dahlström, Annica

    2007-03-30

    Neuroendocrine secretory protein 55 (NESP55) is a soluble, acidic and heat-stable protein, belonging to the class of chromogranins. It is expressed specifically in endocrine cells and the nervous system, and is probably involved in both constitutive and regulated secretion. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of NESP55 in various rat sympathetic ganglia by immunohistochemistry. The expression of NESP55-IR was detected in a subpopulation of principal neurons in the rat SCG, which was also TH positive, and, thus, adrenergic. In the rat stellate ganglion, more than two thirds of NESP55 positive neurons were adrenergic. Colocalization of NESP55 and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in cholinergic neurons was also observed. In the rat thoracic chain, however, the majority of NESP55 positive neurons appeared to lack TH. No detectable NESP55-IR was found in the mouse SCG. Furthermore, in the sexually dimorphic SCG, it was demonstrated that, 80% of the NESP55 positive principal neurons were also NPY positive in the male rat, while a slightly higher, but statistically significant proportion, 87%, was found in the female. Whether or not this small difference is physiologically significant is unknown. The present data provide basic knowledge about the expression of NESP55 in the sympathetic autonomic nervous system of rat, which may further our understanding of the functional significance of NESP55.

  18. Analysis of Translocation-Competent Secretory Proteins by HDX-MS.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotaki, A; Papanastasiou, M; Trelle, M B; Jørgensen, T J D; Economou, A

    2017-01-01

    Protein folding is an intricate and precise process in living cells. Most exported proteins evade cytoplasmic folding, become targeted to the membrane, and then trafficked into/across membranes. Their targeting and translocation-competent states are nonnatively folded. However, once they reach the appropriate cellular compartment, they can fold to their native states. The nonnative states of preproteins remain structurally poorly characterized since increased disorder, protein sizes, aggregation propensity, and the observation timescale are often limiting factors for typical structural approaches such as X-ray crystallography and NMR. Here, we present an alternative approach for the in vitro analysis of nonfolded translocation-competent protein states and their comparison with their native states. We make use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), a method based on differentiated isotope exchange rates in structured vs unstructured protein states/regions, and highly dynamic vs more rigid regions. We present a complete structural characterization pipeline, starting from the preparation of the polypeptides to data analysis and interpretation. Proteolysis and mass spectrometric conditions for the analysis of the labeled proteins are discussed, followed by the analysis and interpretation of HDX-MS data. We highlight the suitability of HDX-MS for identifying short structured regions within otherwise highly flexible protein states, as illustrated by an exported protein example, experimentally tested in our lab. Finally, we discuss statistical analysis in comparative HDX-MS. The protocol is applicable to any protein and protein size, exhibiting slow or fast loss of translocation competence. It could be easily adapted to more complex assemblies, such as the interaction of chaperones with nonnative protein states.

  19. Independent transport and sorting of functionally distinct protein families in Tetrahymena thermophila dense core secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Abdur; Miao, Wei; Turkewitz, Aaron P

    2009-10-01

    Dense core granules (DCGs) in Tetrahymena thermophila contain two protein classes. Proteins in the first class, called granule lattice (Grl), coassemble to form a crystalline lattice within the granule lumen. Lattice expansion acts as a propulsive mechanism during DCG release, and Grl proteins are essential for efficient exocytosis. The second protein class, defined by a C-terminal beta/gamma-crystallin domain, is poorly understood. Here, we have analyzed the function and sorting of Grt1p (granule tip), which was previously identified as an abundant protein in this family. Cells lacking all copies of GRT1, together with the closely related GRT2, accumulate wild-type levels of docked DCGs. Unlike cells disrupted in any of the major GRL genes, DeltaGRT1 DeltaGRT2 cells show no defect in secretion, indicating that neither exocytic fusion nor core expansion depends on GRT1. These results suggest that Grl protein sorting to DCGs is independent of Grt proteins. Consistent with this, the granule core lattice in DeltaGRT1 DeltaGRT2 cells appears identical to that in wild-type cells by electron microscopy, and the only biochemical component visibly absent is Grt1p itself. Moreover, gel filtration showed that Grl and Grt proteins in cell homogenates exist in nonoverlapping complexes, and affinity-isolated Grt1p complexes do not contain Grl proteins. These data demonstrate that two major classes of proteins in Tetrahymena DCGs are likely to be independently transported during DCG biosynthesis and play distinct roles in granule function. The role of Grt1p may primarily be postexocytic; consistent with this idea, DCG contents from DeltaGRT1 DeltaGRT2 cells appear less adhesive than those from the wild type.

  20. Modular Integrated Secretory System Engineering in Pichia pastoris To Enhance G-Protein Coupled Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Claes, Katrien; Vandewalle, Kristof; Laukens, Bram; Laeremans, Toon; Vosters, Olivier; Langer, Ingrid; Parmentier, Marc; Steyaert, Jan; Callewaert, Nico

    2016-10-21

    Membrane protein research is still hampered by the generally very low levels at which these proteins are naturally expressed, necessitating heterologous expression. Protein degradation, folding problems, and undesired post-translational modifications often occur, together resulting in low expression levels of heterogeneous protein products that are unsuitable for structural studies. We here demonstrate how the integration of multiple engineering modules in Pichia pastoris can be used to increase both the quality and the quantity of overexpressed integral membrane proteins, with the human CXCR4 G-protein coupled receptor as an example. The combination of reduced proteolysis, enhanced ER folding capacity, GlycoDelete-based N-Glycan trimming, and nanobody-based fold stabilization improved the expression of this GPCR in P. pastoris from a low expression level of a heterogeneously glycosylated, proteolyzed product to substantial quantities (2-3 mg/L shake flask culture) of a nonproteolyzed, homogeneously glycosylated proteoform. We expect that this set of tools will contribute to successful expression of more membrane proteins in a quantity and quality suitable for functional and structural studies.

  1. Sendai virus assembly: M protein binds to viral glycoproteins in transit through the secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, C M; McQueen, N L; Nayak, D P

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the relative ability of Sendai virus M (matrix) protein to associate with membranes containing viral glycoproteins at three distinct stages of the exocytic pathway prior to cell surface appearance. By the use of selective low-temperature incubations or the ionophore monensin, the transport of newly synthesized viral glycoproteins was restricted to either the pre-Golgi intermediate compartment (by incubation at 15 degrees C), the medial Golgi (in the presence of monensin), or the trans-Golgi network (by incubation at 20 degrees C). All three of these treatments resulted in a marked accumulation of the M protein on perinuclear Golgi-like membranes which in each case directly reflected the distribution of the viral F protein. Subsequent redistribution of the F protein to the plasma membrane by removal of the low-temperature (20 degrees C) block resulted in a concomitant redistribution of the M protein, thus implying association of the two components during intracellular transit. The extent of M protein-glycoprotein association was further examined by cell fractionation studies performed under each of the three restrictive conditions. Following equilibrium sedimentation of membranes derived from monensin-treated cells, approximately 40% of the recovered M protein was found to cofractionate with membranes containing the viral glycoproteins. Also, by flotation analyses, a comparable subpopulation of M protein was found to be membrane associated whether viral glycoproteins were restricted to the trans-Golgi network, the medial Golgi, or the pre-Golgi intermediate compartment. Additionally, transient expression of M protein alone from cloned cDNA showed that neither membrane association nor Golgi localization occurs in the absence of Sendai virus glycoproteins. Images PMID:8380460

  2. Crovirin, a Snake Venom Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein (CRISP) with Promising Activity against Trypanosomes and Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Adade, Camila M.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia O.; Tomaz, Marcelo A.; Costa, Tatiana F. R.; Godinho, Joseane L.; Melo, Paulo A.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.; Rodrigues, Juliany C. F.; Zingali, Russolina B.; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2014-01-01

    Background The neglected human diseases caused by trypanosomatids are currently treated with toxic therapy with limited efficacy. In search for novel anti-trypanosomatid agents, we showed previously that the Crotalus viridis viridis (Cvv) snake venom was active against infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Here, we describe the purification of crovirin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) from Cvv venom with promising activity against trypanosomes and Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Crude venom extract was loaded onto a reverse phase analytical (C8) column using a high performance liquid chromatographer. A linear gradient of water/acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid was used. The peak containing the isolated protein (confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry) was collected and its protein content was measured. T. cruzi trypomastigotes and amastigotes, L. amazonensis promastigotes and amastigotes and T. brucei rhodesiense procyclic and bloodstream trypomastigotes were challenged with crovirin, whose toxicity was tested against LLC-MK2 cells, peritoneal macrophages and isolated murine extensor digitorum longus muscle. We purified a single protein from Cvv venom corresponding, according to Nano-LC MS/MS sequencing, to a CRISP of 24,893.64 Da, henceforth referred to as crovirin. Human infective trypanosomatid forms, including intracellular amastigotes, were sensitive to crovirin, with low IC50 or LD50 values (1.10–2.38 µg/ml). A considerably higher concentration (20 µg/ml) of crovirin was required to elicit only limited toxicity on mammalian cells. Conclusions This is the first report of CRISP anti-protozoal activity, and suggests that other members of this family might have potential as drugs or drug leads for the development of novel agents against trypanosomatid-borne neglected diseases. PMID:25330220

  3. Early secretory pathway localization and lack of processing for hepatitis E virus replication protein pORF1.

    PubMed

    Perttilä, Julia; Spuul, Pirjo; Ahola, Tero

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a positive-strand RNA virus and a major causative agent of acute sporadic and epidemic hepatitis. HEV replication protein is encoded by ORF1 and contains the predicted domains of methyltransferase (MT), protease, macro domain, helicase (HEL) and polymerase (POL). In this study, the full-length protein pORF1 (1693 aa) and six truncated variants were expressed by in vitro translation and in human HeLa and hepatic Huh-7 cells by using several vector systems. The proteins were visualized by three specific antisera directed against the MT, HEL and POL domains. In vitro translation of full-length pORF1 yielded smaller quantities of two fragments. However, these fragments were not observed after pORF1 expression and pulse-chase studies in human cells, and their production was not dependent on the predicted protease domain in pORF1. The weight of evidence supports the proposition that pORF1 is not subjected to specific proteolytic processing, which is unusual among animal positive-strand RNA viruses but common for plant viruses. pORF1 was membrane associated in cells and localized to a perinuclear region, where it partially overlapped with localization of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker BAP31 and was closely interspersed with staining of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment marker protein ERGIC-53. Co-localization with BAP31 was enhanced by treatment with brefeldin A. Therefore, HEV may utilize modified early secretory pathway membranes for replication.

  4. Design of a covalently linked human interleukin-10 fusion protein and its secretory expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guggenbichler, Florian; Büttner, Carolin; Rudolph, Wolfram; Zimmermann, Kurt; Gunzer, Florian; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Wild-type human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) is a non-covalent homodimer with a short half-life, thus limiting its therapeutic applications in vivo. To avoid loss of function due to dimer dissociation, we designed a synthetic hIL-10 analog by bridging both monomers via a 15 amino acid-long peptide spacer in a C-terminal to N-terminal fashion. For secretory expression in Escherichia coli, a 1156 bp fragment was generated from template vector pAZ1 by fusion PCR encoding a T7 promoter region and the signal sequence of the E. coli outer membrane protein F fused in frame to two tandem E. coli codon-optimized mature hIL-10 genes connected via a 45 nucleotide linker sequence. The construct was cloned into pUC19 for high-level expression in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The mean concentrations of hIL-10 fusion protein in the periplasm and supernatant of E. coli at 37 °C growth temperature were 130 ± 40 and 2 ± 1 ng/ml, respectively. The molecular mass of the recombinant protein was assessed via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis, indicating correct processing of the signaling sequence in E. coli. In vitro biological activity was shown by phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 3 and suppression of tumor necrosis factor α secretion in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

  5. Characterization of secretory proteins from cultured cauda epididymal cells that significantly sustain bovine sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Moreno, Carlos; Boilard, Mathieu; Sullivan, Robert; Sirard, Marc-André

    2002-12-01

    Epididymis provides a safe environment in which stored-spermatozoa could survive for days before ejaculation. In vitro studies suggested that epididymal proteins seem to be implicated in sperm survival during coincubation with cultured epididymal cells. This study was basically designed to confirm if secretory proteins from bovine epididymal cell cultures provide sperm protection against rapid loss of sperm motility in vitro. Bovine spermatozoa were incubated in conditioned media (CM), which were prepared from cultured cauda epididymal cell (CEC). Motion parameters were recorded using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. Sperm-free protein extracts from CM were fractionated by ultrafiltration through a 10-kDa cut off membrane. A significantly positive effect on sperm motility was observed when spermatozoa were incubated in CM (54 +/- 4%) and CM > 10 kDa (57 +/- 4%) compared to CM < 10-kDa fraction (30 +/- 3%) or fresh media (34 +/- 3%), after a 6-hr incubation period. This beneficial effect on sperm motility was abolished when the CM > 10-kDa fraction was heat-treated at 100 degrees C for 10 min. The CM > 10 kDa fraction provides factors that remained active even though spermatozoa were washed twice after a 2-hr preincubation period. To identify potential beneficial factors, bovine spermatozoa were incubated with radiolabeled proteins obtained using (35)S-methionine in culture medium. SDS-PAGE analysis of proteins extracted from CM-preincubated spermatozoa revealed the presence of a 42-kDa protein strongly associated to the sperm surface. This 42-kDa spot was trypsin-digested and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) as a protein homologue to a 35-kDa bovine estrogen-sulfotransferase. This protein can play a role in epididymal biology and sperm function. Taken together, these results suggest that specific epididymal proteins can be implicated in the sperm protection in vitro, and can be characterized in our cell culture

  6. Conversion of proteins from a non-polarized to an apical secretory pattern in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Lotte K. . E-mail: vogel@imbg.ku.dk; Larsen, Jakob E.; Hansen, Martin; Truffer, Renato

    2005-05-13

    Previously it was shown that fusion proteins containing the amino terminus of an apical targeted member of the serpin family fused to the corresponding carboxyl terminus of the non-polarized secreted serpin, antithrombin, are secreted mainly to the apical side of MDCK cells. The present study shows that this is neither due to the transfer of an apical sorting signal from the apically expressed proteins, since a sequence of random amino acids acts the same, nor is it due to the deletion of a conserved signal for correct targeting from the non-polarized secreted protein. Our results suggest that the polarity of secretion is determined by conformational sensitive sorting signals.

  7. Characterization of toxins from the broad-banded water snake Helicops angulatus (Linnaeus, 1758): isolation of a cysteine-rich secretory protein, Helicopsin.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Amalid; Sánchez, Elda E; Galán, Jacob A; Tao, W Andy; Guerrero, Belsy; Navarrete, Luis F; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2011-04-01

    Helicops angulatus (broad-banded water snake) according to recent proposals is presently cited in the family Dipsadidae, subfamily Xenodontinae, forming the tribe Hydropsini along with the genera Hydrops and Pseudoeryx. The current work characterizes the proteolytic and neurotoxic activities of H. angulatus crude toxins from salivary excretion (SE) and describes the isolation and identification of a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) called helicopsin. The SE lethal dose (LD₅₀) was 5.3 mg/kg; however, the SE did not contain hemorrhagic activity. Helicopsin was purified using activity-guided, Superose 12 10/300 GL molecular exclusion, Mono Q10 ion exchange, and Protein Pak 60 molecular exclusion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed a highly purified band of approximately 20 kDa. The minimal lethal dose for helicopsin was 0.4 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis identified 2 unique peptides MEWYPEAAANAER and YTQIVWYK, representing a protein sequence (deleted homology) belonging to cysteine-rich secretory proteins, which are conserved in snake venoms (CRISPs). CRISPs are a large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins found in various organisms and participate in diverse biological processes. Helicopsin exhibited robust neurotoxic activity as evidenced by immediate death (~8 min) due to respiratory paralysis in NIH mice. These observations for helicopsin purified from H. angulatus provide further evidence of the extensive distribution of highly potent neurotoxins in the Colubroidea superfamily of snakes than previously described.

  8. Lifespan Extension Conferred by Endoplasmic Reticulum Secretory Pathway Deficiency Requires Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Delaney, Joe R.; Kaya, Alaattin; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The UPR restores ER homeostasis by degrading misfolded proteins, inhibiting translation, and increasing expression of chaperones that enhance ER protein folding capacity. Although ER stress and protein aggregation have been implicated in aging, the role of UPR signaling in regulating lifespan remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of several UPR target genes significantly increases replicative lifespan in yeast. This extended lifespan depends on a functional ER stress sensor protein, Ire1p, and is associated with constitutive activation of upstream UPR signaling. We applied ribosome profiling coupled with next generation sequencing to quantitatively examine translational changes associated with increased UPR activity and identified a set of stress response factors up-regulated in the long-lived mutants. Besides known UPR targets, we uncovered up-regulation of components of the cell wall and genes involved in cell wall biogenesis that confer resistance to multiple stresses. These findings demonstrate that the UPR is an important determinant of lifespan that governs ER stress and identify a signaling network that couples stress resistance to longevity. PMID:24391512

  9. A crucial role for the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in nicotinic cholinergic signaling to secretory protein transcription in pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, K; Wu, H; Mahata, S K; O'Connor, D T

    1998-07-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular signaling, and this cascade may impinge on cAMP response elements (CREs) of target genes. Both the MAPK pathway and chromogranin A expression may be activated by cytosolic calcium influx, and calcium-dependent signals map onto the chromogranin A promoter proximal CRE. We therefore probed the role of the MAPK pathway in chromogranin A biosynthesis after secretory stimulation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells by the nicotinic cholinergic pathway, the physiological secretory trigger. Chemical inhibition of either MAPK or MAPK kinase blocked the response of a transfected chromogranin A promoter to nicotine or protein kinase C activation [by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)], although nicotine-evoked catecholamine secretion was unaffected. Activation of the MAP kinase cascade (Ras, Raf, MAPK, or CREB kinase) by cotransfection of pathway components stimulated the chromogranin A promoter. Cotransfection of MAPK pathway dominant negative mutants (for Raf, MAPK, or CREB kinase) blocked nicotinic or PMA activation of chromogranin A, although a dominant negative Ras mutant was without effect. MAPK pathway enzymatic activity was stimulated by both nicotine and PMA. Point mutations of the chromogranin A CRE suggested that this element was necessary in cis for stimulation by nicotine, PMA, or chemical activation of the MAPK pathway. Transfer of the CRE to a heterologous promoter conferred inducibility by not only nicotine or cAMP but also MAPK activation. Expression of the CREB antagonist KCREB blocked the response of the chromogranin A promoter to nicotine, cAMP, or MAPK pathway activation by either chemical stimulation or cotransfection of active cascade components. Chromogranin A mRNA responded to MAPK pathway manipulation in a fashion similar to the transfected chromogranin A promoter, in both direction and magnitude. We conclude that the MAPK pathway is a necessary intermediate in

  10. βIII Spectrin Regulates the Structural Integrity and the Secretory Protein Transport of the Golgi Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Sicilia, Laia; Granell, Susana; Jovic, Marko; Sicart, Adrià; Mato, Eugenia; Johannes, Ludger; Balla, Tamas; Egea, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    A spectrin-based cytoskeleton is associated with endomembranes, including the Golgi complex and cytoplasmic vesicles, but its role remains poorly understood. Using new generated antibodies to specific peptide sequences of the human βIII spectrin, we here show its distribution in the Golgi complex, where it is enriched in the trans-Golgi and trans-Golgi network. The use of a drug-inducible enzymatic assay that depletes the Golgi-associated pool of PI4P as well as the expression of PH domains of Golgi proteins that specifically recognize this phosphoinositide both displaced βIII spectrin from the Golgi. However, the interference with actin dynamics using actin toxins did not affect the localization of βIII spectrin to Golgi membranes. Depletion of βIII spectrin using siRNA technology and the microinjection of anti-βIII spectrin antibodies into the cytoplasm lead to the fragmentation of the Golgi. At ultrastructural level, Golgi fragments showed swollen distal Golgi cisternae and vesicular structures. Using a variety of protein transport assays, we show that the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi and post-Golgi protein transports were impaired in βIII spectrin-depleted cells. However, the internalization of the Shiga toxin subunit B to the endoplasmic reticulum was unaffected. We state that βIII spectrin constitutes a major skeletal component of distal Golgi compartments, where it is necessary to maintain its structural integrity and secretory activity, and unlike actin, PI4P appears to be highly relevant for the association of βIII spectrin the Golgi complex. PMID:23233669

  11. Difference in distribution of membrane proteins between low- and high-density secretory granules in parotid acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko . E-mail: yoshigaki.junko@nihon-u.ac.jp; Katsumata, Osamu; Matsuki, Miwako; Yoshigaki, Tomoyoshi; Furuyama, Shunsuke; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2006-05-26

    Secretory granules (SGs) are considered to be generated as immature granules and to mature by condensation of their contents. In this study, SGs of parotid gland were separated into low-, medium-, and high-density granule fractions by Percoll-density gradient centrifugation, since it was proposed that the density corresponds to the degree of maturation. The observation with electron microscopy showed that granules in the three fractions were very similar. The average diameter of high-density granules was a little but significantly larger than that of low-density granules. Although the three fractions contained amylase, suggesting that they are all SGs, distribution of membrane proteins was markedly different. Syntaxin6 and VAMP4 were localized in the low-density granule fraction, while VAMP2 was concentrated in the high-density granule fraction. Immunoprecipitation with anti-syntaxin6 antibody caused coprecipitation of VAMP2 from the medium-density granule fraction without solubilization, but not from Triton X-100-solubilized fraction, while VAMP4 was coprecipitated from both fractions. Therefore, VAMP2 is present on the same granules, but is separated from syntaxin6 and VAMP4, which are expected to be removed from immature granules. These results suggest that the medium-density granules are intermediates from low- to high-density granules, and that the membrane components of SGs dynamically change by budding and fusion during maturation.

  12. Genome-Wide Comparison of Magnaporthe Species Reveals a Host-Specific Pattern of Secretory Proteins and Transposable Elements

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Malali

    2016-01-01

    Blast disease caused by the Magnaporthe species is a major factor affecting the productivity of rice, wheat and millets. This study was aimed at generating genomic information for rice and non-rice Magnaporthe isolates to understand the extent of genetic variation. We have sequenced the whole genome of the Magnaporthe isolates, infecting rice (leaf and neck), finger millet (leaf and neck), foxtail millet (leaf) and buffel grass (leaf). Rice and finger millet isolates infecting both leaf and neck tissues were sequenced, since the damage and yield loss caused due to neck blast is much higher as compared to leaf blast. The genome-wide comparison was carried out to study the variability in gene content, candidate effectors, repeat element distribution, genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and SNPs. The analysis of repeat element footprints revealed some genes such as naringenin, 2-oxoglutarate 3-dioxygenase being targeted by Pot2 and Occan, in isolates from different host species. Some repeat insertions were host-specific while other insertions were randomly shared between isolates. The distributions of repeat elements, secretory proteins, CAZymes and SNPs showed significant variation across host-specific lineages of Magnaporthe indicating an independent genome evolution orchestrated by multiple genomic factors. PMID:27658241

  13. Role of Endoproteolytic Dibasic Proprotein Processing in Maturation of Secretory Proteins in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Goller, Sabine P.; Schoisswohl, Doris; Baron, Michel; Parriche, Martine; Kubicek, Christian P.

    1998-01-01

    Cell extracts of Trichoderma reesei exhibited dibasic endopeptidase activity toward the carboxylic side of KR, RR, and PR sequences. This activity was stimulated by the presence of Ca2+ ions and localized in vesicles of low bouyant density; it therefore exhibited some similarity to yeast Kex2. Analytical chromatofocusing revealed a single peak of activity. The dibasic endopeptidase activity was strongly and irreversibly inhibited in vitro as well as in vivo by 1 mM p-amidinophenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (pAPMSF) but not by PMSF at concentrations up to 5 mM. We therefore used pAPMSF to study the role of the dibasic endopeptidase in the secretion of protein by T. reesei. Secretion of xylanase I (proprotein processing sequence -R-R-↓-R-↓-A-) and xylanase II (-K-R-↓-Q-) was strongly inhibited by 1 mM pAPMSF, and a larger, unprocessed enzyme form was detected intracellularly under these conditions. Secretion of cellobiohydrolase II (CBH II; -E-R-↓-Q-) was only slightly inhibited by pAPMSF, and no accumulation of unprocessed precursors was detected. In contrast, secretion of CBH I (-R-A-↓-Q-) was stimulated by pAPMSF addition, and a simultaneous decrease in the concentration of intracellular CBH I was detected. Similar experiments were also carried out with a single heterologous protein, ShBLE, the phleomycin-binding protein from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus, fused to a series of model proprotein-processing sequences downstream of the expression signals of the Aspergillus nidulans gpdA promoter. Consistent with the results obtained with homologous proteins, pAPMSF inhibited the secretion of ShBLE with fusions containing dibasic (RK and KR) target sequences, but it even stimulated secretion in fusions to LR, NHA, and EHA target sequences. Addition of 5 mM PMSF, a nonspecific inhibitor of serine protease, nonspecifically inhibited the secretion of heterologous proteins from fusions bearing the NHA and LR targets. These data point to the existence of different

  14. Human epididymis protein 4 and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in vaginal fluid: relation to vaginal components and bacterial composition.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Jayaram, Aswathi; Doulaveris, Georgios; Forney, Larry J; Ledger, William J; Witkin, Steven S

    2014-04-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a protease inhibitor and a recently identified serum biomarker for ovarian cancer. Properties of HE4 in the genital tract of healthy women have not been evaluated. We evaluated associations between HE4 and a second vaginal protease inhibitor, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), with vaginal concentrations of innate immune mediators or proteases and with the types of vaginal bacterial communities. Vaginal secretions were collected from 18 healthy reproductive age women and assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for concentrations of HE4, SLPI, kallikrein 5, cathepsin B, interleukin 1β (IL-1), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 ra), mannose-binding lectin (MBL), the inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8. The species composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 16 women was characterized by sequencing amplicons derived from 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA genes. Correlations between any 2 assays were analyzed by the Spearman rank correlation tests. Differences in the concentrations of HE4 and SLPI, and between soluble components and vaginal community types, were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U tests. Vaginal HE4 concentrations, but not SLPI levels, were positively correlated with levels of IL-1β (P = .0152), IL-1ra (P = .0061), MBL (P = .0100), and MMP-8 (P = .0315). The median vaginal HE4 level, as well as concentrations of MBL, IL-1β, IL-1ra, and MMP-8, was highest when Gardnerella vaginalis dominated a vaginal community. The association between HE4, elevated levels of proteases, immune mediators and high proportions of G vaginalis strongly suggests that HE4 is a component of the proinflammatory immune response in the female genital tract.

  15. Efficient secretory expression of the sweet-tasting protein brazzein in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyun-Joo; Noh, Jin-Seok; Kong, Kwang-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    Brazzein is an intensely sweet-tasting protein with high water solubility, heat stability, and taste properties resembling those of carbohydrate sweeteners. In the present study, we describe the expression of the synthetic gene encoding brazzein, a sweet protein in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The synthetic brazzein gene was designed based on the biased codons of the yeast, so as to optimize its expression, as well as on the extracellular secretion for expression in an active, soluble form. The synthesized brazzein gene was cloned into the secretion vector pKLAC2, which contains the yeast prepropeptide signal from the Saccharomycescerevisiae α-mating factor. The constructed plasmid pKLAC2-des-pE1M-brazzein was introduced into the yeast K. lactis GG799. The yeast transformants were cultured for high-yield secretion of the recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein in YPGal medium for 96 h at 30°C. The expressed recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein was purified by CM-Sepharose column chromatography and approximately 104 mg/L was obtained. The purity and conformational state of the recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein were confirmed using SDS-PAGE, HPLC, and circular dichroism. The identity of the recombinant protein was also confirmed by N-terminal amino acid analysis and taste testing. The purified recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein had an intrinsic sweetness in its minor form, approximately 2130 times sweeter than sucrose on a weight basis. These results demonstrate that the K. lactis expression system is useful for producing the recombinant brazzein in active form at a high yield with attributes useful in the food industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonclathrin coat protein gamma, a subunit of coatomer, binds to the cytoplasmic dilysine motif of membrane proteins of the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, C; Pavel, J; Coccia, F; Draken, E; Wegehingel, S; Tschochner, H; Wieland, F

    1996-01-01

    Coatomer, a cytosolic heterooligomeric protein complex that consists of seven subunits [alpha-, beta-, beta'-, gamma-, delta-, epsilon-, and zeta-COP (nonclathrin coat protein)], has been shown to interact with dilysine motifs typically found in the cytoplasmic domains of various endoplasmic-reticulum-resident membrane proteins [Cosson, P. & Letourneur, F. (1994) Science 263, 1629-1631]. We have used a photo-cross-linking approach to identify the site of coatomer that is involved in binding to the dilysine motifs. An octapeptide corresponding to the C-terminal tail of Wbp1p, a component of the yeast N-oligosaccharyltransferase complex, has been synthesized with a photoreactive phenylalanine at position -5 and was radioactively labeled with [125I]iodine at a tyrosine residue introduced at the N terminus of the peptide. Photolysis of isolated coatomer in the presence of this peptide and immunoprecipitation of coatomer from photo-cross-linked cell lysates reveal that gamma-COP is the predominantly labeled protein. From these results, we conclude that coatomer is able to bind to the cytoplasmic dilysine motifs of membrane proteins of the early secretory pathway via its gamma-COP subunit, whose complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence is also presented. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8700856

  17. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Sandra; Hempel, Madlen; Brückner, Sandra; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Kaufmann, Roland; Christ, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1) increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM) decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor) signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration. PMID:27409608

  18. Fast and efficient detection of tuberculosis antigens using liposome encapsulated secretory proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Dileep; Haque, Shafiul; Tiwari, Ram P; Jawed, Arshad; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2017-04-01

    A rapid and efficient diagnostic test was developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in serum samples of active tuberculosis (TB) and extrapulmonary TB patients via a liposomal agglutination-based method. A rapid card test has been developed to facilitate the recognition of high-affinity binding rabbit raised purified culture filtrate protein antibodies coupled on the surface of activated liposomal preparation. In the presence of TB antigens, the polyclonal antibodies bound to the liposomal particles demonstrate a visible agglutination reaction. The developed assay was simple, rapid, reliable, sensitive, and specific as a diagnostic test for the detection of antigens in serum samples of clinically confirmed cases of TB within 4-5 minutes' duration. The test was evaluated at different hospitals, medical colleges, and pathology centers, and involved 1483 participants. This investigation was conducted to detect the presence of these antigens during the period of active growth of the microorganism in serum samples for pulmonary TB and processed tissue biopsy for other extrapulmonary TB. Results obtained using this test were compared with acid-fast bacilli smear and culture results. Our study demonstrated that the newly developed liposome tuberculosis antigen card test detected antigens in our study population with approximately 97.48% sensitivity and 95.79% specificity. This is the first study to report the liposomal encapsulation of culture filtrate proteins from M. tuberculosis for diagnostic application. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Implantable Three-Dimensional Salivary Spheroid Assemblies Demonstrate Fluid and Protein Secretory Responses to Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Harrington, Daniel A.; Duncan, Randall L.; Jia, Xinqiao; Witt, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation treatment in patients with head and neck tumors commonly results in hyposalivation and xerostomia due to the loss of fluid-secreting salivary acinar cells. Patients develop susceptibility to oral infections, dental caries, impaired speech and swallowing, reducing the quality of life. Clinical management is largely unsatisfactory. The development of a tissue-engineered, implantable salivary gland will greatly benefit patients suffering from xerostomia. This report compares the ability of a 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) and a three-dimensional (3D) hyaluronic acid (HA)-based culture system to support functional salivary units capable of producing fluid and phenotypic proteins. Parotid cells seeded on 2.5D, as well as those encapsulated in 3D HA hydrogels, self-assembled into acini-like structures and expressed functional neurotransmitter receptors. Structures in 3D hydrogels merged to form organized 50 μm spheroids that could be maintained in culture for over 100 days and merged to form structures over 500 μm in size. Treatment of acini-like structures with the β-adrenergic agonists norepinephrine or isoproterenol increased granule production and α-amylase staining in treated structures, demonstrating regain of protein secretion. Upon treatment with the M3 muscarinic agonist acetylcholine, acini-like structures activated the fluid production pathway by increasing intracellular calcium levels. The increase in intracellular calcium seen in structures in the 3D hydrogel culture system was more robust and prolonged than that in 2.5D. To compare the long-term survival and retention of acini-like structures in vivo, cell-seeded 2.5D and 3D hydrogels were implanted into an athymic rat model. Cells in 2.5D failed to maintain organized acini-like structures and dispersed in the surrounding tissue. Encapsulated cells in 3D retained their spheroid structure and structural integrity, along with the salivary biomarkers and maintained viability for over 3 weeks in vivo

  20. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  1. Optimization of the secretory expression of recombinant human C-reactive protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Junming; Sun, Chengming; Chen, Lei; Sun, Lihui; Duan, Lijun; Zheng, Qing; Hu, Xuejun

    2017-10-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP), a classical human acute-phase plasma protein, is not only a sensitive systemic inflammatory marker but also an independent risk predictor of cardiovascular diseases. However, existing heterologous expression systems for expressing CRP is not efficient and cost-effective for large-scale industrial production of CRP to meet the growing market demand for CRP. This study aims to improve the secretion of recombinant CRP by Pichia pastoris via optimizing signal peptides, promoters and carbon sources. The CRP genes with encoding four different signal peptides were designed and synthesized. The genes were cloned into pPICZαA or pPICZ B, respectively via splicing by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE-PCR) technology and expressed in P. pastoris X-33, regulated by the alcohol oxidase I promoter (pAOX1). The CRP led by the α-mating factor secretion signal peptide (α-MF) was secreted at the highest level in these signal peptides. Then, a constitutive construct and expression of the CRP genes were achieved by switching to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (pGAP). Subsequently, different carbon sources and at different concentrations were used to further improve the secretion of CRP. The expression of CRP with the α-MF driven by the pGAP gave the highest yield of secreted CRP, about 3 mg/l of culture on the optimized culture conditions. The purified recombinant CRP exhibited good immunoreactivity determined by ELISA with anti-human CRP monoclonal antibody. The efficient engineering strategy established in this work might provide potential uses in large-scale industrial production of human CRP in the future.

  2. A study of the association of human secretory component with IgA and IgM proteins.

    PubMed

    Weicker, J; Underdown, B J

    1975-04-01

    Human secretory component (SC) was isolated from colostral whey, and the binding of 125I-SC to purified IgA and IgM monoclonal proteins was studied using two methods to separate free from immunoglobulin-bound 125I-SC: a) gel filtration on Sephadex G-200, and b) precipitation of 125I-SC-Ig complexes with anti-Ig antibody. Both IgA dimeric proteins and IgM pentamers bound 125I-SC with approximately one SC-binding site per mole of polymer and similar affinity. Assuming a reversible equilibrium, an apparent association constant congruent to 10-8 M-1 was calculated to govern the binding of 125I-SC to immunoglobulin polymers. The assignment of a single association constant may be an oversimplication, particularly for the case of IgA polymers, since evidence was obtained that disulfide bonds were formed in the 125I-SC-IgA complex. Despite the complexity of the reaction, binding of 125I-SC to both IgA and IgM polymers could be analyzed by standard methods of saturation analysis, and both were shown to have a similar affinity for 125I-SC. No differences were noted in the affinity of 125I-SC binding to the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses. Binding of monomeric IgA and IgM proteins could not be measured and was at least 100-fold lower than that found for IgA and IgM polymers. Complexes of 125I-SC with IgA dimers were presumed to involve covalent bond formation, since these complexes did not dissociate in guanidine-HCl. One IgA2 trimer did not form a covalent bond since it was completely dissociated in guanidine. In contrast, 125I-SC-IgM complexes were dissociated in denaturing solvent, indicating that such complexes were held together primarily by non-covalent bonds. Experiments with (Fc)5 mu isolated by high temperature tryptic digestion of IgM showed that binding of 125I-SC was to the Fc region of IgM proteins. It was suggested that the binding of SC with similar affinity to both IgA and IgM polymers may be important in the biologic function of both these immunoglobulin classes.

  3. Decrease of UPR- and ERAD-related proteins in Pichia pastoris during methanol-induced secretory insulin precursor production in controlled fed-batch cultures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pichia pastoris is a popular yeast preferably employed for secretory protein production. Secretion is not always efficient and endoplasmic retention of proteins with aberrant folding properties, or when produced at exaggerated rates, can occur. In these cases production usually leads to an unfolded protein response (UPR) and the induction of the endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD). P. pastoris is nowadays also an established host for secretory insulin precursor (IP) production, though little is known about the impact of IP production on the host cell physiology, in particular under industrially relevant production conditions. Here, we evaluate the cellular response to aox1 promoter-controlled, secretory IP production in controlled fed-batch processes using a proteome profiling approach. Results Cells were first grown in a batch procedure using a defined medium with a high glycerol concentration. After glycerol depletion IP production was initiated by methanol addition which was kept constant through continuous methanol feeding. The most prominent changes of the intracellular proteome after the onset of methanol feeding were related to the enzymes of central carbon metabolism. In particular, the enzymes of the methanol dissimilatory pathway - virtually absent in the glycerol batch phase - dominated the proteome during the methanol fed-batch phase. Unexpectedly, a strong decrease of UPR and ERAD related proteins was also observed during methanol-induced IP production. Compared to non-producing control strains grown under identical conditions the UPR down-regulation was less pronounced indicating that IP production elicits a detectable but non prominent UPR response which is repressed by the general culture condition-dependent UPR down-regulation after the shift from glycerol to methanol. Conclusions The passage of IP through the secretory pathway using an optimized IP vector and growing the strain at fed-batch conditions with a high initial

  4. Decrease of UPR- and ERAD-related proteins in Pichia pastoris during methanol-induced secretory insulin precursor production in controlled fed-batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Vanz, Ana Letícia; Nimtz, Manfred; Rinas, Ursula

    2014-02-13

    Pichia pastoris is a popular yeast preferably employed for secretory protein production. Secretion is not always efficient and endoplasmic retention of proteins with aberrant folding properties, or when produced at exaggerated rates, can occur. In these cases production usually leads to an unfolded protein response (UPR) and the induction of the endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD). P. pastoris is nowadays also an established host for secretory insulin precursor (IP) production, though little is known about the impact of IP production on the host cell physiology, in particular under industrially relevant production conditions. Here, we evaluate the cellular response to aox1 promoter-controlled, secretory IP production in controlled fed-batch processes using a proteome profiling approach. Cells were first grown in a batch procedure using a defined medium with a high glycerol concentration. After glycerol depletion IP production was initiated by methanol addition which was kept constant through continuous methanol feeding. The most prominent changes of the intracellular proteome after the onset of methanol feeding were related to the enzymes of central carbon metabolism. In particular, the enzymes of the methanol dissimilatory pathway - virtually absent in the glycerol batch phase - dominated the proteome during the methanol fed-batch phase. Unexpectedly, a strong decrease of UPR and ERAD related proteins was also observed during methanol-induced IP production. Compared to non-producing control strains grown under identical conditions the UPR down-regulation was less pronounced indicating that IP production elicits a detectable but non prominent UPR response which is repressed by the general culture condition-dependent UPR down-regulation after the shift from glycerol to methanol. The passage of IP through the secretory pathway using an optimized IP vector and growing the strain at fed-batch conditions with a high initial glycerol concentration does

  5. The ARH adaptor protein regulates endocytosis of the ROMK potassium secretory channel in mouse kidney

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Liang; Garuti, Rita; Kim, Bo-Young; Wade, James B.; Welling, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channels are exquisitely regulated to adjust renal potassium excretion and maintain potassium balance. Clathrin-dependent endocytosis plays a critical role, limiting urinary potassium loss in potassium deficiency. In renal disease, aberrant ROMK endocytosis may contribute to potassium retention and hyperkalemia. Previous work has indicated that ROMK endocytosis is stimulated by with-no-lysine (WNK) kinases, but the endocytotic signal and the internalization machinery have not been defined. Here, we found that ROMK bound directly to the clathrin adaptor molecule autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH), and this interaction was mediated by what we believe to be a novel variant of the canonical “NPXY” endocytotic signal, YxNPxFV. ARH recruits ROMK to clathrin-coated pits for constitutive and WNK1-stimuated endocytosis, and ARH knockdown decreased basal rates of ROMK endocytosis, in a heterologous expression system, COS-7 cells. We found that ARH was predominantly expressed in the distal nephron where it coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with ROMK. In mice, the abundance of kidney ARH protein was modulated by dietary potassium and inversely correlated with changes in ROMK. Furthermore, ARH-knockout mice exhibited an altered ROMK response to potassium intake. These data suggest that ARH marks ROMK for clathrin-dependent endocytosis, in concert with the demands of potassium homeostasis. PMID:19841541

  6. Ancylostoma ceylanicum Excretory-Secretory Protein 2 Adopts a Netrin-Like Fold and Defines a Novel Family of Nematode Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    K Kucera; L Harrison; M Cappello; Y Modis

    2011-12-31

    Hookworms are human parasites that have devastating effects on global health, particularly in underdeveloped countries. Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects humans and animals, making it a useful model organism to study disease pathogenesis. A. ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 (AceES-2), a highly immunoreactive molecule secreted by adult worms at the site of intestinal attachment, is partially protective when administered as a mucosal vaccine against hookworm anemia. The crystal structure of AceES-2 determined at 1.75 {angstrom} resolution shows that it adopts a netrin-like fold similar to that found in tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (TIMPs) and in complement factors C3 and C5. However, recombinant AceES-2 does not significantly inhibit the 10 most abundant human matrix metalloproteases or complement-mediated cell lysis. The presence of a highly acidic surface on AceES-2 suggests that it may function as a cytokine decoy receptor. Several small nematode proteins that have been annotated as TIMPs or netrin-domain-containing proteins display sequence homology in structurally important regions of AceES-2's netrin-likefold. Together, our results suggest that AceES-2 defines a novel family of nematode netrin-like proteins, which may function to modulate the host immune response to hookworm and other parasites.

  7. Ancylostoma ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 adopts a netrin-like fold and defines a novel family of nematode proteins.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Kaury; Harrison, Lisa M; Cappello, Michael; Modis, Yorgo

    2011-04-22

    Hookworms are human parasites that have devastating effects on global health, particularly in underdeveloped countries. Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects humans and animals, making it a useful model organism to study disease pathogenesis. A. ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 (AceES-2), a highly immunoreactive molecule secreted by adult worms at the site of intestinal attachment, is partially protective when administered as a mucosal vaccine against hookworm anemia. The crystal structure of AceES-2 determined at 1.75 Å resolution shows that it adopts a netrin-like fold similar to that found in tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (TIMPs) and in complement factors C3 and C5. However, recombinant AceES-2 does not significantly inhibit the 10 most abundant human matrix metalloproteases or complement-mediated cell lysis. The presence of a highly acidic surface on AceES-2 suggests that it may function as a cytokine decoy receptor. Several small nematode proteins that have been annotated as TIMPs or netrin-domain-containing proteins display sequence homology in structurally important regions of AceES-2's netrin-like fold. Together, our results suggest that AceES-2 defines a novel family of nematode netrin-like proteins, which may function to modulate the host immune response to hookworm and other parasites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Host-derived apolipoproteins play comparable roles with viral secretory proteins Erns and NS1 in the infectious particle formation of Flaviviridae

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Chikako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Satomi; Okamoto, Toru; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Yoshii, Kentaro; Kurosu, Takeshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Aoki, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Amphipathic α-helices of exchangeable apolipoproteins have shown to play crucial roles in the formation of infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles through the interaction with viral particles. Among the Flaviviridae members, pestivirus and flavivirus possess a viral structural protein Erns or a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) as secretory glycoproteins, respectively, while Hepacivirus including HCV has no secretory glycoprotein. In case of pestivirus replication, the C-terminal long amphipathic α-helices of Erns are important for anchoring to viral membrane. Here we show that host-derived apolipoproteins play functional roles similar to those of virally encoded Erns and NS1 in the formation of infectious particles. We examined whether Erns and NS1 could compensate for the role of apolipoproteins in particle formation of HCV in apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and ApoE double-knockout Huh7 (BE-KO), and non-hepatic 293T cells. We found that exogenous expression of either Erns or NS1 rescued infectious particle formation of HCV in the BE-KO and 293T cells. In addition, expression of apolipoproteins or NS1 partially rescued the production of infectious pestivirus particles in cells upon electroporation with an Erns-deleted non-infectious RNA. As with exchangeable apolipoproteins, the C-terminal amphipathic α-helices of Erns play the functional roles in the formation of infectious HCV or pestivirus particles. These results strongly suggest that the host- and virus-derived secretory glycoproteins have overlapping roles in the viral life cycle of Flaviviridae, especially in the maturation of infectious particles, while Erns and NS1 also participate in replication complex formation and viral entry, respectively. Considering the abundant hepatic expression and liver-specific propagation of these apolipoproteins, HCV might have evolved to utilize them in the formation of infectious particles through deletion of a secretory viral glycoprotein gene. PMID:28644867

  9. Coxsackievirus Expression of the Murine Secretory Protein Interleukin-4 Induces Increased Synthesis of Immunoglobulin G1 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Nora M.; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Tracy, Steven; Jackson, John; Höfling, Katja; Leser, J. Smith; Malone, James; Kolbeck, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We cloned the sequence encoding murine interleukin-4 (mIL-4), including the secretory signal, into the genome of CVB3/0, an artificially attenuated strain of coxsackievirus B3, at the junction of the capsid protein 1D and the viral protease 2Apro. Two strains of chimeric CVB3 were constructed using, in one case, identical sequences to encode 2Apro cleavage sites (CVB3/0-mIL4/47) on either side of the inserted coding sequence and, in the other case, nonidentical sequences that varied at the nucleotide level without changing the amino acid sequences (CVB3-PL2-mIL4/46). Transfection of HeLa cells yielded progeny viruses that replicated with rates similar to that of the parental CVB3/0 strain, although yields of mIL-4-expressing strains were approximately 10-fold lower than those of the parental virus. Western blot analysis of viral proteins isolated from HeLa cells inoculated with either strain of chimeric virus demonstrated that the chimeric viruses synthesized capsid protein 1D at approximately twofold-higher levels than the parental virus. mIL-4 protein was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in HeLa cells inoculated with either strain of chimeric virus. Lysates of HeLa cells inoculated with either chimeric virus induced the proliferation of the mIL-4-requiring murine MC-9 cell line, demonstrating biological activity of the CVB3-expressed mIL-4. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis of viral RNA derived from sequential passaging of CVB3/0-mIL4/47 in HeLa cells demonstrated deletion of the mIL-4 coding sequence occurring by the fourth passage, while similar analysis of CVB3-PL2-mIL4/46 RNA demonstrated detection of the mIL-4 coding sequence in the virus population through 10 generations in HeLa cells. mIL-4 protein levels determined by ELISA were consistent with the stability and loss data determined by RT-PCR analysis of the passaged viral genomes. Studies of insert stability of CVB3-PL2-mIL4/46 during replication in mice showed the presence of

  10. Cytoplasmic fragment of Alcadein α generated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis enhances amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) transport into the late secretory pathway and facilitates APP cleavage.

    PubMed

    Takei, Norio; Sobu, Yuriko; Kimura, Ayano; Urano, Satomi; Piao, Yi; Araki, Yoichi; Taru, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Hata, Saori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-09

    The neural type I membrane protein Alcadein α (Alcα), is primarily cleaved by amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) α-secretase to generate a membrane-associated carboxyl-terminal fragment (Alcα CTF), which is further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alcα peptides and generate an intracellular cytoplasmic domain fragment (Alcα ICD) in the late secretory pathway. By association with the neural adaptor protein X11L (X11-like), Alcα and APP form a ternary complex that suppresses the cleavage of both Alcα and APP by regulating the transport of these membrane proteins into the late secretory pathway where secretases are active. However, it has not been revealed how Alcα and APP are directed from the ternary complex formed largely in the Golgi into the late secretory pathway to reach a nerve terminus. Using a novel transgenic mouse line expressing excess amounts of human Alcα CTF (hAlcα CTF) in neurons, we found that expression of hAlcα CTF induced excess production of hAlcα ICD, which facilitated APP transport into the nerve terminus and enhanced APP metabolism, including Aβ generation. In vitro cell studies also demonstrated that excess expression of Alcα ICD released both APP and Alcα from the ternary complex. These results indicate that regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Alcα by γ-secretase regulates APP trafficking and the production of Aβ in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. RNA-binding Protein Immunoprecipitation (RIP) to Examine AUF1 Binding to Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) Factor mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Alspach, Elise; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation and subsequent isolation of nucleic acids allows for the investigation of protein:nucleic acid interactions. RNA-binding protein immunoprecipitation (RIP) is used for the analysis of protein interactions with mRNA. Combining RIP with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) further enhances the RIP technique by allowing for the quantitative assessment of RNA-binding protein interactions with their target mRNAs, and how these interactions change in different cellular settings. Here, we describe the immunoprecipitation of the RNA-binding protein AUF1 with several different factors associated with the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) (Alspach and Stewart, 2013), specifically IL6 and IL8. This protocol was originally published in Alspach et al. (2014). PMID:27453911

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis secretory proteins downregulate T cell activation by interfering with proximal and downstream T cell signalling events.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawna; Upadhyay, Rajni; Dua, Bhavyata; Khan, Naim Akhtar; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Bajaj, Bharat; Joshi, Beenu

    2015-11-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) modulates host immune response, mainly T cell responses for its own survival leading to disease or latent infection. The molecules and mechanisms utilized to accomplish immune subversion by M. tuberculosis are not fully understood. Understanding the molecular mechanism of T cell response to M. tuberculosis is important for development of efficacious vaccine against TB. Here, we investigated effect of M. tuberculosis antigens Ag85A and ESAT-6 on T cell signalling events in CD3/CD28 induced Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of PPD+ve healthy individuals and pulmonary TB patients. We studied CD3 induced intracellular calcium mobilization in PBMCs of healthy individuals and TB patients by spectrofluorimetry, CD3 and CD28 induced activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in PBMCs of healthy individuals and TB patients by western blotting and binding of transcription factors NFAT and NFκB by Electrophorectic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We observed CD3 triggered modulations in free intracellular calcium concentrations in PPD+ve healthy individuals and pulmonary TB patients after the treatment of M. tuberculosis antigens. As regards the downstream signalling events, phosphorylation of MAPKs, Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 was curtailed by M. tuberculosis antigens in TB patients whereas, in PPD+ve healthy individuals only ERK1/2 phosphorylation was inhibited. Besides, the terminal signalling events like binding of transcription factors NFAT and NFκB was also altered by M. tuberculosis antigens. Altogether, our results suggest that M. tuberculosis antigens, specifically ESAT-6, interfere with TCR/CD28-induced upstream as well as downstream signalling events which might be responsible for defective IL-2 production which further contributed in T-cell unresponsiveness, implicated in the progression of disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to

  13. Activity-based targeting of secretory phospholipase A2 enzymes: A fatty-acid-binding-protein assisted approach.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Amir; Zelaya, Ligia; Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha; Hajdu, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Syntheses and enzymological characterization of fluorogenic substrate probes targeting secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) for detection and quantitative assays are presented. Three fluorogenic phosphatidylcholine analogs PC-1, PC-2, and PC-3 each containing the duo of 7-mercapto-4-methyl-coumarin fluorophore and 2,4-dinitroanaline quencher on either tail were synthesized from (R)-3-amino-1,2-propanediol and R-(-)-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane-4-methanol. These small reporter groups are advantageous in preserving natural membrane integrity. Phosphocholine was incorporated into the sn-3 position of the glycerol backbone. Acyl amino group at the sn-1 position in PC-1 and PC-2 is meant to block sPLA1. The sn-1 and sn-2 positions of the glycerol backbone in PC-1 have a quencher terminated 12-carbon chain and fluorophore terminated 11-carbon chain respectively. PC-2 has a quencher terminated 3-carbon chain at the sn-2 and chain terminating fluorescent reporter at the sn-1 positions. PC-3 resembles PC-1 except for an ester instead of amide at the sn-1 position, because of which it is more similar to natural phospholipids than PC-1. It was designed to elucidate the effect of replacing the ester group with amide by comparing its hydrolysis rate with that of PC-1. Design principles apply to synthesis of other labeled phospholipids. Enzymological characterization using bee-venom sPLA2 was performed by a fatty-acid-binding-protein fluorescence assay and by pH-Stat method in which the amount of fatty acid released by hydrolysis is given by the amount of base required to maintain a constant pH of 8.0. Hydrolytic activity toward PC-1 and PC-3 were each about 238±25μmol/mg/min and 537μmol/mg/min on unmodified phospholipid. Ester to amide change did not affect hydrolysis rates. Activity toward PC-2 was about 45-μmol/mg/min. PC-1 and PC-3 show potential for targeted real-time spectrophotometric assay of sPLA2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recombinant Haemonchus contortus 24 kDa excretory/secretory protein (rHcES-24) modulate the immune functions of goat PBMCs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Li, Baojie; Ehsan, Muhammad; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Yujian; Hasan, Muhammad Waqqas; Yan, Ruofeng; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2016-12-20

    A 24 kDa protein is one of the important components in Haemonchus contortus (barber pole worm) excretory/secretory products (HcESPs), which was shown to have important antigenic function. However, little is known about the immunomodulatory effects of this proteinon host cell. In the present study gene encoding 24kDa excretory/secretory protein (HcES-24) was cloned. The recombinant protein of HcES-24 (rHcES-24) was expressed in a histidine-tagged fusion protein soluble form in Escherichia coli. Binding activity of rHcES-24 to goat PBMCs was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and its immunomudulatory effect on cytokine secretion, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide production were observed by co-incubation of rHcES-24. IFA results revealed that rHcES-24 could bind to the PBMCs. The interaction of rHcES-24 increased the production of IL4, IL10, IL17 and cell migration in dose dependent manner. However, rHcES-24 treatment significantly suppressed the production of IFNγ, proliferation of the PBMC and Nitric oxide (NO) production. Our findings showed that the rHcES-24 played important regulatory effects on the goat PBMCs.

  15. Recombinant Haemonchus contortus 24 kDa excretory/secretory protein (rHcES-24) modulate the immune functions of goat PBMCs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baojie; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Yujian; Hasan, Muhammad Waqqas; Yan, Ruofeng; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2016-01-01

    A 24 kDa protein is one of the important components in Haemonchus contortus (barber pole worm) excretory/secretory products (HcESPs), which was shown to have important antigenic function. However, little is known about the immunomodulatory effects of this proteinon host cell. In the present study gene encoding 24kDa excretory/secretory protein (HcES-24) was cloned. The recombinant protein of HcES-24 (rHcES-24) was expressed in a histidine-tagged fusion protein soluble form in Escherichia coli. Binding activity of rHcES-24 to goat PBMCs was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and its immunomudulatory effect on cytokine secretion, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide production were observed by co-incubation of rHcES-24. IFA results revealed that rHcES-24 could bind to the PBMCs. The interaction of rHcES-24 increased the production of IL4, IL10, IL17 and cell migration in dose dependent manner. However, rHcES-24 treatment significantly suppressed the production of IFNγ, proliferation of the PBMC and Nitric oxide (NO) production. Our findings showed that the rHcES-24 played important regulatory effects on the goat PBMCs. PMID:27893414

  16. Gene fusions of signal sequences with a modified beta-glucuronidase gene results in retention of the beta-glucuronidase protein in the secretory pathway/plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yan, X; Gonzales, R A; Wagner, G J

    1997-11-01

    Signal sequences and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signals are known to play central roles in targeting and translocation in the secretory pathway, but molecular aspects about their involvement are poorly understood. We tested the effectiveness of deduced signal sequences from various genes (hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein [HRGP] from Phaseolus vulgaris; Serpin from Manduca sexta) to direct a modified beta-glucuronidase (GUS) protein into the secretory pathway in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The reporter protein was not secreted to the cell wall/extracellular space as monitored using extracellular fluid analysis (low- or high-ionic-strength conditions) but occurred in membranes with a density of 1.16 to 1.20 g/mL. Membrane-bound GUS equilibrated with the plasma membrane (PM) and the ER on linear sucrose gradients with or without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, suggesting that GUS associates with the ER and the PM. Confocal microscopy of fixed cultured cells prepared from GUS control and HRGP signal peptide (SP)-GUS-expressing plants suggested only cytosolic localization in GUS-expressing plants but substantial peripheral localization in HRGP SP-GUS plants, which is consistent with GUS being associated with the PM. Aqueous two-phase partitioning of microsomal membranes from HRGP SP-GUS and Serpin SP-GUS transgenic leaves also indicated that GUS activity was enriched in the ER and the PM. These observations, together with hydrophobic moment plot analysis, suggest that properties of the SP-GUS protein result in its retention in the secretory pathway and PM.

  17. Bem3, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, traffics to an intracellular compartment and recruits the secretory Rab GTPase Sec4 to endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Boettner, Douglas R.; Fairn, Gregory D.; Schlam, Daniel; Bonilla Valentin, Fernando J.; Michael McCaffery, J.; Hazbun, Tony; Staiger, Chris J.; Grinstein, Sergio; Lemmon, Sandra K.; Claudio Aguilar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell polarity is essential for many cellular functions including division and cell-fate determination. Although RhoGTPase signaling and vesicle trafficking are both required for the establishment of cell polarity, the mechanisms by which they are coordinated are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast RhoGAP (GTPase activating protein), Bem3, is targeted to sites of polarized growth by the endocytic and recycling pathways. Specifically, deletion of SLA2 or RCY1 led to mislocalization of Bem3 to depolarized puncta and accumulation in intracellular compartments, respectively. Bem3 partitioned between the plasma membrane and an intracellular membrane-bound compartment. These Bem3-positive structures were polarized towards sites of bud emergence and were mostly observed during the pre-mitotic phase of apical growth. Cell biological and biochemical approaches demonstrated that this intracellular Bem3 compartment contained markers for both the endocytic and secretory pathways, which were reminiscent of the Spitzenkörper present in the hyphal tips of growing fungi. Importantly, Bem3 was not a passive cargo, but recruited the secretory Rab protein, Sec4, to the Bem3-containing compartments. Moreover, Bem3 deletion resulted in less efficient localization of Sec4 to bud tips during early stages of bud emergence. Surprisingly, these effects of Bem3 on Sec4 were independent of its GAP activity, but depended on its ability to efficiently bind endomembranes. This work unveils unsuspected and important details of the relationship between vesicle traffic and elements of the cell polarity machinery: (1) Bem3, a cell polarity and peripherally associated membrane protein, relies on vesicle trafficking to maintain its proper localization; and (2) in turn, Bem3 influences secretory vesicle trafficking. PMID:23943876

  18. Gene fusions of signal sequences with a modified beta-glucuronidase gene results in retention of the beta-glucuronidase protein in the secretory pathway/plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, X; Gonzales, R A; Wagner, G J

    1997-01-01

    Signal sequences and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signals are known to play central roles in targeting and translocation in the secretory pathway, but molecular aspects about their involvement are poorly understood. We tested the effectiveness of deduced signal sequences from various genes (hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein [HRGP] from Phaseolus vulgaris; Serpin from Manduca sexta) to direct a modified beta-glucuronidase (GUS) protein into the secretory pathway in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The reporter protein was not secreted to the cell wall/extracellular space as monitored using extracellular fluid analysis (low- or high-ionic-strength conditions) but occurred in membranes with a density of 1.16 to 1.20 g/mL. Membrane-bound GUS equilibrated with the plasma membrane (PM) and the ER on linear sucrose gradients with or without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, suggesting that GUS associates with the ER and the PM. Confocal microscopy of fixed cultured cells prepared from GUS control and HRGP signal peptide (SP)-GUS-expressing plants suggested only cytosolic localization in GUS-expressing plants but substantial peripheral localization in HRGP SP-GUS plants, which is consistent with GUS being associated with the PM. Aqueous two-phase partitioning of microsomal membranes from HRGP SP-GUS and Serpin SP-GUS transgenic leaves also indicated that GUS activity was enriched in the ER and the PM. These observations, together with hydrophobic moment plot analysis, suggest that properties of the SP-GUS protein result in its retention in the secretory pathway and PM. PMID:9390428

  19. The 11S rat seminal vesicle mRNA directs the in vitro synthesis of two precursors of the major secretory protein IV.

    PubMed Central

    Metafora, S; Guardiola, J; Paonessa, G; Abrescia, P

    1984-01-01

    The 11s mRNA extracted from the rat seminal vesicles directs the synthesis of two different precursors of the major secretory protein RSV-IV. These two precursors are not interconvertible and seemingly originate from different translational events. Sucrose gradients, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and positive hybridization translation experiments do not allow the separation of the two putatively different mRNAs. It is concluded that the two RSV-IV precursors either derive from two extremely similar, but physically not separable mRNA species, or from two different modes of translation of the same mRNA molecule. Images PMID:6701092

  20. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP) Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Wang, Shuai; Bo, Gao; Ehsan, Muhammad; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai; Xu, LiXin; Li, XiangRui

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO) distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis. PMID:27467391

  1. Stage-specific excretory-secretory small heat shock proteins from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti--putative links to host's intestinal mucosal defense system.

    PubMed

    Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Geisinger, Frank; Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Soblik, Hanns; Steen, Hanno; Mitreva, Makedonka; Erttmann, Klaus D; Perbandt, Markus; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W

    2011-09-01

    In a search for molecules involved in the interaction between intestinal nematodes and mammalian mucosal host cells, we performed MS to identify excretory-secretory proteins from Strongyloides ratti. In the excretory-secretory proteins of the parasitic female stage, we detected, in addition to other peptides, peptides homologous with the Caenorhabditis elegans heat shock protein (HSP)-17, named Sra-HSP-17.1 (∼ 19 kDa) and Sra-HSP-17.2 (∼ 18 kDa), with 49% amino acid identity. The full-length cDNAs (483 bp and 474 bp, respectively) were identified, and the genomic organization was analyzed. To allow further characterization, the proteins were recombinantly expressed and purified. Profiling of transcription by quantitative real-time-PCR and of protein by ELISA in various developmental stages revealed parasitic female-specific expression. Sequence analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences showed that the two proteins share a conserved α-crystallin domain and variable N-terminals. The Sra-HSP-17s showed the highest homology with the deduced small HSP sequence of the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis. We observed strong immunogenicity of both proteins, leading to strong IgG responses following infection of rats. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the binding of Sra-HSP-17s to the monocyte-macrophage lineage but not to peripheral lymphocytes or neutrophils. A rat intestinal epithelial cell line showed dose-dependent binding to Sra-HSP-17.1, but not to Sra-HSP-17.2. Exposed monocytes released interleukin-10 but not tumor necrosis factor-α in response to Sra-HSP-17s, suggesting the possible involvement of secreted female proteins in host immune responses. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  2. Better Than Nothing? Limitations of the Prediction Tool SecretomeP in the Search for Leaderless Secretory Proteins (LSPs) in Plants.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Andrew; Davis, Melissa J; Doblin, Monika S; Bacic, Antony

    2016-01-01

    In proteomic analyses of the plant secretome, the presence of putative leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs) is difficult to confirm due to the possibility of contamination from other sub-cellular compartments. In the absence of a plant-specific tool for predicting LSPs, the mammalian-trained SecretomeP has been applied to plant proteins in multiple studies to identify the most likely LSPs. This study investigates the effectiveness of using SecretomeP on plant proteins, identifies its limitations and provides a benchmark for its use. In the absence of experimentally verified LSPs we exploit the common-feature hypothesis behind SecretomeP and use known classically secreted proteins (CSPs) of plants as a proxy to evaluate its accuracy. We show that, contrary to the common-feature hypothesis, plant CSPs are a poor proxy for evaluating LSP detection due to variation in the SecretomeP prediction scores when the signal peptide (SP) is modified. Removing the SP region from CSPs and comparing the predictive performance against non-secretory proteins indicates that commonly used threshold scores of 0.5 and 0.6 result in false-positive rates in excess of 0.3 when applied to plants proteins. Setting the false-positive rate to 0.05, consistent with the original mammalian performance of SecretomeP, yields only a marginally higher true positive rate compared to false positives. Therefore the use of SecretomeP on plant proteins is not recommended. This study investigates the trade-offs of using SecretomeP on plant proteins and provides insights into predictive features for future development of plant-specific common-feature tools.

  3. Better Than Nothing? Limitations of the Prediction Tool SecretomeP in the Search for Leaderless Secretory Proteins (LSPs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lonsdale, Andrew; Davis, Melissa J.; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony

    2016-01-01

    In proteomic analyses of the plant secretome, the presence of putative leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs) is difficult to confirm due to the possibility of contamination from other sub-cellular compartments. In the absence of a plant-specific tool for predicting LSPs, the mammalian-trained SecretomeP has been applied to plant proteins in multiple studies to identify the most likely LSPs. This study investigates the effectiveness of using SecretomeP on plant proteins, identifies its limitations and provides a benchmark for its use. In the absence of experimentally verified LSPs we exploit the common-feature hypothesis behind SecretomeP and use known classically secreted proteins (CSPs) of plants as a proxy to evaluate its accuracy. We show that, contrary to the common-feature hypothesis, plant CSPs are a poor proxy for evaluating LSP detection due to variation in the SecretomeP prediction scores when the signal peptide (SP) is modified. Removing the SP region from CSPs and comparing the predictive performance against non-secretory proteins indicates that commonly used threshold scores of 0.5 and 0.6 result in false-positive rates in excess of 0.3 when applied to plants proteins. Setting the false-positive rate to 0.05, consistent with the original mammalian performance of SecretomeP, yields only a marginally higher true positive rate compared to false positives. Therefore the use of SecretomeP on plant proteins is not recommended. This study investigates the trade-offs of using SecretomeP on plant proteins and provides insights into predictive features for future development of plant-specific common-feature tools. PMID:27729919

  4. Transport of proteins to the plant vacuole is not by bulk flow through the secretory system, and requires positive sorting information.

    PubMed

    Dorel, C; Voelker, T A; Herman, E M; Chrispeels, M J

    1989-02-01

    Plant cells, like other eukaryotic cells, use the secretory pathway to target proteins to the vacuolar/lysosomal compartment and to the extracellular space. We wished to determine whether the presence of a hydrophobic signal peptide would result in the transport of a reporter protein to vacuoles by bulk flow; to investigate this question, we expressed a chimeric gene in transgenic tobacco. The chimeric gene, Phalb, used for this study consists of the 1,188-bp 5' upstream sequence and the hydrophobic signal sequence of a vacuolar seed protein phytohemagglutinin, and the coding sequence of a cytosolic seed albumin (PA2). The chimeric protein PHALB cross-reacted with antibodies to PA2 and was found in the seeds of the transgenic plants (approximately 0.7% of total protein), but not in the leaves, roots, or flowers. Immunoblot analyses of seed extracts revealed four glycosylated polypeptides ranging in molecular weight from 29,000 to 32,000. The four polypeptides are glycoforms of a single polypeptide of Mr 27,000, and the heterogeneity is due to the presence of high mannose and endoglycosidase H-resistant glycans. The PHALB products reacted with an antiserum specific for complex plant glycans indicating that the glycans had been modified in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation of glycerol extracts of mature seeds showed that only small amounts of PHALB accumulated in the protein storage vacuoles of the tobacco seeds. In homogenates made in an isotonic medium, very little PHALB was associated with the organelle fraction containing the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus; most of it was in the soluble fraction. We conclude that PHALB passed through the Golgi apparatus, but did not arrive in the vacuoles. Transport to vacuoles is not by a bulk-flow mechanism, once proteins have entered the secretory system, and requires information beyond that provided by a hydrophobic signal peptide.

  5. DEVELOPMENTALLY REGULATED PLASMA MEMBRANE PROTEIN of Nicotiana benthamiana contributes to potyvirus movement and transports to plasmodesmata via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin system.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chao; Cong, Qian-Qian; Li, Xiang-Dong; Mou, An-Li; Gao, Rui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Tian, Yan-Ping

    2015-02-01

    The intercellular movement of plant viruses requires both viral and host proteins. Previous studies have demonstrated that the frame-shift protein P3N-PIPO (for the protein encoded by the open reading frame [ORF] containing 5'-terminus of P3 and a +2 frame-shift ORF called Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF and embedded in the P3) and CYLINDRICAL INCLUSION (CI) proteins were required for potyvirus cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide genetic evidence showing that a Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV; genus Potyvirus) mutant carrying a truncated PIPO domain of 58 amino acid residues could move between cells and induce systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants; mutants carrying a PIPO domain of seven, 20, or 43 amino acid residues failed to move between cells and cause systemic infection in this host plant. Interestingly, the movement-defective mutants produced progeny that eliminated the previously introduced stop codons and thus restored their systemic movement ability. We also present evidence showing that a developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein of N. benthamiana (referred to as NbDREPP) interacted with both P3N-PIPO and CI of the movement-competent TVBMV. The knockdown of NbDREPP gene expression in N. benthamiana impeded the cell-to-cell movement of TVBMV. NbDREPP was shown to colocalize with TVBMV P3N-PIPO and CI at plasmodesmata (PD) and traffic to PD via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system. We also show that myosin XI-2 is specially required for transporting NbDREPP to PD. In conclusion, NbDREPP is a key host protein within the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system that interacts with two movement proteins and influences virus movement.

  6. DEVELOPMENTALLY REGULATED PLASMA MEMBRANE PROTEIN of Nicotiana benthamiana Contributes to Potyvirus Movement and Transports to Plasmodesmata via the Early Secretory Pathway and the Actomyosin System1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Chao; Cong, Qian-Qian; Li, Xiang-Dong; Mou, An-Li; Gao, Rui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Tian, Yan-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular movement of plant viruses requires both viral and host proteins. Previous studies have demonstrated that the frame-shift protein P3N-PIPO (for the protein encoded by the open reading frame [ORF] containing 5′-terminus of P3 and a +2 frame-shift ORF called Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF and embedded in the P3) and CYLINDRICAL INCLUSION (CI) proteins were required for potyvirus cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide genetic evidence showing that a Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV; genus Potyvirus) mutant carrying a truncated PIPO domain of 58 amino acid residues could move between cells and induce systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants; mutants carrying a PIPO domain of seven, 20, or 43 amino acid residues failed to move between cells and cause systemic infection in this host plant. Interestingly, the movement-defective mutants produced progeny that eliminated the previously introduced stop codons and thus restored their systemic movement ability. We also present evidence showing that a developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein of N. benthamiana (referred to as NbDREPP) interacted with both P3N-PIPO and CI of the movement-competent TVBMV. The knockdown of NbDREPP gene expression in N. benthamiana impeded the cell-to-cell movement of TVBMV. NbDREPP was shown to colocalize with TVBMV P3N-PIPO and CI at plasmodesmata (PD) and traffic to PD via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system. We also show that myosin XI-2 is specially required for transporting NbDREPP to PD. In conclusion, NbDREPP is a key host protein within the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system that interacts with two movement proteins and influences virus movement. PMID:25540331

  7. Proteome analysis of excretory-secretory proteins of Entamoeba histolytica HM1:IMSS via LC-ESI-MS/MS and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF.

    PubMed

    Ujang, Jorim Anak; Kwan, Soon Hong; Ismail, Mohd Nazri; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah; Othman, Nurulhasanah

    2016-01-01

    Excretory-secretory (ES) proteins of E. histolytica are thought to play important roles in the host invasion, metabolism, and defence. Elucidation of the types and functions of E. histolytica ES proteins can further our understanding of the disease pathogenesis. Thus, the aim of this study is to use proteomics approach to better understand the complex ES proteins of the protozoa. E. histolytica ES proteins were prepared by culturing the trophozoites in protein-free medium. The ES proteins were identified using two mass spectrometry tools, namely, LC-ESI-MS/MS and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF. The identified proteins were then classified according to their biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular components using the Panther classification system (PantherDB). A complementary list of 219 proteins was identified; this comprised 201 proteins detected by LC-ESI-MS/MS and 107 proteins by LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF. Of the 219 proteins, 89 were identified by both mass-spectrometry systems, while 112 and 18 proteins were detected exclusively by LC-ESI-MS/MS and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF respectively. Biological protein functional analysis using PantherDB showed that 27% of the proteins were involved in metabolic processes. Using molecular functional and cellular component analyses, 35% of the proteins were found to be involved in catalytic activity, and 21% were associated with the cell parts. This study showed that complementary use of LC-ESI-MS/MS and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF has improved the identification of ES proteins. The results have increased our understanding of the types of proteins excreted/secreted by the amoeba and provided further evidence of the involvement of ES proteins in intestinal colonisation and evasion of the host immune system, as well as in encystation and excystation of the parasite.

  8. Loss of secretory pathway FK506-binding proteins results in cold-sensitive lethality and associate extracellular matrix defects in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Winter, Alan D; Eschenlauer, Sylvain C P; McCormack, Gillian; Page, Antony P

    2007-04-27

    The FK506-binding proteins (FKBs) represent ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the rate-limiting peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerization step in protein folding. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has eight FKBs, three of which (FKB-3, -4, and -5) have dual peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) domains, signal peptides and ER retention signals. PPIase activity has been detected for recombinant FKB-3. Both FKB-3 and -5 are expressed in the exoskeleton-synthesizing hypodermis with transcript peaks that correspond to the molting and collagen synthesis cycles. FKB-4 is expressed at a low level throughout development. No phenotypes were observed in deletion mutants in each of the secretory pathway FKBs. Combined triple and fkb-4, -5 double deletion mutants were however found to arrest at 12 degrees C, but developed normally at 15-25 degrees C. This cold-sensitive larval lethal effect was not maternally derived, occurred during embryogenesis, and could be rescued following the transgenic introduction of a wild type copy of either fkb-4 or fkb-5. The temperature-sensitive defects also affected molting, cuticle collagen expression, hypodermal seam cell morphology, and the structural integrity of the cuticular extracellular matrix. This study establishes that the secretory pathway FK506-binding PPIase enzymes are essential for normal nematode development, collagen biogenesis, and the formation of an intact exoskeleton under adverse physiological conditions.

  9. Proteolysis in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.E.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    Many secretory proteins are degraded intracellularly rather than secreted, however the location of this catabolic process is not known. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the degradation occurs in the organelles of the secretory pathway. Slices of rat liver were incubated with (/sup 14/C)leucine for 3 h and then incubated under chase conditions for 30 min. The tissue was homogenized and the Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The organelles were incubated in 0.3M sucrose-50 mM citrate (pH 4) for 8-12 h at 37 C; control samples were incubated at 4 C. Percent degradation was calculated as the amount of acid soluble radioactivity released relative to total radioactivity in the sample. Proteolysis in the organelles incubated at 37 C was as follows: Golgi: 15-25%; sER: 10-20%; rER: 10-20%. Proteolysis at 4 C was negligible in all cases. These results support the hypothesis that the compartments of the secretory pathway are capable of degrading newly synthesized secretory proteins.

  10. Expression, immunolocalization, and serological reactivity of a novel sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase-like protein, an excretory/secretory antigen from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanwei; Zheng, Youwei; Li, Yuzhe; Yang, Mei; Li, Ting; Zeng, Suxiang; Yu, Xinbing; Huang, Huaiqiu; Hu, Xuchu

    2013-06-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by Clonorchis sinensis infection, is a zoonotic parasitic disease of hepatobiliary system in which the proteins released by adult are major pathogenetic factors. In this study, we first characterized a putative sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase (CsSMPase) A-like secretory protein, which was highly expressed in the adult worm. The full-length gene was cloned. The putative protein is of relatively low homology comparing with SMPase from other species, and of rich T cell and B cell epitopes, suggesting that it is an antigen of strong antigenicity. The complete coding sequence of the gene was expressed in the Escherichia coli. The recombinant CsSMPase (rCsSMPase) can be recognized by C. sinensis-infected serum, and the protein immunoserum can recognize a specific band in excretory/secretory products (ESPs) of C. sinensis adult by western blotting. Immunolocalization revealed that CsSMPase was not only localized on tegument, ventral sucker of metacercaria, and the intestine of adult but also on the nearby epithelium of bile duct of the infected Sprague-Dawley rats, implying that CsSMPase was mainly secreted and excreted through adult intestine and directly interacted with bile duct epithelium. Although immunized rats evoked high level antibody response, the antigen level was low in clonorchiasis patients. And the sensitivity and specificity of rCsSMPase were 50.0 % (12/24) and 88.4 % (61/69), in sera IgG-ELISA, respectively. It is likely due to the fact that CsSMPase binding to the plasma membrane of biliary epithelium decreases the antigen immune stimulation.

  11. The src-family protein-tyrosine kinase p59hck is located on the secretory granules in human neutrophils and translocates towards the phagosome during cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Möhn, H; Le Cabec, V; Fischer, S; Maridonneau-Parini, I

    1995-01-01

    The src-family protein-tyrosine kinase p59hck is mainly expressed in neutrophils; however, its functional role in these cells is unknown. Several other src-family members are localized on secretory vesicles and have been proposed to regulate intracellular traffic. We have established here the subcellular localization of p59hck in human neutrophils. Immunoblotting of subcellular fractions showed that approx. 60% of the p59hck per cell is localized on the secretory granules; the other 40% is distributed equally between non-granular membranes and the cytosol. Immunofluorescence of neutrophils and HL60 cells suggests that the p59hck-positive granules are azurophil granules. Granular p59hck is highly susceptible to degradation by an azurophil-granule proteinase. Different forms of p59hck occur in the three subcellular compartments: a 61 kDa form is mainly found in the granules, a 59 kDa form is predominant in the non-granular membranes, whereas cytosolic p59hck migrates as a doublet at 63 kDa. During the process of phagocytosis-linked degranulation, induced by serum-opsonized zymosan in neutrophils or HL60 cells, granular p59hck translocates towards the phagosome. The subcellular localization of p59hck suggests that the enzyme could be involved in the regulation of the degranulation process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626033

  12. Prognostic significance of surfactant protein A, surfactant protein D, Clara cell protein 16, S100 protein, trefoil factor 3, and prostatic secretory protein 94 in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Doubková, Martina; Karpíšek, Michal; Mazoch, Jiri; Skřičková, Jana; Doubek, Michael

    2016-10-07

    Identification of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) biomarkers may facilitate diagnosis and prognostication in various lung disorders. Serum and BALF levels of surfactant protein A (SP-A), surfactant protein D (SP-D), Clara cell protein 16 (CC16), S100 protein, trefoil factor 3 (TFF3), and prostatic secretory protein 94 (PSP94) were evaluated in 94 consecutive patients (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF; n=18), sarcoidosis (n=25), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=51)), and in 155 healthy controls. Biomarkers were measured at diagnosis and compared with disease characteristics. Both uniparametric and multiparametric analyses were used. Seven significant correlations were found: 1) BALF PSP94 level correlated with prognosis of sarcoidosis (P=0.035); 2) BALF SP-D level with pulmonary functions in IPF (P=0.032); 3) BALF SP-D and TFF3 with IPF mortality (P=0.049 and 0.017, respectively); 4) serum TFF3 level with COPD mortality (P=0.006,); 5) serum SP-A with pulmonary functions impairment in IPF (P=0.011); 6) serum SP-D level was associated with HRCT interstitial score in IPF (P=0.0346); and 7) serum SP-A was associated with staging of COPD according to spirometry (P<0.001). Moreover, our analysis showed that some biomarker levels differed significantly among the diseases: 1) BALF SP-D level differed between sarcoidosis and IPF; 2) serum SP-A level differed among IPF, sarcoidosis, COPD and was also different from healthy controls; 3) serum S100A6, S100A11 levels differed among IPF, sarcoidosis, COPD from healthy controls 4) serum SP-D, CC16, TFF-3 levels distinguished IPF patients from healthy controls; and 5) serum CC16, TFF3, PSP94 distinguished COPD patients from healthy controls. Our study shows that some of selected biomarkers should have prognostic value in the analysed lung disorders. On the other hand, these biomarkers do not appear to be unequivocally suitable for differential diagnosis of these disorders.

  13. A biosynthetic regulated secretory pathway in constitutive secretory cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    It has frequently been proposed that while the constitutive secretory pathway is present in all cells, the regulated secretory pathway is found only in specialized cells such as neuronal, endocrine, or exocrine types. In this study we provide evidence that suggests that this distinction is not as restrictive as proposed. We have identified a population of post-Golgi storage vesicles in several constitutive secretory cells using [35S]SO4-labeled glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains as a marker. A fraction of this pool of vesicles can undergo exocytosis in response to stimuli such as cytoplasmic Ca2+ and phorbol esters. The effect of Ca2+ was demonstrated both in intact cells in the presence of the ionophore A23187 and in streptolysin-O-permeabilized semi-intact cells. N-ethylmaleiimide, under conditions known to block regulated and constitutive secretion, inhibited the stimulated secretion from these cells, suggesting that the observed release of labeled GAG chains was not due to a leakage artefact. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the stored GAG chains were in low-density membrane granules (d approximately 1.12 g/ml), whose size was greater than that of synaptic- like vesicles found in PC12 cells. In addition, in CHO cells that express epitope-tagged rab 3D, the labeled GAG chains were found to cofractionate with the exogenous rab protein. When expressed in the regulated cell line AtT-20, this tagged rab protein was found to colocalize with ACTH-containing dense-core granules by indirect immunofluorescence. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the presence of a cryptic regulated secretory pathway in "constitutive" cells and suggest that the regulated secretory pathway is more widespread amongst different cell types than previously believed. PMID:8682857

  14. Secretory granule biogenesis: rafting to the SNARE.

    PubMed

    Tooze, S A; Martens, G J; Huttner, W B

    2001-03-01

    Regulated secretion of hormones occurs when a cell receives an external stimulus, triggering the secretory granules to undergo fusion with the plasma membrane and release their content into the extracellular milieu. The formation of a mature secretory granule (MSG) involves a series of discrete and unique events such as protein sorting, formation of immature secretory granules (ISGs), prohormone processing and vesicle fusion. Regulated secretory proteins (RSPs), the proteins stored and secreted from MSGs, contain signals or domains to direct them into the regulated secretory pathway. Recent data on the role of specific domains in RSPs involved in sorting and aggregation suggest that the cell-type-specific composition of RSPs in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) has an important role in determining how the RSPs get into ISGs. The realization that lipid rafts are implicated in sorting RSPs in the TGN and the identification of SNARE molecules represent further major advances in our understanding of how MSGs are formed. At the heart of these findings is the elucidation of molecular mechanisms driving protein--lipid and protein--protein interactions specific for secretory granule biogenesis.

  15. Secretory heat-shock protein as a dendritic cell-targeting molecule: a new strategy to enhance the potency of genetic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hauser, H; Shen, L; Gu, Q-L; Krueger, S; Chen, S-Y

    2004-06-01

    DNA vaccines are an appealing strategy for inducing cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and antibody responses against tumor cells as well as infectious agents. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in inducing immune responses, but their potential is not fully utilized in the DNA vaccine setting since they take up only a minor fraction of the injected DNA. Here we describe a novel DNA vaccination strategy based on the targeting of a modified tumor-associated antigen, the human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16 E7 protein, to DCs by a heat-shock protein (HSP) to enhance antigen presentation and immune responses. Specifically, a chimerical HPV-E7 and HSP70 fusion gene preceded with a leader sequence was constructed. When mice were immunized with this construct, the DNA is taken up by various types of cells, which then produce and secrete an HPV-E7-HSP70 fusion protein that is targeted to DCs by the HSP70 portion of the chimerical molecule for antigen presentation. In studies to test the efficacy of this strategy, we demonstrated that DNA vaccination with this secretory HPV-E7-HSP70 construct strongly enhanced an antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell response as well as a specific B-cell response in mice. Furthermore, this immunization approach not only protected mice against lethal challenge with an HPV E7-expressing tumor line (TC-1), but also showed a therapeutic effect against established tumors. The results of this study indicate that secretory HSPs can be broadly used to target tumor-associated antigens to DCs to enhance antigen-specific immune responses.

  16. Bead rings at the endoplasmic reticulum-golgi complex boundary: morphological changes accompanying inihibition of intracellular transport of secretory proteins in arthropod fat body tissue

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, DA

    1981-01-01

    Golgi complex beads are 10-nm particles arranged in rings on the smooth surface of rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) makind the forming face of the Golgi complex (GC). In arthropod cells they stain specifically with bismuth. Their morphology has been studied after treatment with reagents known to interfere with GC function. Inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (antimycin A, cyanide, and anoxia), but not an inhibitor of glycolysis (iodoacetate), both cause the bead rings to collapse and the GC saccules to round up, and inhibit transition vesicle (TV) formation. Cycloheximide blocks protein synthesis on ribosomes but does not stop TV formation or disrupt bead rings, even after prolonged treatment (6 h) to allow emptying of the rough ER cisternae. Thus the collapse of bead rings is not attributable to inhibition of protein synthesis, and the ring structure of beads does not require continued protein synthesis and secretion for its maintenance. Valinomycin has effects on the GC similar to those of antimycin A, but A23187, monensin, and lasalocid do not affect bead ring structure or TV formation. These results are consistent with valinomycin’s secondarily uncoupling mitochondria, which collapses bead rings and prevents TV formation. Thus inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation do not influence the beads through cation movement. Because mononsin and lasalocid block secretion at the level of the condensing vacuoles, bead rings are not influenced by blocks in secretion distal to them or by the backup of secretory material. These experiments are consistent with inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation collapsing bead rings by decreasing intracellular ATP. The concomitant block to TV formation and the collapse of bead rings suggests that integrity of the bead rings is essential for the transport of secretory material from the rough ER to the GC. PMID:7251678

  17. Effect of colchicine on the transport of precursor enamel protein in secretory ameloblasts studied by /sup 3/H-proline radioautography in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, S.; Takano, Y.; Wakisaka, S.; Ichikawa, H.; Nishikawa, S.; Akai, M.

    1988-08-01

    The incorporation of 3H-proline into the secretory ameloblasts of rat molar tooth germs cultured with or without colchicine was studied by light and electron microscope radioautography to determine the function of microtubules in the transport of precursor enamel protein from the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum (rER) to the Golgi cisternae. The grain counts over the transitional vesicles, which accumulated in various cellular regions with colchicine treatment, continued to increase with chase time, unlike in controls. At 30 and 90 min chase, these counts were significantly higher than in controls. Moreover, the total grain count over the organelles (rER, pale granules, and transitional vesicles), which are positioned before the Golgi cisternae in the synthetic pathway, maintained a significantly higher level at 90 min chase in colchicine-treated tooth germs than in controls. The transport of synthesized protein to the Golgi cisternae via transitional vesicles was suppressed in colchicine-treated tooth germs. Some grains appeared with time over pale granular materials that appeared in the intercellular spaces of secretory ameloblasts with colchicine treatment. However, at each chase period, the grain count over pale granular materials was not so high as the count over the enamel in control. The present results indicate that colchicine affects the transport of newly synthesized protein from the rER to the Golgi cisterna via transitional vesicles, probably by interfering with the oriented transport related to microtubular function. It is suggested that the microtubular system may be concerned with the movement of the transitional vesicles.

  18. Actin filament-associated protein 1 is required for cSrc activity and secretory activation in the lactating mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Cunnick, Jess M; Kim, Stephanie; Hadsell, James; Collins, Stephen; Cerra, Carmine; Reiser, Patti; Flynn, Daniel C; Cho, Youngjin

    2014-01-01

    Actin filament-associated protein 1 (AFAP1) is an adaptor protein of cSrc that binds to filamentous actin and regulates the activity of this tyrosine kinase to affect changes to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In breast and prostate cancer cells, AFAP1 has been shown to regulate cellular responses requiring actin cytoskeletal changes such as adhesion, invadopodia formation and invasion. However, a normal physiological role for AFAP1 has remained elusive. In this study, we generated an AFAP1 knockout mouse model that establishes a novel physiological role for AFAP1 in lactation. Specifically, these animals displayed a defect in lactation that resulted in an inability to efficiently nurse. Histologically, the mammary glands of the lactating knockout mice were distinguished by the accumulation of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in the alveolar epithelial cells. There was a reduction in lipid synthesis and the expression of lipogenic genes without a corresponding reduction in the production of beta-casein, a milk protein. Furthermore, these defects were associated with histological and biochemical signs of precocious involution. This study also demonstrated that AFAP1 responds to prolactin, a lactogenic hormone, by forming a complex with cSrc and becoming tyrosine phosphorylated. Together, these observations pointed to a defect in secretory activation. Certain characteristics of this phenotype mirrored the defect in secretory activation in the cSrc knockout mouse, but most importantly, the activity of cSrc in the mammary gland was reduced during early lactation in the AFAP1 null mouse and the localization of active cSrc at the apical surface of luminal epithelial cells during lactation was selectively lost in the absence of AFAP1. These data define, for the first time, the requirement of AFAP1 for the spatial and temporal regulation of cSrc activity in the normal breast, specifically for milk production. PMID:25043309

  19. The Secretory System of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bassham, Diane C.; Brandizzi, Federica; Otegui, Marisa S.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, a vast amount of research has illuminated the workings of the secretory system of eukaryotic cells. The bulk of this work has been focused on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or on mammalian cells. At a superficial level, plants are typical eukaryotes with respect to the operation of the secretory system; however, important differences emerge in the function and appearance of endomembrane organelles. In particular, the plant secretory system has specialized in several ways to support the synthesis of many components of the complex cell wall, and specialized kinds of vacuole have taken on a protein storage role—a role that is intended to support the growing seedling, but has been co-opted to support human life in the seeds of many crop plants. In the past, most research on the plant secretory system has been guided by results in mammalian or fungal systems but recently plants have begun to stand on their own as models for understanding complex trafficking events within the eukaryotic endomembrane system. PMID:22303241

  20. A TSPO-related protein localizes to the early secretory pathway in Arabidopsis, but is targeted to mitochondria when expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Vanhee, Celine; Guillon, Stéphanie; Masquelier, Danièle; Degand, Hervé; Deleu, Magali; Morsomme, Pierre; Batoko, Henri

    2011-01-01

    AtTSPO is a TspO/MBR domain-protein potentially involved in multiple stress regulation in Arabidopsis. As in most angiosperms, AtTSPO is encoded by a single, intronless gene. Expression of AtTSPO is tightly regulated both at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. It has been shown previously that overexpression of AtTSPO in plant cell can be detrimental, and the protein was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi stacks, contrasting with previous findings and suggesting a mitochondrial subcellular localization for this protein. To ascertain these findings, immunocytochemistry and ABA induction were used to demonstrate that, in plant cells, physiological levels of AtTSPO colocalized with AtArf1, a mainly Golgi-localized protein in plant cells. In addition, fluorescent protein-tagged AtTSPO was targeted to the secretory pathway and did not colocalize with MitoTracker-labelled mitochondria. These results suggest that the polytopic membrane protein AtTSPO is cotranslationally targeted to the ER in plant cells and accumulates in the Trans-Golgi Network. Heterologous expression of AtTSPO in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yeast devoid of TSPO-related protein, resulted in growth defects. However, subcellular fractionation and immunoprecipitation experiments showed that AtTSPO was targeted to mitochondria where it colocalized and interacted with the outer mitochondrial membrane porin VDAC1p, reminiscent of the subcellular localization and activity of mammalian translocator protein 18 kDa TSPO. The evolutionarily divergent AtTSPO appears therefore to be switching its sorting mode in a species-dependent manner, an uncommon peculiarity for a polytopic membrane protein in eukaryotic cells. These results are discussed in relation to the recognition and organelle targeting mechanisms of polytopic membrane proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita provides potential targets for parasite control.

    PubMed

    Gahoi, Shachi; Gautam, Budhayash

    2017-04-01

    The root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita causes significant damage to various economically important crops. Infection is associated with secretion of effector proteins into host cytoplasm and interference with host innate immunity. To combat this infection, the identification and functional annotations of Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins serve as a key to produce durable control measures. The identification of ES proteins through experimental methods are expensive and time consuming while bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective by prioritizing the experimental analysis of potential drug targets for parasitic diseases. In this study, we predicted and functionally annotated the 1889 ES proteins in M. incognita genome using integration of several bioinformatics tools. Of these 1889 ES proteins, 473 (25%) had orthologues in free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, 825(67.8%) in parasitic nematodes whereas 561 (29.7%) appeared to be novel and M. incognita specific molecules. Of the C. elegans homologues, 17 ES proteins had "loss of function phenotype" by RNA interference and could represent potential drug targets for parasite intervention and control. We could functionally annotate 429 (22.7%) ES proteins using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, 672 (35.5%) proteins to protein domains and established pathway associations for 223 (11.8%) sequences using Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). The 162 (8.5%) ES proteins were also mapped to several important plant cell-wall degrading CAZyme families including chitinase, cellulase, xylanase, pectate lyase and endo-β-1,4-xylanase. Our comprehensive analysis of M. incognita secretome provides functional information for further experimental study.

  2. A TSPO-related protein localizes to the early secretory pathway in Arabidopsis, but is targeted to mitochondria when expressed in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vanhee, Celine; Guillon, Stéphanie; Masquelier, Danièle; Degand, Hervé; Deleu, Magali; Morsomme, Pierre; Batoko, Henri

    2011-01-01

    AtTSPO is a TspO/MBR domain-protein potentially involved in multiple stress regulation in Arabidopsis. As in most angiosperms, AtTSPO is encoded by a single, intronless gene. Expression of AtTSPO is tightly regulated both at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. It has been shown previously that overexpression of AtTSPO in plant cell can be detrimental, and the protein was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi stacks, contrasting with previous findings and suggesting a mitochondrial subcellular localization for this protein. To ascertain these findings, immunocytochemistry and ABA induction were used to demonstrate that, in plant cells, physiological levels of AtTSPO colocalized with AtArf1, a mainly Golgi-localized protein in plant cells. In addition, fluorescent protein-tagged AtTSPO was targeted to the secretory pathway and did not colocalize with MitoTracker-labelled mitochondria. These results suggest that the polytopic membrane protein AtTSPO is cotranslationally targeted to the ER in plant cells and accumulates in the Trans-Golgi Network. Heterologous expression of AtTSPO in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yeast devoid of TSPO-related protein, resulted in growth defects. However, subcellular fractionation and immunoprecipitation experiments showed that AtTSPO was targeted to mitochondria where it colocalized and interacted with the outer mitochondrial membrane porin VDAC1p, reminiscent of the subcellular localization and activity of mammalian translocator protein 18 kDa TSPO. The evolutionarily divergent AtTSPO appears therefore to be switching its sorting mode in a species-dependent manner, an uncommon peculiarity for a polytopic membrane protein in eukaryotic cells. These results are discussed in relation to the recognition and organelle targeting mechanisms of polytopic membrane proteins in eukaryotic cells. PMID:20847098

  3. Structure and expression of the rat epididymal secretory protein I gene. An androgen-regulated member of the lipocalin superfamily with a rare splice donor site.

    PubMed Central

    Girotti, M; Jones, R; Emery, D C; Chia, W; Hall, L

    1992-01-01

    The complete rat epididymal secretory protein I (ESP I) gene was isolated from a genomic library constructed in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene and its immediate 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Interesting features include the presence of a rare, but functional, splice donor site (...GC) and the presence of a putative androgen-receptor-binding element. A detailed analysis of ESP I regulation was carried out after castration and subsequent testosterone treatment, demonstrating the requirement for androgens. Efferent-duct ligation and cryptorchism, on the other hand, had no effect on the steady-state concentrations of ESP I transcripts. Comparison of the exon/intron organization of the ESP I gene with those of members of the lipocalin superfamily provides strong support for a common ancestral origin. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1731756

  4. The cytoskeleton and the secretory pathway are not involved in targeting the cowpea mosaic virus movement protein to the cell periphery.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, Jeroen; Van Der Krogt, Gerard N M; Van Lent, Jan; Bisseling, Ton; Wellink, Joan

    2002-05-25

    The movement protein (MP) of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) forms tubules on infected protoplasts and through plasmodesmata in infected plants. In protoplasts the MP fused to GFP (MP-GFP) was shown to localize in peripheral punctate structures and in long tubular structures extending from the protoplast surface. Using cytoskeletal assembly inhibitors (latrunculin B and oryzalin) and an inhibitor of the secretory pathway (brefeldin A), targeting of the MP to the peripheral punctate structures was demonstrated not to be dependent on an intact cytoskeleton or functional secretion pathway. Furthermore it was shown that a disrupted cytoskeleton had no effect on tubule formation but that the addition of brefeldin A severely inhibited tubule formation. The results presented in this paper suggest a role for a plasma membrane host factor in tubule formation of plant viral MPs. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  5. ENA/VASP proteins regulate exocytosis by mediating myosin VI-dependent recruitment of secretory granules to the cortical actin network.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Vanesa M; Josh, Peter; Papadopulos, Andreas; Gormal, Rachel S; Lanoue, Vanessa; Martin, Sally; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2017-08-04

    In neurosecretory cells, myosin VI associated with secretory granules (SGs) mediates their activity-dependent recruitment to the cortical actin network and is necessary to sustain exocytosis. The mechanism by which myosin VI interacts with SGs is unknown. Using a myosin VI pull-down assay and mass spectrometry we identified Mena, a member of the ENA/VASP family, as a myosin VI binding partner in PC12 cells, and confirmed that Mena colocalized with myosin VI on SGs. Using a knock-sideways approach to inactivate the ENA/VASP family members by mitochondrial relocation, we revealed a concomitant redistribution of myosin VI. This was ensued by a reduction in the association of myosin VI with SGs, a decreased SG mobility and density in proximity to the plasma membrane as well as decreased evoked exocytosis. These data demonstrate that ENA/VASP proteins regulate SG exocytosis through modulating the activity of myosin VI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor reverses inhibition by CNS myelin, promotes regeneration in the optic nerve, and suppresses expression of the TGFβ signaling protein Smad2

    PubMed Central

    Hannila, Sari S.; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Carmel, Jason B.; Hou, Jianwei; Chaudhry, Nagarathnamma; Bradley, Peter M.J.; Hilaire, Melissa; Richman, Erica L.; Hart, Ronald P.; Filbin, Marie T.

    2013-01-01

    Following CNS injury, axonal regeneration is limited by myelin-associated inhibitors; however, this can be overcome through elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP, as occurs with conditioning lesions of the sciatic nerve. This study reports that expression of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is strongly upregulated in response to elevation of cyclic AMP. We also show that SLPI can overcome inhibition by CNS myelin and significantly enhance regeneration of transected retinal ganglion cell axons in rats. Furthermore, regeneration of dorsal column axons does not occur after a conditioning lesion in SLPI null mutant mice, indicating that expression of SLPI is required for the conditioning lesion effect. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that SLPI localizes to the nuclei of neurons, binds to the Smad2 promoter, and reduces levels of Smad2 protein. Adenoviral overexpression of Smad2 also blocked SLPI-induced axonal regeneration. SLPI and Smad2 may therefore represent new targets for therapeutic intervention in CNS injury. PMID:23516280

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in gamete interaction: evidence for the participation of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP) in sperm-egg fusion.

    PubMed

    Da Ros, V; Busso, D; Cohen, D J; Maldera, J; Goldweic, N; Cuasnicu, P S

    2007-01-01

    Epididymal protein DE and testicular protein Tpx-1 are two cysteine-rich secretory proteins also known as CRISP-1 and CRISP-2, respectively. DE/ CRISP-1 is localised on the equatorial segment of acrosome-reacted sperm and participates in rat gamete fusion through its binding to egg-complementary sites. Recent results using bacterially-expressed recombinant fragments of DE as well as synthetic peptides revealed that the ability of DE to bind to the egg surface and inhibit gamete fusion resides in a region of 12 amino acids corresponding to an evolutionary conserved motif of the CRISP family (Signature 2). Given the high degree of homology between DE/CRISP-1 and Tpx-1/CRISP-2, we also explored the potential participation of the testicular intra-acrosomal protein in gamete fusion. Results showing the ability of recombinant Tpx-1 to bind to the surface of rat eggs (evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence) and to significantly inhibit zona-free egg penetration, support the participation of this protein in gamete fusion through its interaction with egg-binding sites. Interestingly, rat Tpx-1 exhibits only two substitutions in Signature 2 when compared to this region in DE. Together, these results provide evidence for the involvement of both epididymal DE/CRISP-1 and testicular Tpx-1/CRISP-2 in gamete fusion suggesting the existence of a functional cooperation between homologue molecules as a mechanism to ensure the success of fertilisation.

  8. Group X secretory phospholipase A2 regulates the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M; Boyanovsky, Boris B; Oslund, Rob C; Gelb, Michael H; Webb, Nancy R

    2010-06-25

    We developed C57BL/6 mice with targeted deletion of group X secretory phospholipase A(2) (GX KO). These mice have approximately 80% higher plasma corticosterone concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) mice under both basal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced stress conditions. This increased corticosterone level was not associated with increased circulating ACTH or a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis as evidenced by a normal response to dexamethasone challenge. Primary cultures of adrenal cells from GX KO mice exhibited significantly increased corticosteroid secretion compared with WT cells. Conversely, overexpression of GX secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), but not a catalytically inactive mutant form of GX sPLA(2), significantly reduced steroid production 30-40% in Y1 mouse adrenal cell line. This effect was reversed by the sPLA(2) inhibitor, indoxam. Silencing of endogenous M-type receptor expression did not restore steroid production in GX sPLA(2)-overexpressing Y1 cells, ruling out a role for this sPLA(2) receptor in this regulatory process. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), the rate-limiting protein in corticosteroid production, was approximately 2-fold higher in adrenal glands of GX KO mice compared with WT mice, whereas StAR expression was suppressed in Y1 cells overexpressing GX sPLA(2). Results from StAR-promoter luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that GX sPLA(2) antagonizes StAR promoter activity and liver X receptor-mediated StAR promoter activation. In summary, GX sPLA(2) is expressed in mouse adrenal glands and functions to negatively regulate corticosteroid synthesis, most likely by negatively regulating StAR expression.

  9. High ω-3:ω-6 fatty acids ratio increases fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in human ectopic endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Khanaki, Korosh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Darabi, Masoud; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shabani, Mahdi; Rahimipour, Ali; Nouri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis, a common chronic inflammatory disorder, is defined by the atypical growth of endometrium- like tissue outside of the uterus. Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIa (sPLA2-IIa) and fatty acid binding protein4 (FABP4) play several important roles in the inflammatory diseases. Objective: Due to reported potential anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in cultured endometrial cells. Materials and Methods: Ectopic and eutopic endometrial tissues obtained from 15 women were snap frozen. After thawing and tissue digestion, primary mixed stromal and endometrial epithelial cell culture was performed for 8 days in culture mediums supplemented with normal and high ratios of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA. sPLA2-IIa in the culture medium and FABP4 level was determined using enzyme immuno assay (EIA) technique. Results: Within ectopic endometrial cells group, the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa were remarkably increased under high ω-3 PUFA exposure compared with control condition (p=0.014 and p=0.04 respectively). Conclusion: ω-3 PUFAs may increase the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa in ectopic endometrial cells, since sPLAIIa and FABP4 may affect endometriosis via several mechanisms, more relevant studies are encouraged to know the potential effect of increased cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa on endometriosis. PMID:25709631

  10. Group X Secretory Phospholipase A2 Regulates the Expression of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR) in Mouse Adrenal Glands*

    PubMed Central

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M.; Boyanovsky, Boris B.; Oslund, Rob C.; Gelb, Michael H.; Webb, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed C57BL/6 mice with targeted deletion of group X secretory phospholipase A2 (GX KO). These mice have ∼80% higher plasma corticosterone concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) mice under both basal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced stress conditions. This increased corticosterone level was not associated with increased circulating ACTH or a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis as evidenced by a normal response to dexamethasone challenge. Primary cultures of adrenal cells from GX KO mice exhibited significantly increased corticosteroid secretion compared with WT cells. Conversely, overexpression of GX secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), but not a catalytically inactive mutant form of GX sPLA2, significantly reduced steroid production 30–40% in Y1 mouse adrenal cell line. This effect was reversed by the sPLA2 inhibitor, indoxam. Silencing of endogenous M-type receptor expression did not restore steroid production in GX sPLA2-overexpressing Y1 cells, ruling out a role for this sPLA2 receptor in this regulatory process. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), the rate-limiting protein in corticosteroid production, was ∼2-fold higher in adrenal glands of GX KO mice compared with WT mice, whereas StAR expression was suppressed in Y1 cells overexpressing GX sPLA2. Results from StAR-promoter luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that GX sPLA2 antagonizes StAR promoter activity and liver X receptor-mediated StAR promoter activation. In summary, GX sPLA2 is expressed in mouse adrenal glands and functions to negatively regulate corticosteroid synthesis, most likely by negatively regulating StAR expression. PMID:20421306

  11. Immunosuppressive PAS-1 is an excretory/secretory protein released by larval and adult worms of the ascarid nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M F P; Titz, T O; Batista, I F C; Marques-Porto, R; Oliveira, C F; Alves de Araujo, C A; Macedo-Soares, M F

    2015-05-01

    Helminths use several strategies to evade and/or modify the host immune response, including suppression or inactivation of the host antigen-specific response. Several helminth immunomodulatory molecules have been identified. Our studies have focused on immunosuppression induced by the roundworm Ascaris suum and an A. suum-derived protein named protein 1 from A. suum (PAS-1). Here we assessed whether PAS-1 is an excretory/secretory (E/S) protein and whether it can suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. Larvae from infective eggs were cultured in unsupplemented Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) for 2 weeks. PAS-1 was then measured in the culture supernatants and in adult A. suum body fluid at different time points by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the monoclonal antibody MAIP-1. Secreted PAS-1 was detected in both larval culture supernatant and adult body fluid. It suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced leucocyte migration and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and stimulated interleukin (IL)-10 secretion, indicating that larval and adult secreted PAS-1 suppresses inflammation in this model. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory activity of PAS-1 was abolished by treatment with MAIP-1, a PAS-1-specific monoclonal antibody, confirming the crucial role of PAS-1 in suppressing LPS-induced inflammation. These findings demonstrate that PAS-1 is an E/S protein with anti-inflammatory properties likely to be attributable to IL-10 production.

  12. Calelectrin, a calcium-dependent membrane-binding protein associated with secretory granules in Torpedo cholinergic electromotor nerve endings and rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Walker, J H; Obrocki, J; Südhof, T C

    1983-07-01

    Calelectrin, a calcium-dependent membrane-binding protein of subunit molecular weight 32,000 has been isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo, and shown to occur in cholinergic neurones and in bovine adrenal medulla. In this study a monospecific antiserum against the Torpedo protein has been used to study the localization of calelectrin in the rat adrenal gland. The cortex was not stained, whereas in the medulla the cytoplasm of the chromaffin cells was stained in a particulate manner. An identical staining pattern was obtained with an antiserum against the chromaffin granule enzyme dopamine beta-hydroxylase, although the two antisera did not cross-react with the same antigen. The purified protein aggregates bovine chromaffin granule membranes and cholinergic synaptic vesicles and also self aggregates in a calcium-dependent manner. Negative staining results demonstrate that calcium induces a transformation of the purified protein from circular structures 30-80 nm in diameter into a highly aggregated structure. Calelectrin may have a structural or regulatory role in the intracellular organization of secretory cells.

  13. Engineering the cellular protein secretory pathway for enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of CERT and XBP1s genes.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Azam; Vaziri, Behrouz; Moazzami, Reza; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Kokabee, Leila; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2013-08-01

    Cell line development is the most critical and also the most time-consuming step in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this regard, a variety of vector and cell engineering strategies have been developed for generating high-producing mammalian cells; however, the cell line engineering approach seems to show various results on different recombinant protein producer cells. In order to improve the secretory capacity of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, we developed cell line engineering approaches based on the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) genes. For this purpose, CERT S132A, a mutant form of CERT that is resistant to phosphorylation, and XBP1s were overexpressed in a recombinant t-PA-producing CHO cell line. Overexpression of CERT S132A increased the specific productivity of t-PA-producing CHO cells up to 35%. In contrast, the heterologous expression of XBP1s did not affect the t-PA expression rate. Our results suggest that CERTS132A- based secretion engineering could be an effective strategy for enhancing recombinant t- PA production in CHO cells.

  14. Exocyst Is Involved in Cystogenesis and Tubulogenesis and Acts by Modulating Synthesis and Delivery of Basolateral Plasma Membrane and Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, Joshua H.; Guo, Wei; O'Brien, Lucy E.; Nguyen, Yen H.; Novick, Peter; Mostov, Keith E.

    2000-01-01

    Epithelial cyst and tubule formation are critical processes that involve transient, highly choreographed changes in cell polarity. Factors controlling these changes in polarity are largely unknown. One candidate factor is the highly conserved eight-member protein complex called the exocyst. We show that during tubulogenesis in an in vitro model system the exocyst relocalized along growing tubules consistent with changes in cell polarity. In yeast, the exocyst subunit Sec10p is a crucial component linking polarized exocytic vesicles with the rest of the exocyst complex and, ultimately, the plasma membrane. When the exocyst subunit human Sec10 was exogenously expressed in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, there was a selective increase in the synthesis and delivery of apical and basolateral secretory proteins and a basolateral plasma membrane protein, but not an apical plasma membrane protein. Overexpression of human Sec10 resulted in more efficient and rapid cyst formation and increased tubule formation upon stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor. We conclude that the exocyst plays a central role in the development of epithelial cysts and tubules. PMID:11102522

  15. Stage-specific excretory/secretory small heat shock proteins from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti: putative links to host’s intestinal mucosal defense system

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Geisinger, Frank; Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Soblik, Hanns; Steen, Hanno; Mitreva, Makedonka; Erttmann, Klaus D.; Perbandt, Markus; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In search of molecules involved in the interaction of intestinal nematodes and mammalian mucosal host cells, we performed mass spectrometry to identify excretory/secretory proteins (ESP) from Strongyloides ratti. In addition to other peptides, we detected in the ESP of parasitic female stage peptides homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans heat shock protein-17, named Sra-HSP-17.1 (~19 kDa) and Sra-HSP-17.2 (~ 18 kDa) with 49% amino acid identity. The full-length cDNAs (483 bp and 474 bp, respectively) were identified and the genomic organization analyzed. To allow further characterization, the proteins were recombinantly expressed and purified. Profiling of transcription by qRT-PCR and of protein by ELISA in various developmental stages revealed parasitic female-specific expression. The sequence analysis of both DNA and amino acid sequence showed two genes share a conserved alpha-crystallin domain and variable N-terminals. The Sra-HSP-17 proteins showed the highest homology to the deduced small heat-shock protein sequence of the human pathogen S. stercoralis. We observed strong immunogenicity of both proteins, leading to high IgG responses following infection of rats. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the binding of Sra-HSP-17s to the monocytes/macrophage lineage but not to peripheral lymphocytes or neutrophils. A rat intestinal epithelial cell line showed dose dependent binding to Sra-HSP-17.1, but not to Sra-HSP-17.2. Exposed monocytes released IL-10 but not TNF-alpha in response to Sra-HSP-17s, suggesting a possible involvement of secreted female proteins in host immune responses. PMID:21762402

  16. Histochemical Analysis of Plant Secretory Structures.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Histochemical analysis is essential for the study of plant secretory structures whose classification is based, at least partially, on the composition of their secretion. As each gland may produce one or more types of substances, a correct analysis of its secretion should be done using various histochemical tests to detect metabolites of different chemical classes. Here I describe some of the most used methods to detect carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, phenolic compounds, and alkaloids in the secretory structures.

  17. Blocking effect and crystal structure of natrin toxin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein from Naja atra venom that targets the BKCa channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Shen, Bing; Guo, Min; Lou, Xiaohua; Duan, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Xin Ping; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen; Liu, Qun; Huang, Qingqiu; Hao, Quan

    2005-08-02

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are widespread in snake venoms. Some members of these CRISPs recently have been found to block L-type Ca(2+) channels or cyclic nucleotide-gated ion (CNG) channels. Here, natrin purified from Naja atra venom, a member of the CRISP family, can induce a further contractile response in the endothelium-denuded thoracic aorta of mouse which has been contracted by a high-K(+) solution. Further experiments show it can block the high-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channel in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 34.4 nM and a Hill coefficient of 1.02, which suggests that only a single natrin molecule is required to bind an ion channel to block BK(Ca) current. The crystal structure of natrin displaying two domains in tandem shows its cysteine-rich domain (CRD) has relatively independent flexibility, especially for the C-terminal long loop (loop I) of CRD to participate in the interface of two domains. On the basis of previous studies of CNG channel and L-Ca(2+) channel blockers, and the sequence and structural comparison of natrin and stecrisp, the deviation of the vital loop I of CRD is suggested to contribute to different effects of some CRISPs in protein-protein interaction.

  18. Investigating possible biological targets of Bj-CRP, the first cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) isolated from Bothrops jararaca snake venom.

    PubMed

    Lodovicho, Marina E; Costa, Tássia R; Bernardes, Carolina P; Menaldo, Danilo L; Zoccal, Karina F; Carone, Sante E; Rosa, José C; Pucca, Manuela B; Cerni, Felipe A; Arantes, Eliane C; Tytgat, Jan; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Pereira-Crott, Luciana S; Sampaio, Suely V

    2017-01-04

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are commonly described as part of the protein content of snake venoms, nevertheless, so far, little is known about their biological targets and functions. Our study describes the isolation and characterization of Bj-CRP, the first CRISP isolated from Bothrops jararaca snake venom, also aiming at the identification of possible targets for its actions. Bj-CRP was purified using three chromatographic steps (Sephacryl S-200, Source 15Q and C18) and showed to be an acidic protein of 24.6kDa with high sequence identity to other snake venom CRISPs. This CRISP was devoid of proteolytic, hemorrhagic or coagulant activities, and it did not affect the currents from 13 voltage-gated potassium channel isoforms. Conversely, Bj-CRP induced inflammatory responses characterized by increase of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, after 1 and 4h of its injection in the peritoneal cavity of mice, also stimulating the production of IL-6. Bj-CRP also acted on the human complement system, modulating some of the activation pathways and acting directly on important components (C3 and C4), thus inducing the generation of anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a and C5a). Therefore, our results for Bj-CRP open up prospects for better understanding this class of toxins and its biological actions.

  19. Association of the cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) and some of its polymorphisms with the quality of cryopreserved stallion semen.

    PubMed

    Usuga, Alexandra; Rojano, Benjamín A; Restrepo, Giovanni

    2017-08-31

    Contribution of seminal plasma proteins to semen freezability has been reported in several species, suggesting these proteins as genetic markers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) and some of its single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with post-thawing semen quality in stallions. DNA was obtained from 100 stallions, regions of interest were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Evaluated SNPs within the equine CRISP-3 gene were CRISP3c.+199A>G (SNP1), CRISP3c.+566C>A (SNP2), CRISP3c.+622G>A (SNP3) and CRISP3c.+716A>G (SNP4). CRISP-3 protein content in seminal plasma was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Semen from 30 stallions was cryopreserved and post-thaw motility, kinetics, abnormal morphology (AM), sperm vitality (SV) and membrane integrity (MI) were evaluated. Generalized linear models were fitted and means were compared using Tukey's test. Correlation and regression analyses were performed. For SNP1 and SNP3, the AA genotype had the highest results for motility and MI; for SNP2, the best results for motility and AM were obtained with the CC genotype. For SNP4, the GG genotype had the lowest results, except for MI. A high level of CRISP-3 protein in seminal plasma had the best results for motility, kinetics, SV and AM. In conclusion, there was a relationship between CRISP-3 genotype and seminal plasma protein and post-thawing semen quality in stallions.

  20. Participation of epididymal cysteine-rich secretory proteins in sperm-egg fusion and their potential use for male fertility regulation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Debora J; Da Ros, Vanina G; Busso, Dolores; Ellerman, Diego A; Maldera, Julieta A; Goldweic, Nadia; Cuasnicú, Patricia S

    2007-07-01

    Rat protein DE is an androgen-dependent cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) synthesized by proximal epididymal regions. DE, also known as CRISP-1, is localized on the equatorial segment of acrosome-reacted spermatozoa and participates in gamete fusion through binding to egg complementary sites. Immunization of rats with DE inhibits fertility and sperm fusion ability, suggesting that DE represents a good epididymal contraceptive target. Recombinant DE fragments and synthetic peptides revealed that DE binds to the egg via a 12-amino acid region of an evolutionarily conserved motif, Signature 2 (S2). The ability of other CRISP to bind to the rat egg was correlated with their S2 amino acid sequences. Although testicular protein Tpx-1 (CRISP-2) was capable of binding to rodent eggs, human epididymal AEG-related protein (ARP) and helothermine (from lizard saliva) were not. The S2 region presented only two substitutions in Tpx-1 and four in ARP and helothermine, compared with the DE S2, suggesting that this amino acid sequence was relevant for egg interaction. Studies with Tpx-1 and anti-Tpx-1 revealed the participation of this protein in gamete fusion through binding to complementary sites in the egg. In competition studies, DE reduced binding of Tpx-1 dose-dependently, indicating that both CRISP share the egg complementary sites. That anti-DE and anti-Tpx-1 inhibit sperm-egg fusion while recognizing only the corresponding proteins, suggests functional cooperation between these homologous CRISP to ensure fertilization success. These results increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of gamete fusion and contribute to the development of new and safer fertility regulating methods.

  1. Secretory diarrhoea: mechanisms and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Donowitz, Mark; Verkman, Alan S

    2015-08-01

    Diarrhoeal disease remains a major health burden worldwide. Secretory diarrhoeas are caused by certain bacterial and viral infections, inflammatory processes, drugs and genetic disorders. Fluid secretion across the intestinal epithelium in secretory diarrhoeas involves multiple ion and solute transporters, as well as activation of cyclic nucleotide and Ca(2+) signalling pathways. In many secretory diarrhoeas, activation of Cl(-) channels in the apical membrane of enterocytes, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, increases fluid secretion, while inhibition of Na(+) transport reduces fluid absorption. Current treatment of diarrhoea includes replacement of fluid and electrolyte losses using oral rehydration solutions, and drugs targeting intestinal motility or fluid secretion. Therapeutics in the development pipeline target intestinal ion channels and transporters, regulatory proteins and cell surface receptors. This Review describes pathogenic mechanisms of secretory diarrhoea, current and emerging therapeutics, and the challenges in developing antidiarrhoeal therapeutics.

  2. Secretory diarrhoea: mechanisms and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Donowitz, Mark; Verkman, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease remains a major health burden worldwide. Secretory diarrhoeas are caused by certain bacterial and viral infections, inflammatory processes, drugs and genetic disorders. Fluid secretion across the intestinal epithelium in secretory diarrhoeas involves multiple ion and solute transporters, as well as activation of cyclic nucleotide and Ca2+ signalling pathways. In many secretory diarrhoeas, activation of Cl− channels in the apical membrane of enterocytes, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, increases fluid secretion, while inhibition of Na+ transport reduces fluid absorption. Current treatment of diarrhoea includes replacement of fluid and electrolyte losses using oral rehydration solutions, and drugs targeting intestinal motility or fluid secretion. Therapeutics in the development pipeline target intestinal ion channels and transporters, regulatory proteins and cell surface receptors. This Review describes pathogenic mechanisms of secretory diarrhoea, current and emerging therapeutics, and the challenges in developing antidiarrhoeal therapeutics. PMID:26122478

  3. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator miR-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Qi-Zhao; Lyu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zi-Jian; Chen, Ming-Kun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan; Qi, Tao; Li, Xin; Liu, Cun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia. Initially, through analyzing CRISP2 expression and methylation on CRISP2 promoter activity in sperm, we observed a decreased expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients and no methylation in the CRISP2 promoter, suggesting CRISP2 expression may be regulated in the sperm at the posttranscriptional level. Subsequently, we found that microRNA 27b (miR-27b), predicted as a candidate regulator of CRISP2 using bioinformatics, was highly expressed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients. Luciferase reporter assay and transfection experiments disclosed that this microRNA could target CRISP2 by specifically binding its 3' untranslated region, suppressing CRISP2 expression. Extended clinical observation further confirmed a highly expressed miR-27b and its obviously negative correlation with CRISP2 protein expression in ejaculated spermatozoa samples from asthenozoospermic patients. Finally, we conducted a retrospective follow-up study to support that either high miR-27b expression or low CRISP2 protein expression was significantly associated with low sperm progressive motility, abnormal morphology, and infertility. Thus, this study provides the first preliminary insight into the mechanism leading to the reduced CRISP2 expression in asthenozoospermia, offering a potential therapeutic target for treating male infertility or for male contraception.

  4. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 4 is an inhibitor of transient receptor potential M8 with a role in establishing sperm function.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerard M; Orta, Gerardo; Reddy, Thulasimala; Koppers, Adam J; Martínez-López, Pablo; de la Vega-Beltràn, José Luis; Lo, Jennifer C Y; Veldhuis, Nicholas; Jamsai, Duangporn; McIntyre, Peter; Darszon, Alberto; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-04-26

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a group of four proteins in the mouse that are expressed abundantly in the male reproductive tract, and to a lesser extent in other tissues. Analysis of reptile CRISPs and mouse CRISP2 has shown that CRISPs can regulate cellular homeostasis via ion channels. With the exception of the ability of CRISP2 to regulate ryanodine receptors, the in vivo targets of mammalian CRISPs function are unknown. In this study, we have characterized the ion channel regulatory activity of epididymal CRISP4 using electrophysiology, cell assays, and mouse models. Through patch-clamping of testicular sperm, the CRISP4 CRISP domain was shown to inhibit the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel TRPM8. These data were confirmed using a stably transfected CHO cell line. TRPM8 is a major cold receptor in the body, but is found in other tissues, including the testis and on the tail and head of mouse and human sperm. Functional assays using sperm from wild-type mice showed that TRPM8 activation significantly reduced the number of sperm undergoing the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction following capacitation, and that this response was reversed by the coaddition of CRISP4. In accordance, sperm from Crisp4 null mice had a compromised ability to undergo to the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction. Collectively, these data identify CRISP4 as an endogenous regulator of TRPM8 with a role in normal sperm function.

  5. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 4 is an inhibitor of transient receptor potential M8 with a role in establishing sperm function

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Gerard M.; Orta, Gerardo; Reddy, Thulasimala; Koppers, Adam J.; Martínez-López, Pablo; Luis de la Vega-Beltràn, José; Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Veldhuis, Nicholas; Jamsai, Duangporn; McIntyre, Peter; Darszon, Alberto; O'Bryan, Moira K.

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a group of four proteins in the mouse that are expressed abundantly in the male reproductive tract, and to a lesser extent in other tissues. Analysis of reptile CRISPs and mouse CRISP2 has shown that CRISPs can regulate cellular homeostasis via ion channels. With the exception of the ability of CRISP2 to regulate ryanodine receptors, the in vivo targets of mammalian CRISPs function are unknown. In this study, we have characterized the ion channel regulatory activity of epididymal CRISP4 using electrophysiology, cell assays, and mouse models. Through patch-clamping of testicular sperm, the CRISP4 CRISP domain was shown to inhibit the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel TRPM8. These data were confirmed using a stably transfected CHO cell line. TRPM8 is a major cold receptor in the body, but is found in other tissues, including the testis and on the tail and head of mouse and human sperm. Functional assays using sperm from wild-type mice showed that TRPM8 activation significantly reduced the number of sperm undergoing the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction following capacitation, and that this response was reversed by the coaddition of CRISP4. In accordance, sperm from Crisp4 null mice had a compromised ability to undergo to the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction. Collectively, these data identify CRISP4 as an endogenous regulator of TRPM8 with a role in normal sperm function. PMID:21482758

  6. Quality control in the secretory assembly line.

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, A

    2001-01-01

    As a rule, only proteins that have reached a native, folded and assembled structure are transported to their target organelles and compartments within the cell. In the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells, this type of sorting is particularly important. A variety of molecular mechanisms are involved that distinguish between folded and unfolded proteins, modulate their intracellular transport, and induce degradation if they fail to fold. This phenomenon, called quality control, occurs at several levels and involves different types of folding sensors. The quality control system provides a stringent and versatile molecular sorting system that guaranties fidelity of protein expression in the secretory pathway. PMID:11260794

  7. Independent Transport and Sorting of Functionally Distinct Protein Families in Tetrahymena thermophila Dense Core Secretory Granules▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Abdur; Miao, Wei; Turkewitz, Aaron P.

    2009-01-01

    Dense core granules (DCGs) in Tetrahymena thermophila contain two protein classes. Proteins in the first class, called granule lattice (Grl), coassemble to form a crystalline lattice within the granule lumen. Lattice expansion acts as a propulsive mechanism during DCG release, and Grl proteins are essential for efficient exocytosis. The second protein class, defined by a C-terminal β/γ-crystallin domain, is poorly understood. Here, we have analyzed the function and sorting of Grt1p (granule tip), which was previously identified as an abundant protein in this family. Cells lacking all copies of GRT1, together with the closely related GRT2, accumulate wild-type levels of docked DCGs. Unlike cells disrupted in any of the major GRL genes, ΔGRT1 ΔGRT2 cells show no defect in secretion, indicating that neither exocytic fusion nor core expansion depends on GRT1. These results suggest that Grl protein sorting to DCGs is independent of Grt proteins. Consistent with this, the granule core lattice in ΔGRT1 ΔGRT2 cells appears identical to that in wild-type cells by electron microscopy, and the only biochemical component visibly absent is Grt1p itself. Moreover, gel filtration showed that Grl and Grt proteins in cell homogenates exist in nonoverlapping complexes, and affinity-isolated Grt1p complexes do not contain Grl proteins. These data demonstrate that two major classes of proteins in Tetrahymena DCGs are likely to be independently transported during DCG biosynthesis and play distinct roles in granule function. The role of Grt1p may primarily be postexocytic; consistent with this idea, DCG contents from ΔGRT1 ΔGRT2 cells appear less adhesive than those from the wild type. PMID:19684282

  8. Secretory Immunoglobulin A Antibodies against the σ1 Outer Capsid Protein of Reovirus Type 1 Lang Prevent Infection of Mouse Peyer's Patches†

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Amy B.; Helander, Anna; Silvey, Katherine J.; Chandran, Kartik; Lucas, William T.; Nibert, Max L.; Neutra, Marian R.

    2004-01-01

    Reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L) adheres to M cells in the follicle-associated epithelium of mouse intestine and exploits the transport activity of M cells to enter and infect the Peyer's patch mucosa. Adult mice that have previously cleared a reovirus T1L infection have virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum and IgA in secretions and are protected against reinfection. Our aim in this study was to determine whether secretory IgA is sufficient for protection of Peyer's patches against oral reovirus challenge and, if so, against which reovirus antigen(s) the IgA may be directed. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) of the IgA isotype, directed against the σ1 protein of reovirus T1L, the viral adhesin, were produced and tested along with other, existing IgA and IgG MAbs against reovirus T1L outer capsid proteins. Anti-σ1 IgA and IgG MAbs neutralized reovirus T1L in L cell plaque reduction assays and inhibited T1L adherence to L cells and Caco-2BBe intestinal epithelial cells in vitro, but MAbs against other proteins did not. Passive oral administration of anti-σ1 IgA and IgG MAbs prevented Peyer's patch infection in adult mice, but other MAbs did not. When anti-σ1 IgA and IgG MAbs were produced in mice from hybridoma backpack tumors, however, the IgA prevented Peyer's patch infection, but the IgG did not. The results provide evidence that neutralizing IgA antibodies specific for the σ1 protein are protective in vitro and in vivo and that the presence of these antibodies in intestinal secretions is sufficient for protection against entry of reovirus T1L into Peyer's patches. PMID:14694126

  9. Fate of secretory proteins trapped in oocytes of Xenopus laevis by disruption of the cytoskeleton or by imbalanced subunit synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The effects of imbalanced subunit synthesis, temperature, colchicine, and cytochalasin on the secretion from Xenopus laevis oocytes of a variety of avian and mammalian proteins were investigated; these proteins were encoded by microinjected messenger RNA. Cytochalasin and colchicine together severely reduced secretion in a temperature- independent manner, the exact reduction varying among the different proteins. In contrast cytochalasin alone had no effect, whereas colchicine alone caused a smaller, temperature-dependent reduction. The synthesis and subcellular compartmentation of these proteins were unaffected by the drug treatments; however, the proteins did not accumulate in the drug-treated oocytes but were degraded. The rate of degradation of each protein was similar to its rate of exocytosis from untreated oocytes. A similar result was obtained without recourse to drugs by studying the fate of immunoglobulin light chains trapped in oocytes by a deficiency in heavy chain synthesis. These results are discussed in terms of the disruptive effects, as revealed by electron microscopy, of the drug treatments on the cytoskeleton of the oocyte. PMID:6173386

  10. The kunitz protease inhibitor form of the amyloid precursor protein (KPI/APP) inhibits the proneuropeptide processing enzyme prohormone thiol protease (PTP). Colocalization of KPI/APP and PTP in secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Hook, V Y; Sei, C; Yasothornsrikul, S; Toneff, T; Kang, Y H; Efthimiopoulos, S; Robakis, N K; Van Nostrand, W

    1999-01-29

    Proteolytic processing of proenkephalin and proneuropeptides is required for the production of active neurotransmitters and peptide hormones. Variations in the extent of proenkephalin processing in vivo suggest involvement of endogenous protease inhibitors. This study demonstrates that "protease nexin 2 (PN2)," the secreted form of the kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), potently inhibited the proenkephalin processing enzyme known as prohormone thiol protease (PTP), with a Ki,app of 400 nM. Moreover, PTP and PN2 formed SDS-stable complexes that are typical of kunitz protease inhibitor interactions with target proteases. In vivo, KPI/APP (120 kDa), as well as a truncated form of KPI/APP that resembles PN2 in apparent molecular mass (110 kDa), were colocalized with PTP and (Met)enkephalin in secretory vesicles of adrenal medulla (chromaffin granules). KPI/APP (110-120 kDa) was also detected in pituitary secretory vesicles that contain PTP. In chromaffin cells, calcium-dependent secretion of KPI/APP with PTP and (Met)enkephalin demonstrated the colocalization of these components in functional secretory vesicles. These results suggest a role for KPI/APP inhibition of PTP in regulated secretory vesicles. In addition, these results are the first to identify an endogenous protease target of KPI/APP, which is developmentally regulated in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  11. A Retained Secretory Signal Peptide Mediates High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Assembly and Function of Haptoglobin-related Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, John M.; Nishanova, Tuiumkan; Pena, Savannah Rose; Hess, Matthew; Scelsi, Chris L.; Widener, Justin; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) is a component of a minor subspecies of high density lipoproteins (HDL) that function in innate immunity. Here we show that assembly of Hpr into HDL is mediated by its retained N-terminal signal peptide, an unusual feature for a secreted protein and the major difference between Hpr and the soluble acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp). The 18-amino acid signal peptide is necessary for binding to HDL and interacts directly with the hydrocarbon region of lipids. Utilizing model liposomes, we show that the rate of assembly and steady-state distribution of Hpr in lipid particles is mediated by the physical property of lipid fluidity. Dye release assays reveal that Hpr interacts more rapidly with fluid liposomes. Conversely, steady-state binding assays indicate that more rigid lipid compositions stabilize Hpr association. Lipid association also plays a role in facilitating hemoglobin binding by Hpr. Our data may offer an explanation for the distinct distribution of Hpr among HDL subspecies. Rather than protein-protein interactions mediating localization, direct interaction with phospholipids and sensitivity to lipid fluidity may be sufficient for localization of Hpr and may represent a mechanism of HDL subspeciation. PMID:25037218

  12. Endometrial cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is inhibited by human chorionic gonadotrophin, and is increased in the decidua of tubal ectopic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Horne, A.W.; Duncan, W.C.; King, A.E.; Burgess, S.; Lourenco, P.C.; Cornes, P.; Ghazal, P.; Williams, A.R.; Udby, L.; Critchley, H.O.D.

    2009-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) remains a considerable cause of morbidity and occasional mortality. Currently, there is no reliable test to differentiate ectopic from intrauterine gestation. We have previously used array technology to demonstrate that differences in gene expression in decidualized endometrium from women with ectopic and intrauterine gestations could be used to identify candidate diagnostic biomarkers for EP. The aim of this study was to further investigate the decidual gene with the highest fold increase in EP, cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3). Decidualized endometrium from gestation-matched women undergoing surgical termination of pregnancy (n = 8), evacuation of uterus for miscarriage (n = 6) and surgery for EP (n = 11) was subjected to quantitative RT–PCR, morphological assessment, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Sera were analysed for progesterone and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels. Immortalized endometrial epithelial cells were cultured with physiological concentrations of hCG. CRISP-3 mRNA and protein expression were greater in endometrium from ectopic when compared with intrauterine pregnancies (P < 0.05). CRISP-3 protein was localized to epithelium and granulocytes of endometrium. CRISP-3 serum concentrations were not different in women with ectopic compared with intrauterine pregnancies. CRISP-3 expression in endometrium was not related to the degree of decidualization or to serum progesterone levels. Endometrial CRISP-3 expression was inversely proportional to serum hCG concentrations (P < 0.001). Stimulation of endometrial epithelial cells with hCG in vitro caused a reduction in CRISP-3 expression (P < 0.01). The measurement of CRISP-3 in endometrium could provide an additional tool in the diagnosis of failing early pregnancy of unknown location. The absence of a local reduction in expression of CRISP-3 in decidualized endometrium of women with EP may be due to reduced exposure to hCG due to the ectopic

  13. The cysteine-rich secretory protein domain of Tpx-1 is related to ion channel toxins and regulates ryanodine receptor Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerard M; Scanlon, Martin J; Swarbrick, James; Curtis, Suzanne; Gallant, Esther; Dulhunty, Angela F; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2006-02-17

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (Crisp) are predominantly found in the mammalian male reproductive tract as well as in the venom of reptiles. Crisps are two domain proteins with a structurally similar yet evolutionary diverse N-terminal domain and a characteristic cysteine-rich C-terminal domain, which we refer to as the Crisp domain. We presented the NMR solution structure of the Crisp domain of mouse Tpx-1, and we showed that it contains two subdomains, one of which has a similar fold to the ion channel regulators BgK and ShK. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that the ion channel regulatory activity of Crisp proteins is attributed to the Crisp domain. Specifically, the Tpx-1 Crisp domain inhibited cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) 2 with an IC(50) between 0.5 and 1.0 microM and activated the skeletal RyR1 with an AC(50) between 1 and 10 microM when added to the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor. This activity was nonvoltage-dependent and weakly voltage-dependent, respectively. Furthermore, the Tpx-1 Crisp domain activated both RyR forms at negative bilayer potentials and showed no effect at positive bilayer potentials when added to the luminal domain of the receptor. These data show that the Tpx-1 Crisp domain on its own can regulate ion channel activity and provide compelling evidence for a role for Tpx-1 in the regulation of Ca(2+) fluxes observed during sperm capacitation.

  14. Endometrial cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is inhibited by human chorionic gonadotrophin, and is increased in the decidua of tubal ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horne, A W; Duncan, W C; King, A E; Burgess, S; Lourenco, P C; Cornes, P; Ghazal, P; Williams, A R; Udby, L; Critchley, H O D

    2009-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) remains a considerable cause of morbidity and occasional mortality. Currently, there is no reliable test to differentiate ectopic from intrauterine gestation. We have previously used array technology to demonstrate that differences in gene expression in decidualized endometrium from women with ectopic and intrauterine gestations could be used to identify candidate diagnostic biomarkers for EP. The aim of this study was to further investigate the decidual gene with the highest fold increase in EP, cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3). Decidualized endometrium from gestation-matched women undergoing surgical termination of pregnancy (n = 8), evacuation of uterus for miscarriage (n = 6) and surgery for EP (n = 11) was subjected to quantitative RT-PCR, morphological assessment, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Sera were analysed for progesterone and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels. Immortalized endometrial epithelial cells were cultured with physiological concentrations of hCG. CRISP-3 mRNA and protein expression were greater in endometrium from ectopic when compared with intrauterine pregnancies (P < 0.05). CRISP-3 protein was localized to epithelium and granulocytes of endometrium. CRISP-3 serum concentrations were not different in women with ectopic compared with intrauterine pregnancies. CRISP-3 expression in endometrium was not related to the degree of decidualization or to serum progesterone levels. Endometrial CRISP-3 expression was inversely proportional to serum hCG concentrations (P < 0.001). Stimulation of endometrial epithelial cells with hCG in vitro caused a reduction in CRISP-3 expression (P < 0.01). The measurement of CRISP-3 in endometrium could provide an additional tool in the diagnosis of failing early pregnancy of unknown location. The absence of a local reduction in expression of CRISP-3 in decidualized endometrium of women with EP may be due to reduced exposure to hCG due to the ectopic

  15. Sphingolipids Containing Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acids Define a Secretory Pathway for Specific Polar Plasma Membrane Protein Targeting in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Jonathan E.; Molino, Diana; Gissot, Lionel; Bellec, Yannick; Hématy, Kian; Marion, Jessica; Belcram, Katia; Palauqui, Jean-Christophe; Satiat-JeuneMaître, Béatrice; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a class of structural membrane lipids involved in membrane trafficking and cell polarity. Functional analysis of the ceramide synthase family in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrates the existence of two activities selective for the length of the acyl chains. Very-long-acyl-chain (C > 18 carbons) but not long-chain sphingolipids are essential for plant development. Reduction of very-long-chain fatty acid sphingolipid levels leads in particular to auxin-dependent inhibition of lateral root emergence that is associated with selective aggregation of the plasma membrane auxin carriers AUX1 and PIN1 in the cytosol. Defective targeting of polar auxin carriers is characterized by specific aggregation of Rab-A2a– and Rab-A1e–labeled early endosomes along the secretory pathway. These aggregates correlate with the accumulation of membrane structures and vesicle fragmentation in the cytosol. In conclusion, sphingolipids with very long acyl chains define a trafficking pathway with specific endomembrane compartments and polar auxin transport protein cargoes. PMID:21666002

  16. Construction of a shuttle vector for protein secretory expression in Bacillus subtilis and the application of the mannanase functional heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Su; Tang, Jia-jie; Wei, Dong-zhi; Wei, Wei

    2014-04-01

    We report the construction of two Bacillus subtilis expression vectors, pBNS1/pBNS2. Both vectors are based on the strong promoter P43 and the ampicillin resistance gene expression cassette. Additionally, a fragment with the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and a multiple cloning site (BamHI, SalI, SacI, XhoI, PstI, SphI) were inserted. The coding region for the amyQ (encoding an amylase) signal peptide was fused to the promoter P43 of pBNS1 to construct the secreted expression vector pBNS2. The applicability of vectors was tested by first generating the expression vectors pBNS1-GFP/pBNS2-GFP and then detecting for green fluorescent protein gene expression. Next, the mannanase gene from B. pumilus Nsic-2 was fused to vector pBNS2 and we measured the mannanase activity in the supernatant. The mannanase total enzyme activity was 8.65 U/ml, which was 6 times higher than that of the parent strain. Our work provides a feasible way to achieve an effective transformation system for gene expression in B. subtilis and is the first report to achieve B. pumilus mannanase secretory expression in B. subtilis.

  17. Detection of serum human epididymis secretory protein 4 in patients with ovarian cancer using a label-free biosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jialing; Duan, Ruiqi; Yang, Huan; Luo, Xiangang; Xi, Mingrong

    2012-01-01

    Detection of the human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) biomarker plays an important role in the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. This study aimed to develop a novel localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor for detecting HE4 in blood samples from patients with ovarian cancer. Silver nanoparticles were fabricated using a nanosphere lithography method. The anti-HE4 antibody as a probe, which can distinctly recognize HE4, was assembled onto the nanochip surface using an amine coupling method. Detection was based on the shift in the extinction maximum of the LSPR spectrum before and after the HE4-anti-HE4 antibody reaction. These nanobiosensors were applied to detect HE4 in human serum samples and compare them using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tests relating to the detection of HE4 demonstrated that the LSPR-based biosensor featured a fast detection speed, good specificity, effective reproducibility, and long-term stability. The linear range for LSPR was between 10 pM and 10,000 pM, with a detection limit of 4 pM. An excellent correlation between LSPR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results was observed in human serum. This study is the first clinical diagnostic application of the LSPR biosensor in ovarian cancer. The LSPR biosensor, a rapid, low-cost, label-free and portable screening tool, can serve as a very effective alternative for the clinical serological diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  18. Detection of serum human epididymis secretory protein 4 in patients with ovarian cancer using a label-free biosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jialing; Duan, Ruiqi; Yang, Huan; Luo, Xiangang; Xi, Mingrong

    2012-01-01

    Background Detection of the human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) biomarker plays an important role in the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. This study aimed to develop a novel localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor for detecting HE4 in blood samples from patients with ovarian cancer. Methods Silver nanoparticles were fabricated using a nanosphere lithography method. The anti-HE4 antibody as a probe, which can distinctly recognize HE4, was assembled onto the nanochip surface using an amine coupling method. Detection was based on the shift in the extinction maximum of the LSPR spectrum before and after the HE4-anti-HE4 antibody reaction. These nanobiosensors were applied to detect HE4 in human serum samples and compare them using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Tests relating to the detection of HE4 demonstrated that the LSPR-based biosensor featured a fast detection speed, good specificity, effective reproducibility, and long-term stability. The linear range for LSPR was between 10 pM and 10,000 pM, with a detection limit of 4 pM. An excellent correlation between LSPR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results was observed in human serum. Conclusion This study is the first clinical diagnostic application of the LSPR biosensor in ovarian cancer. The LSPR biosensor, a rapid, low-cost, label-free and portable screening tool, can serve as a very effective alternative for the clinical serological diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:22745553

  19. Inheritance of a Parotid Secretory Protein in Mice and Its Use in Determining Salivary Amylase Quantitative Variants

    PubMed Central

    Owerbach, David; Hjorth, J. Peter

    1980-01-01

    Among inbred strains of mice, a major protein, PSP, produced and secreted by the parotid glands, shows variation in electrophoretic mobility and in the peptides produced by cyanogen bromide treatment. This variation is inherited as a single Mendelian factor with two alleles showing co-dominant expression. In genetic crosses, it segregates independently from the amylase complex and is closely linked to the agouti locus on chromosome 2. The protein ratios between amylase and PSP in saliva, obtained by scanning of electrophoretic gel separations, were found to reflect genetic differences in salivary amylase production in strains YBR/Cv and C3H/As. PMID:6159249

  20. AB035. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator mir-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Qi-Zhao; Lyu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zi-Jian; Chen, Ming-Kun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan; Qi, Tao; Li, Xin; Liu, Cun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia Methods Spermatozoa were isolated from 90 study subjects’ ejaculated semen samples. DNA methylation was evaluated using bisulfite-sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR. The CRISP2 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined in the ejaculated spermatozoa by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. miRNA expression was detected by qRT-PCR. The direct regulatory effect of miR-27b on CRISP2 was predicted computationally and validated via luciferase reporter assay and in vitro experiments in which miR-27b mimic or inhibitor was transfected into 293T cells. Respective correlations of miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression with clinical features were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results Initially, low expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA was observed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients relative to normozoospermic males. Meanwhile, methylation was not found in CRISP2 promoter. These data suggest a possible post-transcriptional regulation of CRISP2 in asthenozoospermia. Subsequently, bioinformatics prediction, luciferase reporter assay and miR-27b transfection experiments revealed that miR-27b could specifically target CRISP2 by binding its 3’-UTR, suppressing CRISP2 expression post-transcriptionally. Further evidence was provided by the clinical observation of a high miR-27b expression in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients and a negative correlation between miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression. Finally, a retrospective

  1. Comparison between the effects of copper and iron deficiency on erythrocyte membrane protein composition and platelet secretory response

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.T.; Dufault, S.N. )

    1991-03-11

    Because severe Cu deficiency causes anemia in rats, it is possible that reported effects of Cu deficiency on erythrocyte membrane protein composition and platelet secretion result from impaired Fe utilization by the hemopoietic system. In the present study, weanling rats were fed diets that were either Cu deficient, Fe deficient or adequate in both Cu and Fe. After 5 weeks of dietary treatment, rats fed CuD and FeD were anemic. Although the amount of a 170 kDa protein associated with erythrocyte membranes doubled in rats fed CuD compared to rats fed CuAFeA, the amount remained unchanged in rats feed FeD. The rate of platelet dense granule secretion, as assessed by ATP release following thrombin activation, was 2-fold higher in rats fed CuD and FeD than in rats fed CuAFeA. However, the rates of secretion were not significantly different in platelets from rats fed CuD compared to those fed FeD. These findings suggest that changes induced by Cu deficiency in the protein composition of erythrocyte membranes result directly from Cu deprivation. The similarity between the effects of Cu and Fe deficiency on platelet secretion indicate that impairment of Fe-dependent cellular processes during Cu deficiency may contribute to the abnormal rate of dense granule secretion.

  2. Variations in concentrations of the major endometrial secretory proteins (placental protein 14 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1) in assisted conception regimes.

    PubMed

    Arthur, I D; Anthony, F W; Chard, T; Masson, G M; Thomas, E J

    1995-03-01

    We have previously shown that placental protein 14 (PP14) concentrations were depressed in two pregnancies that followed down-regulation of the anterior pituitary and exogenous hormone support prior to a frozen-thawed embryo transfer. We now report on a more comprehensive series of pregnancies following this form of treatment, in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and natural cycle frozen-thawed embryo transfer. Serum specimens were analysed for PP14 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 12 days after embryo transfer and at 7 weeks gestation. At 12 days after embryo transfer, the mean serum PP14 concentrations in the IVF and natural cycle were significantly higher in those who conceived than those who did not (82 versus 23 and 107 versus 39 micrograms/l respectively, P < 0.001). Although the mean PP14 concentration in the hormone-supported pregnant patients was higher than in the non-pregnant patients, this had not reached statistical significance 12 days after embryo transfer (49 versus 31 micrograms/l). By 7 weeks gestation the PP14 concentrations in the hormone-supported pregnant patients were significantly higher than in the non-pregnant patients (152 versus 31 micrograms/l, P < 0.001). However, the PP14 concentrations for hormone-supported pregnant patients were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than those for pregnant IVF or natural cycle patients at 7 weeks gestation (152, 777 and 660 micrograms/l respectively). The PP14 concentrations in the pregnant patients, although lower than those in IVF and natural cycle pregnancies, were higher than those previously reported in ovarian failure and Turner's syndrome ovum donation cycles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Cloning of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii GAS1 homologue and effect of cell wall engineering on protein secretory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a diploid budding yeast still poorly characterized, but widely recognised as tolerant to several stresses, most of which related to industrial processes of production. Because of that, it would be very interesting to develop its ability as a cell factory. Gas1p is a β-1,3-glucanosyltransglycosylase which plays an important role in cell wall construction and in determining its permeability. Cell wall defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, deleted in the GAS1 gene, were reported as super-secretive. The aim of this study was the cloning and deletion of the GAS1 homologue of Z. bailii and the evaluation of its deletion on recombinant protein secretion. Results The GAS1 homologue of Z. bailii was cloned by PCR, and when expressed in a S. cerevisiae GAS1 null mutant was able to restore the parental phenotype. The respective Z. bailii Δgas1 deleted strain was obtained by targeted deletion of both alleles of the ZbGAS1 gene with deletion cassettes having flanking regions of ~400 bp. The morphological and physiological characterization of the Z. bailii null mutant resulted very similar to that of the corresponding S. cerevisiae mutant. As for S. cerevisiae, in the Z. bailii Δgas1 the total amount of protein released in the medium was significantly higher. Moreover, three different heterologous proteins were expressed and secreted in said mutant. The amount of enzymatic activity found in the medium was almost doubled in the case of the Candida rugosa lipase CRL1 and of the Yarrowia lipolytica protease XPR2, while for human IL-1β secretion disruption had no relevant effect. Conclusions The data presented confirm that the engineering of the cell wall is an effective way to improve protein secretion in yeast. They also confirmed that Z. bailii is an interesting candidate, despite the knowledge of its genome and the tools for its manipulation still need to be improved. However, as already widely reported in

  4. Proteoglycans from Boswellia serrata Roxb. and B. carteri Birdw. and identification of a proteolytic plant basic secretory protein.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Andreas; König, Simone; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Sehlbach, Maria; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Peter-Katalinic, Jasna; Hensel, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Water-soluble high molecular weight compounds were isolated in yields of 21-22% from the oleogum of Boswellia serrata and B. carteri. Using anion exchange chromatography and gel permeation chromatography, different proteoglycans were purified and characterized, leading to four principally different groups: (i) Hyp-/Ser-rich extensins with O-glycosidic attached arabinan side chains; (ii) Modified extensins, with arabinogalactosylated side chains containing GlA and 4-O-Me-GlcA; (iii) Glycoproteins with N-glycosidic side chains containing higher amounts of Fuc, Man and GluNH(2,) featuring a 200 kD metalloproteinase that has been de novo sequenced and is described for the first time; (iv) Type II arabinogalactans-proteins. Significant differences between the gums from the two species were observed in the protein content (6% vs 22%), offering the possibility of a quick differentiation of gums from both species for analytical quality control. The data also offer an insight into the plant response towards wound-closing by the formation of extensin and AGP-containing gum.

  5. Alternative splicing of PSP94 (prostatic secretory protein of 94 amino acids) mRNA in prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Xuan, J W; Chin, J L; Guo, Y; Chambers, A F; Finkelman, M A; Clarke, M W

    1995-09-21

    While performing reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of total mRNA from prostate cancer specimens, two forms of PSP94 cDNA were detected. RT-PCR products were analysed by Southern blotting and probing with exon-specific oligonucleotides. In the short form of PSP94 mRNA, designated as PSP57, exon III was found to be deleted. The two mRNA forms were confirmed by cloning and sequencing of the RT-PCR products and were found to result from alternative splicing. The alternatively spliced form, PSP57, was characterized by sequence analysis. PSP94 and PSP57 possess identical exons I and II, including identical secretion signal peptide and the 5' untranslated sequences. PSP57 has a frame-shifted exon IV and encodes a putative 57 amino acid protein with a novel, highly basic C-terminus of 41 amino acids. PSP57 mRNA was detected in other urogenital tissues (kidney, bladder) and in most tumor cell lines tested, but was not detectable in other tissues such as breast and lung. In prostate tumor cell lines, PSP57 mRNA was aberrantly spliced and localized in the nuclear fraction of the cell. Our results suggest the possible existence of a novel PSP protein that originates from alternative splicing of PSP94 mRNA in urogenital tissues.

  6. Disruption of gene expression rhythms in mice lacking secretory vesicle proteins IA-2 and IA-2β.

    PubMed

    Punia, Sohan; Rumery, Kyle K; Yu, Elizabeth A; Lambert, Christopher M; Notkins, Abner L; Weaver, David R

    2012-09-15

    Insulinoma-associated protein (IA)-2 and IA-2β are transmembrane proteins involved in neurotransmitter secretion. Mice with targeted disruption of both IA-2 and IA-2β (double-knockout, or DKO mice) have numerous endocrine and physiological disruptions, including disruption of circadian and diurnal rhythms. In the present study, we have assessed the impact of disruption of IA-2 and IA-2β on molecular rhythms in the brain and peripheral oscillators. We used in situ hybridization to assess molecular rhythms in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of wild-type (WT) and DKO mice. The results indicate significant disruption of molecular rhythmicity in the SCN, which serves as the central pacemaker regulating circadian behavior. We also used quantitative PCR to assess gene expression rhythms in peripheral tissues of DKO, single-knockout, and WT mice. The results indicate significant attenuation of gene expression rhythms in several peripheral tissues of DKO mice but not in either single knockout. To distinguish whether this reduction in rhythmicity reflects defective oscillatory function in peripheral tissues or lack of entrainment of peripheral tissues, animals were injected with dexamethasone daily for 15 days, and then molecular rhythms were assessed throughout the day after discontinuation of injections. Dexamethasone injections improved gene expression rhythms in liver and heart of DKO mice. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that peripheral tissues of DKO mice have a functioning circadian clockwork, but rhythmicity is greatly reduced in the absence of robust, rhythmic physiological signals originating from the SCN. Thus, IA-2 and IA-2β play an important role in the regulation of circadian rhythms, likely through their participation in neurochemical communication among SCN neurons.

  7. An Epididymis-Specific Secretory Protein HongrES1 Critically Regulates Sperm Capacitation and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuchuan; Zheng, Min; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Li; Zhen, Wei; Chen, Wenying; Zhang, Yonglian

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilizion. Although progress had been made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little is known about the potential roles of epididymal proteins during this process. Here we report that HongrES1, a new member of the SERPIN (serine proteinase inhibitor) family exclusively expressed in the rat cauda epididymis and up-regulated by androgen, is secreted into the lumen and covers the sperm head. Co-culture of caudal sperms with HongrES1 antibody in vitro resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa. Furthermore, the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa clearly increased in rats when HongrES1 was down-regulated by RNAi in vivo. Remarkably, knockdown of HongrES1 in vivo led to reduced fertility accompanied with deformed appearance of fetuses and pups. These results identify HongrES1 as a novel and critical molecule in the regulation of sperm capacitation and male fertility. PMID:19116669

  8. A 24 kDa Excretory-Secretory Protein of Anisakis simplex Larvae Could Elicit Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Park, Mi Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Yun Seong; Kim, Ki Uk; Lee, Min Ki; Ock, Mee Sun; Cha, Hee Jae

    2011-01-01

    We have reported that a 24 kDa protein (22U homologous; As22U) of Anisakis simplex larvae could elicit several Th2-related chemokine gene expressions in the intestinal epithelial cell line which means that As22U may play a role as an allergen. In order to determine the contribution of As22U to allergic reactions, we treated mice with 6 times intra-nasal application of recombinant As22U (rAs22U). In the group challenged with rAs22U and ovalbumin (OVA), the number of eosinophils in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was significantly increased, as compared to the group receiving only OVA. In addition, mice treated with rAs22U and OVA showed significantly increased airway hyperresponsiveness. Thus, severe inflammation around the airway and immune cell recruitment was observed in mice treated with rAs22U plus OVA. The levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 cytokines in the BALF increased significantly after treatment with rAs22U and OVA. Similarly, the levels of anti-OVA specific IgE and IgG1 increased in mice treated with rAs22U and OVA, compared to those treated only with OVA. The Gro-α (CXCL1) gene expression in mouse lung epithelial cells increased instantly after treatment with rAs22U, and allergy-specific chemokines eotaxin (CCL11) and thymus-and-activation-regulated-chemokine (CCL17) gene expressions significantly increased at 6 hr after treatment. In conclusion, rAs22U may induce airway allergic inflammation, as the result of enhanced Th2 and Th17 responses. PMID:22355204

  9. Secretory carrier membrane protein SCAMP2 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate interactions in the regulation of dense core vesicle exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Haini; Ellena, Jeff; Liu, Lixia; Szabo, Gabor; Cafiso, David; Castle, David

    2007-09-25

    Secretory carrier membrane protein 2 (SCAMP2) functions in late steps of membrane fusion in calcium-dependent granule exocytosis. A basic/hydrophobic peptide segment within SCAMP2 (SCAMP2 E: CWYRPIYKAFR) has been implicated in this function and shown to bind and sequester phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2] within membranes through an electrostatic mechanism. We now show that alanine substitution of tryptophan W2 within SCAMP2 E substantially weakens peptide binding to negatively charged liposomes; other substitutions for arginine R4 and lysine K8 have only limited effects on binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of liposomes containing spin-labeled PIP2 shows that R4 but not K8 is critical for SCAMP E binding to PIP2. The interfacial locations of SCAMP E and its structural variants within lipid bicelles measured by oxygen enhancement of nuclear relaxation are all similar. Corresponding point mutations within full-length SCAMP2 (SC2-R204A, SC2-K208A, and SC2-W202A) have been analyzed for biological effects on dense core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine PC12 cells. With the same level of overexpression, SC2-R204A but not SC2-K208A inhibited secretion of cotransfected human growth hormone and of noradrenalin. Inhibition by SC2-R204A was the same as or greater than previously observed for SC2-W202A. Analysis of noradrenalin secretion by amperometry showed that inhibitory mutants of SCAMP2 decrease the probability of fusion pore opening and the stability of initially opened but not yet expanded fusion pores. The strong correlation between SCAMP2 E interactions with PIP2 and inhibition of exocytosis, particularly by SC2-R204A, led us to propose that SCAMP2 interaction with PIP2 within the membrane interface regulates fusion pore formation during exocytosis.

  10. Crystal structures of human secretory proteins ZG16p and ZG16b reveal a Jacalin-related β-prism fold.

    PubMed

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Satoh, Tadashi; Ikeda, Akemi; Nakano, Yukiko; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kato, Koichi; Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2011-01-07

    ZG16p is a secretory protein that mediates condensation-sorting of pancreatic enzymes to the zymogen granule membrane in pancreatic acinar cells. ZG16p interacts with glycosaminoglycans and the binding is considered to be important for condensation-sorting of pancreatic enzymes. ZG16b/PAUF, a paralog of ZG16p, has recently been found to play a role in gene regulation and cancer metastasis. However, the detailed functions of ZG16p and ZG16b remain to be clarified. Here, in order to obtain insights into structure-function relationships, we conducted crystallographic studies of human ZG16p lectin as well as its paralog, ZG16b, and determined their crystal structures at 1.65 and 2.75 Å resolution, respectively. ZG16p has a Jacalin-related β-prism fold, the first to be reported among mammalian lectins. The putative sugar-binding site of ZG16p is occupied by a glycerol molecule, mimicking the mannose bound to Jacalin-related mannose-binding-type plant lectins such as Banlec. ZG16b also has a β-prism fold, but some amino acid residues of the putative sugar-binding site differ from those of the mannose-type binding site suggesting altered preference. A positively charged patch, which may bind sulfated groups of the glycosaminoglycans, is located around the putative sugar-binding site of ZG16p and ZG16b. Taken together, we suggest that the sugar-binding site and the adjacent basic patch of ZG16p and ZG16b cooperatively form a functional glycosaminoglycan-binding site. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Liver-Enriched Gene 1, a Glycosylated Secretory Protein, Binds to FGFR and Mediates an Anti-stress Pathway to Protect Liver Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxia; Liu, Feng; Cui, Zongbin; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals and birds, teleost fish undergo external embryogenesis, and therefore their embryos are constantly challenged by stresses from their living environment. These stresses, when becoming too harsh, will cause arrest of cell proliferation, abnormal cell death or senescence. Such organisms have to evolve a sophisticated anti-stress mechanism to protect the process of embryogenesis/organogenesis. However, very few signaling molecule(s) mediating such activity have been identified. liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1) is an uncharacterized gene that encodes a novel secretory protein containing a single domain DUF781 (domain of unknown function 781) that is well conserved in vertebrates. In the zebrafish genome, there are two copies of leg1, namely leg1a and leg1b. leg1a and leg1b are closely linked on chromosome 20 and share high homology, but are differentially expressed. In this report, we generated two leg1a mutant alleles using the TALEN technique, then characterized liver development in the mutants. We show that a leg1a mutant exhibits a stress-dependent small liver phenotype that can be prevented by chemicals blocking the production of reactive oxygen species. Further studies reveal that Leg1a binds to FGFR3 and mediates a novel anti-stress pathway to protect liver development through enhancing Erk activity. More importantly, we show that the binding of Leg1a to FGFR relies on the glycosylation at the 70th asparagine (Asn70 or N70), and mutating the Asn70 to Ala70 compromised Leg1’s function in liver development. Therefore, Leg1 plays a unique role in protecting liver development under different stress conditions by serving as a secreted signaling molecule/modulator. PMID:26901320

  12. Monitoring of exocytosis and endocytosis of insulin secretory granules in the pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 using pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHluorin) and confocal laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nakamichi, Yoko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Katsuta, Hidenori; Ishida, Hitoshi; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2002-04-01

    The dynamics of exocytosis/endocytosis of insulin secretory granules in pancreatic beta-cells remains to be clarified. In the present study, we visualized and analysed the motion of insulin secretory granules in MIN6 cells using pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHluorin) fused to either insulin or the vesicle membrane protein, phogrin. In order to monitor insulin exocytosis, pHluorin, which is brightly fluorescent at approximately pH 7.4, but not at approximately pH 5.0, was attached to the C-terminus of insulin. To monitor the motion of insulin secretory granules throughout exocytosis/endocytosis, pHluorin was inserted between the third and fourth amino acids after the identified signal-peptide cleavage site of rat phogrin cDNA. Using this method of cDNA construction, pHluorin was located in the vesicle lumen, which may enable discrimination of the unfused acidic secretory granules from the fused neutralized ones. In MIN6 cells expressing insulin-pHluorin, time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy (5 or 10 s intervals) revealed the appearance of fluorescent spots by depolarization after stimulation with 50 mM KCl and 22 mM glucose. The number of these spots in the image at the indicated times was counted and found to be consistent with the results of insulin release measured by RIA during the time course. In MIN6 cells expressing phogrin-pHluorin, data showed that fluorescent spots appeared following high KCl stimulation and remained stationary for a while, moved on the plasma membrane and then disappeared. Thus we demonstrate the visualized motion of insulin granule exocytosis/endocytosis using the pH-sensitive marker, pHluorin.

  13. Proteomic analysis of common bean seed with storage protein deficiency reveals up-regulation of sulfur-rich proteins and starch and raffinose metabolic enzymes, and down-regulation of the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Marsolais, Frédéric; Pajak, Agnieszka; Yin, Fuqiang; Taylor, Meghan; Gabriel, Michelle; Merino, Diana M; Ma, Vanessa; Kameka, Alexander; Vijayan, Perumal; Pham, Hai; Huang, Shangzhi; Rivoal, Jean; Bett, Kirstin; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Liu, Qiang; Bertrand, Annick; Chapman, Ralph

    2010-06-16

    A deficiency in major seed storage proteins is associated with a nearly two-fold increase in sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Their mature seed proteome was compared by an approach combining label-free quantification by spectral counting, 2-DE, and analysis of selective extracts. Lack of phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin was mainly compensated by increases in legumin, alpha-amylase inhibitors and mannose lectin FRIL. Along with legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were major contributors to the elevated sulfur amino acid content. Coordinate induction of granule-bound starch synthase I, starch synthase II-2 and starch branching enzyme were associated with minor alteration of starch composition, whereas increased levels of UDP-glucose 4-epimerase were correlated with a 30% increase in raffinose content. Induction of cell division cycle protein 48 and ubiquitin suggested enhanced ER-associated degradation. This was not associated with a classical unfolded protein response as the levels of ER HSC70-cognate binding protein were actually reduced in the mutant. Repression of rab1 GTPase was consistent with decreased traffic through the secretory pathway. Collectively, these results have implications for the nutritional quality of common bean, and provide information on the pleiotropic phenotype associated with storage protein deficiency in a dicotyledonous seed.

  14. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined.

  15. Autoantigen 1 of the guinea pig sperm acrosome is the homologue of mouse Tpx-1 and human TPX1 and is a member of the cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family.

    PubMed

    Foster, J A; Gerton, G L

    1996-06-01

    We have cloned and sequenced cDNAs encoding autoantigen 1 (AA1), a testis-specific protein and the major autoantigen of the guinea pig sperm acrosome. The cDNA predicts a precursor protein of 244 amino acids including a 21 amino acid hydrophobic, secretory signal sequence. The mature polypeptide is predicted to have a molecular mass of 24,891 Daltons which agrees with the experimentally determined molecular weight of 25,000. Consistent with previous studies demonstrating that AA1 is not a glycoprotein, the predicted amino acid sequence contained no canonical sites for N-linked glycosylation. Comparison with other sequences showed that AA1 is the guinea pig homologue of the testis-specific protein Tpx-1 in mice and TPX1 in humans. AA1 also showed significant amino acid sequence homology with other cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP's): rat and mouse acidic epididymal glycoproteins (AEG; also known as proteins D/E in rats) and helothermine, a toxin from the Mexican beaded lizard. In addition, AA1 had a lesser degree of homology with antigen 5 (vespid wasp venom), PR-1 (a plant pathogenesis related protein), and GliPR (a protein identified in human gliomas). Northern analysis of RNA from purified guinea pig spermatogenic cells showed that a 1.5 kb message was first detected in pachytene spermatocytes, was strongest in round spermatids, and was detected at a low level in condensing spermatids. Immunoblot analysis and metabolic labeling data of AA1 in spermatogenic cells showed that the protein was synthesized as early as the pachytene spermatocyte stage of spermatogenesis. Thus, the patterns of AA1 mRNA and protein expression during spermatogenesis are similar to the expression of other acrosomal mRNAs and proteins that are first detected meiotically.

  16. Isolation of a cDNA clone for spinach lipid transfer protein and evidence that the protein is synthesized by the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, W.R.; Thoma, S.; Botella, J.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a nonspecific lipid transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was isolated by probing a library with synthetic oligonucleotides based on the amino acid sequence of the protein. Determination of the DNA sequence indicated a 354-nucleotide open reading frame which encodes a 118-amino acid residue polypeptide. The first 26 amino acids of the open reading frame, which are not present in the mature protein, have all the characteristics of a signal sequence which is normally associated with the synthesis of membrane proteins or secreted proteins. In vitro transcription of the cDNA and translation in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes or microsomes from cultured maize endosperm cells indicated that proteolytic processing of the preprotein to the mature form was associated with cotranslational insertion into the microsomal membranes. Because there is no known mechanism by which the polypeptide could be transferred from the microsomal membranes to the cytoplasm, the proposed role of this protein in catalyzing lipid transfer between intracellular membranes is in doubt. Although the lipid transfer protein is one of the most abundant proteins in leaf cells, the results of genomic Southern analysis were consistent with the presence of only one gene. Analysis of the level of mRNA by Northern blotting indicated that the transcript was several-fold more abundant than an actin transcript in leaf and petiole tissue, but was present in roots at less than 1% of the level in petioles.

  17. Disorders in barrier protein mRNA expression and placenta secretory activity under the influence of polychlorinated biphenyls in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska, A; Mlynarczuk, J; Kotwica, J

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy disorders are often correlated with the presence of organic pollutants in the tissues of living bodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects (over 24 and 48 hours) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) 153, 126, and 77 at doses of 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL on barrier function and secretory activity in cow placentome sections collected during the second trimester of pregnancy. None of the PCBs affected the viability of the sections (P > 0.05). Polychlorinated biphenyl 153 decreased (P < 0.05) connexin 26 (Cx 26) mRNA expression, and all three PCBs reduced (P < 0.05) Cx 43 mRNA expression. Cx 32 mRNA expression showed a downward trend (P > 0.05) under the influence of PCBs 126 and 77. Moreover, PCBs 153 and 126 increased keratin 8 (KRT8) mRNA expression, whereas all PCBs decreased (P < 0.05) placenta specific protein 1 (PLAC-1) mRNA expression without changing (P > 0.05) hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) mRNA expression. Concomitantly, PCBs 153 and 126 stimulated (P < 0.05) cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA expression, all PCBs increased (P < 0.05) prostaglandin E2 synthase (PGES) mRNA expression, and PCBs 126 and 77 increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion. All three PCBs decreased (P < 0.05) prostaglandin F2α synthase (PGFS) mRNA expression and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) secretion. In addition, all three PCBs increased (P < 0.05) neurophysin I/oxytocin (NP-I/OT) mRNA expression and OT secretion but did not affect peptidyl-glycine-α-amidating monooxygenase (PGA) mRNA expression (P > 0.05). Moreover, the PCBs increased (P < 0.05) estradiol (E2) secretion, whereas progesterone (P4) secretion remained unchanged (P > 0.05). These changes could affect trophoblast invasion and uterine contractility and thus impact the course of gestation and/or fetal development in the cow.

  18. Fluconazole transport into Candida albicans secretory vesicles by the membrane proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luiz R; Gast, Charles E; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-06-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [(3)H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [(3)H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The K(m)s (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and V(max)s (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [(3)H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [(3)H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s; expressed as proportions of the [(3)H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi.

  19. Fluconazole Transport into Candida albicans Secretory Vesicles by the Membrane Proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p ▿

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Luiz R.; Gast, Charles E.; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [3H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [3H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The Kms (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and Vmaxs (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [3H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [3H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [3H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [3H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s; expressed as proportions of the [3H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi. PMID:20348384

  20. Listeria-vectored vaccine expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30 kDa major secretory protein via the constitutively active prfA* regulon boosts BCG efficacy against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingmei; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2017-06-19

    A potent vaccine against tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest diseases, is needed to enhance the immunity of people worldwide, most of whom have been vaccinated with the partially effective BCG vaccine. Here we investigate novel live attenuated recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (rLm) vaccines expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) 30 kDa major secretory protein (r30/Ag85B) (rLm30) as heterologous booster vaccines in animals primed with BCG. Using three attenuated Lm vectors, rLm ΔactA (LmI), rLm ΔactA ΔinlB (LmII), and rLm ΔactA ΔinlBprfA* (LmIII), we constructed five rLm30 vaccine candidates expressing the r30 linked in-frame to the Lm Listeriolycin O signal sequence and driven by the hly promoter (h30) or linked in-frame to the ActA N-terminus and driven by the actA promoter (a30). All five rLm30 vaccines secreted r30 in broth and macrophages; while rLm expressing r30 via a constitutively active prfA* regulon (rLmIII/a30) expressed the greatest amount of r30 in broth culture, all five rLm vaccines expressed equivalent amounts of r30 in infected macrophages. In comparative studies, boosting BCG-immunized mice with rLmIII/a30 induced the strongest antigen-specific T-cell responses, including splenic and lung polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells expressing the three cytokines of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) (P < 0.001) and splenic and lung CD8+ T-cells expressing IFN-γ (P < 0.0001). In mice and guinea pigs, rLmIII/a30 and rLmI/h30 vaccines were generally more potent booster vaccines than r30 in adjuvant and a recombinant adenovirus vaccine expressing r30. In a setting in which BCG alone was highly immunoprotective, boosting mice with rLmIII/a30, the most potent of the vaccines, significantly enhanced protection against aerosolized Mtb (P <0.01). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Muscle as a secretory organ.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise.

  2. The lung enriched transcription factor TTF-1 and the ubiquitously expressed proteins Sp1 and Sp3 interact with elements located in the minimal promoter of the rat Clara cell secretory protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, R F; Gowan, S; Bingle, C D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms that direct expression of the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) gene to the bronchiolar epithelial cells of the lung remain to be elucidated. Previous studies have identified a number of proteins which bind to a functionally important region (Region 1) located -132 to -76 bp from the transcription start site in the rat CCSP gene. Subsequently we have shown that while Region 1 is an important positive regulator of CCSP gene expression, sequences 3' of this region (-75 to +38) are sufficient to confer tissue-specific expression of a reporter gene. In the present study we have used transient transfections with a deletion series of CCSP-CAT reporter plasmids (where CAT is chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) and gel mobility shift assays with a series of overlapping oligonucleotides covering the whole minimal promoter region to study protein-DNA interactions within this region. These studies have identified a conserved functional binding site for the lung and thyroid enriched homeodomain transcription factor TTF-1, located between positions -51 and -42 from the transcription start site. CCSP-CAT chimaeric reporters containing this region are specifically activated by TTF-1 in co-transfection assays, and nuclear extracts from cells which express TTF-1 bind to this region, as does in vitro translated rat TTF-1. Three additional conserved regions were identified, and in further gel mobility shift studies with an oligonucleotide spanning the conserved region immediately 5' to the TTF-1 site we identified a binding site for the ubiquitously expressed zinc-finger-containing proteins Sp1 and Sp3. These studies suggest that cell-type-restricted and ubiquitous nuclear proteins may play a combined role in the regulation of the CCSP gene within the bronchiolar epithelium by interacting with the minimal promoter region. PMID:8687389

  3. Parotid salivary secretory pattern in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Riad, M; Barton, J R; Wilson, J A; Freeman, C P; Maran, A G

    1991-01-01

    Parotid gland enlargement occurs in about 25% of patients with the binge eating syndrome of bulimia nervosa. The parotid salivary secretory patterns in 28 bulimics were determined in order to investigate the functional abnormality in the glands. Bulimia patients had a reduced resting flow rate. Bulimics who developed sialadenosis (4 patients) had reduced resting and stimulated flow rates. The salivary amylase activity was increased in both the resting and stimulated states in bulimics and the sialadenosis group. The resting total protein levels were greater in the bulimics. The electrolyte and immunoglobulin levels were within normal limits. The possibility of protein and enzymatic secretory disturbances due to autonomic nerve disorders as an explanation for the development of sialadenosis in bulimia nervosa is discussed.

  4. Regulation on the expression of Clara cell secretory protein in the lungs of the rats with acute lung injury by growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia; Luo, Fo-Quan; Zhao, Wei-Lu

    2012-08-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) is an important lung derived protective factor and may play an important role on the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by endotoxemia. Growth hormone (GH) is an important anabolism hormone secreted by GH cells of the hypophysis. Previous research showed that GH would significantly exacerbate ALI induced by endotoxemia, but the mechanism is not very clear yet. Whether the effects are related to CC16 or not is undetermined. One hundred and twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into an ALI group and a GH group. The rats in the two groups were subdivided into seven subgroups, according to injection with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or not, then according to different intervals of time after LPS injection; 0 hour (pre-injection of LPS, acted as control group), 0.5 hour, 1 hour, 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours and 24 hours for subgroups. Pulmonary alveolar septa area density (PASAD) and ploymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the lungs were analyzed morphometrically. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were determined by radioimmunoassay. To analyze the expression and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), the numbers of NF-κB positive cells in lungs were counted after immunofluorescence staining, and the levels of NF-κB inhibitory protein-α (IκB-α) in lung homogenates of rats were detected by Western blotting. The expression levels of CC16 mRNA in lungs of the rats with ALI were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The levels of CC16 protein in lung homogenates were detected by Western blotting. Half an hour after LPS injury both the PASAD and PMN numbers in lungs of the rats with ALI began to increase significantly and peaked at 6-hour post-injury. They then began to recover and reached normal levels at 24-hour post-injury. Both the PASAD and PMN numbers in the GH group increased more significantly than those in the ALI

  5. The secretory synapse: the secrets of a serial killer.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Giovanna; Trambas, Christina; Booth, Sarah; Clark, Richard; Stinchcombe, Jane; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2002-11-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) destroy their targets by a process involving secretion of specialized granules. The interactions between CTLs and target can be very brief; nevertheless, adhesion and signaling proteins segregate into an immunological synapse. Secretion occurs in a specialized secretory domain. Use of live and fixed cell microscopy allows this secretory synapse to be visualized both temporally and spatially. The combined use of confocal and electron microscopy has produced some surprising findings, which suggest that the secretory synapse may be important both in delivering the lethal hit and in facilitating membrane transfer from target to CTL. Studies on the secretory synapse in wild-type and mutant CTLs have been used to identify proteins involved in secretion. Further clues as to the signals required for secretion are emerging from comparisons of inhibitory and activating synapses formed by natural killer cells.

  6. AM67, a secretory component of the guinea pig sperm acrosomal matrix, is related to mouse sperm protein sp56 and the complement component 4-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Foster, J A; Friday, B B; Maulit, M T; Blobel, C; Winfrey, V P; Olson, G E; Kim, K S; Gerton, G L

    1997-05-09

    The guinea pig sperm acrosomal matrix is the dense core of the acrosome and is likely to be important in acrosome biogenesis and fertilization. Isolated acrosomal matrices are composed of a limited number of major bands when analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, among which is a Mr 67,000 protein that we have termed AM67. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that AM67 is localized to the apical segment of the cauda epididymal sperm acrosome. Immunoelectron microscopy further refined the localization of AM67 to the M1 (dorsal bulge) domain within the acrosome. Using a polymerase chain reaction product based upon tryptic peptide sequences from AM67, a lambdagt11 guinea pig testis cDNA library was screened to yield two cDNA clones that encode the AM67 peptides. Northern analysis revealed that AM67 is transcribed as a 1. 9-kilobase testis-specific mRNA. The complete AM67 sequence encodes a prepropolypeptide of 533 amino acids with a calculated Mr of 59, 768. Following cleavage of a probable signal sequence, the polypeptide was predicted to have a Mr of 56,851 and seven consensus sites for asparagine-linked glycosylation. The deduced amino acid sequence of AM67 is most similar to those of the mouse sperm protein sp56 and the alpha-subunits of complement component 4-binding proteins from various mammalian species. Although mouse sp56 has been reported to be a cell-surface receptor for the murine zona pellucida glycoprotein ZP3, standard immunoelectron microscopy using the anti-sp56 monoclonal antibody 7C5 detected sp56 within the mouse sperm acrosome, but failed to detect sp56 on the surface of acrosome-intact mouse sperm. Furthermore, acrosomal labeling was detected in mouse sperm prepared for immunofluorescence using paraformaldehyde fixation, but was not observed with live unfixed sperm. Thus, the finding that sp56 is present within the acrosome provides further support that sp56 and AM67 are orthologues and suggests that sp56 may function in

  7. Role of aquaporins and regulation of secretory vesicle volume in cell secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sugiya, H; Matsuki-Fukushima, M; Hashimoto, S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract In exocrine glands, secretory proteins synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) exhibit vectorial transport from ER through a succession of membrane-bounded components such as Golgi complex, condensing vacuoles and secretory granules. The secretory granules migrate to particular locations within the cell close to the apical membrane prior to the release of their contents into the acinar lumen. Currently, to release intragranular contents, secretory granules have been demonstrated to transiently dock and fuse at ‘porosome’, a permanent cup-shaped structures at the cell membranes. Then swelling of secretory granules occurs to allow explusion of intragranular contents. In this process, water and ion fluxes in the granule membrane appear to contribute to maintain secretory granule integrity and morphology via osmoregulation in secretory granules. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of small, hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins, which function as channels to permeate water and small solutes. The AQPs reside constitutively at the plasma membrane in most cell types. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the AQPs are present in secretory granules in exocrine glands, synaptic vesicles and intracellular vesicles in liver and kidney, implying that AQPs in secretory granules and vesicles are involved in their volume regulation. This paper reviews the possible role of AQPs on secretory granules, especially in exocrine glands, in secretory function. PMID:18194450

  8. Ursodeoxycholic acid attenuates colonic epithelial secretory function

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Orlaith B; Mroz, Magdalena S; Ward, Joseph B J; Colliva, Carolina; Scharl, Michael; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gilmer, John F; Fallon, Padraic G; Hofmann, Alan F; Roda, Aldo; Murray, Frank E; Keely, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Dihydroxy bile acids, such as chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), are well known to promote colonic fluid and electrolyte secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea associated with bile acid malabsorption. However, CDCA is rapidly metabolised by colonic bacteria to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), the effects of which on epithelial transport are poorly characterised. Here, we investigated the role of UDCA in the regulation of colonic epithelial secretion. Cl− secretion was measured across voltage-clamped monolayers of T84 cells and muscle-stripped sections of mouse or human colon. Cell surface biotinylation was used to assess abundance/surface expression of transport proteins. Acute (15 min) treatment of T84 cells with bilateral UDCA attenuated Cl− secretory responses to the Ca2+ and cAMP-dependent secretagogues carbachol (CCh) and forskolin (FSK) to 14.0 ± 3.8 and 40.2 ± 7.4% of controls, respectively (n= 18, P < 0.001). Investigation of the molecular targets involved revealed that UDCA acts by inhibiting Na+/K+-ATPase activity and basolateral K+ channel currents, without altering their cell surface expression. In contrast, intraperitoneal administration of UDCA (25 mg kg−1) to mice enhanced agonist-induced colonic secretory responses, an effect we hypothesised to be due to bacterial metabolism of UDCA to lithocholic acid (LCA). Accordingly, LCA (50–200 μm) enhanced agonist-induced secretory responses in vitro and a metabolically stable UDCA analogue, 6α-methyl-UDCA, exerted anti-secretory actions in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, UDCA exerts direct anti-secretory actions on colonic epithelial cells and metabolically stable derivatives of the bile acid may offer a new approach for treating intestinal diseases associated with diarrhoea. PMID:23507881

  9. P-selectin targeting to secretory lysosomes of Rbl-2H3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasber; Cutler, Daniel F

    2002-03-22

    The biogenesis of secretory lysosomes, which combine characteristics of both lysosomes and secretory granules, is currently of high interest. In particular, it is not clear whether delivery of membrane proteins to the secretory lysosome requires lysosomal, secretory granule, or some novel targeting determinants. Heterologous expression of P-selectin has established that this membrane protein contains targeting signals for both secretory granules and lysosomes. P-selectin is therefore an ideal probe with which to determine the signals required for targeting to secretory lysosomes. We have exploited subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy to monitor targeting of transiently expressed wild-type and mutant horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-P-selectin chimeras to secretory lysosomes of Rbl-2H3 cells. The exposure of the HRP chimeras to intracellular proteolysis was also determined as a third monitor of secretory lysosome targeting. Our data show that HRP-P-selectin accumulates in secretory lysosomes of Rbl-2H3 cells using those cytoplasmic sequences previously found to be sufficient for targeting to conventional lysosomes. This work highlights the similar sorting signals used for targeting of membrane proteins to conventional lysosomes and secretory lysosomes.

  10. Docking of Secretory Vesicles Is Syntaxin Dependent

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Toonen, Ruud F.G.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones. PMID:17205130

  11. A Kinome-Wide Small Interfering RNA Screen Identifies Proviral and Antiviral Host Factors in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication, Including Double-Stranded RNA-Activated Protein Kinase and Early Secretory Pathway Proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Wilde, Adriaan H.; Wannee, Kazimier F.; Scholte, Florine E. M.; Goeman, Jelle J.; ten Dijke, Peter; Snijder, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify host factors relevant for severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) replication, we performed a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library screen targeting the human kinome. Protein kinases are key regulators of many cellular functions, and the systematic knockdown of their expression should provide a broad perspective on factors and pathways promoting or antagonizing coronavirus replication. In addition to 40 proteins that promote SARS-CoV replication, our study identified 90 factors exhibiting an antiviral effect. Pathway analysis grouped subsets of these factors in specific cellular processes, including the innate immune response and the metabolism of complex lipids, which appear to play a role in SARS-CoV infection. Several factors were selected for in-depth validation in follow-up experiments. In cells depleted for the β2 subunit of the coatomer protein complex (COPB2), the strongest proviral hit, we observed reduced SARS-CoV protein expression and a >2-log reduction in virus yield. Knockdown of the COPB2-related proteins COPB1 and Golgi-specific brefeldin A-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GBF1) also suggested that COPI-coated vesicles and/or the early secretory pathway are important for SARS-CoV replication. Depletion of the antiviral double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) enhanced virus replication in the primary screen, and validation experiments confirmed increased SARS-CoV protein expression and virus production upon PKR depletion. In addition, cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) was identified as a novel antiviral host factor in SARS-CoV replication. The inventory of pro- and antiviral host factors and pathways described here substantiates and expands our understanding of SARS-CoV replication and may contribute to the identification of novel targets for antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Replication of all viruses, including SARS-CoV, depends on and is influenced by cellular pathways. Although

  12. Label-free Quantitative Proteomics Reveals a Role for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis SecA2 Pathway in Exporting Solute Binding Proteins and Mce Transporters to the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Feltcher, Meghan E; Gunawardena, Harsha P; Zulauf, Katelyn E; Malik, Seidu; Griffin, Jennifer E; Sassetti, Christopher M; Chen, Xian; Braunstein, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an example of a bacterial pathogen with a specialized SecA2-dependent protein export system that contributes to its virulence. Our understanding of the mechanistic basis of SecA2-dependent export and the role(s) of the SecA2 pathway in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has been hindered by our limited knowledge of the proteins exported by the pathway. Here, we set out to identify M. tuberculosis proteins that use the SecA2 pathway for their export from the bacterial cytoplasm to the cell wall. Using label-free quantitative proteomics involving spectral counting, we compared the cell wall and cytoplasmic proteomes of wild type M. tuberculosis to that of a ΔsecA2 mutant. This work revealed a role for the M. tuberculosis SecA2 pathway in the cell wall localization of solute binding proteins that work with ABC transporters to import solutes. Another discovery was a profound effect of SecA2 on the cell wall localization of the Mce1 and Mce4 lipid transporters, which contribute to M. tuberculosis virulence. In addition to the effects on solute binding proteins and Mce transporter export, our label-free quantitative analysis revealed an unexpected relationship between SecA2 and the hypoxia-induced DosR regulon, which is associated with M. tuberculosis latency. Nearly half of the transcriptionally controlled DosR regulon of cytoplasmic proteins were detected at higher levels in the ΔsecA2 mutant versus wild type M. tuberculosis. By increasing the list of M. tuberculosis proteins known to be affected by the SecA2 pathway, this study expands our appreciation of the types of proteins exported by this pathway and guides our understanding of the mechanism of SecA2-dependent protein export in mycobacteria. At the same time, the newly identified SecA2-dependent proteins are helpful for understanding the significance of this pathway to M. tuberculosis virulence and physiology.

  13. Secretory Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Aktepe, Fatma; Sarsenov, Dauren; Özmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Secretory carcinoma is a very rare subtype of breast carcinoma. These tumors are generally associated with a favorable prognosis, although having triple-negative phenotype (estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) negative and c-erbB2 (HER2) negative). In this presentation, a rare secretory carcinoma of the breast in a woman aged 24 years is discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:28331758

  14. [Estimation of secretory immunoglobulin A in serum of pregnant women (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Lorenz, U; Brock, J; Straube, W

    1982-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was measured by means of radial immunodiffusion, according to Mancini, with a self-made antiserum to the secretory component being used together with a S-IgA standard. S-IgA serum concentrations went up with significance in the course of pregnancy, which was probably attributable to increased production of secretory protein in the breasts in preparation for lactation.

  15. Regulation of HIV-Gag Expression and Targeting to the Endolysosomal/Secretory Pathway by the Luminal Domain of Lysosomal-Associated Membrane Protein (LAMP-1) Enhance Gag-Specific Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J. Thomas; de Azevedo Marques, Ernesto Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field. PMID:24932692

  16. Regulation of HIV-Gag expression and targeting to the endolysosomal/secretory pathway by the luminal domain of lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1) enhance Gag-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Rodrigo Maciel da Costa; Matassoli, Flavio Lemos; Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J Thomas; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field.

  17. An evolving paradigm for the secretory pathway?

    PubMed Central

    Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The paradigm that the secretory pathway consists of a stable endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, using discrete transport vesicles to exchange their contents, gained important support from groundbreaking biochemical and genetic studies during the 1980s. However, the subsequent development of new imaging technologies with green fluorescent protein introduced data on dynamic processes not fully accounted for by the paradigm. As a result, we may be seeing an example of how a paradigm is evolving to account for the results of new technologies and their new ways of describing cellular processes. PMID:22039065

  18. Secretory Defect and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songhua; Yang, Zhihui; Hu, Jane; Gordon, William C.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Haas, Arthur L.; Bok, Dean; Jin, Minghao

    2013-01-01

    Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) secreted by photoreceptors plays a pivotal role in photoreceptor survival and function. Recently, a D1080N mutation in IRBP was found in patients with retinitis pigmentosa, a frequent cause of retinal degeneration. The molecular and cellular bases for pathogenicity of the mutation are unknown. Here, we show that the mutation abolishes secretion of IRBP and results in formation of insoluble high molecular weight complexes via disulfide bonds. Co-expression of protein disulfide isomerase A2 that regulates disulfide bond formation or introduction of double Cys-to-Ala substitutions at positions 304 and 1175 in D1080N IRBP promoted secretion of the mutated IRBP. D1080N IRBP was not transported to the Golgi apparatus, but accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), bound with the ER-resident chaperone proteins such as BiP, protein disulfide isomerase, and heat shock proteins. Splicing of X-box-binding protein-1 mRNA, expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and cleavage of ATF6 were significantly increased in cells expressing D1080N IRBP. Moreover, D1080N IRBP induced up-regulation and nuclear translocation of the C/EBP homologous protein, a proapoptotic transcription factor associated with the unfolded protein response. These results indicate that loss of normal function (nonsecretion) and gain of cytotoxic function (ER stress) are involved in the disease mechanisms of D1080N IRBP. Chemical chaperones and low temperature, which help proper folding of many mutated proteins, significantly rescued secretion of D1080N IRBP, suggesting that misfolding is the molecular basis for pathogenicity of D1080N substitution and that chemical chaperones are therapeutic candidates for the mutation-caused blinding disease. PMID:23486466

  19. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, potent peptidic inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, have been prepared and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.25 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction of retinal and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins are structurally classified as cysteine-rich secretory proteins and exhibit structural features that are quite distinct from those of other known small peptidic channel blockers. This article describes the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of these toxins. Crystals of PsTx belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.30, b = 61.59, c = 251.69 Å, and diffraction data were collected to 2.25 Å resolution. Crystals of Pdc also belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with similar unit-cell parameters a = 60.71, b = 61.67, c = 251.22 Å, and diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution.

  1. Secretion from Myeloid Cells: Secretory Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gillian M

    2016-08-01

    Many cells of the myeloid lineage use an unusual secretory organelle to deliver their effector mechanisms. In these cells, the lysosomal compartment is often modified not only to fulfill the degradative functions of a lysosome but also as a mechanism for secreting additional proteins that are found in the lysosomes of each specialized cell type. These extra proteins vary from one cell type to another according to the specialized function of the cell. For example, mast cells package histamine; cytotoxic T cells express perforin; azurophilic granules in neutrophils express antimicrobial peptides, and platelets von Willebrand factor. Upon release, these very different proteins can trigger inflammation, cell lysis, microbial death, and clotting, respectively, and hence deliver the very different effector mechanisms of these different myeloid cells.

  2. Some features of secretory systems in plants.

    PubMed

    Juniper, B E; Gilchrist, A J; Robins, R J

    1977-09-01

    Recent work on secretion in plants is reviewed, with emphasis on the anatomy and physiology of root cap cells in higher plants, the stalked glands of Drosera capensis, and the secretory mechanism of Dionaea muscipula. Cells of the root cap of higher plants switch from a geo-perceptive role to one of mucilage secretion at maturation. Features of this process, the role of the Golgi and the pathway for mucilage distribution are reviewed. In contrast, the stalked glands of the leaves of Drosera capensis are much longer lived and have a complex anatomy. The mechanisms for mucilage secretion, protein absorption and the role of the cell membranes in the internal secretion of the protein are described, using data from X-ray microscopv. The secretion of fluid and protein by Dionaea is stimulated by various nitrogen-containing compounds. Uric acid, often excreted by captured insects, is particularly effective in this respect.

  3. Detection of Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Human Colostrum as Mucosal Immune Response against Proteins of the Type Three Secretion System of Salmonella, Shigella and Enteropathogenic Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Durand, David; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Bellomo, Sicilia M. E.; Contreras, Carmen A.; Bustamante, Víctor H.; Ruiz, Joaquim; Cleary, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Some enteropathogens use the type three secretion system (T3SS) to secrete proteins that allows them to interact with enterocytes and promote bacterial attachment or intracellular survival. These proteins are Salmonella invasion proteins (Sip), invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa) of Shigella and E. coli secreted proteins (Esp) of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). There are no previous studies defining the presence of colostral sIgA against all these three major enteric pathogens. Objective To evaluate the presence of sIgA in colostrum against proteins of the T3SS of Salmonella, Shigella and EPEC. Methods We collected 76 colostrum samples from puerperal women in Lima, Peru. These samples were reacted with T3SS proteins extracted from bacterial culture supernatants and evaluated by Western Blot. Results Antibodies were detected against Salmonella antigens SipA in 75 samples (99%), SipC in 62 (82%) and SipB in 31 (41%); against Shigella antigens IpaC in 70 (92%), IpaB in 68 (89%), IpaA in 66 (87%) and IpaD in 41 (54%); and against EPEC EspC in 70 (92%), EspB-D in 65 (86%) and EspA in 41 (54%). 10% of samples had antibodies against all proteins evaluated; and 42% against all except one protein. There was no sample negative to all these proteins. Conclusions The extraordinarily high frequency of antibodies in colostrum of puerperal women detected in this study against these multiple enteric pathogens, shows evidence of immunological memory and prior exposure to these pathogens, in addition to its possible protective role against infection. PMID:23538526

  4. Needles in the EST haystack: large-scale identification and analysis of excretory-secretory (ES) proteins in parasitic nematodes using expressed sequence tags (ESTs).

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Shivashankar H; Gasser, Robin B; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2008-09-24

    Parasitic nematodes of humans, other animals and plants continue to impose a significant public health and economic burden worldwide, due to the diseases they cause. Promising antiparasitic drug and vaccine candidates have been discovered from excreted or secreted (ES) proteins released from the parasite and exposed to the immune system of the host. Mining the entire expressed sequence tag (EST) data available from parasitic nematodes represents an approach to discover such ES targets. In this study, we predicted, using EST2Secretome, a novel, high-throughput, computational workflow system, 4,710 ES proteins from 452,134 ESTs derived from 39 different species of nematodes, parasitic in animals (including humans) or plants. In total, 2,632, 786, and 1,292 ES proteins were predicted for animal-, human-, and plant-parasitic nematodes. Subsequently, we systematically analysed ES proteins using computational methods. Of these 4,710 proteins, 2,490 (52.8%) had orthologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas 621 (13.8%) appeared to be novel, currently having no significant match to any molecule available in public databases. Of the C. elegans homologues, 267 had strong "loss-of-function" phenotypes by RNA interference (RNAi) in this nematode. We could functionally classify 1,948 (41.3%) sequences using the Gene Ontology (GO) terms, establish pathway associations for 573 (12.2%) sequences using Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and identify protein interaction partners for 1,774 (37.6%) molecules. We also mapped 758 (16.1%) proteins to protein domains including the nematode-specific protein family "transthyretin-like" and "chromadorea ALT," considered as vaccine candidates against filariasis in humans. We report the large-scale analysis of ES proteins inferred from EST data for a range of parasitic nematodes. This set of ES proteins provides an inventory of known and novel members of ES proteins as a foundation for studies focused on understanding the biology

  5. Needles in the EST Haystack: Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Excretory-Secretory (ES) Proteins in Parasitic Nematodes Using Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Shivashankar H.; Gasser, Robin B.; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2008-01-01

    Background Parasitic nematodes of humans, other animals and plants continue to impose a significant public health and economic burden worldwide, due to the diseases they cause. Promising antiparasitic drug and vaccine candidates have been discovered from excreted or secreted (ES) proteins released from the parasite and exposed to the immune system of the host. Mining the entire expressed sequence tag (EST) data available from parasitic nematodes represents an approach to discover such ES targets. Methods and Findings In this study, we predicted, using EST2Secretome, a novel, high-throughput, computational workflow system, 4,710 ES proteins from 452,134 ESTs derived from 39 different species of nematodes, parasitic in animals (including humans) or plants. In total, 2,632, 786, and 1,292 ES proteins were predicted for animal-, human-, and plant-parasitic nematodes. Subsequently, we systematically analysed ES proteins using computational methods. Of these 4,710 proteins, 2,490 (52.8%) had orthologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas 621 (13.8%) appeared to be novel, currently having no significant match to any molecule available in public databases. Of the C. elegans homologues, 267 had strong “loss-of-function” phenotypes by RNA interference (RNAi) in this nematode. We could functionally classify 1,948 (41.3%) sequences using the Gene Ontology (GO) terms, establish pathway associations for 573 (12.2%) sequences using Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and identify protein interaction partners for 1,774 (37.6%) molecules. We also mapped 758 (16.1%) proteins to protein domains including the nematode-specific protein family “transthyretin-like” and “chromadorea ALT,” considered as vaccine candidates against filariasis in humans. Conclusions We report the large-scale analysis of ES proteins inferred from EST data for a range of parasitic nematodes. This set of ES proteins provides an inventory of known and novel members of ES proteins as a

  6. Purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and excretory-secretory antigen(s) of Toxocara canis expand in vitro human T cells with stable and opposite (type 1 T helper or type 2 T helper) profile of cytokine production.

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, G F; De Carli, M; Mastromauro, C; Biagiotti, R; Macchia, D; Falagiani, P; Ricci, M; Romagnani, S

    1991-01-01

    A large series of T cell clones (TCC) specific for purified protein derivative (PPD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (total 60) or Toxocara canis excretory/secretory (TES) antigen (total 69) were established from the peripheral blood of two healthy individuals and analyzed for their profile of cytokine production in response to stimulation with either the specific antigen or the polyclonal activator phorbol myristate acetate plus anti-CD3 antibody. Under both these experimental conditions, the great majority of PPD-specific TCC secreted IL-2 and IFN-gamma but not, or limited amounts of, IL-4 and IL-5. In contrast, most TES-specific TCC secreted IL-4 and IL-5 but not, or limited amounts of, IL-2 and IFN-gamma. PPD-specific TCC that failed to secrete IL-4 and IL-5, and TES-specific TCC that failed to secrete IL-2 and IFN-gamma, were found to lack transcripts for IL-4 and IL-5, or for IL-2 and IFN-gamma, respectively. During the course of the study, over a 6-mo period, the functional phenotype of both TES- and PPD-specific TCC was repeatedly assessed and remained constant. These data demonstrate that T cells with stable Th1 or Th2 functional pattern exist not only in mice but also in humans and suggest that in the course of natural immunization certain infectious agents preferentially expand T cell subsets with stable and definite profile of cytokine production. PMID:1829097

  7. A dynamin is required for the biogenesis of secretory organelles in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Breinich, Manuela S; Ferguson, David J P; Foth, Bernardo J; van Dooren, Giel G; Lebrun, Maryse; Quon, Doris V; Striepen, Boris; Bradley, Peter J; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Carruthers, Vern B; Meissner, Markus

    2009-02-24

    Apicomplexans contain only a core set of factors involved in vesicular traffic. Yet these obligate intracellular parasites evolved a set of unique secretory organelles (micronemes, rhoptries, and dense granules) that are required for invasion and modulation of the host cell. Apicomplexa replicate by budding from or within a single mother cell, and secretory organelles are synthesized de novo at the final stage of division. To date, the molecular basis for their biogenesis is unknown. We demonstrate that the apicomplexan dynamin-related protein B (DrpB) belongs to an alveolate specific family of dynamins that is expanded in ciliates. DrpB accumulates in a cytoplasmic region close to the Golgi that breaks up during replication and reforms after assembly of the daughter cells. Conditional ablation of DrpB function results in mature daughter parasites that are devoid of micronemes and rhoptries. In the absence of these organelles, invasion-related secretory proteins are mistargeted to the constitutive secretory pathway. Mutant parasites are able to replicate but are unable to escape from or invade into host cells. DrpB is the essential mechanoenzyme for the biogenesis of secretory organelles in Apicomplexa. We suggest that DrpB is required during replication to generate vesicles for the regulated secretory pathway that form the unique secretory organelles. Our study supports a role of an alveolate-specific dynamin that was required for the evolution of novel, secretory organelles. In the case of Apicomplexa, these organelles further evolved to enable a parasitic lifestyle.

  8. AB087. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator miR-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junhao; Zhou, Qizhao; Lyu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zijian; Chen, Mingkun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chunyan; Qi, Tao; Li, Xin; Liu, Cundong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia. Methods Spermatozoa were isolated from 90 study subjects’ ejaculated semen samples. DNA methylation was evaluated using bisulfite-sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR. The CRISP2 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined in the ejaculated spermatozoa by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. MiRNA expression was detected by qRT-PCR. The direct regulatory effect of miR-27b on CRISP2 was predicted computationally and validated via luciferase reporter assay and in vitro experiments in which miR-27b mimic or inhibitor was transfected into 293T cells. Respective correlations of miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression with clinical features were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results Initially, low expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA was observed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients relative to normozoospermic males. Meanwhile, methylation was not found in CRISP2 promoter. These data suggest a possible post-transcriptional regulation of CRISP2 in asthenozoospermia. Subsequently, bioinformatics prediction, luciferase reporter assay and miR-27b transfection experiments revealed that miR-27b could specifically target CRISP2 by binding its 3’-UTR, suppressing CRISP2 expression post-transcriptionally. Further evidence was provided by the clinical observation of a high miR-27b expression in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients and a negative correlation between miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression. Finally, a retrospective

  9. Secretory function of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuryszko, J; Sławuta, P; Sapikowski, G

    2016-01-01

    There are two kinds of adipose tissue in mammals: white adipose tissue - WAT and brown adipose tissue - BAT. The main function of WAT is accumulation of triacylglycerols whereas the function of BAT is heat generation. At present, WAT is also considered to be an endocrine gland that produces bioactive adipokines, which take part in glucose and lipid metabolism. Considering its endocrine function, the adipose tissue is not a homogeneous gland but a group of a few glands which act differently. Studies on the secretory function of WAT began in 1994 after discovery of leptin known as the satiation hormone, which regulates body energy homeostasis and maintainence of body mass. Apart from leptin, the following belong to adipokines: adiponectin, resistin, apelin, visfatin and cytokines: TNF and IL 6. Adiponectin is a polypeptide hormone of antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity. It plays a key role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Resistin exerts a counter effect compared to adiponectin and its physiological role is to maintain fasting glycaemia. Visfatin stimulates insulin secretion and increases insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake by muscle cells and adipocytes. Apelin probably increases the insulin sensitivity of tissues. TNF evokes insulin resistance by blocking insulin receptors and inhibits insulin secretion. Approximately 30% of circulating IL 6 comes from adipose tissue. It causes insulin resistance by decreasing the expression of insulin receptors, decreases adipogenesis and adiponectin and visfatin secretion, and stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis. In 2004, Bays introduced the notion of adiposopathy, defined as dysfunction of the adipose tissue, whose main feature is insulin and leptin resistance as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines: TNF and IL 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein. This means that excess of adipose tissue, especially visceral adipose tissue, leads to the development of a chronic subclinical

  10. Secretory transport in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, H G; Haldar, K

    1993-03-01

    The asexual blood stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resides within the mature erythrocyte - a cell that has no intracellular organelles and few biosynthetic activities. However, Plasmodium, as on actively growing and dividing cell, has numerous requirements for the uptake o f nutrients and expulsion of waste. Hence, the parasite must extensively remodel the erythrocyte to facilitate its survival, not only by exporting numerous proteins, but also by providing the requisite machinery for their .trafficking. In this review, Heidi Elmendorf and Kastun Haldar propose a model for secretion in P. falciparum.

  11. An uncleaved signal peptide directs the Malus xiaojinensis iron transporter protein Mx IRT1 into the ER for the PM secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Tan, Song; Berry, James O; Li, Peng; Ren, Na; Li, Shuang; Yang, Guang; Wang, Wei-Bing; Qi, Xiao-Ting; Yin, Li-Ping

    2014-11-07

    Malus xiaojinensis iron-regulated transporter 1 (Mx IRT1) is a highly effective inducible iron transporter in the iron efficient plant Malus xiaojinensis. As a multi-pass integral plasma membrane (PM) protein, Mx IRT1 is predicted to consist of eight transmembrane domains, with a putative N-terminal signal peptide (SP) of 1-29 amino acids. To explore the role of the putative SP, constructs expressing Mx IRT1 (with an intact SP) and Mx DsIRT1 (with a deleted SP) were prepared for expression in Arabidopsis and in yeast. Mx IRT1 could rescue the iron-deficiency phenotype of an Arabidopsis irt1 mutant, and complement the iron-limited growth defect of the yeast mutant DEY 1453 (fet3fet4). Furthermore, fluorescence analysis indicated that a chimeric Mx IRT1-eGFP (enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) construct was translocated into the ER (Endoplasmic reticulum) for the PM sorting pathway. In contrast, the SP-deleted Mx DsIRT1 could not rescue either of the mutant phenotypes, nor direct transport of the GFP signal into the ER. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis indicated that the SP was not cleaved from the mature protein following transport into the ER. Taken together, data presented here provides strong evidence that an uncleaved SP determines ER-targeting of Mx IRT1 during the initial sorting stage, thereby enabling the subsequent transport and integration of this protein into the PM for its crucial role in iron uptake.

  12. An Uncleaved Signal Peptide Directs the Malus xiaojinensis Iron Transporter Protein Mx IRT1 into the ER for the PM Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Tan, Song; Berry, James O.; Li, Peng; Ren, Na; Li, Shuang; Yang, Guang; Wang, Wei-Bing; Qi, Xiao-Ting; Yin, Li-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Malus xiaojinensis iron-regulated transporter 1 (Mx IRT1) is a highly effective inducible iron transporter in the iron efficient plant Malus xiaojinensis. As a multi-pass integral plasma membrane (PM) protein, Mx IRT1 is predicted to consist of eight transmembrane domains, with a putative N-terminal signal peptide (SP) of 1–29 amino acids. To explore the role of the putative SP, constructs expressing Mx IRT1 (with an intact SP) and Mx DsIRT1 (with a deleted SP) were prepared for expression in Arabidopsis and in yeast. Mx IRT1 could rescue the iron-deficiency phenotype of an Arabidopsis irt1 mutant, and complement the iron-limited growth defect of the yeast mutant DEY 1453 (fet3fet4). Furthermore, fluorescence analysis indicated that a chimeric Mx IRT1-eGFP (enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) construct was translocated into the ER (Endoplasmic reticulum) for the PM sorting pathway. In contrast, the SP-deleted Mx DsIRT1 could not rescue either of the mutant phenotypes, nor direct transport of the GFP signal into the ER. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis indicated that the SP was not cleaved from the mature protein following transport into the ER. Taken together, data presented here provides strong evidence that an uncleaved SP determines ER-targeting of Mx IRT1 during the initial sorting stage, thereby enabling the subsequent transport and integration of this protein into the PM for its crucial role in iron uptake. PMID:25387073

  13. Signal peptidase I processed secretory signal sequences: Selection for and against specific amino acids at the second position of mature protein.

    PubMed

    Zalucki, Yaramah M; Jennings, Michael P

    2017-02-12

    Signal peptides direct proteins from the cytoplasm to the periplasm. These N-terminal peptides are cleaved upon entry to the periplasm by either signal peptidase I, or signal peptidase II for lipoproteins. Signal peptidase I is a serine protease that has either a serine-lysine or serine-histidine catalytic dyad present in the active site. The recognition site for signal peptide cleavage by signal peptidase I has been defined primarily by an Ala-X-Ala motif at the C-terminal end of the signal peptide, one amino acid away from the cleavage site. We used a verified set of signal peptidase I cleaved proteins from E. coli to look for novel conserved features, focusing on the N-terminus of the mature protein. We observed a striking bias for the presence of acidic residues at second position of the mature protein (P2'), and a complete absence of aromatic amino acids at the same position. Whole genome analysis of the predicted set of all E. coli and B. subtilis secreted proteins confirmed the same strong bias for acidic residues at P2' of the mature protein, and against aromatic amino acids at the same position. When these studies were extended to archaeal genomes (M. voltae and S. tokodaii) and the yeast genome from S. cerevisiae, this bias was not observed. E. coli and B. subtilis primarily express a signal peptidase I contains a serine-lysine catalytic dyad, whilst those of archaeal and eukaryotic origin generally have a serine-histidine catalytic dyad. This difference may explain the differential bias for acidic residues and against aromatic residues at P2'. These observations suggest additional key residues that may favor or prevent signal sequence recognition or cleavage by signal peptidase I, and thereby facilitate more accurate in silico prediction of signal peptidase I cleavage sites. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. P-selectin, a granule membrane protein of platelets and endothelial cells, follows the regulated secretory pathway in AtT-20 cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    P-selectin (PADGEM, GMP-140, CD62) is a transmembrane protein specific to alpha granules of platelets and Weibel-Palade bodies of endotheial cells. Upon stimulation of these cells, P-selectin is translocated to the plasma membrane where it functions as a receptor for monocytes and neutrophils. To investigate whether the mechanism of targeting of P- selectin to granules is specific for megakaryocytes and endothelial cells and/or dependent on von Willebrand factor, a soluble adhesive protein that is stored in the same granules, we have expressed the cDNA for P-selectin in AtT-20 cells. AtT-20 cells are a mouse pituitary cell line that can store proteins in a regulated fashion. By double-label immunofluorescence, P-selectin was visible as a punctate pattern at the tips of cell processes. This pattern closely resembled the localization of ACTH, the endogenous hormone produced and stored by the AtT-20 cells. Fractionation of the transfected cells resulted in the codistribution of P-selectin and ACTH in cellular compartments of the same density. Immunoelectron microscopy using a polyclonal anti-P- selectin antibody demonstrated immunogold localization in dense granules, morphologically indistinguishable from the ACTH granules. Binding experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody to P-selectin indicated that there was also surface expression of P-selectin on the AtT-20 cells. After stimulation with the secretagogue 8-Bromo-cAMP the surface expression increased twofold, concomitant with the release of ACTH. In contrast, the surface expression of P-selectin transfected into CHO cells, which do not have a regulated pathway of secretion, did not change with 8-Br-cAMP treatment. In conclusion, we provide evidence for the regulated secretion of a transmembrane protein (P-selectin) in a heterologous cell line, which indicates that P-selectin contains an independent sorting signal directing it to storage granules. PMID:1370497

  15. Secretory granules in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca2+ signaling in the cytoplasm of neuroendocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Of all the intracellular organelles, secretory granules contain by far the highest calcium concentration; secretory granules of typical neuroendocrine chromaffin cells contain ∼40 mM Ca2+ and occupy ∼20% cell volume, accounting for >60% of total cellular calcium. They also contain the majority of cellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in addition to the presence of >2 mM of chromogranins A and B that function as high-capacity, low-affinity Ca2+ storage proteins. Chromogranins A and B also interact with the IP3Rs and activate the IP3R/Ca2+ channels. In experiments with both neuroendocrine PC12 and nonneuroendocrine NIH3T3 cells, in which the number of secretory granules present was changed by either suppression or induction of secretory granule formation, secretory granules were demonstrated to account for >70% of the IP3-induced Ca2+ releases in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the IP3 sensitivity of secretory granule IP3R/Ca2+ channels is at least ∼6- to 7-fold more sensitive than those of the endoplasmic reticulum, thus enabling secretory granules to release Ca2+ ahead of the endoplasmic reticulum. Further, there is a direct correlation between the number of secretory granules and the IP3 sensitivity of cytoplasmic IP3R/Ca2+ channels and the increased ratio of IP3-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ release, highlighting the importance of secretory granules in the IP3-dependent Ca2+ signaling. Given that secretory granules are present in all secretory cells, these results presage critical roles of secretory granules in the control of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations in other secretory cells.—Yoo, S. H. Secretory granules in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca2+ signaling in the cytoplasm of neuroendocrine cells. PMID:19837865

  16. Secretory adenocarcinoma of the endometrium.

    PubMed

    Tobon, H; Watkins, G J

    1985-01-01

    Secretory adenocarcinomas of the endometrium are uncommon tumors distinct from clear cell carcinomas. We reviewed nine cases that included the original endometrial curettings and the specimens of uteri with both adnexa [total abdominal hysterectomy-bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH-BSO)]. The patients' ages ranged from 36 to 79 years (with an average of 55 years). Six women were postmenopausal, and most complained of vaginal bleeding. Two patients were nulliparous and the others had one to four children. Four patients were obese, of whom one was diabetic and hypertensive. Eight tumors were of grade I and one was grade II. The histologic pattern was comparable to that of secretory endometrium, days 17 to 22, and the glands were positive with periodic acid-Schiff (whether predigested or not); they were partly positive with alcian blue and negative with Best Carmine. The carcinoma in one case was positive for carcinoembryonic antigen; all cases were negative with alpha-fetoprotein. Six patients were staged as IA and three as IB. One 47-year-old patient had a concurrent endometrioid adenocarcinoma (grade II) of the right ovary with squamous, clear cell, and mucinous components. Three cases had no tumour penetration of the myometrium while in the others penetration varied from 5 to 70%. One patient received intracavitary radium prior to TAH-BSO and two had postoperative radiation. All patients are alive 11 to 113 months following surgery. Secretory adenocarcinoma of the endometrium should be separated from clear cell carcinoma, as it has the pattern of secretory endometrium day 17 to 22, is very well differentiated, and has a relatively good prognosis.

  17. Intermediates in the constitutive and regulated secretory pathways released in vitro from semi-intact cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Regulated secretory cells have two pathways that transport secreted proteins from the Golgi complex to the cell surface. To identify carrier vesicles involved in regulated and constitutive secretion, PC12 pheochromocytoma cells were labeled with [35S]sulfate to identify markers for the two secretory pathways, then mechanically permeabilized and incubated in vitro. Small constitutive secretory vesicles, containing mostly sulfated proteoglycans, accumulated during an in vitro incubation with ATP. In the presence of GTP gamma S, the constitutive vesicles became significantly more dense, suggesting that a coated intermediate was stabilized. Larger immature regulated secretory granules, enriched in sulfated secretogranin II, also escaped from the permeabilized cells in vitro. During granule maturation, their density increased and the amount of cofractionating proteoglycans diminished. The data suggest that sorting continues during secretory granule maturation. PMID:1572894

  18. The evolution of plant secretory structures and emergence of terpenoid chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    Secretory structures in terrestrial plants appear to have first emerged as intracellular oil bodies in liverworts. In vascular plants, internal secretory structures, such as resin ducts and laticifers, are usually found in conjunction with vascular bundles, whereas subepidermal secretory cavities and epidermal glandular trichomes generally have more complex tissue distribution patterns. The primary function of plant secretory structures is related to defense responses, both constitutive and induced, against herbivores and pathogens. The ability to sequester secondary (or specialized) metabolites and defense proteins in secretory structures was a critical adaptation that shaped plant-herbivore and plant-pathogen interactions. Although this review places particular emphasis on describing the evolution of pathways leading to terpenoids, it also assesses the emergence of other metabolite classes to outline the metabolic capabilities of different plant lineages.

  19. The ubiquitin ligase Mindbomb 1 coordinates gastrointestinal secretory cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Jin, Ramon U.; Kong, Young-Yun; Peek, Richard M.; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo; Mills, Jason C.

    2013-01-01

    After cell fate specification, differentiating cells must amplify the specific subcellular features required for their specialized function. How cells regulate such subcellular scaling is a fundamental unanswered question. Here, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mindbomb 1 (MIB1) is required for the apical secretory apparatus established by gastric zymogenic cells as they differentiate from their progenitors. When Mib1 was deleted, death-associated protein kinase–1 (DAPK1) was rerouted to the cell base, microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) was dephosphorylated, and the apical vesicles that normally support mature secretory granules were dispersed. Consequently, secretory granules did not mature. The transcription factor MIST1 bound the first intron of Mib1 and regulated its expression. We further showed that loss of MIB1 and dismantling of the apical secretory apparatus was the earliest quantifiable aberration in zymogenic cells undergoing transition to a precancerous metaplastic state in mouse and human stomach. Our results reveal a mechanistic pathway by which cells can scale up a specific, specialized subcellular compartment to alter function during differentiation and scale it down during disease. PMID:23478405

  20. The secretory pathway of protists: spatial and functional organization and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, B; Melkonian, M

    1996-01-01

    All cells secrete a diversity of macromolecules to modify their environment or to protect themselves. Eukaryotic cells have evolved a complex secretory pathway consisting of several membrane-bound compartments which contain specific sets of proteins. Experimental work on the secretory pathway has focused mainly on mammalian cell lines or on yeasts. Now, some general principles of the secretory pathway have become clear, and most components of the secretory pathway are conserved between yeast cells and mammalian cells. However, the structure and function of the secretory system in protists have been less extensively studied. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the secretory pathway of five different groups of protists: Giardia lamblia, one of the earliest lines of eukaryotic evolution, kinetoplastids, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and two lineages within the "crown" of eukaryotic cell evolution, the alveolates (ciliates and Plasmodium species) and the green algae. Comparison of these systems with the mammalian and yeast system shows that most elements of the secretory pathway were presumably present in the earliest eukaryotic organisms. However, one element of the secretory pathway shows considerable variation: the presence of a Golgi stack and the number of cisternae within a stack. We suggest that the functional separation of the plasma membrane from the nucleus-endoplasmic reticulum system during evolution required a sorting compartment, which became the Golgi apparatus. Once a Golgi apparatus was established, it was adapted to the various needs of the different organisms. PMID:8987360

  1. ECHIDNA protein impacts on male fertility in Arabidopsis by mediating trans-Golgi network secretory trafficking during anther and pollen development.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinping; Yang, Caiyun; Klisch, Doris; Ferguson, Alison; Bhaellero, Rishi P; Niu, Xiwu; Wilson, Zoe A

    2014-03-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role in cellular secretion and has been implicated in sorting cargo destined for the plasma membrane. Previously, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) echidna (ech) mutant was shown to exhibit a dwarf phenotype due to impaired cell expansion. However, ech also has a previously uncharacterized phenotype of reduced male fertility. This semisterility is due to decreased anther size and reduced amounts of pollen but also to decreased pollen viability, impaired anther opening, and pollen tube growth. An ECH translational fusion (ECHPro:ECH-yellow fluorescent protein) revealed developmentally regulated tissue-specific expression, with expression in the tapetum during early anther development and microspore release and subsequent expression in the pollen, pollen tube, and stylar tissues. Pollen viability and production, along with germination and pollen tube growth, were all impaired. The ech anther endothecium secondary wall thickening also appeared reduced and disorganized, resulting in incomplete anther opening. This did not appear to be due to anther secondary thickening regulatory genes but perhaps to altered secretion of wall materials through the TGN as a consequence of the absence of the ECH protein. ECH expression is critical for a variety of aspects of male reproduction, including the production of functional pollen grains, their effective release, germination, and tube formation. These stages of pollen development are fundamentally influenced by TGN trafficking of hormones and wall components. Overall, this suggests that the fertility defect is multifaceted, with the TGN trafficking playing a significant role in the process of both pollen formation and subsequent fertilization.

  2. Elevated concentration of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in the cervical mucus before delivery.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Taiki; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Schust, Danny J; Itaoka, Nao; Iriyama, Takayuki; Nakayama, Toshio; Komatsu, Atsushi; Kawana, Kei; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-06-01

    Cervical remodeling during parturition progresses under exquisite regulation by immunologic mediators and proteases. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor is a secretory protein that can function as an antimicrobial peptide, an antiinflammatory molecule, and a protease inhibitor. The involvement of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in cervical remodeling before and during parturition is understood poorly. We aimed to reveal the role of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in the cervical remodeling process before normal term delivery and to evaluate its utility as a predictive biomarker for timing of delivery. Cervical mucus samples were collected prospectively at weekly prenatal visits from a cohort of pregnant women at term. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor concentrations in 95 mucus samples that were obtained from 49 women with uncomplicated pregnancy who subsequently underwent normal vaginal delivery were assessed. Alterations in secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor concentrations at term and the association of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor levels with the time to delivery were analyzed. A moderate positive correlation with significance was detected between cervical mucus secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor concentrations and days to delivery (r = 0.38; P = .0001). The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor concentration was significantly higher in samples that were collected within 7 days of delivery when compared with samples that were collected >7 days before delivery (P = .001). Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor concentrations were also significantly higher in samples from women with premature rupture of membranes when compared with those without premature rupture of membranes (P = .01), all of whom delivered within 7 days. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the cervical secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor level was a significant parameter for the prediction of the onset of delivery. (P = .017; unit

  3. Excretory/secretory products from in vitro-cultured Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Veridiana G; Monteiro, Karina M; Drumond, Fernanda; de Carvalho, Marcos O; Vargas, Daiani M; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2012-05-01

    Cystic hydatid disease (CHD) is caused by infection with Echinococcus granulosus metacestodes and affects humans and livestock. Proteins secreted or excreted by protoscoleces, pre-adult worms found in the metacestode, are thought to play fundamental roles in the host-parasite relationship. In this work, we performed an LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of the excretory-secretory products obtained from the first 48 h of an in vitro culture of the protoscoleces. We identified 32 proteins, including 18 that were never detected previously in metacestode proteomic studies. Among the novel identified excretory-secretory products are antigenic proteins, such as EG19 and P-29 and a calpain protease. We also identified other important protoscolex excretory-secretory products, such as thioredoxin peroxidase and 14-3-3 proteins, which are potentially involved in evasion mechanisms adopted by parasites to establish infection. Several intracellular proteins were found in the excretory-secretory products, revealing a set of identified proteins not previously thought to be exposed at the host-parasite interface. Additionally, immunological analyses established the antigenic profiles of the newly identified excretory-secretory products and revealed, for the first time, the in vitro secretion of the B antigen by protoscoleces. Considering that the excretory-secretory products obtained in vitro might reflect the products released and exposed to the host in vivo, our results provide valuable information on parasite survival strategies in adverse host environments and on the molecular mechanisms underpinning CHD immunopathology.

  4. Sorting and storage during secretory granule biogenesis: looking backward and looking forward.

    PubMed Central

    Arvan, P; Castle, D

    1998-01-01

    Secretory granules are specialized intracellular organelles that serve as a storage pool for selected secretory products. The exocytosis of secretory granules is markedly amplified under physiologically stimulated conditions. While granules have been recognized as post-Golgi carriers for almost 40 years, the molecular mechanisms involved in their formation from the trans-Golgi network are only beginning to be defined. This review summarizes and evaluates current information about how secretory proteins are thought to be sorted for the regulated secretory pathway and how these activities are positioned with respect to other post-Golgi sorting events that must occur in parallel. In the first half of the review, the emerging role of immature secretory granules in protein sorting is highlighted. The second half of the review summarizes what is known about the composition of granule membranes. The numerous similarities and relatively limited differences identified between granule membranes and other vesicular carriers that convey products to and from the plasmalemma, serve as a basis for examining how granule membrane composition might be established and how its unique functions interface with general post-Golgi membrane traffic. Studies of granule formation in vitro offer additional new insights, but also important challenges for future efforts to understand how regulated secretory pathways are constructed and maintained. PMID:9620860

  5. Signaling from the secretory granule to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Chitra; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons and endocrine cells use a complex array of signaling molecules to communicate with each other and with various targets. The majority of these signaling molecules are stored in specialized organelles awaiting release on demand: 40–60 nm vesicles carry conventional or small molecule neurotransmitters, and 200–400 nm granules contain bioactive peptides. The supply of small molecule neurotransmitters is tightly regulated by local feedback of synthetic rates and transport processes at sites of release. The larger granules that contain bioactive peptides present the secretory cell with special challenges, since the peptide precursors are inserted into the lumen of the secretory pathway in the cell soma and undergo biosynthetic processing while being transported to distant sites for eventual secretion. One solution to this dilemma in information handling has been to employ proteolytic cleavage of secretory granule membrane proteins to produce cytosolic fragments that can signal to the nucleus, affecting gene expression. The use of regulated intramembrane proteolysis to signal from secretory granules to the nucleus is compared to its much better understood role in relaying information from the endoplasmic reticulum by SREBP and ATF6 and from the plasma membrane by Cadherins, Notch and ErbB4. PMID:22681236

  6. The secretory pathway at 50: a golden anniversary for some momentous grains of silver

    PubMed Central

    Matlin, Karl S.; Caplan, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The secretory pathway along which newly synthesized secretory and membrane proteins traffic through the cell was revealed in two articles published 50 years ago. This discovery was the culmination of decades of effort to unite the power of biochemical and morphological methodologies in order to elucidate the dynamic nature of the cell’s biosynthetic machinery. The secretory pathway remains a central paradigm of modern cell biology. Its elucidation 50 years ago inspired tremendous multidisciplinary and on-going efforts to understand the machinery that makes it run, the adaptations that permit it to serve the needs of specialized cell types, and the pathological consequences that arise when it is perturbed. PMID:28082520

  7. Secretory Carcinoma of the Skin Harboring ETV6 Gene Fusions: A Cutaneous Analogue to Secretory Carcinomas of the Breast and Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Taube, Janis M; Su, Albert; Binder, Scott W; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Michal, Michal; Westra, William H

    2017-01-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma is a low-grade salivary gland carcinoma that exhibits analogous features to secretory carcinoma of the breast including the presence of a t(12;15) translocation resulting in the ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion. Rare cases of purported secretory carcinoma of the skin adnexa have been reported, but their relationship to true secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary glands is unclear, as they generally do not harbor ETV6 rearrangements. Cases of cutaneous neoplasms with histologic features identical to secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary glands were identified from the consultation files of 3 academic medical institutions. Immunohistochemistry was performed for S100 protein, mammaglobin and STAT5a. Break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization was used evaluate for disruption of the ETV6 gene. Six cases of cutaneous secretory carcinoma were identified. The tumors arose in 4 women and 2 men, ranging from 24 to 71 years in age (mean, 47 y). The carcinomas presented in the skin of the axilla (n=4), ventral neck (n=1), and cheek (n=1). The tumors arose in the superficial dermis in association with adnexal structures. None of the patients had a prior or concurrent breast or salivary gland tumor. They were histologically characterized by well-circumscribed but unencapsulated proliferations of bland, eosinophilic cells arranged in microcysts and follicles with intraluminal secretions. Ectopic breast or salivary gland tissue was not identified. The cases were diffusely positive for S100 protein (6 of 6), mammaglobin (6 of 6), and STAT5a (5 of 5). All 6 cases harbored rearrangements of ETV6. All tumors were treated by simple excision alone. No recurrences or metastases developed in the 2 cases with follow-up. Secretory carcinoma of the skin represents a phenotypic, immunohistochemical, and genetic counterpart to secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary glands. This tumor entity is less anatomically restricted than previously

  8. Secretory function in subplate neurons during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shinichi; Al-Hasani, Hannah; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Wang, Wei Zhi; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Subplate cells are among the first generated neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex and have been implicated in the establishment of cortical wiring. In rodents some subplate neurons persist into adulthood. Here we would like to highlight several converging findings which suggest a novel secretory function of subplate neurons during cortical development. Throughout the postnatal period in rodents, subplate neurons have highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are under an ER stress condition. By comparing gene expression between subplate and layer 6, we found that several genes encoding secreted proteins are highly expressed in subplate neurons. One of these secreted proteins, neuroserpin, encoded by the serpini1 gene, is localized to the ER in subplate cells. We propose that subplate might influence cortical circuit formation through a transient secretory function. PMID:25859180

  9. Evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolate superphylum includes many free-living and parasitic organisms, which are united by the presence of alveolar sacs lying proximal to the plasma membrane, providing cell structure. All species comprising the apicomplexan group of alveolates are parasites and have adapted to the unique requirements of the parasitic lifestyle. Here the evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles that are involved in the critical process of egress from one cell and invasion of another is explored. The variations within the Apicomplexa and how these relate to species-specific biology will be discussed. In addition, recent studies have identified specific calcium-sensitive molecules that coordinate the various events and regulate the release of these secretory organelles within apicomplexan parasites. Some aspects of this machinery are conserved outside the Apicomplexa, and are beginning to elucidate the conserved nature of the machinery. Briefly, the relationship of this secretion machinery within the Apicomplexa will be discussed, compared with free-living and predatory alveolates, and how these might have evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:23068912

  10. Effects of 5-fluorouracil on the secretory process of the rat parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sandborg, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental animals were injected intraperitoneally with 100 mg/kg 5-fluorouracil for three days. The total volume, amylase and protein content of cannulated parotid saliva were determined following stimulation with either 5 mg/kg pilocarpine or 5 mg/kg isoproterenol in experimental, pair-fed , and control animals. Saliva from experimental animals was significantly lower in volume, amylase and protein content than both control groups. 5-fluorouracil treatment reduced the total glandular amylase per unit DNA in both unstimulated and isoproterenol-stimulated parotid glands. Decreased protein synthesis may be the mechanism underlying depleted secretory protein stores since the contents of isolated secretory granules from experimental parotid glands contained less radiolabelled protein than either control group and whole gland homogenates showed marked reductions in the activities of three lysosomal enzymes and total RNA content. Experimental animals contained less labelled protein in their secretory granules than controls, but secreted a greater proportion of their total glandular radiolabelled secretory protein into saliva relative to amylase suggesting that newly synthesized secretory proteins are preferentially secreted.

  11. [Study of human secretory immunoglobulin A. I. Obtaining monospecific antiserum to human secretory immunoglobulin A].

    PubMed

    German, G P; Chernokhvostova, E V; Gol'derman, S Ia

    1975-10-01

    A method of obtaining monospecific antiserum to the human secretory IgA is described. Immunochemically pure secretory IgA (isolated from human colostrum by fractionation with ammonium sulfate and gel-filtration on Sephadex G-200) was used for immunization of rabbits or sheep. Heterologous antibodies were removed by adsorption with commercial gamma globulin, normal serum, the serum of a patient suffering from A-myeloma with the IgA polymere and purified lactoferrin. Monospecific antiserum to the secretory IgA gave a reaction of complete immunological identity with the secretory IgA and a free secretory component.

  12. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-12-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of < or = 14, 22, 26-28, 30, 46, 60, 70-80, and > 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection.

  13. Secretory process in Brunner's glands during recovery from stimulation with a single dose of pilocarpine

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.A.; Flickinger, C.J.

    1983-07-01

    The secretory pathway and kinetics of the secretory process were studied in Brunner's glands of mice after stimulation of secretion with a parasympathomimetic drug. Adult male mice were injected with pilocarpine. The animals were subsequently administered an intravenous injection of /sup 3/H-threonine, and tissue was prepared for electron microscope autoradiography at intervals ranging from 5 minutes to 2 hours after injection of the radioactive precursor. Stimulation with pilocarpine resulted in discharge of secretory granules, which was reflected in a significantly lower percentage of the cell volume occupied by granules. In both control and stimulated mice, at 5 minutes after injection of /sup 3/H-threonine, the highest percentage of silver grains was found over the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The proportion of silver grains over the rough endoplasmic reticulum declined at later intervals, and a peak of labeling was observed over the Golgi apparatus at 1 hour. Labeling of the secretory granules increased in the 1- and 2-hour samples from both control and stimulated mice, although the relative concentration of radioactivity in both Golgi-associated and apical secretory granules was greater in stimulated than control glands at 1 hour. The results suggest that the secretory protein produced by Brunner's glands was synthesized by the rough endoplasmic reticulum and transported to the Golgi apparatus where secretory granules were formed in both stimulated and control glands. Depletion of secretory granules by prior stimulation resulted in no change in the kinetics of arrival of radioactivity in the cell organelles involved in the secretory process. However, the drainage of the radioactive label from the rough endoplasmic reticulum was significantly slower in the stimulated glands than in the controls.

  14. Unremitting Cell Proliferation in the Secretory Phase of Eutopic Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Murillo, Yanira; Miranda-Rodríguez, José Antonio; Rendón-Huerta, Erika; Montaño, Luis F.; Cornejo, Gerardo Velázquez; Gómez, Lucila Poblano; Valdez-Morales, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Endometriosis is linked to altered cell proliferation and stem cell markers c-kit/stem cell factor (SCF) in ectopic endometrium. Our aim was to investigate whether c-kit/SCF also plays a role in eutopic endometrium. Design: Eutopic endometrium obtained from 35 women with endometriosis and 25 fertile eumenorrheic women was analyzed for in situ expression of SCF/c-kit, Ki67, RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (Akt), phosphorylated RAC-alpha serine/threonin-protein kinase (pAkt), Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (pGSK3β), throughout the menstrual cycle. Results: Expression of Ki67 and SCF was higher in endometriosis than in control tissue (P < .05) and greater in secretory rather than proliferative (P < .01) endometrium in endometriosis. Expression of c-kit was also higher in endometriosis although similar in both phases. Expression of Akt and GSK3β was identical in all samples and cycle phases, whereas pAkt and pGSK3β, opposed to control tissue, remained overexpressed in the secretory phase in endometriosis. Conclusion: Unceasing cell proliferation in the secretory phase of eutopic endometriosis is linked to deregulation of c-kit/SCF-associated signaling pathways. PMID:25194152

  15. Drug-induced secretory diarrhea: A role for CFTR.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Reddy, Vadde Sudhakar; Arora, Kavisha; Helmrath, Michael A; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-12-01

    Many medications induce diarrhea as a side effect, which can be a major obstacle to therapeutic efficacy and also a life-threatening condition. Secretory diarrhea can be caused by excessive fluid secretion in the intestine under pathological conditions. The cAMP/cGMP-regulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the primary chloride channel at the apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells and plays a major role in intestinal fluid secretion and homeostasis. CFTR forms macromolecular complexes at discreet microdomains at the plasma membrane, and its chloride channel function is regulated spatiotemporally through protein-protein interactions and cAMP/cGMP-mediated signaling. Drugs that perturb CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes in the intestinal epithelium and upregulate intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP levels can hyperactivate the CFTR channel, causing excessive fluid secretion and secretory diarrhea. Inhibition of CFTR chloride-channel activity may represent a novel approach to the management of drug-induced secretory diarrhea.

  16. An inside job: subversion of the host secretory pathway by intestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Tyler M; Estes, Mary K

    2010-10-01

    The cellular secretory pathway, composed of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and cellular vesicles, mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins and lipids. Gastrointestinal pathogens frequently affect the functions of enterocytes, the differentiated cells involved in secretion and absorption of extracellular molecules. Microbial pathogenesis can be enhanced by altering the trafficking of key molecules such as brush border enzymes, soluble immune mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and MHC Class I molecules, all of which rely on the secretory pathway for their appropriate cellular localization. This review focuses on our current understanding of the distinct mechanisms employed by enteric pathogens to antagonize the secretory pathway. Many pathogens encode individual or multiple proteins to antagonize the secretory pathway, including disrupting the trafficking of vesicles between the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and plasma membrane. This antagonism allows for increased pathogenesis and can assist, directly or indirectly, in microbial replication. Virtually all arms of the secretory pathway are targeted by intestinal pathogens, supporting the pathogenic significance of shutting this pathway down. This review summarizes the mechanisms utilized by gut pathogens to disrupt the cellular secretory pathway and addresses potential therapeutic targets to combat these highly prevalent and burdensome microbes.

  17. BPIFB6 Regulates Secretory Pathway Trafficking and Enterovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Morosky, Stefanie; Lennemann, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 3 (BPIFB3) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized host factor that negatively regulates coxsackievirus B (CVB) replication through its control of the autophagic pathway. Here, we show that another member of the BPIFB family, BPIFB6, functions as a positive regulator of CVB, and other enterovirus, replication by controlling secretory pathway trafficking and Golgi complex morphology. We show that similar to BPIFB3, BPIFB6 localizes exclusively to the ER, where it associates with other members of the BPIFB family. However, in contrast to our findings that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of BPIFB3 greatly enhances CVB replication, we show that silencing of BPIFB6 expression dramatically suppresses enterovirus replication in a pan-viral manner. Mechanistically, we show that loss of BPIFB6 expression induces pronounced alterations in retrograde and anterograde trafficking, which correlate with dramatic fragmentation of the Golgi complex. Taken together, these data implicate BPIFB6 as a key regulator of secretory pathway trafficking and viral replication and suggest that members of the BPIFB family participate in diverse host cell functions to regulate virus infections. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus infections are associated with a number of severe pathologies, such as aseptic meningitis, dilated cardiomyopathy, type I diabetes, paralysis, and even death. These viruses, which include coxsackievirus B (CVB), poliovirus (PV), and enterovirus 71 (EV71), co-opt the host cell secretory pathway, which controls the transport of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, to facilitate their replication. Here we report on the identification of a novel regulator of the secretory pathway, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 6 (BPIFB6), whose expression is required for enterovirus replication. We show that loss of

  18. [Overweight and secretory male infertility].

    PubMed

    Oshakbaev, K P; Abylaĭuly, Zh; Dukenbaeva, B A

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a trial with participation of 60 males aged 23-52. Of them, 30 had secretory male iufertility (SMI) and obesity. The control 30 patients were healthy volunteers. The protocol was performed by two stages. Stage 1 included: investigation of a clinico-laboratory status, of correlation between a sorption function of erythrocytes, endogenic metabolic intoxication (EMI) and spermogram parameters, concentration of serum testosterone in SMI patients. Stage 2 consisted in treatment of the intoxication by reducing body mass. All the infertile men were obese; 30% of them had low glucose tolerance, 46.7% had stage 2 hypertension, 23.3%--seasonal allergic symptoms. The level of organic substances on the surface of erythrocytes in infertile men was higher than in the controls (p < 0.01). A negative correlation was seen between spermogram parameters and organic substances content on erythrocytic surface (p < 0/05), concentration of serum testosterone and the above substances (p < 0.01). The loss of fat tissue by 7-14 kg by infertile men resulted in a positive trend in spermogram parameters and the level of serum testosterone (p < 0.01).

  19. Cofilin recruits F-actin to SPCA1 and promotes Ca2+-mediated secretory cargo sorting.

    PubMed

    Kienzle, Christine; Basnet, Nirakar; Crevenna, Alvaro H; Beck, Gisela; Habermann, Bianca; Mizuno, Naoko; von Blume, Julia

    2014-09-01

    The actin filament severing protein cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is required for actin and P-type ATPase secretory pathway calcium ATPase (SPCA)-dependent sorting of secretory proteins at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). How these proteins interact and activate the pump to facilitate cargo sorting, however, is not known. We used purified proteins to assess interaction of the cytoplasmic domains of SPCA1 with actin and CFL-1. A 132-amino acid portion of the SPCA1 phosphorylation domain (P-domain) interacted with actin in a CFL-1-dependent manner. This domain, coupled to nickel nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose beads, specifically recruited F-actin in the presence of CFL-1 and, when expressed in HeLa cells, inhibited Ca(2+) entry into the TGN and secretory cargo sorting. Mutagenesis of four amino acids in SPCA1 that represent the CFL-1 binding site also affected Ca(2+) import into the TGN and secretory cargo sorting. Altogether, our findings reveal the mechanism of CFL-1-dependent recruitment of actin to SPCA1 and the significance of this interaction for Ca(2+) influx and secretory cargo sorting.

  20. Reversible condensation of mast cell secretory products in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, J M; Villalón, M; Verdugo, P

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the condensation and decondensation of secretory products that occur in mast cell secretion. We show here that the hydrated matrix of an exocytosed secretory granule can be recondensed to its original volume by exposure to acidic solutions containing histamine at concentrations that mimic those found in vivo. Recondensation by acidic histamine began in the range of 1-10 mM with a dose response curve that was accurately predicted by a Hill type equation with four highly cooperative binding sites and a half maximum concentration of [Hi++] = 3.9 mM. Recondensation by histamine showed a sigmoidal dependency on pH (critical range pH 5.5-6.5) and was fully reversible. These experiments suggest that histamine, possibly by binding to anionic sites in the protein-heparin complex of the granule matrix, triggers a change in the polymeric structures of the granule matrix from an extended coil to a collapsed globular state. This may be a useful model for understanding the condensation of secretory products into dense core granules and their subsequent decondensation upon exocytosis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:1868152

  1. RNAi knockdown of parafusin inhibits the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Satir, Birgit H

    2011-10-01

    Several glycolytic enzymes and their isoforms have been found to be important in cell signaling unrelated to glycolysis. The involvement of parafusin (PFUS), a member of the phosphoglucomutase (PGM) superfamily with no phosphoglucomutase activity, in Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis has been controversial. This protein was first described in Paramecium tetraurelia, but is widely found. Earlier work showed that parafusin is a secretory vesicle scaffold component with unusual post-translational modifications (cyclic phosphorylation and phosphoglucosylation) coupled to stages in the exocytic process. Using RNAi, we demonstrate that parafusin synthesis can be reversibly blocked, with minor or no effect on other PGM isoforms. PFUS knockdown produces an inhibition of dense core secretory vesicle (DCSV) synthesis leading to an exo(-) phenotype. Although cell growth is unaffected, vesicle content is not packaged properly and no new DCSVs are formed. We conclude that PFUS and its orthologs are necessary for proper scaffold maturation. Because of this association, parafusin is an important signaling component for regulatory control of the secretory pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Secretory granule biogenesis and neuropeptide sorting to the regulated secretory pathway in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Loh, Y Peng; Kim, Taeyoon; Rodriguez, Yazmin M; Cawley, Niamh X

    2004-01-01

    Neuropeptide precursors synthesized at the rough endoplasmic reticulum are transported and sorted at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the granules of the regulated secretory pathway (RSP) of neuroendocrine cells. They are then processed into active peptides and stored in large dense-core granules (LDCGs) until secreted upon stimulation. We have studied the regulation of biogenesis of the LDCGs and the mechanism by which neuropeptide precursors, such as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), are sorted into these LDCGs of the RSP in neuroendocrine and endocrine cells. We provide evidence that chromogranin A (CgA), one of the most abundant acidic glycoproteins ubiquitously present in neuroendocrine/endocrine cells, plays an important role in the regulation of LDCG biogenesis. Specific depletion of CgA expression by antisense RNAs in PC12 cells led to a profound loss of secretory granule formation. Exogenously expressed POMC was neither stored nor secreted in a regulated manner in these CgA-deficient PC12 cells. Overexpression of CgA in a CgA- and LDCG-deficient endocrine cell line, 6T3, restored regulated secretion of transfected POMC and the presence of immunoreactive CgA at the tips of the processes of these cells. Unlike CgA, CgB, another granin protein, could not substitute for the role of CgA in regulating LDCG biogenesis. Thus, we conclude that CgA is a key player in the regulation of the biogenesis of LDCGs in neuroendocrine cells. To examine the mechanism of sorting POMC to the LDCGs, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis, transfected the POMC mutants into PC12 cells, and assayed for regulated secretion. Our previous molecular modeling studies predicted a three-dimensional sorting motif in POMC that can bind to a sorting receptor, membrane carboxypeptidase E (CPE). The sorting signal consists of four conserved residues at the N-terminal loop structure of POMC: two acidic residues and two hydrophobic residues. The two acidic residues were predicted to bind to a

  3. HID-1 is required for homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules during maturation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wen; Zhou, Maoge; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Dongwan; Wang, Lifen; Lu, Jingze; Song, Eli; Feng, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Pingyong; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Secretory granules, also known as dense core vesicles, are generated at the trans-Golgi network and undergo several maturation steps, including homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules (ISGs) and processing of prehormones to yield active peptides. The molecular mechanisms governing secretory granule maturation are largely unknown. Here, we investigate a highly conserved protein named HID-1 in a mouse model. A conditional knockout of HID-1 in pancreatic β cells leads to glucose intolerance and a remarkable increase in the serum proinsulin/insulin ratio caused by defective proinsulin processing. Large volume three-dimensional electron microscopy and immunofluorescence imaging reveal that ISGs are much more abundant in the absence of HID-1. We further demonstrate that HID-1 deficiency prevented secretory granule maturation by blocking homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules. Our data identify a novel player during the early maturation of immature secretory granules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18134.001 PMID:27751232

  4. Immunomodulatory potential of particular Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae excretory-secretory components.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovic, J; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Lj; Ilic, N; Gnjatovic, M; Nagano, I; Gruden-Movsesijan, A

    2016-12-01

    Excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae can induce the semi-matured status of rat dendritic cells. This may at least partly be the consequence of transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Here we investigated the potential of several components of excretory-secretory antigens (native fraction containing 45, 49 and 53kDa proteins and recombinant Tsp53, representing one of the constituents of this fraction) to demonstrate previously observed effects of excretory-secretory antigens on dendritic cells in vitro, characterised by establishment of a particular phenotype (very low MHC II expression, moderate CD86 expression and significant ICAM-1 expression) and functional properties (low production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12p70, and high production of IL-10 and TGF-β). Dendritic cells activated by these components were able to provoke proliferation of naïve T cells and their polarisation towards Th2 and anti-inflammatory responses. The investigated antigens had almost the same capacity to induce IL-4 and IL-10 production from T cells as excretory-secretory antigens, but failed to induce significant TGF-β synthesis. It could be concluded that the investigated excretory-secretory antigens components can largely reproduce the immunomodulatory effects of the complete excretory-secretory antigens and therefore may be considered as molecules important for creation of the anti-inflammatory milieu achieved by the parasite.

  5. AP-1 and clathrin are essential for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason; Jauregui, Miluska; Tan, Julie; Rollins, Janet; Lallet, Sylvie; Leventis, Peter A.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Chang, Henry C.; Le Borgne, Roland; Krämer, Helmut; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

     Regulated secretion of hormones, digestive enzymes, and other biologically active molecules requires the formation of secretory granules. Clathrin and the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) are necessary for maturation of exocrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine secretory granules. However, the initial steps of secretory granule biogenesis are only minimally understood. Powerful genetic approaches available in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were used to investigate the molecular pathway for biogenesis of the mucin-containing “glue granules” that form within epithelial cells of the third-instar larval salivary gland. Clathrin and AP-1 colocalize at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and clathrin recruitment requires AP-1. Furthermore, clathrin and AP-1 colocalize with secretory cargo at the TGN and on immature granules. Finally, loss of clathrin or AP-1 leads to a profound block in secretory granule formation. These findings establish a novel role for AP-1– and clathrin-dependent trafficking in the biogenesis of mucin-containing secretory granules. PMID:21490149

  6. Estradiol increases cAMP in the oviductal secretory cells through a nongenomic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Oróstica, María L; Lopez, John; Rojas, Israel; Rocco, Jocelyn; Díaz, Patricia; Reuquén, Patricia; Cardenas, Hugo; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Orihuela, Pedro A

    2014-09-01

    In the rat oviduct, estradiol (E2) accelerates egg transport by a nongenomic action that requires previous conversion of E2 to methoxyestrogens via catechol-O-methyltranferase (COMT) and activation of estrogen receptor (ER) with subsequent production of cAMP and inositol triphosphate (IP3). However, the role of the different oviductal cellular phenotypes on this E2 nongenomic pathway remains undetermined. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of E2 on the levels of cAMP and IP3 in primary cultures of secretory and smooth muscle cells from rat oviducts and determine the mechanism by which E2 increases cAMP in the secretory cells. In the secretory cells, E2 increased cAMP but not IP3, while in the smooth muscle cells E2 decreased cAMP and increased IP3. Suppression of protein synthesis by actinomycin D did not prevent the E2-induced cAMP increase, but this was blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182 780 and the inhibitors of COMT OR 486, G protein-α inhibitory (Gαi) protein pertussis toxin and adenylyl cyclase (AC) SQ 22536. Expression of the mRNA for the enzymes that metabolizes estrogens, Comt, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1 was found in the secretory cells, but this was not affected by E2. Finally, confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that E2 induced colocalization between ESR1 (ERα) and Gαi in extranuclear regions of the secretory cells. We conclude that E2 differentially regulates cAMP and IP3 in the secretory and smooth muscle cells of the rat oviduct. In the secretory cells, E2 increases cAMP via a nongenomic action that requires activation of COMT and ER, coupling between ESR1 and Gαi, and stimulation of AC.

  7. Porosome: The Universal Secretory Portal in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Bhanu

    2012-10-01

    In the past 50 years it was believed that during cell secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles completely merge at the cell plasma membrane resulting in the diffusion of intra-vesicular contents to the cell exterior and the compensatory retrieval of the excess membrane by endocytosis. This explanation made no sense or logic, since following cell secretion partially empty vesicles accumulate as demonstrated in electron micrographs. Furthermore, with the ``all or none'' mechanism of cell secretion by complete merger of secretory vesicle membrane at the cell plasma membrane, the cell is left with little regulation and control of the amount of content release. Moreover, it makes no sense for mammalian cells to possess such `all or none' mechanism of cell secretion, when even single-cell organisms have developed specialized and sophisticated secretory machinery, such as the secretion apparatus of Toxoplasma gondii, the contractile vacuoles in paramecium, or the various types of secretory structures in bacteria. Therefore, in 1993 in a News and Views article in Nature, E. Neher wrote ``It seems terribly wasteful that, during the release of hormones and neurotransmitters from a cell, the membrane of a vesicle should merge with the plasma membrane to be retrieved for recycling only seconds or minutes later.'' This conundrum in the molecular mechanism of cell secretion was finally resolved in 1997 following discovery of the ``Porosome,'' the universal secretory machinery in cells. Porosomes are supramolecular lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. Since porosomes in exocrine and neuroendocrine cells measure 100-180 nm

  8. (Controls of the plant endomembrane-secretory pathway): Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This project has been directed towards an understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which higher plants control the composition of the plasma membrane, through analysis of the biosynthesis, modification and targeting of plasma membrane proteins and glycoproteins. We have undertaken an identification of molecular markers both for the plasma membrane and for the biosynthetic processes, and the development of techniques for the isolation of conditional-lethal mutants defective at defined stages within the endomembrane-secretory pathway responsible for the biosynthesis, modification and targeting of plasma membrane proteins and glycoproteins. For the identification of molecular markers for the plasma membrane, monoclonal antibodies directed against epitopes present at the plant cell surface have been developed. Novel molecular markers for the plant plasma membrane and for the endomembrane-secretory pathway have been sought. Methods for the analysis of beta-glucuronidase in higher plants have been developed. These technologies have involved the use of flow cytometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In addition, we have been investigating the feasibility of expression of animal plasma membrane marker proteins in plants, specifically the VSV G-protein. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Excretory/secretory products from the gastrointestinal nematode Trichuris muris.

    PubMed

    Tritten, Lucienne; Tam, Mifong; Vargas, Mireille; Jardim, Armando; Stevenson, Mary M; Keiser, Jennifer; Geary, Timothy G

    2017-07-01

    To better control gastrointestinal nematode infections in humans and animals, it is important to understand the strategies used by these parasites to modulate the host immune system. In this regard, molecules released by parasites have been attributed crucially important roles in host-parasite negotiations. We characterized the excretory/secretory (E/S) microRNA (miRNA) and protein profiles from the mouse gastrointestinal nematode parasite Trichuris muris. Released miRNAs were subjected to miRNA sequencing and E/S proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry. Fourteen miRNAs were identified in T. muris exosome-like vesicles, as well as 73 proteins of nematode origin, 11 of which were unique to this study. Comparison with published nematode protein secretomes revealed high conservation at the functional level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interactions between Melanin Enzymes and Their Atypical Recruitment to the Secretory Pathway by Palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Melanins are biopolymers that confer coloration and protection to the host organism against biotic or abiotic insults. The level of protection offered by melanin depends on its biosynthesis and its subcellular localization. Previously, we discovered that Aspergillus fumigatus compartmentalizes melanization in endosomes by recruiting all melanin enzymes to the secretory pathway. Surprisingly, although two laccases involved in the late steps of melanization are conventional secretory proteins, the four enzymes involved in the early steps of melanization lack a signal peptide or a transmembrane domain and are thus considered “atypical” secretory proteins. In this work, we found interactions among melanin enzymes and all melanin enzymes formed protein complexes. Surprisingly, the formation of protein complexes by melanin enzymes was not critical for their trafficking to the endosomal system. By palmitoylation profiling and biochemical analyses, we discovered that all four early melanin enzymes were strongly palmitoylated during conidiation. However, only the polyketide synthase (PKS) Alb1 was strongly palmitoylated during both vegetative hyphal growth and conidiation when constitutively expressed alone. This posttranslational lipid modification correlates the endosomal localization of all early melanin enzymes. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analyses predict that palmitoylation is a common mechanism for potential membrane association of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in A. fumigatus. Our findings indicate that protein-protein interactions facilitate melanization by metabolic channeling, while posttranslational lipid modifications help recruit the atypical enzymes to the secretory pathway, which is critical for compartmentalization of secondary metabolism. PMID:27879337

  11. Segregation of sphingolipids and sterols during formation of secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Robin W.; Ejsing, Christer S.; Surma, Michal A.; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Gerl, Mathias J.; Sampaio, Julio L.; de Robillard, Quentin; Ferguson, Charles; Proszynski, Tomasz J.; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) is the major sorting station in the secretory pathway of all eukaryotic cells. How the TGN sorts proteins and lipids to generate the enrichment of sphingolipids and sterols at the plasma membrane is poorly understood. To address this fundamental question in membrane trafficking, we devised an immunoisolation procedure for specific recovery of post-Golgi secretory vesicles transporting a transmembrane raft protein from the TGN to the cell surface in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a novel quantitative shotgun lipidomics approach, we could demonstrate that TGN sorting selectively enriched ergosterol and sphingolipid species in the immunoisolated secretory vesicles. This finding, for the first time, indicates that the TGN exhibits the capacity to sort membrane lipids. Furthermore, the observation that the immunoisolated vesicles exhibited a higher membrane order than the late Golgi membrane, as measured by C-Laurdan spectrophotometry, strongly suggests that lipid rafts play a role in the TGN-sorting machinery. PMID:19433450

  12. Cab45 is required for Ca2+-dependent secretory cargo sorting at the trans-Golgi network

    PubMed Central

    Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Kienzle, Christine; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Valverde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+ import into the lumen of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by the secretory pathway calcium ATPase1 (SPCA1) is required for the sorting of secretory cargo. How is Ca2+ retained in the lumen of the Golgi, and what is its role in cargo sorting? We show here that a soluble, lumenal Golgi resident protein, Cab45, is required for SPCA1-dependent Ca2+ import into the TGN; it binds secretory cargo in a Ca2+-dependent reaction and is required for its sorting at the TGN. PMID:23266954

  13. Characterization of a Secretory Annexin in Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xingju; Hu, Dandan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Wang, Ning; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Tao; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is a widespread parasitic zoonosis causing economic loss and public health problems. Annexins are important proteins usually present in the plasma membrane, but previous studies have shown that an annexin B33 protein of E. granulosus (Eg-ANX) could be detected in the excretory/secretory products and cyst fluid. In this study, we cloned and characterized Eg-ANX. In silico analysis showed that the amino acid sequence of Eg-ANX was conserved and lacked any signal peptides. The phospholipid-binding activity of recombinant Eg-ANX (rEg-ANX) was tested; liposomes could bind to rEg-ANX only in the presence of Ca2+. In addition, we performed western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses to further validate the secretory properties of Eg-ANX. The protein could be detected in the cyst fluid of E. granulosus and was also present in the intermediate host tissues, which suggested that Eg-ANX might play an important role in parasite–host interaction. PMID:26787154

  14. Pro-hormone secretogranin II regulates dense core secretory granule biogenesis in catecholaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Courel, Maïté; Soler-Jover, Alex; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L; Mahata, Sushil K; Elias, Salah; Montero-Hadjadje, Maïté; Anouar, Youssef; Giuly, Richard J; O'Connor, Daniel T; Taupenot, Laurent

    2010-03-26

    Processes underlying the formation of dense core secretory granules (DCGs) of neuroendocrine cells are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that DCG biogenesis is dependent on the secretory protein secretogranin (Sg) II, a member of the granin family of pro-hormone cargo of DCGs in neuroendocrine cells. Depletion of SgII expression in PC12 cells leads to a decrease in both the number and size of DCGs and impairs DCG trafficking of other regulated hormones. Expression of SgII fusion proteins in a secretory-deficient PC12 variant rescues a regulated secretory pathway. SgII-containing dense core vesicles share morphological and physical properties with bona fide DCGs, are competent for regulated exocytosis, and maintain an acidic luminal pH through the V-type H(+)-translocating ATPase. The granulogenic activity of SgII requires a pH gradient along this secretory pathway. We conclude that SgII is a critical factor for the regulation of DCG biogenesis in neuroendocrine cells, mediating the formation of functional DCGs via its pH-dependent aggregation at the trans-Golgi network.

  15. Pro-hormone Secretogranin II Regulates Dense Core Secretory Granule Biogenesis in Catecholaminergic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Courel, Maïté; Soler-Jover, Alex; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Elias, Salah; Montero-Hadjadje, Maïté; Anouar, Youssef; Giuly, Richard J.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Taupenot, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Processes underlying the formation of dense core secretory granules (DCGs) of neuroendocrine cells are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that DCG biogenesis is dependent on the secretory protein secretogranin (Sg) II, a member of the granin family of pro-hormone cargo of DCGs in neuroendocrine cells. Depletion of SgII expression in PC12 cells leads to a decrease in both the number and size of DCGs and impairs DCG trafficking of other regulated hormones. Expression of SgII fusion proteins in a secretory-deficient PC12 variant rescues a regulated secretory pathway. SgII-containing dense core vesicles share morphological and physical properties with bona fide DCGs, are competent for regulated exocytosis, and maintain an acidic luminal pH through the V-type H+-translocating ATPase. The granulogenic activity of SgII requires a pH gradient along this secretory pathway. We conclude that SgII is a critical factor for the regulation of DCG biogenesis in neuroendocrine cells, mediating the formation of functional DCGs via its pH-dependent aggregation at the trans-Golgi network. PMID:20061385

  16. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-dependent secretory transport in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, M A; Ransom, D M; Bangs, J D

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors in forward secretory trafficking using African trypanosomes as a model system. Soluble GPI-minus forms of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), in which the C-terminal GPI-addition peptide signal is deleted, are secreted from transformed procyclic trypanosomes with 5-fold reduced kinetics, relative to matched GPI-anchored constructs. Cell fractionation and immunofluorescence localization studies indicate that the GPI-minus VSG reporters accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This transport defect is specific, since overexpression of GPI-minus VSG has no effect on the rate of transport of a second soluble secretory reporter (BiPN) when co-expressed in the same cells. Two results suggest that delayed forward transport cannot be accounted for by failure to fold/assemble in the absence of a GPI anchor, thereby leading to prolonged association with ER quality-control machinery. First, no evidence was found for elevated association of GPI-minus VSG with the ER molecular chaperone, BiP. Secondly, newly synthesized GPI-minus VSG is dimerized efficiently, as judged by velocity-sedimentation analysis. GPI-dependent transport is not confined to the VSG reporters, because a similar dependence is found with another trypanosomal GPI-anchored protein, trans-sialidase. These findings suggest that GPI structures act in a positive manner to mediate efficient forward transport of some, and perhaps all, GPI-anchored proteins in the early secretory pathway of trypanosomes. Possible mechanisms for GPI-dependent transport are discussed with respect to current models of vesicular trafficking. PMID:9794811

  17. [Secretory immunoglobulin A in amniotic fluid].

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Straube, W; Brock, J; Lorenz, U

    1983-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was estimated in amniotic fluid samples by means of the single radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. A monospecific antiserum against human secretory component was used. 163 amniotic fluid samples from normal pregnancies and risk pregnancies respectively were investigated. Within the 3rd trimenon the S-IgA content in amniotic fluid increased significantly. With respect to literature and examinations performed previously a connection between S-IgA content in amniotic fluid and fetal lung maturity seems to be possible.

  18. Parallel increase in secretory activity between N-glycosylated and nonglycosylated α-amylase without protein synthesis after short-term β-adrenergic receptor activation in isolated rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long-hui; Yang, Ze-min; Chen, Wei-wen

    2014-10-01

    To investigate comparisons of the secretory activity between N-glycosylated and nonglycosylated α-amylase, and α-amylase synthetic activity, after β-adrenergic receptor activation in rat parotid acinar cells in vitro. Rat parotid acinar cells were incubated in the presence or absence of (-)-isoproterenol. For β-adrenergic blocking experiments, acinar cells were pretreated with (±)-propranolol prior to adding agonist. After the time indicated, the "released amylase" and "total amylase" were obtained. Western blotting was applied to identify and quantify the N-glycosylated and nonglycosylated α-amylase. Amylase activity was also measured. The potent β-adrenergic agonist (-)-isoproterenol induced a dramatic increase (2-3-fold) of α-amylase secretion for 30 minutes (p < 0.05 vs. control), while the effect was completely abolished when cells were pretreated with (±)-propranolol for 15 minutes. Moreover, the N-glycosylated level of released and total amylase among groups was measured accordingly. Our data showed the N-glycosylated level ratios (released amylase/total amylase) did not differ among groups, which indicated that the N-glycosylated form of α-amylase was not secreted more easily than the nonglycosylated one after stimulation. Interestingly, the total amylase concentration remained unchanged after stimulation within 30 minutes, which might indicate no α-amylase synthesized within the time indicated. Our findings suggest a parallel increase in secretory activity between N-glycosylated and nonglycosylated α-amylase after β-adrenergic receptor activation. There seems to be a dissociation of α-amylase synthesis from secretion within 30 minutes.

  19. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-01-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of < or = 14, 22, 26-28, 30, 46, 60, 70-80, and > 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection. Images PMID:1469104

  20. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Pacheco-Yépez, Judith; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA) or polymeric IgA (pIgA) and the secretory component (SC), a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models) on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation. PMID:24348350

  1. Taenia taeniaeformis: inhibition of rat testosterone production by excretory-secretory product of the cultured metacestode.

    PubMed

    Rikihisa, Y; Lin, Y C; Fukaya, T

    1985-06-01

    In 3- to 5-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats infected with the hepatic metacestode, Taenia taeniaeformis, the serum testosterone level was significantly lower than in comparable uninfected controls. By transmission electron microscopy, testicular Leydig cells of infected rats had less smooth endoplasmic reticulum than control Leydig cells. Cultured metacestodes isolated from the hepatic cysts secreted or excreted substances into the incubation medium. The effect of the excretory-secretory product on testosterone concentration in the sera and testes of 15-day-old rats was examined. Subcutaneous injection of 50-200 micrograms of excretory-secretory product/0.1 ml saline/rat for 2 days significantly reduced human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated serum and testicular testosterone concentrations. Furthermore, the effect of the excretory-secretory product on isolated rat Leydig cell testosterone production was examined. Rat Leydig cells produced testosterone in vitro and, in the presence of 50 IU human chorionic gonadotropin/ml incubation medium, they responded with approximately 100% increase in testosterone production. Addition of 2-10 micrograms excretory-secretory product protein/ml of culture medium significantly reduced the testosterone production by rat Leydig cells in vitro. These results indicate that excretory-secretory product of cultured T. taeniaeformis metacestodes has a direct inhibitory effect on Leydig cell testosterone production under stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin.

  2. Secretory immunity with special reference to the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, Per

    2013-01-01

    The two principal antibody classes present in saliva are secretory IgA (SIgA) and IgG; the former is produced as dimeric IgA by local plasma cells (PCs) in the stroma of salivary glands and is transported through secretory epithelia by the polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR), also named membrane secretory component (SC). Most IgG in saliva is derived from the blood circulation by passive leakage mainly via gingival crevicular epithelium, although some may be locally produced in the gingiva or salivary glands. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) do not contribute equally to the pool of memory/effector B cells differentiating to mucosal PCs throughout the body. Thus, enteric immunostimulation may not be the best way to activate the production of salivary IgA antibodies although the level of specific SIgA in saliva may still reflect an intestinal immune response after enteric immunization. It remains unknown whether the IgA response in submandibular/sublingual glands is better related to B-cell induction in GALT than the parotid response. Such disparity is suggested by the levels of IgA in submandibular secretions of AIDS patients, paralleling their highly upregulated intestinal IgA system, while the parotid IgA level is decreased. Parotid SIgA could more consistently be linked to immune induction in palatine tonsils/adenoids (human NALT) and cervical lymph nodes, as supported by the homing molecule profile observed after immune induction at these sites. Several other variables influence the levels of antibodies in salivary secretions. These include difficulties with reproducibility and standardization of immunoassays, the impact of flow rate, acute or chronic stress, protein loss during sample handling, and uncontrolled admixture of serum-derived IgG and monomeric IgA. Despite these problems, saliva is an easily accessible biological fluid with interesting scientific and clinical potentials. PMID:23487566

  3. Amelogenins as Potential Buffers during Secretory-stage Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; Takano, Y.; Gibson, C.W.; DenBesten, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenins are the most abundant protein species in forming dental enamel, taken to regulate crystal shape and crystal growth. Unprotonated amelogenins can bind protons, suggesting that amelogenins could regulate the pH in enamel in situ. We hypothesized that without amelogenins the enamel would acidify unless ameloblasts were buffered by alternative ways. To investigate this, we measured the mineral and chloride content in incisor enamel of amelogenin-knockout (AmelX-/-) mice and determined the pH of enamel by staining with methyl-red. Ameloblasts were immunostained for anion exchanger-2 (Ae2), a transmembrane pH regulator sensitive for acid that secretes bicarbonate in exchange for chloride. The enamel of AmelX-/- mice was 10-fold thinner, mineralized in the secretory stage 1.8-fold more than wild-type enamel and containing less chloride (suggesting more bicarbonate secretion). Enamel of AmelX-/- mice stained with methyl-red contained no acidic bands in the maturation stage as seen in wild-type enamel. Secretory ameloblasts of AmelX-/- mice, but not wild-type mice, were immunopositive for Ae2, and stained more intensely in the maturation stage compared with wild-type mice. Exposure of AmelX-/- mice to fluoride enhanced the mineral content in the secretory stage, lowered chloride, and intensified Ae2 immunostaining in the enamel organ in comparison with non-fluorotic mutant teeth. The results suggest that unprotonated amelogenins may regulate the pH of forming enamel in situ. Without amelogenins, Ae2 could compensate for the pH drop associated with crystal formation. PMID:25535204

  4. Amelogenins as potential buffers during secretory-stage amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Lyaruu, D M; Takano, Y; Gibson, C W; DenBesten, P K; Bronckers, A L J J

    2015-03-01

    Amelogenins are the most abundant protein species in forming dental enamel, taken to regulate crystal shape and crystal growth. Unprotonated amelogenins can bind protons, suggesting that amelogenins could regulate the pH in enamel in situ. We hypothesized that without amelogenins the enamel would acidify unless ameloblasts were buffered by alternative ways. To investigate this, we measured the mineral and chloride content in incisor enamel of amelogenin-knockout (AmelX(-/-)) mice and determined the pH of enamel by staining with methyl-red. Ameloblasts were immunostained for anion exchanger-2 (Ae2), a transmembrane pH regulator sensitive for acid that secretes bicarbonate in exchange for chloride. The enamel of AmelX(-/-) mice was 10-fold thinner, mineralized in the secretory stage 1.8-fold more than wild-type enamel and containing less chloride (suggesting more bicarbonate secretion). Enamel of AmelX(-/-) mice stained with methyl-red contained no acidic bands in the maturation stage as seen in wild-type enamel. Secretory ameloblasts of AmelX(-/-) mice, but not wild-type mice, were immunopositive for Ae2, and stained more intensely in the maturation stage compared with wild-type mice. Exposure of AmelX(-/-) mice to fluoride enhanced the mineral content in the secretory stage, lowered chloride, and intensified Ae2 immunostaining in the enamel organ in comparison with non-fluorotic mutant teeth. The results suggest that unprotonated amelogenins may regulate the pH of forming enamel in situ. Without amelogenins, Ae2 could compensate for the pH drop associated with crystal formation. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2014.

  5. A single nucleotide polymorphism in osteoprotegerin, an anti-inflammatory protein produced in response to infection with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli is associated with an increased risk of non-secretory bacterial diarrhea in US travelers to Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jamal A.; DuPont, Herbert L.; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Flores, Jose; Carlin, Lily G.; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Martinez-Sandoval, Francisco J.; Guo, Dongchuan; White, Clinton A.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Osteoprotegerin (OPG), an immunoregulatory member of the TNF receptor superfamily, is expressed in inflamed intestinal mucosa. We investigated whether OPG is produced by intestinal epithelial cells and tested the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the osteoprotegerin gene are associated with travelers’ diarrhea (TD) among US travelers to Mexico. Methods OPG concentration was measured in the supernatants of T84 cells infected with various diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes. Genotyping was performed for four SNPs in the OPG gene from 968 US travelers with and without TD. Stools from travelers with TD were evaluated for the presence of enteric pathogens. Results T84 cells produced higher OPG levels in response to infection with various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes than E. coli controls (P < .05). A SNP in exon1 region of the OPG gene (OPG+1181 G>C) was associated with TD in Caucasian travelers who stayed in Mexico for more than one week during the summer (P = .009) and for TD due to non-secretory pathogens (P = .001). Conclusions Our study suggests that OPG is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells in response to enteropathogens and that a polymorphism in the OPG gene is associated with an increased susceptibility to TD. PMID:19128145

  6. Secretory cargo sorting by Ca2+-dependent Cab45 oligomerization at the trans-Golgi network

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Birgit; Maiser, Andreas; Emin, Derya; Prescher, Jens; Beck, Gisela; Kienzle, Christine; Bartnik, Kira; Habermann, Bianca; Pakdel, Mehrshad; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Lamb, Don C.

    2016-01-01

    Sorting and export of transmembrane cargoes and lysosomal hydrolases at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) are well understood. However, elucidation of the mechanism by which secretory cargoes are segregated for their release into the extracellular space remains a challenge. We have previously demonstrated that, in a reaction that requires Ca2+, the soluble TGN-resident protein Cab45 is necessary for the sorting of secretory cargoes at the TGN. Here, we report that Cab45 reversibly assembles into oligomers in the presence of Ca2+. These Cab45 oligomers specifically bind secretory proteins, such as COMP and LyzC, in a Ca2+-dependent manner in vitro. In intact cells, mutation of the Ca2+-binding sites in Cab45 impairs oligomerization, as well as COMP and LyzC sorting. Superresolution microscopy revealed that Cab45 colocalizes with secretory proteins and the TGN Ca2+ pump (SPCA1) in specific TGN microdomains. These findings reveal that Ca2+-dependent changes in Cab45 mediate sorting of specific cargo molecules at the TGN. PMID:27138253

  7. Phosphorylation of αSNAP is Required for Secretory Organelle Biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Rebecca J; Ferguson, David J P; Whitehead, Lachlan; Bradin, Clare H; Wu, Hong J; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Upon infection, apicomplexan parasites quickly invade host cells and begin a replicative cycle rapidly increasing in number over a short period of time, leading to tissue lysis and disease. The secretory pathway of these highly polarized protozoan parasites tightly controls, in time and space, the biogenesis of specialized structures and organelles required for invasion and intracellular survival. In other systems, regulation of protein trafficking can occur by phosphorylation of vesicle fusion machinery. Previously, we have shown that Toxoplasma gondii αSNAP - a protein that controls the disassembly of cis-SNARE complexes--is phosphorylated. Here, we show that this post-translational modification is required for the correct function of αSNAP in controlling secretory traffic. We demonstrate that during intracellular development conditional expression of a non-phosphorylatable form of αSNAP results in Golgi fragmentation and vesiculation of all downstream secretory organelles. In addition, we show that the vestigial plastid (termed apicoplast), although reported not to be reliant on Golgi trafficking for biogenesis, is also affected upon overexpression of αSNAP and is much more sensitive to the levels of this protein than targeting to other organelles. This work highlights the importance of αSNAP and its phosphorylation in Toxoplasma organelle biogenesis and exposes a hereto fore-unexplored mechanism of regulation of vesicle fusion during secretory pathway trafficking in apicomplexan parasites. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Homotypic Fusion of Immature Secretory Granules during Maturation in a Cell-free Assay

    PubMed Central

    Urbé, Sylvie; Page, Lesley J.; Tooze, Sharon A.

    1998-01-01

    The biogenesis of secretory granules embodies several morphological and biochemical changes. In particular, in neuroendocrine cells maturation of secretory granules is characterized by an increase in size which has been proposed to reflect homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules (ISGs). Here we describe an assay that provides the first biochemical evidence for such a fusion event and allows us to analyze its regulation. The assay reconstitutes homotypic fusion between one population of ISGs containing a [35S]sulfate-labeled substrate, secretogranin II (SgII), and a second population containing the prohormone convertase PC2. Both substrate and enzyme are targeted exclusively to ISGs. Fusion is measured by quantification of a cleavage product of SgII produced by PC2. With this assay we show that fusion only occurs between ISGs and not between ISGs and MSGs, is temperature dependent, and requires ATP and GTP and cytosolic proteins. NSF (N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive fusion protein) is amongst the cytosolic proteins required, whereas we could not detect a requirement for p97. The ability to reconstitute ISG fusion in a cell-free assay is an important advance towards the identification of molecules involved in the maturation of secretory granules and will increase our understanding of this process. PMID:9864358

  9. PICK1 Deficiency Impairs Secretory Vesicle Biogenesis and Leads to Growth Retardation and Decreased Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Anna M.; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Mattias; Lund, Viktor K.; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N.; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K.; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard; Stamou, Dimitrios; Kjærulff, Ole; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine

  10. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Mattias; Lund, Viktor K; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard; Stamou, Dimitrios; Kjærulff, Ole; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine

  11. Morphological docking of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-dependent secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones is essential for brain function and neuroendocrine-signaling. Prior to exocytosis, neurotransmitter-containing vesicles dock to the target membrane. In electron micrographs of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, like chromaffin cells many synaptic vesicles (SVs) and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are docked. For many years the molecular identity of the morphologically docked state was unknown. Recently, we resolved the minimal docking machinery in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells using embryonic mouse model systems together with electron-microscopic analyses and also found that docking is controlled by the sub-membrane filamentous (F-)actin. Currently it is unclear if the same docking machinery operates in synapses. Here, I will review our docking assay that led to the identification of the LDCV docking machinery in chromaffin cells and also discuss whether identical docking proteins are required for SV docking in synapses. PMID:20577884

  12. Involvement of AQP6 in the Mercury-sensitive osmotic lysis of rat parotid secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko; Murakami, Masataka; Katsumata-Kato, Osamu; Yokoyama, Megumi; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    In secretory granules and vesicles, membrane transporters have been predicted to permeate water molecules, ions and/or small solutes to swell the granules and promote membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated that aquaporin-6 (AQP6), a water channel protein, which permeates anions, is localized in rat parotid secretory granules (Matsuki-Fukushima et al., Cell Tissue Res 332:73-80, 2008). Because the localization of AQP6 in other organs is restricted to cytosolic vesicles, the native function or functions of AQP6 in vivo has not been well determined. To characterize the channel property in granule membranes, the solute permeation-induced lysis of purified secretory granules is a useful marker. To analyze the role of AQP6 in secretory granule membranes, we used Hg²⁺, which is known to activate AQP6, and investigated the characteristics of solute permeability in rat parotid secretory granule lysis induced by Hg²⁺ (Hg lysis). The kinetics of osmotic secretory granule lysis in an iso-osmotic KCl solution was monitored by the decay of optical density at 540 nm using a spectrophotometer. Osmotic secretory granule lysis was markedly facilitated in the presence of 0.5-2.0 μM Hg²⁺, concentrations that activate AQP6. The Hg lysis was completely blocked by β-mercaptoethanol which disrupts Hg²⁺-binding, or by removal of chloride ions from the reaction medium. An anion channel blocker, DIDS, which does not affect AQP6, discriminated between DIDS-insensitive and sensitive components in Hg lysis. These results suggest that Hg lysis is required for anion permeability through the protein transporter. Hg lysis depended on anion conductance with a sequence of NO(3) (-) > Br⁻ > I⁻ > Cl⁻ and was facilitated by acidic pH. The anion selectivity for NO(3) (-) and the acidic pH sensitivity were similar to the channel properties of AQP6. Taken together, it is likely that AQP6 permeates halide group anions as a Hg²⁺-sensitive anion channel in rat parotid

  13. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Jethwaney, Deepa; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Leidal, Kevin G; de Bernabe, Daniel Beltran-Valero; Campbell, Kevin P; Nauseef, William M; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-01-01

    Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting) and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli. PMID:17692124

  14. Interactions between Melanin Enzymes and Their Atypical Recruitment to the Secretory Pathway by Palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-11-22

    Melanins are biopolymers that confer coloration and protection to the host organism against biotic or abiotic insults. The level of protection offered by melanin depends on its biosynthesis and its subcellular localization. Previously, we discovered that Aspergillus fumigatus compartmentalizes melanization in endosomes by recruiting all melanin enzymes to the secretory pathway. Surprisingly, although two laccases involved in the late steps of melanization are conventional secretory proteins, the four enzymes involved in the early steps of melanization lack a signal peptide or a transmembrane domain and are thus considered "atypical" secretory proteins. In this work, we found interactions among melanin enzymes and all melanin enzymes formed protein complexes. Surprisingly, the formation of protein complexes by melanin enzymes was not critical for their trafficking to the endosomal system. By palmitoylation profiling and biochemical analyses, we discovered that all four early melanin enzymes were strongly palmitoylated during conidiation. However, only the polyketide synthase (PKS) Alb1 was strongly palmitoylated during both vegetative hyphal growth and conidiation when constitutively expressed alone. This posttranslational lipid modification correlates the endosomal localization of all early melanin enzymes. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analyses predict that palmitoylation is a common mechanism for potential membrane association of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in A. fumigatus Our findings indicate that protein-protein interactions facilitate melanization by metabolic channeling, while posttranslational lipid modifications help recruit the atypical enzymes to the secretory pathway, which is critical for compartmentalization of secondary metabolism. Subcellular compartmentalization is increasingly recognized as an important aspect of fungal secondary metabolism. It facilitates sequential enzymatic reactions, provides

  15. The complete general secretory pathway in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, A P

    1993-01-01

    The unifying feature of all proteins that are transported out of the cytoplasm of gram-negative bacteria by the general secretory pathway (GSP) is the presence of a long stretch of predominantly hydrophobic amino acids, the signal sequence. The interaction between signal sequence-bearing proteins and the cytoplasmic membrane may be a spontaneous event driven by the electrochemical energy potential across the cytoplasmic membrane, leading to membrane integration. The translocation of large, hydrophilic polypeptide segments to the periplasmic side of this membrane almost always requires at least six different proteins encoded by the sec genes and is dependent on both ATP hydrolysis and the electrochemical energy potential. Signal peptidases process precursors with a single, amino-terminal signal sequence, allowing them to be released into the periplasm, where they may remain or whence they may be inserted into the outer membrane. Selected proteins may also be transported across this membrane for assembly into cell surface appendages or for release into the extracellular medium. Many bacteria secrete a variety of structurally different proteins by a common pathway, referred to here as the main terminal branch of the GSP. This recently discovered branch pathway comprises at least 14 gene products. Other, simpler terminal branches of the GSP are also used by gram-negative bacteria to secrete a more limited range of extracellular proteins. PMID:8096622

  16. Golgi-independent secretory trafficking through recycling endosomes in neuronal dendrites and spines

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Aaron B; Bourke, Ashley M; Hiester, Brian G; Hanus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    Neurons face the challenge of regulating the abundance, distribution and repertoire of integral membrane proteins within their immense, architecturally complex dendritic arbors. While the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) supports dendritic translation, most dendrites lack the Golgi apparatus (GA), an essential organelle for conventional secretory trafficking. Thus, whether secretory cargo is locally trafficked in dendrites through a non-canonical pathway remains a fundamental question. Here we define the dendritic trafficking itinerary for key synaptic molecules in rat cortical neurons. Following ER exit, the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GluA1 and neuroligin 1 undergo spatially restricted entry into the dendritic secretory pathway and accumulate in recycling endosomes (REs) located in dendrites and spines before reaching the plasma membrane. Surprisingly, GluA1 surface delivery occurred even when GA function was disrupted. Thus, in addition to their canonical role in protein recycling, REs also mediate forward secretory trafficking in neuronal dendrites and spines through a specialized GA-independent trafficking network. PMID:28875935

  17. An Alternative Terminal Step of the General Secretory Pathway in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Craney, Arryn; Dix, Melissa M.; Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I signal peptidase (SPase) is essential for viability in wild-type bacteria because the terminal step of the bacterial general secretory pathway requires its proteolytic activity to release proteins from their membrane-bound N-terminal leader sequences after translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here, we identify the Staphylococcus aureus operon ayrRABC (SA0337 to SA0340) and show that once released from repression by AyrR, the protein products AyrABC together confer resistance to the SPase inhibitor arylomycin M131 by providing an alternate and novel method of releasing translocated proteins. Thus, the derepression of ayrRABC allows cells to bypass the essentiality of SPase. We demonstrate that AyrABC functionally complements SPase by mediating the processing of the normally secreted proteins, albeit in some cases with reduced efficiency and either without cleavage or via cleavage at a site N-terminal to the canonical SPase cleavage site. Thus, ayrRABC encodes a secretion stress-inducible alternate terminal step of the general secretory pathway. Importance  Addressing proteins for proper localization within or outside a cell in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes is often accomplished with intrinsic signals which mediate membrane translocation and which ultimately must be removed. The canonical enzyme responsible for the removal of translocation signals is bacterial type I signal peptidase (SPase), which functions at the terminal step of the general secretory pathway and is thus essential in wild-type bacteria. Here, we identify a four-gene operon in S. aureus that encodes an alternate terminal step of the general secretory pathway and thus makes SPase nonessential. The results have important implications for protein secretion in bacteria and potentially for protein trafficking in prokaryotes and eukaryotes in general. PMID:26286693

  18. Effect of macrophage secretory products on elaboration of virulence factors by planktonic and biofilm cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Sharma, Saroj; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages, which constitute the first line of defense, pour their secretions in the mileu following stimulation with pathogens. These secretory products, referred to as macrophage secretory products (MSPs), can influence ultimate outcome of an infection. In the present investigation, it was observed that different strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa vary in their ability to stimulate macrophages leading to variability in generation of macrophage secretory products. Cytokine levels, reactive nitrogen intermediates and protein content of macrophage secretory products generated with biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa was found to be more as compared to their planktonic counterparts. The effect of macrophage secretory products produced in response to interaction of macrophages with P. aeruginosa on elaboration of virulence factors produced by planktonic and biofilm cell forms of this pathogen was assessed. Significant enhancement in growth and elaboration of all the virulence determinants by both the cell forms was observed when P. aeruginosa was grown in presence of supernatants with macrophage secretory products. Implications of these findings in relation to urinary tract infections induced by P. aeruginosa have been discussed.

  19. Non-secretory multiple myeloma: from biology to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Megan Murray; Tuchman, Sascha A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy in the US. It is typically characterized by production of large amounts of defective immunoglobulin (Ig). Diagnosing MM and monitoring treatment response, including eventual relapse, are largely based on sequential measurements of Ig. However, a small subset of MM called non-secretory multiple myeloma (NSMM) produces no detectable Ig. This subset of true NSMM has become even smaller over time, as the advent of the serum free light chain assay has resulted in the majority of NSMM patients being recategorized as light-chain MM – that is, MM cells that produce only the light-chain component of Ig. True forms of NSMM, meaning MM that secretes no monoclonal proteins whatsoever, constitute a distinct entity that is reviewed; definition of NSMM using current detection methods, discuss the biology underpinning NSMM development, and share recommendations for how NSMM should be managed clinically with respect to detection, treatment, and monitoring. PMID:28008276

  20. Excretory/secretory proteome of 14-day schistosomula, Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Min; Han, Yanhui; Han, Qian; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Zhu, Chuangang; Hong, Yang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem, with 200 million people infected and 779 million people at risk worldwide. The schistosomulum is the early stage of the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma japonicum in their vertebrate hosts, and is the main target of vaccine-induced protective immunity. Excretory/secretory (ES) proteins play a major role in host-parasite interactions and ES protein compositions of schistosomula of S. japonicum have not been characterized to date. In the present study, the proteome of ES proteins from 14 day schistosomula of S. japonicum was analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and 713 unique proteins were finally identified. Gene ontology and pathway analysis revealed that identified proteins were mainly involved in carbohydrate metabolism, degradation, response to stimulus, oxidation-reduction, biological regulation and binding. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that thioredoxin peroxidase identified in this study had the effect on inhibiting MHCII and CD86 expression on LPS-activated macrophages. The present study provides insight into the growth and development of the schistosome in the final host and valuable information for screening vaccine candidates for schistosomiasis.

  1. Accumulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecules in Mast Cell Secretory Granules and Their Release upon Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Graça; Tenza, Danielle; Mecheri, Salahedine; Peronet, Roger; Bonnerot, Christian; Desaymard, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II compartments, secretory granules, and secretory lysosomes, we analyzed the localization and fate of MHC class II molecules in mast cells. In bone marrow-derived mast cells, the bulk of MHC class II molecules is contained in two distinct compartments, with features of both lysosomal compartments and secretory granules defined by their protein content and their accessibility to endocytic tracers. Type I granules display internal membrane vesicles and are accessed by exogenous molecules after a time lag of 20 min; type II granules are reached by the endocytic tracer later and possess a serotonin-rich electron-dense core surrounded by a multivesicular domain. In these type I and type II granules, MHC class II molecules, mannose-6-phosphate receptors and lysosomal membrane proteins (lamp1 and lamp2) localize to small intralumenal vesicles. These 60–80-nm vesicles are released along with inflammatory mediators during mast cell degranulation triggered by IgE-antigen complexes. These observations emphasize the intimate connection between the endocytic and secretory pathways in cells of the hematopoietic lineage which allows regulated secretion of the contents of secretory lysosomes, including membrane proteins associated with small vesicles. PMID:9398681

  2. Accumulation of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules in mast cell secretory granules and their release upon degranulation.

    PubMed

    Raposo, G; Tenza, D; Mecheri, S; Peronet, R; Bonnerot, C; Desaymard, C

    1997-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II compartments, secretory granules, and secretory lysosomes, we analyzed the localization and fate of MHC class II molecules in mast cells. In bone marrow-derived mast cells, the bulk of MHC class II molecules is contained in two distinct compartments, with features of both lysosomal compartments and secretory granules defined by their protein content and their accessibility to endocytic tracers. Type I granules display internal membrane vesicles and are accessed by exogenous molecules after a time lag of 20 min; type II granules are reached by the endocytic tracer later and possess a serotonin-rich electron-dense core surrounded by a multivesicular domain. In these type I and type II granules, MHC class II molecules, mannose-6-phosphate receptors and lysosomal membrane proteins (lamp1 and lamp2) localize to small intralumenal vesicles. These 60-80-nm vesicles are released along with inflammatory mediators during mast cell degranulation triggered by IgE-antigen complexes. These observations emphasize the intimate connection between the endocytic and secretory pathways in cells of the hematopoietic lineage which allows regulated secretion of the contents of secretory lysosomes, including membrane proteins associated with small vesicles.

  3. Kinesin-related Smy1 enhances the Rab-dependent association of myosin-V with secretory cargo

    PubMed Central

    Lwin, Kyaw Myo; Li, Donghao; Bretscher, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which molecular motors associate with specific cargo is a central problem in cell organization. The kinesin-like protein Smy1 of budding yeast was originally identified by the ability of elevated levels to suppress a conditional myosin-V mutation (myo2-66), but its function with Myo2 remained mysterious. Subsequently, Myo2 was found to provide an essential role in delivery of secretory vesicles for polarized growth and in the transport of mitochondria for segregation. By isolating and characterizing myo2 smy1 conditional mutants, we uncover the molecular function of Smy1 as a factor that enhances the association of Myo2 with its receptor, the Rab Sec4, on secretory vesicles. The tail of Smy1—which binds Myo2—its central dimerization domain, and its kinesin-like head domain are all necessary for this function. Consistent with this model, overexpression of full-length Smy1 enhances the number of Sec4 receptors and Myo2 motors per transporting secretory vesicle. Rab proteins Sec4 and Ypt11, receptors for essential transport of secretory vesicles and mitochondria, respectively, bind the same region on Myo2, yet Smy1 functions selectively in the transport of secretory vesicles. Thus a kinesin-related protein can function intimately with a myosin-V and its receptor in the transport of a specific cargo. PMID:27307583

  4. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J.; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N.; Bagchi, Milan K.; Bagchi, Indrani C.

    2015-01-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  5. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development.

    PubMed

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N; Bagchi, Milan K; Bagchi, Indrani C

    2015-08-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  6. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii Vps11, a subunit of HOPS and CORVET tethering complexes, is essential for the biogenesis of secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Pastore, Sandra; Berry, Laurence; Lebrun, Maryse; Daher, Wassim

    2015-08-01

    Apicomplexan parasites harbour unique secretory organelles (dense granules, rhoptries and micronemes) that play essential functions in host infection. Toxoplasma gondii parasites seem to possess an atypical endosome-like compartment, which contains an assortment of proteins that appear to be involved in vesicular sorting and trafficking towards secretory organelles. Recent studies highlighted the essential roles of many regulators such as Rab5A, Rab5C, sortilin-like receptor and syntaxin-6 in secretory organelle biogenesis. However, little is known about the protein complexes that recruit Rab-GTPases and SNAREs for membrane tethering in Apicomplexa. In mammals and yeast, transport, tethering and fusion of vesicles from early endosomes to lysosomes and the vacuole, respectively, are mediated by CORVET and HOPS complexes, both built on the same Vps-C core that includes Vps11 protein. Here, we show that a T. gondii Vps11 orthologue is essential for the biogenesis or proper subcellular localization of secretory organelle proteins. TgVps11 is a dynamic protein that associates with Golgi endosomal-related compartments, the vacuole and immature apical secretory organelles. Conditional knock-down of TgVps11 disrupts biogenesis of dense granules, rhoptries and micronemes. As a consequence, parasite motility, invasion, egress and intracellular growth are affected. This phenotype was confirmed with additional knock-down mutants of the HOPS complex. In conclusion, we show that apicomplexan parasites use canonical regulators of the endolysosome system to accomplish essential parasite-specific functions in the biogenesis of their unique secretory organelles.

  8. Calcium mediation of the pig jejunal secretory response.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Wong, P H; Maenz, D D

    1985-01-01

    The involvement of Ca++ ions as secretory mediators in pig jejunal epithelia has been investigated with an in vitro system. Omission of Ca++ from the Ringer-HCO3 bathing media on both sides of the tissue had minor effects on the basal electrical activity of pig jejunal mucosa. There were only slight decreases in transepithelial potential difference and increases in conductance with Ca++ free media. Low EGTA concentrations which reversibly blocked potential difference responses to secretory agents also had minimal effects on basal electrical activity. The in vitro secretory responses to A23187, to theophylline, and to Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin were all eliminated by Ca++ depletion and restored by replacing normal Ca++ concentrations in the bathing media. Dantrolene prevented the secretory response but not the potential difference increases caused by heat-stable enterotoxin and A23187, suggesting that intracellular Ca++ stores may be reservoirs of secretory signal agent. Verapamil only blocked the secretory response to heat-stable enterotoxin. Chlorpromazine had negligible effects on basal conditions, but totally blocked both the secretory response and the Ca++-dependent effects of A23187 and heat-stable enterotoxin on potential difference. The response to theophylline was only partially inhibited by chlorpromazine, implying some involvement of both cAMP and Ca++ as secretory signals for theophylline. Cytoplasmic Ca++ concentrations appear to be at least as important as cyclic nucleotides in regulating the secretory effects of pig jejunum. PMID:2410089

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