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Sample records for second-order reaction kinetics

  1. Power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-03-01

    The finite-time thermodynamic method based on probability analysis can more accurately describe various performance parameters of thermodynamic systems. Based on the relation between optimal efficiency and power output of a generalized Carnot heat engine with a finite high-temperature heat reservoir (heat source) and an infinite low-temperature heat reservoir (heat sink) and with the only irreversibility of heat transfer, this paper studies the problem of power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory, puts forward a model of the coupling heat engine which can be run periodically and obtains the effects of the finite-time thermodynamic characteristics of the coupling relation between chemical reaction and heat engine on the power optimization. The results show that the first order reaction kinetics model can use fuel more effectively, and can provide heat engine with higher temperature heat source to increase the power output of the heat engine. Moreover, the power fluctuation bounds of the chemically driven heat engine are obtained by using the probability analysis method. The results may provide some guidelines for the character analysis and power optimization of the chemically driven heat engines.

  2. Second-order kinetic Kohn-Sham lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solórzano, S.; Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we introduce a semi-implicit second-order correction scheme to the kinetic Kohn-Sham lattice model. This approach is validated by performing realistic exchange-correlation energy calculations of atoms and dimers of the first two rows of the Periodic Table, finding good agreement with the expected values. Additionally, we simulate the ethane molecule, where we recover the bond lengths and compare the results with standard methods. Finally, we discuss the current applicability of pseudopotentials within the lattice kinetic Kohn-Sham approach.

  3. The role of reduction extent of graphene oxide in the photocatalytic performance of Ag/AgX (X = Cl, Br)/rGO composites and the pseudo-second-order kinetics reaction nature of the Ag/AgBr system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiyin; Ran, Chenxin; Wang, Minqiang; Li, Le; Sun, Zhongwang; Yao, Xi

    2016-07-21

    Although reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based photocatalyst composites have been intensively developed during the past few years, the influence of reduction extent of rGO on the photocatalytic performance of the rGO-based composite has virtually not been investigated due to some technical limitations, such as the poor water dispersibility of rGO and low reduction selectivity of the hydrothermal method, which make it difficult to control the reduction extent of rGO in these composites. Herein, we used a facile room-temperature method to synthesize Ag/AgX (X = Cl, Br)/rGO photocatalyst composites as a model to study the effect of reduction extent of rGO on the photocatalytic performance of the photocatalyst. It was found that the photocatalytic activities of both Ag/AgCl/PrGO and Ag/AgBr/PrGO systems had an optimized threshold of the reduction extent of photoreduced GO (PrGO). More importantly, due to the different conductive band values of AgCl and AgBr, the optimized thresholds in the two systems were at different PrGO reduction extents, based on which we proposed that the favorable energy band matching between AgX and PrGO in the two systems played a crucial role in obtaining high photocatalysis performance. Besides, the photocatalytic reaction of the Ag/AgBr based system was confirmed to be a pseudo-second-order kinetics reaction rather than pseudo-first-order kinetics reaction. The new insights presented in this work provided useful information on the design and development of a more sophisticated photocatalyst, and can also be applied to many other applications. PMID:27332751

  4. An Example of Following Second-Order Kinetics by Simple Laboratory Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Gisela

    1976-01-01

    Describes a procedure for studying the kinetics of the second-order hydrolysis of ethylene bromohydrine in alkaline medium by incorporating a substance that changes color as one of the reacting components is depleted. (MLH)

  5. Second-order radio frequency kinetic theory revisited: Resolving inconsistency with conventional fluid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2013-08-15

    The second-order velocity distribution function was calculated from the second-order rf kinetic theory [Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 641 (2000)]. However, the nonresonant ponderomotive force in the radial direction derived from the theory is inconsistent with that from the fluid theory. The inconsistency arises from that the multiple-timescale-separation assumption fails when the second-order Vlasov equation is directly integrated along unperturbed particle orbits. A slowly ramped wave field including an adiabatic turn-on process is applied in the modified kinetic theory in this paper. Since this modification leads only to additional reactive/nonresonant response relevant with the secular resonant response from the previous kinetic theory, the correct nonresonant ponderomotive force can be obtained while all the resonant moments remain unchanged.

  6. Second order kinetic theory of parallel momentum transport in collisionless drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    A second order kinetic model for turbulent ion parallel momentum transport is presented. A new nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux term is calculated. The resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the momentum source, while the nonresonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force compensates for that of the nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux. The resonant component of the kinetic momentum flux can be divided into three parts, including the pinch term, the diffusive term, and the residual stress. By reassembling the pinch term and the residual stress, the residual stress can be considered as a pinch term of parallel wave-particle resonant velocity, and, therefore, may be called as "resonant velocity pinch" term. Considering the resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the transfer rate between resonant ions and waves (or, equivalently, nonresonant ions), a conservation equation of the parallel momentum of resonant ions and waves is obtained.

  7. Observation of second-order kinetic damage in sodium salicylate due to soft x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husk, D. E.; Tarrio, C.; Benitez, E. L.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1991-10-01

    We have observed the dose dependence of the bulk quantum efficiency for luminescence of sodium salicylate as a function of the photon energy from 7 to 150 eV. We show that the damage is a second-order or higher kinetic process in the number of electron-hole pairs and is not reversible. We predict that the threshold for damage occurs at 7.2 eV, or twice the band gap of sodium salicylate.

  8. Temporal Frequency Modulates Reaction Time Responses to First-Order and Second-Order Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Claire V.; Ledgeway, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal frequency and modulation depth on reaction times for discriminating the direction of first-order (luminance-defined) and second-order (contrast-defined) motion, equated for visibility using equal multiples of direction-discrimination threshold. Results showed that reaction times were heavily…

  9. Implementing the Second-Order Fermi Process in a Kinetic Monte-Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerlin, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    Kinetic Monte-Carlo test-particle simulations require a way to simulate the effects of turbulence on particles. One way to do this is to prescribe a phenomenological scattering mechanism based on an empirical and/or qualitative description of turbulent scattering. Previous incarnations of the simulation presented here parameterize a scattering mean free path proportional to some power of the particle’s momentum in agreement with observational evidence from many sources. The scattering itself was done by scattering of the particle’s local fluid frame velocity onto a sphere of radius |v| via either large of small angle scattering. However, in real plasmas the scattering centers (turbulent plasma waves) are not stationary in the local fluid frame and particle velocities should, instead, be randomized in the frame of the moving scattering centers (which presumably move with the Alfvén speed) to more accurately represent the effects of turbulence on particles. Allowing scattering centers to move introduces heating as particles now diffuse in momentum as well as space (receiving a random kick of order the Alfvén speed at each scattering event). In 1965, Eugene Parker considered this effect (then called fermi acceleration) for cosmic ray particles and (correctly) concluded that it was negligible for those highly energetic particles because the particle speed was so much larger than the Alfvén speed kick which it received. However, doing the same calculation for thermal particles embedded in the solar wind (for whom a single kick of an Alfvén speed is significant) yields a very different result and it becomes clear that this process, now called second-order Fermi acceleration, must be included to get an accurate picture of particle acceleration in the heliosphere. This presentation will highlight the theoretical argument for the importance of second-order fermi acceleration in both the solar wind and shock environs as well as problems in heliophysics to which it

  10. An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

    1983-01-01

    Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

  11. Structural changes of small amplitude kinetic Alfvén solitary waves due to second-order corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Cheong R.

    2015-10-15

    The structural changes of kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (KASWs) due to higher-order terms are investigated. While the first-order differential equation for KASWs provides the dispersion relation for kinetic Alfvén waves, the second-order differential equation describes the structural changes of the solitary waves due to higher-order nonlinearity. The reductive perturbation method is used to obtain the second-order and third-order partial differential equations; then, Kodama and Taniuti's technique [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45, 298 (1978)] is applied in order to remove the secularities in the third-order differential equations and derive a linear second-order inhomogeneous differential equation. The solution to this new second-order equation indicates that, as the amplitude increases, the hump-type Korteweg-de Vries solution is concentrated more around the center position of the soliton and that dip-type structures form near the two edges of the soliton. This result has a close relationship with the interpretation of the complex KASW structures observed in space with satellites.

  12. A second-order accurate kinetic-theory-based method for inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Suresh M.

    1986-01-01

    An upwind method for the numerical solution of the Euler equations is presented. This method, called the kinetic numerical method (KNM), is based on the fact that the Euler equations are moments of the Boltzmann equation of the kinetic theory of gases when the distribution function is Maxwellian. The KNM consists of two phases, the convection phase and the collision phase. The method is unconditionally stable and explicit. It is highly vectorizable and can be easily made total variation diminishing for the distribution function by a suitable choice of the interpolation strategy. The method is applied to a one-dimensional shock-propagation problem and to a two-dimensional shock-reflection problem.

  13. First- and Second-Order Stimuli Reaction Time Measures Are Highly Sensitive to Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    PubMed

    Piponnier, Jean-Claude; Forget, Robert; Gagnon, Isabelle; McKerral, Michelle; Giguère, Jean-François; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2016-01-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has subtle effects on several brain functions that can be difficult to assess and follow up. We investigated the impact of mTBI on the perception of sine-wave gratings defined by first- and second-order characteristics. Fifteen adults diagnosed with mTBI were assessed at 15 days, 3 months, and 12 months postinjury. Fifteen matched controls followed the same testing schedule. Reaction times (RTs) for flicker detection and motion direction discrimination were measured. Stimulus contrast of first- and second-order patterns was equated to control for visibility, and correct-response RT means, standard deviations (SDs), medians, and interquartile ranges (IQRs) were calculated. The level of symptoms was also evaluated to compare it to RT data. In general in mTBI, RTs were longer, and SDs as well as IQRs larger, than those of controls. In addition, mTBI participants' RTs to first-order stimuli were shorter than those to second-order stimuli, and SDs as well as IQRs larger for first- than for second-order stimuli in the motion condition. All these observations were made over the three sessions. The level of symptoms observed in mTBI was higher than that of control participants, and this difference did also persist up to 1 year after the brain injury, despite an improvement. The combination of RT measures with particular stimulus properties is a highly sensitive method for measuring mTBI-induced visuomotor anomalies and provides a fine probe of the underlying mechanisms when the brain is exposed to mild trauma.

  14. Impact of magnetohydrodynamics in bidirectional flow of nanofluid subject to second order slip velocity and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the steady three-dimensional boundary layer flow of viscous nanofluid. The flow is caused by a permeable stretching surface with second order velocity slip and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. Water is treated as base fluid and copper as nanoparticle. An incompressible fluid fills the porous space. The fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of an applied magnetic field. A system of ordinary differential equations is obtained by using suitable transformations. Convergent series solutions are derived. Impact of various pertinent parameters on the velocity, concentration and skin friction coefficient is discussed. Analysis of the obtained results shows that the flow field is influenced appreciably by the presence of velocity slip parameters. Also concentration distribution decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter.

  15. Evaluating rates and yields of second-order, photoinitiated reactions under conditons of Gaussian-profile excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Cambron, R.T.; Zhu, X.R.; Harris, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Under conditions of Gaussian radial profile excitation, a mixed-order kinetic model is used to interpret the rates and yields of photoinitiated reactions. This model is used to determine the triplet-triplet annihilation rate constant for benzophenone in acetonitrile and anthracene at room temperature. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Kinetics of solute adsorption at solid/solution interfaces: a theoretical development of the empirical pseudo-first and pseudo-second order kinetic rate equations, based on applying the statistical rate theory of interfacial transport.

    PubMed

    Rudzinski, Wladyslaw; Plazinski, Wojciech

    2006-08-24

    For practical applications of solid/solution adsorption processes, the kinetics of these processes is at least as much essential as their features at equilibrium. Meanwhile, the general understanding of this kinetics and its corresponding theoretical description are far behind the understanding and the level of theoretical interpretation of adsorption equilibria in these systems. The Lagergren empirical equation proposed at the end of 19th century to describe the kinetics of solute sorption at the solid/solution interfaces has been the most widely used kinetic equation until now. This equation has also been called the pseudo-first order kinetic equation because it was intuitively associated with the model of one-site occupancy adsorption kinetics governed by the rate of surface reaction. More recently, its generalization for the two-sites-occupancy adsorption was proposed and called the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation. However, the general use and the wide applicability of these empirical equations during more than one century have not resulted in a corresponding fundamental search for their theoretical origin. Here the first theoretical development of these equations is proposed, based on applying the new fundamental approach to kinetics of interfacial transport called the Statistical Rate Theory. It is shown that these empirical equations are simplified forms of a more general equation developed here, for the case when the adsorption kinetics is governed by the rate of surface reactions. The features of that general equation are shown by presenting exhaustive model investigations, and the applicability of that equation is tested by presenting a quantitative analysis of some experimental data reported in the literature.

  17. Free [ADP] and aerobic muscle work follow at least second order kinetics in rat gastrocnemius in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cieslar, J H; Dobson, G P

    2000-03-01

    The relationship between free cytosolic [ADP] (and [P(i)]) and steady-state aerobic muscle work in rat gastrocnemius muscle in vivo using (31)P NMR was investigated. Anesthetized rats were ventilated and placed in a custom-built cradle fitted with a force transducer that could be placed into a 7-tesla NMR magnet. Muscle work was induced by supramaximal sciatic nerve stimulation that activated all fibers. Muscles were stimulated at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0, and 2.0 Hz until twitch force, phosphocreatine, and P(i) were unchanged between two consecutive spectra acquired in 4-min blocks (8-12 min). Parallel bench experiments were performed to measure total tissue glycogen, lactate, total creatine, and pyruvate in freeze-clamped muscles after 10 min of stimulation at each frequency. Up to 0.5 Hz, there was no significant change in muscle glycogen, lactate, and the lactate/pyruvate ratios between 8-12 min. At 0.8 Hz, there was a 17% fall in glycogen and a 65% rise in the muscle lactate with a concomitant fall in pH. Above this frequency, glycogen fell rapidly, lactate continued to rise, and ATP and pH declined. On the basis of these force and metabolic measurements, we estimated the maximal mitochondrial capacity (V(max)) to be 0.8 Hz. Free [ADP] was then calculated at each submaximal workload from measuring all the reactants of the creatine kinase equilibrium after adjusting the K'(CK) to the muscle temp (30 degrees C), pH, and pMg. We show that ADP (and P(i)) and tension-time integral follow a Hill relationship with at least a second order function. The K(0.5) values for free [ADP] and [P(i)] were 48 microM and 9 mM, respectively. Our data did not fit any form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. We therefore conclude that free cytosolic [ADP] and [P(i)] could potentially control steady-state oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle in vivo. PMID:10692403

  18. Fractal reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, R

    1988-09-23

    Classical reaction kinetics has been found to be unsatisfactory when the reactants are spatially constrained on the microscopic level by either walls, phase boundaries, or force fields. Recently discovered theories of heterogeneous reaction kinetics have dramatic consequences, such as fractal orders for elementary reactions, self-ordering and self-unmixing of reactants, and rate coefficients with temporal "memories." The new theories were needed to explain the results of experiments and supercomputer simulations of reactions that were confined to low dimensions or fractal dimensions or both. Among the practical examples of "fractal-like kinetics" are chemical reactions in pores of membranes, excitation trapping in molecular aggregates, exciton fusion in composite materials, and charge recombination in colloids and clouds.

  19. Quantitative fluorescence kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma using three- and four-way calibration methods capable of providing the second-order advantage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chao; Wu, Hai-Long; Zhou, Chang; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-03-01

    The metabolic coenzymes reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the primary electron donor and acceptor respectively, participate in almost all biological metabolic pathways. This study develops a novel method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma containing an uncalibrated interferent, by using three-way calibration based on multi-way fluorescence technique. In the three-way analysis, by using the calibration set in a static manner, we directly predicted the concentrations of both analytes in the mixture at any time after the start of their reactions, even in the presence of an uncalibrated spectral interferent and a varying background interferent. The satisfactory quantitative results indicate that the proposed method allows one to directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the mixture as the function of time in real-time and nondestructively, instead of determining the concentration after the analytical separation. Thereafter, we fitted the first-order rate law to their concentration data throughout their reactions. Additionally, a four-way calibration procedure is developed as an alternative for highly collinear systems. The results of the four-way analysis confirmed the results of the three-way analysis and revealed that both the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma fit the first-order rate law. The proposed methods could be expected to provide promising tools for simultaneous kinetic analysis of multiple reactions in complex systems in real-time and nondestructively. PMID:26873466

  20. Second-Order Algebraic Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Marcelo; Mahmoud, Ola

    Fiore and Hur [10] recently introduced a conservative extension of universal algebra and equational logic from first to second order. Second-order universal algebra and second-order equational logic respectively provide a model theory and a formal deductive system for languages with variable binding and parameterised metavariables. This work completes the foundations of the subject from the viewpoint of categorical algebra. Specifically, the paper introduces the notion of second-order algebraic theory and develops its basic theory. Two categorical equivalences are established: at the syntactic level, that of second-order equational presentations and second-order algebraic theories; at the semantic level, that of second-order algebras and second-order functorial models. Our development includes a mathematical definition of syntactic translation between second-order equational presentations. This gives the first formalisation of notions such as encodings and transforms in the context of languages with variable binding.

  1. Reanalysis of Rate Data for the Reaction CH3 + CH3 → C2H6 Using Revised Cross Sections and a Linearized Second-Order Master Equation.

    PubMed

    Blitz, M A; Green, N J B; Shannon, R J; Pilling, M J; Seakins, P W; Western, C M; Robertson, S H

    2015-07-16

    Rate coefficients for the CH3 + CH3 reaction, over the temperature range 300-900 K, have been corrected for errors in the absorption coefficients used in the original publication ( Slagle et al., J. Phys. Chem. 1988 , 92 , 2455 - 2462 ). These corrections necessitated the development of a detailed model of the B̃(2)A1' (3s)-X̃(2)A2″ transition in CH3 and its validation against both low temperature and high temperature experimental absorption cross sections. A master equation (ME) model was developed, using a local linearization of the second-order decay, which allows the use of standard matrix diagonalization methods for the determination of the rate coefficients for CH3 + CH3. The ME model utilized inverse Laplace transformation to link the microcanonical rate constants for dissociation of C2H6 to the limiting high pressure rate coefficient for association, k∞(T); it was used to fit the experimental rate coefficients using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to minimize χ(2) calculated from the differences between experimental and calculated rate coefficients. Parameters for both k∞(T) and for energy transfer ⟨ΔE⟩down(T) were varied and optimized in the fitting procedure. A wide range of experimental data were fitted, covering the temperature range 300-2000 K. A high pressure limit of k∞(T) = 5.76 × 10(-11)(T/298 K)(-0.34) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained, which agrees well with the best available theoretical expression.

  2. Relation of Turbojet and Ramjet Combustion Efficiency to Second-Order Reaction Kinetics and Fundamental Flame Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, J Howard; Reynolds, Thaine W; Graves, Charles C

    1957-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the turbojet and ramjet combustion process are summarized and the resulting equations are applied to experimental data obtained from various combustor tests. The theoretical treatment assumes that one step in the over-all chain of processes which constitute jet-engine combustion is sufficiently slow to be the rate-controlling step that determines combustion efficiency.

  3. Local reaction kinetics by imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchorski, Yuri; Rupprechter, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution we present an overview of our recent studies using the "kinetics by imaging" approach for CO oxidation on heterogeneous model systems. The method is based on the correlation of the PEEM image intensity with catalytic activity: scaled down to the μm-sized surface regions, such correlation allows simultaneous local kinetic measurements on differently oriented individual domains of a polycrystalline metal-foil, including the construction of local kinetic phase diagrams. This allows spatially- and component-resolved kinetic studies and, e.g., a direct comparison of inherent catalytic properties of Pt(hkl)- and Pd(hkl)-domains or supported μm-sized Pd-powder agglomerates, studies of the local catalytic ignition and the role of defects and grain boundaries in the local reaction kinetics.

  4. Second-Order Footsteps Illusions.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Akiyoshi; Anstis, Stuart

    2015-12-01

    In the "footsteps illusion", light and dark squares travel at constant speed across black and white stripes. The squares appear to move faster and slower as their contrast against the stripes varies. We now demonstrate some second-order footsteps illusions, in which all edges are defined by colors or textures-even though luminance-based neural motion detectors are blind to such edges. PMID:27551366

  5. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  6. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  7. Aqueous-phase chemistry and bactericidal effects from an air discharge plasma in contact with water: evidence for the formation of peroxynitrite through a pseudo-second-order post-discharge reaction of H2O2 and HNO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, P.; Dolezalova, E.; Sisrova, I.; Clupek, M.

    2014-02-01

    The formation of transient species (OH·, NO2·, NO radicals) and long-lived chemical products (O3, H2O2, NO_{3}^{-} , NO_{2}^{-} ) produced by a gas discharge plasma at the gas-liquid interface and directly in the liquid was measured in dependence on the gas atmosphere (20% oxygen mixtures with nitrogen or with argon) and pH of plasma-treated water (controlled by buffers at pH 3.3, 6.9 or 10.1). The aqueous-phase chemistry and specific contributions of these species to the chemical and biocidal effects of air discharge plasma in water were evaluated using phenol as a chemical probe and bacteria Escherichia coli. The nitrated and nitrosylated products of phenol (4-nitrophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrocatechol, 4-nitrosophenol) in addition to the hydroxylated products (catechol, hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone) evidenced formation of NO2·, NO· and OH· radicals and NO+ ions directly by the air plasma at the gas-liquid interface and through post-discharge processes in plasma-activated water (PAW) mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOOH). Kinetic study of post-discharge evolution of H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} in PAW has demonstrated excellent fit with the pseudo-second-order reaction between H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} . The third-order rate constant k = 1.1 × 103 M-2 s-1 for the reaction NO_{2}^{-} +H_{2}O_{2}+H^{+}\\to ONOOH+H_{2}O was determined in PAW at pH 3.3 with the rate of ONOOH formation in the range 10-8-10-9 M s-1. Peroxynitrite chemistry was shown to significantly participate in the antibacterial properties of PAW. Ozone presence in PAW was proved indirectly by pH-dependent degradation of phenol and detection of cis,cis-muconic acid, but contribution of ozone to the inactivation of bacteria by the air plasma was negligible.

  8. Modelling reaction kinetics inside cells

    PubMed Central

    Grima, Ramon; Schnell, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in molecular biology such as the development of non-invasive single molecule imaging techniques have given us a window into the intricate biochemical activities that occur inside cells. In this article we review four distinct theoretical and simulation frameworks: (1) non-spatial and deterministic, (2) spatial and deterministic, (3) non-spatial and stochastic and (4) spatial and stochastic. Each framework can be suited to modelling and interpreting intracellular reaction kinetics. By estimating the fundamental length scales, one can roughly determine which models are best suited for the particular reaction pathway under study. We discuss differences in prediction between the four modelling methodologies. In particular we show that taking into account noise and space does not simply add quantitative predictive accuracy but may also lead to qualitatively different physiological predictions, unaccounted for by classical deterministic models. PMID:18793122

  9. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) study of N(2D) + H2O reaction paths on D1 and D0 potential energy surfaces: Direct and roaming pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isegawa, Miho; Liu, Fengyi; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    We report reaction paths starting from N(2D) + H2O for doublet spin states, D0 and D1. The potential energy surfaces are explored in an automated fashion using the global reaction route mapping strategy. The critical points and reaction paths have been fully optimized at the complete active space second order perturbation theory level taking all valence electrons in the active space. In addition to direct dissociation pathways that would be dominant, three roaming processes, two roaming dissociation, and one roaming isomerization: (1) H2ON → H-O(H)N → H-HON → NO(2Π) + H2, (2) cis-HNOH → HNO-H → H-HNO → NO + H2, (3) H2NO → H-HNO → HNO-H → trans-HNOH, are confirmed on the D0 surface.

  10. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) study of N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2}O reaction paths on D{sub 1} and D{sub 0} potential energy surfaces: Direct and roaming pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Isegawa, Miho; Liu, Fengyi; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-10-21

    We report reaction paths starting from N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2}O for doublet spin states, D{sub 0} and D{sub 1}. The potential energy surfaces are explored in an automated fashion using the global reaction route mapping strategy. The critical points and reaction paths have been fully optimized at the complete active space second order perturbation theory level taking all valence electrons in the active space. In addition to direct dissociation pathways that would be dominant, three roaming processes, two roaming dissociation, and one roaming isomerization: (1) H{sub 2}ON → H–O(H)N → H–HON → NO({sup 2}Π) + H{sub 2}, (2) cis-HNOH → HNO–H → H–HNO → NO + H{sub 2}, (3) H{sub 2}NO → H–HNO → HNO–H → trans-HNOH, are confirmed on the D{sub 0} surface.

  11. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  12. Reaction kinetics and transformation of antipyrine chlorination with free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Quan; Feng, Li; Jiang, Jin; Qi, Fei; Zhang, Li-Qiu

    2013-05-15

    Chlorine has been documented that it can effectively remove some pharmaceuticals. Recently, new active oxidants chlorine monoxide and molecular chlorine, which exist as free active chlorine in solution, were reported during pharmaceuticals chlorination. In this study, reaction kinetics, active oxidants, and transformation products during antipyrine chlorination were investigated with batch experiments. The reaction orders in [chlorine] were determined at various pH (6.53-7.62) and ranged from 1.13 ± 0.15 to 1.59 ± 0.08, which indicated that antipyrine chlorination is the concurrent existence of reactions appearing first-order and second-order in [chlorine]. The results by varying solution conditions (solution pH, chloride, ionic strength, and buffer concentration) show that chlorine monoxide and molecular chlorine play significant roles during the process of antipyrine chlorination. With kinetics modeling, the second-order rate constants for hypochlorous acid, chlorine monoxide, and molecular chlorine were obtained at 25 ± 2 °C (units: M(-1) s(-1)): kHOCl = 3.23 × 10(3), kCL2 = 2.86 × 10(7), kCL2O= 8.38 × 10(9) (R(2) = 0.9801). At pH 7, hypochlorous acid and chlorine monoxide are the main contributors to the degradation of antipyrine, about 80% and 20%, respectively (calculated by kHOCl, kCL2 and kCL2O. By applying these rate constants to predict the antipyrine elimination in real water matrixes (surface water, ground water), a good agreement was obtained, particularly in ground water. Moreover, liquid chromatography-tandems mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used for products identification. Two main intermediate products and three stable products were observed during the process of antipyrine chlorination. The possible routes for antipyrine chlorination were proposed, which mainly consisted of halogenations, dealkylations and hydroxylations.

  13. An Analysis of Second-Order Autoshaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-Robinson, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Three mechanisms can explain second-order conditioning: (1) The second-order conditioned stimulus (CS2) could activate a representation of the first-order conditioned stimulus (CS1), thereby provoking the conditioned response (CR); The CS2 could enter into an excitatory association with either (2) the representation governing the CR, or (3) with a…

  14. Using of "pseudo-second-order model" in adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2014-01-01

    A research paper's contribution exists not only in its originality and creativity but also in its continuity and development for research that follows. However, the author easily ignores it. Citation error and quotation error occurred very frequently in a scientific paper. Numerous researchers use secondary references without knowing the original idea from authors. Sulaymon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:3011-3023, 2013) and Spiridon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6367-6381, 2013) presented wrong pseudo-second-order models in Environmental Science and Pollution Research, vol. 20. This comment pointed the errors of the kinetic models and offered information for citing original idea of pseudo-second-order kinetic expression. In order to stop the proliferation of the mistake, it is suggested to cite the original paper for the kinetic model which provided greater accuracy and more details about the kinetic expression.

  15. Unraveling reaction pathways and specifying reaction kinetics for complex systems.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve a complex set of competing reactions that include several different species. Detailed kinetic modeling of such systems can shed light on the important pathways involved in various transformations and therefore can be used to optimize the process conditions for the desired product composition and properties. This review focuses on elucidating the various components involved in modeling the kinetics of pyrolysis and oxidation of polymers. The elementary free radical steps that constitute the chain reaction mechanism of gas-phase/nonpolar liquid-phase processes are outlined. Specification of the rate coefficients of the various reaction families, which is central to the theme of kinetics, is described. Construction of the reaction network on the basis of the types of end groups and reactive moieties in a polymer chain is discussed. Modeling frameworks based on the method of moments and kinetic Monte Carlo are evaluated using illustrations. Finally, the prospects and challenges in modeling biomass conversion are addressed.

  16. Rapid biocatalytic polytransesterification: Reaction kinetics in an exothermic reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, A.K.; Beckman, E.J.; Russell, A.J.

    1998-08-20

    Biocatalytic polytransesterification at high concentrations of monomers proceeds rapidly and is accompanied by an increase in the temperature of the reaction mixture due to liberation of heat of reaction during the initial phase. The authors have used principles of reaction calorimetry to monitor the kinetics of polymerization during this initial phase, thus relating the temperature to the extent of polymerization. Rate of polymerization increases with the concentration of monomers. This is also reflected by the increase in the temperature of the reaction mixture. Using time-temperature-conversion contours, a differential method of kinetic analysis was used to calculate the energy of activation ({approximately} 15.1 Kcal/mol).

  17. Second-order corrected Hadamard formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epele, L. N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Canal, C. A. García

    1985-08-01

    The second-order correction to the Hadamard formulas for the Green's function, harmonic measures, and period matrix of a two-dimensional domain is obtained in the context of the domain-variational theory.

  18. Modeling the enzyme kinetic reaction.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2015-09-01

    The Enzymatic control reactions model was presented within the scope of fractional calculus. In order to accommodate the usual initial conditions, the fractional derivative used is in Caputo sense. The methodologies of the three analytical methods were used to derive approximate solution of the fractional nonlinear system of differential equations. Two methods use integral operator and the other one uses just an integral. Numerical results obtained exhibit biological behavior of real world problem.

  19. Selfishness as second-order altruism.

    PubMed

    Eldakar, Omar Tonsi; Wilson, David Sloan

    2008-05-13

    Selfishness is seldom considered a group-beneficial strategy. In the typical evolutionary formulation, altruism benefits the group, selfishness undermines altruism, and the purpose of the model is to identify mechanisms, such as kinship or reciprocity, that enable altruism to evolve. Recent models have explored punishment as an important mechanism favoring the evolution of altruism, but punishment can be costly to the punisher, making it a form of second-order altruism. This model identifies a strategy called "selfish punisher" that involves behaving selfishly in first-order interactions and altruistically in second-order interactions by punishing other selfish individuals. Selfish punishers cause selfishness to be a self-limiting strategy, enabling altruists to coexist in a stable equilibrium. This polymorphism can be regarded as a division of labor, or mutualism, in which the benefits obtained by first-order selfishness help to "pay" for second-order altruism. PMID:18448681

  20. Kinetics of reactions at an interface: functionalisation of silicate glass with porphyrins via covalent bonds.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Furuta, Nao; Mizutani, Tadashi

    2015-03-21

    Porphyrins carrying either a primary alcohol, a tertiary alcohol or a primary bromide linker group were allowed to react with the surface silanol groups on silicate glass thermally at 80-240 °C to obtain a monolayer film. The kinetics of the reaction was analysed based on the pseudo-second order equation. The tertiary alcohol and the primary bromide reacted much slower than the primary alcohol. Arrhenius plots indicated that higher activation energies can account for the slower reaction of both tertiary alcohol and primary bromide linkers. The introduction of six dodecyl chains into hydroxyporphyrin accelerated the anchoring reaction by a factor of 50 owing to the larger frequency factor of the reaction, demonstrating that the dynamics of the interface is one of the dominant factors regulating the reaction kinetics.

  1. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  2. Nine Practices of Second Order Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bill; Tucker, Patrick; Williams, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Many schools are in some stage of implementing differentiated instruction, with some already in what Carol Tomlinson describes in "The Differentiated School" as "second order change," where the entire school practices differentiation. In high-performing schools, differentiation has proved to be an effective instructional strategy; in classroom…

  3. Unraveling reaction pathways and specifying reaction kinetics for complex systems.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve a complex set of competing reactions that include several different species. Detailed kinetic modeling of such systems can shed light on the important pathways involved in various transformations and therefore can be used to optimize the process conditions for the desired product composition and properties. This review focuses on elucidating the various components involved in modeling the kinetics of pyrolysis and oxidation of polymers. The elementary free radical steps that constitute the chain reaction mechanism of gas-phase/nonpolar liquid-phase processes are outlined. Specification of the rate coefficients of the various reaction families, which is central to the theme of kinetics, is described. Construction of the reaction network on the basis of the types of end groups and reactive moieties in a polymer chain is discussed. Modeling frameworks based on the method of moments and kinetic Monte Carlo are evaluated using illustrations. Finally, the prospects and challenges in modeling biomass conversion are addressed. PMID:22468596

  4. Reaction Kinetics of Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Kendra; Zerda, T. W.

    2006-10-01

    Nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) is of interest particularly for use in nanocomposites that demonstrate high hardness as well as for use in semiconductor applications. Reaction kinetics studies of solid-solid reactions are relatively recent and present a method of determining the reaction mechanism and activation energy by measuring reaction rates. We have used induction heating to heat quickly, thus reducing the error in reaction time measurements. Data will be presented for reactions using silicon nanopowder (< 30 nm) and carbon multi-walled nanotubes with diameter 60 - 100 nm at five different temperatures below the melting point of silicon. Using the well-known Avrami-Erofeev model, a two-parameter chi- square fit of the data provided a rate constant (k) and parameter (n), related to the reaction mechanism, for each temperature. From these data, an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol was calculated. In addition, the parameter n suggests the reaction mechanism, which will also be discussed. Experiments are continuing at higher temperatures to consider the liquid- solid reaction as well.

  5. Beyond special relativity at second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, J. M.; Cortés, J. L.; Relancio, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    The study of generic, nonlinear, deformations of special relativity parametrized by a high-energy scale M , which was carried out at first order in 1 /M in J. M. Carmona, J. L. Cortés, and F. Mercati, Phys. Rev. D 86, 084032 (2012), is extended to second order. This can be done systematically through a ("generalized") change of variables from momentum variables that transform linearly. We discuss the different perspectives on the meaning of the change of variables, obtain the coefficients of modified composition laws and Lorentz transformations at second order, and work out how κ -Poincaré, the most commonly used example in the literature, is reproduced as a particular case of the generic framework exposed here.

  6. Calculating Second-Order Effects in MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John A.; Coss, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of mathematical models includes second-order effects in n-channel, enhancement-mode, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). When dimensions of circuit elements relatively large, effects neglected safely. However, as very-large-scale integration of microelectronic circuits leads to MOSFET's shorter or narrower than 2 micrometer, effects become significant in design and operation. Such computer programs as widely-used "Simulation Program With Integrated Circuit Emphasis, Version 2" (SPICE 2) include many of these effects. In second-order models of n-channel, enhancement-mode MOSFET, first-order gate-depletion region diminished by triangular-cross-section deletions on end and augmented by circular-wedge-cross-section bulges on sides.

  7. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  8. Manganese peroxidase from the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Transient state kinetics and reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Gold, M.H. ); Dunford, H.B.; MacDonald, I.D. )

    1989-02-25

    Stopped-flow techniques were used to investigate the kinetics of the formation of manganese peroxidase compound I (MnPI) and of the reactions of MnPI and manganese peroxidase compound II (MnPII) with p-cresol and Mn{sup II}. All of the rate data were obtained from single turnover experiments under pseudo-first order conditions. In the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} the formation of MnPI is independent of pH over the range 3.12-8.29 with a second-order rate constant of (2.0{+-}0.1) {times} 10{sup 6} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The activation energy for MnPI formation is 20 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. MnPI formation also occurs with organic peroxides such as peracetic acid, m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid, and p-nitroperoxybenzoic acid with second-order rate constants of 9.7 x 10{sup 5}, 9.5 {times} 10{sup 4}, and 5.9 {times} 10{sup 4} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactions of MnPI and MnPII with p-cresol strictly obeyed second-order kinetics. The second-order rate constant for the reaction of MnPII with p-cresol is extremely low, (9.5{+-}0.5) m{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Kinetic analysis of the reaction of Mn{sup II} with MnPI and MnPII showed a binding interaction with the oxidized enzymes which led to saturation kinetics. The first-order dissociation rate constants for the reaction of Mn{sup II} with MnPI and MnPII are (0.7{+-}0.1) and (0.14{+-}0.01) s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, when the reaction is conducted in lactate buffer. Rate constants are considerably lower when the reactions are conducted in succinate buffer. Single turnover experiments confirmed that Mn{sup II} serves as an obligatory substrate for MnPII and that both oxidized forms of the enzyme form productive complexes with Mn{sup II}. Finally, these results suggest the {alpha}-hydroxy acids such as lactate facilitate the dissociation of Mn{sup II} from the enzyme.

  9. Second-order coherence of supercontinuum light.

    PubMed

    Genty, Goëry; Surakka, Minna; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T

    2010-09-15

    We analyze the coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in photonic crystal fibers by applying the second-order coherence theory of nonstationary light. Using an ensemble of simulated realizations, we construct two-frequency cross-spectral density and two-time mutual coherence functions. This allows us to introduce measures of temporal and spectral coherence. We show that, in the long-pulse regime, supercontinuum light can be decomposed into a sum of coherent and quasi-stationary contributions. Our approach and findings are also applicable in the short-pulse regime. PMID:20847777

  10. Robust stability of second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a robust control design using strictly positive realness for second-order dynamic systems. The robust strictly positive real controller allows the system to be stabilized with only acceleration measurements. An important property of this design is that stabilization of the system is independent of the system parameters. The control design connects a virtual system to the given plant. The combined system is positive real regardless of system parameter uncertainty. Then any strictly positive real controllers can be used to achieve robust stability. A spring-mass system example and its computer simulations are presented to demonstrate this controller design.

  11. Kinetic analysis of complex reactions using FEMLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-06-07

    A finite element method software FEMALB has been implemented to the kinetic analysis of complex reaction systems. The established protocol provides fast solutions to the coupled differential-algebraic equations. It shows significant advantages over the conventional coding process with the standard implicit Runge-Kutta (IRK) method. The accuracy and high efficiency have been demonstrated in the simulation of the reaction processes such as glucose/fructose hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of gasoil. As model validation, the numerical results showed satisfactory agreement with the exact solutions. With the powerful capability of solving large matrixes of differential equations (both ODE and PDE) with nonlinear algebraic constrains, such an algorithm has greatly reduced the coding labor in reaction mechanistic studies and provided a unique tool in reactor design and optimization.

  12. Spectroscopy and reaction kinetics of HCO

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yili

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of the C-H stretching fundamental of HCO has been studied by means of infrared flash kinetic spectroscopy. HCO was generated by flash photolysis of acetaldehyde or formaldehyde using a 308 nm (XeCl) excimer laser. The transient absorption was probed with an infrared difference frequency laser system. The high resolution spectra obtained were assigned and fitted with rotational, spin-rotational, and centrifugal distortion constants. The ..nu../sub 1/ band origin is 2434.48 cm/sup /minus/1/. New ground state constants have been derived from a least-squares fit combining the ..nu../sub 1/ data with previous microwave and FIR LMR measurements. A new set of spectroscopic constants for the (1, 0, 0) state, the equilibrium rotational constants, and the orientation of the transition dipole moment are also reported. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HCO + NO/sub 2/ reaction have been studied using visible and infrared laser flash kinetic spectroscopy. The rate constant for the disappearance of HCO radical at 296 K is (5.7 +- 0.9) /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ cm/sup 3/ molec/sup /minus/1/ sec/sup /minus/1/, and it is independent of the pressure of SF/sub 6/ buffer gas up to 700 torr. Less than 10% of the reaction goes through the most exothermic product channel, HNO + CO/sub 2/. The product channel, H + CO/sub 2/ + NO, is responsible for 52% of the reaction. HONO has been observed, though not quantitatively, as a reaction product corresponding to the HONO + CO channel. 51 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Kinetic features of an intraresin reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.; Kirszensztejn, P.; Bolikal, D.; Regen, S.L.

    1983-03-23

    The kinetic features of the intraresin displacement by pendant ammonium acetate groups on chloromethylated polystrene have been investigated as a function of temperature, swelling solvent, and cross-link density. In all cases, intraresin displacement proceeds with a rapid initial rate followed by a very slow stage; the latter represents that fraction of reactants which become ''kinetically isolated''. The free energy of activation for the first stage, under the various swelling conditions used, lies in the range 24.4-26.8 kcal mol/sup -1/, which is similar to that found for analogous homogeneous reactions. The absolute rates measured for the homogeneous and the initial intraresin displacement in dioxane were similar; with n-hexane and toluene as solvents, polymeric rates were considerably slower than those of their homogeneous counterparts. Intraresin displacement was rapid even when a poor swelling solvent (n-hexane) was used. As the rate of intrapolymeric reaction decreased (through a decrease in temperature, increase in cross-link density, or change in solvent), the percent of ''kinetical isolated'' sites increased.

  14. Kinetics of rouleau formation. II. Reversible reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, R W; Perelson, A S

    1984-01-01

    Red blood cells aggregate face-to-face to form long, cylindrical, straight chains and sometimes branched structures called rouleaux. Here we extend a kinetic model developed by R. W. Samsel and A. S. Perelson (1982, Biophys. J. 37:493-514) to include both the formation and dissociation of rouleaux. We examine thermodynamic constraints on the rate constants of the model imposed by the principle of detailed balance. Incorporation of reverse reactions allows us to compute mean sizes of rouleaux and straight chain segments within rouleaux, as functions of time and at equilibrium. Using the Flory - Stockmayer method from polymer chemistry, we obtain a closed-form solution for the size distribution of straight chain segments within rouleaux at any point in the evolution of the reaction. The predictions of our theory compare favorably with data collected by D. Kernick , A.W.L. Jay , S. Rowlands , and L. Skibo (1973, Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 51:690-699) on the kinetics of rouleau formation. When rouleaux grow large, they may contain rings or loops and take on the appearance of a network. We demonstrate the importance of including the kinetics of ring closure in the development of realistic models of rouleaux formation. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 13 PMID:6426540

  15. Understanding Arsenate Reaction Kinetics with Ferric Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James; Chaudhary, Binod K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding arsenic reactions with ferric hydroxides is important in understanding arsenic transport in the environment and in designing systems for removing arsenic from potable water. Many experimental studies have shown that the kinetics of arsenic adsorption on ferric hydroxides is biphasic, where a fraction of the arsenic adsorption occurs on a time scale of seconds while full equilibrium may require weeks to attain. This research employed density functional theory modeling in order to understand the mechanisms contributing to biphasic arsenic adsorption kinetics. The reaction energies and activation barriers for three modes of arsenate adsorption to ferric hydroxides were calculated. Gibbs free energies of reaction depended on the net charge of the complexes, which is a function of the system pH value. Physical adsorption of arsenate to ferric hydroxide proceeded with no activation barrier, with Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −21 to −58 kJ/mol. The highest Gibbs free energies of reaction for physical adsorption resulted from negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding between H atoms on the ferric hydroxide and O atoms in arsenate. The conversion of physically adsorbed arsenate into monodentate surface complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 62 to 73 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −23 to −38 kJ/mol. The conversion of monodentate surface complexes to bidentate, binuclear complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 79 to 112 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −11 to −55 kJ/mol. For release of arsenate from uncharged bidentate complexes, energies of activation as high as 167 kJ/mol were encountered. Increasingly negative charges on the complexes lowered the activation barriers for desorption of arsenate, and in complexes with −2 charges, the highest activation barrier was 65 kJ/mol. This study shows that the slow kinetics associated with arsenic

  16. First- and second-order Poisson spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, William R.; Shirley, Eric L.; Migdall, Alan L.; Polyakov, Sergey V.; Hendrix, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    Although Thomas Young is generally given credit for being the first to provide evidence against Newton's corpuscular theory of light, it was Augustin Fresnel who first stated the modern theory of diffraction. We review the history surrounding Fresnel's 1818 paper and the role of the Poisson spot in the associated controversy. We next discuss the boundary-diffraction-wave approach to calculating diffraction effects and show how it can reduce the complexity of calculating diffraction patterns. We briefly discuss a generalization of this approach that reduces the dimensionality of integrals needed to calculate the complete diffraction pattern of any order diffraction effect. We repeat earlier demonstrations of the conventional Poisson spot and discuss an experimental setup for demonstrating an analogous phenomenon that we call a "second-order Poisson spot." Several features of the diffraction pattern can be explained simply by considering the path lengths of singly and doubly bent paths and distinguishing between first- and second-order diffraction effects related to such paths, respectively.

  17. Robust stability of second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C.-H.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown recently how virtual passive controllers can be designed for second-order dynamic systems to achieve robust stability. The virtual controllers were visualized as systems made up of spring, mass and damping elements. In this paper, a new approach emphasizing on the notion of positive realness to the same second-order dynamic systems is used. Necessary and sufficient conditions for positive realness are presented for scalar spring-mass-dashpot systems. For multi-input multi-output systems, we show how a mass-spring-dashpot system can be made positive real by properly choosing its output variables. In particular, sufficient conditions are shown for the system without output velocity. Furthermore, if velocity cannot be measured then the system parameters must be precise to keep the system positive real. In practice, system parameters are not always constant and cannot be measured precisely. Therefore, in order to be useful positive real systems must be robust to some degrees. This can be achieved with the design presented in this paper.

  18. Slowly rotating scalar field wormholes: The second order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, S. V.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss rotating wormholes in general relativity with a scalar field with negative kinetic energy. To solve the problem, we use the assumption about slow rotation. The role of a small dimensionless parameter plays the ratio of the linear velocity of rotation of the wormhole's throat and the velocity of light. We construct the rotating wormhole solution in the second-order approximation with respect to the small parameter. The analysis shows that the asymptotical mass of the rotating wormhole is greater than that of the nonrotating one, and the null energy condition violation in the rotating wormhole spacetime is weaker than that in the nonrotating one.

  19. Second-order (2 +1 ) -dimensional anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazow, Dennis; Heinz, Ulrich; Strickland, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We present a complete formulation of second-order (2 +1 ) -dimensional anisotropic hydrodynamics. The resulting framework generalizes leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics by allowing for deviations of the one-particle distribution function from the spheroidal form assumed at leading order. We derive complete second-order equations of motion for the additional terms in the macroscopic currents generated by these deviations from their kinetic definition using a Grad-Israel-Stewart 14-moment ansatz. The result is a set of coupled partial differential equations for the momentum-space anisotropy parameter, effective temperature, the transverse components of the fluid four-velocity, and the viscous tensor components generated by deviations of the distribution from spheroidal form. We then perform a quantitative test of our approach by applying it to the case of one-dimensional boost-invariant expansion in the relaxation time approximation (RTA) in which case it is possible to numerically solve the Boltzmann equation exactly. We demonstrate that the second-order anisotropic hydrodynamics approach provides an excellent approximation to the exact (0+1)-dimensional RTA solution for both small and large values of the shear viscosity.

  20. Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions: Extracts from Volume I, Diffusion and Slowing Down of Neutrons: Chapter I. Elementary Theory of Neutron Diffusion. Chapter II. Second Order Diffusion Theory. Chapter III. Slowing Down of Neutrons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1951-05-15

    The large scale release of nuclear energy in a uranium fission chain reaction involves two essentially distinct physical phenomena. On the one hand there are the individual nuclear processes such as fission, neutron capture, and neutron scattering. These are essentially quantum mechanical in character, and their theory is non-classical. On the other hand, there is the process of diffusion -- in particular, diffusion of neutrons, which is of fundamental importance in a nuclear chain reaction. This process is classical; insofar as the theory of the nuclear chain reaction depends on the theory of neutron diffusion, the mathematical study of chain reactions is an application of classical, not quantum mechanical, techniques.

  1. Reaction kinetics of dolomite rim growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Abart, R.; Morales, L. F. G.; Rhede, D.; Jeřábek, P.; Dresen, G.

    2014-04-01

    Reaction rims of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) were produced by solid-state reactions at the contacts of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals at 400 MPa pressure, 750-850 °C temperature, and 3-146 h annealing time to determine the reaction kinetics. The dolomite reaction rims show two different microstructural domains. Elongated palisades of dolomite grew perpendicular into the MgCO3 interface with length ranging from about 6 to 41 µm. At the same time, a 5-71 µm wide rim of equiaxed granular dolomite grew at the contact with CaCO3. Platinum markers showed that the original interface is located at the boundary between the granular and palisade-forming dolomite. In addition to dolomite, a 12-80 µm thick magnesio-calcite layer formed between the dolomite reaction rims and the calcite single crystals. All reaction products show at least an axiotactic crystallographic relationship with respect to calcite reactant, while full topotaxy to calcite prevails within the granular dolomite and magnesio-calcite. Dolomite grains frequently exhibit growth twins characterized by a rotation of 180° around one of the equivalent axis. From mass balance considerations, it is inferred that the reaction rim of dolomite grew by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Assuming an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, activation energies for diffusion of CaO and MgO are E a (CaO) = 192 ± 54 kJ/mol and E a (MgO) = 198 ± 44 kJ/mol, respectively.

  2. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results. PMID:25768640

  3. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  4. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  5. A novel approach to modeling the reaction kinetics of tetracycline antibiotics with aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Zachary R; Blaney, Lee

    2014-01-15

    Tetracycline antibiotics represent one of the most successful classes of pharmaceuticals and are extensively used around the world for human and veterinary health. Ozone-based processes have emerged as a selective water treatment process for many pharmaceuticals. The primary objective of this study was to determine the reaction kinetics for transformation of five tetracycline antibiotics (i.e., chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, rolitetracycline, and tetracycline) by ozone across the pH2 to 9 range. The apparent second-order rate constant for tetracycline was on the order of 1-6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at low pH, and 0.6-2.0 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at near neutral pH. The apparent second-order rate constants did not fit a conventional pKa-based model, presumably due to the complex acid/base speciation of tetracycline antibiotics. A model that considers the net charge on tetracycline molecules in solution provided a nice fit to experimental data for all five tetracyclines. The five tetracycline antibiotics demonstrated similar reaction kinetics with ozone, and a cumulative analysis of all kinetics data provides a baseline model for other tetracycline compounds. The ozone exposure required for complete transformation of tetracycline antibiotics (10(-5) M-s) is well below that achieved during ozone disinfection processes (10(-3) M-s), indicating that ozone is an effective treatment for tetracycline antibiotics.

  6. Challenges for an enzymatic reaction kinetics database.

    PubMed

    Wittig, Ulrike; Rey, Maja; Kania, Renate; Bittkowski, Meik; Shi, Lei; Golebiewski, Martin; Weidemann, Andreas; Müller, Wolfgang; Rojas, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The scientific literature contains a tremendous amount of kinetic data describing the dynamic behaviour of biochemical reactions over time. These data are needed for computational modelling to create models of biochemical reaction networks and to obtain a better understanding of the processes in living cells. To extract the knowledge from the literature, biocurators are required to understand a paper and interpret the data. For modellers, as well as experimentalists, this process is very time consuming because the information is distributed across the publication and, in most cases, is insufficiently structured and often described without standard terminology. In recent years, biological databases for different data types have been developed. The advantages of these databases lie in their unified structure, searchability and the potential for augmented analysis by software, which supports the modelling process. We have developed the SABIO-RK database for biochemical reaction kinetics. In the present review, we describe the challenges for database developers and curators, beginning with an analysis of relevant publications up to the export of database information in a standardized format. The aim of the present review is to draw the experimentalist's attention to the problem (from a data integration point of view) of incompletely and imprecisely written publications. We describe how to lower the barrier to curators and improve this situation. At the same time, we are aware that curating experimental data takes time. There is a community concerned with making the task of publishing data with the proper structure and annotation to ontologies much easier. In this respect, we highlight some useful initiatives and tools.

  7. Anaerobic corrosion reaction kinetics of nanosized iron.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Eric J; Fagan, Randal; Vogan, John L; Przepiora, Andrzej

    2008-04-01

    Nanosized Fe0 exhibits markedly different anaerobic corrosion rates in water compared to that disseminated in moist quartz sand. In water, hydrogen production from corrosion exhibits an autocatalytic style, attaining a maximum rate of 1.9 mol kg(-1) d(-1) within 2 d of reaction. The rate then drops sharply over the next 20 d and enters a period of uniformly decreasing rate, represented equally well by first-order or diffusion-controlled kinetic expressions. In quartz sand, hydrogen production exhibits a double maximum over the first 20 d, similar to the hydration reaction of Portland cement, and the highest rate attained is less than 0.5 mol kg(-1) d(-1). We ascribe this difference in early time corrosion behavior to the ability of the released hydrogen gas to convect both water and iron particles in an iron/water system and to its inability to do so when the iron particles are disseminated in sand. By 30 d, the hydrogen production rate of iron in quartz sand exhibits a uniform decrease as in the iron/water system, which also can be described by first-order or diffusion-controlled kinetic expressions. However, the corrosion resistance of the iron in moist sand is 4 times greater than in pure water (viz. t1/2 of 365 d vs 78 d, respectively). The lower rate for iron in sand is likely due to the effect of dissolved silica sorbing onto iron reaction sites and acting as an anodic inhibitor, which reduces the iron's susceptibility to oxidation by water. This study indicates that short-term laboratory corrosion tests of nanosized Fe0/water slurries will substantially underestimate both the material's longevity as an electron source and its potential as a long-term source of hydrogen gas in groundwater remediation applications.

  8. Reaction rate kinetics for in situ combustion retorting of Michigan Antrim oil shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Mickelson, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The intrinsic reaction rate kinetics for the pyrolysis of Michigan Antrim oil shale and the oxidation of the carbonaceous residue of this shale have been determined using a thermogravimetric analysis method. The kinetics of the pyrolysis reaction were evaluated from both isothermal and nonisothermal rate data. The reaction was found to be second-order with an activation energy of 252.2 kJ/mole, and with a frequency factor of 9.25 ?? 1015 sec-1. Pyrolysis kinetics were not affected by heating rates between 0.01 to 0.67??K/s. No evidence of any reactions among the oil shale mineral constituents was observed at temperatures below 1173??K. However, it was found that the presence of pyrite in oil shale reduces the primary devolatilization rate of kerogen and increases the amount of residual char in the spent shale. Carbonaceous residues which were prepared by heating the oil shale at a rate of 0.166??K/s to temperatures between 923??K and 1073??K, had the highest reactivities when oxidized at 0.166??K/s in a gas having 21 volume percent oxygen. Oxygen chemisorption was found to be the initial precursor to the oxidation process. The kinetics governing oxygen chemisorption is (Equation Presented) where X is the fractional coverage. The oxidation of the carbonaceous residue was found also to be second-order. The activation energy and the frequency factor determined from isothermal experiments were 147 kJ/mole and 9.18??107 sec-1 respectively, while the values of these parameters obtained from a nonisothermal experiment were 212 kJ/mole and 1.5??1013 sec-1. The variation in the rate constants is attributed to the fact that isothermal and nonisothermal analyses represent two different aspects of the combustion process.

  9. [Kinetics modeling and reaction mechanism of ferrate(VI) oxidation of triclosan].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2011-09-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent widely used in many personal care products. We investigated oxidation of TCS by aqueous ferrate Fe(VI) to determine reaction kinetics, interpreted the reaction mechanism by a linear free-energy relationship, and evaluated the degradation efficiency. Second-order reaction kinetics was used to model Fe (VI) oxidation of TCS, with the apparent second-order rate constant (k(app)) being 531.9 L x (mol x s)(-1) at pH 8.5 and (24 +/- 1) degrees C. The half life (t1/2) is 25.8 s for an Fe( VI) concentration of 10 mg x L(-1). The rate constants of the reaction decrease with increasing pH values. These pH-dependent variations in k(app) could be distributed by considering species-specific reactions between Fe(VI) species and acid-base species of an ionizable TCS. Species-specific second-order reaction rate constants, k, were determined for reaction of HFeO4(-) with each of TCS's acid-base species. The value of k determined for neutral TCS was (4.1 +/- 3.5) x 10(2) L x (mol x s)(-1), while that measured for anionic TCS was (1.8 +/- 0.1) x 10(4) L x (mol x s)(-1). The reaction between HFeO4(-) and the dissociated TCS controls the overall reaction. A linear free-energy relationship illustrated the electrophilic oxidation mechanism. Fe (VI) reacts initially with TCS by electrophilic attack at the latter's phenol moiety. At a n[Fe(VI)]: n(TCS) > 7: 1, complete removal of TCS was achieved. And lower concentration of the humic acid could enhance the k(app) of Fe( VI) with TCS. In conclusion, Fe(VI) oxidation technology appears to be a promising tool for applications of WWTPs effluents and other decontamination processes.

  10. Mathematics analysis of polymerase chain reaction kinetic curves.

    PubMed

    Sochivko, D G; Fedorov, A A; Varlamov, D A; Kurochkin, V E; Petrov, R V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews different approaches to the mathematical analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kinetic curves. The basic principles of PCR mathematical analysis are presented. Approximation of PCR kinetic curves and PCR efficiency curves by various functions is described. Several PCR models based on chemical kinetics equations are suggested. Decision criteria for an optimal function to describe PCR efficiency are proposed.

  11. Second-order splitting schemes for a class of reactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhuyin; Pope, Stephen B.

    2008-09-01

    We consider the numerical time integration of a class of reaction-transport systems that are described by a set of ordinary differential equations for primary variables. In the governing equations, the terms involved may require the knowledge of secondary variables, which are functions of the primary variables. Specifically, we consider the case where, given the primary variables, the evaluation of the secondary variables is computationally expensive. To solve this class of reaction-transport equations, we develop and demonstrate several computationally efficient splitting schemes, wherein the portions of the governing equations containing chemical reaction terms are separated from those parts containing the transport terms. A computationally efficient solution to the transport sub-step is achieved through the use of linearization or predictor-corrector methods. The splitting schemes are applied to the reactive flow in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with the Davis-Skodjie reaction model, to the CO+H oxidation in a CSTR with detailed chemical kinetics, and to a reaction-diffusion system with an extension of the Oregonator model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. As demonstrated in the test problems, the proposed splitting schemes, which yield efficient solutions to the transport sub-step, achieve second-order accuracy in time.

  12. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  13. A classical but new kinetic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Deng, Fei-Huang; Yang, Jin-Dong; Li, Xiu-Tao; Chen, Qiang; Lei, Nan-Ping; Meng, Fan-Kun; Zhao, Xiao-Peng; Han, Su-Hui; Hao, Er-Jun; Mu, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-09-28

    A classical but new kinetic equation to estimate activation energies of various hydride transfer reactions was developed according to transition state theory using the Morse-type free energy curves of hydride donors to release a hydride anion and hydride acceptors to capture a hydride anion and by which the activation energies of 187 typical hydride self-exchange reactions and more than thirty thousand hydride cross transfer reactions in acetonitrile were safely estimated in this work. Since the development of the kinetic equation is only on the basis of the related chemical bond changes of the hydride transfer reactants, the kinetic equation should be also suitable for proton transfer reactions, hydrogen atom transfer reactions and all the other chemical reactions involved with breaking and formation of chemical bonds. One of the most important contributions of this work is to have achieved the perfect unity of the kinetic equation and thermodynamic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

  14. Experimental study of non-linear second-order analytical data with focus on the second-order advantage.

    PubMed

    Culzoni, María J; Damiani, Patricia C; García-Reiriz, Alejandro; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2007-07-01

    Three different experimental systems have been studied regarding the determination of analytes in complex samples, using non-linear second-order instrumental data, which are intrinsically able to provide the second-order advantage. This permits the quantitation of calibrated analytes in the presence of unexpected sample components, although a suitable algorithm is required. The recently described combination of artificial neural networks with post-training residual bilinearization has been applied to the three data sets, with successful results concerning prediction accuracy and precision, as well as profile recovery for the potential interferents in test samples. The studies involve: (1) the determination of two pharmaceuticals in the presence of an unexpected excipient by absorbance-pH matrix measurements, (2) the quantitation of iron(II) by its catalytic effect on the kinetics of the bromate oxidation of a colorant in the presence of a second interfering organic dye, and (3) the analysis of the antibiotic amoxicillin by fluorescence excitation-emission matrices in the presence of a fluorescent anti-inflammatory. The prediction results were compared and shown to be significantly better than those yielded by the unfolded partial least-squares/residual bilinearization model, due to the non-linear nature of the studied data.

  15. Kinetic analysis of free-radical reactions in the low-temperature autoxidation of triglycerides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jingmin; Sevilla, M.D. )

    1990-02-22

    The kinetics of the low-temperature autoxidation of triglycerides has been investigated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. After initial radical production, four reaction stages are found in the overall autoxidation of unsaturated lipids: (1) formation of peroxyl radicals by addition of molecular oxygen to the initial carbon radicals, (2) consumption of oxygen in the autoxidation cycle, (3) decay of the lipid peroxyl radical into allylic and pentadienyl radicals, and (4) recombination of the carbon-centered radicals. Peroxyl radical decay in saturated lipids follows second-order kinetics with an apparent activation energy of ca. 50 kJ/mol. The authors find that, for polyunsaturated lipids, even at quite low temperatures (120 K), the autoxidation process occurs readily and must be considered in the storage of biological samples.

  16. A Case Study in Chemical Kinetics: The OH + CO Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Ralph E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews some important properties of the bimolecular reaction between the hydroxyl radical and carbon monoxide. Investigates the kinetics of the reaction, the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate constant, the state-to-state dynamics of the reaction, and the reverse reaction. (MVL)

  17. A Generalized Kinetic Model for Heterogeneous Gas-Solid Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-15

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used.

  18. Kinetic and mechanistic studies on the formation and reactions of early-transition-metal-ketene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, J.M.; Bruno, J.W.; Hazin, P.N.; Folting, K.; Huffman, J.C.

    1988-05-01

    A series of complexes of vanadocene or molybdenocene with unsymmetrical ketenes were prepared, either by reaction of the various ketenes with vanadocene itself or by reaction with the molybdenocene phosphine complex (C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/Mo(PEt/sub 3/). All of the complexes exhibited the expected ketene C=O bonding mode, and all reactions were very specific in their formation of the facial isomer with metallocene fragment located on the side of the smaller ketene substituent. Kinetic studies were used to assess the sensitivity of the incoming vanadocene to steric and electronic effects, with the latter found to dominate. Kinetic studies and activation parameters for reaction of Cp/sub 2/Mo(PEt/sub 3/) with EtPhC=C=O indicated a second-order associative mechanism, proposed to involve a nucleophilic attack of the metal center on the ketene central carbon in the rate-limiting step. Lastly, reactions of the bound ketenes with nucleophiles (alkyllithiums or Grignard reagents) proceeded readily to either ketone or aldehyde enolates (the latter via transfer of a ..beta..-hydride from the alkyl); the clean production of only Z enolates from the unsymmetrical ketenes is indicate of a metal-mediated internal attack of nucleophile on the bound ketene.

  19. Assessment of closure schemes in second-order conditional moment closure against DNS with extinction and ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhara, S.; Huh, Kang Y.

    2005-12-01

    The performance of second-order conditional moment closure (CMC) depends on models to evaluate conditional variances and covariances of temperature and species mass fractions. In this paper the closure schemes based on the steady laminar flamelet model (SLFM) are validated against direct numerical simulation (DNS) involving extinction and ignition. Scaling is performed to reproduce proper absolute magnitudes, irrespective of the origin of mismatch between local flamelet structures and scalar dissipation rates. DNS based on the pseudospectral method is carried out to study hydrogen-air combustion with a detailed kinetic mechanism, in homogeneous, isotropic, and decaying turbulent media. Lewis numbers are set equal to unity to avoid complication of differential diffusion. The SLFM-based closures for correlations among fluctuations of reaction rate, scalar dissipation rate, and species mass fractions show good comparison with DNS. The variance parameter in lognormal PDF and the constants in the dissipation term have been estimated from DNS results. Comparison is made for the resulting conditional profiles from DNS, first-order CMC, and second-order CMC with correction to the most critical reaction step according to sensitivity analysis. Overall good agreement ensures validity of the SLFM-based closures for modeling conditional variances and covariances in second-order CMC.

  20. Kinetic Study of the Heck Reaction: An Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozzi, Christel; Bouzidi, Naoual

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study and calculate the kinetic constant of a Heck reaction: the arylation of but-3-en-2-ol by iodobenzene catalyzed by palladium acetate in presence of triethylamine in DMF. The reaction leads to a mixture of two ketones. Students use GC analysis to quantify reagents and products of reaction. They control the…

  1. The surface reaction kinetics of salicylate on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ainsworth, C.C.; Friedrich, D.M.; Joly, A.G.; Gassman, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    The kinetics of reaction of salicylate with colloidal alumina in aqueous suspension and with Al(III) in homogeneous aqueous solution were studied by stopped-flow laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission spectra confirmed the formation of both monodentate complexes and more stable bidentate chelates. Temporal evolution of the spectra indicated that the reaction was fast (within first few minutes) for both the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions but slowed down afterwards for the latter. Reactions completed within 10 minutes in homogeneous phase at pH 3.3 but took more than 12 hours in alumina suspension. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity within first four minutes showed that in homogeneous phase the reaction followed a single pseudo-first-order kinetics. In alumina suspension log plots were nonlinear and characteristic of multiple heterogeneous reaction paths. The kinetics are interpreted in terms of the simultaneous formation of multiple species as well as subsequent conversion between species.

  2. Moment equations for chromatography based on Langmuir type reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Kanji

    2014-08-22

    Moment equations were derived for chromatography, in which the reaction kinetics between solute molecules and functional ligands on the stationary phase was represented by the Langmuir type rate equation. A set of basic equations of the general rate model of chromatography representing the mass balance, mass transfer rate, and reaction kinetics in the column were analytically solved in the Laplace domain. The moment equations for the first absolute moment and the second central moment in the real time domain were derived from the analytical solution in the Laplace domain. The moment equations were used for predicting the chromatographic behavior under hypothetical HPLC conditions. The influence of the parameters relating to the adsorption equilibrium and to the reaction kinetics on the chromatographic behavior was quantitatively evaluated. It is expected that the moment equations are effective for a detailed analysis of the influence of the mass transfer rates and of the Langmuir type reaction kinetics on the column efficiency.

  3. Reaction Kinetics: An Experiment for Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Sheila

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment to examine the kinetics of carbamate decomposition and the effect of buffer catalysis on the reaction. Includes background information, laboratory procedures, evaluation of data, and teaching suggestions. (Author/JN)

  4. Steady deflagration of HMX with simple kinetics: A gas phase chain reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, M.J.; Brewster, M.Q.; Son, S.F.

    1998-08-01

    A new approach is presented for modeling steady combustion of energetic solids, in particular HMX. A simplified, global, gas phase chain reaction kinetic mechanism is employed. Specifically, a zero-order, high activation energy thermal decomposition initiation reaction in the condensed phase followed by a second-order, low activation energy chain reaction in the gas phase is assumed. A closed-form solution is obtained, which is based on the activation energy asymptotics analysis of Lengelle in the condensed phase and the assumption of zero activation energy in the gas phase. Comparisons between the model and a variety of experimental observations over a wide range of pressures and initial temperatures are presented and demonstrate the validity of the approach. The model provides excellent agreement with burning rate data (including sensitivity to pressure and initial temperature) and temperature profile data (in particular the gas phase). This suggests that in the realm of simplified, approximate kinetics modeling of energetic solids, the low gas phase activation energy limit is a more appropriate model than the classical high activation energy limit or heuristic flame sheet models. The model also indicates that the condensed phase reaction zone plays an important role in determining the deflagration rate of HMX, underscoring the need for better understanding of the chemistry in this zone.

  5. Kinetics of Acid Reactions: Making Sense of Associated Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    In chemical kinetics, in addition to the concepts related to kinetics, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and the characteristics of the reactants are often involved when comparing the rates of different reactions, making such comparisons very challenging for students at all levels, as well as for pre-service science teachers. Consequently, four…

  6. A joint experimental and theoretical investigation of kinetics and mechanistic study in a synthesis reaction between triphenylphosphine and dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates in the presence of benzhydrazide.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, Mohammad Amin; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa; Ebrahimi, Ali; Maghsoodlou, Malek Taher; Jahani, Peyman Mohammadzadeh; Ghahramaninezhad, Mahbobeh

    2012-12-01

    Stable crystalline phosphorus ylides were obtained in excellent yields from the 1:1:1 addition reaction between triphenylphosphine (TPP) and dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates, in the presence of NH-acids, such as benzhydrazide. To determine the kinetic parameters of the reactions, they were monitored by UV spectrophotometery. The second order fits were automatically drawn and the values of the second order rate constant (k(2)) were calculated using standard equations within the program. At the temperature range studied the dependence of the second order rate constant (Ln k(2)) on reciprocal temperature was compatible with Arrhenius equation. This provided the relevant plots to calculate the activation energy of all reactions. Furthermore, useful information were obtained from studies of the effect of solvent, structure of reactants (different alkyl groups within the dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates) and also concentration of reactants on the rate of reactions. On the basis of experimental data the proposed mechanism was confirmed according to the obtained results and a steady state approximation and the first step (k(2)) and third (k(3)) steps of the reactions were recognized as the rate determining steps, respectively. In addition, three speculative proposed mechanisms were theoretically investigated using quantum mechanical calculation. The results, arising from the second and third speculative mechanisms, were far from the experimental data. Nevertheless, there was a good agreement between the theoretical kinetic data, emerge from the first speculative mechanism, and experimental kinetic data of proposed mechanism.

  7. Kinetics of the carbon monoxide oxidation reaction under microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W.L.; Katz, J.D.; Rees, D.; Paffett, M.T.; Datye, A.

    1996-06-01

    915 MHz microwave heating has been used to drive the CO oxidation reaction over Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with out significantly affecting the reaction kinetics. As compared to an identical conventionally heated system, the activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction order with respect to CO were unchanged. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple extrapolation technique. Microwave-induced thermal gradients were found to play a significant role in kinetic observations. The authors chose the CO oxidation reaction over a supported metal catalyst because the reaction kinetics are well known, and because of the diverse dielectric properties of the various elements in the system: CO is a polar molecule, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are non-polar, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a dielectric, and Pt and Pd are conductors.

  8. A study of the Sabatier-methanation reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, C. E.; Forsythe, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetics of the Sabatier methanation reaction, the reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to methane and water, was investigated for 58 percent nickel on kieselguhr catalyst and 20 percent ruthenium on alumina catalyst. Differential rate data from an experimental program were correlated with a power function rate equation both for forward and reverse reactions. The kinetic parameters of activation energy, frequency rate constant and reaction order were determined for the rate equation. The values of these parameters were obtained from an Arrhenius plot of the experimental differential rate data. Also the carbon monoxide side reaction effect was measured and included in the correlation of parameters. The reaction was found to fit the rate equation experimentally within the temperature range 421 K, where the reaction effectively begins, the 800 K where the reaction rate drops and departs from the rate equation form.

  9. Kinetics of reactions between chlorine and the cyanobacterial toxins microcystins.

    PubMed

    Acero, Juan L; Rodriguez, Eva; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2005-04-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria can give rise to the production of toxins which contaminate drinking water sources. Among the oxidants and disinfectants typically applied in waterworks, chlorine has been found to be effective for the degradation of microcystins. In the present study, unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), -RR and -YR with chlorine were determined over a wide pH range. It was found that an increase of pH has a negative effect on the microcystin degradation rate. Apparent second-order rate constant for the chlorination of MC-LR at 20 degrees C varied from 475 M(-1)s(-1) at pH 4.8 to 9.8 M(-1)s(-1) at pH 8.8. From these apparent second-order rate constants, rate constants for the reactions of MC-LR with hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypochlorite (ClO-) were evaluated. Half-life times ranged from minutes at pH 6 to 1 h at pH 8 for a constant residual chlorine concentration of 1.0-0.5 mgl(-1), typical of oxidation pre-treatment and final disinfection. Similar reactivity with chlorine was found for MC-RR and MC-YR. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for microcystin degradation during oxidation and disinfection processes, and can be applied in drinking water treatment in case of cyanobacterial toxin risk if the pH is kept below 8.

  10. Reaction kinetics of selected micropollutants in ozonation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    Second-order reaction rate constants of micropollutants with ozone (k(O3)) and hydroxyl radicals (k(OH)) are essential for evaluating their removal efficiencies from water during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes. Kinetic data are unavailable for many of the emerging micropollutants. Twenty-four micropollutants with very diverse structures and applications including endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products were selected, and their k(O3) and k(OH) values were determined using bench-scale reactors (at pH 7 and T = 20 °C). Reactions with molecular ozone are highly selective as indicated by their k(O3) values ranging from 10(-2)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The general trend of ozone reactivity can be explained by micropollutant structures in conjunction with the electrophilic nature of ozone reactions. All of the studied compounds are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals as shown by their high k(OH) values (10(8)-10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) even though they are structurally very diverse. For compounds with a low reactivity toward ozone, hydroxyl radical based treatment such as O(3)/H(2)O(2) or UV/H(2)O(2) is a viable alternative. This study contributed to filling the data gap pertaining kinetic data of organic micropollutants while confirming results reported in the literature where available. PMID:23079129

  11. Kinetic and theoretical study of the reaction of Cl atoms with a series of linear thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Andres; Albaladejo, Jose

    2008-11-21

    The reactions of Cl with a series of linear thiols: 1-propanethiol (k{sub 1}), 1-butanethiol (k{sub 2}), and 1-pentanethiol (k{sub 3}) were investigated as a function of temperature (in the range of 268-379 K) and pressure (in the range of 50-200 Torr) by laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence. Only 1-propanethiol has previously been studied, but at 1 Torr of total pressure. The derived Arrhenius expressions obtained using our kinetic data were as follows: k{sub 1}=(3.97{+-}0.44)x10{sup -11} exp[(410{+-}36)/T], k{sub 2}=(1.01{+-}0.16)x10{sup -10} exp[(146{+-}23)/T], and k{sub 3}=(1.28{+-}0.10)x10{sup -10} exp[(129{+-}25)/T] (in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Moreover, a theoretical insight into mechanisms of these reactions has also been pursued through ab initio Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation treatment calculations with 6-311G** basis set. Optimized geometries have been obtained for transition states and molecular complexes appearing along the different reaction pathways. Furthermore, molecular energies have been calculated at QCISD(T) level in order to get an estimation of the activation energies. Finally, the nature of the molecular complexes and transitions states is analyzed by using kinetic-potential and natural bond orbital total energy decomposition schemes.

  12. Chemical kinetics computer program for static and flow reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    General chemical kinetics computer program for complex gas mixtures has been developed. Program can be used for any homogeneous reaction in either one dimensional flow or static system. It is flexible, accurate, and easy to use. It can be used for any chemical system for which species thermodynamic data and reaction rate constant data are known.

  13. The Kinetic Rate Law for Autocatalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata-Perez, Fernando; Perez-Benito, Joaquin F.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a method of obtaining accurate rate constants for autocatalytic reactions. The autocatalytic oxidation of dimethylamine by permanganate ion in aqueous solution is used as an example. (RH)

  14. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  15. Kinetics of Chemical Reactions in Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldovich, Y.; Semenov, N.

    1946-01-01

    In part I of the paper the theory of flame propagation is developed along the lines followed by Frank-Kamenetsky and one of the writers. The development of chain processes in flames is considered. A basis is given for the application of the method of stationary concentrations to reactions in flames; reactions with branching chains are analyzed. The case of a diffusion coefficient different from the coefficient of temperature conductivity is considered.

  16. Visualization of second order tensor fields and matrix data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delmarcelle, Thierry; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    We present a study of the visualization of 3-D second order tensor fields and matrix data. The general problem of visualizing unsymmetric real or complex Hermitian second order tensor fields can be reduced to the simultaneous visualization of a real and symmetric second order tensor field and a real vector field. As opposed to the discrete iconic techniques commonly used in multivariate data visualization, the emphasis is on exploiting the mathematical properties of tensor fields in order to facilitate their visualization and to produce a continuous representation of the data. We focus on interactively sensing and exploring real and symmetric second order tensor data by generalizing the vector notion of streamline to the tensor concept of hyperstreamline. We stress the importance of a structural analysis of the data field analogous to the techniques of vector field topology extraction in order to obtain a unique and objective representation of second order tensor fields.

  17. Fluid flow and chemical reaction kinetics in metamorphic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The treatment and effects of chemical reaction kinetics during metamorphism are developed along with the incorporation of fluid flow, diffusion, and thermal evolution. The interplay of fluid flow and surface reaction rates, the distinction between steady state and equilibrium, and the possible overstepping of metamorphic reactions are discussed using a simple analytic model. This model serves as an introduction to the second part of the paper, which develops a reaction model that solves the coupled temperature-fluid flow-chemical composition differential equations relevant to metamorphic processes. Consideration of stable isotopic evidence requires that such a kinetic model be considered for the chemical evolution of a metamorphic aureole. A general numerical scheme is discussed to handle the solution of the model. The results of this kinetic model allow us to reach several important conclusions regarding the factors controlling the chemical evolution of mineral assemblages during a metamorphic event. 41 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Toluene and benzyl decomposition mechanisms: elementary reactions and kinetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Derudi, Marco; Polino, Daniela; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2011-12-28

    The high temperature decomposition kinetics of toluene and benzyl were investigated by combining a kinetic analysis with the ab initio/master equation study of new reaction channels. It was found that similarly to toluene, which decomposes to benzyl and phenyl losing atomic hydrogen and methyl, also benzyl decomposition proceeds through two channels with similar products. The first leads to the formation of fulvenallene and hydrogen and has already been investigated in detail in recent publications. In this work it is proposed that benzyl can decompose also through a second decomposition channel to form benzyne and methyl. The channel specific kinetic constants of benzyl decomposition were determined by integrating the RRKM/master equation over the C(7)H(7) potential energy surface. The energies of wells and saddle points were determined at the CCSD(T) level on B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) structures. A kinetic mechanism was then formulated, which comprises the benzyl and toluene decomposition reactions together with a recently proposed fulvenallene decomposition mechanism, the decomposition kinetics of the fulvenallenyl radical, and some reactions describing the secondary chemistry originated by the decomposition products. The kinetic mechanism so obtained was used to simulate the production of H atoms measured in a wide pressure and temperature range using different experimental setups. The calculated and experimental data are in good agreement. Kinetic constants of the new reaction channels here examined are reported as a function of temperature at different pressures. The mechanism here proposed is not compatible with the assumption often used in literature kinetic mechanisms that benzyl decomposition can be effectively described through a lumped reaction whose products are the cyclopentadienyl radical and acetylene.

  19. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  20. Kinetics and mechanisms of some atomic oxygen reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cvetanovic, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms and kinetics of some reactions of the ground state of oxygen atoms, O(3P), are briefly summarized. Attention is given to reactions of oxygen atoms with several different types of organic and inorganic compounds such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and some oxygen, nitrogen, halogen and sulfur derivatives of these compounds. References to some recent compilations and critical evaluations of reaction rate constants are given.

  1. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  2. Second order guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-08-15

    Second order gyrogauge invariant guiding-center coordinates with strong ExB-flow are derived using the Lie transformation method. The corresponding Poisson bracket structure and equations of motion are obtained. From a variational principle the explicit Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived including second order terms. The second order contributions contain the lowest order finite-Larmor-radius corrections to the electromagnetic field. Therefore, the model is capable of describing situations where strong ExB-flows and finite-Larmor-radius effects are mutually important.

  3. Method to render second order beam optics programs symplectic

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    We present evidence that second order matrix-based beam optics programs violate the symplectic condition. A simple method to avoid this difficulty, based on a generating function approach to evaluating transfer maps, is described. A simple example illustrating the non-symplectricity of second order matrix methods, and the effectiveness of our solution to the problem, is provided. We conclude that it is in fact possible to bring second order matrix optics methods to a canonical form. The procedure for doing so has been implemented in the program DIMAT, and could be implemented in programs such as TRANSPORT and TURTLE, making them useful in multiturn applications. 15 refs.

  4. Optimal second order sliding mode control for nonlinear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a chattering free optimal second order sliding mode control (OSOSMC) method is proposed to stabilize nonlinear systems affected by uncertainties. The nonlinear optimal control strategy is based on the control Lyapunov function (CLF). For ensuring robustness of the optimal controller in the presence of parametric uncertainty and external disturbances, a sliding mode control scheme is realized by combining an integral and a terminal sliding surface. The resulting second order sliding mode can effectively reduce chattering in the control input. Simulation results confirm the supremacy of the proposed optimal second order sliding mode control over some existing sliding mode controllers in controlling nonlinear systems affected by uncertainty.

  5. Heuristic control of kinetic energy in dynamic reaction coordinate calculations.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Arnim

    2013-08-01

    For the understanding and prediction of chemical reactions, detailed knowledge of the minimum energy path between reactants and transition state is of utmost importance. Stewart et al. (J. Comput. Chem. 1987, 8, 1117) proposed the usage of molecular trajectories calculated from Newton's equations of motion for an efficient reaction path following. Two operational modes are possible thereby: intrinsic (IRC) and dynamic reaction coordinate calculations (DRC). The technical difference between these modes is that in an IRC calculation the kinetic energy of the nuclei is quenched while the total energy is conserved in DRC calculations. In this work, a heuristic control methodology of atomic kinetic energies in DRC calculations using fuzzy logic is proposed. A diversified test set of 10 reactions has been collected to examine the performance of this approach. Fuzzy rule-based models are found to be a convenient way to make the determination of accessible paths of chemical reactions computationally efficient.

  6. Reversibly Switching Silver Hierarchical Structures via Reaction Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianmei; Yang, Tao; Li, Chengxiang; Dai, Jinhui; Han, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a study on controllable synthesis of hierarchical silver structures via regulating reaction kinetics. Silver particles with various morphologies are synthesized by a solution-based reduction approach at the addition of amino acids. The amino acid is used to coordinate with silver ions to slow down the reduction of silver ions. With the increase of glycine concentration, the morphologies of silver particles switch from dendrites, to flowers and to compacted spheres, which is attributed to the decrease of reaction rate as a result of the coordination. Three more amino acids are examined and confirms the role of reaction kinetic in shaping silver particles. Furthermore, by increasing the concentration of the reductant, the silver morphologies change from compact spheres to loose flowers as a result of the increase of reaction rate. Therefore the silver hierarchical structure can be reversibly switched by reaction kinetics. The silver particles synthesized are tested for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) property and the dendritic particles present a remarkable SERS activity. This study shows that reaction kinetics is a powerful tool to tune hierarchical structures of silver particles, which is expected to be transferable to other material systems. PMID:26442867

  7. Kinetic modeling of reactions in heated monosaccharide-casein systems.

    PubMed

    Brands, Carline M J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2002-11-01

    In the present study, a kinetic model of the Maillard reaction occurring in heated monosaccharide-casein systems was proposed. Its parameters, the reaction rate constants, were estimated via multiresponse modeling. The determinant criterion was used as the statistical fit criterion instead of the familiar least squares to avoid statistical problems. The kinetic model was extensively tested by varying the reaction conditions. Different sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, and tagatose) were studied regarding their effect on the reaction kinetics. This study has shown the power of multiresponse modeling for the unraveling of complicated reaction routes as occur in the Maillard reaction. The iterative process of proposing a model, confronting it with experiments, and criticizing the model was passed through four times to arrive at a model that was largely consistent with all results obtained. A striking difference was found between aldose and ketose sugars as suggested by the modeling results: not the ketoses themselves but only their reaction products were found to be reactive in the Maillard reaction.

  8. Insights into the "free state" enzyme reaction kinetics in nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Ye, De-Kai; Wang, Yun-Yi; Lu, Tao; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2013-04-21

    The investigation of enzyme reaction kinetics in nanoconfined spaces mimicking the conditions in living systems is of great significance. Here, a nanofluidics chip integrated with an electrochemical detector has been designed for studying "free state" enzyme reaction kinetics in nanoconfinement. The nanofluidics chip is fabricated using the UV-ablation technique developed in our group. The enzyme and substrate solutions are simultaneously supplied from two single streams into a nanochannel through a Y-shaped junction. The laminar flow forms in the front of the nanochannel, then the two liquids fully mix at their downstream where a homogeneous enzyme reaction occurs. The "free state" enzyme reaction kinetics in nanoconfinement can thus be investigated in this laminar flow based nanofluidics device. For demonstration, glucose oxidase (GOx) is chosen as the model enzyme, which catalyzes the oxidation of beta-d-glucose. The reaction product hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be electrochemically detected by a microelectrode aligning to the end of nanochannel. The steady-state electrochemical current responding to various glucose concentrations is used to evaluate the activity of the "free state" GOx under nanoconfinement conditions. The effect of liquid flow rate, enzyme concentration, and nanoconfinement on reaction kinetics has been studied in detail. Results show that the "free state" GOx activity increases significantly compared to the immobilized enzyme and bath system, and the GOx reaction rate in the nanochannel is two-fold faster than that in bulk solution, demonstrating the importance of "free state" and spatial confinement for the enzyme reaction kinetics. The present approach provides an effective method for exploiting the "free state" enzyme activity in nanospatial confinement.

  9. Oxidation of diclofenac by potassium ferrate (VI): reaction kinetics and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Gao, Shuyan

    2015-02-15

    The reaction kinetics and toxicity of diclofenac (DCF) oxidation by ferrate (VI) under simulated water disinfection conditions were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the reaction between DCF and Fe(VI) followed first-order kinetics with respect to each reactant. Furthermore, the effects of pH and temperature on DCF oxidation by Fe(VI) were elucidated using a systematic examination. The apparent second-order rate constants (kapp) increased significantly from 2.54 to 11.6M(-1)s(-1), as the pH of the solution decreased from 11.0 to 7.0, and the acid-base equilibriums of Fe(VI) and DCF were proposed to explain the pH dependence of kapp. The acute toxicity of DCF solution during Fe(VI) oxidation was evaluated using a Microtox bioassay. Overall, the DCF degradation process resulted in a rapid increase of the inhibition rate of luminescent bacteria. These toxicity tests suggest that the formation of enhanced toxic intermediates during the Fe(VI) disinfection process may pose potential health risk to consumers.

  10. Reaction kinetics of free fatty acids esterification in palm fatty acid distillate using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi, Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new strategy of preparing novel carbon-based solid acids has been developed. In this research, the esterification reactions of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) with methanol, using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst from biomass wastes as catalyst, were studied. In this study, the coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalysts were synthesized by sulfonating the coconut shell biochar using concentrated H2SO4. The kinetics of free fatty acid (FFA) esterification in PFAD using a coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst was also studied. The effects of the mass ratio of catalyst to oil (1-10%), the molar ratio of methanol to oil (6:1-12:1), and the reaction temperature (40-60°C) were studied for the conversion of PFAD to optimize the reaction conditions. The results showed that the optimal conditions were an methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 12:1, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60°C. The proposed kinetic model shows a reversible second order reaction and represents all the experimental data satisfactorily, providing deeper insight into the kinetics of the reaction.

  11. A second-order theory for transverse ion heating and momentum coupling due to electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Winske, Dan; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A second-order theory for electrostatic instabilities driven by counterstreaming ion beams is developed which describes momentum coupling and heating of the plasma via wave-particle interactions. Exchange rates between the waves and particles are derived, which are suitable for the fluid equations simulating microscopic effects on macroscopic scales. Using a fully kinetic simulation, the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability due to counterstreaming H(+) beams has been simulated. A power spectrum from the kinetic simulation is used to evaluate second-order exchange rates. The calculated heating and momentum loss from second-order theory is compared to the numerical simulation.

  12. The Reaction of a Food Colorant with Sodium Hypochlorite: A Student-Designed Kinetics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Josefina; Betancourt, Rosa; Rivera, Yamil; Pijem, Joan

    1998-09-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of the food colorant FD&C Blue #1 with sodium hypochlorite (Clorox) is described in a student-designed experimental format. In this format, students are guided- by means of questions- to make decisions regarding concentration of reagents, choice of equipment, and actual laboratory procedures to be followed. This format provides an opportunity for students to apply the concepts and skills learned in class and in previous laboratory sessions to a new problem. We have found that this experience helps students gain depth of understanding of all concepts involved. The reaction (with a large excess of NaOCl) is followed with a Spectronic 20 at the Blue #1 colorant lmax of 630 nm. The %T is measured over time and three graphs: A vs time, ln A vs time and 1/A vs time are plotted to find that the second one is linear and thus first order with respect to the Blue #1. When the concentration of NaOCl is reduced to one-half the original value, it is found that the rate is reduced by one-half, indicating that the reaction is first order with respect to NaOCl and second order overall. The rate constant of the reaction is determined from the slope of the curve and the mean obtained by our students is 17 M-1 min-1 at room temperature (about 28° C).

  13. Second-order model selection in mixture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redgate, P.E.; Piepel, G.F.; Hrma, P.R.

    1992-07-01

    Full second-order models for q-component mixture experiments contain q(q+l)/2 terms, which increases rapidly as q increases. Fitting full second-order models for larger q may involve problems with ill-conditioning and overfitting. These problems can be remedied by transforming the mixture components and/or fitting reduced forms of the full second-order mixture model. Various component transformation and model reduction approaches are discussed. Data from a 10-component nuclear waste glass study are used to illustrate ill-conditioning and overfitting problems that can be encountered when fitting a full second-order mixture model. Component transformation, model term selection, and model evaluation/validation techniques are discussed and illustrated for the waste glass example.

  14. Fluctuation Dominated Kinetics in Diffusion-Controlled Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kiho

    The kinetics of a number of prototypical diffusion -controlled reactions are studied. Our goal is to investigate the effects of spatial inhomogeneities in the particle densities on the reaction kinetics. In general, we find that there exists an upper critical dimension below which the kinetics cannot be described by a rate equation analysis, an approach which gives the kinetic laws of a mean-field approximation. Below the upper critical dimension, spatial inhomogeneities in the particle densities give rise to new fluctuation-dominated kinetics. For "trapping" reaction, A + B (--->) (1-(epsilon))A + B (0 < (epsilon) (LESSTHEQ) 1), we find a quasi-exponential decay law (rho)(,A)(t)(TURN)t('1/2)exp(-kt('1/3)) for the density of A particle in one dimension. The introduction of drift velocity superimposed on the diffusive motion of the A particles results in a novel crossover to an exponential decay law. For an arbitrary fixed configurations of traps and values of (epsilon) in the case of static B's and mobile A's, an exact formal expression for the kinetics of the reaction is derived by using generating functions. For irreversible multi-particle reactions, with bimolecular decay A + B (--->) inert being a simple generic example, universal kinetic laws are obtained, which are founded to be a function only of the spatial dimension, the number of particles needed to intiate a reaction, and the nature of the particle conservation laws for the system. These results are obtained primarily through the application of scaling approaches. We also introduce a simple and new model of coagulation. In contrast to the often-used cluster-cluster aggregation model, the reaction kernel in our model can be adjusted exactly. For the special case of a constant reaction kernel, we find that the upper critical dimension is two and fluctuations give rise to dimension dependent kinetic exponents and a novel non-monotonic cluster size distribution below two dimensions. Many of our new

  15. a Second Order Born Calculation for Charge Transfer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simony, Paul Richard

    Charge transfer cross sections, from the ground state of the target to the ground state of the projectile, have been computed in a second order Born approximation for protons incident upon hydrogen at energies of 1, 10, and 50 MeV. The exact second order matrix element is evaluated numerically, and the results are compared to a standard peaking approximation (SP), as well as to a new peaking approximation (LP) developed herein. At 50 MeV two distinct second order effects are evident in the differential cross section. For very small (center of mass) scattering angles ((theta) (DBLTURN) .032(DEGREES)) the second order cross section is smaller than the first order cross section, while at larger angles ((theta) (DBLTURN) .054(DEGREES)) a second Born peak occurs. This peak can be kinematically associated with a classical two step process which gives rise to the well known dominating v('-11) asymptotic velocity dependence of the total cross section. The reduction of the differential cross section at smaller angles serves to decrease the total cross section, as is predicted by the asymptotic expression. At 10 MeV second order effects become less important, and at 1 MeV the kinematic peak has all but disappeared, while the second order cross section has here become larger than the first order cross section. At intermediate energies experimental results indicate that the first order cross section used here is itself too large.

  16. [Second-order retrospective revaluation in human contingency learning].

    PubMed

    Numata, Keitaro; Shimazaki, Tsuneo

    2009-04-01

    We demonstrated second-order retrospective revaluation with three cues (T1, T2, and C) and an outcome, in human contingency learning. Experimental task, PC-controlled video game in which participants were required to observe about the relations between firing missiles and the tank destruction, consisted of three training phases and two rating phases. Groups C+ and C- consisted of same first two training phases, CT+ (cues C and T with an outcome) and T1T2+ followed by C+, or C- training for Groups C+, C-, respectively. In rating phases, it is clearly demonstrated that the judgment of predictive value for the outcome of the T2 were higher by C+ training (second-order unovershadowing) and lowered by C- training (second-order backward blocking). The results for Groups RC+ and RC-, in which the orders of the first two training phase for Groups C+ and C- were interchanged, also showed second-order unovershadowing and second-order backward blocking. These results, the robustness of second-order retrospective revaluation against the order of the first training phases, can be explained by the extended comparator hypothesis and probabilistic contrast model. However, these results cannot be explained by traditional associative learning models. PMID:19489431

  17. Chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane is presented and discussed. The mechanism consists of 27 chemical species and 83 elementary chemical reactions. Ignition and combustion data as determined in shock tube studies were used to evaluate the mechanism. Numerical simulation of the shock tube experiments showed that the kinetic behavior predicted by the mechanism for stoichiometric mixtures is in good agrement with the experimental results over the entire temperature range examined (1150-2600K). Sensitivity and theoretical studies carried out using the mechanism revealed that hydrocarbon reactions which are involved in the formation of the HO2 radical and the H2O2 molecule are very important in the mechanism and that the observed nonlinear behavior of ignition delay time with decreasing temperature can be interpreted in terms of the increased importance of the HO2 and H2O2 reactions at the lower temperatures.

  18. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Piers; *Morse, John W.

    2010-11-15

    1. Objective The general objective of this research was to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and modest ranges of T and P. This would be done by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry. Also, nanoscale observations of calcite surface morphology and composition would be made to provide an understanding of rate controlling mechanisms.

  19. SABIO-RK--database for biochemical reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wittig, Ulrike; Kania, Renate; Golebiewski, Martin; Rey, Maja; Shi, Lei; Jong, Lenneke; Algaa, Enkhjargal; Weidemann, Andreas; Sauer-Danzwith, Heidrun; Mir, Saqib; Krebs, Olga; Bittkowski, Meik; Wetsch, Elina; Rojas, Isabel; Müller, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    SABIO-RK (http://sabio.h-its.org/) is a web-accessible database storing comprehensive information about biochemical reactions and their kinetic properties. SABIO-RK offers standardized data manually extracted from the literature and data directly submitted from lab experiments. The database content includes kinetic parameters in relation to biochemical reactions and their biological sources with no restriction on any particular set of organisms. Additionally, kinetic rate laws and corresponding equations as well as experimental conditions are represented. All the data are manually curated and annotated by biological experts, supported by automated consistency checks. SABIO-RK can be accessed via web-based user interfaces or automatically via web services that allow direct data access by other tools. Both interfaces support the export of the data together with its annotations in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language), e.g. for import in modelling tools.

  20. Diagnostic Appraisal of Grade 12 Students' Understanding of Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics, a topic which has not been extensively explored in the chemistry education literature at this level. A 3-tier diagnostic instrument with 11 questions was developed--this format is of very recent origin and has been the subject of only a handful of studies. The findings…

  1. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  2. REACTION KINETICS OF CA-BASED SORBENTS WITH HC1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of the reaction between CaO and HCl were investigated under conditions that minimize bulk mass transfer and pore diffusion limitations. Reactivity data from 0.2- to 1-s exposure to 5000 ppm HCl in a fixed bed reactor were analyzed by a shrinking core model of diffusi...

  3. Developing the reaction kinetics for a biodiesel reactor.

    PubMed

    Slinn, Matthew; Kendall, Kevin

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the kinetics of the biodiesel reaction in order to find out how best to reach 96.5% methyl ester. The purity of the biodiesel product was examined using gas chromatography to the EN14214 FAME standard and real-time optical microscopy was used to observe the reaction. The problem was the reaction does not reach completion and the mechanism is not understood. It was observed that droplet size had a major influence on reaction end point and that the reaction was mass-transfer limited. This observation was confirmed by developing a mass-transfer based reaction model using the data from the batch reactor which agreed with results from other researchers. The model predicted better conversion with more mixing intensity. The results show that significant improvements could be made to the conventional FAME process.

  4. Laccase-catalyzed removal of the antimicrobials chlorophene and dichlorophen from water: Reaction kinetics, pathway and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huanhuan; Peng, Jianbiao; Li, Jianhua; Mao, Liang; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-11-01

    As active agents in cleaning and disinfecting products, antimicrobials have been widely spread in the environment and have drawn extensive attention as potential threats to the ecological system and human health. In this study, the laccase-catalyzed removal of two emerging antimicrobials, chlorophene (CP) and dichlorophen (DCP), was investigated under simulated environmental conditions. Intrinsic reaction kinetics showed that the removal of CP and DCP followed second-order reaction kinetics, first-order with respect to both the enzyme and the substrate concentration. It was also found that fulvic acid could suppress the transformation of CP and DCP by reversing the oxidation reactions through its action as a scavenger of the free radical intermediates produced from reactions between laccase and the substrates. Several reaction products were identified by a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and detailed reaction pathways were proposed. For both CP and DCP, direct polymerization was the principal pathway, and the coupling patterns were further corroborated based on molecular modeling. The nucleophilic substitution of chlorine by the hydroxyl group was observed, and further oxidation products capable of coupling with each other were also found. Additionally, toxicity evaluation tests using Scenedesmus obliquus confirmed that the toxicity of CP and DCP was effectively eliminated during the reaction processes.

  5. Laccase-catalyzed removal of the antimicrobials chlorophene and dichlorophen from water: Reaction kinetics, pathway and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huanhuan; Peng, Jianbiao; Li, Jianhua; Mao, Liang; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-11-01

    As active agents in cleaning and disinfecting products, antimicrobials have been widely spread in the environment and have drawn extensive attention as potential threats to the ecological system and human health. In this study, the laccase-catalyzed removal of two emerging antimicrobials, chlorophene (CP) and dichlorophen (DCP), was investigated under simulated environmental conditions. Intrinsic reaction kinetics showed that the removal of CP and DCP followed second-order reaction kinetics, first-order with respect to both the enzyme and the substrate concentration. It was also found that fulvic acid could suppress the transformation of CP and DCP by reversing the oxidation reactions through its action as a scavenger of the free radical intermediates produced from reactions between laccase and the substrates. Several reaction products were identified by a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and detailed reaction pathways were proposed. For both CP and DCP, direct polymerization was the principal pathway, and the coupling patterns were further corroborated based on molecular modeling. The nucleophilic substitution of chlorine by the hydroxyl group was observed, and further oxidation products capable of coupling with each other were also found. Additionally, toxicity evaluation tests using Scenedesmus obliquus confirmed that the toxicity of CP and DCP was effectively eliminated during the reaction processes. PMID:27262275

  6. Kinetics and Thermochemistry of the Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) + C2Cl4 Association Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wang, S.; Mckee, M. L.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the Cl(sup 2)P(sub j) + C2Cl4 association reaction as a function of temperature (231-390 K) and pressure (3-700 Torr) in nitrogen buffer gas. The reaction is found to be in the falloff regime between third and second order over the range of conditions investigated, although the second-order limit is approached at the highest pressures and lowest temperatures. At temperatures below 300 K, the association reaction is found to be irreversible on the experimental time scale of approximately 20 m-s. The kinetic data at T is less than 300 K have been employed to obtain falloff parameters in a convenient format for atmospheric modeling. At temperatures above 330 K, reversible addition is observed, thus allowing equilibrium constants for C2Cl5 formation and dissociation to be determined. Second- and third-law analyses of the equilibrium data lead to the following thermochemical parameters for the association reaction: Delta-H(298) = -18.1 +/- 1.3 kcal/mol, Delta-H(0) = -17.6 +/- 1.3 kcal/mol, and Delta-S(298) = -27.7 +/- 3.0 cal/mol.K. In conjunction with the well-known heats of formation of Cl((sup 2)P(sub j)) and C2Cl4 the above Delta-H values lead to the following heats of formation for C2Cl5, at 298 and 0 K: Delta-H(f,298) = 8.0 +/- 1.3 kcal/mol and Delta-H(f,0) = 8.1 +/- 1.5 kcal/mol. The kinetic and thermochemical parameters reported above are compared with other reported values, and the significance of reported association rate coefficients for understanding tropospheric chlorine chemistry is discussed.

  7. Palm fatty acid biodiesel: process optimization and study of reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Praveen K S; Singh, Onkar; Singh, R P

    2010-01-01

    The relatively high cost of refined oils render the resulting fuels unable to compete with petroleum derived fuel. In this study, biodiesel is prepared from palm fatty acid (PFA) which is a by-product of palm oil refinery. The process conditions were optimized for production of palm fatty acid methyl esters. A maximum conversion of 94.4% was obtained using two step trans-esterification with 1:10 molar ratio of oil to methanol at 65°C. Sulfuric acid and Sodium hydroxide were used as acid and base catalyst respectively. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) obtained was similar to that of palm oil. The biodiesel produced met the established specifications of biodiesel of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The kinetics of the trans-esterification reaction was also studied and the data reveals that the reaction is of first order in fatty acid and methanol (MeOH) and over all the reaction is of second order. PMID:20972357

  8. Second-order conditioning with and without unconditioned stimulus presentation.

    PubMed

    Holland, P C

    1980-07-01

    The effects of presenting various episodes after serial presentation of two conditioned stimuli (CS2-CS1 sequences) on second-order conditioning to CS2 were examined in three experiments using rat subjects in an appetitive conditioning situation. In Experiment 1, presentation of food unconditioned stimuli (USs) immediately after CS2-CS1 sequences interfered with second-order conditioning of CS2. In Experiment 2, postsequence presentation of a "surprising" US interfered with second-order conditioning more than did presentation of an "expected" US; similarly, less second-order conditioning of CS2 was observed when postsequence nonpresentation of a US was surprising than when US omission was expected. In Experiment 3, the interfering effect of US presentation on second-order conditioning was smaller when a brief delay was introduced between presentation of the CS2-CS-1 sequence and the US. The results are discussed in terms of an information-processing theory recently proposed by Wagner and his colleagues.

  9. Pulsed ion beam investigation of the kinetics of surface reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, C. C.; Eck, T. G.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsed ion beam measurements of the kinetics of surface reactions are discussed for the case where the width of the ion pulse is comparable to the measured reaction time, but short compared to the time between successive pulses. Theoretical expressions are derived for the time dependence of the ion-induced signals for linear surface reactions. Results are presented for CO emission from surface carbon and CF emission from Teflon induced by oxygen ion bombardment. The strengths and limitations of this technique are described.

  10. Deflection of light to second order in conformal Weyl gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    We reexamine the deflection of light in conformal Weyl gravity obtained in Sultana and Kazanas (2010), by extending the calculation based on the procedure by Rindler and Ishak, for the bending angle by a centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution, to second order in M/R, where M is the mass of the source and R is the impact parameter. It has recently been reported in Bhattacharya et al. (JCAP 09 (2010) 004; JCAP 02 (2011) 028), that when this calculation is done to second order, the term γr in the Mannheim-Kazanas metric, yields again the paradoxical contribution γR (where the bending angle is proportional to the impact parameter) obtained by standard formalisms appropriate to asymptotically flat spacetimes. We show that no such contribution is obtained for a second order calculation and the effects of the term γr in the metric are again insignificant as reported in our earlier work.

  11. Some restrictions on the existence of second order limit language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Yusof, Yuhani; Fong, Wan Heng

    2015-10-01

    The cut and paste phenomenon on DNA molecules with the presence of restriction enzyme and appropriate ligase has led to the formalism of mathematical modelling of splicing system. A type of splicing system named Yusof-Goode splicing system is used to present the transparent behaviour of the DNA splicing process. The limit language that is defined as the leftover molecules after the system reaches its equilibrium point has been extended to a second order limit language. The non-existence of the second order limit language biologically has lead to this study by using mathematical approach. In this paper, the factors that restrict the formation of the second order limit language are discussed and are presented as lemmas and theorem using Y-G approach. In addition, the discussion focuses on Yusof- Goode splicing system with at most two initial strings and two rules with one cutting site and palindromic crossing site and recognition sites.

  12. Weak value amplification via second-order correlated technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Cui; Jing-Zheng, Huang; Xiang, Liu; Gui-Hua, Zeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new framework combining weak measurement and second-order correlated technique. The theoretical analysis shows that weak value amplification (WVA) experiment can also be implemented by a second-order correlated system. We then build two-dimensional second-order correlated function patterns for achieving higher amplification factor and discuss the signal-to-noise ratio influence. Several advantages can be obtained by our proposal. For instance, detectors with high resolution are not necessary. Moreover, detectors with low saturation intensity are available in WVA setup. Finally, type-one technical noise can be effectively suppressed. Project supported by the Union Research Centre of Advanced Spaceflight Technology (Grant No. USCAST2013-05), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61170228, 61332019, and 61471239), and the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122901).

  13. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  14. Reaction kinetics of some important site-specific endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Hinsch, B; Kula, M R

    1981-01-01

    Reaction kinetics of the site-specific endonucleases BamHI, BgIII, C1aI, EcoRI, HpaII, PstI, SaII, SmaI, and XorII were investigated employing some frequently used substrates. Six of these enzymes could be analyzed under steady-state conditions. Kinetic data were obtained from progress curves applying an integrated Michaelis-Menten equation. KM ranged from 4 x 10(-9) M to 4 x 10(-11) M. Activities also spanned two orders of magnitude. In the case of C1aI the analysis of the pre-steady-state kinetics ("burst reaction") allowed the assessment of several rate constants. The rate-limiting step is the very slow dissociation of the enzyme-product complex (0.22 min(-1)). This complex is formed from the enzyme-bound nicked intermediate at a rate of 1.7 min(-1). The introduction of the first cut is again faster by a factor of about 6. SmaI and XorII resembled C1aI in their kinetics. The burst reaction can be used for the easy and unambiguous determination of molar concentrations of site-specific endonucleases in any preparation, which is free of non-specific DNases. PMID:6269074

  15. Solution of second order supersymmetrical intertwining relations in Minkowski plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, M. V.; Kolevatova, E. V.; Nishnianidze, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    Supersymmetrical (SUSY) intertwining relations are generalized to the case of quantum Hamiltonians in Minkowski space. For intertwining operators (supercharges) of second order in derivatives, the intertwined Hamiltonians correspond to completely integrable systems with the symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta. In terms of components, the intertwining relations correspond to the system of nonlinear differential equations which are solvable with the simplest—constant—ansatzes for the "metric" matrix in second order part of the supercharges. The corresponding potentials are built explicitly both for diagonalizable and nondiagonalizable form of "metric" matrices, and their properties are discussed.

  16. Human cooperation: second-order free-riding problem solved?

    PubMed

    Fowler, James H

    2005-09-22

    Panchanathan and Boyd describe a model of indirect reciprocity in which mutual aid among cooperators can promote large-scale human cooperation without succumbing to a second-order free-riding problem (whereby individuals receive but do not give aid). However, the model does not include second-order free riders as one of the possible behavioural types. Here I present a simplified version of their model to demonstrate how cooperation unravels if second-round defectors enter the population, and this shows that the free-riding problem remains unsolved.

  17. Controlling flexible structures with second order actuator dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Umland, Jeffrey W.; Bellos, John

    1989-01-01

    The control of flexible structures for those systems with actuators that are modeled by second order dynamics is examined. Two modeling approaches are investigated. First a stability and performance analysis is performed using a low order finite dimensional model of the structure. Secondly, a continuum model of the flexible structure to be controlled, coupled with lumped parameter second order dynamic models of the actuators performing the control is used. This model is appropriate in the modeling of the control of a flexible panel by proof-mass actuators as well as other beam, plate and shell like structural numbers. The model is verified with experimental measurements.

  18. Kubo Formulas for Second-Order Hydrodynamic Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Guy D.; Sohrabi, Kiyoumars A.

    2011-03-25

    At second order in gradients, conformal relativistic hydrodynamics depends on the viscosity {eta} and on five additional ''second-order'' hydrodynamical coefficients {tau}{sub {Pi}}, {kappa}, {lambda}{sub 1}, {lambda}{sub 2}, and {lambda}{sub 3}. We derive Kubo relations for these coefficients, relating them to equilibrium, fully retarded three-point correlation functions of the stress tensor. We show that the coefficient {lambda}{sub 3} can be evaluated directly by Euclidean means and does not in general vanish.

  19. The Poisson equation at second order in relativistic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, J.C.; Christopherson, Adam J.; Malik, Karim A. E-mail: Adam.Christopherson@nottingham.ac.uk

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the relativistic constraint equation which relates the curvature perturbation to the matter density contrast at second order in cosmological perturbation theory. This relativistic ''second order Poisson equation'' is presented in a gauge where the hydrodynamical inhomogeneities coincide with their Newtonian counterparts exactly for a perfect fluid with constant equation of state. We use this constraint to introduce primordial non-Gaussianity in the density contrast in the framework of General Relativity. We then derive expressions that can be used as the initial conditions of N-body codes for structure formation which probe the observable signature of primordial non-Gaussianity in the statistics of the evolved matter density field.

  20. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  1. A kinetics investigation of several reactions involving chlorine containing compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence was utilized to study nine reactions of stratospheric importance. The tropospheric degradation reactions of seven halogenated hydrocarbons were studied to assess their possible influx into the stratosphere. There are reactions of either Cl, OH, or O(3P) species with hydrogenated species, O3 or chlorinated compounds. Apart from the kinetic measurements, the quantum yield for the production of O(1D) from O3 in the crucial wavelength region of 293 to 316.5 nm was studied by utilizing a narrow wavelength laser as the photolysis source. The product formation was monitored by measuring the fluorescence of NO2 formed through O(1D) reaction with N2O followed by NO reaction with O3 to give NO2.

  2. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  3. Second-Order Conditioning during a Compound Extinction Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineno, Oskar; Zilski, Jessica M.; Schachtman, Todd R.

    2007-01-01

    Two conditioned taste aversion experiments with rats were conducted to establish if a target taste that had received a prior pairing with illness could be subject to second-order conditioning during extinction treatment in compound with a flavor that also received prior conditioning. In these experiments, the occurrence of second-order…

  4. Second-order variational equations for N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno; Tamayo, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    First-order variational equations are widely used in N-body simulations to study how nearby trajectories diverge from one another. These allow for efficient and reliable determinations of chaos indicators such as the Maximal Lyapunov characteristic Exponent (MLE) and the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO). In this paper we lay out the theoretical framework to extend the idea of variational equations to higher order. We explicitly derive the differential equations that govern the evolution of second-order variations in the N-body problem. Going to second order opens the door to new applications, including optimization algorithms that require the first and second derivatives of the solution, like the classical Newton's method. Typically, these methods have faster convergence rates than derivative-free methods. Derivatives are also required for Riemann manifold Langevin and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods which provide significantly shorter correlation times than standard methods. Such improved optimization methods can be applied to anything from radial-velocity/transit-timing-variation fitting to spacecraft trajectory optimization to asteroid deflection. We provide an implementation of first- and second-order variational equations for the publicly available REBOUND integrator package. Our implementation allows the simultaneous integration of any number of first- and second-order variational equations with the high-accuracy IAS15 integrator. We also provide routines to generate consistent and accurate initial conditions without the need for finite differencing.

  5. Second-order accurate difference schemes on highly irregular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Manteuffel, T.A.; White, A.B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper compact-as-possible second-order accurate difference schemes will be constructed for boundary-value problems of arbitrary order on highly irregular meshes. It will be shown that for equations of order (K) these schemes will have truncation error of order (3/endash/K). This phenomena is known as supraconvergence. 7 refs.

  6. Second-order nonlinear optical metamaterials: ABC-type nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Alloatti, L. Kieninger, C.; Lauermann, M.; Köhnle, K.; Froelich, A.; Wegener, M.; Frenzel, T.; Freude, W.; Leuthold, J.; Koos, C.

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrate a concept for second-order nonlinear metamaterials that can be obtained from non-metallic centrosymmetric constituents with inherently low optical absorption. The concept is based on iterative atomic-layer deposition of three different materials, A = Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B = TiO{sub 2}, and C = HfO{sub 2}. The centrosymmetry of the resulting ABC stack is broken since the ABC and the inverted CBA sequences are not equivalent—a necessary condition for non-zero second-order nonlinearity. In our experiments, we find that the bulk second-order nonlinear susceptibility depends on the density of interfaces, leading to a nonlinear susceptibility of 0.26 pm/V at a wavelength of 800 nm. ABC-type nanolaminates can be deposited on virtually any substrate and offer a promising route towards engineering of second-order optical nonlinearities at both infrared and visible wavelengths.

  7. Forward and Backward Second-Order Pavlovian Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussaini, Syed Abid; Komischke, Bernhard; Menzel, Randolf; Lachnit, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Second-order conditioning (SOC) is the association of a neutral stimulus with another stimulus that had previously been combined with an unconditioned stimulus (US). We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in honeybees ("Apis mellifera") with odors (CS) and sugar (US). Previous SOC experiments in bees were…

  8. Generalized Second-Order Partial Derivatives of 1/r

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The generalized second-order partial derivatives of 1/r, where r is the radial distance in three dimensions (3D), are obtained using a result of the potential theory of classical analysis. Some non-spherical-regularization alternatives to the standard spherical-regularization expression for the derivatives are derived. The utility of a…

  9. Maximum principles for second order dynamic equations on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehlik, Petr; Thompson, Bevan

    2007-07-01

    This paper establishes some new maximum principles for second order dynamic equations on time scales, including: a strong maximum principle; a generalized maximum principle; and a boundary point lemma. The new results include, as special cases, well-known ideas for ordinary differential equations and difference equations.

  10. Second-order accurate nonoscillatory schemes for scalar conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1989-01-01

    Explicit finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of nonlinear scalar conservation laws is presented and analyzed. These schemes are uniformly second-order accurate and nonoscillatory in the sense that the number of extrema of the discrete solution is not increasing in time.

  11. A New Factorisation of a General Second Order Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A factorisation of a general second order ordinary differential equation is introduced from which the full solution to the equation can be obtained by performing two integrations. The method is compared with traditional methods for solving these type of equations. It is shown how the Green's function can be derived directly from the factorisation…

  12. Remarks on the second-order Seiberg-Witten maps

    SciTech Connect

    Trampetic, Josip; Wohlgenannt, Michael

    2007-12-15

    In this brief report, we discuss the Seiberg-Witten maps up to the second order in the noncommutative parameter {theta}. They add to the recently published solutions in [A. Alboteanu, T. Ohl, and R. Rueckl, Phys. Rev. D 76, 105018 (2007).]. Expressions for the vector, fermion, and Higgs fields are given explicitly.

  13. Pecuniary Effects, Second-Order Conditions, and the LRAC Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comolli, Paul M.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the importance of second-order conditions in the cost-minimization problem confronting the monopsonistic employer of factor inputs. Describes an alternative approach to the presence of pecuniary effects that does not depend on the assumption that firms are monopsonistic in factor markets. (CMK)

  14. Modeling Ability Differentiation in the Second-Order Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Dylan; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present factor models to test for ability differentiation. Ability differentiation predicts that the size of IQ subtest correlations decreases as a function of the general intelligence factor. In the Schmid-Leiman decomposition of the second-order factor model, we model differentiation by introducing heteroscedastic residuals,…

  15. Solving Second-Order Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmer, A., III; Costa, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed in which an analytical solution is obtained for certain classes of second-order differential equations with variable coefficients. By the use of transformations and by repeated iterated integration, a desired solution is obtained. This alternative method represents a different way to acquire a solution from classic power…

  16. Green's function of the second order differential operator with involution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Sarsenbi, Abdisalam A.

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, the Green's function of the second order differential operator L defined by formula L u =α u″ (x ) -u″ (-x ) =λ u (x ) ,-1

  17. Second-order sliding mode control with experimental application.

    PubMed

    Eker, Ilyas

    2010-07-01

    In this article, a second-order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed for second-order uncertain plants using equivalent control approach to improve the performance of control systems. A Proportional + Integral + Derivative (PID) sliding surface is used for the sliding mode. The sliding mode control law is derived using direct Lyapunov stability approach and asymptotic stability is proved theoretically. The performance of the closed-loop system is analysed through an experimental application to an electromechanical plant to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed second-order sliding mode control and factors involved in the design. The second-order plant parameters are experimentally determined using input-output measured data. The results of the experimental application are presented to make a quantitative comparison with the traditional (first-order) sliding mode control (SMC) and PID control. It is demonstrated that the proposed 2-SMC system improves the performance of the closed-loop system with better tracking specifications in the case of external disturbances, better behavior of the output and faster convergence of the sliding surface while maintaining the stability.

  18. Autocatalysis-driven clock reaction II: kinetics of the pentathionate-periodate reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-10-23

    The pentathionate-periodate reaction has been investigated by spectrophotometrically monitoring the total amount of iodine evolved in the presence of phosphoric acid/dihydrogen phosphate buffer at 468 nm. The majority of the main characteristics of the title system is very reminiscent of that found recently in the pentathionate-iodate reaction, a system that led us to classify generally the clock reactions. Along with the pentathionate-iodate reaction the title system is proposed to belong to the autocatalysis-driven clock reactions as well. The kinetic model of the pentathionate-iodate system published recently was implemented by the necessary reactions of periodate to compose a 24-step kinetic model in which the mechanisms of the pentathionate-iodine, pentathionate-iodate, bisulfite-periodate, bisulfite-iodate, iodide-periodate, and the well-known Dushman reactions are combined. A thorough analysis revealed that the direct pentathionate-periodate reaction plays a role only to produce iodide ion via a finite sequence of reactions, and once its concentration reaches a certain level, the reaction is almost exclusively governed by the pentathionate-iodine, the iodide-periodate, and the Dushman reactions. As expected strong catalytic effect of the buffer composition is also found that can readily be explained by its well-known catalytic influence on the Dushman reaction. PMID:25268333

  19. Kinetics of the monomer-monomer surface reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W.; Ray, T.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The two-dimensional monomer-monomer ([ital AB]) surface reaction model without diffusion is considered for infinitesimal, finite, and infinite reaction rates [ital k]. For equal reactant adsorption rates, in all cases, simulations reveal the same form of slow poisoning, associated with clustering of reactants. This behavior is also the same as that found in simulations of the two-dimensional [ital voter] [ital model] studied in interacting-particle systems theory. The voter model can also be obtained from the dimer-dimer or monomer-dimer surface reaction models with infinitesimal reaction rate. We provide a detailed elucidation of the slow poisoning kinetics via an analytic treatment for the [ital k]=0[sup +] [ital AB] reaction and the voter models. This analysis is extended to incorporate the effects of place-exchange diffusion which slows, but does not prevent poisoning. We also show that the [ital k]=0[sup +] [ital AB] reaction with no diffusion is equivalent to the voter model with diffusion at rate 1/2. Identical behavior of the monomer-monomer reaction and the voter model is also found in an epidemic'' analysis, where one considers the evolution of a surface poisoned by one species, except for a small patch. Finally, we apply our findings to elucidate the behavior of the monomer-dimer surface reaction model for small reaction rates.

  20. Reactions of allylic radicals that impact molecular weight growth kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-03-01

    The reactions of allylic radicals have the potential to play a critical role in molecular weight growth (MWG) kinetics during hydrocarbon oxidation and/or pyrolysis. Due to their stability (when compared to alkyl radicals), they can accumulate to relatively high concentrations. Thus, even though the rate coefficients for their various reactions are small, the rates of these reactions may be significant. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations to examine the recombination, addition, and abstraction reactions of allylic radicals. For the recombination reaction of allyl radicals, we assign a high pressure rate rule that is based on experimental data. Once formed, the recombination product can potentially undergo an H-atom abstraction reaction followed by unimolecular cyclization and β-scission reactions. Depending upon the conditions (e.g., higher pressures) these pathways can lead to the formation of stable MWG species. The addition of allylic radicals to olefins can also lead to MWG species formation. Once again, cyclization of the adduct followed by β-scission is an important energy accessible route. Since the recombination and addition reactions produce chemically-activated adducts, we have explored the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the overall rate constants as well as that for the multiple product channels. We describe a strategy for estimating these pressure-dependencies for systems where detailed electronic structure information is not available. We also derive generic rate rules for hydrogen abstraction reactions from olefins and diolefins by methyl and allyl radicals.

  1. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products.

  2. Kinetics of Solid Phase Reactions at High Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J M; Farber, D L; Saw, C K; Weeks, B L

    2002-02-11

    We report on the subject of temperature and/or pressure induced solid-solid phase transitions of energetic molecular crystals. Over the last three years we have applied experimental techniques that when used simultaneously provide insight into some of the complexities that govern reaction rate processes. After more than 55 years of study a global kinetics model describing the P-T phase space transition kinetics of such materials as HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is not only missing, but from a formal perspective is perhaps as many years away from completion. The essence of this report describes what material parameters affect first-order reaction rates of the CHNO moiety of molecular crystals and introduces the application of new experimental tools thus permitting quantifiable studies of important rate limiting mechanisms.

  3. Kinetics of the BrO + NO2 Association Reaction. Temperature and Pressure Dependence in the Falloff Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thron, R. P.; Daykin, E. P.; Wine, P.H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-long path absorption technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reaction BrO + NO2 + M yields (k1) products as a function of temperature (248-346 K), pressure (16-800 torr), and buffer gas identity (N2,CF4) The reaction is found to be in the falloff regime between third and second-order over the entire range of conditions investigated This is the first study where temperature-dependent measurements of k1(P,T) have been reported at pressures greater than 12 torr; hence, our results help constrain choices of k1(P,T) for use in models of lower stratospheric BrO(x) chemistry. Approximate falloff parameters in a convenient form for atmospheric modeling are derived.

  4. Portable centrifugal analyzer for the determination of rapid reaction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bauer, M.L.; McCracken, R.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1980-02-01

    A portable centrifugal analyzer prototype is capable of rapidly initiating reactions and monitoring 17 optical channels as they rotate past a stationary photodetector. An advanced rotor drive permits transfer of discretely loaded sample and reagent into a cuvette within 60 ms. Various rotor designs have been employed to ensure effieicnt mixing concurrent with solution transfer, thus permitting absorbance or luminescence measurements to be made almost immediately after solution contract. Dye-dillution studies have been used to investigate transfer and mixing efficiencies. Rotor designs with parallel access for sample and reagent into the cuvette were found to promote efficient mixing during liquid transfer. The hypochlorite-luminol chemiluminescent reaction served to demonstrate the utility of the system for performing rapid kinetic analyses. Appropriate adjustment of reaction conditions allows first-order reaction half-lives as short as 0.04 s to be measured. 13 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons hydrogenation. 1: Experimental reaction pathways and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Korre, S.C.; Klein, M.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Quann, R.J. . Paulsboro Research Lab.)

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between molecular structure and hydrogenation reactivity in heavy oil hydroprocessing was sought via the elucidation of the controlling reaction pathways and kinetics of one-, two-, three-, and four-fused ring compounds. Hydrogenation reactions of o-xylene, tetralin, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, and chrysene and their multicomponent mixtures were studied in cyclohexane solvent using a presulfided CoMo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalyst in a 1-liter batch autoclave at P[sub H[sub 2

  6. Characterization of hot hydrogen-atom reactions by kinetic spectrography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomalesky, R. E.; Sturm, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The flash photolysis of hydrogen iodide in the presence of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and water has been investigated by kinetic spectroscopy. Although the fraction of hydrogen iodide dissociated was very large, the only observable intermediate was imidogen. It was demonstrated that the rapid removal of imidogen and the apparent absence of hydroxyl radicals in each case is a result of the following two reactions, respectively: (1) NH + HI yields NH2 + I; and (2) OH + HI yields H2O + I.

  7. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  8. Electrochemically responsive heterogeneous catalysis for controlling reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianwen; Tian, Wenda; Wu, Jie; Rutledge, Gregory C; Hatton, T Alan

    2015-01-28

    We report a method to control reaction kinetics using electrochemically responsive heterogeneous catalysis (ERHC). An ERHC system should possess a hybrid structure composed of an electron-conducting porous framework coated with redox-switchable catalysts. In contrast to other types of responsive catalysis, ERHC combines all the following desired characteristics for a catalysis control strategy: continuous variation of reaction rates as a function of the magnitude of external stimulus, easy integration into fixed-bed flow reactors, and precise spatial and temporal control of the catalyst activity. Herein we first demonstrate a facile approach to fabricating a model ERHC system that consists of carbon microfibers with conformal redox polymer coating. Second, using a Michael reaction whose kinetics depends on the redox state of the redox polymer catalyst, we show that use of different electrochemical potentials permits continuous adjustment of the reaction rates. The dependence of the reaction rate on the electrochemical potential generally agrees with the Nernstian prediction, with minor discrepancies due to the multilayer nature of the polymer film. Additionally, we show that the ERHC system can be employed to manipulate the shape of the reactant concentration-time profile in a batch reactor through applying customized potential-time programs. Furthermore, we perform COMSOL simulation for an ERHC-integrated flow reactor, demonstrating highly flexible manipulation of reactant concentrations as a function of both location and time.

  9. Kinetics of the reversible reaction of struvite crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Crutchik, D; Garrido, J M

    2016-07-01

    The crystallisation of struvite could be a sustainable and economical alternative for recovering phosphorus from wastewater streams with high phosphate concentrations. Knowledge regarding the kinetics and thermodynamics that are involved in the crystallisation of struvite is the key to determine the optimal conditions for obtaining an efficient process. This study was conducted in a continuous stirred batch reactor. Different sets of experiments were performed in which struvite was either dissolved (undersaturated) or precipitated (oversaturated). These experiments were conducted at different temperatures (25, 30 and 35 °C) and pH values (8.2, 8.5 and 8.8) to determine the kinetics of struvite precipitation and dissolution. Struvite crystallisation was modelled as a reversible reaction. The kinetic rate parameters of struvite precipitation were 1.03·10(-4), 1.25·10(-4) and 1.54·10(-4) mol m(-2) min(-1) at 25, 30 and 35 °C, respectively. Similar kinetic rate parameters were determined for struvite dissolution. Struvite heterogeneous crystallisation can be represented by a first-order kinetic model that fitted well the experimental data. PMID:27085317

  10. Ab initio kinetics of gas phase decomposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2010-12-01

    The thermal and kinetic aspects of gas phase decomposition reactions can be extremely complex due to a large number of parameters, a variety of possible intermediates, and an overlap in thermal decomposition traces. The experimental determination of the activation energies is particularly difficult when several possible reaction pathways coexist in the thermal decomposition. Ab initio calculations intended to provide an interpretation of the experiment are often of little help if they produce only the activation barriers and ignore the kinetics of the decomposition process. To overcome this ambiguity, a theoretical study of a complete picture of gas phase thermo-decomposition, including reaction energies, activation barriers, and reaction rates, is illustrated with the example of the β-octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) molecule by means of quantum-chemical calculations. We study three types of major decomposition reactions characteristic of nitramines: the HONO elimination, the NONO rearrangement, and the N-NO(2) homolysis. The reaction rates were determined using the conventional transition state theory for the HONO and NONO decompositions and the variational transition state theory for the N-NO(2) homolysis. Our calculations show that the HMX decomposition process is more complex than it was previously believed to be and is defined by a combination of reactions at any given temperature. At all temperatures, the direct N-NO(2) homolysis prevails with the activation barrier at 38.1 kcal/mol. The nitro-nitrite isomerization and the HONO elimination, with the activation barriers at 46.3 and 39.4 kcal/mol, respectively, are slow reactions at all temperatures. The obtained conclusions provide a consistent interpretation for the reported experimental data. PMID:21077597

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of the chlorine dioxide-trithionate reaction.

    PubMed

    Cseko, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2012-03-22

    The trithionate-chlorine dioxide reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in a slightly acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in acetate/acetic acid buffer monitoring the decay of chlorine dioxide at constant ionic strength (I = 0.5 M) adjusted by sodium perchlorate. We found that under our experimental conditions two limiting stoichiometries exist and the pH, the concentration of the reactants, and even the concentration of chloride ion affects the actual stoichiometry of the reaction that can be augmented by an appropriate linear combination of these limiting processes. It is also shown that although the formal kinetic order of trithionate is strictly one that of chlorine dioxide varies between 1 and 2, depending on the actual chlorine dioxide excess and the pH. Moreover, the otherwise sluggish chloride ion, which is also a product of the reaction, slightly accelerates the initial rate of chlorine dioxide consumption and may therefore act as an autocatalyst. In addition to that, overshoot-undershoot behavior is also observed in the [(·)ClO(2)]-time curves in the presence of chloride ion at chlorine dioxide excess. On the basis of the experiments, a 13-step kinetic model with 6 fitted kinetic parameter is proposed by nonlinear parameter estimation.

  12. Carborane tuning on iridium complexes: redox-switchable second-order NLO responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Wang, Wen-Yong; Fang, Xin-Yan; Qiu, Yong-Qing

    2015-04-01

    Much effort has been devoted to investigating the molecular geometries, electronic structures, redox properties and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of Ir complexes involving o-, m- or p-carborane groups by density functional theory (DFT) methods. Switchable second-order NLO properties were induced by redox processes involving these complexes, and it was found that mainly the coordination bonds of Ir complexes changed during the oxidation process. Our calculations revealed that oxidation reactions have a significant influence on the second-order NLO response owing to the change in charge transfer pattern. The β tot values of oxidized species are at least ∼9 times larger for set I and ∼5 times larger for set II than those of the corresponding parent complexes. Introduction of carborane groups into ppy (phenylpyridine) ligands can enhance the second-order NLO response by 1.2- 1.6 times by a metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition between the Ir atom and carborane. The β tot of complex 2 [(ppy)2Ir(phen)](+) (phen = phenanthroline) is 3.3 times larger than that of complex 1 (ppy)2Ir(acce) (acce = acetylacetonate), which is caused by ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) between ppy ligands and the ancillary ligand. Therefore, it can be concluded that the second-order NLO response can be effectively enhanced by oxidation reactions.

  13. Second order modeling of boundary-free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Lumley, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of realizable second order models for boundary-free turbulent flows is presented. The constraints on second order models based on the realizability principle are re-examined. The rapid terms in the pressure correlations for both the Reynolds stress and the passive scalar flux equations are constructed to exactly satisfy the joint realizability. All other model terms (return-to-isotropy, third moments, and terms in the dissipation equations) already satisfy realizability. To correct the spreading rate of the axisymmetric jet, an extra term is added to the dissipation equation which accounts for the effect of mean vortex stretching on dissipation. The test flows used in this study are the mixing shear layer, plane jet, axisymmetric jet, and plane wake. The numerical solutions show that the unified model equations predict all these flows reasonably. It is expected that these models would be suitable for more complex and critical flows.

  14. Optimal second order sliding mode control for linear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-11-01

    In this paper an optimal second order sliding mode controller (OSOSMC) is proposed to track a linear uncertain system. The optimal controller based on the linear quadratic regulator method is designed for the nominal system. An integral sliding mode controller is combined with the optimal controller to ensure robustness of the linear system which is affected by parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. To achieve finite time convergence of the sliding mode, a nonsingular terminal sliding surface is added with the integral sliding surface giving rise to a second order sliding mode controller. The main advantage of the proposed OSOSMC is that the control input is substantially reduced and it becomes chattering free. Simulation results confirm superiority of the proposed OSOSMC over some existing.

  15. Second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for Euler equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin -Chiang; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-06-01

    A new second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for solving Euler equations for compressible inviscid fluid or gas flows is proposed. Similar to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), the method represents fluid cells with Lagrangian particles and is suitable for the simulation of complex free surface / multiphase flows. The main contributions of our method, which is different from SPH in all other aspects, are (a) significant improvement of approximation of differential operators based on a polynomial fit via weighted least squares approximation and the convergence of prescribed order, (b) an upwind second-order particle-based algorithm with limiter, providing accuracy and longmore » term stability, and (c) accurate resolution of states at free interfaces. In conclusion, numerical verification tests demonstrating the convergence order for fixed domain and free surface problems are presented.« less

  16. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-17

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources. PMID:27367389

  17. A Second-Order Achromat Design Based on FODO Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Two dipole doglegs are widely used to translate the beam axis horizontally or vertically. Quadrupoles are placed between the two consecutive dipoles to match first order dispersion and provide betatron focusing. Similarly a four dipole chicane is usually employed to form a bypass region, where the beam axis is transversely shifted first, then translated back to the original axis. In order to generate an isochronous section, quadrupoles are again needed to tune the first order transfer matrix element R{sub 56} equaling zero. Usually sextupoles are needed to correct second order dispersion in the bending plane, for both the dogleg optics and the chicane (with quad) optics. In this paper, an alternative optics design is introduced, which is based on a simple FODO cell and does not need sextupoles assistance to form a second-order achromat. It may provide a similar function of either a dogleg or a bypass, by using 2 or 4 of such combined supercells.

  18. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-01

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources.

  19. Compressible turbulence transport equations for generalized second order closure

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    1999-05-01

    Progress on the theory of second order closure in turbulence models of various types requires knowledge of the transport equations for various turbulence correlations. This report documents a procedure that provides such equations for a wide variety of turbulence averages for compressible flows of a multicomponent fluid. Generalizing some work by Germano for incompressible flows, we introduce an appropriate extension of his generalized second order correlations and use a generalized mass-weighted averaging procedure to derive transport equations for the correlations. The averaging procedure includes all of the commonly used averages as special cases. The resulting equations provide an internally consistent starting point for future work in developing single-point statistical turbulence transport models for fluid flows. The form invariance of the in-compressible equations also holds for the compressible case, and we discuss some of the closure issues and frequently ignored complications of statistical turbulence models of compressible flows.

  20. Robust eigensystem assignment for second-order estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1990-01-01

    An approach for the robust eigensystem assignment of flexible structures using full state or output feedback is developed. Using the second-order dynamic equations, the approach can assign the eigenvalues of the system via velocity and displacement feedbacks, or acceleration and velocity feedbacks. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system are assigned, via the second-order eigenvalue problem for the structural system, in two steps. First, an orthonormal basis spanning the attainable closed-loop eigenvector space corresponding to each desired closed-loop eigenvalue is generated using the Singular Value or QR decompositions. Second, a sequential procedure is used to choose a set of closed-loop eigenvectors that are as close as possible to the column space of a well-conditioned target matrix. Among the possible choices of the target matrix, the closest unitary matrix to the open-loop eigenvector matrix appears to be a suitable choice. A numerical example is given to illustrate the proposed algorithm.

  1. First- and second-order charged particle optics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-07-01

    Since the invention of the alternating gradient principle there has been a rapid evolution of the mathematics and physics techniques applicable to charged particle optics. In this publication we derive a differential equation and a matrix algebra formalism valid to second-order to present the basic principles governing the design of charged particle beam transport systems. A notation first introduced by John Streib is used to convey the essential principles dictating the design of such beam transport systems. For example the momentum dispersion, the momentum resolution, and all second-order aberrations are expressed as simple integrals of the first-order trajectories (matrix elements) and of the magnetic field parameters (multipole components) characterizing the system. 16 references, 30 figures.

  2. Transport equations with second-order differential collision operators

    SciTech Connect

    Cosner, C.; Lenhart, S.M.; Protopopescu, V.

    1988-07-01

    This paper discusses existence, uniqueness, and a priori estimates for time-dependent and time-independent transport equations with unbounded collision operators. These collision operators are described by second-order differential operators resulting from diffusion in the velocity space. The transport equations are degenerate parabolic-elliptic partial differential equations, that are treated by modifications of the Fichera-Oleinik-Radkevic Theory of second-order equations with nonnegative characteristic form. They consider weak solutions in spaces that are extensions of L/sup rho/ to include traces on certain parts of the boundary. This extension is necessary due to the nonclassical boundary conditions imposed by the transport problem, which requires a specific analysis of the behavior of our weak solutions.

  3. Gravitational waves from global second order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier; Vlcek, Brian E-mail: larryp@caltech.edu E-mail: bvlcek@uwm.edu

    2012-11-01

    Global second-order phase transitions are expected to produce scale-invariant gravitational wave spectra. In this manuscript we explore the dynamics of a symmetry-breaking phase transition using lattice simulations. We explicitly calculate the stochastic gravitational wave background produced during the transition and subsequent self-ordering phase. We comment on this signal as it compares to the scale-invariant spectrum produced during inflation.

  4. Asymptotic stability of second-order neutral stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Ren, Yong; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we study the existence and asymptotic stability in pth moment of mild solutions to second-order nonlinear neutral stochastic differential equations. Further, this result is extended to establish stability criterion for stochastic equations with impulsive effects. With the help of fixed point strategy, stochastic analysis technique, and semigroup theory, a set of novel sufficient conditions are derived for achieving the required result. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the obtained result.

  5. Second-order reconstruction of the inflationary potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Turner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    To first order in the deviation from scale invariance the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives can be expressed in terms of the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor perturbations, n and n(sub T), and their contributions to the variance of the quadrupole CBR temperature anisotropy, S and T. In addition, there is a 'consistency relation' between these quantities: n(sub T) = (-1/ 7)(T/S). We derive the second-order expressions for the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives and the first-order expression for its third derivative, in terms, of n, n(sub T), S, T, and dn/d ln gamma. We also obtain the second-order consistency relation, n(sub T) = (-1/7)(T/S)(1 + 0.11(T/S) + 0.15(n-1)). As an example we consider the exponential potential, the only known case where exact analytic solutions for the perturbation spectra exist. We reconstruct the potential via Taylor expansion (with coefficients calculated at both first and second order), and introduce the Pade approximate as a greatly improved alternative.

  6. Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Dicyanocobinamide and Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Dhiman; Ali, Iyad; Abdulridha, Rasha M.; Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is an abundant enzyme used for defense against microbes. We examined the potential role of HOCl in corrin ring destruction and subsequent formation of cyanogen chloride (CNCl) from dicyanocobinamide ((CN)2-Cbi). Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the reaction consists of at least three observable steps, including at least two sequential transient intermediates prior to corrin ring destruction. The first two steps were attributed to sequential replacement of the two cyanide ligands with hypochlorite, while the third step was the destruction of the corrin ring. The formation of (OCl)(CN)-Cbi and its conversion to (OCl)2-Cbi was fitted to a first order rate equation with second order rate constants of 0.002 and 0.0002 µM−1s−1, respectively. The significantly lower rate of the second step compared to the first suggests that the replacement of the first cyanide molecule by hypochlorite causes an alteration in the ligand trans effects changing the affinity and/or accessibility of Co toward hypochlorite. Plots of the apparent rate constants as a function of HOCl concentration for all the three steps were linear with Y-intercepts close to zero, indicating that HOCl binds in an irreversible one-step mechanism. Collectively, these results illustrate functional differences in the corrin ring environments toward binding of diatomic ligands. PMID:25375773

  7. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Brian P

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  8. Correction for instrument time constant in determination of reaction kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Marie; Clark, Jared; Thomas, Nathan; Nicholson, Allen; Hansen, Lee D.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Hansen, Jaron

    2010-02-01

    Rates of reactions can be expressed as dn/dt = kcf(n) where n is moles of reaction, k is a rate constant, c is a proportionality constant, and f(n) is a function of the properties of the sample. When the instrument time constant, ?, and k are sufficiently comparable that measured rates are significantly affected by instrument response, correction for instrument response must be done to obtain accurate reaction kinetics. Correction for instrument response has previously been done by truncating early data or by use of the Tian equation. Both methods can lead to significant errors. We describe a method for simultaneous determination of ?, k, and c by fitting equations describing the combined instrument response and rate law to rates observed as a function of time. The method was tested with data on the heat rate from acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose.

  9. Reaction kinetics of the CN radical with methyl bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodny, Michael; Hershberger, John F.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of the CN + CH3Br reaction were studied using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy to detect CN reactants and HCN products. This reaction has a rate constant of k = (2.20 ± 0.6) × 10-12 exp (453 ± 98/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the range 298-523 K. Hydrogen abstraction to produce HCN + CH2Br is only a minor reaction product, with a branching fraction of 0.12 ± 0.02. Other product channels, including BrCN + CH3, CH2CN + HBr, CH3CN + Br are likely. An upper limit of 0.01 was established for the HBr yield. These results are in qualitative agreement with recent ab initio calculations.

  10. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  11. NO sub x -char reactions: Kinetics and transport aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    The present project is motivated by the need to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from combustors, especially coal combustors. Reactions with carbon are known to be effective at reducing No to N{sub 2}, and remain interesting candidates in a wide variety of possible applications. These reactions are known to be important in reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fluidized bed coal combustors, in which the coal char itself serves as the reducing agent. The principal goal of this project is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the processes by which carbons reduce NO to N{sub 2}. The carbon was a char derived from phenol-formaldehyde resin. This material has been noted to be a reasonable model for coal chars in most respects, expect that its gasification behavior is not complicated by catalytic processes due to minerals. In the first phases of the project, the global kinetics of the process were established. In more recent work, attention has been turned to the individual steps in the mechanism. Recent quarterly reports have detailed the role of both chemisorption and desorption processes in determining the course and kinetics of the process. This report continues the reporting of results obtained along these lines, and draws an important new conclusion concerning the number of separate processes involved in determining the kinetics. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Kinetic study on the reactions of platinum drugs with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Hagrman, Douglas; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2004-02-01

    The binding of platinum (Pt) drugs (oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and cisplatin) to glutathione (GSH, 6.75 mM) was investigated at 37 degrees C in Hepes (100 mM, pH approximately 7.4) or Tris-NO(3) (60 mM, pH 7.4) buffer and NaCl (4.62, 6.63, or 7.82 mM). The conditions were chosen to mimic passage of clinical concentrations of the drugs (135 microM) through the cytosol. The reactions were monitored by UV-absorption spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The initial rates, detected by UV absorbance, were similar for oxaliplatin and cisplatin reacting with GSH and were more than 5-fold faster than for carboplatin reacting with GSH. The Pt contents in HPLC eluates corresponding to unbound drug decreased exponentially with time, confirming that the reactions were first order in [Pt drug] and allowing determination of the pseudo first-order rate constants (k(1)). The second-order rate constants (k(2)) were calculated as k(1) divided by [GSH]. The k(2) value for oxaliplatin reacting with GSH was approximately 3.8 x 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1), for cisplatin reacting with GSH approximately 2.7 x 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1), and for carboplatin reacting with GSH approximately 1.2 x 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1) (approximately 32-fold slower than that of oxaliplatin and approximately 23-fold slower than that of cisplatin). These results demonstrate an influence of ligands surrounding the Pt coordination sphere on the reactivity of Pt(2+) with GSH.

  13. Low temperature dry scrubbing reaction kinetics and mechanisms: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Sampson, K.J.; Visneski, M.J.; Reddy, S.N.; Ben-Said, L.; Maldei, M. )

    1992-03-01

    A resistance-in-series kinetic model for the low temperature reaction of sulfur dioxide with limestone is presented. The resistances considered are the gas-phase transport of sulfur dioxide, the liquid-phase diffusion of both the sulfur species and the calcium species and the solid-phase dissolution of limestone. The model uses film theory to predict the liquid concentrations of the dissolved species and assumes an instantaneous reaction between the sulfur species and calcium species. The kinetic model incorporates three rate equations for the removal of sulfur dioxide. When the rate of removal is limited by the diffusion of sulfur dioxide across the gas film surrounding the limestone particle, a gas-phase controlled rate equation is used. When the diffusion of the reacting species through the liquid film covering the limestone particle is the predominant resistance, a liquid-phase controlled rate equation is used. When the rate is limited by the dissolution of limestone, a solid-phase controlled rate equation is used. The kinetic model is incorporated into a flow model for the fixed-bed Limestone Emission Control (LEC) system. The LEC system employs a fixed-bed of standard quarry-sized limestone to remove sulfur dioxide from coal-fired boiler flue gases. The flow modeling equations for the fixed-bed LEC system, which include simultaneous heat and mass transfer as applied to water-phase evaporation and condensation are also presented. The combined kinetic and flow model is subjected to a parametric study and the modeling predictions are compared with experimental results.

  14. A study of switchgrass pyrolysis: Product variability and reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovee, Jonathan Matthew

    Samples of the same cultivar of cave-in-rock switchgrass were harvested from plots in Frankenmuth, Roger City, Cass County, and Grand Valley, Michigan. It was determined that variation exists, between locations, among the pyrolytic compounds which can lead to variability in bio-oil and increased processing costs at bio-refineries to make hydrocarbon fuels. Washed and extractives-free switchgrass samples, which contain a lower alkali and alkaline earth metals content than untreated samples, were shown to produce lower amounts of acids, esters, furans, ketones, phenolics, and saccharides and also larger amounts of aldehydes upon pyrolysis. Although the minerals catalyzed pyrolytic reactions, there was no evidence indicating their effect on reducing the production of anhydrosugars, specifically levoglucosan. To further link minerals present in the biomass to a catalytic pathway, mathematic models were employed to determine the kinetic parameters of the switchgrass. While the calculated activation energies of switchgrass, using the FWO and KAS methods, were 227.7 and 217.8 kJ/mol, correspondingly, it was concluded that the activation energies for the switchgrass hemicellulose and cellulose peaks were 115.5 and 158.2 kJ/mol, respectively, using a modified model-fitting method. The minerals that effect the production of small molecules and levoglucosan also have an observable catalytic effect on switchgrass reaction rate, which may be quantifiable through the use of reaction kinetics so as to determine activation energy.

  15. Kinetics of coal liquefaction at very short reaction times

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Wang, K.; Wang, S.

    1995-12-31

    Kinetics of direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 Bituminous coal in tetralin has been investigated at three temperatures (309-424{degrees}C) during the first few seconds of the reaction and up to an hour. Conversion was followed by the ash content of the coal residue as determined by TGA, and changes in the reaction were followed by changes in the TGA parameters, such as Volatile Matter (VM) and Fixed Carbon (FC). The effects of temperature on the reaction kinetics were in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed liquefaction with a large excess of tetralin, there is an initial very rapid extraction of the soluble matter by the tetralin. After extraction there is an induction period followed by a slower rate of conversion of the coal structure itself. At higher temperatures, the amount of extraction increases and the induction period becomes shorter. At least two conflicting processes are occurring in the last stage: (1) breakdown of the coal structure to liquid products, and (2) formation of retrograde material (precursor of tar and coke). Catalysts such as sulfided molybdenum naphthenate in the presence of hydrogen greatly reduce the formation of retrograde products.

  16. Second order distorted wave calculations for electron impact ionization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangjin

    Electron impact ionization of atoms provides a fundamental test of the current understanding of atomic structure as well as our understanding of the three body problem. Triple differential cross sections (TDCS), measured in the coincidence experiment, provide the most sensitive test of the theory of electron impact ionization processes. It was found two decades ago that second-order effects were crucial in explaining both the positions and magnitudes of the binary and recoil peaks in the TDCS. However, the existing theoretical calculations of second-order amplitudes typically resort to simplifying approximations, such as the closure approximation or neglecting the real part of the Green's function, to make the calculation tractable. In this work, we have developed a second-order distorted wave (DWB2) theory for atomic ionization which does not make these approximations. The DWB2 theory has been used to calculate the TDCS for electron impact ionization of hydrogen. It is found that the DWB2 results are in good agreement with absolute experimental measurements for incident energy greater than 100 eV. We have also performed DWB2 calculations for electron impact ionization of helium with the residual ion left in the n=1 and 2 states at intermediate energies in coplanar asymmetric geometry. Both the neutral and ionic distorting potentials are employed for the projectile in the final state. It has been found that the DWB2 results with the ionic distorting potential are in better agreement with experiment for the case in which the residual ion is left in the excited states. We have also performed the calculations to check the validity of the closure approximation and the simplified Green's function approximation and found that these approximations are not accurate for non-coplanar geometry and low incident energies.

  17. Determination of robust stability margin for second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C.-H.; Kau, C.-T.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1992-01-01

    Robust stabilization of uncertain systems has been extensively investigated and the stability test for the whole set of uncertain parameters has been reduced to a finite number of test points, four points for the characteristic polynomial with independent coefficients. As a result the robust stability margin can be determined using a reasonable amount of computation. It is impossible to apply the results of the test to a practical system as the coefficients of the characteristic polynomial for a physical system are usually functions of uncertain parameters. However, many physical systems may be represented by a second-order mass-spring-damper system with a special multilinear form in its characteristic polynomial. This paper investigates second-order mass-spring-damper systems and the reduction of the number of test points. It is shown that such a system with arbritrary compensators always has a multilinear characteristic polynomial. It is also shown that a line in the two-dimensional parameter space forms the boundary after the mapping of a multilinear characteristic polynomial and this interior extreme line forms a conic curve in the complex plane. The boundary of uncertain domain for a multilinear polynomial with two uncertainty parameters can be determined analytically using this curve, and the four sides image of a square of the uncertain parameter. Therefore, the stability margin may be determined by checking the intersections of the boundary with the zero point. A similar procedure can be used for second-order systems with more than two uncertainty parameters when parameter optimization is used in determining the boundary.

  18. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  19. Kinetic Study of the Austempering Reactions in Ductile Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M. J.; Cisneros, M. M.; Almanza, E.; Haro, S.

    2012-11-01

    Kinetics of the reaction that occur during the austempering heat treatment in unalloyed and alloyed ductile irons with 1Cu-0.25Mo, 1Ni-0.25Mo, and 0.7Cu-1Ni-0.25Mo, was studied. The austenitization and austempering cycles were achieved by isothermal dilatometry in cylindrical samples of 2 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length. The specimens were austenitized at 870 °C for 120 min, followed by isothermal holding for 300 min at temperatures between 270 and 420 °C. Kinetic parameters such as the order of reaction " n" and the rate of reaction " k" were calculated using the Johnson-Mehl equation while the empirical activation energy was calculated by means of the Arrhenius equation. It was found that the values of " k" decreased with the addition of Cu, Ni, and Mo as well as with the reduction of the isothermal temperature. The activation energy changes with the austempering temperature, in the range 30,348-58,250 J/mol when the heat treatment was carried out between 370 and 420 °C and 10,336-26,683 J/mol when the temperature varied from 270 to 350 °C. The microstructures in samples austempered at 370 and 315 °C were observed by transmission electron microscopy. No carbides precipitation was observed on samples heat treated at 370 °C for less than 120 min, while at 315 °C carbides of hexagonal structure ɛ(Fe2.4C) were found from the beginning of the transformation. The smallest value of activation energy and a slower kinetic transformation seem to be related with the presence of a carbide phase. Additionally, the time results obtained for transformation fractions of 0.05 and 0.95 by the dilatometry analysis were used to build the temperature-time-transformation diagrams for the irons.

  20. Multireference second order perturbation theory with a simplified treatment of dynamical correlation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Enhua; Zhao, Dongbo; Li, Shuhua

    2015-10-13

    A multireference second order perturbation theory based on a complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) function or density matrix renormalized group (DMRG) function has been proposed. This method may be considered as an approximation to the CAS/A approach with the same reference, in which the dynamical correlation is simplified with blocked correlated second order perturbation theory based on the generalized valence bond (GVB) reference (GVB-BCPT2). This method, denoted as CASCI-BCPT2/GVB or DMRG-BCPT2/GVB, is size consistent and has a similar computational cost as the conventional second order perturbation theory (MP2). We have applied it to investigate a number of problems of chemical interest. These problems include bond-breaking potential energy surfaces in four molecules, the spectroscopic constants of six diatomic molecules, the reaction barrier for the automerization of cyclobutadiene, and the energy difference between the monocyclic and bicyclic forms of 2,6-pyridyne. Our test applications demonstrate that CASCI-BCPT2/GVB can provide comparable results with CASPT2 (second order perturbation theory based on the complete active space self-consistent-field wave function) for systems under study. Furthermore, the DMRG-BCPT2/GVB method is applicable to treat strongly correlated systems with large active spaces, which are beyond the capability of CASPT2.

  1. Entanglement in a second-order quantum phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, Julien; Palacios, Guillaume; Mosseri, Remy

    2004-02-01

    We consider a system of mutually interacting spins 1/2 embedded in a transverse magnetic field which undergoes a second-order quantum phase transition. We analyze the entanglement properties and the spin squeezing of the ground state and show that, contrarily to the one-dimensional case, a cusplike singularity appears at the critical point {lambda}{sub c} in the thermodynamical limit. We also show that there exists a value {lambda}{sub 0}{>=}{lambda}{sub c} above which the ground state is not spin squeezed despite a nonvanishing concurrence.

  2. Detection of a diffusive cloak via second-order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Milan; Yamilov, Alexey

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme to detect the diffusive cloak proposed by Schittny et al [Science 345, 427 (2014)]. We exploit the fact that diffusion of light is an approximation that disregards wave interference. The long-range contribution to intensity correlation is sensitive to locations of paths crossings and the interference inside the medium, allowing one to detect the size and position, including the depth, of the diffusive cloak. Our results also suggest that it is possible to separately manipulate the first- and the second-order statistics of wave propagation in turbid media.

  3. Local second-order boundary methods for lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzbourg, I.; d`Humieres, D.

    1996-09-01

    A new way to implement solid obstacles in lattice Boltzmann models is presented. The unknown populations at the boundary nodes are derived from the locally known populations with the help of a second-order Chapman-Enskog expansion and Dirichlet boundary conditions with a given momentum. Steady flows near a flat wall, arbitrarily inclined with respect to the lattice links, are then obtained with a third-order error. In particular, Couette and Poiseuille flows are exactly recovered without the Knudsen layers produced for inclined walls by the bounce back condition.

  4. Finite difference schemes for second order systems describing black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Motamed, Mohammad; Kreiss, H-O.; Babiuc, M.; Winicour, J.; Szilagyi, B.

    2006-06-15

    In the harmonic description of general relativity, the principal part of Einstein's equations reduces to 10 curved space wave equations for the components of the space-time metric. We present theorems regarding the stability of several evolution-boundary algorithms for such equations when treated in second order differential form. The theorems apply to a model black hole space-time consisting of a spacelike inner boundary excising the singularity, a timelike outer boundary and a horizon in between. These algorithms are implemented as stable, convergent numerical codes and their performance is compared in a 2-dimensional excision problem.

  5. Supersonic second order analysis and optimization program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at supersonic and moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to conceptual configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical codes were developed for analysis and design of relatively general three dimensional geometries. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes. Case computational time of one minute on a CDC 176 are typical for practical aircraft arrangement.

  6. Adaptive second-order sliding mode control with uncertainty compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, G.; Levant, A.; Pisano, A.; Usai, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper endows the second-order sliding mode control (2-SMC) approach with additional capabilities of learning and control adaptation. We present a 2-SMC scheme that estimates and compensates for the uncertainties affecting the system dynamics. It also adjusts the discontinuous control effort online, so that it can be reduced to arbitrarily small values. The proposed scheme is particularly useful when the available information regarding the uncertainties is conservative, and the classical `fixed-gain' SMC would inevitably lead to largely oversized discontinuous control effort. Benefits from the viewpoint of chattering reduction are obtained, as confirmed by computer simulations.

  7. Reaction kinetics and mechanism of magnetic field effects in cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-26

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and birds have an intriguing sixth sense that allows them to orient themselves in the Earth's magnetic field. Despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically sensitive radical pair reactions occurring in the retina, the light-sensitive part of animal eyes. A photoreceptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to endow birds with magnetoreceptive abilities as the protein has been shown to exhibit the biophysical properties required for an animal magnetoreceptor to operate properly. Here, we propose a theoretical analysis method for identifying cryptochrome's signaling reactions involving comparison of measured and calculated reaction kinetics in cryptochrome. Application of the method yields an exemplary light-driven reaction cycle, supported through transient absorption and electron-spin-resonance observations together with known facts on avian magnetoreception. The reaction cycle permits one to predict magnetic field effects on cryptochrome activation and deactivation. The suggested analysis method gives insight into structural and dynamic design features required for optimal detection of the geomagnetic field by cryptochrome and suggests further experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:22171949

  8. Kinetic studies of cascade reactions in high-throughput systems.

    PubMed

    Iron, David; Boelens, Hans F M; Westerhuis, Johan A; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2003-12-01

    The application of robotic systems to the study of complex reaction kinetics is considered, using the cascade reaction A --> B --> C as a working example. Practical problems in calculating the rate constants k1 and k2 for the reactions A --> B and B --> C from concentration measurements of CA, CB, or CC are discussed in the light of the symmetry and invertability of the rate equations. A D-optimal analysis is used to determine the points in time and the species that will give the best (i.e., most accurate) results. When exact data are used, the most robust solution results from measuring the pair of concentrations (CA, CC). The system's information function is computed using numeric methods. This function is then used to estimate the amount of information obtainable from a given cascade reaction at any given time. The theoretical findings are compared with experimental results from a set of two-stage cascade experiments monitored using UV-visible spectroscopy. Finally, the pros and cons of using a single reaction sample to estimate both k1 and k2 are discussed. PMID:16465720

  9. Single-molecule chemical reaction reveals molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Song, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Ruan, Mingbo; Xu, Weilin

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the microscopic elementary process of chemical reactions, especially in condensed phase, is highly desirable for improvement of efficiencies in industrial chemical processes. Here we show an approach to gaining new insights into elementary reactions in condensed phase by combining quantum chemical calculations with a single-molecule analysis. Elementary chemical reactions in liquid-phase, revealed from quantum chemical calculations, are studied by tracking the fluorescence of single dye molecules undergoing a reversible redox process. Statistical analyses of single-molecule trajectories reveal molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics of elementary reactions. The reactivity dynamic fluctuations of single molecules are evidenced and probably arise from either or both of the low-frequency approach of the molecule to the internal surface of the SiO2 nanosphere or the molecule diffusion-induced memory effect. This new approach could be applied to other chemical reactions in liquid phase to gain more insight into their molecular reaction kinetics and the dynamics of elementary steps.

  10. Influence of chemical kinetics on postcolumn reaction in a capillary Taylor reactor with catechol analytes and photoluminescence following electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moon Chul; Weber, Stephen G

    2005-02-15

    Postcolumn derivatization reactions can enhance detector sensitivity and selectivity, but their successful combination with capillary liquid chromatography has been limited because of the small peak volumes in capillary chromatography. A capillary Taylor reactor (CTR), developed in our laboratory, provides simple and effective mixing and reaction in a 25-microm-radius postcolumn capillary. Homogenization of reactant streams occurs by radial diffusion, and a chemical reaction follows. Three characteristic times for a given reaction process can be predicted using simple physical and chemical parameters. Two of these times are the homogenization time, which governs how long it takes the molecules in the analyte and reagent streams to mix, and the reaction time, which governs how long the molecules in a homogeneous solution take to react. The third characteristic time is an adjustment to the reaction time called the start time, which represents an estimate of the average time the analyte stream spends without exposure to reagent. In this study, laser-induced fluorescence monitored the extent of the postcolumn reaction (reduction of Os(bpy)3(3+) by analyte to the photoluminescent Os(bpy)3(2+)) in a CTR. The reaction time depends on the reaction rates. Analysis of product versus time data yielded second-order reaction rate constants between the PFET reagent, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)osmium, and standards ((ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium cation and p-hydroquinone) or catechols (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. The extent of the reactions in a CTR were then predicted from initial reaction conditions and compared to experimental results. Both the theory and experimental results suggested the reactions of catechols were generally kinetically controlled, while those of the standards were controlled by mixing time (1-2 s). Thus, the extent of homogenization can be monitored in a CTR using the relatively fast reaction of the reagent and p

  11. Kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.; Watson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive study was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in a laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence system. A 266 nm laser was used to photolyze HNO3 in the temperature range 225-415 K at pressures of 20-300 torr. A temperature dependence was detected below room temperature, with a leveling off at 298 K and a wide spread in the rate constants. A pressure dependence was observed over the entire range and was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The results are noted to be in agreement with those of previous investigations. However, the wide range of rate constants are suggested to be a problem for stratospheric HO(x) modeling for anthropogenic effects. No explanation could be given of the varying results obtained by other investigators regarding the kinetics of the reactions.

  12. Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-05-14

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals

  13. Second-order analytic solutions for re-entry trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Kyou

    1993-01-01

    With the development of aeroassist technology, either for near-earth orbital transfer with or without a plane change or for planetary aerocapture, it is of interest to have accurate analytic solutions for reentry trajectories in an explicit form. Starting with the equations of motion of a non-thrusting aerodynamic vehicle entering a non-rotating spherical planetary atmosphere, a normalization technique is used to transform the equations into a form suitable for an analytic integration. Then, depending on the type of planar entry modes with a constant angle-of-attack, namely, ballistic fly-through, lifting skip, and equilibrium glide trajectories, the first-order solutions are obtained with the appropriate simplification. By analytic continuation, the second-order solutions for the altitude, speed, and flight path angle are derived. The closed form solutions lead to explicit forms for the physical quantities of interest, such as the deceleration and aerodynamic heating rates. The analytic solutions for the planar case are extended to three-dimensional skip trajectories with a constant bank angle. The approximate solutions for the heading and latitude are developed to the second order. In each type of trajectory examined, explicit relations among the principal variables are in a form suitable for guidance and navigation purposes. The analytic solutions have excellent agreement with the numerical integrations. They also provide some new results which were not reported in the existing classical theory.

  14. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  15. Optimal automatic reaction and species elimination in kinetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsos, A.

    2008-10-15

    A known challenge for the simulation of reacting flow systems is that detailed chemical mechanisms contain hundreds to thousands of species and thousands of reactions, leading to high CPU requirements despite the use of state-of-the-art solvers. For specific conditions of interest (temperature, pressure, and composition), smaller mechanisms can predict the chemistry relatively accurately. One possibility for obtaining such mechanisms is species elimination from a detailed mechanism. Here, an automatic method for kinetic model reduction by simultaneous reaction and species elimination is proposed, based on an integer linear program (ILP) formulation. The solution of the ILP is an optimally reduced kinetic mechanism that reproduces the predictions of a reference mechanism within prespecified tolerances for finitely many reference points in the state space. The method is applied to generate optimally reduced models for isobaric, adiabatic homogeneous combustion. Case studies are presented for the combustion of n-heptane. Comparisons between the full and reduced models are shown and the tradeoff between species and reaction elimination is discussed. Tolerances in the ILP formulation control the error introduced by the model reduction. For increasing acceptable error, more species and/or reactions are eliminated. A method of quantifying this tradeoff between approximation error and reduction achieved is proposed, based on multiobjective optimization, and demonstrated in a case study. The effect of variable initial conditions is investigated. The mechanisms generated achieve significant reduction in the CPU requirement and can accurately predict the trajectories of the state variables (species mass fractions and temperature), as well as other metrics of interest, such as ignition time delay. (author)

  16. Study of enzyme adsorption and reaction kinetics for cellulose hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, I.G.

    1982-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose occurs due to the combined catalytic action of two types of cellulase components commonly referred to as C/sub 1/ and C/sub x/. However, before the hydrolysis reaction can begin, it is necessary for these enzymes to first adsorb onto the accessible surfaces of the insoluble cellulose substrate. The objective of the study was to gain a better understanding of the relationships between the adsorption of these enzyme components, the hydrolysis kinetics, the cellulosic surface area accessible to the enzymes, and the cellulose crystallinity. These relationships were investigated by passing a Trichoderma viride cellulase solution through columns of cellulose powder having different accessibility and crystallinity, and then analyzing the quantities of the different enzyme components and the hydrolysis product in the effluent. The amounts of the different cellulase components were analyzed using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Additional adsorption and hydrolysis experiments were done using columns of cellulose beads specially developed to provide amodel substrate for this analysis. A mathematical model has been formulated to describe the kinetics of enzyme adsorption and the resultant, initial hydrolysis rate in cellulose column. The analytical solutions obtained have been linearized into a convenient form so that the kinetic parameters of the model can be readily determined from experimental breakthrough curves.

  17. Reaction kinetics and oxidation product formation in the degradation of acetaminophen by ferrate (VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Yibing; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the degradation of acetaminophen (AAP) in aqueous solutions by ferrate (VI), aiming to propose the kinetics, pathways and the oxidation products' formation in the AAP degradation. A series of jar tests were undertaken over ferrate (VI) dosages (molar ratios of ferrate (VI):AAP, 5:1 to 25:1) and pH values (4-11). The effects of co-existing ions (0.2-5 mM) and humic acid (10-50 mg l(-1)) on the AAP removal were investigated. Ferrate (VI) can remove 99.6% AAP (from 1000 μg l(-1)) in 60 min under study conditions when majority of the AAP reduction occurred in the first 5 min. The treatment performance depended on the ferrate(VI) dosage, pH and the type and strength of co-existing ions and humic acid. Raising ferrate (VI) dosage with optimal pH 7 improved the AAP degradation. In the presence of humic acid, the AAP degradation by ferrate (VI) was promoted in a short period (<30 min) but then inhibited with increasing in humic acid contents. The presence of Al(3+), CO3(2-) and PO4(3-) ions declined but the existence of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions can improve the AAP removal. The catalytic function of Al(3+) on the decomposition of ferrate (VI) in aqueous solution was found. The kinetics of the reaction between ferrate (VI) and AAP was pseudo first-order for ferrete (VI) and pseudo second-order for AAP. The pseudo rate constant of ferrate (VI) with AAP was 1.4 × 10(-5) L(2) mg(-2) min(-1). Three oxidation products (OPs) were identified and the AAP degradation pathways were proposed.

  18. Transport coefficients in second-order non-conformal viscous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2015-05-01

    Based on the exact solution of Boltzmann kinetic equation in the relaxation-time approximation, the precision of the two most recent formulations of relativistic second-order non-conformal viscous hydrodynamics (14-moment approximation and causal Chapman-Enskog method), standard Israel-Stewart theory, and anisotropic hydrodynamics framework, in the simple case of one-dimensional Bjorken expansion, is tested. It is demonstrated that the failure of Israel-Stewart theory in reproducing exact solutions of the Boltzmann kinetic equation occurs due to neglecting and/or choosing wrong forms of some of the second-order transport coefficients. In particular, the importance of shear-bulk couplings in the evolution equations for dissipative quantities is shown. One finds that, in the case of the bulk viscous pressure correction, such coupling terms are as important as the corresponding first-order Navier-Stokes term and must be included in order to obtain, at least qualitative, overall agreement with the kinetic theory.

  19. Reaction route graphs. III. Non-minimal kinetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fishtik, Ilie; Callaghan, Caitlin A; Datta, Ravindra

    2005-02-24

    The concept of reaction route (RR) graphs introduced recently by us for kinetic mechanisms that produce minimal graphs is extended to the problem of non-minimal kinetic mechanisms for the case of a single overall reaction (OR). A RR graph is said to be minimal if all of the stoichiometric numbers in all direct RRs of the mechanism are equal to +/-1 and non-minimal if at least one stoichiometric number in a direct RR is non-unity, e.g., equal to +/-2. For a given mechanism, four unique topological characteristics of RR graphs are defined and enumerated, namely, direct full routes (FRs), empty routes (ERs), intermediate nodes (INs), and terminal nodes (TNs). These are further utilized to construct the RR graphs. One algorithm involves viewing each IN as a central node in a RR sub-graph. As a result, the construction and enumeration of RR graphs are reduced to the problem of balancing the peripheral nodes in the RR sub-graphs according to the list of FRs, ERs, INs, and TNs. An alternate method involves using an independent set of RRs to draw the RR graph while satisfying the INs and TNs. Three examples are presented to illustrate the application of non-minimal RR graph theory.

  20. KINETICS OF IRON - SODIUM DISILICATE REACTIONS AND WETTING

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Pask, Joseph A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermogravimetric and sessile drop measurements were used to study kinetics of redox reactions between sodium disilicate glass and iron. Two redox reaction sequences were identified; both introduced ferrous oxide into the glass at the interface. One consists of formation of ferrous oxide at the interface by reduction of sodium ions in the glass; this is primarily dependent on the a(FeO) in the metal being less than one. The second consists of oxidation of ferrous ions in the glass by the reduction of sodium ions to form ferric ions which subsequently react with the iron to form ferrous oxide. The reaction rates were shown to be sensitive to temperature, time, total ambient pressure, partial pressure of sodium and oxygen in the atmosphere, and the a(FeO) in the iron. Decrease of contact angles and spreading occur with the redox reaction in which the metal plays an active role, i.e. whose a(FeO) is less than one and whose composition undergoes a change.

  1. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  2. Products and kinetics of the liquid-phase reaction of glyoxal catalyzed by ammonium ions (NH4(+)).

    PubMed

    Nozière, Barbara; Dziedzic, Pawel; Córdova, Armando

    2009-01-01

    Glyoxal, a common atmospheric gas, has been reported to be depleted in some regions of the atmosphere. The corresponding sink could be accounted for by reactions in or at the surface of atmospheric particles, but these reactions were not identified. Recently, we showed that inorganic ammonium ions, NH(4)(+), are efficient catalysts for reactions of carbonyl compounds, including glyoxal, in the liquid phase. To determine whether ammonium-catalyzed reactions can contribute to depletion of glyoxal in the atmosphere, the reactivity of this compound in aqueous solutions containing ammonium salts (ammonium sulfate, chloride, fluoride, and phosphate) at 298 K has been studied. The products identified by LC-HRMS and UV absorption revealed a mechanism involving two distinct pathways: a Bronsted acid pathway and an iminium pathway. The kinetics of the iminium pathway was studied by monitoring formation of a specific product. This pathway was second order in glyoxal in most of the solutions studied and should therefore be second order in most ammonium-containing aerosols in the atmosphere. The corresponding rate constant, k(II) (M(-1) s(-1)), increased strongly with ammonium ion activity, a(NH(4)(+)), and pH: k(II) (M(-1) s(-1)) = (2 +/- 1) x 10(-10) exp((1.5 +/- 0.8)aNH(4)(+)) exp((2.5 +/- 0.2)pH). This iminium pathway is a lower limit for the ammonium-catalyzed consumption of glyoxal, but the contribution of the acid pathway is expected to be small in tropospheric aerosols. With these results the reactive uptake of glyoxal on ammonium-containing aerosols was estimated and shown to be a possible explanation for depletion of this compound in Mexico City.

  3. Constraints on general second-order scalar-tensor models from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rampei; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate that the general second-order scalar-tensor theories, which have attracted attention as possible modified gravity models to explain the late time cosmic acceleration, could be strongly constrained from the argument of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation. To this end, we consider the purely kinetic coupled gravity and the extended galileon model on a cosmological background. In these models, the propagation speed of tensor mode could be less than the speed of light, which puts very strong constraints from the gravitational Cherenkov radiation.

  4. Magnetic Compensation for Second-Order Doppler Shift in LITS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tjoelker, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainty in the frequency of a linear-ion-trap frequency standard (LITS) can be reduced substantially by use of a very small magnetic inhomogeneity tailored to compensate for the residual second-order Doppler shift. An effect associated with the relativistic time dilatation, one cause of the second-order Doppler shift, is ion motion that is attributable to the trapping radio-frequency (RF)electromagnetic field used to trap ions. The second-order Doppler shift is reduced by using a multi-pole trap; however it is still the largest source of systematic frequency shift in the latest generation of LITSs, which are among the most stable clocks in the world. The present compensation scheme reduces the frequency instability of the affected LITS to about a tenth of its previous value. The basic principles of prior generation LITSs were discussed in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. Below are recapitulated only those items of basic information necessary to place the present development in context. A LITS includes a microwave local oscillator, the frequency of which is stabilized by comparison with the frequency of the ground state hyperfine transition of 199Hg+ ions. The comparison involves a combination of optical and microwave excitation and interrogation of the ions in a linear ion trap in the presence of a nominally uniform magnetic field. In the current version of the LITS, there are two connected traps (see figure): (1) a quadrupole trap wherein the optical excitation and measurement take place and (2) a 12-pole trap (denoted the resonance trap), wherein the microwave interrogation takes place. The ions are initially loaded into the quadrupole trap and are thereafter shuttled between the two traps. Shuttling ions into the resonance trap allows sensitive microwave interrogation to take place well away from loading interference. The axial magnetic field for the resonance trap is generated by an electric current in a finely wound wire coil surrounded by

  5. Solvent effects on kinetics of an heteroatomic nucleophilic substitution reaction in ionic liquid and molecular solvents mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Hadi; Pedervand, Mohsen; Sadeghzadeh-Darabi, Faramarz; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2013-12-01

    Rate constants, k A, for the aromatic nucleophilic substitution reaction of 2-chloro-3,5-dinitropyridine with aniline were determined in different compositions of 2-propanol mixed with hexane, benzene, and 2-methylpropan-2-ol and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([Emim][EtSO4]) with dimethyl sulfoxide at 25°C. The obtained rate constants of the reaction in pure solvents are in the following order: 2-methylpropan-2-ol > dimethyl sulfoxide > 2-propanol > hexane > benzene > [Emim][EtSO4]. Molecularmicroscopic solvent parameters corresponding to the selected binary mixtures were utilized to study the kinetics of a nucleophilic substitution reaction in order to investigate and compare the effects of the solvents on a chemical process. The influence of solvent parameters including normalized polarity ( E {/T N }), dipolarity/polarizability (π*), hydrogen bond donor acidity (α), and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity (β) on the second-order rate constants were investigated and multiple linear regressions gave much better results with regard to single parameter regressions. The dipolarity/polarizability of media has a positive effect in all mixtures regarding zwitterionic character of the reaction intermediate and the hydrogen bond acceptor basicity of the solvent by stabilizing of activated complex increases the reaction rate.

  6. Second-Order Fermi Acceleration and Emission in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations, adopt it for 1ES 1101-232, and Mrk 421. The Fermi-II model with radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient can reproduce the spectra from the radio to the gamma-ray regime. For Mrk 421, an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 begin{math} {times} 10 (38) erg s (-1) is required to agree with the observed GeV flux. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  7. Compact Two-State-Variable Second-Order Memristor Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2016-06-01

    A key requirement for using memristors in functional circuits is a predictive physical model to capture the resistive switching behavior, which shall be compact enough to be implemented using a circuit simulator. Although a number of memristor models have been developed, most of these models (i.e., first-order memristor models) have utilized only a one-state-variable. However, such simplification is not adequate for accurate modeling because multiple mechanisms are involved in resistive switching. Here, a two-state-variable based second-order memristor model is presented, which considers the axial drift of the charged vacancies in an applied electric field and the radial vacancy motion caused by the thermophoresis and diffusion. In particular, this model emulates the details of the intrinsic short-term dynamics, such as decay and temporal heat summation, and therefore, it accurately predicts the resistive switching characteristics for both DC and AC input signals. PMID:27152649

  8. Second-order analysis of semiparametric recurrent event processes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yongtao

    2011-09-01

    A typical recurrent event dataset consists of an often large number of recurrent event processes, each of which contains multiple event times observed from an individual during a follow-up period. Such data have become increasingly available in medical and epidemiological studies. In this article, we introduce novel procedures to conduct second-order analysis for a flexible class of semiparametric recurrent event processes. Such an analysis can provide useful information regarding the dependence structure within each recurrent event process. Specifically, we will use the proposed procedures to test whether the individual recurrent event processes are all Poisson processes and to suggest sensible alternative models for them if they are not. We apply these procedures to a well-known recurrent event dataset on chronic granulomatous disease and an epidemiological dataset on meningococcal disease cases in Merseyside, United Kingdom to illustrate their practical value.

  9. Stress-dependent second-order grain statistics of polycrystals.

    PubMed

    Kube, Christopher M; Turner, Joseph A

    2015-10-01

    In this article, the second-order statistics of the elastic moduli of randomly oriented grains in a polycrystal are derived for the case when an initial stress is present. The initial stress can be either residual stress or stresses generated from external loading. The initial stress is shown to increase or decrease the variability of the grain's elastic moduli from the average elastic moduli of the polycrystal. This variation in the elastic properties of the individual grains causes acoustic scattering phenomenon in polycrystalline materials to become stress-dependent. The influence of the initial stress on scattering is shown to be greater than the influence on acoustic phase velocities, which defines the acoustoelastic effect. This work helps the development of scattering based tools for the nondestructive analysis of material stresses in polycrystals.

  10. Analysis of implicit second-order upwind-biased stencils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Thomas W.; Warren, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Truncation error and stability properties of several implicit upwind schemes for the two-dimensional Euler equations are examined. The schemes use linear data reconstruction methods to achieve second-order flux integrations where the implicit Jacobian operators are first order. The stability properties of the schemes are examined by a Von Neumann analysis of the linearized, constant-coefficient Euler equations. The choice of the data reconstruction method used to evaluate the flux integral has a dramatic effect on the convergence properties of the implicit solution method. In particular, the typical one-dimensional data reconstruction methods used with structured grids exhibit poor convergence properties compared to the unstructured grid method considered. Of the schemes examined, the one with the superior convergence properties is well-suited for both unstructured and structured grids, which has important implications for the design of implicit methods.

  11. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  12. Nonoscillation for second order sublinear dynamic equations on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbe, Lynn; Baoguo, Jia; Peterson, Allan

    2009-10-01

    Consider the Emden-Fowler sublinear dynamic equation x[Delta][Delta](t)+p(t)f(x([sigma](t)))=0, where , is a time scale, , where ai>0, 0<[beta]i<1, with [beta]i the quotient of odd positive integers, 1<=i<=m. When m=1, and , (0.1) is the usual sublinear Emden-Fowler equation which has attracted the attention of many researchers. In this paper, we allow the coefficient function p(t) to be negative for arbitrarily large values of t. We extend a nonoscillation result of Wong for the second order sublinear Emden-Fowler equation in the continuous case to the dynamic equation (0.1). As applications, we show that the sublinear difference equation has a nonoscillatory solution, for b>0, c>[alpha], and the sublinear q-difference equation has a nonoscillatory solution, for , q>1, b>0, c>1+[alpha].

  13. Second-Order Accurate Projective Integrators for Multiscale Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S L; Gear, C W

    2005-05-27

    We introduce new projective versions of second-order accurate Runge-Kutta and Adams-Bashforth methods, and demonstrate their use as outer integrators in solving stiff differential systems. An important outcome is that the new outer integrators, when combined with an inner telescopic projective integrator, can result in fully explicit methods with adaptive outer step size selection and solution accuracy comparable to those obtained by implicit integrators. If the stiff differential equations are not directly available, our formulations and stability analysis are general enough to allow the combined outer-inner projective integrators to be applied to black-box legacy codes or perform a coarse-grained time integration of microscopic systems to evolve macroscopic behavior, for example.

  14. Compact Two-State-Variable Second-Order Memristor Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2016-06-01

    A key requirement for using memristors in functional circuits is a predictive physical model to capture the resistive switching behavior, which shall be compact enough to be implemented using a circuit simulator. Although a number of memristor models have been developed, most of these models (i.e., first-order memristor models) have utilized only a one-state-variable. However, such simplification is not adequate for accurate modeling because multiple mechanisms are involved in resistive switching. Here, a two-state-variable based second-order memristor model is presented, which considers the axial drift of the charged vacancies in an applied electric field and the radial vacancy motion caused by the thermophoresis and diffusion. In particular, this model emulates the details of the intrinsic short-term dynamics, such as decay and temporal heat summation, and therefore, it accurately predicts the resistive switching characteristics for both DC and AC input signals.

  15. Absorbing boundary conditions for second-order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wong, Yau Shu

    1989-01-01

    A uniform approach to construct absorbing artificial boundary conditions for second-order linear hyperbolic equations is proposed. The nonlocal boundary condition is given by a pseudodifferential operator that annihilates travelling waves. It is obtained through the dispersion relation of the differential equation by requiring that the initial-boundary value problem admits the wave solutions travelling in one direction only. Local approximation of this global boundary condition yields an nth-order differential operator. It is shown that the best approximations must be in the canonical forms which can be factorized into first-order operators. These boundary conditions are perfectly absorbing for wave packets propagating at certain group velocities. A hierarchy of absorbing boundary conditions is derived for transonic small perturbation equations of unsteady flows. These examples illustrate that the absorbing boundary conditions are easy to derive, and the effectiveness is demonstrated by the numerical experiments.

  16. K-inflationary power spectra at second order

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2013-06-01

    Within the class of inflationary models, k-inflation represents the most general single field framework that can be associated with an effective quadratic action for the curvature perturbations and a varying speed of sound. The incoming flow of high-precision cosmological data, such as those from the Planck satellite and small scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, calls for greater accuracy in the inflationary predictions. In this work, we calculate for the first time the next-to-next-to-leading order scalar and tensor primordial power spectra in k-inflation needed in order to obtain robust constraints on the inflationary theory. The method used is the uniform approximation together with a second order expansion in the Hubble and sound flow functions. Our result is checked in various limits in which it reduces to already known situations.

  17. Perfectly matched layers for Maxwell's equations in second order formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Petersson, A

    2004-07-26

    We consider the two-dimensional Maxwell's equations in domains external to perfectly conducting objects of complex shape. The equations are discretized using a node-centered finite-difference scheme on a Cartesian grid and the boundary condition are discretized to second order accuracy employing an embedded technique which does not suffer from a ''small-cell'' time-step restriction in the explicit time-integration method. The computational domain is truncated by a perfectly matched layer (PML). We derive estimates for both the error due to reflections at the outer boundary of the PML, and due to discretizing the continuous PML equations. Using these estimates, we show how the parameters of the PML can be chosen to make the discrete solution of the PML equations converge to the solution of Maxwell's equations on the unbounded domain, as the grid size goes to zero. Several numerical examples are given.

  18. First principle kinetic studies of zeolite-catalyzed methylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van der Mynsbrugge, Jeroen; Vandichel, Matthias; Hemelsoet, Karen; Lesthaeghe, David; Ghysels, An; Marin, Guy B; Waroquier, Michel

    2011-02-01

    Methylations of ethene, propene, and butene by methanol over the acidic microporous H-ZSM-5 catalyst are studied by means of state of the art computational techniques, to derive Arrhenius plots and rate constants from first principles that can directly be compared with the experimental data. For these key elementary reactions in the methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) process, direct kinetic data became available only recently [J. Catal.2005, 224, 115-123; J. Catal.2005, 234, 385-400]. At 350 °C, apparent activation energies of 103, 69, and 45 kJ/mol and rate constants of 2.6 × 10(-4), 4.5 × 10(-3), and 1.3 × 10(-2) mol/(g h mbar) for ethene, propene, and butene were derived, giving following relative ratios for methylation k(ethene)/k(propene)/k(butene) = 1:17:50. In this work, rate constants including pre-exponential factors are calculated which give very good agreement with the experimental data: apparent activation energies of 94, 62, and 37 kJ/mol for ethene, propene, and butene are found, and relative ratios of methylation k(ethene)/k(propene)/k(butene) = 1:23:763. The entropies of gas phase alkenes are underestimated in the harmonic oscillator approximation due to the occurrence of internal rotations. These low vibrational modes were substituted by manually constructed partition functions. Overall, the absolute reaction rates can be calculated with near chemical accuracy, and qualitative trends are very well reproduced. In addition, the proposed scheme is computationally very efficient and constitutes significant progress in kinetic modeling of reactions in heterogeneous catalysis.

  19. Second order closure modeling of turbulent buoyant wall plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Gang; Lai, Ming-Chia; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1992-01-01

    Non-intrusive measurements of scalar and momentum transport in turbulent wall plumes, using a combined technique of laser Doppler anemometry and laser-induced fluorescence, has shown some interesting features not present in the free jet or plumes. First, buoyancy-generation of turbulence is shown to be important throughout the flow field. Combined with low-Reynolds-number turbulence and near-wall effect, this may raise the anisotropic turbulence structure beyond the prediction of eddy-viscosity models. Second, the transverse scalar fluxes do not correspond only to the mean scalar gradients, as would be expected from gradient-diffusion modeling. Third, higher-order velocity-scalar correlations which describe turbulent transport phenomena could not be predicted using simple turbulence models. A second-order closure simulation of turbulent adiabatic wall plumes, taking into account the recent progress in scalar transport, near-wall effect and buoyancy, is reported in the current study to compare with the non-intrusive measurements. In spite of the small velocity scale of the wall plumes, the results showed that low-Reynolds-number correction is not critically important to predict the adiabatic cases tested and cannot be applied beyond the maximum velocity location. The mean and turbulent velocity profiles are very closely predicted by the second-order closure models. but the scalar field is less satisfactory, with the scalar fluctuation level underpredicted. Strong intermittency of the low-Reynolds-number flow field is suspected of these discrepancies. The trends in second- and third-order velocity-scalar correlations, which describe turbulent transport phenomena, are also predicted in general, with the cross-streamwise correlations better than the streamwise one. Buoyancy terms modeling the pressure-correlation are shown to improve the prediction slightly. The effects of equilibrium time-scale ratio and boundary condition are also discussed.

  20. A second-order closure analysis of turbulent diffusion flames. [combustion physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, A. K.; Fishburne, E. S.; Beddini, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A complete second-order closure computer program for the investigation of compressible, turbulent, reacting shear layers was developed. The equations for the means and the second order correlations were derived from the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and contain third order and higher order correlations, which have to be modeled in terms of the lower-order correlations to close the system of equations. In addition to fluid mechanical turbulence models and parameters used in previous studies of a variety of incompressible and compressible shear flows, a number of additional scalar correlations were modeled for chemically reacting flows, and a typical eddy model developed for the joint probability density function for all the scalars. The program which is capable of handling multi-species, multistep chemical reactions, was used to calculate nonreacting and reacting flows in a hydrogen-air diffusion flame.

  1. Spectator Ions ARE Important! A Kinetic Study of the Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Cohen, Skyler

    2010-01-01

    Surprisingly, spectator ions are responsible for unexpected kinetics in the biphasic copper(II)-aluminum displacement reaction, with the rate of reaction dependent on the identity of the otherwise ignored spectator ions. Application of a published kinetic analysis developed for a reaction between a rotating Al disk and a Cu(II) ion solution to the…

  2. Kinetic studies of reactions of cobalt clusters with deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, J.; Zhu, L.; Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1992-10-01

    The kinetics of chemical reactions of cobalt clusters Co{sub n} with deuterium are described. Absolute rate constants have been measured in the cluster range n = 7--68 at 293 K. The rate constants are found to be a strong function of cluster size, varying by up to three orders of magnitude. This size , dependence is most prominent in the n = 7--25 size range: CO{sub 15} is the most reactive cluster, and CO{sub 7-9} and CO{sub 19--20} are particularly unreactive. Abrupt changes in the rate constants from one cluster size to the next are observed. For the clusters above n = 25, the rate constants show several less prominent maxima and minima superimposed on a slow, nearly monotonic increase with cluster size.

  3. Low temperature dry scrubbing reaction kinetics and mechanisms, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Sampson, K.J.; Reddy, S.N.; Maldei, M.; Ben-Said, L. )

    1992-10-01

    Dry scrubbing that takes place after the air preheater (<350[degree]F) is the mode of operation that is of primary interest to this research project. At the relatively low temperatures that occur in this region of operation the rate of the gas-solid reaction that drives SO[sub 2] capture in the convective (800 to 1200[degree]F) and the combustion (1600 to 2400[degree]F) zones is too slow to be significant. The presence of significant amounts of either liquid-phase or vapor-phase water is required in order to mediate SO[sub 2] capture and to produce reasonable capture rates. A mathematical process model describing the cross-flow, moving-bed Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process has been formulated. This process model incorporates the resistance-in-series SO[sub 2] capture kinetic model described in the Project Year [number sign]1 final report. The kinetic model formulated during Project Year [number sign]1 pointed to limestone solubility and rate of solubilization as being key factors in determining the rate of SO[sub 2] capture in wetted limestone (LEC) scrubbing systems. In Project Year [number sign]2, limestone solubilities and rates of solubilization are being determined for a suite of Ohio limestones.

  4. Reaction Kinetics of Meteoric Sodium Reservoirs in the Upper Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gómez Martín, J C; Garraway, S A; Plane, J M C

    2016-03-10

    The gas-phase reactions of a selection of sodium-containing species with atmospheric constituents, relevant to the chemistry of meteor-ablated Na in the upper atmosphere, were studied in a fast flow tube using multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For the first time, unambiguous observations of NaO and NaOH in the gas phase under atmospheric conditions have been achieved. This enabled the direct measurement of the rate constants for the reactions of NaO with H2, H2O, and CO, and of NaOH with CO2, which at 300-310 K were found to be (at 2σ confidence level): k(NaO + H2O) = (2.4 ± 0.6) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1), k(NaO + H2) = (4.9 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1), k(NaO + CO) = (9 ± 4) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1), and k(NaOH + CO2 + M) = (7.6 ± 1.6) × 10(-29) cm(6) molecule (-2) s(-1) (P = 1-4 Torr). The NaO + H2 reaction was found to make NaOH with a branching ratio ≥ 99%. A combination of quantum chemistry and statistical rate theory calculations are used to interpret the reaction kinetics and extrapolate the atmospherically relevant experimental results to mesospheric temperatures and pressures. The NaO + H2O and NaOH + CO2 reactions act sequentially to provide the major atmospheric sink of meteoric Na and therefore have a significant impact on the underside of the Na layer in the terrestrial mesosphere: the newly determined rate constants shift the modeled peak to about 93 km, i.e., 2 km higher than observed by ground-based lidars. This highlights further uncertainties in the Na chemistry cycle such as the unknown rate constant of the NaOH + H reaction. The fast Na-recycling reaction between NaO and CO and a re-evaluated rate constant of the NaO + CO2 sink should be now considered in chemical models of the Martian Na layer. PMID:25723735

  5. Second-Order Modeling of Low-Reynolds-Number Turbulence Near Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.; Mansour, N. N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a set of second-order closure models for low-Reynolds-number turbulence near the wall. Existing closure models for the Reynolds-stress equations were modified to show proper near-wall behavior. A dissipation-rate equation for the turbulent kinetic energy is also reformulated. The proposed models satisfy realizability and will not produce unphysical behavior. Fully developed channel flows are used for model testing. The equations are solved for the mean velocity, the Reynolds stresses, and the dissipation rate of the turbulent kinetic energy. The calculations are compared with both direct numerical simulations and with measurements. It is shown that the present models perform well in predicting the behavior of the turbulence near a wall. Significant improvements over previous models in predicting the components of the Reynolds stress tensor are obtained in the present models.

  6. Nuclear quantum effects and kinetic isotope effects in enzyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Nitoker, Neta; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes are extraordinarily effective catalysts evolved to perform well-defined and highly specific chemical transformations. Studying the nature of rate enhancements and the mechanistic strategies in enzymes is very important, both from a basic scientific point of view, as well as in order to improve rational design of biomimetics. Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is a very important tool in the study of chemical reactions and has been used extensively in the field of enzymology. Theoretically, the prediction of KIEs in condensed phase environments such as enzymes is challenging due to the need to include nuclear quantum effects (NQEs). Herein we describe recent progress in our group in the development of multi-scale simulation methods for the calculation of NQEs and accurate computation of KIEs. We also describe their application to several enzyme systems. In particular we describe the use of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods in classical and quantum simulations. The development of various novel path-integral methods is reviewed. These methods are tailor suited to enzyme systems, where only a few degrees of freedom involved in the chemistry need to be quantized. The application of the hybrid QM/MM quantum-classical simulation approach to three case studies is presented. The first case involves the proton transfer in alanine racemase. The second case presented involves orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase where multidimensional free energy simulations together with kinetic isotope effects are combined in the study of the reaction mechanism. Finally, we discuss the proton transfer in nitroalkane oxidase, where the enzyme employs tunneling as a catalytic fine-tuning tool. PMID:25769515

  7. Nuclear quantum effects and kinetic isotope effects in enzyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Nitoker, Neta; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes are extraordinarily effective catalysts evolved to perform well-defined and highly specific chemical transformations. Studying the nature of rate enhancements and the mechanistic strategies in enzymes is very important, both from a basic scientific point of view, as well as in order to improve rational design of biomimetics. Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is a very important tool in the study of chemical reactions and has been used extensively in the field of enzymology. Theoretically, the prediction of KIEs in condensed phase environments such as enzymes is challenging due to the need to include nuclear quantum effects (NQEs). Herein we describe recent progress in our group in the development of multi-scale simulation methods for the calculation of NQEs and accurate computation of KIEs. We also describe their application to several enzyme systems. In particular we describe the use of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods in classical and quantum simulations. The development of various novel path-integral methods is reviewed. These methods are tailor suited to enzyme systems, where only a few degrees of freedom involved in the chemistry need to be quantized. The application of the hybrid QM/MM quantum-classical simulation approach to three case studies is presented. The first case involves the proton transfer in alanine racemase. The second case presented involves orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase where multidimensional free energy simulations together with kinetic isotope effects are combined in the study of the reaction mechanism. Finally, we discuss the proton transfer in nitroalkane oxidase, where the enzyme employs tunneling as a catalytic fine-tuning tool.

  8. Kinetics Of Isomerisation Reaction Of Oriented Polyacetylene Induced By Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mammeri, S.; Belloum, M.; Tabacik, V.

    2008-09-23

    The impact of a laser's photons ({lambda} = 514.5 nm) on the surface of polyacetylene films (PA), composed of macromolecules PAcis and PAtrans produces simultaneously thermal and Raman diffusion [1]. The thermal effect initializes the isomerization of macromolecules PAcis to PAtrans [2]; this reaction is exothermic. Samples are polyacetylene oriented films synthesized horizontally or vertically in cis configuration and are subject to different laser powers during intervals of time which vary between 20 s and 250 s. The power (P ({lambda}), mW) of the laser is equivalent to the temperature T, of isomerization [3]. Isotherms are constructed and are characterized by the laser power applied. We have established theoretical models calculations with the aim of determining the kinetic parameters of the reaction of isomerization: the activation energy (Ea), the frequency factor of Arrhenius (A), and the rate constant (k). We concluded that even in the field of seconds, the isomerization is a complex process different from a reaction of order: 1, 7/10, 2/3, 3/5, 1/2, 2/5 and 1/4. The order 2/3 being the most suitable. The study determined, among others, the rate constants k 2/3 (T)(of the order 2/3 of the isomerization reaction)= 0.003337244, 0.0052149, 0.0209636, 0.043727 s-1 respectively for Laser powers 30, 120, 200 and 300 mW; activation energy 17.7844 kcal/mol and a factor of collision 19.066816 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. These results are found to be close to the experimental results studied.

  9. Kinetic study of the reactions between chloramine disinfectants and hydrogen peroxide: temperature dependence and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    McKay, Garrett; Sjelin, Brittney; Chagnon, Matthew; Ishida, Kenneth P; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    The temperature-dependent kinetics for the reaction between hydrogen peroxide and chloramine water disinfectants (NH2Cl, NHCl2, and NCl3) have been determined using stopped flow-UV/Vis spectrophotometry. Rate constants for the mono- and dichloramine-peroxide reaction were on the order of 10(-2)M(-1)s(-1) and 10(-5)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The reaction of trichloramine with peroxide was negligibly slow compared to its thermal and photolytically-induced decomposition. Arrhenius expressions of ln(kH2O2-NH2Cl)=(17.3±1.5)-(51500±3700)/RT and ln(kH2O2-NHCl2)=(18.2±1.9)-(75800±5100)/RT were obtained for the mono- and dichloramine peroxide reaction over the temperature ranges 11.4-37.9 and 35.0-55.0°C, respectively. Both monochloramine and hydrogen peroxide were first-order in the rate-limiting kinetic step and concomitant measurements made using a chloride ion selective electrode showed that the chloride was produced quantitatively. These data will aid water utilities in predicting chloramine concentrations (and thus disinfection potential) throughout the water distribution system.

  10. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  11. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  12. On computing first and second order derivative spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Indrajit G.

    2015-08-01

    Enhancing resolution in spectral response and an ability to differentiate spectral mixing in delineating the endmembers from the spectral response are central to the spectral data analysis. First and higher order derivatives analysis of absorbance and reflectance spectral data is commonly used techniques in differentiating the spectral mixing. But high sensitivity of derivative to the noise in data is a major problem in the robust estimation of derivative of spectral data. An algorithm of robust estimation of first and second order derivative spectra from evenly spaced noisy normal spectral data is proposed. The algorithm is formalized in the framework of an inverse problem, where based on the fundamental theorem of calculus a matrix equation is formed using a Volterra type integral equation of first kind. A regularization technique, where the balancing principle is used in selecting a posteriori optimal regularization parameter is designed to solve the inverse problem for robust estimation of first order derivative spectra. The higher order derivative spectra are obtained while using the algorithm in sequel. The algorithm is tested successfully with synthetically generated spectral data contaminated with additive white Gaussian noise, and also with real absorbance and reflectance spectral data for fresh and sea water respectively.

  13. Modal cost analysis for linear matrix-second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reduced models and reduced controllers for systems governed by matrix-second-order differential equations are obtained by retaining those modes which make the largest contributions to quadratic control objectives. Such contributions, expressed in terms of modal data, used as mode truncation criteria, allow the statement of the specific control objectives to influence the early model reduction from very high order models which are available, for example, from finite element methods. The relative importance of damping, frequency, and eigenvector in the mode truncation decisions are made explicit for each of these control objectives: attitude control, vibration suppression and figure control. The paper also shows that using modal cost analysis (MCA) on the closed loop modes of the optimally controlled system allows the construction of reduced control policies which feedback only those closed loop modal coordinates which are most critical to the quadratic control performance criterion. In this way, the modes which should be controlled (and hence the modes which must be observable by choice of measurements), are deduced from truncations of the optimal controller.

  14. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low β- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (βx*100mm - βy* 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (δp/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  15. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-01-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form −K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated −K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface. PMID:27246631

  16. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-06-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form ‑K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated ‑K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface.

  17. Second-order spatial analysis of epidermal nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Waller, Lance A; Särkkä, Aila; Olsbo, Viktor; Myllymäki, Mari; Panoutsopoulou, Ioanna G; Kennedy, William R; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen

    2011-10-15

    Breakthroughs in imaging of skin tissue reveal new details on the distribution of nerve fibers in the epidermis. Preliminary neurologic studies indicate qualitative differences in the spatial patterns of nerve fibers based on pathophysiologic conditions in the subjects. Of particular interest is the evolution of spatial patterns observed in the progression of diabetic neuropathy. It appears that the spatial distribution of nerve fibers becomes more 'clustered' as neuropathy advances, suggesting the possibility of diagnostic prediction based on patterns observed in skin biopsies. We consider two approaches to establish statistical inference relating to this observation. First, we view the set of locations where the nerves enter the epidermis from the dermis as a realization of a spatial point process. Secondly, we treat the set of fibers as a realization of a planar fiber process. In both cases, we use estimated second-order properties of the observed data patterns to describe the degree and scale of clustering observed in the microscope images of blister biopsies. We illustrate the methods using confocal microscopy blister images taken from the thigh of one normal (disease-free) individual and two images each taken from the thighs of subjects with mild, moderate, and severe diabetes and report measurable differences in the spatial patterns of nerve entry points/fibers associated with disease status.

  18. Second-order perturbation theory: Problems on large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2015-11-01

    In general-relativistic perturbation theory, a point mass accelerates away from geodesic motion due to its gravitational self-force. Because the self-force is small, one can often approximate the motion as geodesic. However, it is well known that self-force effects accumulate over time, making the geodesic approximation fail on long time scales. It is less well known that this failure at large times translates to a failure at large distances as well. At second perturbative order, two large-distance pathologies arise: spurious secular growth and infrared-divergent retarded integrals. Both stand in the way of practical computations of second-order self-force effects. Utilizing a simple flat-space scalar toy model, I develop methods to overcome these obstacles. The secular growth is tamed with a multiscale expansion that captures the system's slow evolution. The divergent integrals are eliminated by matching to the correct retarded solution at large distances. I also show how to extract conservative self-force effects by taking local-in-time "snapshots" of the global solution. These methods are readily adaptable to the physically relevant case of a point mass orbiting a black hole.

  19. Kinetic study of hydrated lime reaction with HCl.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rong; Chin, Terence; Liang, David Tee; Laursen, Karin; Ong, Wan Yean; Yao, Kaiwen; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2003-06-01

    Hydrochloride (HCl) is an acidic pollutant present in the flue gas of most municipal or hazardous waste incinerators. Hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) is often used as a dry sorbent for injection in a spray reactor to remove HCI. However, due to the short residence time encountered, this control method has generally been found to have low conversion efficiencies which results in the high lime usage and generates large amount of fly ash as solid wastes. A fundamental study was carried outto investigate the kinetics of HCl-lime reaction under simulated flue gas conditions in order to better understand the process thereby providing a basis for an optimized lime usage and reduced fly ash production. The initial reaction rate and conversion of three limes were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer by varying the gas flow rate, temperature (170-400 degrees C), and HCI concentrations (600-1200 mg/m3) as well as the associated particle size and surface area of the limes. The initial lime conversions were found to rely mostly on the residence time, while the ultimate lime conversions were strongly influenced by temperature and the reaction products. CaOHCI was found to be the primary product in most cases, while for one specific lime, CaCl2 was the ultimate conversion product after an extended time period. The true utilization of lime in flue gas cleanup is thus higher when CaOHCl is considered as the final product than those based on CaCl2 as the final product, which has been commonly used in previous studies. The initial reaction was controlled by diffusion of HCl in gas phase and the subsequent reaction by gaseous diffusion through the developing product layer. Increasing the HCI concentration raised the initial rate as well as conversion. However, overloading the lime with excessive HCI caused clogging at its surface and a drop in the ultimate conversion. Limes with smaller particle diameters and higher surface areas were found to be more reactive. The effect of gas

  20. Assessment of the second-order perturbative corrections to PNOF5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piris, M.; Ruipérez, F.; Matxain, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    In a recent paper (J. Chem. Phys. 139, 064111, 2013), an antisymmetrised product of strongly orthogonal geminals with the expansion coefficients explicitly expressed by means of the occupation numbers was used to generate the Piris natural orbital functional 5 (PNOF5). This functional describes most of the non-dynamical effects, but also an important part of the intrapair (intrageminal) electron correlation. Second-order corrections to the generating PNOF5 wave function were derived using the multiconfigurational perturbation theory size consistent at the second order (SC2-MCPT) to include the missing interpair (intergeminal) electron correlation. A modified version of the SC2-MCPT involving double excitations only from different geminals was introduced and denoted as PNOF5-PT2. In this paper, the ground-state energies of 36 closed-shell species belonging to the G2/97 test set of molecules are studied by the PNOF5-PT2 and PNOF5-SC2-MCPT methods. The numerical performance of both methods on eight dimers, with different strength of hydrogen bonds, and 13 isogyric reactions is also assessed. The results are in reasonable agreement with those obtained using the complete active space second-order perturbation theory and coupled-cluster method with singles, doubles, and noniterative triples corrections.

  1. The kinetics study of the S + S2 → S3 reaction by the chaperone mechanism.

    PubMed

    Du, Shiyu; Germann, Timothy C; Francisco, Joseph S; Peterson, Kirk A; Yu, Hua-Gen; Lyons, James R

    2011-04-21

    The recombination of S atoms has been found to be stepwise from the smallest unit, the elemental S atom, to the most abundant molecule S(8). The reaction between S + S(2) → S(3) has not been reported either experimentally or by theory, but may be a key intermediate step in the formation of sulfur aerosols in low-O(2) atmospheres. In this work, the kinetics of this reaction is reported with Ar gas used as the chaperone molecule in the production of S(3) via two complex intermediates: SAr + S(2) and S(2)Ar + S. Quasi-classical and classical trajectory methods are used. The rate constant of the S + S(2) + Ar → S(3) + Ar reaction is determined to be 2.66 × 10(-33) cm(6)  mol(-1) s(-1) at 298.15 K. The temperature dependence of the reaction is found to be 2.67 × 10(-33) exp[143.56(1∕T-1∕298.15)]. The second-order rate constant of S + S(2) → S(3) is 6.47 × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298.15 K and the Arrhenius-type rate constant is calculated to be 6.25 × 10(-14) exp[450.15(1∕T-1∕298.15)] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). This work provides a rate coefficient for a key intermediate species in studies of sulfur formation in the modern Venus atmosphere and the primitive Earth atmosphere, for which assumed model rate coefficients have spanned nearly 4 orders of magnitude. Although a symmetry-induced mass-independent isotope effect is not expected for a chaperone mechanism, the present work is an important step toward evaluating whether mass-independence is expected for thiozone formation as is observed for ozone formation. PMID:21513396

  2. Second order multidimensional sign-preserving remapping for ALE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Ryan N; Szmelter, J.

    2010-12-15

    A second-order conservative sign-preserving remapping scheme for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods is developed utilising concepts of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The algorithm is inherently multidimensional, and so does not introduce splitting errors. The remapping is implemented in a two-dimensional, finite element ALE solver employing staggered quadrilateral meshes. The MPDATA remapping uses a finite volume discretization developed for volume coordinates. It is applied for the remapping of density and internal energy arranged as cell centered, and velocity as nodal, dependent variables. In the paper, the advection of scalar fields is examined first for test cases with prescribed mesh movement. A direct comparison of MPDATA with the performance of the van Leer MUSCL scheme indicates advantages of a multidimensional approach. Furthermore, distinctly different performance between basic MPDATA and the infinite gauge option is illustrated using benchmarks involving transport of a sign changing velocity field. Further development extends the application of MPDATA remapping to the full ALE solver with a staggered mesh arrangement for density, internal energy and momentum using volume coordinates. At present, two options of the algorithm - basic and infinite gauge - are implemented. To ensure a meaningful assessment, an identical Lagrangian solver and computational mesh update routines are used with either MPDATA or van Leer MUSCL remapping. The evaluation places particular focus on the abilities of both schemes to accurately model multidimensional problems. Theoretical considerations are supported with numerical examples. In addition to the prescribed mesh movement cases for advection of scalars, the demonstrations include two-dimensional Eulerian and ALE flow simulations on quadrilateral meshes with both fixed and variable timestep control. The key comparisons include the standard test cases of Sod and Noh

  3. Combustion reaction kinetics of guarana seed residue applying isoconversional methods and consecutive reaction scheme.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rezende; Tannous, Katia; Rueda-Ordóñez, Yesid Javier

    2016-11-01

    This work aims the study of decomposition kinetics of guarana seed residue using thermogravimetric analyzer under synthetic air atmosphere applying heating rates of 5, 10, and 15°C/min, from room temperature to 900°C. Three thermal decomposition stages were identified: dehydration (25.1-160°C), oxidative pyrolysis (240-370°C), and combustion (350-650°C). The activation energies, reaction model, and pre-exponential factor were determined through four isoconversional methods, master plots, and linearization of the conversion rate equation, respectively. A scheme of two-consecutive reactions was applied validating the kinetic parameters of first-order reaction and two-dimensional diffusion models for the oxidative pyrolysis stage (149.57kJ/mol, 6.97×10(10)1/s) and for combustion stage (77.98kJ/mol, 98.611/s), respectively. The comparison between theoretical and experimental conversion and conversion rate showed good agreement with average deviation lower than 2%, indicating that these results could be used for modeling of guarana seed residue. PMID:27513645

  4. Combustion reaction kinetics of guarana seed residue applying isoconversional methods and consecutive reaction scheme.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rezende; Tannous, Katia; Rueda-Ordóñez, Yesid Javier

    2016-11-01

    This work aims the study of decomposition kinetics of guarana seed residue using thermogravimetric analyzer under synthetic air atmosphere applying heating rates of 5, 10, and 15°C/min, from room temperature to 900°C. Three thermal decomposition stages were identified: dehydration (25.1-160°C), oxidative pyrolysis (240-370°C), and combustion (350-650°C). The activation energies, reaction model, and pre-exponential factor were determined through four isoconversional methods, master plots, and linearization of the conversion rate equation, respectively. A scheme of two-consecutive reactions was applied validating the kinetic parameters of first-order reaction and two-dimensional diffusion models for the oxidative pyrolysis stage (149.57kJ/mol, 6.97×10(10)1/s) and for combustion stage (77.98kJ/mol, 98.611/s), respectively. The comparison between theoretical and experimental conversion and conversion rate showed good agreement with average deviation lower than 2%, indicating that these results could be used for modeling of guarana seed residue.

  5. Reaction kinetics of dual setting α-tricalcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Hurle, Katrin; Christel, Theresa; Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus; Neubauer, Juergen; Goetz-Neunhoeffer, Friedlinde

    2016-01-01

    Addition of ductile polymers to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA)-forming bone cements based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) is a promising approach to improve the mechanical performance of α-TCP cements and extend their application to load-bearing defects, which is else impeded by the brittleness of the hardened cement. One suitable polymer is poly-(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (p-HEMA), which forms during cement setting by radical polymerisation of the monomer. In this study the hydration kinetics and the mechanical performance of α-TCP cements modified with addition of different HEMA concentrations (0-50 wt% in the cement liquid) was investigated by quantitative in situ XRD and four-point bending tests. Morphology of CDHA crystals was monitored by scanning electron microscopy. The hydration of α-TCP to CDHA was increasingly impeded and the visible crystal size of CDHA increasingly reduced with increasing HEMA concentration. Modification of the cements by adding 50 wt% HEMA to the cement liquid changed the brittle performance of the hardened cement to a pseudoplastic behaviour, reduced the flexural modulus and increased the work of fracture, while lower HEMA concentrations had no significant effect on these parameters. In such a composite, the extent of CDHA formation was considerably reduced (34.0 ± 1.8 wt% CDHA with 50 % HEMA compared to 54.1 ± 2.4 wt% CDHA in the reference formed after 48 h), while the general reaction kinetics were not changed. In conclusion, while the extent of CDHA formation was decreased, the mechanical properties were noticeably improved by addition of HEMA. Hence, α-TCP/HEMA composites might be suitable for application in some load-bearing defects and have adequate properties for mechanical treatment after implantation, like insertion of screws. PMID:26610924

  6. Kinetic modelling of GlmU reactions - prioritization of reaction for therapeutic application.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Das, Kaveri; Seshadri, Kothandaraman

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis(Mtu), a successful pathogen, has developed resistance against the existing anti-tubercular drugs necessitating discovery of drugs with novel action. Enzymes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis are attractive targets for antibacterial drug discovery. The bifunctional enzyme mycobacterial GlmU (Glucosamine 1-phosphate N-acetyltransferase/ N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase) has been a target enzyme for drug discovery. Its C- and N- terminal domains catalyze acetyltransferase (rxn-1) and uridyltransferase (rxn-2) activities respectively and the final product is involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. However, the bifunctional nature of GlmU poses difficulty in deciding which function to be intervened for therapeutic advantage. Genetic analysis showed this as an essential gene but it is still unclear whether any one or both of the activities are critical for cell survival. Often enzymatic activity with suitable high-throughput assay is chosen for random screening, which may not be the appropriate biological function inhibited for maximal effect. Prediction of rate-limiting function by dynamic network analysis of reactions could be an option to identify the appropriate function. With a view to provide insights into biochemical assays with appropriate activity for inhibitor screening, kinetic modelling studies on GlmU were undertaken. Kinetic model of Mtu GlmU-catalyzed reactions was built based on the available kinetic data on Mtu and deduction from Escherichia coli data. Several model variants were constructed including coupled/decoupled, varying metabolite concentrations and presence/absence of product inhibitions. This study demonstrates that in coupled model at low metabolite concentrations, inhibition of either of the GlmU reactions cause significant decrement in the overall GlmU rate. However at higher metabolite concentrations, rxn-2 showed higher decrement. Moreover, with available intracellular concentration of the

  7. Cr stable isotope fractionation and reaction kinetics in aqueous milieu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, S.; Schoenberg, R.; Staubwasser, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mass-dependent stable Cr isotope variations show great potential to monitor the natural attenuation of anthropogenic chromate pollution as well as to investigate changes in environmental conditions in the present and the past. However, accurate interpretation of mass-dependent Cr isotope variations requires profound knowledge of the Cr isotope fractionation behaviour during redox transitions and the isotope exchange kinetics of the reactions involved. Here, we present a comprehensive dataset of stable Cr isotope fractionation and reaction kinetics during Cr(III) oxidation, Cr(VI) reduction and isotopic exchange between soluble Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in aqueous milieu. All experiments were carried out with both oxidation states (i.e. Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) in solution, using H2O2 as oxidising as well as reducing agent. The pH conditions were varied to investigate the influence of the different Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species on the Cr isotope fractionation and on the reaction mechanisms during the enforced redox transitions. All Cr stable isotope measurements were performed by high-resolution MC-ICP-MS [1]. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) with H2O2 under strongly acidic conditions shows an equilibrium isotope fractionation of Δ(53,52Cr)Cr(III)-Cr(VI) of -3.54 ± 0.35 ‰. This value is within uncertainty equal to that of -3.4 ± 0.1 ‰ reported by Ellis et al. [2], who used natural sediment and magnetite as reducing agents at pH 6 to 7. At pH = 7 our reduction experiments show a unidirectional, kinetic isotope fractionation Δ(53,52Cr)Cr(III)-Cr(VI) of approximately -5 ‰ for reduction rates of up to 80 %, but a strong deviation from this Rayleigh-type process for higher reduction rates. However, at a pH value of 7 H2O2 supports the temporary formation and decomposition of Cr(V)-peroxo complexes that might explain this fractionation behaviour and deviation from a single Rayleigh type trend. The oxidation experiments of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) were carried out in alkaline media

  8. Iteration Scheme for Implicit Calculations of Kinetic and Equilibrium Chemical Reactions in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, J. D.; Chang, C. H.

    1995-02-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described (J. D. Ramshaw and A. A. Amsden, J. Comput. Phys.59, 484 (1985); 71 , 224 (1987)). Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in some regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow.

  9. General chemical kinetics computer program for static and flow reactions, with application to combustion and shock-tube kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics program is described for complex, homogeneous ideal-gas reactions in any chemical system. Its main features are flexibility and convenience in treating many different reaction conditions. The program solves numerically the differential equations describing complex reaction in either a static system or one-dimensional inviscid flow. Applications include ignition and combustion, shock wave reactions, and general reactions in a flowing or static system. An implicit numerical solution method is used which works efficiently for the extreme conditions of a very slow or a very fast reaction. The theory is described, and the computer program and users' manual are included.

  10. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  11. Reaction of Phenyl Radical with O2: Thermodynamic Properties, Important Reaction Paths and Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzelli, J; Sebbar, N; Pitz, W; Bockhorn, H

    2001-04-12

    The Phenyl + O{sub 2} association results in a chemically activated phenyl-peroxy radical which can dissociate to phenoxy radical + O, undergo intramolecular addition of the peroxy radical to several unsaturated carbon sites or react back to phenyl + O{sub 2}. The intramolecular addition channels further react through several paths to ring opening (unsaturated + carbonyl moieties) as well as cyclopentadieny radical + CO{sub 2}. Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub f(298)}{sup o}), Entropy (S{sub 298}), and heat capacities Cp(T) for species in the decomposition of the ring are evaluated using density functional and ab initio calculations and by comparisons to vinyl + O{sub 2} data of Mebel et al, and phenyl + O{sub 2} data of Hadad et al. Isodesmic reaction analysis is used to estimate enthalpy values of the intermediates and well depths of the adducts. High Pressure limit kinetic parameters are obtained from the calculation results using canonical Transition State Theory. Quantum RRK analysis is utilized to obtain k(E) and modified strong collision or master equation analysis is used for evaluation of pressure fall-off in this complex bimolecular, chemical activation, reaction system. Uncertainty in key barriers is discussed, resulting variations in important reaction product ratios are illustrated, and changes in these branching ratios are evaluated with a detailed reaction mechanism.

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Kinetic Isotope Effects on Proton Transfer Reactions between Substituted α-Methoxystyrenes and Substituted Acetic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Yiu; Richard, John P.; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on a series of carboxylic acid-catalyzed protonation reactions of aryl-substituted α-methoxystyrenes (X-1) to form oxocarbenium ions have been computed using the Kleinert variational second-order perturbation theory (KP2) in the framework of Feynman path integrals (PI) along with the potential energy surface obtained at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained, demonstrating that this novel computational approach for computing KIEs of organic reactions is a viable alternative to the traditional method employing Bigeleisen equation and harmonic vibrational frequencies. Although tunneling makes relative small contributions to the lowering of the free energy barriers for the carboxylic acid catalyzed protonation reaction, it is necessary to include tunneling contributions to obtain quantitative estimates of the KIEs. Consideration of anharmonicity can further improve the calculated KIEs for the protonation of substituted α-methoxystyrenes by chloroacetic acid, but for the reactions of the parent and 4-NO2 substituted α-methoxystyrene with substituted carboxylic acids, the correction of anharmonicity overestimates the computed KIEs for strong acid catalysts. In agreement with experimental findings, the largest KIEs are found in nearly ergoneutral reactions, ΔGo ≈ 0, where the transition structures are nearly symmetric and the reaction barriers are relatively low. Furthermore, the optimized transition structures are strongly dependent on the free energy for the formation of the carbocation intermediate, i.e., the driving force ΔGo, along with a good correlation of Hammond shift in the transition state structure. PMID:19754046

  13. Theoretical analysis of kinetic isotope effects on proton transfer reactions between substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes and substituted acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Richard, John P; Gao, Jiali

    2009-10-01

    Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on a series of carboxylic acid-catalyzed protonation reactions of aryl-substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes (X-1) to form oxocarbenium ions have been computed using the second-order Kleinert variational perturbation theory (KP2) in the framework of Feynman path integrals (PI) along with the potential energy surface obtained at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained, demonstrating that this novel computational approach for computing KIEs of organic reactions is a viable alternative to the traditional method employing Bigeleisen equation and harmonic vibrational frequencies. Although tunneling makes relatively small contributions to the lowering of the free energy barriers for the carboxylic acid catalyzed protonation reaction, it is necessary to include tunneling contributions to obtain quantitative estimates of the KIEs. Consideration of anharmonicity can further improve the calculated KIEs for the protonation of substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes by chloroacetic acid, but for the reactions of the parent and 4-NO(2) substituted alpha-methoxystyrene with substituted carboxylic acids, the correction of anharmonicity overestimates the computed KIEs for strong acid catalysts. In agreement with experimental findings, the largest KIEs are found in nearly ergoneutral reactions, DeltaG(o) approximately 0, where the transition structures are nearly symmetric and the reaction barriers are relatively low. Furthermore, the optimized transition structures are strongly dependent on the free energy for the formation of the carbocation intermediate, that is, the driving force DeltaG(o), along with a good correlation of Hammond shift in the transition state structure.

  14. Soil solid materials affect the kinetics of extracellular enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammirato, C.; Miltner, A.; Kästner, M.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Soil solid materials affect the degradation processes of many organic compounds by decreasing the bioavailability of substrates and by interacting with degraders. The magnitude of this effect in the environment is shown by the fact that xenobiotics which are readily metabolized in aquatic environments can have long residence times in soil. Extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose (enzyme: beta-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger) was chosen as model degradation process since it is easier to control and more reproducible than a whole cell processes. Furthermore extracellular enzymes play an important role in the environment since they are responsible for the first steps in the degradation of organic macromolecules; beta-glucosidase is key enzyme in the degradation of cellulose and therefore it is fundamental in the carbon cycle and for soil in general. The aims of the project are: 1) quantification of solid material effect on degradation, 2) separation of the effects of minerals on enzyme (adsorption →change in activity) and substrate (adsorption →change in bioavailability). Our hypothesis is that a rate reduction in the enzymatic reaction in the presence of a solid phase results from the sum of decreased bioavailability of the substrate and decreased activity of enzyme molecules. The relative contribution of the two terms to the overall effect can vary widely depending on the chemical nature of the substrate, the properties of the enzyme and on the surface properties of the solid materials. Furthermore we hypothesize that by immobilizing the enzyme in an appropriate carrier the adsorption of enzymes to soil materials can be eliminated and that therefore immobilization can increase the overall reaction rate (activity loss caused by immobilization < activity loss caused by adsorption to soil minerals). MATERIALS AND METHODS Enzymatic kinetic experiments are carried out in homogeneous liquid systems and in heterogeneous systems where solid

  15. Further development and testing of a second-order bulk boundary layer model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krasner, R.D.

    1993-05-03

    A one-layer bulk boundary layer model is developed. The model predicts the mixed layer values of the potential temperature, mixing ratio, and u- and v-momentum. The model also predicts the depth of the boundary layer and the vertically integrated turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). The TKE is determined using a second-order closure that relates the rate of dissipation to the TKE. The fractional area covered by rising motion sigma and the entrainment rate (E) are diagnostically determined. The model is used to study the clear convective boundary layer (CBL) using data from the Wangara, Australia boundary layer experiment. The Wangara data is also used as an observation base to validate model results. A further study is accomplished by simulating the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over an ocean surface. This study is designed to find the steady-state solutions of the prognostic variable.

  16. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with cysteine. Kinetics studies of the formation and reactions of DNICs in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Clayston Melo; Iretskii, Alexei V; Han, Rui-Min; Ford, Peter C

    2015-01-14

    Kinetics studies provide mechanistic insight regarding the formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) now viewed as playing important roles in the mammalian chemical biology of the ubiquitous bioregulator nitric oxide (NO). Reactions in deaerated aqueous solutions containing FeSO4, cysteine (CysSH), and NO demonstrate that both the rates and the outcomes are markedly pH dependent. The dinuclear DNIC Fe2(μ-CysS)2(NO)4, a Roussin's red salt ester (Cys-RSE), is formed at pH 5.0 as well as at lower concentrations of cysteine in neutral pH solutions. The mononuclear DNIC Fe(NO)2(CysS)2(-) (Cys-DNIC) is produced from the same three components at pH 10.0 and at higher cysteine concentrations at neutral pH. The kinetics studies suggest that both Cys-RSE and Cys-DNIC are formed via a common intermediate Fe(NO)(CysS)2(-). Cys-DNIC and Cys-RSE interconvert, and the rates of this process depend on the cysteine concentration and on the pH. Flash photolysis of the Cys-RSE formed from Fe(II)/NO/cysteine mixtures in anaerobic pH 5.0 solution led to reversible NO dissociation and a rapid, second-order back reaction with a rate constant kNO = 6.9 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). In contrast, photolysis of the mononuclear-DNIC species Cys-DNIC formed from Fe(II)/NO/cysteine mixtures in anaerobic pH 10.0 solution did not labilize NO but instead apparently led to release of the CysS(•) radical. These studies illustrate the complicated reaction dynamics interconnecting the DNIC species and offer a mechanistic model for the key steps leading to these non-heme iron nitrosyl complexes.

  17. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  18. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  19. Growth kinetics of forsterite reaction rims at high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Yu; Maruyama, Genta; Nishi, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Growth kinetics of forsterite (Fo) reaction rims between periclase (Per) and enstatite (En) were studied experimentally at pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions of 3.0-11.1 GPa and 1473-1873 K, respectively. Pt markers originally placed at the Per-En interface were always observed at the Per-Fo interface, which indicates that Mg and O are the diffusing species in Fo rim growth (Mg-O coupled diffusion). The presence of some En inclusions in Fo grains and the growth rate of the Fo rim suggests that grain boundary diffusion is dominant rather than lattice diffusion. Considering the very fast grain boundary diffusion of O in olivine, the Mg-O coupled grain boundary diffusion in Fo is deduced to be rate-limited by the diffusivity of Mg. Based on an analysis of data collected under dry conditions, the product of the Mg grain boundary diffusion coefficient (Dgb) and the effective grain boundary width (δ) was determined to be δDgb = δDgb,0exp[-(E∗ + PV∗)/RT] with δDgb,0 = 10-9.68 ± 1.51 m3/s, E∗ = 379 ± 44 kJ/mol and V∗ = -1.9 ± 1.4 cm3/mol. Our results, combined with previously reported data on Mg lattice diffusion in Fo, suggest that for Mg, the significance of grain boundary diffusion increases with depth in the Earth's upper mantle, although lattice diffusion is still dominant for typical mantle grain sizes of 1-10 mm.

  20. Renormalized second-order perturbation theory for the electron correlation energy: Concept, implementation, and benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xinguo; Rinke, Patrick; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    We present a renormalized second-order perturbation theory (rPT2), based on a Kohn-Sham (KS) reference state, for the electron correlation energy that includes the random-phase approximation (RPA), second-order screened exchange (SOSEX), and renormalized single excitations (rSE). These three terms all involve a summation of certain types of diagrams to infinite order, and can be viewed as ``renormalization'' of the second-order direct, exchange, and single-excitation (SE) terms of Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory based on a KS reference. In this work, we establish the concept of rPT2 and present the numerical details of our SOSEX and rSE implementations. A preliminary version of rPT2, in which the renormalized SE (rSE) contribution was treated approximately, has already been benchmarked for molecular atomization energies and chemical reaction barrier heights and shows a well-balanced performance [J. Paier , New J. Phys.1367-263010.1088/1367-2630/14/4/043002 14, 043002 (2012)]. In this work, we present a refined version of rPT2, in which we evaluate the rSE series of diagrams rigorously. We then extend the benchmark studies to noncovalent interactions, including the rare-gas dimers, and the S22 and S66 test sets, as well as the cohesive energy of small copper clusters, and the equilibrium geometry of 10 diatomic molecules. Despite some remaining shortcomings, we conclude that rPT2 gives an overall satisfactory performance across different electronic situations, and is a promising step towards a generally applicable electronic-structure approach.

  1. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  2. An application of second-order UV-derivative spectrophotometry for study of solvolysis of a novel fluocinolone acetonide ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Bojan; Vladimirov, Sote; Cudina, Olivera; Savic, Vladimir; Karljikovic-Rajic, Katarina

    2010-02-01

    A novel topical corticosteroid FA-21-PhP, 2-phenoxypropionate ester of fluocinolone acetonide, has been synthesized in order to investigate the possibility of decreasing systemic side effects. In this study model system for in vitro solvolytic reaction of FA-21-PhP has been analyzed in ethanol/water (90:10, v/v) with excess of sodium hydrogen carbonate. The selected conditions have been used as in vitro model for activation of corticosteroid C-21 ester prodrug. The second-order derivative spectrophotometric method (DS) using zero-crossing technique was developed for monitoring ternary mixture of solvolysis. Fluocinolone acetonide (FA) as a solvolyte was determined in the mixture in the concentration range 0.062-0.312 mM using amplitude 2D 274.96. Experimentally determined LOD value was 0.0295 mM. The accuracy of proposed DS method was confirmed with HPLC referent method. Peak area of parent ester FA-21-PhP was used for solvolysis monitoring to ensure the initial stage of changes. Linear relationship in HPLC assay for parent ester was obtained in the concentration range 0.054-0.54 mM, with experimentally determined LOD value of 0.0041 mM. Investigated solvolytic reaction in the presence of excess of NaHCO 3 proceeded via a pseudo-first-order kinetic with significant correlation coefficients 0.9891 and 0.9997 for DS and HPLC, respectively. The values of solvolysis rate constant calculated according to DS and HPLC methods are in good accordance 0.038 and 0.043 h -1, respectively.

  3. Ab initio study of the kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F; Buchanan III, A C; Harrison, Robert J; Hathorn, Bryan C

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions play a key role in many thermal and catalytic processes involved in the production of fuels and chemicals. In this paper, the reaction barriers and rate constants for the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin by the benzyl radical are calculated by ab initio methods. These reactions are representatives of similar reactions occurring in the thermolysis of lignin model compounds containing the phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) structural moiety. Thermolysis of PPE occurs by a free radical chain mechanism in which the product selectivity arises from competitive hydrogen abstraction at the benzylic and nonbenzylic methylen sites by chain carrying benzyl and phenoxyl radicals. The title reactions serve to calibrate the theoretical methods to be used in the study of PPE through comparison of the rate constants and the reaction enthalpies with reliable experimental values. In this study, we used two different hybrid density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP) and second-order perturbation theory to obtain equilibrium and transition state geometries. Multiple transition states were found for both reactions. BHandHLYP underestimates and second-order perturbation theory overestimates the reaction barriers; B3LYP energy barriers agree well with experiment. Absolute and relative rate constants were calculated using transition state theory. We found that the relative rate constant using the B3LYP functional agrees within a factor of 2.0 with experiment at the experimental temperature of 333 K, indicating that the B3LYP functional will be successful in predicting relative rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions participating in the pyrolysis of PPE.

  4. H-Atom Reaction Kinetics in Solid Parahydrogen Followed by Rapid Scan FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Reactions of migrating H-atoms in parahydrogen (pH2) matrices with trapped molecular species provide a relatively unexplored yet well-established experimental method to study the kinetics and mechanisms of atom tunneling reactions in the 1.5 to 5 K temperature range. My group has now completed a series of experimental studies on the kinetics of reactions of H-atoms with HCOOH, CH3OH, and N2O which all show a pronounced inverse temperature dependence over this small temperature range. Conversely, the analogous H-atom reaction with NO displays a more standard Arrhenius behavior. In this talk, I will present a brief summary of these results with the objective of developing a predictive understanding of the kinetics of these H-atom tunneling reactions. I will also emphasize the advantages of following the kinetics using rapid scan FTIR. Fredrick M. Mutunga, Shelby E. Follett, and David T. Anderson, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 151104 (2013).

  5. Fluctuating reaction rate and non-exponential blinking statistics in single-enzyme kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jau; Yeh, Yi-Cheun; Tai, Po-Tse

    2008-09-01

    Extending the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, we consider a three-state diffusion-controlled reaction model to investigate the effects of fluctuating reaction rate on the blinking statistics of single-enzyme catalytic reactions. As a result of conformational changes, the barrier-height and the reaction rate for the bottleneck enzymatic reaction could fluctuate in time, leading to non-exponential blinking statistics. To illustrate model applications, some reported experimental data for single β-galactosidase molecules were reanalyzed here to extract useful kinetic parameters.

  6. Upscaling Mixed-Limited Reactions for Equilibrium and Fast Complete Kinetic Reactions in Radial and 1-D Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. A. M.; Ginn, T. R.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The new upscaling approach that implements the lamella concept utilizing the Lagrangian frame of reference gives a promising result when applied to the calcite precipitation equilibrium mixing-limited reaction. Here it is applied to the radial injection case representing aquifer remediation. To approximate aerobic biodegradation, the irreversible bimolecular kinetic reaction case is studied here also using the lamella approach for the one dimensional case. The theoretical rate for the mixing-limited kinetic reaction is derived from Gramling et al. (2002) for the special case where the total concentration of the injected component equals the total concentration of the ambient component, and then this special case is generalized for arbitrary concentrations. The results for both the equilibrium and the kinetic reaction cases are tested numerically versus COMSOL which matched the theoretical cases very well.

  7. A Pore Scale Evaluation of the Kinetics of Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation Reactions (EMSI)

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl I.

    2006-06-01

    The chief goals for CEKA are to (1) collect and synthesize molecular-level kinetic data into a coherent framework that can be used to predict time evolution of environmental processes over a range of temporal and spatial scales; (2) train a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on kinetic problems at multiple scales; (3) develop and promote the use of new experimental techniques in environmental kinetics; (4) develop and promote the use of new modeling tools to conceptualize reaction kinetics in environmental systems; and (5) communicate our understanding of issues related to environmental kinetics and issues of scale to the broader scientific community and to the public.

  8. Effects of Deception on Children's Understanding of Second-Order False Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined two questions: effects of deception on children's understanding of second-order false belief, and possible effects of number of siblings on second-order performance. Kindergarten children responded to 3 second-order problems that varied in the presence and the nature of deception. Performance was better on the problems…

  9. Radical Recombination Kinetics: An Experiment in Physical Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student kinetic experiment involving second order kinetics as well as displaying photochromism using a wide variety of techniques from both physical and organic chemistry. Describes measurement of (1) the rate of the recombination reaction; (2) the extinction coefficient; and (3) the ESR spectrometer signal. (Author/JN)

  10. Kinetics of the. gamma. -radiation-initiated reaction of 2-propanol with tri- and hexafluoropropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Zamyslov, R.A.; Shostenko, A.G.; Dobrov, I.V.; Tarasova, N.P.

    1988-02-01

    The initiation of telomerization reactions by ionizing radiation provides good opportunities for studying the kinetics of free radical reactions. The fluoroalcohols and their derivatives prepared using fluoroolefins and aliphatic alcohols find wide practical application. The object of this exercise was to study the reactivity of trifluoropropylene and hexafluoropropylene with 2-propanol. The reaction products were analyzed gas chromatographically.

  11. Model for reaction kinetics in pyrolysis of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, P.; Singh, P.C.; Upadhyay, S.N.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    A reaction model for the pyrolysis of small and large particles of wood Is developed. The chemical reactions that take place when biomass is pyrolyzed are the devolatilization reactions (primary) and due to the vapour-solid interactions (secondary). In the case of small particles, when the volatiles are immediately removed by the purge gas, only primary reactions occur and the reaction model is described by weight loss and char forming reactions. The of heterogeneous secondary reactions occur in the case of large particles due to the interaction between the volatiles and the hot nascent primary char. A chain reaction mechanism of secondary char formation is proposed. The model takes both the volatiles retention time and cracking and repolymerization reactions of the vapours with the decomposing solid as well as autocatalysis into consideration. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. THE KINETICS OF THE BACTERIUM-BACTERIOPHAGE REACTION.

    PubMed

    Krueger, A P; Northrop, J H

    1930-11-20

    " as applying to the maximal [P]'s. That is, they all are grouped within a narrow range of [P] values, those having been made with high Po's being of lower titre than those made with low initial [P]'s. (1) There is a significant difference in the temperature coefficients of P and B formation. Further, the temperature coefficients of P and B destruction during lysis differ in almost the same ratio. Consequently, while all experimental evidence postulates B growth as an essential conditioning factor for P formation, the temperature coefficient data suggest that the two processes are basically separate reactions. A similar interpretation holds in the case of B dissolution and P inactivation. (m) The major events in the complete process of "bacteriophagy" are mathematically predictable. The [B] at which lysis occurs under certain standard conditions for given values of Bo and Po may be calculated from the equation: See PDF for Equation Substitution of this value for log B in the equation: See PDF for Equation gives satisfactory agreement with observed values for t((lysis)). (n) The kinetic analysis of the P-B reaction predicts that the values of log Po plotted against t((lysis)) for a constant Bo will give a straight line. This plot is employed in a method for the quantitative estimation of P described in an earlier paper on the basis of experimental observation alone. Its use is made more rational by the facts given above.

  13. Linear-noise approximation and the chemical master equation agree up to second-order moments for a class of chemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, Ramon

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that the linear-noise approximation (LNA) agrees with the chemical master equation, up to second-order moments, for chemical systems composed of zero and first-order reactions. Here we show that this is also a property of the LNA for a subset of chemical systems with second-order reactions. This agreement is independent of the number of interacting molecules.

  14. Linear-noise approximation and the chemical master equation agree up to second-order moments for a class of chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Grima, Ramon

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that the linear-noise approximation (LNA) agrees with the chemical master equation, up to second-order moments, for chemical systems composed of zero and first-order reactions. Here we show that this is also a property of the LNA for a subset of chemical systems with second-order reactions. This agreement is independent of the number of interacting molecules.

  15. Microscopic molecular dynamics characterization of the second-order non-Navier-Fourier constitutive laws in the Poiseuille gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, A.; Ravichandran, R.; Park, J. H.; Myong, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    The second-order non-Navier-Fourier constitutive laws, expressed in a compact algebraic mathematical form, were validated for the force-driven Poiseuille gas flow by the deterministic atomic-level microscopic molecular dynamics (MD). Emphasis is placed on how completely different methods (a second-order continuum macroscopic theory based on the kinetic Boltzmann equation, the probabilistic mesoscopic direct simulation Monte Carlo, and, in particular, the deterministic microscopic MD) describe the non-classical physics, and whether the second-order non-Navier-Fourier constitutive laws derived from the continuum theory can be validated using MD solutions for the viscous stress and heat flux calculated directly from the molecular data using the statistical method. Peculiar behaviors (non-uniform tangent pressure profile and exotic instantaneous heat conduction from cold to hot [R. S. Myong, "A full analytical solution for the force-driven compressible Poiseuille gas flow based on a nonlinear coupled constitutive relation," Phys. Fluids 23(1), 012002 (2011)]) were re-examined using atomic-level MD results. It was shown that all three results were in strong qualitative agreement with each other, implying that the second-order non-Navier-Fourier laws are indeed physically legitimate in the transition regime. Furthermore, it was shown that the non-Navier-Fourier constitutive laws are essential for describing non-zero normal stress and tangential heat flux, while the classical and non-classical laws remain similar for shear stress and normal heat flux.

  16. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  17. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H2O2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H2O2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H2O2 concentration were 7.0 and 8μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1UmL(-1) SBP in 30min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3UmL(-1) was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (KCAT) and catalytic efficiency (KCAT/KM) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via CC and CO coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment. PMID:26921508

  18. A Generic Length-scale Equation For Second-order Turbulence Models of Oceanic Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umlauf, L.; Burchard, H.

    A generic transport equation for a generalized length-scale in second-order turbulence closure models for geophysical boundary layers is suggested. This variable consists of the products of powers of the turbulent kinetic energy, k, and the integral length-scale, l. The new approach generalizes traditional second-order models used in geophysical boundary layer modelling, e.g. the Mellor-Yamada model and the k- model, which, however, can be recovered as special cases. It is demonstrated how this new model can be calibrated with measurements in some typical geophysical boundary layer flows. As an example, the generic model is applied to the uppermost oceanic boundary layer directly influenced by the effects of breaking surface waves. Recent measurements show that in this layer the classical law of the wall is invalid, since there turbulence is dominated by turbulent transport of TKE from above, and not by shear-production. A widely accepted approach to describe the wave-affected layer with a one-equation turbulence model was suggested by Craig and Banner (1994). Here, some deficien- cies of their solutions are pointed out and a generalization of their ideas for the case of two-equation models is suggested. Direct comparison with very recently obtained measurements of the dissipation rate, , in the wave-affected boundary layer with com- puted results clearly demonstrate that only the generic two-equation model yields cor- rect predictions for the profiles of and the turbulent length scale, l. Also, the pre- dicted velocity profiles in the wave-affected layer, important e.g. for the interpretation of surface drifter experiments, are reproduced correctly only by the generic model. Implementation and computational costs of the generic model are comparable with traditonal two-equation models.

  19. Second Order Catalytic Quasispecies Yields Discontinuous Mean Fitness at Error Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Nathaniel; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2010-05-01

    The quasispecies model describes processes related to the origin of life and viral evolutionary dynamics. We discuss how the error catastrophe that reflects the transition from localized to delocalized quasispecies population is affected by catalytic replication of different reaction orders. Specifically, we find that second order mechanisms lead to a discontinuity in the mean fitness of the population at the error threshold. This is in contrast to the behavior of the first order, autocatalytic replication mechanism considered in the standard quasispecies model. This suggests that quasispecies models with higher order replication mechanisms produce discontinuities in the mean fitness, and hence the viable population fraction as well, at the error threshold, while lower order replication mechanisms yield a continuous mean fitness function. We discuss potential implications for understanding replication in the RNA world and in virology.

  20. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Incineration of Organophosphorus and Fluoro-Organophosphorus Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P A; Melius, C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2001-12-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed to describe incineration of the chemical warfare nerve agent sarin (GB), based on commonly used principles of bond additivity and hierarchical reaction mechanisms. The mechanism is based on previous kinetic models of organophosphorus compounds such as TMP, DMMP and DIMP that are often used as surrogates to predict incineration of GB. Kinetic models of the three surrogates and GB are then used to predict their consumption in a perfectly stirred reactor fueled by natural gas to simulate incineration of these chemicals. Computed results indicate that DIMP is the only one of these surrogates that adequately describes combustion of GB under comparable conditions. The kinetic pathways responsible for these differences in reactivity are identified and discussed. The most important reaction in GB and DIMP that makes them more reactive than TMP or DMMP is found to be a six-center molecular elimination reaction producing propene.

  1. Kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in Li/SOCl2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Lee D.; Frank, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    Work is described that was designed to determine the kinetic constants necessary to extrapolate kinetic data on Li/SOCl2 cells over the temperature range from 25 to 75 C. A second objective was to characterize as far as possible the chemical reactions that occur in the cells since these reactions may be important in understanding the potential hazards of these cells. The kinetics of the corrosion processes in undischarged Li/SOCl2 cells were determined and separated according to their occurrence at the anode and cathode; the effects that switching the current on and off has on the corrosion reactions was determined; and the effects of discharge state on the kinetics of the corrosion process were found. A thermodynamic analysis of the current-producing reactions in the cell was done and is included.

  2. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  3. Physico-Geometrical Kinetics of Solid-State Reactions in an Undergraduate Thermal Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Goshi, Yuri; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    An undergraduate kinetic experiment of the thermal decomposition of solids by microscopic observation and thermal analysis was developed by investigating a suitable reaction, applicable techniques of thermal analysis and microscopic observation, and a reliable kinetic calculation method. The thermal decomposition of sodium hydrogen carbonate is…

  4. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  5. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  6. Oxidation of microcystins by permanganate: reaction kinetics and implications for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Eva; Majado, María E; Meriluoto, Jussi; Acero, Juan L

    2007-01-01

    A few genera of cyanobacteria produce toxins which contaminate drinking water resources. Microcystins (MC), widely reported cyanotoxins, cause acute and chronic toxicity effects in living beings including humans and warrant removal from drinking water. In the present study, unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), -RR and -YR with potassium permanganate were determined at pH 6.2-8.2 and temperature 10-25 degrees C. The reaction of permanganate with MCs is second-order overall and first-order with respect to both permanganate and toxin. The second-order rate constant for the reaction of MC-LR with permanganate at pH 7 and 20 degrees C was 357.2+/-17.5M(-1)s(-1). The influence of pH on the oxidation process was not appreciable and the activation energy was 28.8 kJ mol(-1). Slightly higher reactivity with permanganate was found for MC-RR (418.0M(-1)s(-1)) and MC-YR (405.9M(-1)s(-1)). According to the results obtained, permanganate likely attacks the Adda moiety of the MC molecule. The oxidation of MCs in a natural surface water was also investigated. A permanganate dose of 1-1.25mgL(-1) was enough to reduce MCs concentration below the guideline value of 1microgL(-1). Permanganate oxidation is therefore a feasible option for microcystin removal during preoxidation processes. However, the oxidant dose must be carefully optimized in order to remove extracellular MCs without causing cell lysis (due to chemical stress) and further release of MCs.

  7. The maintenance of the second-order advantage: second-order calibration of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence for quantitative analysis of herbicide napropamide in various environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Na; Wu, Hai-Long; Qing, Xiang-Dong; Nie, Chong-Chong; Li, Shu-Fang; Yu, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Rong; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2011-07-15

    A rapid non-separative spectrofluorometric method based on the second-order calibration of excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence was proposed for the determination of napropamide (NAP) in soil, river sediment, and wastewater as well as river water samples. With 0.10 mol L(-1) sodium citrate-hydrochloric acid (HCl) buffer solution of pH 2.2, the system of NAP has a large increase in fluorescence intensity. To handle the intrinsic fluorescence interferences of environmental samples, the alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) algorithm as an efficient second-order calibration method was employed. Satisfactory results have been achieved for NAP in complex environmental samples. The limit of detection obtained for NAP in soil, river sediment, wastewater and river water samples were 0.80, 0.24, 0.12, 0.071 ng mL(-1), respectively. Furthermore, in order to fully investigate the performance of second-order calibration method, we test the second-order calibration method using different calibration approaches including the single matrix model, the intra-day various matrices model and the global model based on the APTLD algorithm with nature environmental datasets. The results showed the second-order calibration methods also enable one or more analyte(s) of interest to be determined simultaneously in the samples with various types of matrices. The maintenance of second-order advantage has been demonstrated in simultaneous determinations of the analyte of interests in the environmental samples of various matrices. PMID:21645706

  8. CHLORINE DEMAND AND TTHM FORMATION KINETICS: A SECOND-ORDER MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much effort has been expended in attempting to develop mathematical models for chlorine demand in water and wastewater. Most of these efforts have centered around the use of first-order functions or modifications of first-order functions. Recently there has also been interest i...

  9. Implementing the Second-Order Fermi Process in a Kinetic Monte-Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summerlin, Errol J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  10. Kinetics, mechanisms and products of reactions of Criegee intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    The atmospheric ozonolysis of alkenes such as isoprene produces Criegee intermediates which are increasingly recognized as important contributors to oxidation chemistry in the Earth's troposphere. Stabilized Criegee intermediates are conveniently produced in the laboratory by ultraviolet photolysis of diiodoalkanes in the presence of O2, and can be detected by absorption spectroscopy using their strong electronic bands in the near ultraviolet region. We have used these techniques to study a wide range of reactions of Criegee intermediates, including their self-reactions, and reactions with carboxylic acids and various other trace atmospheric constituents. In collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory group led by Drs C.A. Taatjes and D.L. Osborn, we have used photoionization and mass spectrometry methods, combined with electronic structure calculations, to characterize the products of several of these reactions. Our laboratory studies determine rate coefficients for the Criegee intermediate reactions, many of which prove to be fast. In the case of reactions with carboxylic acids, a correlation between the dipole moments of the reactants and the reaction rate coefficients suggests a dipole-capture controlled reaction and allows us to propose a structure-activity relationship to predict the rates of related processes. The contributions of these various Criegee intermediate reactions to the chemistry of the troposphere have been assessed using the STOCHEM-CRI global atmospheric chemistry model. This work was supported by NERC grant NE/K004905/1.

  11. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  12. New Direction in Hydrogeochemical Transport Modeling: Incorporating Multiple Kinetic and Equilibrium Reaction Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, C.I.

    2000-02-02

    At least two distinct kinds of hydrogeochemical models have evolved historically for use in analyzing contaminant transport, but each has important limitations. One kind, focusing on organic contaminants, treats biodegradation reactions as parts of relatively simple kinetic reaction networks with no or limited coupling to aqueous and surface complexation and mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions. A second kind, evolving out of the speciation and reaction path codes, is capable of handling a comprehensive suite of multicomponent complexation (aqueous and surface) and mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, but has not been able to treat reaction networks characterized by partial redox disequilibrium and multiple kinetic pathways. More recently, various investigators have begun to consider biodegradation reactions in the context of comprehensive equilibrium and kinetic reaction networks (e.g. Hunter et al. 1998, Mayer 1999). Here we explore two examples of multiple equilibrium and kinetic reaction pathways using the reactive transport code GIMRT98 (Steefel, in prep.): (1) a computational example involving the generation of acid mine drainage due to oxidation of pyrite, and (2) a computational/field example where the rates of chlorinated VOC degradation are linked to the rates of major redox processes occurring in organic-rich wetland sediments overlying a contaminated aerobic aquifer.

  13. Kinetics of a Substitution Reaction of Sulfitopentaaminecobalt(III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Lynne

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment to determine the rate law for a substitution reaction of a transition metal. Derives the corresponding rate law from the accepted mechanism for the reaction using the steady state approximation and determines the conditions under which the two agree. (CW)

  14. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  15. High temperature chemical kinetic study of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the kinetics of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system was made behind incident shock waves at temperatures of 2460 and 2950 K. The overall rate of the reaction was measured by monitoring radiation from the CO + O yields CO2 + h upoilon reaction. Correlation of these data with a detailed reaction mechanism showed that the high-temperature rate of the reaction N + OH yields NO + H can be described by the low-temperature (320 K) rate coefficient. Catalytic dissociation of molecular hydrogen was an important reaction under the tests conditions.

  16. Reaction progress kinetic analysis of a copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction with N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline.

    PubMed

    Scott, Martin; Sud, Abhishek; Boess, Esther; Klussmann, Martin

    2014-12-19

    The results from a kinetic investigation of a Cu-catalyzed oxidative coupling reaction between N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline and a silyl enol ether using elemental oxygen as oxidant are presented. By using reaction progress kinetic analysis as an evaluation method for the obtained data, we discovered information regarding the reaction order of the substrates and catalysts. Based on this information and some additional experiments, a refined model for the initial oxidative activation of the amine substrate and the activation of the nucleophile by the catalyst was developed. The mechanistic information also helped to understand why silyl nucleophiles have previously failed in a related Cu-catalyzed reaction using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant and how to overcome this limitation. PMID:25203932

  17. Kinetics of FeS precipitation: Part 1. Competing reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickard, David

    1995-11-01

    The kinetics of the fast precipitation reaction between aqueous iron (II) and dissolved sulfide at 25°C can be interpreted in terms of two competing reactions. The first may be represented by Fe 2+ + H2S → FeS(s) + 2 H+ This can be described by an observed rate law - d[aH 2S]/dt = k11[aH 2S] where k' 1, is the observed first order rate constant with a value of 90 ± 10 s -1, [ cH 2S] is the concentration of dissolved H 2S in moles per liter, and t is time in seconds. The rate law is consistent with an Eigen-Wilkins model of the process in which the rate is described by d[FeS]/dt = - d[ aH2S]/dt = k1[ aFe2+][aH 2S], where aH 2S and aFe 2+ are the formally dimensionless hydrogen sulfide and Fe(II) activities which are represented on a moles·liter -1 scale for experimental and practical convenience. The logarithm of k1, the theoretical Eigen-Wilkins reaction rate constant, has a value of 7 ± 1 liters·mole -1·s -1. The second reaction may be represented by Fe 2 + 2HS - → Fe(HS) 2(s) The rate of this reaction may be described by an observed rate law of the form - d[aHS -]/ dt = k21[aHS -] 2 where [ aHS -] is the formally dimensionless bisulfide activity which is represented on a moles·liter -1 scale for experimental convenience. The observed second order rate constant, k' 2, has a value of 1.3 × 10 7 liters·mole -1·s -1 at 25°C. The result is consistent with an Eigen-Wilkins model of the process in which k21[aFe 2+][aHS -] 2 where aFe 2+ is the dissolved Fe(II) activity and the logarithm of k2, the Eigen-Wilkins reaction rate constant, has a value of 12.5 ± 1 liters 2·mole -2·s -1. The theoretical interpretation of both reactions suggests that the rates are direct functions of the ion activity products of the iron sulfide precipitates. The second stage of the reaction involves the condensation of Fe(SH) 2 to FeS with the release of dissolved sulfide back to solution: Fe(SH) 2( s)→FeS( s)+H 2S This reaction is relatively slow and results in a

  18. Low temperature dry scrubbing reaction kinetics and mechanisms, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Sampson, K.J.; Reddy, S.N.; Maldei, M.; Ben-Said, L. )

    1992-10-01

    A novel wet/dry desulfurization post-Furnace process (ETS' Limestone Emission control (LEC) process) for SO[sub 2] removal has been described by Prudich et al.(1988). In this process hot flue gases are contacted with a bed of quarry-sized (1/4in. to 1/32in.) wet limestone granules. This thesis represents the development of a second generation model of ETS' LEC process. The first generation model developed by Prudich et al.(1988) the use of a fixed limestone bed. The work done on this has been well documented by Appell (1989) and Visneski (1991) process under consideration for this thesis involves a continuously moving limestone bed. The moving bed simplifies the process flowsheet and facilitates limestone reactivation. The moving-bed LEC process involves the use of a cross-flow pattern with the flue gas flowing horizontally across the limestone bed at speeds of around 1 to 2 feet per second and the limestone moving vertically downward through the LEC reactor at speeds of around 1 to 15 feet per hour. The primary parameters considered in the mathematical modeling of the moving-bed LEC process are inlet sulfur dioxide concentration, inlet gas-phase water concentration, inlet flue gas and limestone temperatures and water spray addition rate over the bed. For solution of the process, mass and energy balance equations derived as a function of the positions of the flue gas limestone are solved using a predictor-corrector method. The Adams-Bashforth (modified Euler's) method is used with a second order corrector.

  19. Low energy ion-molecule reaction dynamics and chemiionization kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, J. M.

    Low energy crossed ion beam neutral beam studies of a wide spectrum of elementary chemical reactions were performed. The reactive scattering work embodies crossed beam studies of simple chemical processes under single collision conditions which elucidate reaction dynamics by measuring product branching ratios, translational energy distributions and scattering angle distributions. The studies have emphasized the proton transfer reactions of the important flame cations HCO(+) and H3O(+) with a number of neutral molecules present in flames, including H2O, CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, and (CH3)2CO, and a wide variety of reactions of the ground state carbon cation, C(+)((2)P), with neutrals, illustrating the important reactions of insertion into C-H, O-H, N-H, and C-C bonds, as well as condensation reactions in which new C-C bonds are formed, yielding significant increases in the molecular weight of the charged product. These studies represent the first crossed beam studies in which information more detailed than rate constants and energy dependent total cross sections was inferred about the reaction dynamics.

  20. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  1. Kinetic Studies of the Solvolysis of Two Organic Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, J. A.; Pasto, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment which utilizes the solvolysis of organic halides to demonstrate first and second order reaction kinetics. The experiment also investigates the effect of a change of solvent polarity on reaction rate, common-ion and noncommon-ion salt effects, and the activation parameters of a…

  2. Accurately Predicting Complex Reaction Kinetics from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, William

    Many important systems contain a multitude of reactive chemical species, some of which react on a timescale faster than collisional thermalization, i.e. they never achieve a Boltzmann energy distribution. Usually it is impossible to fully elucidate the processes by experiments alone. Here we report recent progress toward predicting the time-evolving composition of these systems a priori: how unexpected reactions can be discovered on the computer, how reaction rates are computed from first principles, and how the many individual reactions are efficiently combined into a predictive simulation for the whole system. Some experimental tests of the a priori predictions are also presented.

  3. Surface reactions kinetics between nanocrystalline magnetite and uranyl.

    PubMed

    Missana, Tiziana; Maffiotte, César; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel

    2003-05-01

    Magnetite is the most important end member of iron corrosion products under reducing environment, which is the condition expected in a deep geological high level radioactive waste disposal. Nanocrystalline magnetite was synthesized in the laboratory and its physicochemical properties were analyzed in detail. The kinetics of the adsorption of U(VI) and the kinetics of the actinide reduction to a lower oxidation state, in presence of the oxide, were studied by means of batch sorption techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The results showed that the uranium sorption and reduction processes on the magnetite surface have very fast kinetics (hours), the reduction process being triggered by sorption. XPS measurements showed that the speciation of uranium at the surface does not show significant changes with time (from 1 day to 3 months), as well as the quantity of uranium detected at the surface. The surface speciation depended on the initial pH of the contact solution. Considering that the Eh of equilibrium between magnetite and the solution, under our experimental conditions, is slightly positive (50-100 mV), the uranium reduction would also be thermodynamically possible within the liquid phase. However, the kinetics of reduction in the liquid occur at a much slower rate which, in turn, has to depend on the attainment of the magnetite/solution equilibrium. The decrease of uranium in solution, observed after the uranyl adsorption stage, and particularly at acidic pH, is most probably due to the precipitation of U(IV) formed in the solution.

  4. Reactions between beta-lactoglobulin and genipin: kinetics and characterization of the products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we present the first detailed report of the reaction kinetics studies and the characterization of the products from the endothermic reactions between beta-lactoglobulin and genipin. The effects of concentration, temperature, and pH were examined. In the temperature range studied, th...

  5. A simultaneous one pot synthesis of two fractal structures via swapping two fractal reaction kinetic states.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subrata; Dutta, Mrinal; Ray, Kanad; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a new class of fractal reaction kinetics wherein two or more distinct fractal structures are synthesized as parts of a singular cascade reaction in a single chemical beaker. Two examples: sphere ↔ spiral & triangle ↔ square fractals, grow 10(6) orders from a single dendrimer (8 nm) to the visible scale. PMID:27166589

  6. Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating the behavior of porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

    2006-11-29

    In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. Assuming validity of the mostaccurate kinetic reaction model that is currently available, the use ofthe equilibrium reaction model often appears to be justified andpreferred for simulating the behavior of gas hydrates, given that thecomputational demands for the kinetic reaction model far exceed those forthe equilibrium reaction model.

  7. Graphene liquid marbles as photothermal miniature reactors for reaction kinetics modulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Hobley, Jonathan; Liu, Tianxi; Phang, In Yee; Ling, Xing Yi

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the fabrication of graphene liquid marbles as photothermal miniature reactors with precise temperature control for reaction kinetics modulation. Graphene liquid marbles show rapid and highly reproducible photothermal behavior while maintaining their excellent mechanical robustness. By tuning the applied laser power, swift regulation of graphene liquid marble's surface temperature between 21-135 °C and its encapsulated water temperature between 21-74 °C are demonstrated. The temperature regulation modulates the reaction kinetics in our graphene liquid marble, achieving a 12-fold superior reaction rate constant for methylene blue degradation than at room temperature.

  8. Linear matrix inequalities for analysis and control of linear vector second-order systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adegas, Fabiano D.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-10-06

    Many dynamical systems are modeled as vector second-order differential equations. This paper presents analysis and synthesis conditions in terms of LMI with explicit dependence in the coefficient matrices of vector second-order systems. These conditions benefit from the separation between the Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices by introducing matrix multipliers, which potentially reduce conservativeness in hard control problems. Multipliers facilitate the usage of parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions as certificates of stability of uncertain and time-varying vector second-order systems. The conditions introduced in this work have the potential to increase the practice of analyzing and controlling systems directly in vector second-order form.

  9. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, F.P.

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  10. Glycosylation of aromatic amines I: Characterization of reaction products and kinetic scheme.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Madhushree Y; Kearney, William R; Kirsch, Lee E

    2009-01-01

    The reactions of aliphatic and aromatic amines with reducing sugars are important in both drug stability and synthesis. The formation of glycosylamines in solution, the first step in the Maillard reaction, does not typically cause browning but results in decreased potency and is hence significant from the aspect of drug instability. The purpose of this research was to present (1) unreported ionic equilibria of model reactant (kynurenine), (2) the analytical methods used to characterize and measure reaction products, (3) the kinetic scheme used to measure reaction rates and (4) relevant properties of various reducing sugars that impact the reaction rate in solution. The methods used to identify the reversible formation of two products from the reaction of kynurenine and monosaccharides included LC mass spectrometry, UV spectroscopy, and 1-D and 2-D (1)H-(1)H COSY NMR spectroscopy. Kinetics was studied using a stability-indicating HPLC method. The results indicated the formation of alpha and beta glycosylamines by a pseudo first-order reversible reaction scheme in the pH range of 1-6. The forward reaction was a function of initial glucose concentration but not the reverse reaction. It was concluded that the reaction kinetics and equilibrium concentrations of the glycosylamines were pH-dependent and also a function of the acyclic content of the reacting glucose isomer. PMID:19306062

  11. Thermal decomposition of sugarcane straw, kinetics and heat of reaction in synthetic air.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Ordóñez, Yesid Javier; Tannous, Katia

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the thermal decomposition, kinetics and heat of reaction of sugarcane straw in synthetic air by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The TG and DSC experiments were carried out using heating rates of 2.5°C/min, 5°C/min, and 10°C/min, and particle diameter of 0.250mm. In the study of the smoldering reaction were identified three consecutive stages, drying, oxidative pyrolysis, and combustion. Thus, the kinetic pathway was composed by six independent parallel reactions, three for each stage after drying, in which the activation energies were 176, 313, 150, 80, 150, and 100kJ/mol. The heat of reaction in synthetic air was completely exothermic releasing 8MJ/kg. The modeled curves of thermal decomposition of sugarcane straw presented good agreement with experimental data. Then, the kinetic parameters obtained could be used to analyze different processes involving smoldering.

  12. General theory of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. I. Kinetic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Kipriyanov, Alexey A.

    2014-05-14

    General matrix approach to the consideration of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants depending on reactant mobility is formulated on the basis of the concept of “effective” particles. Various elementary reactions (stages of multistage reaction including physicochemical processes of internal quantum state changes) proceeding with the participation of isolated pairs of reactants (or isolated reactants) are taken into account. Investigation has been made in terms of kinetic approach implying the derivation of general (matrix) kinetic equations for local and mean probabilities of finding any of the reaction species in the sample under study (or for local and mean concentrations). The recipes for the calculation of kinetic coefficients of the equations for mean quantities in terms of relative coordinates of reactants have been formulated in the general case of inhomogeneous reacting systems. Important specific case of homogeneous reacting systems is considered.

  13. An efficient second-order accurate and continuous interpolation for block-adaptive grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, Dmitry; Sokolov, Igor V.; Tóth, Gábor

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a second-order and continuous interpolation algorithm for cell-centered adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) grids. Continuity requirement poses a non-trivial problem at resolution changes. We develop a classification of the resolution changes, which allows us to employ efficient and simple linear interpolation in the majority of the computational domain. The algorithm is well suited for massively parallel computations. Our interpolation algorithm allows extracting jump-free interpolated data distribution along lines and surfaces within the computational domain. This capability is important for various applications, including kinetic particles tracking in three dimensional vector fields, visualization (i.e. surface extraction) and extracting variables along one-dimensional curves such as field lines, streamlines and satellite trajectories, etc. Particular examples are models for acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) along magnetic field-lines. As such models are sensitive to sharp gradients and discontinuities the capability to interpolate the data from the AMR grid to be passed to the SEP model without producing false gradients numerically becomes crucial. We provide a complete description of the algorithm and make the code publicly available as a Fortran 90 library.

  14. ACKS2: Atom-condensed Kohn-Sham DFT approximated to second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraelen, T.; Ayers, P. W.; Van Speybroeck, V.; Waroquier, M.

    2013-02-01

    A new polarizable force field (PFF), namely atom-condensed Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximated to second order (ACKS2), is proposed for the efficient computation of atomic charges and linear response properties of extended molecular systems. It is derived from Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT), making use of two novel ingredients in the context of PFFs: (i) constrained atomic populations and (ii) the Legendre transform of the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy. ACKS2 is essentially an extension of the Electronegativity Equalization Method (EEM) [W. J. Mortier, S. K. Ghosh, and S. Shankar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 108, 4315 (1986)], 10.1021/ja00275a013 in which two major EEM shortcomings are fixed: ACKS2 predicts a linear size-dependence of the dipole polarizability in the macroscopic limit and correctly describes the charge distribution when a molecule dissociates. All ACKS2 parameters are defined as atoms-in-molecules expectation values. The implementation of ACKS2 is very similar to that of EEM, with only a small increase in computational cost.

  15. Density Functional Theory and Reaction Kinetics Studies of the Water–Gas Shift Reaction on Pt–Re Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Gallo, Jean Marcel R.; Hahn, Konstanze; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2013-11-05

    Periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations (DFT-GGA-PW91) on Pt(111) and Pt3Re(111) surfaces, reaction kinetics measurements, and microkinetic modeling are employed to study the mechanism of the water–gas shift (WGS) reaction over Pt and Pt–Re catalysts. The values of the reaction rates and reaction orders predicted by the model are in agreement with the ones experimentally determined; the calculated apparent activation energies are matched to within 6% of the experimental values. The primary reaction pathway is predicted to take place through adsorbed carboxyl (COOH) species, whereas formate (HCOO) is predicted to be a spectator species. We conclude that the clean Pt(111) is a good representation of the active site for the WGS reaction on Pt catalysts, whereas the active sites on the Pt–Re alloy catalyst likely contain partially oxidized metal ensembles.

  16. Circumventing Diffusion in Kinetically Controlled Solid-State Metathesis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Martinolich, Andrew J; Kurzman, Joshua A; Neilson, James R

    2016-08-31

    Solid-state diffusion is often the primary limitation in the synthesis of crystalline inorganic materials and prevents the potential discovery and isolation of new materials that may not be the most stable with respect to the reaction conditions. Synthetic approaches that circumvent diffusion in solid-state reactions are rare and often allow the formation of metastable products. To this end, we present an in situ study of the solid-state metathesis reactions MCl2 + Na2S2 → MS2 + 2 NaCl (M = Fe, Co, Ni) using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Depending on the preparation method of the reaction, either combining the reactants in an air-free environment or grinding homogeneously in air before annealing, the barrier to product formation, and therefore reaction pathway, can be altered. In the air-free reactions, the product formation appears to be diffusion limited, with a number of intermediate phases observed before formation of the MS2 product. However, grinding the reactants in air allows NaCl to form directly without annealing and displaces the corresponding metal and sulfide ions into an amorphous matrix, as confirmed by pair distribution function analysis. Heating this mixture yields direct nucleation of the MS2 phase and avoids all crystalline binary intermediates. Grinding in air also dissipates a large amount of lattice energy via the formation of NaCl, and the crystallization of the metal sulfide is a much less exothermic process. This approach has the potential to allow formation of a range of binary, ternary, or higher-ordered compounds to be synthesized in the bulk, while avoiding the formation of many binary intermediates that may otherwise form in a diffusion-limited reaction. PMID:27490369

  17. Explaining the atypical reaction profiles of heme enzymes with a novel mechanistic hypothesis and kinetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Baburaj, Arun; Ephraim, Binoy; Pappachan, Febin; Maviliparambathu, Pravitha Parapurathu; Vijayan, Umesh K; Narayanan, Sivaprasad Valiyaveettil; Periasamy, Kalaiselvi; George, Ebi Ashley; Mathew, Lazar T

    2010-01-01

    Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP), uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation) of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model) was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the "steady state kinetics" of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates) is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s) affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of "the product of interest" in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of "substrate concentration at maximum observed rate". The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes. PMID:20498847

  18. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  19. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  20. Reaction kinetics of non-reciprocal photo-base generator (NRPBG) patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shykind, D.; Bristol, R.; Roberts, J.; Blackwell, J.; Borodovsky, Y.

    2010-04-01

    We present a simple reaction rate analysis of lithographic patterning using the Non-Reciprocal Photo Base Generation (NRPBG) scheme of Bristol (Bristol, et. al., to be published in Proceedings of the SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2010, presentation 7639-4). Multistep reaction kinetics simulations demonstrate that the NRPBG scheme produces clear pitch division upon 193 nm double-exposure, over a range of photochemical reaction rate constants.

  1. Reaction kinetics and magnetic properties of Ba and Sr ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, K.; Martin, A.; Klink, T.; Wartewig, P.

    1992-04-01

    This Mössbauer study is concerned with the formation mechanism of hexaferrites (n=6) and of monoferrites (n=1) in the systems (1) BaCO3+nFe2O3, (2) SrCO3+nFe2O3 and (3) 0.5BaCO3+0.5SrCO3+nFe2O3. With a molar ratio of 1∶1 for the starting materials one gets final reaction products with different crystalline structures. The experimental results indicate that the thermodynamical final state of the hexaferrite formation is reached on different routes. Various reaction models are discussed.

  2. A solution for multicomponent reactive transport under equilibrium and kinetic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Donado, Leonardo David; Guadagnini, Alberto; Carrera, Jesus

    2010-07-01

    Analysis of the space-time evolution of reactive solutes in porous systems is complex owing to the presence of different types of chemical reactions. The complete description of a reactive transport scenario entails calculating the spatial and temporal distribution of species concentrations and reaction rates. Here we develop an exact explicit expression for the space-time distribution of reaction rates for a scenario where the geochemical system can be described by an arbitrary number of equilibrium (fast) reactions and one kinetic (slow) reaction, in the absence of non-constant-activity immobile species. The key result is that the equilibrium reaction rate is the sum of two terms representing the availability of reactants. One term involves diffusion and dispersion and represents the contribution of mixing. The other term includes the contribution of the kinetic reaction. The approach also yields the local concentrations of all dissolved species. Yet the latter are not needed for the direct computation of equilibrium reaction rates. We illustrate the approach by means of a simple reactive transport scenario, involving a common ion effect in the presence of a kinetic and an equilibrium reaction leading to precipitation and dissolution processes within a one-dimensional fully saturated porous medium. The example highlights the highly nonlinear and nonmonotonic response of the system to the controlling input parameters.

  3. A possible candidate to be classified as an autocatalysis-driven clock reaction: kinetics of the pentathionate-iodate reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-08-14

    The pentathionate-iodate reaction has been investigated by spectrophotometrically monitoring the formation of the total amount of iodine at 468 nm in the presence of phosphoric acid/dihydrogen phosphate buffer. We noticed that iodine forms only after a fairly long time lag, and the inverse of time necessary to produce a certain amount of iodine is linearly proportional to the initial concentration of iodate ion and the square of the hydrogen ion concentration, while depending complexly on the concentration of substrate pentathionate. This reaction can therefore be treated as a clock reaction but differs from the original Landolt reaction in the sense that substrate pentathionate and the clock species iodine coexist for a relatively long time--due to their relatively slow direct reaction--depending on the experimental circumstances. Furthermore, we also provided experimental evidence that iodide ion acts as an autocatalyst of the system. A 14-step kinetic model is proposed in which the mechanisms of the pentathionate-iodine, bisulfite-iodate, and the well-known Dushman reactions are combined. A thorough analysis revealed that the direct pentathionate-iodate reaction plays a role only to produce iodide ions via a finite sequence of reactions, and once its concentration reaches a certain level, the reaction is almost exclusively governed by the pentathionate-iodine and the Dushman reactions. As expected, a strong catalytic effect of the buffer composition is also found that can readily be explained by its well-known catalytic influence on the original Dushman reaction. PMID:25068832

  4. Kinetic transitions in diffusion-reaction space. II. Geometrical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, John J.

    1999-02-01

    We extend the stochastic master equation approach described earlier [J. J. Kozak and R. Davidson, J. Chem. Phys. 101, 6101 (1994)] to examine the influence on reaction efficiency of multipolar correlations between a fixed target molecule and a diffusing coreactant, the latter constrained to move on the surface of a host medium (e.g., a colloidal catalyst or molecular organizate) modeled as a Cartesian shell [Euler characteristic, χ=2]. Our most comprehensive results are for processes involving ion pairs, and we find that there exists a transition between two qualitatively different types of behavior in diffusion-reaction space, viz., a regime where the coreactant's motion is totally correlated with respect to the target ion, and a regime where the coreactant's motion is effectively uncorrelated. This behavior emerges both in the situation where correlations between the ion pair are strictly confined to the surface of the host medium or where correlations can be propagated through the host medium. The effects of system size are also examined and comparisons with diffusion-reaction processes taking place on surfaces characterized by Euler characteristic χ=0 are made. In all cases studied, the most dramatic effects on the reaction efficiency are uncovered in the regime where the Onsager (thermalization) length is comparable to the mean displacement of the coreactant, a conclusion consistent with results reported in earlier work.

  5. Post processing with first- and second-order hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghva, Kazem; Poudel, Srijana; Malreddy, Spandana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the implementation and evaluation of first order and second order Hidden Markov Models to identify and correct OCR errors in the post processing of books. Our experiments show that the first order model approximately corrects 10% of the errors with 100% precision, while the second order model corrects a higher percentage of errors with much lower precision.

  6. The Second Order Approximation to Sample Influence Curve in Canonical Correlation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Wing K.; Gu, Hong

    1998-01-01

    A second order approximation to the sample influence curve (SIC) has been derived in the literature. This paper presents a more accurate second order approximation, which is exact for the SIC of the squared multiple correction coefficient. An example is presented. (SLD)

  7. Increasing stimulus size impairs first- but not second-order motion perception.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Davis M; Tadin, Duje

    2011-11-23

    As stimulus size increases, the direction of high-contrast moving stimuli becomes increasingly difficult to perceive. This counterintuitive effect, termed spatial suppression, is believed to reflect antagonistic center-surround interactions--mechanisms that play key roles in tasks requiring sensitivity to relative motion. It is unknown, however, whether second-order motion also exhibits spatial suppression. To test this hypothesis, we measured direction discrimination thresholds for first- and second-order stimuli of varying sizes. The results revealed increasing thresholds with increasing size for first-order stimuli but demonstrated no spatial suppression of second-order motion. This selective impairment of first-order motion predicts increasing predominance of second-order cues as stimulus size increases. We confirmed this prediction by utilizing compound stimuli that contain first- and second-order information moving in opposite directions. Specifically, we found that for large stimuli, motion perception becomes increasingly determined by the direction of second-order cues. Overall, our findings show a lack of spatial suppression for second-order stimuli, suggesting that the second-order system may have distinct functional roles, roles that do not require high sensitivity to relative motion.

  8. Explanation of Second-Order Asymptotic Theory Via Information Spectrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito

    We explain second-order asymptotic theory via the information spectrum method. From a unified viewpoint based on the generality of the information spectrum method, we consider second-order asymptotic theory for use in fixed-length data compression, uniform random number generation, and channel coding. Additionally, we discuss its application to quantum cryptography, folklore in source coding, and security analysis.

  9. Operator Factorization and the Solution of Second-Order Linear Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of second-order linear ordinary differential equations is reviewed from the standpoint of the operator factorization approach to the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODE). Using the operator factorization approach, the general second-order linear ODE is solved, exactly, in quadratures and the resulting…

  10. Oxygen Diffusion and Reaction Kinetics in Continuous Fiber Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Eckel, Andrew J.; Cawley, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Previous stressed oxidation tests of C/SiC composites at elevated temperatures (350 C to 1500 C) and sustained stresses (69 MPa and 172 MPa) have led to the development of a finite difference cracked matrix model. The times to failure in the samples suggest oxidation occurred in two kinetic regimes defined by the rate controlling mechanisms (i.e. diffusion controlled and reaction controlled kinetics). Microstructural analysis revealed preferential oxidation along as-fabricated, matrix microcracks and also suggested two regimes of oxidation kinetics dependent on the oxidation temperature. Based on experimental results, observation, and theory, a finite difference model was developed. The model simulates the diffusion of oxygen into a matrix crack bridged by carbon fibers. The model facilitates the study of the relative importance of temperature, the reaction rate constant, and the diffusion coefficient on the overall oxidation kinetics.

  11. Effect of mixing on reaction-diffusion kinetics for protein hydrogel-based microchips.

    PubMed

    Zubtsov, D A; Ivanov, S M; Rubina, A Yu; Dementieva, E I; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-03-01

    Protein hydrogel-based microchips are being developed for high-throughput evaluation of the concentrations and activities of various proteins. To shorten the time of analysis, the reaction-diffusion kinetics on gel microchips should be accelerated. Here we present the results of the experimental and theoretical analysis of the reaction-diffusion kinetics enforced by mixing with peristaltic pump. The experiments were carried out on gel-based protein microchips with immobilized antibodies under the conditions utilized for on-chip immunoassay. The dependence of fluorescence signals at saturation and corresponding saturation times on the concentrations of immobilized antibodies and antigen in solution proved to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. It is shown that the enhancement of transport with peristaltic pump results in more than five-fold acceleration of binding kinetics. Our results suggest useful criteria for the optimal conditions for assays on gel microchips to balance high sensitivity and rapid fluorescence saturation kinetics.

  12. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+).

  13. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). PMID:26692518

  14. Second order gravitational effects on CMB temperature anisotropy in {lambda} dominated flat universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-05-15

    We study second order gravitational effects of local inhomogeneities on the cosmic microwave background radiation in flat universes with matter and a cosmological constant {lambda}. We find that the general relativistic correction to the Newtonian approximation is negligible at second order provided that the size of the inhomogeneous region is sufficiently smaller than the horizon scale. For a spherically symmetric top-hat type quasilinear perturbation, the first order temperature fluctuation corresponding to the linear integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is enhanced (suppressed) by the second order one for a compensated void (lump). As a function of redshift of the local inhomogeneity, the second order temperature fluctuations due to evolution of the gravitational potential have a peak before the matter-{lambda} equality epoch for a fixed comoving size and a density contrast. The second order gravitational effects from local quasilinear inhomogeneities at a redshift z{approx}1 may significantly affect the cosmic microwave background.

  15. Optimality Conditions in Differentiable Vector Optimization via Second-Order Tangent Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Bienvenido Novo, Vicente

    2004-03-15

    We provide second-order necessary and sufficient conditions for a point to be an efficient element of a set with respect to a cone in a normed space, so that there is only a small gap between necessary and sufficient conditions. To this aim, we use the common second-order tangent set and the asymptotic second-order cone utilized by Penot. As an application we establish second-order necessary conditions for a point to be a solution of a vector optimization problem with an arbitrary feasible set and a twice Frechet differentiable objective function between two normed spaces. We also establish second-order sufficient conditions when the initial space is finite-dimensional so that there is no gap with necessary conditions. Lagrange multiplier rules are also given.

  16. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  17. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : A Study of the Kinetics of Composite Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1929-01-01

    This report deals with the results of a series of studies of the kinetics of gaseous explosive reactions where the fuel under observation, instead of being a simple gas, is a known mixture of simple gases. In the practical application of the gaseous explosive reaction as a source of power in the gas engine, the fuels employed are composite, with characteristics that are apt to be due to the characteristics of their components and hence may be somewhat complex. The simplest problem that could be proposed in an investigation either of the thermodynamics or kinetics of the gaseous explosive reaction of a composite fuel would seem to be a separate study of the reaction characteristics of each component of the fuel and then a study of the reaction characteristics of the various known mixtures of those components forming composite fuels more and more complex. (author)

  18. Complex Cure Kinetics of the Hydroxyl-Epoxide Reaction in DGEBA Epoxy Hardened with Diethanolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancipink, Windy; McCoy, John; Kropka, Jamie; Celina, Mathias

    The curing of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A Epoxy (Epon 828) with diethanolamine (DEA) involves a fast amine-epoxide reaction followed by a slower hydroxyl-epoxide reaction. At curing temperatures below 100°C, the time scales of these two reactions are well separated, and the hydroxyl addition can be studied as an ''isolated'' reaction. The hydroxyl-epoxide reaction is of great interest due to the complex kinetics involved, which are brought about by competing reactions. The reaction kinetics are believed to be tertiary amine catalyzed and are well fit to a modified form of the Kamal-type equation. Here we study the complex long term reaction kinetics at various temperatures, by using isothermal modulated differential scanning calorimetry, micro calorimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Reaction kinetics of resveratrol with tert-butoxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džeba, Iva; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Mihaljević, Branka

    2012-09-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of t-butoxyl radicals with resveratrol was studied under pseudo-first order conditions. The rate constant was determined by measuring the phenoxyl radical formation rate at 390 nm as function of resveratrol concentration in acetonitrile. The rate constant was determined to be 6.5×108 M-1s-1. This high value indicates the high reactivity consistent with the strong antioxidant activity of resveratrol.

  20. Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics of Enargite Oxidation at Roasting Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Aracena, Alvaro; Ruiz, Maria C.

    2012-10-01

    Roasting of enargite (Cu3AsS4) in the temperature range of 648 K to 898 K (375 °C to 625 °C) in atmospheres containing variable amounts of oxygen has been studied by thermogravimetric methods. From the experimental results of weight loss/gain data and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of partially reacted samples, the reaction mechanism of the enargite oxidation was determined, which occurred in three sequential stages:

  1. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  2. Low Temperature Kinetics of the CH3OH + OH Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Martín, J. C. Gómez; Caravan, R. L.; Blitz, M. A.; Heard, D. E.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The rate constant of the reaction between methanol and the hydroxyl radical has been studied in the temperature range 56-202 K by pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence in two separate experiments using either a low temperature flow tube coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometer or a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus. The two independent techniques yield rate constants which are in mutual agreement and consistent with the results reported previously below 82 K [Shannon et al., Nature Chemistry, 2013, 5, 745-749] and above 210 K [Dillon et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. 2005, 7, 349-355], showing a very sharp increase with decreasing temperature with an onset around 180 K. This onset is also signalled by strong chemiluminescence tentatively assigned to formaldehyde, which is consistent with the formation of the methoxy radical at low temperature by quantum tunnelling, and its subsequent reaction with H and OH. Our results add confidence to the previous low temperature rate constant measurements and consolidate the experimental reference dataset for further theoretical work required to describe quantitatively the tunnelling mechanism operating in this reaction. An additional measurement of the rate constant at 56 K yielded a value of (4.9 ± 0.8) × 10−11 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 (2σ), showing that the rate constant is increasing less rapidly at temperatures below 70 K. PMID:24669816

  3. Kinetic of antigent-antibody reactions with scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyi, Olexander I.; Kiselyov, Yevgen M.; Novikov, Volodymyr P.

    2001-07-01

    The immune reactions of interaction antigen-antibody represent specific effect of an antigene with an antibody, which outcome are the complex immune aggregates forming precipitate in case of a soluble antigene, or agglutinate in case of a corpuscular antigene. Immunological methods which uses in the quality of carrier protein latex's polymeric microspheresis, gained name and method latex agglutination. Polymeric microspheresis have the array of advantages before biological carries, which consist in the opportunity of the variation of attributes surface and size microspheresis in the broad band of meanings with the preservation of narrow distribution particles behind measurements, the putting of functional groups, necessary for bunch with ligand on stage their synthesis, in ragidity at storage. The quantitative evaluation of parameters of a response of interaction antigen-antibody in immunology is possible by optical methods on a measurement of a modification of intensity of a light stream of a solution in an outcome of a course of a reaction. Concentration of immune complexes determine both on slacking a taking place stream of light, and on a modification of intensity of a stream of light scattering suspended particles in a solution. The process light scattering by colloidal aggregates are formed from suspension microspheresis with adsorbed on their surface protein is described. In report the physics principle of registration immune reaction by light scattering methods is concerned. The results of the effectiveness latex's preparation created on basis of the polymeric carries is described.

  4. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  5. Effects of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Semisubmersible Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of the system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the MARIN offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST in the future. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method has been applied to the OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. The loads and response of the system due to the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads and induced response data are compared to the loads and motions induced by aerodynamic loading as solved by FAST.

  6. Interactions between first- and second-order motion revealed by optokinetic nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Harris, L R; Smith, A T

    2000-01-01

    A previous study has suggested that second-order motion is ineffective at driving optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) when presented alone. First- and second-order motion cues interact in creating the perception of motion. Is there an interaction between first- and second-order cues in the control of eye movements? We presented combinations of first- and second-order cues moving in the same or opposite directions and measured the eye movements evoked, to look for a modification of the oculomotor response to first-order motion by simultaneously presented second-order cues. Dynamic random noise was used as a carrier for first- and second-order drifting gratings (13.4 degrees/s; 0.25 cycles/degree; 64 x 48 degrees screen viewed at 28.5 cm). Second-order gratings were defined by spatial modulation of the luminance flicker frequency of noise pixels of constant contrast (50%). A first-order, luminance-defined grating (13.4 degrees/s; 0.25 cycles/degree; variable contrast from 4-50%) was moved in either the same or the opposite direction. Eye movements were recorded by video-oculography from six subjects as they looked straight ahead. The gain (eye velocity/stimulus velocity) of first-order-evoked OKN increased with contrast. The presence of flicker-defined second-order motion in the opposite direction attenuated this OKN below a first-order contrast of 15%, although it had little effect at higher contrasts. When first- and second-order motion were in the same direction, there was an enhancement of the OKN response. We conclude that second-order motion can modify the optokinetic response to simultaneously presented first-order motion. PMID:10638442

  7. Multiresponse kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation in a heated glucose/wheat flour system.

    PubMed

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-11-15

    The study describes the kinetics of the formation and degradation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in glucose/wheat flour system heated under low moisture conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, individual free amino acids, lysine and arginine residues, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl concentrations were determined to form a multiresponse kinetic model for isomerisation and degradation reactions of glucose. Degradation of Amadori product mainly produced 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 3-deoxyglucosone proceeded directly from glucose and also Amadori product degradation. Glyoxal formation was predominant from glucosone while methylglyoxal and diacetyl originated from 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from fructose was found to be a key step. Multi-response kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation simultaneously indicated quantitatively predominant parallel and consecutive pathways and rate limiting steps by estimating the reaction rate constants. PMID:27283710

  8. Explaining the Atypical Reaction Profiles of Heme Enzymes with a Novel Mechanistic Hypothesis and Kinetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Baburaj, Arun; Ephraim, Binoy; Pappachan, Febin; Maviliparambathu, Pravitha Parapurathu; Vijayan, Umesh K.; Narayanan, Sivaprasad Valiyaveettil; Periasamy, Kalaiselvi; George, Ebi Ashley; Mathew, Lazar T.

    2010-01-01

    Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP), uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation) of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model) was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the “steady state kinetics” of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates) is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s) affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of “the product of interest” in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of “substrate concentration at maximum observed rate”. The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes. PMID:20498847

  9. Characterization of reaction kinetics in a porous electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedkiw, Peter S.

    1990-01-01

    A continuum-model approach, analogous to porous electrode theory, was applied to a thin-layer cell of rectangular and cylindrical geometry. A reversible redox couple is assumed, and the local reaction current density is related to the potential through the formula of Hubbard and Anson for a uniformily accessible thin-layer cell. The placement of the reference electrode is also accounted for in the analysis. Primary emphasis is placed on the effect of the solution-phase ohmic potential drop on the voltammogram characteristics. Correlation equations for the peak-potential displacement from E(sup 0 prime) and the peak current are presented in terms of two dimensionless parameters.

  10. The kinetics of electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Rehana; Nadeem, Syed Muhammad Saqib

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride was investigated in different solvents by spectrophotometry at different temperatures. The the reaction rate was determined by monitoring the absorbance as a function of time at λmax 655 nm. The reaction is pseudo-first order, dependent only on the concentration of titanium trichloride at a fixed concentration of methylene green. The effect of an aqueous alcoholic solvent was studied in the acidic range of pH from 4 to 7. It was observed that the reaction rate increased with an increase in polarity of the reaction medium. The the reaction rate was high in acidic conditions and decreased with a further increase in acidity. The increase in temperature increased the rate of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride. The activation energy ( E a) was calculated by the Arrhenius relation. The absence of any reaction intermediate was confirmed by spectroscopic and kinetic investigations. A plausible mechanism for the reaction in line with outer-sphere reaction pathway has been proposed. Thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H), free energy change (Δ G), and entropy change (Δ S) were also evaluated

  11. Self-triggering reaction kinetics between nitrates and aluminium powder.

    PubMed

    Demichela, Micaela

    2007-09-01

    During the night between the 19 and 20 September 2003, a loud explosion occurred at about 3km from the town of Carignano that was clearly heard at a distance of some tens of kilometres. The explosion almost completely destroyed most of the laboratories of the Panzera Company that were used for the production of fireworks. The results of the research activities that were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) on the same raw materials that made up the pyrotechnical mixture that exploded are reported in this paper. This activity was carried out to identify the dynamics of the accident. It proved possible to verify how the event was produced because of a slow exothermic reaction which, after about 8h, caused the self-triggering of 120 kg of finished product. The detonation can therefore be put down to a runaway reaction in the solid phase, whose primogenial causes can be attributed to a still craftsman type production system, not conformed to the rigorous controls and inspections as those required by a safety management system for major risk plants, as the Panzera Company was.

  12. Reaction of benzophenone UV filters in the presence of aqueous chlorine: kinetics and chloroform formation.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Bridenstine, David R; Leslie, Daniel C

    2013-02-01

    The transformation of two benzophenone UV filters (Oxybenzone and Dioxybenzone) was examined over the pH range 6-11 in the presence of excess aqueous chlorine. Under these conditions, both UV filters were rapidly transformed by aqueous chlorine just above circumneutral pH while transformation rates were significantly lower near the extremes of the pH range investigated. Observed first-order rate coefficients (k(obs)) were obtained at each pH for aqueous chlorine concentrations ranging from 10 to 75 μM. The k(obs) were used to determine the apparent second-order rate coefficient (k(app)) at each pH investigated as well as determine the reaction order of aqueous chlorine with each UV filter. The reaction of aqueous chlorine with either UV filter was found to be an overall second-order reaction, first-order with respect to each reactant. Assuming elemental stoichiometry described the reaction between aqueous chlorine and each UV filter, models were developed to determine intrinsic rate coefficients (k(int)) from the k(app) as a function of pH for both UV filters. The rate coefficients for the reaction of HOCl with 3-methoxyphenol moieties of oxybenzone (OXY) and dioxybenzone (DiOXY) were k(1,OxY) = 306 ± 81 M⁻¹s⁻¹ and k(1,DiOxY) = 154 ± 76 M⁻¹s⁻¹, respectively. The k(int) for the reaction of aqueous chlorine with the 3-methoxyphenolate forms were orders of magnitude greater than the un-ionized species, k(2,OxY) = 1.03(±0.52) × 10⁶ M⁻¹s⁻¹ and k(2_1,DiOxY) = 4.14(±0.68) × 10⁵ M⁻¹s⁻¹. Also, k(int) for the reaction of aqueous chlorine with the DiOXY ortho-substituted phenolate moiety was k(2_2,DiOxY) = 2.17(±0.30) × 10³ M⁻¹s⁻¹. Finally, chloroform formation potential for OXY and DiOXY was assessed over the pH range 6-10. While chloroform formation decreased as pH increased for OXY, chloroform formation increased as pH increased from 6 to 10 for DiOXY. Ultimate molar yields of chloroform per mole of UV filter were pH dependent

  13. On the complexity of kinetics and the mechanism of the thiosulfate-periodate reaction.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Evelin; Cseko, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2011-06-20

    The thiosulfate-periodate reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in a slightly acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in an acetate/acetic acid buffer by monitoring the absorbance in the 250-600 nm wavelength range at a constant ionic strength adjusted by the buffer component sodium acetate. In agreement with a previous study, we found that the reaction cannot be described by a single stoichiometric equation, tetrathionate and sulfate are simultaneously formed, and its ratio strongly depends on the pH. As expected at certain initial concentration ratios of the reactants, the reaction behaves as a clock reaction, but after its appearance, iodine is slowly consumed mainly because of the moderate tetrathionate-iodine reaction. It is also enlightened that the initial rate of the reaction is completely independent of the pH, which apparently contradicts a previous study, which postulates a "supercatalytic" behavior of the hydrogen ion on the title reaction. Significant buffer assistance that may change the absorbance-time profiles was also observed. On the basis of the kinetic data, a robust 28-step kinetic model with 22 fitted parameters is proposed and discussed to explain adequately all of the important characteristics of the kinetic curves. PMID:21612189

  14. In unison: First- and second-order information combine for integration of shape information.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ken W S; Dickinson, J Edwin; Badcock, David R

    2016-09-01

    The modulation of orientation around radial frequency (RF) patterns and RF textures is globally processed in both cases. This psychophysical study investigates whether the combination-a textured RF path obtained by applying an RF texture to an RF contour-is processed like a texture or a contour when making judgements about shape. Unlike RF textures, the impression of a closed flow was not required for global integration of textured RF paths, suggesting that these paths were processed as second-order, or contrast-defined contours. Luminance-defined (LD) RF paths were shown to globally integrate but with thresholds approximately half of those for the proposed second-order textured paths. The next experiment investigated whether this benefit was due to LD stimuli possessing double the amount of information (first- and second-order information). A mixed three-part contour composed of two different second-order texture components and an LD component was then employed to determine how the different cues combined. The mixed path thresholds matched predictions derived from a linear combination of first- and second-order cues. The conclusion is that the shape of isolated contours is processed using both first- and second-order information equally and that the contribution of texture is to carry additional second-order signal. PMID:27618513

  15. Second-order schedules of drug self-administration in animals.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Panlilio, Leigh V; Goldberg, Steven R

    2002-10-01

    On a second-order schedule, a subject responds according to one schedule (the unit schedule) for a brief presentation of a stimulus such as a light. Responding by the subject on this unit schedule is then reinforced according to another schedule of reinforcement. Second-order schedules of drug injection allow the study of more complex behavioral sequences than do simple schedules and may more accurately reflect the human drug-abuse situation. Much of the early work in this area used primates as subjects and focused on the behavioral variables controlling responding. It was shown that long sequences of behavior could be maintained on second-order schedules with relatively infrequent injections of drug and that the second-order, brief-stimulus presentations were critical to the acquisition and maintenance of responding. Also, the continued presentation of the brief stimulus in extinction often led to prolonged extinction behavior. These studies clearly showed that environmental stimuli greatly influence drug self-administration behavior under second-order schedules. The focus of much of the more recent work with second-order schedules has been on the evaluation of pharmacological treatments for drug addiction, both as antagonist and substitution therapies. Both types of potential therapies have shown promise in these preclinical models of addictive behavior. The recent extension of second-order self-administration studies to rats as subjects has facilitated the investigation of neural mechanisms involved in this behavior. While this use of second-order schedules is a relatively recent phenomenon, significant contributions have already been made in identifying neural mechanisms critical to second-order schedule drug self-administration. This active area of research holds great promise for delineating specific brain regions critical to different aspects of drug addiction.

  16. Reaction of soluble penicillin-binding protein 2a of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with beta-lactams and acyclic substrates: kinetics in homogeneous solution.

    PubMed Central

    Graves-Woodward, K; Pratt, R F

    1998-01-01

    The kinetics of reaction of solubilized penicillin-binding protein 2a (sPBP2a) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with a variety of beta-lactams and acyclic species was studied in homogeneous aqueous solution at 37 degreesC in 25 mM Hepes buffer, pH7.0, containing 1 M NaCl. Under these conditions, but not at lower salt concentrations, protein precipitation did not occur either during or after the reaction. The reactions of beta-lactams in general could be monitored by competition with a chromophoric beta-lactam, nitrocefin, or directly in certain cases by protein fluorescence. Rate constants for reaction of a wide variety of beta-lactams are reported. The interactions are characterized by a slow second-order acylation reaction followed by a slower deacylation. For example, the rate constants for benzylpenicillin were 12 M-1.s-1 and 3x10(-5) s-1 respectively. The acylation is slow in comparison with those of normal non-resistant high-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins. sPBP2a also seemed to catalyse the slow hydrolysis of a variety of acyclic depsipeptides but not that of a d-Ala-d-Ala peptide. The reactions with certain depsipeptides also led to protein precipitation. These reactions were, however, not affected by prior blockage of the beta-lactam-binding site by benzylpenicillin and thus might take place elsewhere on the enzyme. Two classes of potential transition- state analogue inhibitors, phosphonate monoesters and boronates, seemed to have little effect on the rate of reaction of sPBP2a with nitrocefin and therefore seem to have little affinity for the beta-lactam-binding/D,D-peptidase site. PMID:9620879

  17. Theoretical study of the kinetics of reactions of the monohalogenated methanes with atomic chlorine.

    PubMed

    Brudnik, Katarzyna; Twarda, Maria; Sarzyński, Dariusz; Jodkowski, Jerzy T

    2013-04-01

    Ab initio calculations at the G2 level were used in a theoretical description of the kinetics and mechanism of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from fluoro-, chloro- and bromomethane by chlorine atoms. The profiles of the potential energy surfaces show that mechanism of the reactions under investigation is complex and consists of two - in the case of CH3F+Cl - and of three elementary steps for CH3Cl+Cl and CH3Br+Cl. The heights of the energy barrier related to the H-abstraction are of 8-10 kJ mol(-1), the lowest value corresponds to CH3Cl+Cl and the highest one to CH3F+Cl. The rate constants were calculated using the theoretical method based on the RRKM theory and the simplified version of the statistical adiabatic channel model. The kinetic equations derived in this study[Formula: see text]and[Formula: see text]allow a description of the kinetics of the reactions under investigation in the temperature range of 200-3000 K. The kinetics of reactions of the entirely deuterated reactants were also included in the kinetic analysis. Results of ab initio calculations show that D-abstraction process is related with the energy barrier of 5 kJ mol(-1) higher than the H-abstraction from the corresponding non-deuterated reactant molecule. The derived analytical equations for the reactions, CD3X+Cl, CH2X+HCl and CD2X+DCl (X = F, Cl and Br) are a substantial supplement of the kinetic data necessary for the description and modeling of the processes of importance in the atmospheric chemistry. PMID:23239396

  18. The making of an Alfvenic fluctuation: The resolution of a second-order analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1995-01-01

    Ulysses observations of the high speed polar streams show that they are largely occupied by very large amplitude Alfvenic fluctuations accompanied by many rotational discontinuities. These fluctuations have a nearly constant magnetic intensity or amplitude, and the magnetic field direction per wave cycle sweeps only through a limited arc, much as a car wiperblade would do. Barnes and Hollweg (JGR, 79, 2302, 1974) suggested that this unusual waveform could arise from an obliquely propagating and linearly polarized Alfven wave of finite amplitude. From a second-order analysis, they showed that the existence of a particular solution with a constant amplitude but could not resolve the outcome of the homogeneous solution which consisted of fast waves. They suggested that Landau damping of these fast waves may be needed to get the observed waveform. We present a 1 1/2 D hybrid simulation which is fully nonlinear and correctly describes the ion kinetics for an initially monochromatic and linearly polarized Alfven wave propagating obliquely to the background magnetic field. The wave has a large amplitude and a wavelength so long that it can be considered dispersionless for simulation times. At early times, the second harmonic in density and in magnetic field transverse to the initial wave magnetic field are generated and have more power than other harmonics. Steepening is observed with a weak fast shock emerging, but no rotational discontinuity is left behind, and instead a constant amplitude and an arc-shaped waveform is made. The compressional component which develops after the shocks have dissipated is to zeroth order better described as a pure acoustic wave than as a fast wave. This might be explained by the relaxing of the Alfven wave to a state where its ponderomotive force vanishes so that the compressional component can travel almost independently of it.

  19. Low pressure UV/H2O2 treatment for the degradation of the pesticides metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - Kinetics and reaction product formation.

    PubMed

    Semitsoglou-Tsiapou, Sofia; Templeton, Michael R; Graham, Nigel J D; Hernández Leal, Lucía; Martijn, Bram J; Royce, Alan; Kruithof, Joop C

    2016-03-15

    The degradation kinetics of three pesticides - metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - by ultraviolet photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation by low pressure ultraviolet hydrogen peroxide (LP-UV/H2O2) advanced oxidation was determined. Mecoprop was susceptible to both LP-UV photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation, and exhibited the fastest degradation kinetics, achieving 99.6% (2.4-log) degradation with a UV fluence of 800 mJ/cm(2) and 5 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Metaldehyde was poorly degraded by LP-UV photolysis while 97.7% (1.6-log) degradation was achieved with LP-UV/H2O2 treatment at the maximum tested UV fluence of 1000 mJ/cm(2) and 15 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Clopyralid was hardly susceptible to LP-UV photolysis and exhibited the lowest degradation by LP-UV/H2O2 among the three pesticides. The second-order reaction rate constants for the reactions between the pesticides and OH-radicals were calculated applying a kinetic model for LP-UV/H2O2 treatment to be 3.6 × 10(8), 2.0 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop, respectively. The main LP-UV photolysis reaction product from mecoprop was 2-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid, while photo-oxidation by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment formed several oxidation products. The photo-oxidation of clopyralid involved either hydroxylation or dechlorination of the ring, while metaldehyde underwent hydroxylation and produced acetic acid as a major end product. Based on the findings, degradation pathways for the three pesticides by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment were proposed.

  20. Second order finite volume scheme for Maxwell's equations with discontinuous electromagnetic properties on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Ismagilov, Timur Z.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a second order finite volume scheme for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations with discontinuous dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability on unstructured meshes. The scheme is based on Godunov scheme and employs approaches of Van Leer and Lax–Wendroff to increase the order of approximation. To keep the second order of approximation near dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability discontinuities a novel technique for gradient calculation and limitation is applied near discontinuities. Results of test computations for problems with linear and curvilinear discontinuities confirm second order of approximation. The scheme was applied to modelling propagation of electromagnetic waves inside photonic crystal waveguides with a bend.

  1. First and Second Order Necessary Conditions for Stochastic Optimal Control Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnans, J. Frederic; Silva, Francisco J.

    2012-06-15

    In this work we consider a stochastic optimal control problem with either convex control constraints or finitely many equality and inequality constraints over the final state. Using the variational approach, we are able to obtain first and second order expansions for the state and cost function, around a local minimum. This fact allows us to prove general first order necessary condition and, under a geometrical assumption over the constraint set, second order necessary conditions are also established. We end by giving second order optimality conditions for problems with constraints on expectations of the final state.

  2. Mechanism and kinetics of the NOCO reaction on Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.; Kasemo, B.

    During the past 15 years, the NOCO reaction on Rh has attracted considerable attention of the researchers working in academic and applied surface science. The practical importance of this reaction is connected with its relevance for environmental chemistry. From the point of view of academic studies, the NOCO reaction on Rh is of interest because it represents one of the simplest examples from the class of catalytic reactions occurring via decomposition of adsorbed species. At present, the detailed kinetic data for this reaction are available both for single-crystal and supported Rh, at ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions and also at realistic pressures. For this reason, the NOCO reaction on Rh has become one of the major testing platforms for a microscopic, surface-science based approach to heterogeneous catalysis. The present review shows how far the progress in this field has come. In particular, the review describes in detail the evolution of the ideas for the mechanism of the reaction and also presents the data for the elementary reaction steps, obtained primarily on Rh(1 1 1) at UHV conditions. Then, the possibility of using these data for simulation of the reaction kinetics at moderate pressures, P NO ⋍ P CO ⋍ 0.01 bar, is discussed. The technological aspects of application of Rh in the automotive exhaust systems are surveyed as well, but only briefly.

  3. Kinetics of Thermochemical Reactions Important in the Venus Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the rates of several thermochemical gas-solid reactions between sulfur gases in the Venus atmosphere and reactive minerals on the hot Venus surface. Despite the great importance of these reactions for the maintenance of significant amounts of sulfur gases (and thus for the maintenance of the global cloud cover) in the atmosphere of Venus, essentially no kinetic data are currently available for them.

  4. The kinetics and mechanism of nanoconfined molten salt reactions: trimerization of potassium and rubidium dicyanamide.

    PubMed

    Yancey, Benjamin; Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2015-04-21

    This study highlights the effect of the aggregate state of a reactant on the reaction kinetics under the conditions of nanoconfinement. Our previous work (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 11409) has demonstrated considerable deceleration of the solid state trimerization of sodium dicyanamide in organically modified silica nanopores. In the present study we use FTIR, NMR, pXRD, TGA and DSC to analyze the kinetics and mechanism of the liquid state trimerization of potassium and rubidium dicyanamide under similar conditions of nanoconfinement. It is found that nanoconfinement accelerates dramatically the kinetics of the liquid state trimerization, whereas it does not appear to affect the reaction mechanism. Kinetic analysis indicates that the acceleration is associated with an increase in the preexponential factor. Although nanoconfinement has the opposite effects on the respective kinetics of solid and liquid state trimerization, both effects are linked to a change in the preexponential factor. The results obtained are consistent with our hypothesis that the effects differ because nanoconfinement may promote disordering of the solid and ordering of the liquid reaction media.

  5. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  6. Weak second-order splitting schemes for Lagrangian Monte Carlo particle methods for the composition PDF/FDF transport equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haifeng Popov, Pavel P.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2010-03-01

    We study a class of methods for the numerical solution of the system of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) that arises in the modeling of turbulent combustion, specifically in the Monte Carlo particle method for the solution of the model equations for the composition probability density function (PDF) and the filtered density function (FDF). This system consists of an SDE for particle position and a random differential equation for particle composition. The numerical methods considered advance the solution in time with (weak) second-order accuracy with respect to the time step size. The four primary contributions of the paper are: (i) establishing that the coefficients in the particle equations can be frozen at the mid-time (while preserving second-order accuracy), (ii) examining the performance of three existing schemes for integrating the SDEs, (iii) developing and evaluating different splitting schemes (which treat particle motion, reaction and mixing on different sub-steps), and (iv) developing the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) to assess the convergence of Monte Carlo particle methods. Tests using MMS confirm the second-order accuracy of the schemes. In general, the use of frozen coefficients reduces the numerical errors. Otherwise no significant differences are observed in the performance of the different SDE schemes and splitting schemes.

  7. Thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions in protective coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B.; Sarkhel, A.; Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L.

    1974-01-01

    Investigations of fluoride activated packs with Al:Ni ratios greater than 50 a/o prove that the specimen surface is not in equilibrium with the pack at high Al:Ni ratios but that an activity gradient exists between pack and specimen. Therefore, gaseous diffusion and possibly surface reactions play a role in determining the overall rate of Al deposition in such packs. Noticeable differences in coating behavior have been obtained in packs activated with chloride and iodide, and it appears that poorest results are obtained with iodides, better with chlorides, and best with fluorides. A numerical method has been perfected for calculating rates of solid-state diffusion controlled coating formation, allowing for the variation of diffusivity with composition in the NiAl phase. Layer growth rates can now be accurately predicted from a knowledge of the surface and substrate compositions. Furthermore, the correct diffusion profiles are obtained by this method. These differ substantially from the profile obtained when the diffusivity is assumed constant.

  8. [Study on apparent kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation degradation Rhodamine B by photo-Fenton reaction].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Zheng, Huai-Li; Li, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Li-Guo; Tang, Xue

    2008-11-01

    The Fenton process, mixed by hydrogen peroxide and iron salts with highly oxidative effect, is recognized as one of powerful advanced oxidation technologies available and can be used to destroy a variety of persistent organic pollutants. The oxidation power of Fenton reagent is due to the generation of hydroxyl radical (* OH) during the iron catalysed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in acid medium. The hydroxyl radical with a high oxidation potential (2.8 eV) attacks and completely destroys the pollutants in Fenton process. The degradation of pollutants can be considerably improved by using sunlight radiation, which is due to the generation of additional hydroxyl radicals. This photo-Fenton process had been effectively used to degrade the pollutants. In this paper, the definite quantity of Fenton reagent was added in the definite concentration of Rhodamine B solution. The degradation reaction was carried out at pH 3.5 under natural sunlight. The factors influencing on photocatalytic oxidation degradation rate of Rhodamine B were studied following: the initial concentration of Rhodamine B, initial concentrateions of Fe2+ and H2O2. The orders of degradation reaction were obtained by solving exponential kinetics equations of curve fitting, thereby gaining the kinetic parameters and reaction dynamics equation of the reaction system. The research contents included mainly: the UV-Vis spectra of Rhodamine B solution, the concentration-absorbency work curve of Rhodamine B solution, the analysis of the reaction system at various initial Rhodamine B concentrations, the analysis of the reaction system at various initial Fe2+ concentrateions, the analysis of the reaction system at various initial H2O2 concentrations, and the calculation of the apparent kinetics parameters in reaction dynamics equation. The reaction dynamics equation from experiments was constructed: V = 5 x 10(-9) P1.28 F0.366 E0.920, and overall reaction order was 2.57.

  9. Trigonometrically fitted two step hybrid method for the numerical integration of second order IVPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monovasilis, Th.; Kalogiratou, Z.; Simos, T. E.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we consider the numerical integration of second order ODEs where the first derivative is missing. We construct trigonometrically fitted two step hybrid methods. We apply the new methods on the numerical integration of several test problems.

  10. Evaluation of decay curves of a chemical species undergoing simultaneous first- and second-order decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K. H.

    1970-01-01

    IBM 1620 computer prepares tables to enable fast calculation of the first- and second-order rate constants from two half-lives and the corresponding initial concentrations, obtained from either one or two decay curves.

  11. Second-order conditioning of the pigeon's key-peck using an autoshaping procedure.

    PubMed

    Green, L; Schweitzer, L

    1980-03-01

    Second-order conditioning of the pigeon's key-peck was established using an autoshaping procedure. In the first experiment, pigeons came to peck a response key, the second-order conditioned stimulus (CS2), when it was paired with another key (CS1) that had previously been paired with food delivery. In the second experiment, pigeons again came to peck a key (CS2) when it was followed by a clicker (CS1) which had been paired with food delivery, even though the clicker itself had not evoked pecking. Responses to a second-order stimulus, therefore, need not resemble responses to the first-order CS. Furthermore, in both experiments, extinction of the first-order IS led to reduction in pecking CS2. These results were discussed in terms of the nature of the associations being formed during second-order conditioning.

  12. A second order accurate embedded boundary method for the wave equation with Dirichlet data

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiss, H O; Petersson, N A

    2004-03-02

    The accuracy of Cartesian embedded boundary methods for the second order wave equation in general two-dimensional domains subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions is analyzed. Based on the analysis, we develop a numerical method where both the solution and its gradient are second order accurate. We avoid the small-cell stiffness problem without sacrificing the second order accuracy by adding a small artificial term to the Dirichlet boundary condition. Long-time stability of the method is obtained by adding a small fourth order dissipative term. Several numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the method. The method is also used to solve the two-dimensional TM{sub z} problem for Maxwell's equations posed as a second order wave equation for the electric field coupled to ordinary differential equations for the magnetic field.

  13. Comparison of Second-Order Loads on a Tension-Leg Platform for Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gueydon, S.; Wuillaume, P.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2015-03-01

    The first objective of this work is to compare the two floating offshore wind turbine simulation packages {DIFFRAC+aNySIM} and {WAMIT+FAST}. The focus is on second-order wave loads, and so first- and second-order wave loads are applied to a structure sequentially for a detailed comparison and a more precise analysis of the effects of the second-order loads. aNySIM does not have the capability to model flexible bodies, and so the simulations performed in this tool are done assuming a rigid body. FAST also assumes that the platform is rigid, but can account for the flexibility of the tower. The second objective is to study the effects of the second-order loads on the response of a TLP floating wind turbine. The flexibility of the tower must be considered for this investigation, and therefore only FAST is used.

  14. Kinetics of the reaction of diethylene glycol bis-chloroformate with allyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, N.N.; Shtoda, N.F.; Dzumedzei, N.V.

    1988-10-01

    The kinetics of diethylene glycol bis-chloroformate solvolysis by excess allyl alcohol in toluene and carbon tetrachloride has been studied. Under conditions of a pseudofirst order reaction with respect to diethylene glycol bis-chloroformate the activation parameters confirm an addition-detachment mechanism.

  15. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  16. Interfacial reaction kinetics of coated SiC fibers with various titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundel, D. B.; Wawner, F. E.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between the silicon carbide fibers and the titanium-based alloy matrix was investigated at temperatures from 800 to 1000 C for several titanium-based alloys (including Ti-1100 alloy and BETA 21S) and unalloyed Ti, reinforced with coated silicon carbide fiber SCS-6. The reaction zone growth kinetics was studied by exposing vacuum encapsulated samples to temperatures from 700 to 1000 C for times up to 150 hrs, followed by SAM observations of samples which were polished perpendicular to the fiber axis and etched. It was found that the reaction zone growth kinetics of the alpha (hcp) and beta (bcc) phases of unalloyed titanium reacting with SCS-6 fibers exhibited different values of the apparent activation energy and of the preexponential factor. Additions of other metals to Ti was found to slow down the reaction kinetics. Among the alloys studied, the Ti-1100 was the slowest reacting conventional alloy and the Ti-14Al-21Nb (in wt pct) was the slowest overall.

  17. Pulsed laser photolysis kinetics study of the O(3P) + ClO reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique was used to investigate the kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction O + ClO yields Cl + O2 in buffer gas over the temperature and pressure ranges of 231-367 K and 25-500 torr. The results indicate a lack of pressure dependence at 298 K over the 25-500 torr range.

  18. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Francine; Agblevor, Foster; Klein, Michael; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  19. An Inexpensive Kinetic Study: The Reaction of FD&C Red #3 (Erythrosin B) with Hypochlorite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henary, Maher M.; Russell, Arlene A.

    2007-01-01

    Kinetics constitutes a core topic in both the lecture and laboratory components of lower- level chemistry courses. While textbook examples can ignore issues of time, temperature and safety, the laboratory can not. Reactions must occur slowly enough to be detected by students, occur rapidly enough for data collection in the few hours assigned to a…

  20. Studies of NO-char reaction kinetics obtained from drop-tube furnace and thermogravimetric experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shaozeng Sun; Juwei Zhang; Xidong Hu; Shaohua Wu; Jiancheng Yang; Yang Wang; Yukun Qin

    2009-01-15

    Four coal chars were prepared in a flat flame flow reactor (FFR), which can simulate the temperature and gas composition of a real pulverized coal combustion environment. The pore structure of chars was measured by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption, and the Hg and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas were obtained. The kinetics of NO-char was studied in a drop-tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). In the TGA experiments, the random pore model (RPM) was applied to describe the NO-char reactions and obtain the intrinsic kinetics. By presenting the data of DTF and TGA experiments on the same Arrhenius plot, it can be concluded that TGA is an available tool to study the kinetics of a high-temperature NO-char reaction. With respect to the DTF experiments, in comparison to the BET surface area, the Hg surface area is a better basis for normalizing the reactivity of different coal chars because of less scatter in the measured values, better agreement with TGA experimental data, and more stable values during the process of reaction. Moreover, by comparing the Hg surface area of chars before and after reactions, it is believed that the Hg surface area basis is more appropriate for high-rank coal chars. The determined kinetic rate constants are in good agreement with other data in the literature, and a new rate constant expression is proposed. 30 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Marcus Theory: Thermodynamics CAN Control the Kinetics of Electron Transfer Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is generally true that thermodynamics do not influence kinetics, this is NOT the case for electron transfer reactions in solution. Marcus Theory explains why this is so, using straightforward physical chemical principles such as transition state theory, Arrhenius' Law, and the Franck-Condon Principle. Here the background and…

  2. Racing carbon atoms. Atomic motion reaction coordinates and structural effects on Newtonian kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Andujar-De Sanctis, Ivonne L; Singleton, Daniel A

    2012-10-19

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of methacrolein. Trajectory studies accurately predict the isotope effects and support an origin in Newton's second law of motion, with no involvement of zero-point energy or transition state recrossing. Atomic motion reaction coordinate diagrams are introduced as a way to qualitatively understand the selectivity.

  3. Stereochemically Rich Polycyclic Amines from the Kinetic Resolution of Indolines through Intramolecular Povarov Reactions.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang; Seidel, Daniel

    2016-07-25

    Under control of a chiral Brønsted acid catalyst, racemic indolines undergo intramolecular Povarov reactions with achiral aromatic aldehydes bearing a pendent dienophile. One enantiomer of the indoline reacts preferentially, resulting in the highly enantio- and diastereoselective formation of polycyclic heterocycles with four stereogenic centers. This kinetic resolution approach exploits the differential formation/reactivity of diastereomeric ion pairs.

  4. A Molecular Reaction Cycle with a Solvatochromic Merocyanine Dye: An Experiment in Photochemistry, Kinetics, and Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Kader, M. H.; Steiner, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experiments using merocyanine M suitable as an integrated laboratory experience for undergraduates are described. Experiments demonstrate: complete molecular cycle composed of photochemical, thermal, and protolytic reaction steps; kinetics of cis-trans isomerization of the dye; and mechanism of base catalysis for thermal isomerization of the…

  5. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Multimaterial Flows and Its Application in Chemical Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    This paper concerns the extension of the multicomponent gas-kinetic BGK-type scheme to multidimensional chemical reactive flow calculations. In the kinetic model, each component satisfies its individual gas-kinetic BGK equation and the equilibrium states of both components are coupled in space and time due to the momentum and energy exchange in the course of particle collisions. At the same time, according to the chemical reaction rule one component can be changed into another component with the release of energy, where the reactant and product could have different gamma. Many numerical test cases are included in this paper, which show the robustness and accuracy of kinetic approach in the description of multicomponent reactive flows.

  6. Algorithms and design for a second-order automatic differentiation module

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, J.; Bischof, C.; Roh, L.; Carle, A.

    1997-07-01

    This article describes approaches to computing second-order derivatives with automatic differentiation (AD) based on the forward mode and the propagation of univariate Taylor series. Performance results are given that show the speedup possible with these techniques relative to existing approaches. The authors also describe a new source transformation AD module for computing second-order derivatives of C and Fortran codes and the underlying infrastructure used to create a language-independent translation tool.

  7. An alternative assessment of second-order closure models in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of three recently proposed second-order closure models is tested in benchmark turbulent shear flows. Both homogeneous shear flow and the log-layer of an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer are considered for this purpose. An objective analysis of the results leads to an assessment of these models that stands in contrast to that recently published by other authors. A variety of pitfalls in the formulation and testing of second-order closure models are uncovered by this analysis.

  8. Exponential stability of second-order stochastic evolution equations with Poisson jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Ren, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the exponential stability problem of second-order nonlinear stochastic evolution equations with Poisson jumps. By using the stochastic analysis theory, a set of novel sufficient conditions are derived for the exponential stability of mild solutions to the second-order nonlinear stochastic differential equations with infinite delay driven by Poisson jumps. An example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed result.

  9. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

  10. SurfKin: an ab initio kinetic code for modeling surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Le, Thong Nguyen-Minh; Liu, Bin; Huynh, Lam K

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we describe a C/C++ program called SurfKin (Surface Kinetics) to construct microkinetic mechanisms for modeling gas-surface reactions. Thermodynamic properties of reaction species are estimated based on density functional theory calculations and statistical mechanics. Rate constants for elementary steps (including adsorption, desorption, and chemical reactions on surfaces) are calculated using the classical collision theory and transition state theory. Methane decomposition and water-gas shift reaction on Ni(111) surface were chosen as test cases to validate the code implementations. The good agreement with literature data suggests this is a powerful tool to facilitate the analysis of complex reactions on surfaces, and thus it helps to effectively construct detailed microkinetic mechanisms for such surface reactions. SurfKin also opens a possibility for designing nanoscale model catalysts.

  11. Motion aftereffect of combined first-order and second-order motion.

    PubMed

    van der Smagt, M J; Verstraten, F A; Vaessen, E B; van Londen, T; van de Grind, W A

    1999-01-01

    When, after prolonged viewing of a moving stimulus, a stationary (test) pattern is presented to an observer, this results in an illusory movement in the direction opposite to the adapting motion. Typically, this motion aftereffect (MAE) does not occur after adaptation to a second-order motion stimulus (i.e. an equiluminous stimulus where the movement is defined by a contrast or texture border, not by a luminance border). However, a MAE of second-order motion is perceived when, instead of a static test pattern, a dynamic test pattern is used. Here, we investigate whether a second-order motion stimulus does affect the MAE on a static test pattern (sMAE), when second-order motion is presented in combination with first-order motion during adaptation. The results show that this is indeed the case. Although the second-order motion stimulus is too weak to produce a convincing sMAE on its own, its influence on the sMAE is of equal strength to that of the first-order motion component, when they are adapted to simultaneously. The results suggest that the perceptual appearance of the sMAE originates from the site where first-order and second-order motion are integrated.

  12. Reaction between Chromium(III) and EDTA Ions: an Overlooked Mechanism of Case Study Reaction of Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cerar, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Widely cited and accepted explanation of reaction mechanism of the case study reaction of chemical kinetics between Cr(III) ions and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) contradicts modern chromium(III) coordination chemistry data. Absorption UV and visible light spectra were recorded during the reaction between aqueous solution of Cr(NO(3))(3) and EDTA in order to obtain new information about this reaction. Analysis of the spectra showed that only very small fraction of intermediates may be present in solution during the course of the reaction. The reaction scheme was established and according to it calculations based on a simplified model were carried out. Literature data for constants were used if known, otherwise, adjusted values of their sound estimates were applied. Reasonable agreement of the model calculations with the experimental data was obtained for pH values 3.8 and 4.5 but the model failed to reproduce measured rate of reaction at pH 5.5, probably due to the use of the oversimplified model. PMID:26454587

  13. Reaction between Chromium(III) and EDTA Ions: an Overlooked Mechanism of Case Study Reaction of Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cerar, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Widely cited and accepted explanation of reaction mechanism of the case study reaction of chemical kinetics between Cr(III) ions and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) contradicts modern chromium(III) coordination chemistry data. Absorption UV and visible light spectra were recorded during the reaction between aqueous solution of Cr(NO(3))(3) and EDTA in order to obtain new information about this reaction. Analysis of the spectra showed that only very small fraction of intermediates may be present in solution during the course of the reaction. The reaction scheme was established and according to it calculations based on a simplified model were carried out. Literature data for constants were used if known, otherwise, adjusted values of their sound estimates were applied. Reasonable agreement of the model calculations with the experimental data was obtained for pH values 3.8 and 4.5 but the model failed to reproduce measured rate of reaction at pH 5.5, probably due to the use of the oversimplified model.

  14. Oxygen exchange reaction kinetics for cerium(IV) oxide at 1000 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Christofer E. Douglas, John M.; Cremeans, Bethany M.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    2014-10-15

    Bulk oxygen exchange rate kinetics on CeO{sub 2} at 1000 °C were observed to have a first order dependence on the fraction of reaction remaining and to be independent of oxygen partial pressure, total pressure, particle size, and specific surface area. This suggests that the exchange reaction is dominated by an internal chemical reaction that is occurring throughout the bulk of the material, and not at the material surface. Oxygen exchange rates were limited by this internal chemical reaction for all CeO{sub 2} powders studied (15 nm to −325 mesh), and had a rate constant of 1.19×10{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a time to completion of 617 s. These results are similar to the exchange rates observed previously on PuO{sub 2}, suggesting that oxygen exchange on PuO{sub 2} may also be dominated by an internal chemical reaction under similar conditions. This work will help guide future experiments on {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} oxygen exchange reactions. - Graphical abstract: Oxygen exchange kinetics on CeO{sub 2} at 1000 °C are independent of a wide range of experimental conditions and exhibit first-order chemical reaction kinetics. - Highlights: • Stable oxygen exchange rates obtained on a variety of CeO{sub 2} powders at 1000 °C. • Exchange rates are independent of atmospheric composition and specific surface area. • Exchange rates are limited by an internal chemical reaction, not a surface reaction. • CeO{sub 2} exchange rates appear similar to the rates observed on PuO{sub 2} at 1000 °C.

  15. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Chia, A; Tan, K C; Pawela, Ł; Kurzyński, P; Paterek, T; Kaszlikowski, D

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013)], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  16. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  17. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-01

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2‧-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe2+ ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323 K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH‡ and entropy of activation ΔS‡) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  18. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction. PMID:25721780

  19. Reaction kinetics for the oxygen hydrogenation process on Pt(111) derived from temperature-programmed XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, Lars-Åke

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen hydrogenation under ultra high vacuum conditions at the platinum surface was explored using temperature-programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Through modeling of the oxygen consumption, information on the reaction kinetics was obtained indicating that the reaction rate of the oxygen hydrogenation process depends on the hydrogen diffusion and on the lifetime of hydroxyl intermediates. The reaction rate is, however, enhanced when an autocatalytic process stabilizes the hydroxyl intermediates through hydrogen bonding to neighboring water molecules. The overall activation energy for the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen to form water was determined to be 0.20 eV with a frequency factor of only 103 s- 1.

  20. Kinetic study of free fatty acid esterification reaction catalyzed by recoverable and reusable hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Hung

    2013-02-01

    The catalytic performance and recoverability of several homogeneous acid catalysts (hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids) for the esterification of enzyme-hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) and methanol were studied. Although all tested catalysts drove the reaction to a high yield, hydrochloric acid was the only catalyst that could be considerably recovered and reused. The kinetics of the esterification reaction catalyzed by hydrochloric acid was investigated under varying catalyst loading (0.1-1M), reaction temperature (303-343K), and methanol/FFA molar ratio (1:1-20:1). In addition, a pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model incorporating the above factors was developed. A good agreement (r(2)=0.98) between the experimental and calculated data was obtained, thus proving the reliability of the model. Furthermore, the reusability of hydrochloric acid in FFA esterification can be predicted by the developed model. The recoverable hydrochloric acid achieved high yields of FFA esterification within five times of reuse.

  1. Kinetics of the Br2-CH3CHO Photochemical Chain Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Shackelford, C. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was employed in conjunction with laser flash photolysis of Br2 to study the kinetics of the two elementary steps in the photochemical chain reaction nBr2 + nCH3CHO + hv yields nCH3CBrO + nHBr. In the temperature range 255-400 K, the rate coefficient for the reaction Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) + CH3CHO yields CH3CO + HBr is given by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 6)(T) = (1.51 +/- 0.20) x 10(exp -11) exp(-(364 +/- 41)/T)cu cm/(molecule.s). At 298 K, the reaction CH3CO + Br2 yields CH3CBrO + Br proceeds at a near gas kinetic rate, k(sub 7)(298 K) = (1.08 +/- 0.38) x 10(exp -10)cu cm/(molecule.s).

  2. Carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of CH4 with HO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Tyler, S. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effect in the CH4 + HO reaction is measured experimentally and the use of carbon isotope ratios to diagnose atmospheric methane is examined. The chemical, photolysis, and analytical experimental conditions and procedures are described. It is determined that the CH4 + HO reaction has a carbon kinetic isotope effect of 1.010 + or 0.007 for k(12)k(13) (rate constants ratio) at 297 + or - 3 K. This value is compared with the data of Rust and Stevens (1980). Causes for the poor correlation between the data at high methane conversions are discussed. It is supposed that the difference between the k(12) and k(13) values is due to a difference in the activation energy of the two reactions.

  3. Kinetics of phyllosemiquinone oxidation in the Photosystem I reaction centre of Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Bailleul, Benjamin; Redding, Kevin; Barber, James; Rappaport, Fabrice; Telfer, Alison

    2012-02-01

    Light-induced electron transfer reactions in the chlorophyll a/d-binding Photosystem I reaction centre of Acaryochloris marina were investigated in whole cells by pump-probe optical spectroscopy with a temporal resolution of ~5ns at room temperature. It is shown that phyllosemiquinone, the secondary electron transfer acceptor anion, is oxidised with bi-phasic kinetics characterised by lifetimes of 88±6ns and 345±10ns. These lifetimes, particularly the former, are significantly slower than those reported for chlorophyll a-binding Photosystem I, which typically range in the 5-30ns and 200-300ns intervals. The possible mechanism of electron transfer reactions in the chlorophyll a/d-binding Photosystem I and the slower oxidation kinetics of the secondary acceptors are discussed. PMID:22037394

  4. Hydrolysis of Surfactants Containing Ester Bonds: Modulation of Reaction Kinetics and Important Aspects of Surfactant Self-Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Dan; Stjerndahl, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-assembly on the hydrolysis kinetics of surfactants that contain ester bonds are discussed. A number of examples on how reaction rates and apparent reaction orders can be modulated by changes in the conditions, including an instance of apparent zero-order kinetics, are presented. Furthermore, it is shown that the examples on…

  5. Construction of an antimyoglobin single-chain variable fragment with rapid reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun-Hyuck; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Paek, Se-Hwan; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Kim, Young-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies with rapid reaction kinetics (high association and dissociation rates), named reversible antibodies, are used to perform continuous monitoring of sensitive disease biomarkers. In cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), continuous monitoring and early diagnosis are important. Human myoglobin (Myo) is a useful biomarker for AMI during the early stage after the onset of symptoms. In this study, a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) specific to Myo was derived from an IgG antibody that has rapid reaction kinetics. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that recombinant scFv exhibited 3.8-fold reduced affinity compared with the parent IgG antibody based on the antibody concentration necessary for 50% of the maximum signal. The scFv retained the rapid reaction kinetic mode with average kon and koff of 2.63 × 10(5) M(-1) Sec(-1) and 3.25 × 10(-3) Sec(-1) , respectively, which were reduced to 10- and 2.3-fold compared with those of the parent antibody. The equilibrium constant for the association of the scFv (KA = 8.09 × 10(7) M(-1) ) was 4.6-fold lower than that of its parent IgG antibody. This scFv may be a starting point for further mutagenesis/kinetic and structural analyses providing valuable insight into the mechanism of reversible antibodies.

  6. Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating gas hydrate behavior in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

    2006-11-29

    In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. The use of the equilibriumreaction model often appears to be justified and preferred for simulatingthe behavior of gas hydrates, given that the computational demands forthe kinetic reaction model far exceed those for the equilibrium reactionmodel.

  7. Second-Order Inference for the Mean of a Variable Missing at Random.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Iván; Carone, Marco; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    We present a second-order estimator of the mean of a variable subject to missingness, under the missing at random assumption. The estimator improves upon existing methods by using an approximate second-order expansion of the parameter functional, in addition to the first-order expansion employed by standard doubly robust methods. This results in weaker assumptions about the convergence rates necessary to establish consistency, local efficiency, and asymptotic linearity. The general estimation strategy is developed under the targeted minimum loss-based estimation (TMLE) framework. We present a simulation comparing the sensitivity of the first and second-order estimators to the convergence rate of the initial estimators of the outcome regression and missingness score. In our simulation, the second-order TMLE always had a coverage probability equal or closer to the nominal value 0.95, compared to its first-order counterpart. In the best-case scenario, the proposed second-order TMLE had a coverage probability of 0.86 when the first-order TMLE had a coverage probability of zero. We also present a novel first-order estimator inspired by a second-order expansion of the parameter functional. This estimator only requires one-dimensional smoothing, whereas implementation of the second-order TMLE generally requires kernel smoothing on the covariate space. The first-order estimator proposed is expected to have improved finite sample performance compared to existing first-order estimators. In the best-case scenario of our simulation study, the novel first-order TMLE improved the coverage probability from 0 to 0.90. We provide an illustration of our methods using a publicly available dataset to determine the effect of an anticoagulant on health outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. We provide R code implementing the proposed estimator. PMID:27227727

  8. Ability of Sagittal Kinematic Variables to Estimate Ground Reaction Forces and Joint Kinetics in Running

    PubMed Central

    Wille, Christa; Lenhart, Rachel; Wang, Sijian; Thelen, Darryl; Heiderscheit, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, cross sectional design. Objective To determine if sagittal kinematic variables can be used to estimate select running kinetics. Background Excessive loading during running has been implicated in a variety of injuries, yet this information is typically not assessed during a standard clinical examination. Developing a clinically feasible strategy to estimate ground reaction forces and joint kinetics may improve the ability to identify those at an increased risk of injury. Methods Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces of 45 participants were recorded during treadmill running at self-selected speed. Kinematic variables used to estimate specific kinetic metrics included: vertical excursion of the center of mass, foot inclination angle at initial contact, horizontal distance between the center of mass and heel at initial contact, knee flexion angle at initial contact, and peak knee flexion angle during stance. Linear mixed effects models were fitted to explore the association between the kinetic and kinematic measures, including step rate and gender, with final models created using backward variable selection. Results Models were developed to estimate peak knee extensor moment (R2=0.43), energy absorbed at the knee during loading response (R2=0.58), peak patellofemoral joint reaction force (R2=0.55), peak vertical ground reaction force (R2=0.48), braking impulse (R2=0.50), and average vertical loading rate (R2=0.04). Conclusions Our findings suggest that insights into important running kinetics can be obtained from a subset of sagittal plane kinematics common to a clinical running analysis. Of note, the limb posture at initial contact influenced subsequent loading patterns in stance. PMID:25156183

  9. Kinetics and products of reactions of MTBE with ozone and ozone/hydrogen peroxide in water.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Marie M; Keller, Arturo A; Bunton, Clifford A; Rinker, Robert G; Sandall, Orville C

    2002-01-28

    Methyl-t-butyl-ether (MTBE) has become a prevalent groundwater pollutant due to its high volume use as a nationwide gasoline additive. Given its physicochemical properties, it requires new treatment approaches. Both aqueous O(3) and a combination of O(3)/H(2)O(2), which gives *OH, can remove MTBE from water, making use of O(3) a viable technology for remediation of groundwater from fuel contaminated sites. Rate constants and temperature dependencies for reactions of MTBE with O(3) or with *OH at pH 7.2, in a range of 21-45 degrees C (294-318K) were measured. The second-order rate constant for reaction of MTBE with O(3) is 1.4 x 10(18)exp(-95.4/RT) (M(-1)s(-1)), and for reaction of MTBE with *OH produced by the combination of O(3)/H(2)O(2) is 8.0 x 10(9)exp(-4.6/RT) (M(-1)s(-1)), with the activation energy (kJ mol(-1)) in both cases. At 25 degrees C, this corresponds to a rate constant of 27 M(-1)s(-1) for ozone alone, and 1.2 x 10(9) M(-1)s(-1) for O(3)/H(2)O(2). The concentration of *OH was determined using benzene trapping. Products of reactions of O(3) and O(3)/H(2)O(2) with MTBE, including t-butyl-formate (TBF), t-butyl alcohol (TBA), methyl acetate, and acetone, were determined after oxidant depletion. A reaction pathway for mineralization of MTBE was also explored. Under continuously stirred flow reactor (CSTR) conditions, addition of H(2)O(2) markedly increases the rate and degree of degradation of MTBE by O(3).

  10. Development and application of a numerical model of kinetic and equilibrium microbiological and geochemical reactions (BIOKEMOD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvage, Karen M.; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents the conceptual and mathematical development of the numerical model titled BIOKEMOD, and verification simulations performed using the model. BIOKEMOD is a general computer model for simulation of geochemical and microbiological reactions in batch aqueous solutions. BIOKEMOD may be coupled with hydrologic transport codes for simulation of chemically and biologically reactive transport. The chemical systems simulated may include any mixture of kinetic and equilibrium reactions. The pH, pe, and ionic strength may be specified or simulated. Chemical processes included are aqueous complexation, adsorption, ion-exchange and precipitation/dissolution. Microbiological reactions address growth of biomass and degradation of chemicals by microbial metabolism of substrates, nutrients, and electron acceptors. Inhibition or facilitation of growth due to the presence of specific chemicals and a lag period for microbial acclimation to new substrates may be simulated if significant in the system of interest. Chemical reactions controlled by equilibrium are solved using the law of mass action relating the thermodynamic equilibrium constant to the activities of the products and reactants. Kinetic chemical reactions are solved using reaction rate equations based on collision theory. Microbiologically mediated reactions for substrate removal and biomass growth are assumed to follow Monod kinetics modified for the potentially limiting effects of substrate, nutrient, and electron acceptor availability. BIOKEMOD solves the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed geochemical and biogeochemical reactions using the Newton-Raphson method with full matrix pivoting. Simulations may be either steady state or transient. Input to the program includes the stoichiometry and parameters describing the relevant chemical and microbiological reactions, initial conditions, and sources/sinks for each chemical species. Output includes the chemical and biomass concentrations

  11. Revisiting Hartle's model using perturbed matching theory to second order: amending the change in mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, Borja; Vera, Raül

    2015-08-01

    Hartle's model describes the equilibrium configuration of a rotating isolated compact body in perturbation theory up to second order in general relativity. The interior of the body is a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state, no convective motions and rigid rotation. That interior is matched across its surface to an asymptotically flat vacuum exterior. Perturbations are taken to second order around a static and spherically symmetric background configuration. Apart from the explicit assumptions, the perturbed configuration is constructed upon some implicit premises, in particular the continuity of the functions describing the perturbation in terms of some background radial coordinate. In this work we revisit the model within a modern general and consistent theory of perturbative matchings to second order, which is independent of the coordinates and gauges used to describe the two regions to be joined. We explore the matching conditions up to second order in full. The main particular result we present is that the radial function m0 (in the setting of the original work) of the second order perturbation tensor, contrary to the original assumption, presents a jump at the surface of the star, which is proportional to the value of the energy density of the background configuration there. As a consequence, the change in mass δ M needed by the perturbed configuration to keep the value of the central energy density unchanged must be amended. We also discuss some subtleties that arise when studying the deformation of the star.

  12. Democratic decisions establish stable authorities that overcome the paradox of second-order punishment.

    PubMed

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Milinski, Manfred

    2014-01-14

    Individuals usually punish free riders but refuse to sanction those who cooperate but do not punish. This missing second-order peer punishment is a fundamental problem for the stabilization of cooperation. To solve this problem, most societies today have implemented central authorities that punish free riders and tax evaders alike, such that second-order punishment is fully established. The emergence of such stable authorities from individual decisions, however, creates a new paradox: it seems absurd to expect individuals who do not engage in second-order punishment to strive for an authority that does. Herein, we provide a mathematical model and experimental results from a public goods game where subjects can choose between a community with and without second-order punishment in two different ways. When subjects can migrate continuously to either community, we identify a bias toward institutions that do not punish tax evaders. When subjects have to vote once for all rounds of the game and have to accept the decision of the majority, they prefer a society with second-order punishment. These findings uncover the existence of a democracy premium. The majority-voting rule allows subjects to commit themselves and to implement institutions that eventually lead to a higher welfare for all.

  13. Democratic decisions establish stable authorities that overcome the paradox of second-order punishment.

    PubMed

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Milinski, Manfred

    2014-01-14

    Individuals usually punish free riders but refuse to sanction those who cooperate but do not punish. This missing second-order peer punishment is a fundamental problem for the stabilization of cooperation. To solve this problem, most societies today have implemented central authorities that punish free riders and tax evaders alike, such that second-order punishment is fully established. The emergence of such stable authorities from individual decisions, however, creates a new paradox: it seems absurd to expect individuals who do not engage in second-order punishment to strive for an authority that does. Herein, we provide a mathematical model and experimental results from a public goods game where subjects can choose between a community with and without second-order punishment in two different ways. When subjects can migrate continuously to either community, we identify a bias toward institutions that do not punish tax evaders. When subjects have to vote once for all rounds of the game and have to accept the decision of the majority, they prefer a society with second-order punishment. These findings uncover the existence of a democracy premium. The majority-voting rule allows subjects to commit themselves and to implement institutions that eventually lead to a higher welfare for all. PMID:24367116

  14. Assessing Stability and Change in a Second-Order Confirmatory Factor Model of Meaning in Life

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, R. David

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that meaning in life is an important correlate of health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about the way a sense of meaning may change over time. The purpose of this study is to explore two ways of assessing change in meaning within a second-order confirmatory factor analysis framework. First, tests are conducted to see if the first and second-order factor loadings and measurement error terms are invariant over time. Second, a largely overlooked technique is used to assess change and stability in meaning at the second-order level. Findings from a nationwide survey reveal that the first and second-order factor loadings are invariant of time. Moreover, the second-order measurement error terms, but not the first-order measurement error terms, are invariant, as well. The results further reveal that standard ways of assessing stability mask significant change in meaning that is due largely to regression to the mean. PMID:24778574

  15. Democratic decisions establish stable authorities that overcome the paradox of second-order punishment

    PubMed Central

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Milinski, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Individuals usually punish free riders but refuse to sanction those who cooperate but do not punish. This missing second-order peer punishment is a fundamental problem for the stabilization of cooperation. To solve this problem, most societies today have implemented central authorities that punish free riders and tax evaders alike, such that second-order punishment is fully established. The emergence of such stable authorities from individual decisions, however, creates a new paradox: it seems absurd to expect individuals who do not engage in second-order punishment to strive for an authority that does. Herein, we provide a mathematical model and experimental results from a public goods game where subjects can choose between a community with and without second-order punishment in two different ways. When subjects can migrate continuously to either community, we identify a bias toward institutions that do not punish tax evaders. When subjects have to vote once for all rounds of the game and have to accept the decision of the majority, they prefer a society with second-order punishment. These findings uncover the existence of a democracy premium. The majority-voting rule allows subjects to commit themselves and to implement institutions that eventually lead to a higher welfare for all. PMID:24367116

  16. Solvation effect on kinetic rate constant of reactions in supercritical solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, A.A.; Cummings, P.T. |; Kalyuzhnyi, Yu.V.

    1998-03-01

    A statistical mechanical analysis of the solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near and supercritical solvents is presented to understand the experimental findings regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects. This is an extension of the solvation formalism of Chialvo and Cummings to the analysis of the microscopic basis for the macroscopic pressure and temperature effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions conducted in the compressible region of the solvent phase diagram. This analysis is illustrated with integral equations calculations involving Lennard-Jones infinitely dilute quaternary systems to describe the species in solution during the reaction of triplet benzophenone ({sup 3}BP) with a cosolvent (either O{sub 2} or 1,4-cyclohexadiene) in supercritical CO{sub 2} along the supercritical isotherms T{sub r} = 1.01 and 1.06. The role of the species molecular asymmetries and consequently their solvation behavior in determining the thermodynamic pressure and temperature effects on the kinetic rate constant of reactions at near-critical conditions are discussed.

  17. Genome-scale Metabolic Reaction Modeling: a New Approach to Geomicrobial Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKernan, S. E.; Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Geomicrobial rates, rates of microbial metabolism in natural environments, are a key parameter of theoretical and practical problems in geobiology and biogeochemistry. Both laboratory- and field-based approaches have been applied to study rates of geomicrobial processes. Laboratory-based approaches analyze geomicrobial kinetics by incubating environmental samples under controlled laboratory conditions. Field methods quantify geomicrobial rates by observing the progress of geomicrobial processes. To take advantage of recent development in biogeochemical modeling and genome-scale metabolic modeling, we suggest that geomicrobial rates can also be predicted by simulating metabolic reaction networks of microbes. To predict geomicrobial rates, we developed a genome-scale metabolic model that describes enzyme reaction networks of microbial metabolism, and simulated the network model by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of enzyme reactions. The model is simulated numerically to solve cellular enzyme abundance and hence metabolic rates under the constraints of cellular physiology. The new modeling approach differs from flux balance analysis of system biology in that it accounts for the thermodynamics and kinetics of enzymatic reactions. It builds on subcellular metabolic reaction networks, and hence also differs from classical biogeochemical reaction modeling. We applied the new approach to Methanosarcina acetivorans, an anaerobic, marine methanogen capable of disproportionating acetate to carbon dioxide and methane. The input of the new model includes (1) enzyme reaction network of acetoclastic methanogenesis, and (2) representative geochemical conditions of freshwater sedimentary environments. The output of the simulation includes the proteomics, metabolomics, and energy and matter fluxes of M. acetivorans. Our simulation results demonstrate the predictive power of the new modeling approach. Specifically, the results illustrate how methanogenesis rates vary

  18. Kinetic energy release in thermal ion--molecule reactions: The Nb sup 2+ --(benzene) single charge--transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gord, J.R.; Freiser, B.S. ); Buckner, S.W. )

    1991-03-15

    We have adapted the techniques originally developed to measure ion kinetic energies in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometry to study the single charge--transfer reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene under thermal conditions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICRMS). The partitioning of reaction exothermicity among the internal and translational modes available is consistent with a long-distance electron-transfer mechanism, in which the reactants approach on an ion-induced dipole attractive potential and cross to a repulsive potential at a critical separation of {similar to}7.5 A when electron transfer occurs. The reaction exothermicity, 5.08 eV, is partitioned to translation of Nb{sup +} , 0.81{plus minus}0.25 eV, translation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +}, 1.22{plus minus}0.25 eV, and internal excitation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +} to produce the la{sub 2{ital u}} electronic state, which is {similar to}3 eV above the ground state of the ion. We have also studied the kinetics of the reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene and determined the rate constant, {ital k} = 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, and the efficiency, 0.60, of the process. These also support the proposed charge--transfer mechanism. In addition to the charge--transfer pathway, which accounts for 95% of the reaction products, Nb{sup 2+} is observed to dehydrogenate benzene to form Nb{sup 2+} (benzyne). This process implies {ital D}(Nb{sup 2+} --benzyne){ge}79 kcal/mol.

  19. Rapid reaction kinetics of proline dehydrogenase in the multifunctional proline utilization A protein.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Michael A; Becker, Donald F

    2012-01-10

    The multifunctional proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme from Escherichia coli catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate in two reaction steps using separate proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains. Here, the kinetic mechanism of PRODH in PutA is studied by stopped-flow kinetics to determine microscopic rate constants for the proline:ubiquinone oxidoreductase mechanism. Stopped-flow data for proline reduction of the flavin cofactor (reductive half-reaction) and oxidation of reduced flavin by CoQ(1) (oxidative half-reaction) were best-fit by a double exponential from which maximum observable rate constants and apparent equilibrium dissociation constants were determined. Flavin semiquinone was not observed in the reductive or oxidative reactions. Microscopic rate constants for steps in the reductive and oxidative half-reactions were obtained by globally fitting the stopped-flow data to a simulated mechanism that includes a chemical step followed by an isomerization event. A microscopic rate constant of 27.5 s(-1) was determined for proline reduction of the flavin cofactor followed by an isomerization step of 2.2 s(-1). The isomerization step is proposed to report on a previously identified flavin-dependent conformational change [Zhang, W. et al. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 483-491] that is important for PutA functional switching but is not kinetically relevant to the in vitro mechanism. Using CoQ(1), a soluble analogue of ubiquinone, a rate constant of 5.4 s(-1) was obtained for the oxidation of flavin, thus indicating that this oxidative step is rate-limiting for k(cat) during catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic constants calculated from the microscopic rate constants agree with the experimental k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) parameters.

  20. Chemical kinetic analysis of hydrogen-air ignition and reaction times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. C.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An anaytical study of hydrogen air kinetics was performed. Calculations were made over a range of pressure from 0.2 to 4.0 atm, temperatures from 850 to 2000 K, and mixture equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 2.0. The finite rate chemistry model included 60 reactions in 20 species of the H2-O2-N2 system. The calculations also included an assessment of how small amounts of the chemicals H2O, NOx, H2O2, and O3 in the initial mixture affect ignition and reaction times, and how the variation of the third body efficiency of H2O relative of N2 in certain key reactions may affect reaction time. The results indicate that for mixture equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7, ignition times are nearly constant; however, the presence of H2O and NO can have significant effects on ignition times, depending on the mixture temperature. Reaction time is dominantly influenced by pressure but is nearly independent of initial temperature, equivalence ratio, and the addition of chemicals. Effects of kinetics on reaction at supersonic combustor conditions are discussed.

  1. Sensitivity of Polar Stratospheric Ozone Loss to Uncertainties in Chemical Reaction Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. Randolph; Stolarksi, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent observational and laboratory studies of processes involved in polar stratospheric ozone loss have prompted a reexamination of aspects of our understanding for this key indicator of global change. To a large extent, our confidence in understanding and projecting changes in polar and global ozone is based on our ability to simulate these processes in numerical models of chemistry and transport. The fidelity of the models is assessed in comparison with a wide range of observations. These models depend on laboratory-measured kinetic reaction rates and photolysis cross sections to simulate molecular interactions. A typical stratospheric chemistry mechanism has on the order of 50- 100 species undergoing over a hundred intermolecular reactions and several tens of photolysis reactions. The rates of all of these reactions are subject to uncertainty, some substantial. Given the complexity of the models, however, it is difficult to quantify uncertainties in many aspects of system. In this study we use a simple box-model scenario for Antarctic ozone to estimate the uncertainty in loss attributable to known reaction kinetic uncertainties. Following the method of earlier work, rates and uncertainties from the latest laboratory evaluations are applied in random combinations. We determine the key reactions and rates contributing the largest potential errors and compare the results to observations to evaluate which combinations are consistent with atmospheric data. Implications for our theoretical and practical understanding of polar ozone loss will be assessed.

  2. Sulfate radical-based degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls: effects of chloride ion and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guo-Dong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Wang, Yu; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2012-08-15

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radical (SO(4)(·-)) have been recently used for soil and groundwater remediation. The presence of chloride ion in natural or wastewater decreases the reactivity of sulfate radical system, but explanations for this behavior were inconsistent, and the mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, in this paper we investigated the effect of chloride ion on the degradation of 2,4,4'-CB (PCB28) and biphenyl (BP) by persulfate, based on the produced SO(4)(·-). The results showed that the presence of chloride ion greatly inhibited the transformation of PCB28 and BP. Transformation intermediates of BP were monitored, suggesting that the chloride ion can react with SO(4)(·-) to produce chlorine radical, which reacts with BP to generate chlorinated compounds. To better understand the underlying mechanisms of these processes, a kinetic model was developed for predicting the effect of chloride ion on the types of radical species and their distributions. The results showed that chloride ion could influence the selectivity of radical species and their distribution, and increase the concentration of the sum of radical species. In addition, the second-order rate constants of sulfate radical with PCBs were determined, and quantum-chemical descriptors were introduced to predict the rate constants of other PCBs based on our experimental data.

  3. Boltzmann hierarchy for the cosmic microwave background at second order including photon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Fidler, C.

    2010-09-15

    Non-Gaussianity and B-mode polarization are particularly interesting features of the cosmic microwave background, as--at least in the standard model of cosmology--their only sources to first order in cosmological perturbation theory are primordial, possibly generated during inflation. If the primordial sources are small, the question arises how large is the non-Gaussianity and B-mode background induced in second order from the initially Gaussian and scalar perturbations. In this paper we derive the Boltzmann hierarchy for the microwave background photon phase-space distributions at second order in cosmological perturbation theory including the complete polarization information, providing the basis for further numerical studies. As an aside we note that the second-order collision term contains new sources of B-mode polarization and that no polarization persists in the tight-coupling limit.

  4. New second order Mumford-Shah model based on Γ-convergence approximation for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jinming; Lu, Wenqi; Pan, Zhenkuan; Bai, Li

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a second order variational model named the Mumford-Shah total generalized variation (MSTGV) is proposed for simultaneously image denoising and segmentation, which combines the original Γ-convergence approximated Mumford-Shah model with the second order total generalized variation (TGV). For image denoising, the proposed MSTGV can eliminate both the staircase artefact associated with the first order total variation and the edge blurring effect associated with the quadratic H1 regularization or the second order bounded Hessian regularization. For image segmentation, the MSTGV can obtain clear and continuous boundaries of objects in the image. To improve computational efficiency, the implementation of the MSTGV does not directly solve its high order nonlinear partial differential equations and instead exploits the efficient split Bregman algorithm. The algorithm benefits from the fast Fourier transform, analytical generalized soft thresholding equation, and Gauss-Seidel iteration. Extensive experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed model.

  5. Theoretical study of second-order hyperpolarizability for nitrogen radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    We report calculations of the static and dynamic hyperpolarizabilities of the nitrogen radical cation in doublet state. The electronic contributions were computed analytically using density functional theory and multi-configurational self-consistent field method with extended basis sets for non-resonant excitation. The open-shell electronic system of nitrogen radical cation provides negative second-order optical nonlinearity, suggesting that the hyperpolarizability coefficient, {{γ }(2)}, in the non-resonant regime is mainly composed of combinations of virtual one-photon transitions rather than two-photon transitions. The second-order optical properties of nitrogen radical cation have been calculated as a function of bond length starting with the neutral molecular geometry (S0 minimum) and stretching the N-N triple bond, reaching the ionic D0 relaxed geometry all the way toward dissociation limit, to investigate the effect of internuclear bond distance on second-order hyperpolarizability.

  6. An inverse strategy for relocation of eigenfrequencies in structural design. Part II: second order approximate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, K.; Bahai, H.

    2004-07-01

    This paper extends the first order formulations presented in Part I to second order methods for relocation of structural natural frequencies from their initial design values to new modified frequencies. The method is based on an inverse formulation and solution algorithm of the eigenvalue problem. Using the second order Taylor's expansion series, the required parameter variation to achieve a desired natural frequency shift for the structure is computed through second order differential or binomial equations. The proposed technique can also incorporate the design constraints or objective functions in the system equations. The formulations are quite generic and applicable to all finite element structures. The accuracy of the proposed methods is tested by conducting several case studies, the results of which demonstrate the validity of the technique for a wide range of practical problems.

  7. First- or second-order transition in the melting of repeat sequence DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Z; Prohofsky, E W

    1994-01-01

    Both theoretical analysis and observation of the continuity of the melted fraction of base pairs indicate that the melting transition in DNA is second order. Analysis of the salt dependence of the transition by polyelectrolyte limiting laws, however, has first-order dynamics imbedded in the analysis. This paper proposes that the observation taken to be a latent heat of melting in the limiting law analysis could instead be a specific heat anomaly associated with a second-order transition. The limiting laws can be reconstructed based on a second-order transition with a specific heat anomaly. The T2M dependence of this excess heat is also consistent with its being a specific heat anomaly of a system displaying classical critical behavior. Classical critical behavior indicates that theoretical mean field approaches such as MSPA should be particularly appropriate to helix melting studies. PMID:8130338

  8. Encoding and estimation of first- and second-order binocular disparity in natural images

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Paul B.; Goutcher, Ross; Hunter, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The first stage of processing of binocular information in the visual cortex is performed by mechanisms that are bandpass-tuned for spatial frequency and orientation. Psychophysical and physiological evidence have also demonstrated the existence of second-order mechanisms in binocular processing, which can encode disparities that are not directly accessible to first-order mechanisms. We compared the responses of first- and second-order binocular filters to natural images. We found that the responses of the second-order mechanisms are to some extent correlated with the responses of the first-order mechanisms, and that they can contribute to increasing both the accuracy, and depth range, of binocular stereopsis. PMID:26731646

  9. Multistability of second-order competitive neural networks with nondecreasing saturated activation functions.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaobing; Cao, Jinde

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, second-order interactions are introduced into competitive neural networks (NNs) and the multistability is discussed for second-order competitive NNs (SOCNNs) with nondecreasing saturated activation functions. Firstly, based on decomposition of state space, Cauchy convergence principle, and inequality technique, some sufficient conditions ensuring the local exponential stability of 2N equilibrium points are derived. Secondly, some conditions are obtained for ascertaining equilibrium points to be locally exponentially stable and to be located in any designated region. Thirdly, the theory is extended to more general saturated activation functions with 2r corner points and a sufficient criterion is given under which the SOCNNs can have (r+1)N locally exponentially stable equilibrium points. Even if there is no second-order interactions, the obtained results are less restrictive than those in some recent works. Finally, three examples with their simulations are presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  10. Feasibility of a second-order gravitational red-shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J.; Vessot, R. F. C.

    1976-01-01

    The number of gravitation experiments undertaken since the advent of Einstein's theory of gravitation is quite small, with, so far, only the famous perihelion-advance experiment and a recent lunar-laser-ranging experiment being capable of measuring a nonlinear, second-order effect. It now appears that another distinct test of the second-order term may be feasible through the use of very stable atomic clocks. This experiment, which would measure the second-order gravitational red-shift, is a bona fide test of the field equations of gravity, not just a test of the underlying principle of equivalence. The nature of such an experiment, the basic equations, model-orbit calculations, and some tracking-accuracy requirements are presented. It is concluded that current space-probe tracking capabilities cannot determine all the necessary orbital parameters with sufficient accuracy for this experiment at the present time.

  11. Second-order systematic errors in Mueller matrix dual rotating compensator ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Broch, Laurent; En Naciri, Aotmane; Johann, Luc

    2010-06-10

    We investigate the systematic errors at the second order for a Mueller matrix ellipsometer in the dual rotating compensator configuration. Starting from a general formalism, we derive explicit second-order errors in the Mueller matrix coefficients of a given sample. We present the errors caused by the azimuthal inaccuracy of the optical components and their influences on the measurements. We demonstrate that the methods based on four-zone or two-zone averaging measurement are effective to vanish the errors due to the compensators. For the other elements, it is shown that the systematic errors at the second order can be canceled only for some coefficients of the Mueller matrix. The calibration step for the analyzer and the polarizer is developed. This important step is necessary to avoid the azimuthal inaccuracy in such elements. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements are presented and discussed.

  12. Second order gauge invariant measure of a tidally deformed black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, Nahid

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a Lagrangian perturbation theory for the second order treatment of small disturbances of the event horizon in Schwarzchild black holes is introduced. The issue of gauge invariance in the context of general relativistic theory is also discussed. The developments of this paper is a logical continuation of the calculations presented in [1], in which the first order coordinate dependance of the intrinsic and exterinsic geometry of the horizon is examined and the first order gauge invariance of the intrinsic geometry of the horizon is shown. In context of second order perturbation theory, It is shown that the rate of the expansion of the congruence of the horizon generators is invariant under a second order reparametrization; so it can be considered as a measure of tidal perturbation. A generally non-vanishing expression for this observable, which accomodates tidal perturbations and implies nonlinear response of the horizon, is also presented.

  13. Use of the particle swarm optimization algorithm for second order design of levelling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetkin, Mevlut; Inal, Cevat; Yigit, Cemal Ozer

    2009-08-01

    The weight problem in geodetic networks can be dealt with as an optimization procedure. This classic problem of geodetic network optimization is also known as second-order design. The basic principles of geodetic network optimization are reviewed. Then the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is applied to a geodetic levelling network in order to solve the second-order design problem. PSO, which is an iterative-stochastic search algorithm in swarm intelligence, emulates the collective behaviour of bird flocking, fish schooling or bee swarming, to converge probabilistically to the global optimum. Furthermore, it is a powerful method because it is easy to implement and computationally efficient. Second-order design of a geodetic levelling network using PSO yields a practically realizable solution. It is also suitable for non-linear matrix functions that are very often encountered in geodetic network optimization. The fundamentals of the method and a numeric example are given.

  14. Mean-value second-order uncertainty analysis method: application to water quality modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, Alain; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre

    Uncertainty analysis in hydrology and water quality modelling is an important issue. Various methods have been proposed to estimate uncertainties on model results based on given uncertainties on model parameters. Among these methods, the mean-value first-order second-moment (MFOSM) method and the advanced mean-value first-order second-moment (AFOSM) method are the most common ones. This paper presents a method based on a second-order approximation of a model output function. The application of this method requires the estimation of first- and second-order derivatives at a mean-value point in the parameter space. Application to a Streeter-Phelps prototype model is presented. Uncertainties on two and six parameters are considered. Exceedance probabilities (EP) of dissolved oxygen concentrations are obtained and compared with EP computed using Monte Carlo, AFOSM and MFOSM methods. These results show that the mean-value second-order method leads to better estimates of EP.

  15. Spectral methods for the wave equation in second-order form

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Nicholas W.; Teukolsky, Saul A.; Kidder, Lawrence E.

    2010-07-15

    Current spectral simulations of Einstein's equations require writing the equations in first-order form, potentially introducing instabilities and inefficiencies. We present a new penalty method for pseudospectral evolutions of second order in space wave equations. The penalties are constructed as functions of Legendre polynomials and are added to the equations of motion everywhere, not only on the boundaries. Using energy methods, we prove semidiscrete stability of the new method for the scalar wave equation in flat space and show how it can be applied to the scalar wave on a curved background. Numerical results demonstrating stability and convergence for multidomain second-order scalar wave evolutions are also presented. This work provides a foundation for treating Einstein's equations directly in second-order form by spectral methods.

  16. Linear and nonlinear second-order polarizabilities of hemispherical and sector-shaped metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabalan, J.; Singh, Manoranjan P.; Banerjee, Arup; Rustagi, K. C.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of calculations of linear and second-order nonlinear polarizabilities of sector-shaped metallic nanoparticles (hemisphere is a special case) using free electron theory. The dependences of the ground state electron density distribution and polarizabilities on various shape parameters of sector are analyzed. The ground state electron densities near the corners and edges of sector-shaped nanoparticle are very low and do not contribute to the linear and second-order polarizabilities. The second-order polarizability is found to depend strongly on the angle of the sector and is shown to be proportional to the product of an appropriately defined asymmetric volume of the particle and the third power of the electron cloud length.

  17. A Quasi-Lie Schemes Approach to Second-Order Gambier Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, José F.; Guha, Partha; de Lucas, Javier

    2013-03-01

    A quasi-Lie scheme is a geometric structure that provides t-dependent changes of variables transforming members of an associated family of systems of first-order differential equations into members of the same family. In this note we introduce two quasi-Lie schemes for studying second-order Gambier equations in a geometric way. This allows us to study the transformation of these equations into simpler canonical forms, which solves a gap in the previous literature, and other relevant differential equations, which leads to derive new constants of motion for families of second-order Gambier equations. Additionally, we describe general solutions of certain second-order Gambier equations in terms of particular solutions of Riccati equations, linear systems, and t-dependent frequency harmonic oscillators.

  18. CP: AN INVESTIGATION OF COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO VARIOUS STIMULI

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-23

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  19. Microwave kinetic spectroscopy of reaction intermediates: O+ethylene reaction at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yasuki; Tsuchiya, Soji; Yamada, Chikashi; Hirota, Eizi; Koda, Seiichiro

    1986-10-01

    A microwave spectroscopic method has been developed to study elementary reactions in real time through in situ observation of rotational spectra of reaction intermediates such as free radicals with lifetime as short as 1 ms. This method was applied to the O(3P)+ethylene reaction in order to assess the roles of (a) vinoxy+H and (b) CH3+CHO channels in the initial process. The reaction was initiated by irradiating an N2O/C2H4 mixture containing a trace amount of mercury with the 253.7 nm mercury resonance line, and the time evolution of vinoxy, HCO, and H2CO was followed by measuring their microwave absorption intensities as functions of time. The branching ratio was thus determined to be 0.4±0.1 and 0.5±0.1 for (a) and (b), respectively, at the sample pressure of 30 mTorr. The present result agrees with those obtained by Hunziker et al. [J. Photochem. 17, 377 (1981)] using much higher pressures of samples, but is not compatible with the observation of Buss et al. [J. Photochem. 17, 389 (1981)] that (a) is dominant in collision-free conditions.

  20. Kinetic and thermochemical studies of the ClO + ClO + M ↔ Cl2O2 + M reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferracci, V.; Rowley, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    Chlorine monoxide (ClO) radicals play a crucial role in polar ozone destruction events and the ClO dimer cycle has been identified as one of the most effective ozone-depleting catalytic cycles operating in the polar winter. A recent paper by von Hobe et al.1 highlighted significant inconsistencies between laboratory results, theoretical calculations and field observations concerning the ClO dimer ozone destruction cycle. This work has investigated the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constant of one of the key reactions in this cycle, ClO + ClO + M ↔ Cl2O2 + M (1, -1), by means of laser flash photolysis coupled with time-resolved UV absorption spectroscopy. ClO radicals were generated via laser flash photolysis of Cl2/Cl2O mixtures in synthetic air. The concentration of radicals was monitored via UV absorption spectroscopy: the use of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detector allowed time resolution over a broad range of wavelengths. The equilibrium constant Keq was determined as the ratio of the rate constants of the forward and reverse reaction (1, -1) over the T range 256 - 312 K. Second Law and Third Law analytical methods were employed to determine the standard enthalpy and entropy changes of reaction 1, ΔrH° and ΔrS°, from the measured equilibrium constants. The values obtained from the Second Law analysis (ΔrH° = - 80.8 ± 2.2 kJ mol-1; ΔrS° = - 168.4 ± 7.9 J K-1 mol-1) are in good agreement with previous work 2 but greater in magnitude than current NASA recommendations 3. It was also found that, under typical laboratory conditions employed in this work, [ClO] decay exhibits pure second order kinetics at T ≤ 250 K. A higher rate constant for the ClO recombination reaction (1) was also observed in this work (compared to the NASA evaluation 3), implying a higher Keq and a different partitioning between ClO and Cl2O2, shifting towards the dimer. 1. M. Von Hobe, R. J. Salawitch, T. Canty, H. Keller-Rudek, G. K. Moortgat, J.-U. Grooss, R. M

  1. Second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations for control-structure interaction simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Alvin, Kenneth F.

    1991-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous, second-order linear structural dynamics equations is introduced in order to derive a corresponding form of first-order Kalman filtering equations (KFE). Time integration of the resulting first-order KFE is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete KFE involving only symmetric, N x N solution matrix.

  2. Effective second-order susceptibility in photonic crystals mode of centrosymmetric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel, A.; Kotler, Z.; Sfez, B.

    2002-02-01

    A technique for obtaining efficient bulk second-order susceptibility in noncentrosymmetric photonic crystals (PC) made of centrosymmetric materials is discussed. The effect is based on the electric quadrupole effect, strong electromagnetic mode deformation, and nonhomogeneous contribution to volume polarization from different parts of the PC. The required symmetry breaking is introduced on the macroscale of the PC unit cell. The obtained structural χ(2)str is comparable with the second-order susceptibility of ordinary nonlinear materials. Phase matching can be achieved by introducing symmetry modulation (quasi-phase-matching) during fabrication of the PC.

  3. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: I. Main result

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We present the galaxy number overdensity up to second order in redshift space on cosmological scales for a concordance model. The result contains all general relativistic effects up to second order that arise from observing on the past light cone, including all redshift effects, lensing distortions from convergence and shear, and contributions from velocities, Sachs-Wolfe, integrated SW and time-delay terms. This result will be important for accurate calculation of the bias on estimates of non-Gaussianity and on precision parameter estimates, introduced by nonlinear projection effects.

  4. First- and second-order backscattering from clouds illuminated by finite beams.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Browell, E V

    1972-06-01

    Calculations have been carried out for first- and second-order backscattering from water clouds illuminated by a continuous 0.9-micro beam with a finite divergence angle. In the single-scattering calculations several cloud types were used, while only an approximation to fair weather cumulus clouds was used for double scattering. It was found that the intensity and hence the reflectivity varied with the transceiver-cloud distance for both orders of scattering. Second-order backscattering also varied with field of view. From these results a criterion is suggested for determining when the plane parallel atmosphere theories can be used with finite beams.

  5. Second order correction in cavity constitutive parameter measurements with application to anisotropic ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. L.; Thompson, M. C.; Robbins, T. S.

    1990-03-01

    An analysis is presented to calculate scalar permittivity and tensor permeability for ferrite materials from waveguide transmission cavity data. A correct measurement of the permittivity of ferrites and other high dielectric constant materials, requires an extension of current techniques to a second-order perturbational analysis. This second-order correction offsets an apparent frequency dependent dielectric behavior measured during a multimode cavity measurement. The analysis implies that dimensions of ferrite samples to be used in various waveguides (X-Ka bands) must be reduced to a near 0.015-in. cross-sections to eliminate a coupling of permittivity and permeability measurements.

  6. Robust controller designs for second-order dynamic system: A virtual passive approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh

    1990-01-01

    A robust controller design is presented for second-order dynamic systems. The controller is model-independent and itself is a virtual second-order dynamic system. Conditions on actuator and sensor placements are identified for controller designs that guarantee overall closed-loop stability. The dynamic controller can be viewed as a virtual passive damping system that serves to stabilize the actual dynamic system. The control gains are interpreted as virtual mass, spring, and dashpot elements that play the same roles as actual physical elements in stability analysis. Position, velocity, and acceleration feedback are considered. Simple examples are provided to illustrate the physical meaning of this controller design.

  7. Anti-Stokes luminescence in the light of second order perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Rupak Pal, Bipul Bansal, Bhavtosh

    2014-11-10

    Anti-Stokes photoluminescence is measured in high-quality GaAs quantum wells. The primary pathway for interband optical absorption and hence emission under subbandgap photoexcitation is the optical phonon-mediated second-order electric dipole transition. This conclusion is drawn from the remarkable agreement between predictions of second-order perturbation calculation and the measured intensity of anti-Stokes photoluminescence, both as function of the detuning wavelength and temperature. The results are of direct relevance to laser cooling of solids where phonon-assisted upconversion is a necessary condition.

  8. Second-order infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabitov, I Kh

    2014-12-31

    We study infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles. We begin by considering the minimal possible smoothness class C{sup 1} both for surfaces and for deformation fields. Conditions are formulated for a given harmonic of a first-order infinitesimal bending to be extendable into a second order infinitesimal bending. We finish by stating a criterion for nonrigidity of second order for closed surfaces of revolution in the analytic class. We also give the first concrete example of such a nonrigid surface. Bibliography: 15 entries.

  9. Observation of a motional Stark effect to determine the second-order Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Hagel, G; Battesti, R; Nez, F; Julien, L; Biraben, F

    2002-11-11

    The high resolution two-photon spectroscopy of hydrogen is often limited by the second-order Doppler effect. To determine this effect, we apply a magnetic field perpendicular to the atomic beam. This field induces a quadratic motional Stark shift proportional, as the second-order Doppler effect, to v(2) (v atomic velocity). For some magnetic field, these two effects are opposite and the total shift due to the atomic velocity is reduced. We present the first observation of this effect for the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen.

  10. First- and second-order error estimates in Monte Carlo integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakx, R.; Kleiss, R. H. P.; Versteegen, F.

    2016-11-01

    In Monte Carlo integration an accurate and reliable determination of the numerical integration error is essential. We point out the need for an independent estimate of the error on this error, for which we present an unbiased estimator. In contrast to the usual (first-order) error estimator, this second-order estimator can be shown to be not necessarily positive in an actual Monte Carlo computation. We propose an alternative and indicate how this can be computed in linear time without risk of large rounding errors. In addition, we comment on the relatively very slow convergence of the second-order error estimate.

  11. Imaging of biological tissues with pixel-level analysis of second-order susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Po-Sheng; Ghazaryan, Ara; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Yang-Fang; Kim, Chang-Seok; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the recent advances in the development and applications of second-order susceptibility as a contrast mechanism in optical microscopy for biological tissues. We review nonlinear optical methods and approaches for differentiation of tissue structures and discrimination of normal and pathological skin tissues, which have been demonstrated for the potential use in clinical diagnosis. In addition, the potential of second-order susceptibility imaging, encompassing applications in differentiating various types of collagen molecules for clinical diagnosis, is demonstrated. Finally, we discuss future development and application of this technique.

  12. Approximate Controllability of Second-Order Stochastic Differential Equations with Impulsive Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, Rathinasamy; Ren, Yong; Mahmudov, N. I.

    Many practical systems in physical and biological sciences have impulsive dynamical behaviors during the evolution process which can be modeled by impulsive differential equations. In this paper, the approximate controllability of nonlinear second-order stochastic infinite-dimensional dynamical systems with impulsive effects is considered. By using the Holder's inequality, stochastic analysis and fixed point strategy, a new set of necessary and sufficient conditions are formulated which guarantees the approximate controllability of the nonlinear second-order stochastic system. The results are obtained under the assumption that the associated linear system is approximately controllable.

  13. Ambient temperature normalization for infrared face recognition based on the second-order polynomial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengzi

    2015-08-01

    The influence of ambient temperature is a big challenge to robust infrared face recognition. This paper proposes a new ambient temperature normalization algorithm to improve the performance of infrared face recognition under variable ambient temperatures. Based on statistical regression theory, a second order polynomial model is learned to describe the ambient temperature's impact on infrared face image. Then, infrared image was normalized to reference ambient temperature by the second order polynomial model. Finally, this normalization method is applied to infrared face recognition to verify its efficiency. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed temperature normalization method is feasible and can significantly improve the robustness of infrared face recognition.

  14. Second order nonlinear optical properties of In-doped lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, D.; Betzler, K.; Hesse, H.

    2001-01-01

    Second order nonlinear optical properties of In-doped lithium niobate crystals have been quantitatively studied from the chemical bond viewpoint. The results show that the second order nonlinear optical response of In-doped lithium niobate crystals at 1079 nm decreases remarkably with increasing In concentration in the crystal. This approximately linear composition-property correlation in In-doped lithium niobate crystals is quantitatively expressed in the current work. Furthermore, the different influences of Mg, Zn, and In dopants, respectively, on the nonlinear susceptibility of lithium niobate single crystals are also compared in the present work.

  15. Semi analytical solution of second order fuzzy Riccati equation by homotopy perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameel, A. F.; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md

    2014-07-01

    In this work, the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) is formulated to find a semi-analytical solution of the Fuzzy Initial Value Problem (FIVP) involving nonlinear second order Riccati equation. This method is based upon homotopy perturbation theory. This method allows for the solution of the differential equation to be calculated in the form of an infinite series in which the components can be easily calculated. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated by solving nonlinear second order fuzzy Riccati equation. The results indicate that the method is very effective and simple to apply.

  16. Robust controller designs for second-order dynamic systems - A virtual passive approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh

    1991-01-01

    A robust controller design is presented for second-order dynamic systems. The controller is model-independent and itself is a virtual second-order dynamic system. Conditions on actuator and sensor placements are identified for controller designs that guarantee overall closed-loop stability. The dynamic controller can be viewed as a virtual passive damping system that serves to stabilize the actual dynamic system. The control gians are interpreted as virtual mass, spring, and dashpot elements that play the same roles as actual physical elements in stability analysis. Position, velocity, and acceleration feedback are considered. Simple examples are provided to illustrate the physical meaning of this controller design.

  17. Three-dimensional direct femtosecond laser writing of second-order nonlinearities in glass.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyeon; Bellec, Matthieu; Royon, Arnaud; Bourhis, Kevin; Papon, Gautier; Cardinal, Thierry; Canioni, Lionel; Richardson, Martin

    2012-03-15

    We demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser writing in silver-containing zinc and gallium phosphate glass enables generation of three-dimensional (3D) optical second-order nonlinear microstructures having an χ(2) value about 2.5 times that of quartz. The proposed physical model involves photo-reduction, photo-dissociation, and migration of silver species within the glass matrix. 3D laser-written second-order nonlinear structures could become a new class of nonlinear optical components. PMID:22446213

  18. Reaction kinetic parameters for ion transport from steady-state current-voltage curves.

    PubMed Central

    Gradmann, D; Klieber, H G; Hansen, U P

    1987-01-01

    This study demonstrates possible ways to estimate the rate constants of reaction kinetic models for ion transport from steady-state current-voltage data as measured at various substrate concentrations. This issue is treated theoretically by algebraic reduction and extension of a reaction kinetic four-state model for uniport. Furthermore, an example for application is given; current-voltage data from an open K+ selective channel (Schroeder, J.I., R. Hedrich, and J.M. Fernandez, 1984, Nature (Lond.), 312:361-362) supplemented by some new data have been evaluated. The analysis yields absolute numerical estimates of the 14 rate constants of a six-state model, which is discussed in a wider context. PMID:2437973

  19. Chemo-Marangoni convection driven by an interfacial reaction: Pattern formation and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, K.; Acker, M.; Tadmouri, R.; Pimienta, V.

    2012-09-01

    A combined study devoted to chemo-Marangoni convection and the underlying kinetics is presented for a biphasic system in which surfactants are produced in situ by an interfacial reaction. The pattern formation studied in a Hele-Shaw cell in both microgravity and terrestrial environments initially shows an ensemble of chemo-Marangoni cells along a nearly planar interface. Soon, a crossover occurs to periodic large-scale interfacial deformations which coexist with the Marangoni cells. This crossover can be correlated with the autocatalytic nature of the interfacial reaction identified in the kinetic studies. The drastic increase in the product concentration is associated with an enhanced aggregate-assisted transfer after the critical micellar concentration is approached. In this context, it was possible to conclusively explain the changes in the periodicity of the interfacial deformations depending on the reactant concentration ratio.

  20. Kinetics of the Reaction of O((sup 3)P) with CF3NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, R. P.; Nicovich, J. M.; Cronkhite, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reaction of O((sup 3)P) with CF3NO (k(2)) as a function of temperature. Our results are described by the Arrhenius expression k(2)(T) = (4.54 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -l2)exp[(-560 +/- 46)/T] cu cm/molecule.s (243 K is less than or equal to T is less than or equal to 424 K); errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The O((sup 3)P) + CF3NO reaction is sufficiently rapid that CF3NO cannot be employed as a selective quencher for O2(alpha(1) Delta-g) in laboratory systems where O((sup 3)P) and O2(alpha 1 Delta g) coexist, and where O((sup 3)P) kinetics are being investigated.

  1. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer

    The central feature of the Combustion Chemistry project at LLNL is the development, validation, and application of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of hydrocarbon and other types of chemical fuels. For the past 30 years, LLNL's Chemical Sciences Division has built hydrocarbon mechanisms for fuels from hydrogen and methane through much larger fuels including heptanes and octanes. Other classes of fuels for which models have been developed include flame suppressants such as halons and organophosphates, and air pollutants such as soot and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur. Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  2. Chemo-Marangoni convection driven by an interfacial reaction: pattern formation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Eckert, K; Acker, M; Tadmouri, R; Pimienta, V

    2012-09-01

    A combined study devoted to chemo-Marangoni convection and the underlying kinetics is presented for a biphasic system in which surfactants are produced in situ by an interfacial reaction. The pattern formation studied in a Hele-Shaw cell in both microgravity and terrestrial environments initially shows an ensemble of chemo-Marangoni cells along a nearly planar interface. Soon, a crossover occurs to periodic large-scale interfacial deformations which coexist with the Marangoni cells. This crossover can be correlated with the autocatalytic nature of the interfacial reaction identified in the kinetic studies. The drastic increase in the product concentration is associated with an enhanced aggregate-assisted transfer after the critical micellar concentration is approached. In this context, it was possible to conclusively explain the changes in the periodicity of the interfacial deformations depending on the reactant concentration ratio.

  3. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of the Tetrathionate-Hypochlorous Acid Reaction in Nearly Neutral Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Dénes; Horváth, Attila K.

    2009-11-01

    The tetrathionate-hypochlorous acid reaction has been investigated in nearly neutral medium at I = 0.5 M ionic strength and T = 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in dihydrogen-phosphate-hydrogen-phosphate buffer by UV-vis spectrophotometry. In excess of hypochlorous acid, the stoichiometry was found to be S4O62- + 7HOCl + 3H2O → 4SO42- + 7Cl- + 13H+, but in excess of tetrathionate colloidal sulfur precipitates. On the basis of the simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, a nine-step kinetic model with four fitted and five fixed rate coefficients is proposed. Analogous oxidation reactions of tetrathionate are also compared and discussed.

  4. Application of an independent parallel reactions model on the annealing kinetics of BEPO irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasithiotakis, Michael; Marsden, Barry J.; James Marrow, T.

    2012-08-01

    Stored energy release rates have been determined for neutron irradiated graphite samples machined from an early air-cooled nuclear reactor (British Experimental Pile Zero or BEPO). The rate of release of stored energy was measured for both isothermal and linear rise heating rate differential scanning calorimetry experiments. The rate of release data were analysed using a thermal kinetics, independent parallel reactions model. The effect of annealing on the graphite crystalline structure was evaluated by investigating changes to X-ray diffraction spectra. A correlation between the calculated crystallite size and stored energy release is presented. A method for calculating the kinetic parameters for the annealing reaction is proposed and tested against the data. The method shows excellent consistency for both the isothermal and linear heating rate experiments (with less than 3% standard deviation).

  5. Heterogeneous photocatalysis of real textile wastewater: evaluation of reaction kinetics and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Chittaranjan; Gupta, Ashok K; Pillai, Indu M Sasidharan

    2012-01-01

    Real textile wastewater collected from the cotton dyeing bath of a fabric dyeing and finishing plant was subjected to heterogeneous photocatalysis using Ag(+) doped TiO(2) under UV irradiation in a batch reactor. The photocatalysts were characterized by FESEM, XRD, EDS, FTIR, DRS and BET analyses. The kinetics of the reaction was also evaluated. Colour removal was more than 88%, 94% and 99%, respectively for undiluted, 2 times diluted and 5 times diluted wastewater with Ag(+) doped TiO(2) (2.5 g/L) after UV irradiation for 360 minutes. The COD removal for undiluted, 2 times diluted and 5 times diluted wastewater was 47%, 70% and 92%, respectively under similar conditions. The reaction followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood pseudo first order kinetic model and the data fitted well to polynomial regression analysis.

  6. Chemical reactions involved in penicillin allergy: kinetics and mechanism of penicillin aminolysis.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, A; Yamana, T; Miyamoto, E; Kiya, E

    1975-08-01

    In view of the fundamental importance of the reaction of penicillins with amino groups of proteins to the penicillin allergy, the aminolysis of benzylpenicillin by various amines was kinetically investigated. The formation rate constants, kamide, of benzylpenicilloylamides were determined at 35 degrees, 45 degrees and 60 degrees (mu equals 0.5), and found to obey the general rate law: kamide equals k1[amine] + k2[amine H+] [amine] + k3[amine]2 + k4[amine]aoh. All of the amines exhibited the unassisted nucleophilic rate constant, k1. The relative importance of the other kinetic terms depends on the basicity and the chemical structure of amines. The reaction mechanism of penicillin aminolysis was discussed. Bronsted relations for k1, k2 and k3, except for hydrazines, were satisfactory.

  7. Monte carlo simulations of enzyme reactions in two dimensions: fractal kinetics and spatial segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Hugues

    2002-01-01

    Conventional equations for enzyme kinetics are based on mass-action laws, that may fail in low-dimensional and disordered media such as biological membranes. We present Monte Carlo simulations of an isolated Michaelis-Menten enzyme reaction on two-dimensional lattices with varying obstacle densities, as models of biological membranes. The model predicts that, as a result of anomalous diffusion on these low-dimensional media, the kinetics are of the fractal type. Consequently, the conventional equations for enzyme kinetics fail to describe the reaction. In particular, we show that the quasi-stationary-state assumption can hardly be retained in these conditions. Moreover, the fractal characteristics of the kinetics are increasingly pronounced as obstacle density and initial substrate concentration increase. The simulations indicate that these two influences are mainly additive. Finally, the simulations show pronounced S-P segregation over the lattice at obstacle densities compatible with in vivo conditions. This phenomenon could be a source of spatial self organization in biological membranes. PMID:12324410

  8. Purification and characterization of Fab fragments with rapid reaction kinetics against myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyung-Nam; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myung Kyu; Paek, Se-Hwan; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2015-01-01

    Myoglobin is an early biomarker for acute myocardial infarction. Recently, we isolated the antibody IgG-Myo2-7ds, which exhibits unique rapid reaction kinetics toward human myoglobin antigen. Antibodies with rapid dissociation kinetics are thought to be premature IgG forms that are produced during the early stage of in vivo immunization. In the present study, we identified the epitope region of the IgG-Myo2-7ds antibody to be the C-terminal region of myoglobin, which corresponds to 144-154 aa. The Fab fragment was directly purified by papain cleavage and protein G affinity chromatography and demonstrated kinetics of an association constant of 4.02 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and a dissociation constant of 2.28 × 10(-2) s(-1), which retained the unique reaction kinetics of intact IgG-Myo2-7ds antibodies. Because a rapid dissociation antibody can be utilized for antibody recycling, the results from this study would provide a platform for the development of antibody engineering in potential diagnostic areas such as a continuous monitoring system for heart disease.

  9. Accelerating the Computation of Detailed Chemical Reaction Kinetics for Simulating Combustion of Complex Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W

    2012-01-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels has been a very challenging scientific and engineering problem due to the complexity of turbulent flows and hydrocarbon reaction kinetics. There is an urgent need to develop an efficient modeling capability to accurately predict the combustion of complex fuels. Detailed chemical kinetic models for the surrogates of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and JP-8 consist of thousands of chemical species and Arrhenius reaction steps. Oxygenated fuels such as bio-fuels and heavier hydrocarbons, such as from newer fossil fuel sources, are expected to have a much more complex chemistry requiring increasingly larger chemical kinetic models. Such models are beyond current computational capability, except for homogeneous or partially stirred reactor type calculations. The advent of highly parallel multi-core processors and graphical processing units (GPUs) promises a steep increase in computational performance in the coming years. This paper will present a software framework that translates the detailed chemical kinetic models to high- performance code targeted for GPU accelerators.

  10. Kinetics of the initial reaction of nitrite ion in bisulfite solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, S.B.; Markowitz, S.S.; Novakov, T.; Chang, S.G.

    1982-12-09

    The kinetics of the reaction of nitrite ion in bisulfite solutions to form hydroxylaminedisulfonate have been investigated. Evidence has been presented that nitrososulfonic acid is the probable intermediate in this reaction and that it can undergo sulfonation or hydrolysis reactions. The hydrolysis reaction yields N/sub 2/O under the present conditions of study (acid solutions), which complicates the determination of the rate of formation of hydroxylaminedisulfonate. The ratio of the rate constants for sulfonation and hydrolysis (k/sub A//k/sub B/) is 1.7 +- 0.5. The previously determined rate law for the formation of the disulfonate has been verified, although one term has been shown to be absent when phthalate, oxalate, or tartrate buffer systems are used to maintain the desired acidity.

  11. The filamentary structure of mixing fronts and its control on reaction kinetics in porous media flows

    SciTech Connect

    de Anna, Pietro; Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2014-07-08

    We investigate the effective kinetics of a reaction front for mixing limited bimolecular reaction $A+B\\rightarrow C$ in a porous medium. While Fickian diffusion predicts a scaling of the cumulative mass produced as $M_C \\propto t^{1/2}$, we observe two time regimes in which the total product mass evolves faster then $t^{1/2}$. At early times the invading solute is organized in fingers of high velocity. Reactions take place only at the fingers boundaries whose surface grows linearly in time. We show that this configuration leads to a mass scaling $M_C \\propto t^2$. When diffusion mixes reactants and destroy these finger structures, the effective reaction rate slows down and we relate it to the longitudinal advective spreading providing $M_C \\propto \\sigma_x$. The transition time between these two regimes is characterized by the diffusion time over the transverse fingers cross section.

  12. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  13. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, Stephan Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  14. Theoretical study on the mechanism and kinetics of acetaldehyde and hydroperoxyl radical: An important atmospheric reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnia, Solaleh; Vahedpour, Morteza; Abedi, Mostafa; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-09-01

    A systematic theoretical study was performed on the mechanism and kinetics of the atmospheric reaction of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the gas phase. The DFT-B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) methods were employed for calculations. Based on the calculations, this reaction leads to four different products through radical addition and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms which are very important in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The favorable reaction paths begin with α-hydroxyethylperoxy radical, CH3CH(OO)OH, in a exothermic process and finally leads to the product P1 (CH3COOH + OH). The overall rate constants for favorite reaction paths have been calculated at different temperatures (200-2500 K).

  15. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase 2: Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M. B.; Isbell, R. E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions.

  16. A temperature dependent kinetic study of the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with CH2Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Saini, Rameshwar D.; Kurylo, Michael; Huie, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Rate constants have been measured for the gas phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with CH3Br over the temperature range 250 to 400 K. The Arrhenius expression k = (5.79 x 10 exp -12) exp(-1560/T) cu cm/molecule per sec was derived from the kinetic data. From the rate constant at 277 K, the tropospheric lifetime of CH3Br with respect to reaction with OH is estimated to be 2.2 years and the overall atmospheric lifetime to be 2.1 years.

  17. Investigation of reaction kinetics and interfacial phase formation in Ti3Al + Nb composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawner, F. E.; Gundel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Titanium aluminide metal matrix composites are prominent materials systems being considered for high temperature aerospace applications. One of the major problems with this material is the reactivity between existing reinforcements and the matrix after prolonged thermal exposure. This paper presents results from an investigation of reaction kinetics between Ti-14Al-21Nb (wt pct) and SCS-6 fibers and SiC fibers with surface coatings of TiB2, TiC, TiN, W, and Si. Microstructural evaluation of the reaction layers as well as matrix regions around the fibers is presented.

  18. Kinetics of the reactions of alkyl radicals with HBr and DBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Van Dijk, C. A.; Kreutter, K. D.; Wine, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions CH3 + HBr, CD3 + HBr, CH3 + DBr, C2H5 + HBr, C2H5 + DBr, t-C4H9 + HBr, and t-C4H9 + DBr is studied as a function of temperature (257-430 K) and pressure (10-300 Torr of N2). Time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of Br atom appearance following laser flash photolysis of RI was used in the experiments. Results show that the rates of all reactions increased as the temperature decreased.

  19. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  20. Reactions of plutonium and uranium with water: Kinetics and potential hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    The chemistry and kinetics of reactions between water and the metals and hydrides of plutonium and uranium are described in an effort to consolidate information for assessing potential hazards associated with handling and storage. New experimental results and data from literature sources are presented. Kinetic dependencies on pH, salt concentration, temperature and other parameters are reviewed. Corrosion reactions of the metals in near-neutral solutions produce a fine hydridic powder plus hydrogen. The corrosion rate for plutonium in sea water is a thousand-fold faster than for the metal in distilled water and more than a thousand-fold faster than for uranium in sea water. Reaction rates for immersed hydrides of plutonium and uranium are comparable and slower than the corrosion rates for the respective metals. However, uranium trihydride is reported to react violently if a quantity greater than twenty-five grams is rapidly immersed in water. The possibility of a similar autothermic reaction for large quantities of plutonium hydride cannot be excluded. In addition to producing hydrogen, corrosion reactions convert the massive metals into material forms that are readily suspended in water and that are aerosolizable and potentially pyrophoric when dry. Potential hazards associated with criticality, environmental dispersal, spontaneous ignition and explosive gas mixtures are outlined.