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Sample records for second-order tensor fields

  1. Visualizing second order tensor fields with hyperstreamlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delmarcelle, Thierry; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1993-01-01

    Hyperstreamlines are a generalization to second order tensor fields of the conventional streamlines used in vector field visualization. As opposed to point icons commonly used in visualizing tensor fields, hyperstreamlines form a continuous representation of the complete tensor information along a three-dimensional path. This technique is useful in visulaizing both symmetric and unsymmetric three-dimensional tensor data. Several examples of tensor field visualization in solid materials and fluid flows are provided.

  2. Visualization of second order tensor fields and matrix data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delmarcelle, Thierry; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    We present a study of the visualization of 3-D second order tensor fields and matrix data. The general problem of visualizing unsymmetric real or complex Hermitian second order tensor fields can be reduced to the simultaneous visualization of a real and symmetric second order tensor field and a real vector field. As opposed to the discrete iconic techniques commonly used in multivariate data visualization, the emphasis is on exploiting the mathematical properties of tensor fields in order to facilitate their visualization and to produce a continuous representation of the data. We focus on interactively sensing and exploring real and symmetric second order tensor data by generalizing the vector notion of streamline to the tensor concept of hyperstreamline. We stress the importance of a structural analysis of the data field analogous to the techniques of vector field topology extraction in order to obtain a unique and objective representation of second order tensor fields.

  3. The most general second-order field equations of bi-scalar-tensor theory in four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Seiju; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2015-07-01

    The Horndeski theory is known as the most general scalar-tensor theory with second-order field equations. In this paper, we explore the bi-scalar extension of the Horndeski theory. Following Horndeski's approach, we determine all the possible terms appearing in the second-order field equations of the bi-scalar-tensor theory. We compare the field equations with those of the generalized multi-Galileons, and confirm that our theory contains new terms that are not included in the latter theory. We also discuss the construction of the Lagrangian leading to our most general field equations.

  4. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  5. Parallel second-order tensors on Vaisman manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Cornelia Livia; Crasmareanu, Mircea

    The aim of this paper is to study the class of parallel tensor fields α of (0, 2)-type in a Vaisman geometry (M,J,g). A sufficient condition for the reduction of such symmetric tensors α to a constant multiple of g is given by the skew-symmetry of α with respect to the complex structure J. As an application of the main result, we prove that certain vector fields on a P0K-manifold turn out to be Killing. Also, we connect our main result with the Weyl connection of conformal geometry as well as with possible Ricci solitons in P0K manifolds.

  6. Spherical integral transforms of second-order gravitational tensor components onto third-order gravitational tensor components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    New spherical integral formulas between components of the second- and third-order gravitational tensors are formulated in this article. First, we review the nomenclature and basic properties of the second- and third-order gravitational tensors. Initial points of mathematical derivations, i.e., the second- and third-order differential operators defined in the spherical local North-oriented reference frame and the analytical solutions of the gradiometric boundary-value problem, are also summarized. Secondly, we apply the third-order differential operators to the analytical solutions of the gradiometric boundary-value problem which gives 30 new integral formulas transforming (1) vertical-vertical, (2) vertical-horizontal and (3) horizontal-horizontal second-order gravitational tensor components onto their third-order counterparts. Using spherical polar coordinates related sub-integral kernels can efficiently be decomposed into azimuthal and isotropic parts. Both spectral and closed forms of the isotropic kernels are provided and their limits are investigated. Thirdly, numerical experiments are performed to test the consistency of the new integral transforms and to investigate properties of the sub-integral kernels. The new mathematical apparatus is valid for any harmonic potential field and may be exploited, e.g., when gravitational/magnetic second- and third-order tensor components become available in the future. The new integral formulas also extend the well-known Meissl diagram and enrich the theoretical apparatus of geodesy.

  7. Variational principles for multisymplectic second-order classical field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Martínez, Pedro Daniel; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2015-06-01

    We state a unified geometrical version of the variational principles for second-order classical field theories. The standard Lagrangian and Hamiltonian variational principles and the corresponding field equations are recovered from this unified framework.

  8. Constraints on general second-order scalar-tensor models from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rampei; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate that the general second-order scalar-tensor theories, which have attracted attention as possible modified gravity models to explain the late time cosmic acceleration, could be strongly constrained from the argument of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation. To this end, we consider the purely kinetic coupled gravity and the extended galileon model on a cosmological background. In these models, the propagation speed of tensor mode could be less than the speed of light, which puts very strong constraints from the gravitational Cherenkov radiation.

  9. Low-energy theory for strained graphene: an approach up to second-order in the strain tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Leyva, Maurice; Wang, Chumin

    2017-04-01

    An analytical study of low-energy electronic excited states in uniformly strained graphene is carried out up to second-order in the strain tensor. We report a new effective Dirac Hamiltonian with an anisotropic Fermi velocity tensor, which reveals the graphene trigonal symmetry being absent in first-order low-energy theories. In particular, we demonstrate the dependence of the Dirac-cone elliptical deformation on the stretching direction with respect to graphene lattice orientation. We further analytically calculate the optical conductivity tensor of strained graphene and its transmittance for a linearly polarized light with normal incidence. Finally, the obtained analytical expression of the Dirac point shift allows a better determination and understanding of pseudomagnetic fields induced by nonuniform strains.

  10. Low-energy theory for strained graphene: an approach up to second-order in the strain tensor.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Leyva, Maurice; Wang, Chumin

    2017-04-26

    An analytical study of low-energy electronic excited states in uniformly strained graphene is carried out up to second-order in the strain tensor. We report a new effective Dirac Hamiltonian with an anisotropic Fermi velocity tensor, which reveals the graphene trigonal symmetry being absent in first-order low-energy theories. In particular, we demonstrate the dependence of the Dirac-cone elliptical deformation on the stretching direction with respect to graphene lattice orientation. We further analytically calculate the optical conductivity tensor of strained graphene and its transmittance for a linearly polarized light with normal incidence. Finally, the obtained analytical expression of the Dirac point shift allows a better determination and understanding of pseudomagnetic fields induced by nonuniform strains.

  11. Vector and tensor contributions to the curvature perturbation at second order

    SciTech Connect

    Carrilho, Pedro; Malik, Karim A. E-mail: k.malik@qmul.ac.uk

    2016-02-01

    We derive the evolution equation for the second order curvature perturbation using standard techniques of cosmological perturbation theory. We do this for different definitions of the gauge invariant curvature perturbation, arising from different splits of the spatial metric, and compare the expressions. The results are valid at all scales and include all contributions from scalar, vector and tensor perturbations, as well as anisotropic stress, with all our results written purely in terms of gauge invariant quantities. Taking the large-scale approximation, we find that a conserved quantity exists only if, in addition to the non-adiabatic pressure, the transverse traceless part of the anisotropic stress tensor is also negligible. We also find that the version of the gauge invariant curvature perturbation which is exactly conserved is the one defined with the determinant of the spatial part of the inverse metric.

  12. Second order higher-derivative corrections in Double Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescano, Eric; Marqués, Diego

    2017-06-01

    HSZ Double Field Theory is a higher-derivative theory of gravity with exact and manifest T-duality symmetry. The first order corrections in the massless sector were shown to be governed solely by Chern-Simons deformations of the three-form field strength. We compute the full action with up to six derivatives O({α}^' 2}) for the universal sector containing the metric, two-form and dilaton fields. The Green-Schwarz transformation of the two-form field remains uncorrected to second order. In addition to the expected Chern-Simons-squared and Riemann-cubed terms the theory contains a cubic Gauss-Bonnet interaction, plus other six-derivative unambiguous terms involving the three-form field strength whose presence indicates that the theory must contain further higher-derivative corrections.

  13. Slowly rotating scalar field wormholes: The second order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, S. V.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss rotating wormholes in general relativity with a scalar field with negative kinetic energy. To solve the problem, we use the assumption about slow rotation. The role of a small dimensionless parameter plays the ratio of the linear velocity of rotation of the wormhole's throat and the velocity of light. We construct the rotating wormhole solution in the second-order approximation with respect to the small parameter. The analysis shows that the asymptotical mass of the rotating wormhole is greater than that of the nonrotating one, and the null energy condition violation in the rotating wormhole spacetime is weaker than that in the nonrotating one.

  14. Perturbations of matter fields in the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kouji

    2009-12-01

    To show that the general framework of the second-order gauge-invariant perturbation theory developed by K. Nakamura [Prog. Theor. Phys. 110, 723 (2003)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.110.723; Prog. Theor. Phys. 113, 481 (2005)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.113.481] is applicable to a wide class of cosmological situations, some formulas for the perturbations of the matter fields are summarized within the framework of the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory in a four-dimensional homogeneous isotropic universe, which is developed in Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 17 (2007)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.117.17. We derive the formulas for the perturbations of the energy-momentum tensors and equations of motion for a perfect fluid, an imperfect fluid, and a single scalar field, and show that all equations are derived in terms of gauge-invariant variables without any gauge fixing. Through these formulas, we may say that the decomposition formulas for the perturbations of any tensor field into gauge-invariant and gauge-variant parts, which are proposed in the above papers, are universal.

  15. Second-order spatial correlation in the far-field: Comparing entangled and classical light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Erfeng; Liu, Weitao; Lin, Huizu; Chen, Pingxing

    2016-02-01

    We consider second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field. The quantum theory of second-order spatial correlation is analyzed, and the role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. Meanwhile, the difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced.

  16. Gauge-invariant perturbations at second order: multiple scalar fields on large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Karim A.

    2005-11-01

    We derive the governing equations for multiple scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity in a flat Friedmann Robertson Walker background spacetime on large scales. We include scalar perturbations up to second order and write the equations in terms of physically transparent gauge-invariant variables at first and second order. This allows us to write the perturbed Klein Gordon equation at second order solely in terms of the field fluctuations on flat slices at first and second order.

  17. Bosonic and fermionic Weinberg-Joos (j,0) ⊕ (0,j) states of arbitrary spins as Lorentz tensors or tensor-spinors and second-order theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Acosta, E. G.; Banda Guzmán, V. M.; Kirchbach, M.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general method for the description of arbitrary single spin- j states transforming according to ( j, 0) ⊕ (0, j) carrier spaces of the Lorentz algebra in terms of Lorentz tensors for bosons, and tensor-spinors for fermions, and by means of second-order Lagrangians. The method allows to avoid the cumbersome matrix calculus and higher ∂2 j order wave equations inherent to the Weinberg-Joos approach. We start with reducible Lorentz tensor (tensor-spinor) representation spaces hosting one sole ( j, 0) ⊕ (0, j) irreducible sector and design there a representation reduction algorithm based on one of the Casimir invariants of the Lorentz algebra. This algorithm allows us to separate neatly the pure spin- j sector of interest from the rest, while preserving the separate Lorentz and Dirac indexes. However, the Lorentz invariants are momentum independent and do not provide wave equations. Genuine wave equations are obtained by conditioning the Lorentz tensors under consideration to satisfy the Klein-Gordon equation. In so doing, one always ends up with wave equations and associated Lagrangians that are of second order in the momenta. Specifically, a spin-3/2 particle transforming as (3/2, 0) ⊕ (0, 3/2) is comfortably described by a second-order Lagrangian in the basis of the totally anti-symmetric Lorentz tensor-spinor of second rank, Ψ [ μν]. Moreover, the particle is shown to propagate causally within an electromagnetic background. In our study of (3/2, 0) ⊕ (0, 3/2) as part of Ψ [ μν] we reproduce the electromagnetic multipole moments known from the Weinberg-Joos theory. We also find a Compton differential cross-section that satisfies unitarity in forward direction. The suggested tensor calculus presents itself very computer friendly with respect to the symbolic software FeynCalc.

  18. Quartic scaling second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles via tensor hypercontraction: THC-CC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenstein, Edward G.; Kokkila, Sara I. L.; Parrish, Robert M.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2013-03-01

    The second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles method (CC2) is a valuable tool in electronic structure theory. Although the density fitting approximation has been successful in extending CC2 to larger molecules, it cannot address the steep O(N^5) scaling with the number of basis functions, N. Here, we introduce the tensor hypercontraction (THC) approximation to CC2 (THC-CC2), which reduces the scaling to O(N^4) and the storage requirements to O(N^2). We present an algorithm to efficiently evaluate the THC-CC2 correlation energy and demonstrate its quartic scaling. This implementation of THC-CC2 uses a grid-based least-squares THC (LS-THC) approximation to the density-fitted electron repulsion integrals. The accuracy of the CC2 correlation energy under these approximations is shown to be suitable for most practical applications.

  19. The Topology of Symmetric Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Yingmei; Batra, Rajesh; Hesselink, Lambertus; Levy, Yuval

    1997-01-01

    Combinatorial topology, also known as "rubber sheet geometry", has extensive applications in geometry and analysis, many of which result from connections with the theory of differential equations. A link between topology and differential equations is vector fields. Recent developments in scientific visualization have shown that vector fields also play an important role in the analysis of second-order tensor fields. A second-order tensor field can be transformed into its eigensystem, namely, eigenvalues and their associated eigenvectors without loss of information content. Eigenvectors behave in a similar fashion to ordinary vectors with even simpler topological structures due to their sign indeterminacy. Incorporating information about eigenvectors and eigenvalues in a display technique known as hyperstreamlines reveals the structure of a tensor field. The simplify and often complex tensor field and to capture its important features, the tensor is decomposed into an isotopic tensor and a deviator. A tensor field and its deviator share the same set of eigenvectors, and therefore they have a similar topological structure. A a deviator determines the properties of a tensor field, while the isotopic part provides a uniform bias. Degenerate points are basic constituents of tensor fields. In 2-D tensor fields, there are only two types of degenerate points; while in 3-D, the degenerate points can be characterized in a Q'-R' plane. Compressible and incompressible flows share similar topological feature due to the similarity of their deviators. In the case of the deformation tensor, the singularities of its deviator represent the area of vortex core in the field. In turbulent flows, the similarities and differences of the topology of the deformation and the Reynolds stress tensors reveal that the basic addie-viscosity assuptions have their validity in turbulence modeling under certain conditions.

  20. Second-order solution for determining density and velocity fields of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramann, Mirt

    1993-01-01

    In this Letter, I use second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory to calculate an analytical expression relating density to velocity in a gravitating system. This solution can be used to compare peculiar velocity field measurements with observations of large-scale structure. The predictions of both linear theory and second-order theory are compared with the results of N-body simulations. While linear theory systematically overestimates the velocity flows in high-density regions, the second-order corrections calculated herein remove this systematic error.

  1. Modelling of the magnetic field effects in hydrodynamic codes using a second order tensorial diffusion scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breil, J.; Maire, P.-H.; Nicolaï, P.; Schurtz, G.

    2008-05-01

    In laser produced plasmas large self-generated magnetic fields have been measured. The classical formulas by Braginskii predict that magnetic fields induce a reduction of the magnitude of the heat flux and its rotation through the Righi-Leduc effect. In this paper a second order tensorial diffusion method used to correctly solve the Righi-Leduc effect in multidimensional code is presented.

  2. Spatial variances of wind fields and their relation to second-order structure functions and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelzang, Jur; King, Gregory P.; Stoffelen, Ad

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic energy variance as a function of spatial scale for wind fields is commonly estimated either using second-order structure functions (in the spatial domain) or by spectral analysis (in the frequency domain). Both techniques give an order-of-magnitude estimate. More accurate estimates are given by a statistic called spatial variance. Spatial variances have a clear interpretation and are tolerant for missing data. They can be related to second-order structure functions, both for discrete and continuous data. Spatial variances can also be Fourier transformed to yield a relation with spectra. The flexibility of spatial variances is used to study various sampling strategies, and to compare them with second-order structure functions and spectral variances. It is shown that the spectral sampling strategy is not seriously biased to calm conditions for scatterometer ocean surface vector winds. When the second-order structure function behaves like rp, its ratio with the spatial variance equals >(p+1>)>(p+2>). Ocean surface winds in the tropics have p between 2/3 and 1, so one-sixth to one-fifth of the second-order structure function value is a good proxy for the cumulative variance.

  3. Linearly first- and second-order, unconditionally energy stable schemes for the phase field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Han, Daozhi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a series of linear, unconditionally energy stable numerical schemes for solving the classical phase field crystal model. The temporal discretizations are based on the first order Euler method, the second order backward differentiation formulas (BDF2) and the second order Crank-Nicolson method, respectively. The schemes lead to linear elliptic equations to be solved at each time step, and the induced linear systems are symmetric positive definite. We prove that all three schemes are unconditionally energy stable rigorously. Various classical numerical experiments in 2D and 3D are performed to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed schemes.

  4. Second-order magnetic critical points at finite magnetic fields: Revisiting Arrott plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustingorry, S.; Pomiro, F.; Aurelio, G.; Curiale, J.

    2016-06-01

    The so-called Arrott plot, which consists in plotting H /M against M2, with H the applied magnetic field and M the magnetization, is used to extract valuable information in second-order magnetic phase transitions. Besides, it is widely accepted that a negative slope in the Arrott plot is indicative of a first-order magnetic transition. This is known as the Banerjee criterion. In consequence, the zero-field transition temperature T* is reported as the characteristic first-order transition temperature. By carefully analyzing the mean-field Landau model used for studying first-order magnetic transitions, we show in this work that T* corresponds in fact to a triple point where three first-order lines meet. More importantly, this analysis reveals the existence of two symmetrical second-order critical points at finite magnetic field (Tc,±Hc) . We then show that a modified Arrott plot can be used to obtain information about these second-order critical points. To support this idea we analyze experimental data on La2 /3Ca1 /3MnO3 and discuss an estimate for the location of the triple point and the second-order critical points.

  5. Primordial non-Gaussianities of gravitational waves in the most general single-field inflation model with second-order field equations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xian; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2011-11-18

    We completely clarify the feature of primordial non-Gaussianities of tensor perturbations in the most general single-field inflation model with second-order field equations. It is shown that the most general cubic action for the tensor perturbation h(ij) is composed only of two contributions, one with two spacial derivatives and the other with one time derivative on each h(ij). The former is essentially identical to the cubic term that appears in Einstein gravity and predicts a squeezed shape, while the latter newly appears in the presence of the kinetic coupling to the Einstein tensor and predicts an equilateral shape. Thus, only two shapes appear in the graviton bispectrum of the most general single-field inflation model, which could open a new clue to the identification of inflationary gravitational waves in observations of cosmic microwave background anisotropies as well as direct detection experiments.

  6. Second-order nonlinear susceptibility in quantum dot structure under applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M.; Noori, Farah T. Mohammed; Al-Khursan, Amin H.

    2015-06-01

    A model for quantum dot (QD) subbands, when the dots are in the form of quantum disks, under applied electric field was stated. Then, subbands of dots with different disk radii and heights were calculated under applied field. The competition between the shift due to confinement by field and the size was shown for subbands. Second-order nonlinear susceptibility in quantum dots (QDs) was derived using density matrix theory which is, then, simulated using the calculated subbands. Both interband (IB) and intersubband (ISB) transitions were discussed. High second-order susceptibility in QDs was predicted. The results show a reduction in the susceptibility with the applied field while the peak wavelength was mainly relates to energy difference between subbands. A good match between theory and laboratory experiments was observed. Laboratory experiments at terahertz region might be possible using valence intersubband which is important in many device applications.

  7. Structure-preserving second-order integration of relativistic charged particle trajectories in electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera, A. V.; Cary, J. R.

    2017-05-01

    Time-centered, hence second-order, methods for integrating the relativistic momentum of charged particles in an electromagnetic field are derived. A new method is found by averaging the momentum before use in the magnetic rotation term, and an implementation is presented that differs from the relativistic Boris Push only in the method for calculating the Lorentz factor. This is shown to have the same second-order accuracy in time as that found by splitting the electric acceleration and magnetic rotation (Boris Push) and that found by averaging the velocity in the magnetic rotation term (Vay's method) [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056701 (2008)]. All three methods are shown to conserve energy when there is no electric field. The Boris Push and the current method are shown to be volume-preserving, while Vay's method and the current method preserve the E →×B → velocity. Thus, of these second-order relativistic momentum integrations, only the integrator introduced here both preserves volume and gives the correct E →×B → velocity. While all methods have error that is second-order in time, they deviate from each other by terms that increase as the motion becomes relativistic. Numerical results show that Vay's method develops energy errors near resonant orbits of a test problem that neither volume-preserving integrator does.

  8. Second order nonlinearity in Si by inhomogeneous strain and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Jörg; Schriever, Clemens; Bianco, Federica; Cazzanelli, Massimo; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    The lack of a dipolar second order susceptibility (χ(2)) in silicon due to its centro-symmetric diamond lattice usually inhibits efficient second order nonlinear optical processes in the silicon bulk. Depositing stressed silicon nitride layers or growing a thermal oxide layer introduces an inhomogeneous strain into the silicon lattice and breaks the centro-symmetry of its crystal structure thereby creating a χ(2). This causes enhanced second harmonic generation and was observed in reflection and transmission measurements for wavelengths in the infrared. However strain is not the only means to break the structures symmetry. Fixed charges at the silicon nitride/silicon interface cause a high electric field close to the silicon interface which causes electric-field-induced-second-harmonic (EFISH) contributions too. The combination of both effects leads to χ(2) values which are estimated to be of the order as classic χ(2) materials like KDP or LiNiO3. This paves the way for the exploitation of other second order nonlinear processes in the area of silicon photonics and is an example how fundamental optical properties of materials can be altered by strain.

  9. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Generalized Active Space Self-Consistent-Field Wave Functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongxia; Li Manni, Giovanni; Olsen, Jeppe; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-07-12

    A multireference second-order perturbation theory approach based on the generalized active space self-consistent-field (GASSCF) wave function is presented. Compared with the complete active space (CAS) and restricted active space (RAS) wave functions, GAS wave functions are more flexible and can employ larger active spaces and/or different truncations of the configuration interaction expansion. With GASSCF, one can explore chemical systems that are not affordable with either CASSCF or RASSCF. Perturbation theory to second order on top of GAS wave functions (GASPT2) has been implemented to recover the remaining electron correlation. The method has been benchmarked by computing the chromium dimer ground-state potential energy curve. These calculations show that GASPT2 gives results similar to CASPT2 even with a configuration interaction expansion much smaller than the corresponding CAS expansion.

  10. Magnetizability and rotational g tensors for density fitted local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory using gauge-including atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Loibl, Stefan; Schütz, Martin

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we present theory and implementation of an efficient program for calculating magnetizabilities and rotational g tensors of closed-shell molecules at the level of local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) using London orbitals. Density fitting is employed to factorize the electron repulsion integrals with ordinary Gaussians as fitting functions. The presented program for the calculation of magnetizabilities and rotational g tensors is based on a previous implementation of NMR shielding tensors reported by S. Loibl and M. Schütz [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 084107 (2012)]. Extensive test calculations show (i) that the errors introduced by density fitting are negligible, and (ii) that the errors of the local approximation are still rather small, although larger than for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors. Electron correlation effects for magnetizabilities are tiny for most of the molecules considered here. MP2 appears to overestimate the correlation contribution of magnetizabilities such that it does not constitute an improvement over Hartree-Fock (when comparing to higher-order methods like CCSD(T)). For rotational g tensors the situation is different and MP2 provides a significant improvement in accuracy over Hartree-Fock. The computational performance of the new program was tested for two extended systems, the larger comprising about 2200 basis functions. It turns out that a magnetizability (or rotational g tensor) calculation takes about 1.5 times longer than a corresponding NMR shielding tensor calculation.

  11. Visualization of 3-D tensor fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, L.

    1996-01-01

    Second-order tensor fields have applications in many different areas of physics, such as general relativity and fluid mechanics. The wealth of multivariate information in tensor fields makes them more complex and abstract than scalar and vector fields. Visualization is a good technique for scientists to gain new insights from them. Visualizing a 3-D continuous tensor field is equivalent to simultaneously visualizing its three eigenvector fields. In the past, research has been conducted in the area of two-dimensional tensor fields. It was shown that degenerate points, defined as points where eigenvalues are equal to each other, are the basic singularities underlying the topology of tensor fields. Moreover, it was shown that eigenvectors never cross each other except at degenerate points. Since we live in a three-dimensional world, it is important for us to understand the underlying physics of this world. In this report, we describe a new method for locating degenerate points along with the conditions for classifying them in three-dimensional space. Finally, we discuss some topological features of three-dimensional tensor fields, and interpret topological patterns in terms of physical properties.

  12. Modeling of finite-amplitude sound beams: second order fields generated by a parametric loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Sha, Kan; Gan, Woon-Seng; Tian, Jing

    2005-04-01

    The nonlinear interaction of sound waves in air has been applied to sound reproduction for audio applications. A directional audible sound can be generated by amplitude-modulating the ultrasound carrier with an audio signal, then transmitting it from a parametric loudspeaker. This brings the need of a computationally efficient model to describe the propagation of finite-amplitude sound beams for the system design and optimization. A quasilinear analytical solution capable of fast numerical evaluation is presented for the second-order fields of the sum-, difference-frequency and second harmonic components. It is based on a virtual-complex-source approach, wherein the source field is treated as an aggregation of a set of complex virtual sources located in complex distance, then the corresponding fundamental sound field is reduced to the computation of sums of simple functions by exploiting the integrability of Gaussian functions. By this result, the five-dimensional integral expressions for the second-order sound fields are simplified to one-dimensional integrals. Furthermore, a substantial analytical reduction to sums of single integrals also is derived for an arbitrary source distribution when the basis functions are expressible as a sum of products of trigonometric functions. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by a comparison of numerical results with experimental data previously published for the rectangular ultrasonic transducer.

  13. The second-order theory of electromagnetic hot ion beam instabilities. [in interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Tokar, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the application of a second-order theory for electromagnetic instabilities in a collisionless plasma to two modes which resonate with hot ion beams. The application of the theory is strictly limited to the linear growth phase. However, the application of the theory may be extended to obtain a description of the beam at postsaturation if the wave-beam resonance is sufficiently broad in velocity space. Under the considered limitations, it is shown that, as in the cold beam case, the fluctuating fields do not gain appreciable momentum and that the primary exchange of momentum is between the beam and main component.

  14. Electric field effect on the second-order nonlinear optical properties in semiparabolic quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jian-Hui; Chen, Ni; Zhang, Yan; Mo, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hai

    2016-03-01

    Electric field effect on the second-order nonlinear optical properties in semiparabolic quantum wells are studied theoretically. Both the second-harmonic generation susceptibility and nonlinear optical rectification depend dramatically on the direction and the strength of the electric field. Numerical results show that both the second-harmonic generation susceptibility and nonlinear optical rectification are always weakened as the electric field increases where the direction of the electric field is along the growth direction of the quantum wells, which is in contrast to the conventional case. However, the second-harmonic generation susceptibility is weakened, but the nonlinear optical rectification is strengthened as the electric field increases where the direction of the electric field is against the growth direction of the quantum wells. Also it is the blue (or red) shift of the resonance that is induced by increasing of the electric field when the direction of the electric field is along (or against) the growth direction of the quantum wells. Finally, the resonant peak and its corresponding to the resonant energy are also taken into account.

  15. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen organization for interpreting the second-order susceptibility tensors in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Tuer, Adam E; Akens, Margarete K; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C; Whyne, Cari M; Barzda, Virginijus

    2012-11-21

    The second-order nonlinear polarization properties of fibrillar collagen in various rat tissues (vertebrae, tibia, tail tendon, dermis, and cornea) are investigated with polarization-dependent second-harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy. Three parameters are extracted: the second-order susceptibility ratio, R = [Formula: see text] ; a measure of the fibril distribution asymmetry, |A|; and the weighted-average fibril orientation, <δ>. A hierarchical organizational model of fibrillar collagen is developed to interpret the second-harmonic generation polarization properties. Highlights of the model include: collagen type (e.g., type-I, type-II), fibril internal structure (e.g., straight, constant-tilt), and fibril architecture (e.g., parallel fibers, intertwined, lamellae). Quantifiable differences in internal structure and architecture of the fibrils are observed. Occurrence histograms of R and |A| distinguished parallel from nonparallel fibril distributions. Parallel distributions possessed low parameter values and variability, whereas nonparallel distributions displayed an increase in values and variability. From the P-SHG parameters of vertebrae tissue, a three-dimensional reconstruction of lamellae of intervertebral disk is presented.

  16. Hierarchical Model of Fibrillar Collagen Organization for Interpreting the Second-Order Susceptibility Tensors in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tuer, Adam E.; Akens, Margarete K.; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari M.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2012-01-01

    The second-order nonlinear polarization properties of fibrillar collagen in various rat tissues (vertebrae, tibia, tail tendon, dermis, and cornea) are investigated with polarization-dependent second-harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy. Three parameters are extracted: the second-order susceptibility ratio, R = χZZZ(2)′/χZXX(2)′; a measure of the fibril distribution asymmetry, |A|; and the weighted-average fibril orientation, 〈δ〉. A hierarchical organizational model of fibrillar collagen is developed to interpret the second-harmonic generation polarization properties. Highlights of the model include: collagen type (e.g., type-I, type-II), fibril internal structure (e.g., straight, constant-tilt), and fibril architecture (e.g., parallel fibers, intertwined, lamellae). Quantifiable differences in internal structure and architecture of the fibrils are observed. Occurrence histograms of R and |A| distinguished parallel from nonparallel fibril distributions. Parallel distributions possessed low parameter values and variability, whereas nonparallel distributions displayed an increase in values and variability. From the P-SHG parameters of vertebrae tissue, a three-dimensional reconstruction of lamellae of intervertebral disk is presented. PMID:23200043

  17. POSSIM: Parameterizing Complete Second-Order Polarizable Force Field for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported development of a fast polarizable force field and software named POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model). The second-order approximation permits the speed up of the polarizable component of the calculations by ca. an order of magnitude. We have now expanded the POSSIM framework to include a complete polarizable force field for proteins. Most of the parameter fitting was done to high-level quantum mechanical data. Conformational geometries and energies for dipeptides have been reproduced within average errors of ca. 0.5 kcal/mol for energies of the conformers (for the electrostatically neutral residues) and 9.7° for key dihedral angles. We have also validated this force field by running Monte Carlo simulations of collagen-like proteins in water. The resulting geometries were within 0.94 Å root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) from the experimental data. We have performed additional validation by studying conformational properties of three oligopeptides relevant in the context of N-glycoprotein secondary structure. These systems have been previously studied with combined experimental and computational methods, and both POSSIM and benchmark OPLS-AA simulations that we carried out produced geometries within ca. 0.9 Å RMSD of the literature structures. Thus, the performance of POSSIM in reproducing the structures is comparable with that of the widely used OPLS-AA force field. Furthermore, our fitting of the force field parameters for peptides and proteins has been streamlined compared with the previous generation of the complete polarizable force field and relied more on transferability of parameters for nonbonded interactions (including the electrostatic component). The resulting deviations from the quantum mechanical data are similar to those achieved with the previous generation; thus, the technique is robust, and the parameters are transferable. At the same time, the number of parameters used in this work was

  18. POSSIM: Parameterizing Complete Second-Order Polarizable Force Field for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinbi; Ponomarev, Sergei Y; Sigalovsky, Daniel L; Cvitkovic, John P; Kaminski, George A

    2014-11-11

    Previously, we reported development of a fast polarizable force field and software named POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model). The second-order approximation permits the speed up of the polarizable component of the calculations by ca. an order of magnitude. We have now expanded the POSSIM framework to include a complete polarizable force field for proteins. Most of the parameter fitting was done to high-level quantum mechanical data. Conformational geometries and energies for dipeptides have been reproduced within average errors of ca. 0.5 kcal/mol for energies of the conformers (for the electrostatically neutral residues) and 9.7° for key dihedral angles. We have also validated this force field by running Monte Carlo simulations of collagen-like proteins in water. The resulting geometries were within 0.94 Å root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) from the experimental data. We have performed additional validation by studying conformational properties of three oligopeptides relevant in the context of N-glycoprotein secondary structure. These systems have been previously studied with combined experimental and computational methods, and both POSSIM and benchmark OPLS-AA simulations that we carried out produced geometries within ca. 0.9 Å RMSD of the literature structures. Thus, the performance of POSSIM in reproducing the structures is comparable with that of the widely used OPLS-AA force field. Furthermore, our fitting of the force field parameters for peptides and proteins has been streamlined compared with the previous generation of the complete polarizable force field and relied more on transferability of parameters for nonbonded interactions (including the electrostatic component). The resulting deviations from the quantum mechanical data are similar to those achieved with the previous generation; thus, the technique is robust, and the parameters are transferable. At the same time, the number of parameters used in this work was

  19. First and second order operator splitting methods for the phase field crystal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Geun; Shin, Jaemin; Lee, June-Yub

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present operator splitting methods for solving the phase field crystal equation which is a model for the microstructural evolution of two-phase systems on atomic length and diffusive time scales. A core idea of the methods is to decompose the original equation into linear and nonlinear subequations, in which the linear subequation has a closed-form solution in the Fourier space. We apply a nonlinear Newton-type iterative method to solve the nonlinear subequation at the implicit time level and thus a considerably large time step can be used. By combining these subequations, we achieve the first- and second-order accuracy in time. We present numerical experiments to show the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed methods.

  20. Dynamics of Equilibrium Points in a Uniformly Rotating Second-Order and Degree Gravitational Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinglang; Hou, Xiyun

    2017-07-01

    Using tools such as periodic orbits and invariant manifolds, the global dynamics around equilibrium points (EPs) in a rotating second-order and degree gravitational field are studied. For EPs on the long axis, planar and vertical periodic families are computed, and their stability properties are investigated. Invariant manifolds are also computed, and their relation to the first-order resonances is briefly discussed. For EPs on the short axis, planar and vertical periodic families are studied, with special emphasis on the genealogy of the planar periodic families. Our studies show that the global dynamics around EPs are highly similar to those around libration points in the circular restricted three-body problem, such as spatial halo orbits, invariant manifolds, and the genealogy of planar periodic families.

  1. First and second order operator splitting methods for the phase field crystal equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Geun; Shin, Jaemin; Lee, June-Yub

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we present operator splitting methods for solving the phase field crystal equation which is a model for the microstructural evolution of two-phase systems on atomic length and diffusive time scales. A core idea of the methods is to decompose the original equation into linear and nonlinear subequations, in which the linear subequation has a closed-form solution in the Fourier space. We apply a nonlinear Newton-type iterative method to solve the nonlinear subequation at the implicit time level and thus a considerably large time step can be used. By combining these subequations, we achieve the first- and second-order accuracy in time. We present numerical experiments to show the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed methods.

  2. Second-Order Self-Consistent-Field Density-Matrix Renormalization Group.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingjin; Knecht, Stefan; Keller, Sebastian; Reiher, Markus

    2017-06-13

    We present a matrix-product state (MPS)-based quadratically convergent density-matrix renormalization group self-consistent-field (DMRG-SCF) approach. Following a proposal by Werner and Knowles (J. Chem. Phys. 1985, 82, 5053), our DMRG-SCF algorithm is based on a direct minimization of an energy expression which is correct to second order with respect to changes in the molecular orbital basis. We exploit a simultaneous optimization of the MPS wave function and molecular orbitals in order to achieve quadratic convergence. In contrast to previously reported (augmented Hessian) Newton-Raphson and superconfiguration-interaction algorithms for DMRG-SCF, energy convergence beyond a quadratic scaling is possible in our ansatz. Discarding the set of redundant active-active orbital rotations, the DMRG-SCF energy converges typically within two to four cycles of the self-consistent procedure.

  3. Second-order receptive fields reveal multidigit interactions in area 3b of the macaque monkey

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Pramodsingh H.; Fitzgerald, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Linear receptive field (RF) models of area 3b neurons reveal a three-component structure: a central excitatory region flanked by two inhibitory regions that are spatially and temporally nonoverlapping with the excitation. Previous studies also report that there is an “infield” inhibitory region throughout the neuronal RF, which is a nonlinear interactive (second order) effect whereby stimuli lagging an input to the excitatory region are suppressed. Thus linear models may be inaccurate approximations of the neurons' true RFs. In this study, we characterize the RFs of area 3b neurons, using a second-order quadratic model. Data were collected from 80 neurons of two awake, behaving macaque monkeys while a random dot pattern was scanned simultaneously across the distal pads of digits D2, 3, and 4. We used an iterative method derived from matching pursuit to identify a set of linear and nonlinear terms with significant effects on the neuronal response. For most neurons (65/80), the linear component of the quadratic RF was characterized by a single excitatory region on the dominant digit. Interactions within the dominant digit were characterized by two quadratic filters that capture the spatial aspects of the interactive infield inhibition. Interactions between the dominant (most responsive) digit and its adjacent digit(s) formed the largest class of cross-digit interactions. The results demonstrate that a significant part of area 3b responses is due to nonlinear mechanisms, and furthermore, the data support the notion that area 3b neurons have “nonclassical RF”-like input from adjacent fingers, indicating that area 3b plays a role in integrating shape inputs across digits. PMID:22457468

  4. Electric field-induced second-order nonlinear optical effects in silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timurdogan, E.; Poulton, C. V.; Byrd, M. J.; Watts, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    The symmetry of crystalline silicon inhibits a second-order optical nonlinear susceptibility, χ(2), in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible silicon photonic platforms. However, χ(2) is required for important processes such as phase-only modulation, second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum/difference frequency generation. Here, we break the crystalline symmetry by applying direct-current fields across p-i-n junctions in silicon ridge waveguides and induce a χ(2) proportional to the large χ(3) of silicon. The obtained χ(2) is first used to perturb the permittivity (the direct-current Kerr effect) and achieve phase-only modulation. Second, the spatial distribution of χ(2) is altered by periodically patterning p-i-n junctions to quasi-phase-match pump and second-harmonic modes and realize SHG. We measure a maximum SHG efficiency of P2ω/Pω2 = 13 ± 0.5% W‑1 at λω = 2.29 µm and with field-induced χ(2) = 41 ± 1.5 pm V-1. We expect such field-induced χ(2) in silicon to lead to a new class of complex integrated devices such as carrier-envelope offset frequency stabilizers, terahertz generators, optical parametric oscillators and chirp-free modulators.

  5. Adjoint based data assimilation for phase field model using second order information of a posterior distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shin-Ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Junya

    Phase field (PF) method, which phenomenologically describes dynamics of microstructure evolutions during solidification and phase transformation, has progressed in the fields of hydromechanics and materials engineering. How to determine, based on observation data, an initial state and model parameters involved in a PF model is one of important issues since previous estimation methods require too much computational cost. We propose data assimilation (DA), which enables us to estimate the parameters and states by integrating the PF model and observation data on the basis of the Bayesian statistics. The adjoint method implemented on DA not only finds an optimum solution by maximizing a posterior distribution but also evaluates the uncertainty in the estimations by utilizing the second order information of the posterior distribution. We carried out an estimation test using synthetic data generated by the two-dimensional Kobayashi's PF model. The proposed method is confirmed to reproduce the true initial state and model parameters we assume in advance, and simultaneously estimate their uncertainties due to quality and quantity of the data. This result indicates that the proposed method is capable of suggesting the experimental design to achieve the required accuracy.

  6. Second-order optical susceptibility in doped III-V piezoelectric semiconductors in the presence of a magnetostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, B.; Aghamkar, P.; Kumar, S.; Kashyap, M. K.

    2011-02-01

    A detailed analytical investigation of second-order optical susceptibility has been made in moderately doped III-V weakly piezoelectric semiconductor crystal, viz. n-InSb, in the absence and presence of an external magnetostatic field, using the coupled mode theory. The second-order optical susceptibility arises from the nonlinear interaction of a pump beam with internally generated density and acoustic perturbations. The effect of doping concentration, magnetostatic field and pump intensity on second-order optical susceptibility of III-V semiconductors has been studied in detail. The numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystals duly shined by pulsed 10.6 μm CO2 laser and efforts are made towards optimising the doping level, applied magnetostatic field and pump intensity to achieve a large value of second-order optical susceptibility and change of its sign. The enhancement in magnitude and change of sign of second-order optical susceptibility, in weakly piezoelectric III-V semiconductor under proper selection of doping concentration and externally applied magnetostatic field, confirms the chosen nonlinear medium as a potential candidate material for the fabrication of nonlinear optical devices. In particular, at B 0 = 14.1 T, the second-order susceptibility was found to be 3.4 × 10-7 (SI unit) near the resonance condition.

  7. High order eigenvalues for the Helmholtz equation in complicated non-tensor domains through Richardson extrapolation of second order finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amore, Paolo; Boyd, John P.; Fernández, Francisco M.; Rösler, Boris

    2016-05-01

    We apply second order finite differences to calculate the lowest eigenvalues of the Helmholtz equation, for complicated non-tensor domains in the plane, using different grids which sample exactly the border of the domain. We show that the results obtained applying Richardson and Padé-Richardson extrapolations to a set of finite difference eigenvalues corresponding to different grids allow us to obtain extremely precise values. When possible we have assessed the precision of our extrapolations comparing them with the highly precise results obtained using the method of particular solutions. Our empirical findings suggest an asymptotic nature of the FD series. In all the cases studied, we are able to report numerical results which are more precise than those available in the literature.

  8. Second-order differential equations for bosons with spin j ≥ 1 and in the bases of general tensor-spinors of rank 2j

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda Guzmán, V. M.; Kirchbach, M.

    2016-09-01

    A boson of spin j≥ 1 can be described in one of the possibilities within the Bargmann-Wigner framework by means of one sole differential equation of order twice the spin, which however is known to be inconsistent as it allows for non-local, ghost and acausally propagating solutions, all problems which are difficult to tackle. The other possibility is provided by the Fierz-Pauli framework which is based on the more comfortable to deal with second-order Klein-Gordon equation, but it needs to be supplemented by an auxiliary condition. Although the latter formalism avoids some of the pathologies of the high-order equations, it still remains plagued by some inconsistencies such as the acausal propagation of the wave fronts of the (classical) solutions within an electromagnetic environment. We here suggest a method alternative to the above two that combines their advantages while avoiding the related difficulties. Namely, we suggest one sole strictly D^{(j,0)oplus (0,j)} representation specific second-order differential equation, which is derivable from a Lagrangian and whose solutions do not violate causality. The equation under discussion presents itself as the product of the Klein-Gordon operator with a momentum-independent projector on Lorentz irreducible representation spaces constructed from one of the Casimir invariants of the spin-Lorentz group. The basis used is that of general tensor-spinors of rank 2 j.

  9. Second order tensor finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  10. Second-Order Far Field Computational Boundary Conditions for Inviscid Duct Flow Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    COMPUTATIONAL BOUNDARY CONDITIONS INTERNAL FLOW COMPUTATIONS EULER METHODS 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number...SOLUTIONS OF THE LINEARIZED, SECOND-ORDER EULER EQUATIONS. THE EULER EQUATIONS ARE LINEARIZED ABOUT A CONSTANT PRESSURE, RECTILINEAR FLOW C)NDITION...THE BOUNDARY PROCEDURE CAN BE USED WITH ANY NUMERICAL EULER SOLUTION METHOD AND ALLOWS COMPUTATIONAL BOUNDARIES TO BE LOCATED EXTREMELY CLOSE TO THE

  11. NMR shielding tensors for density fitted local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory using gauge including atomic orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loibl, Stefan; Schütz, Martin

    2012-08-01

    An efficient method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors is presented, which treats electron correlation at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. It uses spatially localized functions to span occupied and virtual molecular orbital spaces, respectively, which are expanded in a basis of gauge including atomic orbitals (GIAOs or London atomic orbitals). Doubly excited determinants are restricted to local subsets of the virtual space and pair energies with an interorbital distance beyond a certain threshold are omitted. Furthermore, density fitting is employed to factorize the electron repulsion integrals. Ordinary Gaussians are employed as fitting functions. It is shown that the errors in the resulting NMR shielding constant, introduced (i) by the local approximation and (ii) by density fitting, are very small or even negligible. The capabilities of the new program are demonstrated by calculations on some extended molecular systems, such as the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolesion with adjacent nucleobases in the native intrahelical DNA double strand (ATTA sequence). Systems of that size were not accessible to correlated ab initio calculations of NMR spectra before. The presented method thus opens the door to new and interesting applications in this area.

  12. NMR shielding tensors for density fitted local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory using gauge including atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Loibl, Stefan; Schütz, Martin

    2012-08-28

    An efficient method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors is presented, which treats electron correlation at the level of second-order Mo̸ller-Plesset perturbation theory. It uses spatially localized functions to span occupied and virtual molecular orbital spaces, respectively, which are expanded in a basis of gauge including atomic orbitals (GIAOs or London atomic orbitals). Doubly excited determinants are restricted to local subsets of the virtual space and pair energies with an interorbital distance beyond a certain threshold are omitted. Furthermore, density fitting is employed to factorize the electron repulsion integrals. Ordinary Gaussians are employed as fitting functions. It is shown that the errors in the resulting NMR shielding constant, introduced (i) by the local approximation and (ii) by density fitting, are very small or even negligible. The capabilities of the new program are demonstrated by calculations on some extended molecular systems, such as the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolesion with adjacent nucleobases in the native intrahelical DNA double strand (ATTA sequence). Systems of that size were not accessible to correlated ab initio calculations of NMR spectra before. The presented method thus opens the door to new and interesting applications in this area.

  13. Relativistic Lagrangian displacement field and tensor perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampf, Cornelius; Wiegand, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the purely spatial Lagrangian coordinate transformation from the Lagrangian to the basic Eulerian frame. We demonstrate three techniques for extracting the relativistic displacement field from a given solution in the Lagrangian frame. These techniques are (a) from defining a local set of Eulerian coordinates embedded into the Lagrangian frame; (b) from performing a specific gauge transformation; and (c) from a fully nonperturbative approach based on the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) split. The latter approach shows that this decomposition is not tied to a specific perturbative formulation for the solution of the Einstein equations. Rather, it can be defined at the level of the nonperturbative coordinate change from the Lagrangian to the Eulerian description. Studying such different techniques is useful because it allows us to compare and develop further the various approximation techniques available in the Lagrangian formulation. We find that one has to solve the gravitational wave equation in the relativistic analysis, otherwise the corresponding Newtonian limit will necessarily contain spurious nonpropagating tensor artifacts at second order in the Eulerian frame. We also derive the magnetic part of the Weyl tensor in the Lagrangian frame, and find that it is not only excited by gravitational waves but also by tensor perturbations which are induced through the nonlinear frame dragging. We apply our findings to calculate for the first time the relativistic displacement field, up to second order, for a Λ CDM Universe in the presence of a local primordial non-Gaussian component. Finally, we also comment on recent claims about whether mass conservation in the Lagrangian frame is violated.

  14. Polarizable simulations with second order interaction model (POSSIM) force field: developing parameters for protein side-chain analogues.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinbi; Ponomarev, Sergei Y; Sa, Qina; Sigalovsky, Daniel L; Kaminski, George A

    2013-05-30

    A previously introduced polarizable simulations with second-order interaction model (POSSIM) force field has been extended to include parameters for small molecules serving as models for peptide and protein side-chains. Parameters have been fitted to permit reproducing many-body energies, gas-phase dimerization energies, and geometries and liquid-phase heats of vaporization and densities. Quantum mechanical and experimental data have been used as the target for the fitting. The POSSIM framework combines accuracy of a polarizable force field and computational efficiency of the second-order approximation of the full-scale induced point dipole polarization formalism. The resulting parameters can be used for simulations of the parameterized molecules themselves or their analogues. In addition to this, these force field parameters are currently being used in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins.

  15. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model (POSSIM) force field: Developing parameters for protein side-chain analogues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinbi; Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Sa, Qina; Sigalovsky, Daniel L.; Kaminski, George A.

    2013-01-01

    A previously introduced POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) force field has been extended to include parameters for small molecules serving as models for peptide and protein side-chains. Parameters have been fitted to permit reproducing many-body energies, gas-phase dimerization energies and geometries and liquid-phase heats of vaporization and densities. Quantum mechanical and experimental data have been used as the target for the fitting. The POSSIM framework combines accuracy of a polarizable force field and computational efficiency of the second-order approximation of the full-scale induced point dipole polarization formalism. The resulting parameters can be used for simulations of the parameterized molecules themselves or their analogues. In addition to this, these force field parameters are currently being employed in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins. PMID:23420678

  16. Covariant second-order perturbations in generalized two-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Tzavara, Eleftheria; Tent, Bartjan van; Mizuno, Shuntaro E-mail: Shuntaro.Mizuno@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2014-07-01

    We examine the covariant properties of generalized models of two-field inflation, with non-canonical kinetic terms and a possibly non-trivial field metric. We demonstrate that kinetic-term derivatives and covariant field derivatives do commute in a proper covariant framework, which was not realized before in the literature. We also define a set of generalized slow-roll parameters, using a unified notation. Within this framework, we study the most general class of models that allows for well-defined adiabatic and entropic sound speeds, which we identify as the models with parallel momentum and field velocity vectors. For these models we write the exact cubic action in terms of the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. We thus provide the tool to calculate the exact non-Gaussianity beyond slow-roll and at any scale for these generalized models. We illustrate our general results by considering their long-wavelength limit, as well as with the example of two-field DBI inflation.

  17. Identifying residue–residue clashes in protein hybrids by using a second-order mean-field approach

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gregory L.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, a second-order mean-field-based approach is introduced for characterizing the complete set of residue–residue couplings consistent with a given protein structure. This information is subsequently used to classify protein hybrids with respect to their potential to be functional based on the presence/absence and severity of clashing residue–residue interactions. First, atomistic representations of both the native and denatured states are used to calculate rotamer–backbone, rotamer–intrinsic, and rotamer–rotamer conformational energies. Next, this complete conformational energy table is coupled with a second-order mean-field description to elucidate the probabilities of all possible rotamer–rotamer combinations in a minimum Helmholtz free-energy ensemble. Computational results for the dihydrofolate reductase family reveal correlation in substitution patterns between not only contacting but also distal second-order structural elements. Residue–residue clashes in hybrid proteins are quantified by contrasting the ensemble probabilities of protein hybrids against the ones of the original parental sequences. Good agreement with experimental data is demonstrated by superimposing these clashes against the functional crossover profiles of bidirectional incremental truncation libraries for Escherichia coli and human glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylases. PMID:12700353

  18. Going Beyond a Mean-field Model for the Learning Cortex: Second-Order Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Sleigh, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Mean-field models of the cortex have been used successfully to interpret the origin of features on the electroencephalogram under situations such as sleep, anesthesia, and seizures. In a mean-field scheme, dynamic changes in synaptic weights can be considered through fluctuation-based Hebbian learning rules. However, because such implementations deal with population-averaged properties, they are not well suited to memory and learning applications where individual synaptic weights can be important. We demonstrate that, through an extended system of equations, the mean-field models can be developed further to look at higher-order statistics, in particular, the distribution of synaptic weights within a cortical column. This allows us to make some general conclusions on memory through a mean-field scheme. Specifically, we expect large changes in the standard deviation of the distribution of synaptic weights when fluctuation in the mean soma potentials are large, such as during the transitions between the “up” and “down” states of slow-wave sleep. Moreover, a cortex that has low structure in its neuronal connections is most likely to decrease its standard deviation in the weights of excitatory to excitatory synapses, relative to the square of the mean, whereas a cortex with strongly patterned connections is most likely to increase this measure. This suggests that fluctuations are used to condense the coding of strong (presumably useful) memories into fewer, but dynamic, neuron connections, while at the same time removing weaker (less useful) memories. PMID:19669541

  19. Can a spectator scalar field enhance inflationary tensor mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2015-04-01

    We consider the possibility of enhancing the inflationary tensor mode by introducing a spectator scalar field with a small sound speed which induces gravitational waves as a second-order effect. We analytically obtain the power spectra of gravitational waves and curvature perturbation induced by the spectator scalar field. We find that the small sound speed amplifies the curvature perturbation much more than the tensor mode and the current observational constraint forces the induced gravitational waves to be negligible compared with those from the vacuum fluctuation during inflation.

  20. On p -form theories with gauge invariant second order field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffayet, Cédric; Mukohyama, Shinji; Sivanesan, Vishagan

    2016-04-01

    We explore field theories of a single p -form with equations of motions of order strictly equal to 2 and gauge invariance. We give a general method for the classification of such theories which are extensions to the p -forms of the Galileon models for scalars. Our classification scheme allows us to compute an upper bound on the number of different such theories depending on p and on the space-time dimension. We are also able to build a nontrivial Galileon-like theory for a 3-form with gauge invariance and an action which is polynomial into the derivatives of the form. This theory has gauge invariant field equations but an action which is not, like a Chern-Simons theory. Hence the recently discovered no-go theorem stating that there are no nontrivial gauge invariant vector Galileons (which we are also able here to confirm with our method) does not extend to other odd-p cases.

  1. Long-wavelength properties of phase-field-crystal models with second-order dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, V; Achim, C V; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-05-01

    The phase-field-crystal (PFC) approach extends the notion of phase-field models by describing the topology of the microscopic structure of a crystalline material. One of the consequences is that local variation of the interatomic distance creates an elastic excitation. The dynamics of these excitations poses a challenge: pure diffusive dynamics cannot describe relaxation of elastic stresses that happen through phonon emission. To this end, several different models with fast dynamics have been proposed. In this article we use the amplitude expansion of the PFC model to compare the recently proposed hydrodynamic PFC amplitude model with two simpler models with fast dynamics. We compare these different models analytically and numerically. The results suggest that in order to have proper relaxation of elastic excitations, the full hydrodynamical description of the PFC amplitudes is required.

  2. Long-wavelength properties of phase-field-crystal models with second-order dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, V.; Achim, C. V.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-05-01

    The phase-field-crystal (PFC) approach extends the notion of phase-field models by describing the topology of the microscopic structure of a crystalline material. One of the consequences is that local variation of the interatomic distance creates an elastic excitation. The dynamics of these excitations poses a challenge: pure diffusive dynamics cannot describe relaxation of elastic stresses that happen through phonon emission. To this end, several different models with fast dynamics have been proposed. In this article we use the amplitude expansion of the PFC model to compare the recently proposed hydrodynamic PFC amplitude model with two simpler models with fast dynamics. We compare these different models analytically and numerically. The results suggest that in order to have proper relaxation of elastic excitations, the full hydrodynamical description of the PFC amplitudes is required.

  3. Second-order correction to the Bigeleisen–Mayer equation due to the nuclear field shift

    PubMed Central

    Bigeleisen, Jacob

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear field shift affects the electronic, rotational, and vibrational energies of polyatomic molecules. The theory of the shifts in molecular spectra has been studied by Schlembach and Tiemann [Schlembach, J. & Tiemann, E. (1982) Chem. Phys. 68, 21]; measurements of the electronic and rotational shifts of the diatomic halides of Pb and Tl have been made by Tiemann et al. [Tiemann, E., Knöckel, H. & Schlembach, J. (1982) Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem. 86, 821]. These authors have estimated the relative shifts in the harmonic frequencies of these compounds due to the nuclear field shift to be of the order of 10−6. I have used this estimate of the relative shift in vibrational frequency to calculate the correction to the harmonic oscillator approximation to the isotopic reduced partition-function ratio 208Pb32S/207Pb32S. The correction is 0.3% of the harmonic oscillator value at 300 K. In the absence of compelling evidence to the contrary, it suffices to calculate the nuclear field effect on the total isotopic partition-function ratio from its shift of the electronic zero point energy and the unperturbed molecular vibration. PMID:9560183

  4. Models of second-order effects in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors for computer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John; Coss, James

    1988-01-01

    Second-order effects in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) are important for devices with dimensions of 2 microns or less. The short and narrow channel effects and drain-induced barrier lowering primarily affect threshold voltage, but formulas for drain current must also take these effects into account. In addition, the drain current is sensitive to channel length modulation due to pinch-off or velocity saturation and is diminished by electron mobility degradation due to normal and lateral electric fields in the channel. A model of a MOSFET including these considerations and emphasizing charge conservation is discussed.

  5. Models of second-order effects in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors for computer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John; Coss, James

    1988-01-01

    Second-order effects in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) are important for devices with dimensions of 2 microns or less. The short and narrow channel effects and drain-induced barrier lowering primarily affect threshold voltage, but formulas for drain current must also take these effects into account. In addition, the drain current is sensitive to channel length modulation due to pinch-off or velocity saturation and is diminished by electron mobility degradation due to normal and lateral electric fields in the channel. A model of a MOSFET including these considerations and emphasizing charge conservation is discussed.

  6. A general second order complete active space self-consistent-field solver for large-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiming; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-09-01

    We present a new second order complete active space self-consistent field implementation to converge wavefunctions for both large active spaces and large atomic orbital (AO) bases. Our algorithm decouples the active space wavefunction solver from the orbital optimization in the microiterations, and thus may be easily combined with various modern active space solvers. We also introduce efficient approximate orbital gradient and Hessian updates, and step size determination. We demonstrate its capabilities by calculating the low-lying states of the Fe(II)-porphine complex with modest resources using a density matrix renormalization group solver in a CAS(22, 27) active space and a 3000 AO basis.

  7. Pulsed second order field NMR for real time PGSE and single-shot surface to volume ratio measurements.

    PubMed

    Kittler, W C; Obruchkov, S; Galvosas, P; Hunter, M W

    2014-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance provides a powerful tool for the measurement of particle diffusion and mobility. When these particles are contained in a porous medium, the diffusive process is influenced by the pore boundaries, and their effect on diffusion measurements provides information about the pore space. The acquisition of the apparent diffusion coefficient and its dependence on time, in the short time limit, reveals the surface to volume ratio of the porous medium, and in the long time limit, its tortuosity. With conventional pulsed field gradient techniques, processes where pore boundaries are evolving on the sub-second time scale cannot be resolved. Using pulsed second order magnetic fields in conjunction with one-dimensional imaging and the pulse sequence Difftrain, this paper presents a proof of concept for the first ever real time single-shot surface to volume NMR measurement.

  8. First and second order numerical methods based on a new convex splitting for phase-field crystal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaemin; Lee, Hyun Geun; Lee, June-Yub

    2016-12-01

    The phase-field crystal equation derived from the Swift-Hohenberg energy functional is a sixth order nonlinear equation. We propose numerical methods based on a new convex splitting for the phase-field crystal equation. The first order convex splitting method based on the proposed splitting is unconditionally gradient stable, which means that the discrete energy is non-increasing for any time step. The second order scheme is unconditionally weakly energy stable, which means that the discrete energy is bounded by its initial value for any time step. We prove mass conservation, unique solvability, energy stability, and the order of truncation error for the proposed methods. Numerical experiments are presented to show the accuracy and stability of the proposed splitting methods compared to the existing other splitting methods. Numerical tests indicate that the proposed convex splitting is a good choice for numerical methods of the phase-field crystal equation.

  9. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank-p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n-dimensions is bounded by (n + 1)!/p!(n − p)!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes. PMID:26858463

  10. Stess field in Brazil: First and Second-Order Stress Patterns: Examples of Regional Forces Controlling the Stress Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F.; Assumpcao, M.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of stress field is fundamental not only to understand driving forces and plate deformation as also it helps in the study of intraplate seismicity. In Brazil, we find reverse, strike-slip and normal mechanisms that indicates a variable stress field. The stress field has been mainly obtained using focal mechanism results and a few breakout data and in-situ measurements. However the stress field is still poorly known in Brazil. Recent earthquake focal mechanisms were determinate using P-wave modeling of seismogram stacks of several teleseismic stations ( > 30°) grouped according to distance and azimuth and first motion polarities. Every record was visually inspected and those with a good signal/noise ratio (SNR) were grouped in latitude-longitude windows of ten degrees and stacked. We usually consider groups with at least two stations, but, in sometimes a good record of single station with different azimuth was also used to constrain the focal depth. The P, pP, sP wavetrains of the stacked signals were modelled using the hudson96 program of Herrman seismology package (Herrman, 2002). We also determinate moment tensor of same events in the central region. The major difficulty is to determinate focal mechanism of low magnitudes events (< 4.0 mb) using distants seismograph stations. The central region shows a purely compressional pattern which are predicted by regional theoretical models (Richardson & Coblentz, 1996 and the TD0 model of Lithgow& Bertelloni, 2004). Meanwhile in the Amazonic region we find a SHmax from E-W to SE-NW probably caused by Caribbean and South American plates interaction (Meijer, 1995). In NE region, the compression rotates following the coast line which indicates an important component regional present in stress field spreading effects due to the continental/oceanic crustal (Assumpção, 1998) and cases of stress caused by sedimentary load in Amazon Fan in agreement local theoretical models (Watts et al., 2009). We determinate the

  11. Investigation of the linear and second-order nonlinear optical properties of molecular crystals within the local field theory.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Tomasz; Stadnicka, Katarzyna; Champagne, Benoît

    2013-09-21

    In this paper it is shown that modest calculations combining first principles evaluations of the molecular properties with electrostatic interaction schemes to account for the crystal environment effects are reliable for predicting and interpreting the experimentally measured electric linear and second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of molecular crystals within the experimental error bars. This is illustrated by considering two molecular crystals, namely: 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline and 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)-3-acetamidonitrobenzene. Three types of surrounding effects should be accounted for (i) the polarization due to the surrounding molecules, described here by static electric fields originating from their electric dipoles or charge distributions, (ii) the intermolecular interactions, which affect the geometry and particularly the molecular conformation, and (iii) the screening of the external electric field by the constitutive molecules. This study further highlights the role of electron correlation on the linear and nonlinear responses of molecular crystals and the challenge of describing frequency dispersion.

  12. Electric-field-induced fabrication of covalently linked second-order nonlinear optical multilayer films on nonconductive substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Zhao, Lisha; Cui, Zhanchen

    2012-01-15

    A highly stable second-order nonlinear optical multilayer film was constructed on insulating substrates using the electric-field-induced layer-by-layer assembly technique. The substrates used in this method could be arbitrary. In another, the substrates could be modified with polyanion solution by spin coating as cladding layer. Then, the nonlinear optical multilayer films were assembled on the cladding layer directly by the electric-field-induced layer-by-layer assembly technique. The resulting cross-linked multilayer films fabricated by this method displayed high optical transparency, good thermal stability, and excellent nonlinear optical properties which can be made into waveguide devices directly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Piezoelectric Field Enhanced Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibilities in Wurtzite GaN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Chuang, S.-L.; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical processes including second-harmonic generation, optical rectification, and difference-frequency generation associated with intersubband transitions in wurtzite GaN/AlGaN quantum well (QW) are investigated theoretically. Taking into account the strain-induced piezoelectric (PZ) effects, we solve the electronic structure of the QW from coupled effective-mass Schrodinger equation and Poisson equation including the exchange-correlation effect under the local-density approximation. We show that the large PZ field in the QW breaks the symmetry of the confinement potential profile and leads to large second-order susceptibilities. We also show that the interband optical pump-induced electron-hole plasma results in an enhancement in the maximum value of the nonlinear coefficients and a redshift of the peak position in the nonlinear optical spectrum. By use of the difference-frequency generation, THz radiation can be generated from a GaN/Al(0.75)Ga(0.25)N with a pump laser of 1.55 micron.

  14. Reduced field-of-view excitation using second-order gradients and spatial-spectral radiofrequency pulses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Xu, Dan; King, Kevin F; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2013-02-01

    The performance of multidimensional spatially selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses is often limited by their long duration. In this article, high-order, nonlinear gradients are exploited to reduce multidimensional RF pulse length. Specifically, by leveraging the multidimensional spatial dependence of second-order gradients, a two-dimensional spatial-spectral RF pulse is designed to achieve three-dimensional spatial selectivity, i.e., to excite a circular region-of-interest in a thin slice for reduced field-of-view imaging. Compared to conventional methods that use three-dimensional RF pulses and linear gradients, the proposed method requires only two-dimensional RF pulses, and thus can significantly shorten the RF pulses and/or improve excitation accuracy. The proposed method has been validated through Bloch equation simulations and phantom experiments on a commercial 3.0T MRI scanner.

  15. Second-order magnetic field gradient-induced strong coupling between nitrogen-vacancy centers and a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kang; Wang, RuiXia; Yin, ZhangQi; Long, GuiLu

    2017-07-01

    We consider a cantilever mechanical oscillator (MO) made of diamond. A nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center lies at the end of the cantilever. Two magnetic tips near the NV center induce a strong second-order magnetic field gradient. Under coherent driving of the MO, we find that the coupling between the MO and the NV center is greatly enhanced. We studied how to generate entanglement between the MO and the NV center and realize quantum state transfer between them. We also propose a scheme to generate two-mode squeezing between different MO modes by coupling them to the same NV center. The decoherence and dissipation effects for both the MO and the NV center are numerically calculated using the present parameter values of the experimental configuration. We have achieved high fidelity for entanglement generation, quantum state transfer, and large two-mode squeezing.

  16. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model (POSSIM) force field: Developing parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbone

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Kaminski, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A previously introduced POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) force field has been extended to include parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbones. New features were introduced into the fitting protocol, as compared to the previous generation of the polarizable force field for proteins. A reduced amount of quantum mechanical data was employed in fitting the electrostatic parameters. Transferability of the electrostatics between our recently developed NMA model and the protein backbone was confirmed. Binding energy and geometry for complexes of alanine dipeptide with a water molecule were estimated and found in a good agreement with high-level quantum mechanical results (for example, the intermolecular distances agreeing within ca. 0.06Å). Following the previously devised procedure, we calculated average errors in alanine di- and tetra-peptide conformational energies and backbone angles and found the agreement to be adequate (for example, the alanine tetrapeptide extended-globular conformational energy gap was calculated to be 3.09 kcal/mol quantim mechanically and 3.14 kcal/mol with the POSSIM force field). However, we have now also included simulation of a simple alpha-helix in both gas-phase and water as the ultimate test of the backbone conformational behavior. The resulting alanine and protein backbone force field is currently being employed in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins. PMID:21743799

  17. Second order gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cuzinatto, R.R. . E-mail: rodrigo@ift.unesp.br; Melo, C.A.M. de . E-mail: cassius.anderson@gmail.com; Pompeia, P.J. . E-mail: pompeia@ift.unesp.br

    2007-05-15

    A gauge theory of second order in the derivatives of the auxiliary field is constructed following Utiyama's program. A novel field strength G = {partial_derivative}F + fAF arises besides the one of the first order treatment, F = {partial_derivative}A - {partial_derivative}A + fAA. The associated conserved current is obtained. It has a new feature: topological terms are determined from local invariance requirements. Podolsky Generalized Eletrodynamics is derived as a particular case in which the Lagrangian of the gauge field is L {sub P} {proportional_to} G {sup 2}. In this application the photon mass is estimated. The SU (N) infrared regime is analysed by means of Alekseev-Arbuzov-Baikov's Lagrangian.

  18. Magnetic field effect on second order slip flow of nanofluid over a stretching/shrinking sheet with thermal radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Hakeem, A. K.; Vishnu Ganesh, N.; Ganga, B.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic field effect on a steady two dimensional laminar radiative flow of an incompressible viscous water based nanofluid over a stretching/shrinking sheet with second order slip boundary condition is investigated both analytically and numerically. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of Lie symmetry group transformations. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are solved analytically using hyper-geometric function and numerically by the fourth order Runge-Kutta method with the shooting technique. A unique exact solution exists for momentum equation in stretching sheet case and dual solutions are obtained for shrinking sheet case which has upper and lower branches. It is found that the lower branch solution vanishes in the presence of higher magnetic field. The velocity and temperature profiles, the local skin friction coefficient and the reduced Nusselt number are examined and discussed for different spherical nanoparticles such as Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Al2 O3 and TiO2. A comparative study between the previously published results and the present analytical and numerical results for a special case is found to be in good agreement.

  19. Curvature tensors unified field equations on SEXn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kyung Tae; Lee, Il Young

    1988-09-01

    We study the curvature tensors and field equations in the n-dimensional SE manifold SEXn. We obtain several basic properties of the vectors S λ and U λ and then of the SE curvature tensor and its contractions, such as a generalized Ricci identity, a generalized Bianchi identity, and two variations of the Bianchi identity satisfied by the SE Einstein tensor. Finally, a system of field equations is discussed in SEXn and one of its particular solutions is constructed and displayed.

  20. Schrödinger and related equations as hamiltonian systems, manifolds of second-order tensors and new ideas of nonlinearity in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sławianowski, J. J.; Kovalchuk, V.

    2010-01-01

    Considered is the Schrödinger equation in a finite-dimensional space as an equation of mathematical physics derivable from the variational principle and treatable in terms of the Lagrange-Hamilton formalism. It provides an interesting example of "mechanics" with singular Lagrangians, effectively treatable within the framework of Dirac formalism. We discuss also some modified "Schrödinger" equations involving second-order time derivatives and introduce a kind of nondirect, nonperturbative, geometrically-motivated nonlinearity based on making the scalar product a dynamical quantity. There are some reasons to expect that this might be a new way of describing open dynamical systems and explaining some quantum "paradoxes".

  1. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  2. Linear, first and second-order, unconditionally energy stable numerical schemes for the phase field model of homopolymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we develop a series of efficient numerical schemes to solve the phase field model for homopolymer blends. The governing system is derived from the energetic variational approach of a total free energy, that consists of a nonlinear logarithmic Flory-Huggins potential, and a gradient entropy with a concentration-dependent de-Gennes type coefficient. The main challenging issue to solve this kind of models numerically is about the time marching problem, i.e., how to develop suitable temporal discretizations for the nonlinear terms in order to preserve the energy stability at the discrete level. We solve this issue in this paper, by developing the first and second order temporal approximation schemes based on the "Invariant Energy Quadratization" method, where all nonlinear terms are treated semi-explicitly. Consequently, the resulting numerical schemes lead to a symmetric positive definite linear system to be solved at each time step. The unconditional energy stabilities are further proved. Various numerical simulations of 2D and 3D are presented to demonstrate the stability and the accuracy of the proposed schemes.

  3. Spin-torque-induced oscillation at zero bias field in a magnetoresistive nanopillar with a free layer with first- and second-order uniaxial anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Hiroko; Matsumoto, Rie; Yuasa, Shinji; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Spin-torque-induced magnetization dynamics in a nanopillar having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer with first- and second-order uniaxial anisotropy and an in-plane magnetized reference layer is studied theoretically on the basis of the macrospin model. It is shown that in the presence of second-order uniaxial anisotropy, self-oscillation is induced even at zero bias magnetic field. Analytical expressions for the threshold current, condition of the second-order anisotropy constant required for oscillation, and current dependence of the oscillation frequency are obtained.

  4. Perturbation method for the second-order nonlinear effect of focused acoustic field around a scatterer in an ideal fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Jayathilake, Pahala Gedara; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2014-02-01

    Two nonlinear models are proposed to investigate the focused acoustic waves that the nonlinear effects will be important inside the liquid around the scatterer. Firstly, the one dimensional solutions for the widely used Westervelt equation with different coordinates are obtained based on the perturbation method with the second order nonlinear terms. Then, by introducing the small parameter (Mach number), a dimensionless formulation and asymptotic perturbation expansion via the compressible potential flow theory is applied. This model permits the decoupling between the velocity potential and enthalpy to second order, with the first potential solutions satisfying the linear wave equation (Helmholtz equation), whereas the second order solutions are associated with the linear non-homogeneous equation. Based on the model, the local nonlinear effects of focused acoustic waves on certain volume are studied in which the findings may have important implications for bubble cavitation/initiation via focused ultrasound called HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound). The calculated results show that for the domain encompassing less than ten times the radius away from the center of the scatterer, the non-linear effect exerts a significant influence on the focused high intensity acoustic wave. Moreover, at the comparatively higher frequencies, for the model of spherical wave, a lower Mach number may result in stronger nonlinear effects.

  5. Cubic-scaling algorithm and self-consistent field for the random-phase approximation with second-order screened exchange.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Jonathan E

    2014-01-07

    The random-phase approximation with second-order screened exchange (RPA+SOSEX) is a model of electron correlation energy with two caveats: its accuracy depends on an arbitrary choice of mean field, and it scales as O(n(5)) operations and O(n(3)) memory for n electrons. We derive a new algorithm that reduces its scaling to O(n(3)) operations and O(n(2)) memory using controlled approximations and a new self-consistent field that approximates Brueckner coupled-cluster doubles theory with RPA+SOSEX, referred to as Brueckner RPA theory. The algorithm comparably reduces the scaling of second-order Mo̸ller-Plesset perturbation theory with smaller cost prefactors than RPA+SOSEX. Within a semiempirical model, we study H2 dissociation to test accuracy and Hn rings to verify scaling.

  6. Research on the sonic boom problem. Part 1: Second-order solutions for the flow field around slender bodies in supersonic flow for sonic boom analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landahl, M.; Loefgren, P.

    1973-01-01

    A second-order theory for supersonic flow past slender bodies is presented. Through the introduction of characteristic coordinates as independent variables and the expansion procedure proposed by Lin and Oswatitsch, a uniformly valid solution is obtained for the whole flow field in the axisymmetric case and for far field in the general three-dimensional case. For distances far from the body the theory is an extension of Whitham's first-order solution and for the domain close to the body it is a modification of Van Dyke's second-order solution in the axisymmetric case. From the theory useful formulas relating flow deflections to the Whitham F-function are derived, which permits one to determine the sonic boom strength from wind tunnel measurements fairly close to the body.

  7. Efficiency enhancement of slow-wave electron-cyclotron maser by a second-order shaping of the magnetic field in the low-gain limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si-Jia; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Wang, Kang; Li, Yong-Ming; Jing, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Based on the anomalous Doppler effect, we put forward a proposal to enhance the conversion efficiency of the slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) under the resonance condition. Compared with previous studies, we add a second-order shaping term in the guild magnetic field. Theoretical analyses and numerical calculations show that it can enhance the conversion efficiency in the low-gain limit. The case of the initial velocity spread of electrons satisfying the Gaussian distribution is also analysed numerically.

  8. Tensor gauge fields of N =8 supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Igor; Ortín, Tomás

    2015-04-01

    We study the tensor gauge fields ("notophs") of ungauged N =8 ,D =4 supergravity in superspace. These are described by 2-form potentials B2G in the adjoint representation of G =E7 (+7 ). The consistency of the natural candidates for the superspace constraints for their field strengths H3G fixes the form of the generalized Bianchi identities D H3G=… and also requires the potentials B2G /H with indices of G /H =E7 (+7 )/S U (8 ) generators to be dual to the scalars of the N =8 ,D =4 supergravity multiplet. In contrast, the field strengths of the 2-form potentials corresponding to the S U (8 ) generators are dual to fermionic bilinears, so that these potentials are auxiliary rather than physical fields. Their presence, however, is essential to formulate a tensor hierarchy of N =8 ,D =4 supergravity consistent with its U-duality group E7 (+7 ).

  9. Fully relativistic complete active space self-consistent field for large molecules: Quasi-second-order minimax optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jefferson E.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We develop an efficient algorithm for four-component complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods on the basis of the Dirac equation that takes into account spin-orbit and other relativistic effects self-consistently. Orbitals are optimized using a trust-region quasi-Newton method with Hessian updates so that energies are minimized with respect to rotations among electronic orbitals and maximized with respect to rotations between electronic and positronic orbitals. Utilizing density fitting and parallel computation, we demonstrate that Dirac-Coulomb CASSCF calculations can be routinely performed on systems with 100 atoms and a few heavy-elements. The convergence behavior and wall times for octachloridodirhenate(III) and a tungsten methylidene complex are presented. In addition, the excitation energies of octachloridodirhenate(III) are reported using a state-averaged variant.

  10. Fully relativistic complete active space self-consistent field for large molecules: quasi-second-order minimax optimization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jefferson E; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-01-28

    We develop an efficient algorithm for four-component complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods on the basis of the Dirac equation that takes into account spin-orbit and other relativistic effects self-consistently. Orbitals are optimized using a trust-region quasi-Newton method with Hessian updates so that energies are minimized with respect to rotations among electronic orbitals and maximized with respect to rotations between electronic and positronic orbitals. Utilizing density fitting and parallel computation, we demonstrate that Dirac-Coulomb CASSCF calculations can be routinely performed on systems with 100 atoms and a few heavy-elements. The convergence behavior and wall times for octachloridodirhenate(III) and a tungsten methylidene complex are presented. In addition, the excitation energies of octachloridodirhenate(III) are reported using a state-averaged variant.

  11. Fully relativistic complete active space self-consistent field for large molecules: Quasi-second-order minimax optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Jefferson E.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-01-28

    We develop an efficient algorithm for four-component complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods on the basis of the Dirac equation that takes into account spin–orbit and other relativistic effects self-consistently. Orbitals are optimized using a trust-region quasi-Newton method with Hessian updates so that energies are minimized with respect to rotations among electronic orbitals and maximized with respect to rotations between electronic and positronic orbitals. Utilizing density fitting and parallel computation, we demonstrate that Dirac–Coulomb CASSCF calculations can be routinely performed on systems with 100 atoms and a few heavy-elements. The convergence behavior and wall times for octachloridodirhenate(III) and a tungsten methylidene complex are presented. In addition, the excitation energies of octachloridodirhenate(III) are reported using a state-averaged variant.

  12. Cosmological constraints with weak lensing peak counts and second-order statistics in a large-field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Austin; Lin, Chieh-An; Lanusse, Francois; Leonard, Adrienne; Starck, Jean-Luc; Kilbinger, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Peak statistics in weak lensing maps access the non-Gaussian information contained in the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are therefore a promising complementary probe to two-point and higher-order statistics to constrain our cosmological models. To prepare for the high precision afforded by next-generation weak lensing surveys, we assess the constraining power of peak counts in a simulated Euclid-like survey on the cosmological parameters Ωm, σ8, and w0de. In particular, we study how CAMELUS---a fast stochastic model for predicting peaks---can be applied to such large surveys. The algorithm avoids the need for time-costly N-body simulations, and its stochastic approach provides full PDF information of observables. We measure the abundance histogram of peaks in a mock shear catalogue of approximately 5,000 deg2 using a multiscale mass map filtering technique, and we then constrain the parameters of the mock survey using CAMELUS combined with approximate Bayesian computation, a robust likelihood-free inference algorithm. We find that peak statistics yield a tight but significantly biased constraint in the σ8-Ωm plane, indicating the need to better understand and control the model's systematics before applying it to a real survey of this size or larger. We perform a calibration of the model to remove the bias and compare results to those from the two-point correlation functions (2PCF) measured on the same field. In this case, we find the derived parameter Σ8 = σ8(Ωm/0.27)α = 0.76 (-0.03 +0.02) with α = 0.65 for peaks, while for 2PCF the values are Σ8 = 0.76 (-0.01 +0.02) and α = 0.70. We conclude that the constraining power can therefore be comparable between the two weak lensing observables in large-field surveys. Furthermore, the tilt in the σ8-Ωm degeneracy direction for peaks with respect to that of 2PCF suggests that a combined analysis would yield tighter constraints than either measure alone. As expected, w0de cannot be

  13. Cosmological constraints with weak-lensing peak counts and second-order statistics in a large-field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Austin; Lin, Chieh-An; Lanusse, François; Leonard, Adrienne; Starck, Jean-Luc; Kilbinger, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Peak statistics in weak-lensing maps access the non-Gaussian information contained in the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are therefore a promising complementary probe to two-point and higher-order statistics to constrain our cosmological models. Next-generation galaxy surveys, with their advanced optics and large areas, will measure the cosmic weak-lensing signal with unprecedented precision. To prepare for these anticipated data sets, we assess the constraining power of peak counts in a simulated Euclid-like survey on the cosmological parameters Ωm, σ8, and w0de. In particular, we study how Camelus, a fast stochastic model for predicting peaks, can be applied to such large surveys. The algorithm avoids the need for time-costly N-body simulations, and its stochastic approach provides full PDF information of observables. Considering peaks with a signal-to-noise ratio ≥ 1, we measure the abundance histogram in a mock shear catalogue of approximately 5000 deg2 using a multiscale mass-map filtering technique. We constrain the parameters of the mock survey using Camelus combined with approximate Bayesian computation, a robust likelihood-free inference algorithm. Peak statistics yield a tight but significantly biased constraint in the σ8-Ωm plane, as measured by the width ΔΣ8 of the 1σ contour. We find Σ8 = σ8(Ωm/ 0.27)α = 0.77-0.05+0.06 with α = 0.75 for a flat ΛCDM model. The strong bias indicates the need to better understand and control the model systematics before applying it to a real survey of this size or larger. We perform a calibration of the model and compare results to those from the two-point correlation functions ξ± measured on the same field. We calibrate the ξ± result as well, since its contours are also biased, although not as severely as for peaks. In this case, we find for peaks Σ8 = 0.76-0.03+0.02 with α = 0.65, while for the combined ξ+ and ξ- statistics the values are Σ8 = 0.76-0.01+0.02 and α = 0

  14. Second-order nonlinear optical properties in a strained InGaN/AlGaN quantum well under the intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, M. J.; Vafaei, H.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the optical rectification and the second harmonic generation coefficients in a strained InGaN/AlGaN quantum well are studied. Impacts of the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields on the potential profile are taken into account. The energy levels and wave functions are calculated using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and optical properties are obtained using the compact density matrix approach. Effects of intense laser field, In composition, Al composition, the well width and barrier width on the second-order nonlinear optical properties are investigated. Results reveal that the confinement potential is considerably affected by the laser field and internal electric field. Results also indicate that the resonant peaks experience a red-shift with increasing the laser field strength and barrier width. Moreover, the resonant peaks suffer a blue-shift with the increase in In and Al compositions.

  15. Research on the sonic boom problem. Part 2: Flow field measurement in wind tunnel and calculation of second order F-function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landahl, M.; Soerensen, H.; Hilding, L.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in a wind tunnel to test some of the results of Landahl's second order theory. The slender models consisted of a parabolic spindle, tested at M = 3, and a wing body configuration, suggested by Ferri, and tested at M = 2.7. The theory indicates that shock position and strength at an arbitrary distance can be calculated by means of near field measurements. The results show that this method is an appropriate one for simple bodies and for bodies with complicated geometries as well.

  16. Massive symmetric tensor field in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Atsushi

    1989-03-01

    The condition on the background spacetime is derived for the straightforward generalization of the massive symmetric tensor field (MSTF) equation to be possible. The MSTF in spatially flat Robertson-Walker spacetimes is studied in detail. The abovementioned condition in these spacetimes is verified by calculating the Klein-Gordon inner products among the solutions of the field equation. It is shown that the MSTF theory in some spacetimes has features which are probably undesirable even if the condition on the spacetime is satisfied.

  17. Measurement of the second-order Zeeman effect on the sodium clock transition in the weak-magnetic-field region using the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase

    SciTech Connect

    Numazaki, Kazuya; Imai, Hiromitsu; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2010-03-15

    The second-order Zeeman effect of the sodium clock transition in a weak magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T was measured as the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase by two-photon stimulated Raman atom interferometry. The ac Stark effect of the Raman pulse was canceled out by adopting an appropriate intensity ratio of two photons in the Raman pulse. The Ramsey fringes for the pulse separation of 7 ms were obtained with a phase uncertainty of {pi}/200 rad. The nondispersive feature of the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase was clearly demonstrated through 18 fringes with constant amplitude. The Breit-Rabi formula of the sodium clock transition was verified to be {Delta}{nu}=(0.222{+-}0.003)x10{sup 12}xB{sup 1.998{+-}0.004} in a magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T.

  18. The second-order gravitational red shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J.

    1973-01-01

    The direct measurement of the nonlinear term of the gravitational field equations by using very stable clocks is discussed along with measuring the perhelion advance of a planet or satellite. These are considered measurements of the second-order gravitational red shift. The exact expression for the frequency shift of light in a gravitational field is derived. Other topics discussed include: The Doppler-cancelling technique; the second-order red shift in a spherically symmetric gravitational field; finite signal transit time; and the reality and interpretation of coordinates in the second-order red shift experiment.

  19. Using Perturbation theory to reduce noise in diffusion tensor fields.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ravi; Staib, Lawrence H; Xu, Dongrong; Laine, Andrew F; Liu, Jun; Peterson, Bradley S

    2009-08-01

    We propose the use of Perturbation theory to reduce noise in Diffusion Tensor (DT) fields. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) encodes the diffusion of water molecules along different spatial directions in a positive definite, 3 x 3 symmetric tensor. Eigenvectors and eigenvalues of DTs allow the in vivo visualization and quantitative analysis of white matter fiber bundles across the brain. The validity and reliability of these analyses are limited, however, by the low spatial resolution and low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) in DTI datasets. Our procedures can be applied to improve the validity and reliability of these quantitative analyses by reducing noise in the tensor fields. We model a tensor field as a three-dimensional Markov Random Field and then compute the likelihood and the prior terms of this model using Perturbation theory. The prior term constrains the tensor field to be smooth, whereas the likelihood term constrains the smoothed tensor field to be similar to the original field. Thus, the proposed method generates a smoothed field that is close in structure to the original tensor field. We evaluate the performance of our method both visually and quantitatively using synthetic and real-world datasets. We quantitatively assess the performance of our method by computing the SNR for eigenvalues and the coherence measures for eigenvectors of DTs across tensor fields. In addition, we quantitatively compare the performance of our procedures with the performance of one method that uses a Riemannian distance to compute the similarity between two tensors, and with another method that reduces noise in tensor fields by anisotropically filtering the diffusion weighted images that are used to estimate diffusion tensors. These experiments demonstrate that our method significantly increases the coherence of the eigenvectors and the SNR of the eigenvalues, while simultaneously preserving the fine structure and boundaries between homogeneous regions, in the smoothed tensor

  20. Simplified derivation of the gravitational wave stress tensor from the linearized Einstein field equations.

    PubMed

    Balbus, Steven A

    2016-10-18

    A conserved stress energy tensor for weak field gravitational waves propagating in vacuum is derived directly from the linearized general relativistic wave equation alone, for an arbitrary gauge. In any harmonic gauge, the form of the tensor leads directly to the classical expression for the outgoing wave energy. The method described here, however, is a much simpler, shorter, and more physically motivated approach than is the customary procedure, which involves a lengthy and cumbersome second-order (in wave-amplitude) calculation starting with the Einstein tensor. Our method has the added advantage of exhibiting the direct coupling between the outgoing wave energy flux and the work done by the gravitational field on the sources. For nonharmonic gauges, the directly derived wave stress tensor has an apparent index asymmetry. This coordinate artifact may be straightforwardly removed, and the symmetrized (still gauge-invariant) tensor then takes on its widely used form. Angular momentum conservation follows immediately. For any harmonic gauge, however, the stress tensor found is manifestly symmetric from the start, and its derivation depends, in its entirety, on the structure of the linearized wave equation.

  1. The Topology of Three-Dimensional Symmetric Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, Yingmei; Levy, Yuval; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of 3-D symmetric tensor fields. The goal is to represent their complex structure by a simple set of carefully chosen points and lines analogous to vector field topology. The basic constituents of tensor topology are the degenerate points, or points where eigenvalues are equal to each other. First, we introduce a new method for locating 3-D degenerate points. We then extract the topological skeletons of the eigenvector fields and use them for a compact, comprehensive description of the tensor field. Finally, we demonstrate the use of tensor field topology for the interpretation of the two-force Boussinesq problem.

  2. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model – force field and software for fast polarizable calculations: Parameters for small model systems and free energy calculations

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, George A.; Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Liu, Aibing B.

    2009-01-01

    We are presenting POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) – a software package and a set of parameters designed for molecular simulations. The key feature of POSSIM is that the electrostatic polarization is taken into account using a previously introduced fast formalism. This permits cutting computational cost of using the explicit polarization by about an order of magnitude. In this article, parameters for water, methane, ethane, propane, butane, methanol and NMA are introduced. These molecules are viewed as model systems for protein simulations. We have achieved our goal of ca. 0.5 kcal/mol accuracy for gas-phase dimerization energies and no more than 2% deviations in liquid state heats of vaporization and densities. Moreover, free energies of hydration of the polarizable methane, ethane and methanol have been calculated using the statistical perturbation theory. These calculations are a model for calculating protein pKa shifts and ligand binding affinities. The free energies of hydration were found to be 2.12 kcal/mol, 1.80 kcal/mol and −4.95 kcal/mol for methane, ethane and methanol, respectively. The experimentally determined literature values are 1.91 kcal/mol, 1.83 kcal/mol and −5.11 kcal/mol. The POSSIM average error in these absolute free energies of hydration is only about 0.13 kcal/mol. Using the statistical perturbation theory with polarizable force fields is not widespread, and we believe that this work opens road to further development of the POSSIM force field and its applications for obtaining accurate energies in protein-related computer modeling. PMID:20209038

  3. Second-order Cosmological Perturbations Engendered by Point-like Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilenkov, Ruslan; Eingorn, Maxim

    2017-08-01

    In the ΛCDM framework, presenting nonrelativistic matter inhomogeneities as discrete massive particles, we develop the second-order cosmological perturbation theory. Our approach relies on the weak gravitational field limit. The derived equations for the second-order scalar, vector, and tensor metric corrections are suitable at arbitrary distances, including regions with nonlinear contrasts of the matter density. We thoroughly verify fulfillment of all Einstein equations, as well as self-consistency of order assignments. In addition, we achieve logical positive results in the Minkowski background limit. Feasible investigations of the cosmological back-reaction manifestations by means of relativistic simulations are also outlined.

  4. The tensor hierarchy of 8-dimensional field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andino, Óscar Lasso; Ortín, Tomás

    2016-10-01

    We construct the tensor hierarchy of generic, bosonic, 8-dimensional field theories. We first study the form of the most general 8-dimensional bosonic theory with Abelian gauge symmetries only and no massive deformations. This study determines the tensors that occur in the Chern-Simons terms of the (electric and magnetic) field strengths and the action for the electric fields, which we determine. Having constructed the most general Abelian theory we study the most general gaugings of its global symmetries and the possible massive deformations using the embedding tensor formalism, constructing the complete tensor hierarchy using the Bianchi identities. We find the explicit form of all the field strengths of the gauged theory up to the 6-forms. Finally, we find the equations of motion comparing the Noether identities with the identities satisfied by the Bianchi identities themselves. We find that some equations of motion are not simply the Bianchi identities of the dual fields, but combinations of them.

  5. Higher rank antisymmetric tensor fields in Klebanov-Strassler geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashmita; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-05-01

    In string theory, higher rank antisymmetric tensor fields appear as massless excitations of closed strings. To date, there is no experimental support in favor of their existence. In a stringy framework, starting from a warped throatlike Klebanov-Strassler geometry, we show that all the massless higher rank antisymmetric tensor fields are heavily suppressed due to the background fluxes leading to their invisibility in our Universe.

  6. K-inflationary power spectra at second order

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2013-06-01

    Within the class of inflationary models, k-inflation represents the most general single field framework that can be associated with an effective quadratic action for the curvature perturbations and a varying speed of sound. The incoming flow of high-precision cosmological data, such as those from the Planck satellite and small scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, calls for greater accuracy in the inflationary predictions. In this work, we calculate for the first time the next-to-next-to-leading order scalar and tensor primordial power spectra in k-inflation needed in order to obtain robust constraints on the inflationary theory. The method used is the uniform approximation together with a second order expansion in the Hubble and sound flow functions. Our result is checked in various limits in which it reduces to already known situations.

  7. Tensor classification of structure in smoothed particle hydrodynamics density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan; Bonnell, Ian; Lucas, William; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    As hydrodynamic simulations increase in scale and resolution, identifying structures with non-trivial geometries or regions of general interest becomes increasingly challenging. There is a growing need for algorithms that identify a variety of different features in a simulation without requiring a `by eye' search. We present tensor classification as such a technique for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). These methods have already been used to great effect in N-Body cosmological simulations, which require smoothing defined as an input free parameter. We show that tensor classification successfully identifies a wide range of structures in SPH density fields using its native smoothing, removing a free parameter from the analysis and preventing the need for tessellation of the density field, as required by some classification algorithms. As examples, we show that tensor classification using the tidal tensor and the velocity shear tensor successfully identifies filaments, shells and sheet structures in giant molecular cloud simulations, as well as spiral arms in discs. The relationship between structures identified using different tensors illustrates how different forces compete and co-operate to produce the observed density field. We therefore advocate the use of multiple tensors to classify structure in SPH simulations, to shed light on the interplay of multiple physical processes.

  8. Application of graphene second-order nonlinearity in THz plasmons excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalpoor, Kamal; Zarifkar, Abbas; Miri, Mehdi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the phase-matching condition, the excited electric field formula, and the nonlinear susceptibility tensor elements conditions required for excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on flat graphene are derived. The second-order nonlinearity is utilized for compensation of the free-space and SPPs wave vectors mismatch. In order to excite SPPs on graphene, the phase matching condition is investigated for the second-order effects including the difference frequency generation (DFG), the second harmonic generation (SHG), and the sum-frequency generation (SFG). In addition, since the incident waves polarizations play an important role in the excitation of the SPPs, the realization of the susceptibility tensor elements conditions, the effect of TE, TM, not polarized and perpendicularly polarized incident waves are investigated using the Green's function theory.

  9. The symmetric tensor field in the relativistic theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, A. Sh.; Gottlöber, S.

    1995-07-01

    The system of a self-gravitating scalar field is frequently used in inflationary cosmological models. In the present paper we study a more complicated system containing an extra linear tensor field ψik=ψki with minimal coupling. We determine five of the six free parameters that occur in the most general expression for the actionS ψ of this field. In doing so we assume that in flat space-time the field ψik must be invariant under gauge transformations. In a special case theS ψ found becomes a known expression for the action of a massless tensor field ψik. We compute the metric energy-momentum tensor that determines the contribution of ψik to the Einstein equations. We also exhibit the equations of motion of ψik in curved space-time.

  10. Tensor Galileons and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios; Khoo, Fech Scen; Roest, Diederik; Schupp, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The particular structure of Galileon interactions allows for higher-derivative terms while retaining second order field equations for scalar fields and Abelian p-forms. In this work we introduce an index-free formulation of these interactions in terms of two sets of Grassmannian variables. We employ this to construct Galileon interactions for mixed-symmetry tensor fields and coupled systems thereof. We argue that these tensors are the natural generalization of scalars with Galileon symmetry, similar to p-forms and scalars with a shift-symmetry. The simplest case corresponds to linearised gravity with Lovelock invariants, relating the Galileon symmetry to diffeomorphisms. Finally, we examine the coupling of a mixed-symmetry tensor to gravity, and demonstrate in an explicit example that the inclusion of appropriate counterterms retains second order field equations.

  11. Calculating Second-Order Effects in MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John A.; Coss, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of mathematical models includes second-order effects in n-channel, enhancement-mode, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). When dimensions of circuit elements relatively large, effects neglected safely. However, as very-large-scale integration of microelectronic circuits leads to MOSFET's shorter or narrower than 2 micrometer, effects become significant in design and operation. Such computer programs as widely-used "Simulation Program With Integrated Circuit Emphasis, Version 2" (SPICE 2) include many of these effects. In second-order models of n-channel, enhancement-mode MOSFET, first-order gate-depletion region diminished by triangular-cross-section deletions on end and augmented by circular-wedge-cross-section bulges on sides.

  12. Ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging detection with gradient tensor compensation in urban unshielded environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Qiu, Longqing; Shi, Wen; Chang, Baolin; Qiu, Yang; Xu, Lu; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Xie, Xiaoming

    2013-03-01

    An ultra-low field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was set up in an urban laboratory without magnetic shielding. The measured environmental gradient fields of 1 ˜ 5 μT/m caused image distortion. We designed a gradient detection and compensation system to effectively balance the gradient tensor components. The free induction decay signal duration of tap water was thus extended from 0.3 s to 2.5 s, providing the possibility for high-resolution imaging. Two-dimensional MRI images were then obtained at 130 μT with a helium-cooled second-order superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer. This result allows us to develop an inexpensive ULF MRI system for biological studies.

  13. Quantum Gravity Effects in Scalar, Vector and Tensor Field Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Anindita

    Quantum theory of gravity deals with the physics of the gravitational field at Planck length scale (10-35 m). Even though it is experimentally hard to reach the Planck length scale, on can look for evidence of quantum gravity that is detectable in astrophysics. In this thesis, we try to find effects of loop quantum gravity corrections on observable phenomena. We show that the quantum fluctuation strain for LIGO data would be 10 -125 on the Earth. Th correction is, however, substantial near the black hole horizon. We discuss the effect of this for scalar field propagation followed by vector and tensor fields. For the scalar field, the correction introduces a new asymmetry; for the vector field, we found a new perturbation solution and for the tensor field, we found the corrected Einstein equations which are yet to solve. These will affect phenomena like Hawking radiation, black hole entropy and gravitational waves.

  14. Total angular momentum waves for scalar, vector, and tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc; Jeong, Donghui

    2012-12-01

    Most calculations in cosmological perturbation theory, including those dealing with the inflationary generation of perturbations, their time evolution, and their observational consequences, decompose those perturbations into plane waves (Fourier modes). However, for some calculations, particularly those involving observations performed on a spherical sky, a decomposition into waves of fixed total angular momentum (TAM) may be more appropriate. Here we introduce TAM waves—solutions of fixed total angular momentum to the Helmholtz equation—for three-dimensional scalar, vector, and tensor fields. The vector TAM waves of given total angular momentum can be decomposed further into a set of three basis functions of fixed orbital angular momentum, a set of fixed helicity, or a basis consisting of a longitudinal (L) and two transverse (E and B) TAM waves. The symmetric traceless rank-2 tensor TAM waves can be similarly decomposed into a basis of fixed orbital angular momentum or fixed helicity, or a basis that consists of a longitudinal (L), two vector (VE and VB, of opposite parity), and two tensor (TE and TB, of opposite parity) waves. We show how all of the vector and tensor TAM waves can be obtained by applying derivative operators to scalar TAM waves. This operator approach then allows one to decompose a vector field into three covariant scalar fields for the L, E, and B components and symmetric-traceless-tensor fields into five covariant scalar fields for the L, VE, VB, TE, and TB components. We provide projections of the vector and tensor TAM waves onto vector and tensor spherical harmonics. We provide calculational detail to facilitate the assimilation of this formalism into cosmological calculations. As an example, we calculate the power spectra of the deflection angle for gravitational lensing by density perturbations and by gravitational waves. We comment on an alternative approach to cosmic microwave background fluctuations based on TAM waves. An

  15. Relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Friman, Bengt; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and employing a Chapman-Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium, we derive second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current for a system of massless quarks and gluons. The transport coefficients are obtained exactly using quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions at non-zero chemical potential. We show that, within the relaxation time approximation, the second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current can be decoupled. We find that, for large values of the ratio of chemical potential to temperature, the charge conductivity is small compared to the coefficient of shear viscosity. Moreover, we show that in the relaxation-time approximation, the limiting behaviour of the ratio of heat conductivity to shear viscosity is qualitatively similar to that obtained for a strongly coupled conformal plasma.

  16. Anomalies and time reversal invariance in relativistic hydrodynamics: The second order and higher dimensional formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2011-08-01

    We present two new results on relativistic hydrodynamics with anomalies and external electromagnetic fields, “chiral magnetohydrodynamics” (CMHD). First, we study CMHD in four dimensions at second order in the derivative expansion assuming the conformal/Weyl invariance. We classify all possible independent conformal second order viscous corrections to the energy-momentum tensor and to the U(1) current in the presence of external electric and/or magnetic fields, and identify 18 terms that originate from the triangle anomaly. We then propose and motivate the following guiding principle to constrain the CMHD: the anomaly-induced terms that are even under the time-reversal invariance should not contribute to the local entropy production rate. This allows us to fix 13 out of the 18 transport coefficients that enter the second order formulation of CMHD. We also relate one of our second order transport coefficients to the chiral shear waves. Our second subject is hydrodynamics with (N+1)-gon anomaly in an arbitrary 2N dimensions. The effects from the (N+1)-gon anomaly appear in hydrodynamics at (N-1)th order in the derivative expansion, and we identify precisely N such corrections to the U(1) current. The time-reversal constraint is powerful enough to allow us to find the analytic expressions for all transport coefficients. We confirm the validity of our results (and of the proposed guiding principle) by an explicit fluid/gravity computation within the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  17. Anomalies and time reversal invariance in relativistic hydrodynamics: The second order and higher dimensional formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.E.; Yee, H.-U.

    2011-08-25

    We present two new results on relativistic hydrodynamics with anomalies and external electromagnetic fields, 'chiral magnetohydrodynamics' (CMHD). First, we study CMHD in four dimensions at second order in the derivative expansion assuming the conformal/Weyl invariance. We classify all possible independent conformal second order viscous corrections to the energy-momentum tensor and to the U(1) current in the presence of external electric and/or magnetic fields, and identify 18 terms that originate from the triangle anomaly. We then propose and motivate the following guiding principle to constrain the CMHD: the anomaly-induced terms that are even under the time-reversal invariance should not contribute to the local entropy production rate. This allows us to fix 13 out of the 18 transport coefficients that enter the second order formulation of CMHD. We also relate one of our second order transport coefficients to the chiral shear waves. Our second subject is hydrodynamics with (N+1)-gon anomaly in an arbitrary 2N dimensions. The effects from the (N+1)-gon anomaly appear in hydrodynamics at (N-1)th order in the derivative expansion, and we identify precisely N such corrections to the U(1) current. The time-reversal constraint is powerful enough to allow us to find the analytic expressions for all transport coefficients. We confirm the validity of our results (and of the proposed guiding principle) by an explicit fluid/gravity computation within the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  18. Can Torsion BE Treated as Just another Tensor Field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nester, James M.; Wang, Chih-Hung

    Many alternative gravity theories use an independent connection which leads to torsion in addition to curvature. Some have argued that there is no physical need to use such connections, that one can always use the Levi-Civita connection and just treat torsion as another tensor field. We explore this issue here in the context of the Poincaré Gauge theory of gravity, which is usually formulated in terms of an affine connection for a Riemann-Cartan geometry (torsion and curvature). We compare the equations obtained by taking as the independent dynamical variables: (i) the orthonormal coframe and the connection and (ii) the orthonormal coframe and the torsion (contortion), and we also consider the coupling to a source. From this analysis we conclude that, at least for this class of theories, torsion should not be considered as just another tensor field.

  19. Algebras in tensor categories and coset conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, J.; Fuchs, J.; Runkel, I.; Schweigert, C.

    2004-06-01

    The coset construction is the most important tool to construct rational conformal field theories with known chiral data. For some cosets at small level, so-called maverick cosets, the familiar analysis using selection and identification rules breaks down. Intriguingly, this phenomenon is linked to the existence of exceptional modular invariants. Recent progress in CFT, based on studying algebras in tensor categories, allows for a universal construction of the chiral data of coset theories which in particular also applies to maverick cosets.

  20. Spectral expansions of tensor-valued random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, Anatoliy

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the theory of random fields that are defined on the space domain ℝ3, take values in a real finite-dimensional linear space V that consists of tensors of a fixed rank, and are homogeneous and isotropic with respect to an orthogonal representation of a closed subgroup G of the group O(3). A historical introduction, the statement of the problem, some current results, and a sketch of proofs are included.

  1. Synthesis of second-order nonlinearities in dielectric-semiconductor-dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hung-Hsi; Yang, Mu-Han; Sharma, Rajat; Puckett, Matthew W.; Montoya, Sergio; Wurm, Christian D.; Vallini, Felipe; Fullerton, Eric E.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a large effective second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility in electronic optical metamaterials based on sputtered dielectric-semiconductor-dielectric multilayers of silicon dioxide/amorphous silicon (a-Si)/aluminum oxide. The interfacial fixed charges (Qf) with opposite signs on either side of dielectric-semiconductor interfaces result in a non-zero built-in electric field within the a-Si layer, which couples to the large third-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor of a-Si and induces an effective second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor χeff(2). The value of the largest components of the effective χeff(2) tensor, i.e., χ(2)zzz, is determined experimentally to be 2 pm/V for the as-fabricated metamaterials and increases to 8.5 pm/V after the post-thermal annealing process. The constituents and fabrication methods make these metamaterials CMOS compatible, enabling efficient nonlinear devices for chip-scale silicon photonic integrated circuits.

  2. Stress tensor for a scalar field in a spatially varying background potential: Divergences, "renormalization", anomalies, and Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Fulling, Stephen A.; Parashar, Prachi; Kalauni, Pushpa; Murphy, Taylor

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand quantum fluctuation energy densities and stress within a spatially varying dielectric medium, we examine the vacuum expectation value for the stress tensor of a scalar field with arbitrary conformal parameter, in the background of a given potential that depends on only one spatial coordinate. We regulate the expressions by incorporating a temporal-spatial cutoff in the (imaginary) time and transverse-spatial directions. The divergences are captured by the zeroth- and second-order WKB approximations. Then the stress tensor is "renormalized" by omitting the terms that depend on the cutoff. The ambiguities that inevitably arise in this procedure are both duly noted and restricted by imposing certain physical conditions; one result is that the renormalized stress tensor exhibits the expected trace anomaly. The renormalized stress tensor exhibits no pressure anomaly, in that the principle of virtual work is satisfied for motions in a transverse direction. We then consider a potential that defines a wall, a one-dimensional potential that vanishes for z <0 and rises like zα, α >0 , for z >0 . Previously, the stress tensor had been computed outside of the wall, whereas now we compute all components of the stress tensor in the interior of the wall. The full finite stress tensor is computed numerically for the two cases where explicit solutions to the differential equation are available, α =1 and 2. The energy density exhibits an inverse linear divergence as the boundary is approached from the inside for a linear potential, and a logarithmic divergence for a quadratic potential. Finally, the interaction between two such walls is computed, and it is shown that the attractive Casimir pressure between the two walls also satisfies the principle of virtual work (i.e., the pressure equals the negative derivative of the energy with respect to the distance between the walls).

  3. Second-order nonlinearity induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y H; Zhang, S S; Shen, H Z; Yi, X X

    2017-04-01

    In analogy to electromagnetically induced transparency, optomechanically induced transparency was proposed recently in [Science330, 1520 (2010)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1195596]. In this Letter, we demonstrate another form of induced transparency enabled by second-order nonlinearity. A practical application of the second-order nonlinearity induced transparency is to measure the second-order nonlinear coefficient. Our scheme might find applications in quantum optics and quantum information processing.

  4. Second-order perturbation theory: a covariant approach involving a barotropic equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osano, Bob

    2017-06-01

    We present a covariant and gauge-invariant formalism suited to the study of second-order effects associated with higher order tensor perturbations. The analytical method we have developed enables us to characterize pure second-order tensor perturbations about the FLRW model having different kinds of equations of state. Our analysis of the radiation case suggests that it may be feasible to examine the CMB polarization arising from higher order perturbations.

  5. An Analysis of Second-Order Autoshaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-Robinson, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Three mechanisms can explain second-order conditioning: (1) The second-order conditioned stimulus (CS2) could activate a representation of the first-order conditioned stimulus (CS1), thereby provoking the conditioned response (CR); The CS2 could enter into an excitatory association with either (2) the representation governing the CR, or (3) with a…

  6. Molecular g-tensors from analytical response theory and quasi-degenerate perturbation theory in the framework of complete active space self-consistent field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Lan, Tran; Chalupský, Jakub; Yanai, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The molecular g-tensor is an important spectroscopic parameter provided by electron para magnetic resonance (EPR) measurement and often needs to be interpreted using computational methods. Here, we present two new implementations based on the first-order and second-order perturbation theories to calculate the g-tensors within the complete-active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave function model. In the first-order method, the quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (QDPT) is employed for constructing relativistic CASSCF states perturbed with the spin-orbit coupling operator, which is described effectively in one-electron form with the flexible nuclear screening spin-orbit approximation introduced recently by us. The second-order method is a newly reported approach built upon the linear response theory which accounts for the perturbation with respect to external magnetic field. It is implemented with the coupled-perturbed CASSCF (CP-CASSCF) approach, which provides an equivalent of untruncated sum-over-states expansion. The comparison of the performances between the first-order and second-order methods is shown for various molecules containing light to heavy elements, highlighting their relative strength and weakness. The formulations of QDPT and CP-CASSCF approaches as well as the derivation of the second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess picture change of Zeeman operators are given in detail.

  7. Second-Order Gravitational Self-Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2012-08-01

    Using a rigorous method of matched asymptotic expansions, I derive the equation of motion of a small, compact body in an external vacuum spacetime through second order in the body’s mass (neglecting effects of internal structure). The motion is found to be geodesic in a certain locally defined regular geometry satisfying Einstein’s equation at second order. I outline a method of numerically obtaining both the metric of that regular geometry and the complete second-order metric perturbation produced by the body.

  8. Second-Order Gravitational Self-Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In order to extract physical parameters from the waveform of an extreme-mass-ratio binary, one requires a second-order-accurate description of the motion of the smaller of the two objects in the binary. Using a method of matched asymptotic expansions, I derive the second-order equation of motion of a small, nearly spherical and non-rotating compact object in an arbitrary vacuum spacetime. I find that the motion is geodesic in a certain locally defined effective metric satisfying the vacuum Einstein equation through second order, and I outline a method of numerically determining this effective metric.

  9. Symmetries of second-order PDEs and conformal Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamparlis, Michael; Paliathanasis, Andronikos

    2015-06-01

    We study the Lie point symmetries of a general class of partial differential equations (PDE) of second order. An equation from this class naturally defines a second-order symmetric tensor (metric). In the case the PDE is linear on the first derivatives we show that the Lie point symmetries are given by the conformal algebra of the metric modulo a constraint involving the linear part of the PDE. Important elements in this class are the Klein-Gordon equation and the Laplace equation. We apply the general results and determine the Lie point symmetries of these equations in various general classes of Riemannian spaces. Finally we study the type II hidden symmetries of the wave equation in a Riemannian space with a Lorenzian metric.

  10. Nonorthogonal orbital based n-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. III. Second-order perturbation theory using valence bond self-consistent field function as reference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Ying, Fuming; Gu, Junjing; Zhang, Huaiyu; Wu, Wei

    2014-10-07

    Using the formulas and techniques developed in Papers I and II of this series, the recently developed second-order perturbation theory based on a valence bond self-consistent field reference function (VBPT2) has been extended by using the internally contracted correction wave function. This ansatz strongly reduces the size of the interaction space compared to the uncontracted wave function and thus improves the capability of the VBPT2 method dramatically. Test calculations show that internally contracted VBPT2 using only a small number of reference valence bond functions, can give results as accuracy as the VBPT2 method and other more sophisticated methods such as full configuration interaction and multireference configuration interaction.

  11. Understanding Second-Order Theory of Mind

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    children develop the ability to perform second-order false - belief tasks [1]. We simulated five developing models...process of selection. Cognitive Psychology, 50:45–85, 2005. [7] H. W. Wellman, D. Cross, and J. Watson. Meta-analysis of theory -of- mind development: The truth about false belief . Child Development, 72(3):655–684, 2001. 168 ...second-order theory of mind task . Ultimately, this will provide robots with a deeper understanding of their human

  12. Full Moment Tensor Analysis at The Geysers Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, O. S.; Dreger, D. S.; Hellweg, M.; Lombard, P. N.; Ford, S. R.; Taira, T.; Taggart, J.; Weldon, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Geothermal energy has been produced at The Geysers Geothermal Field in Northern California for more than forty years. It has been demonstrated that increased steam production and fluid injection correlates positively with changes in earthquake activity, resulting in thousands of tiny earthquakes each year with events ranging in magnitude up to 4.5. We determine source parameters for the largest of these earthquakes using a regional distance moment tensor method. We invert three-component, complete waveform data from broadband stations of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network, the Northern California Seismic Network and the USArray deployment (2005-2007) for the complete, six-element moment tensor. Some solutions depart substantially from a pure double-couple with some events having large volumetric components. Care is needed in the assessment of the significance of the non-double-couple terms. We have worked to develop a systematic procedure for the evaluation of aleatoric and epistemic solution uncertainty (e.g. Ford et al., 2009; Ford et al., 2010). We will present the solutions for The Geysers events together with estimates of random errors and systematic errors due to imperfect station coverage and knowledge of the velocity structure, which are needed to compute Green's functions for the inversion. Preliminary results indicate that some events have large isotropic components that appear to be stable and suggestive of fluid or gas involvement during the rupture processes. We are presently incorporating full moment tensor capability in the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory's automatic processing system and analyst interface. This upgrade will enable improved monitoring at The Geysers and volcanically active regions of California.

  13. Cosmology in generalized Horndeski theories with second-order equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2014-08-01

    We study the cosmology of an extended version of Horndeski theories with second-order equations of motion on the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background. In addition to a dark energy field χ associated with the gravitational sector, we take into account multiple scalar fields ϕI (I =1,2,…,N-1) characterized by the Lagrangians P(I)(XI) with XI=∂μϕI∂μϕI. These additional scalar fields can model the perfect fluids of radiation and nonrelativistic matter. We derive propagation speeds of scalar and tensor perturbations as well as conditions for the absence of ghosts. The theories beyond Horndeski induce nontrivial modifications to all the propagation speeds of N scalar fields, but the modifications to those for the matter fields ϕI are generally suppressed relative to that for the dark energy field χ. We apply our results to the covariantized Galileon with an Einstein-Hilbert term in which partial derivatives of the Minkowski Galileon are replaced by covariant derivatives. Unlike the covariant Galileon with second-order equations of motion in general space-time, the scalar propagation speed square cs12 associated with the field χ becomes negative during the matter era for late-time tracking solutions, so the two Galileon theories can be clearly distinguished at the level of linear cosmological perturbations.

  14. Magnetotelluric tensors, electromagnetic field scattering and distortion in three-dimensional environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Colin

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes how subsurface resistivity distributions can be estimated directly from the magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationship between electric and magnetic fields observed on a three-dimensional (3-D) half-space. It presents an inhomogeneous plane wave analogy where relationships between horizontal electric and magnetic fields, and an apparent current density define an apparent resistivity tensor constructed from a quadratic function of the MT tensor. An extended-Born relationship allows the electric field to be normalized with respect to an apparent background current density. The model is generalized by including the vertical magnetic field in a 3 by 3 MT response tensor. A complex apparent wave number tensor, constructed from this tensor, has eigenvalues which, using the plane wave analogy, are the vertical wave numbers associated with the eigenpolarizations of propagating waves in the model half space. The elements associated with the vertical magnetic field transfer function define the horizontal wave numbers. An extended 3 by 3 phase tensor contains four elements of the conventional 2 by 2 phase tensor and two elements associated with the vertical magnetic transfer function. The extended phase tensor and a single real distortion tensor with six independent elements can be used to quantify static electric and magnetic field distortions. The approach provides a theoretical basis for visualization and migration of MT data, in comparison with results from other electrical and EM techniques, a starting point for constrained 3-D inversions, and an assessment of results with other geophysical and geological data.

  15. Erratum to Surface‐wave green’s tensors in the near field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haney, Matthew M.; Hisashi Nakahara,

    2016-01-01

    Haney and Nakahara (2014) derived expressions for surface‐wave Green’s tensors that included near‐field behavior. Building on the result for a force source, Haney and Nakahara (2014) further derived expressions for a general point moment tensor source using the exact Green’s tensors. However, it has come to our attention that, although the Green’s tensors were correct, the resulting expressions for a general point moment tensor source were missing some terms. In this erratum, we provide updated expressions with these missing terms. The inclusion of the missing terms changes the example given in Haney and Nakahara (2014).

  16. Static second-order polarizabilities of aminobenzophenones and nitrobenzophenones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Craig E.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1991-01-01

    Static-field theoretical studies on molecular second-order polarizabilities (beta) of benzophenone derivatives were performed. Calculations were based on the use of shaped electric fields and semiempirical Hamiltonians. Either an electron-donating (amine) or an electron-withdrawing (nitro) substituent was incorporated into a phenyl ring of benzophenone; the phenyl rings of benzophenone were oriented either coplanar or perpendicular to the carbonyl. The change in charge transfer with respect to the electrophilic character of the carbonyl group was monitored to determine its effect on the molecular second-order polarizability. Calculations were performed for all constitutional isomers of the two benzophenone derivatives.

  17. Second-order reconstruction of the inflationary potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Turner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    To first order in the deviation from scale invariance the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives can be expressed in terms of the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor perturbations, n and n(sub T), and their contributions to the variance of the quadrupole CBR temperature anisotropy, S and T. In addition, there is a 'consistency relation' between these quantities: n(sub T) = (-1/ 7)(T/S). We derive the second-order expressions for the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives and the first-order expression for its third derivative, in terms, of n, n(sub T), S, T, and dn/d ln gamma. We also obtain the second-order consistency relation, n(sub T) = (-1/7)(T/S)(1 + 0.11(T/S) + 0.15(n-1)). As an example we consider the exponential potential, the only known case where exact analytic solutions for the perturbation spectra exist. We reconstruct the potential via Taylor expansion (with coefficients calculated at both first and second order), and introduce the Pade approximate as a greatly improved alternative.

  18. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  19. Urban Principals' Second Order Change Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Rosemarye T.; La Cava, Gonzalo S.

    2011-01-01

    Urban school leaders have challenges in continually improving student achievement and making change as quickly as needed. To address this problem 37 non-Title I principals completed an on-line survey, Principal's Actions Survey (PAS), based on the seven responsibilities for second order change identified by Marzano, Waters, and McNulty (2005).…

  20. Urban Principals' Second Order Change Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Rosemarye T.; La Cava, Gonzalo S.

    2011-01-01

    Urban school leaders have challenges in continually improving student achievement and making change as quickly as needed. To address this problem 37 non-Title I principals completed an on-line survey, Principal's Actions Survey (PAS), based on the seven responsibilities for second order change identified by Marzano, Waters, and McNulty (2005).…

  1. Nine Practices of Second Order Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bill; Tucker, Patrick; Williams, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Many schools are in some stage of implementing differentiated instruction, with some already in what Carol Tomlinson describes in "The Differentiated School" as "second order change," where the entire school practices differentiation. In high-performing schools, differentiation has proved to be an effective instructional strategy; in classroom…

  2. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  3. Creep of a second-order fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Passman, S.L.

    1982-08-01

    The boundary-value problem associated with flow of a right circular cylinder of a second-order fluid under constant axial stress and lateral pressure is formulated. Closed-form solutions are given. Agreement with creep tests on natural rock salt is noted.

  4. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2014-10-28

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  5. Kinematic projective quantum states for loop quantum gravity coupled to tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okołów, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    We present a construction of kinematic quantum states for theories of tensor fields of an arbitrary sort. The construction is based on projective techniques by Kijowski. Applying projective quantum states for Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) obtained by Lanéry and Thiemann we construct quantum states for LQG coupled to tensor fields.

  6. Flavour fields in steady state: stress tensor and free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a probe brane in a given gravitational background is governed by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The corresponding open string metric arises naturally in studying the fluctuations on the probe. In Gauge-String duality, it is known that in the presence of a constant electric field on the worldvolume of the probe, the open string metric acquires an event horizon and therefore the fluctuation modes on the probe experience an effective temperature. In this article, we bring together various properties of such a system to a formal definition and a subsequent narration of the effective thermodynamics and the stress tensor of the corresponding flavour fields, also including a non-vanishing chemical potential. In doing so, we point out a potentially infinitely-degenerate scheme-dependence of regularizing the free energy, which nevertheless yields a universal contribution in certain cases. This universal piece appears as the coefficient of a log-divergence in free energy when a space-filling probe brane is embedded in AdS d+1-background, for d = 2, 4, and is related to conformal anomaly. For the special case of d = 2, the universal factor has a striking resemblance to the well-known heat current formula in (1 + 1)-dimensional conformal field theory in steady-state, which endows a plausible physical interpretation to it. Interestingly, we observe a vanishing conformal anomaly in d = 6.

  7. Calculation of the zero-field splitting tensor on the basis of hybrid density functional and Hartree-Fock theory.

    PubMed

    Neese, Frank

    2007-10-28

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) (expressed in terms of the D tensor) is the leading spin-Hamiltonian parameter for systems with a ground state spin S>12. To first order in perturbation theory, the ZFS arises from the direct spin-spin dipole-dipole interaction. To second order, contributions arise from spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The latter contributions are difficult to treat since the SOC mixes states of different multiplicities. This is an aspect of dominant importance for the correct prediction of the D tensor. In this work, the theory of the D tensor is discussed from the point of view of analytic derivative theory. Starting from a general earlier perturbation treatment [F. Neese and E. I. Soloman, Inorg. Chem. 37, 6568 (1998)], straightforward response equations are derived that are readily transferred to the self-consistent field (SCF) Hartree-Fock (HF) or density functional theory (DFT) framework. The main additional effort in such calculations arises from the solution of nine sets of nonstandard coupled-perturbed SCF equations. These equations have been implemented together with the spin-orbit mean-field representation of the SOC operator and a mean-field treatment of the direct spin-spin interaction into the ORCA electronic structure program. A series of test calculations on diatomic molecules with accurately known zero-field splittings shows that the new approach corrects most of the shortcomings of previous DFT based methods and, on average, leads to predictions within 10% of the experimental values. The slope of the correlation line is essentially unity for the B3LYP and BLYP functionals compared to approximately 0.5 in previous treatments.

  8. Remarks on the second-order Seiberg-Witten maps

    SciTech Connect

    Trampetic, Josip; Wohlgenannt, Michael

    2007-12-15

    In this brief report, we discuss the Seiberg-Witten maps up to the second order in the noncommutative parameter {theta}. They add to the recently published solutions in [A. Alboteanu, T. Ohl, and R. Rueckl, Phys. Rev. D 76, 105018 (2007).]. Expressions for the vector, fermion, and Higgs fields are given explicitly.

  9. Second-order gravitational self-force

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Eran

    2006-10-15

    We derive an expression for the second-order gravitational self-force that acts on a self-gravitating compact object moving in a curved background spacetime. First we develop a new method of derivation and apply it to the derivation of the first-order gravitational self-force. Here we find that our result conforms with the previously derived expression. Next we generalize our method and derive a new expression for the second-order gravitational self-force. This study also has a practical motivation: The data analysis for the planned gravitational wave detector LISA requires construction of waveform templates for the expected gravitational waves. Calculation of the two leading orders of the gravitational self-force will enable one to construct highly accurate waveform templates, which are needed for the data analysis of gravitational waves that are emitted from extreme mass-ratio binaries.

  10. Beyond special relativity at second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, J. M.; Cortés, J. L.; Relancio, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    The study of generic, nonlinear, deformations of special relativity parametrized by a high-energy scale M , which was carried out at first order in 1 /M in J. M. Carmona, J. L. Cortés, and F. Mercati, Phys. Rev. D 86, 084032 (2012), is extended to second order. This can be done systematically through a ("generalized") change of variables from momentum variables that transform linearly. We discuss the different perspectives on the meaning of the change of variables, obtain the coefficients of modified composition laws and Lorentz transformations at second order, and work out how κ -Poincaré, the most commonly used example in the literature, is reproduced as a particular case of the generic framework exposed here.

  11. Second order Pseudo-gaussian shaper

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, Jean-Francois

    2002-11-22

    The purpose of this document is to provide a calculus spreadsheet for the design of second-order pseudo-gaussian shapers. A very interesting reference is given by C.H. Mosher ''Pseudo-Gaussian Transfer Functions with Superlative Recovery'', IEEE TNS Volume 23, p. 226-228 (1976). Fred Goulding and Don Landis have studied the structure of those filters and their implementation and this document will outline the calculation leading to the relation between the coefficients of the filter. The general equation of the second order pseudo-gaussian filter is: f(t) = P{sub 0} {center_dot} e{sup -3kt} {center_dot} sin{sup 2}(kt). The parameter k is a normalization factor.

  12. Second Order Bragg Scattering in a SAR,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    accept the notion that the short- wave components of the ship wake are slightly distorted versions of the Kelvin wake, then there is the possibility of...scattering, at a given place, from a spectrum of waves . The Dabob Bay data indicates that there is little energy in the wake having wave numbers capable...observations do show considerable enhancement of waves of twice the Bragg wavelength at the angle where a SAR wake is observed.. Second order Bragg

  13. Second order Horner's syndrome in a cat.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Fraser McConnell, James

    2009-08-01

    This case report describes the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 3.5-year-old, male neutered, domestic shorthair cat with second order Horner's syndrome as the only clinical abnormality. The neuroanatomical pathway of the sympathetic innervation to the eye, differential diagnoses for Horner's syndrome in cats, and the interpretation of pharmacological testing are reviewed. The unusual MRI findings and the value of fat-suppressed MRI sequences are discussed.

  14. Pole Assignment for Second-Order Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHU, E. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper contains some results for pole assignment problems for the second-order system M ẍ(t)+D ẋ(t)+K x (t)=B u (t) . Specifically, Algorithm 0 constructs feedback matrices F1 and F2 such that the closed-loop quadratic pencil Pc( λ)= λ2M+ λ ( D+ BF2)+( K+ BF1) has a desired set of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors are well-conditioned. The method is a modification of the SVD-based method proposed by Juang and Maghami [1, 2] which is a second-order adaptation of the well-known robust eigenvalue assignment method by Kautsky et al. [3] for first-order systems. Robustness is achieved by minimising some not-so-well-known condition numbers of the eigenvalues of the closed-loop second-order pencil. We next consider the partial pole assignment problem. In 1997, Datta, Elhay and Ram proposed three biorthogonality relations for eigenvectors of symmetric definite quadratic pencils [4]. One of these relations was used to derive an explicit solution to the partial pole assignment problem by state feedback for the related single-input symmetric definite second-order control system. The solution shed new light on the stabilisation and control of large flexible space structures, for which only one small subset of the spectrum needs to be reassigned while retaining the complementary part of the spectrum. In this paper, the method has been generalised for multi-input and non-symmetric quadratic pencils. Finally, we discuss briefly the output feedback pole assignment problem.

  15. Comments on the present state of second-order closure models for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order closure models account for history and nonlocal effects of the mean velocity gradients on the Reynolds stress tensor. Turbulent flows involving body forces or curvature, Reynolds stress relaxational effects, and counter-gradient transport are usually better described. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: (1) the Reynolds stress transport equation; (2) issues in second-order closure modeling; and (3) near wall models.

  16. Pointwise second-order necessary optimality conditions and second-order sensitivity relations in optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowska, Hélène; Hoehener, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This paper is devoted to pointwise second-order necessary optimality conditions for the Mayer problem arising in optimal control theory. We first show that with every optimal trajectory it is possible to associate a solution p (ṡ) of the adjoint system (as in the Pontryagin maximum principle) and a matrix solution W (ṡ) of an adjoint matrix differential equation that satisfy a second-order transversality condition and a second-order maximality condition. These conditions seem to be a natural second-order extension of the maximum principle. We then prove a Jacobson like necessary optimality condition for general control systems and measurable optimal controls that may be only ;partially singular; and may take values on the boundary of control constraints. Finally we investigate the second-order sensitivity relations along optimal trajectories involving both p (ṡ) and W (ṡ).

  17. Evaluation of the Linear and Second-Order NLO Properties of Molecular Crystals within the Local Field Theory: Electron Correlation Effects, Choice of XC Functional, ZPVA Contributions, and Impact of the Geometry in the Case of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Tomasz; Stadnicka, Katarzyna; Champagne, Benoît

    2014-05-13

    The linear [χ((1))] and second-order nonlinear [χ((2))] optical susceptibilities of the 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) crystal are calculated within the local field theory, which consists of first computing the molecular properties, accounting for the dressing effects of the surroundings, and then taking into account the local field effects. Several aspects of these calculations are tackled with the aim of monitoring the convergence of the χ((1)) and χ((2)) predictions with respect to experiment by accounting for the effects of (i) the dressing field within successive approximations, of (ii) the first-order ZPVA corrections, and of (iii) the geometry. With respect to the reference CCSD-based results, besides double hybrid functionals, the most reliable exchange-correlation functionals are LC-BLYP for the static χ((1)) and CAM-B3LYP (and M05-2X, to a lesser extent) for the dynamic χ((1)) but they strongly underestimate χ((2)). Double hybrids perform better for χ((2)) but not necessarily for χ((1)), and, moreover, their performances are much similar to MP2, which is known to slightly overestimate β, with respect to high-level coupled-clusters calculations and, therefore, χ((2)). Other XC functionals with less HF exchange perform poorly with overestimations/underestimations of χ((1))/χ((2)), whereas the HF method leads to underestimations of both. The first-order ZPVA corrections, estimated at the B3LYP level, are usually small but not negligible. Indeed, after ZPVA corrections, the molecular polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities increase by 2% and 5%, respectively, whereas their impact is magnified on the macroscopic responses with enhancements of χ((1)) by up to 5% and of χ((2)) by as much as 10%-12% at λ = 1064 nm. The geometry plays also a key role in view of predicting accurate susceptibilities, particularly for push-pull π-conjugated compounds such as MNA. So, the geometry optimized using periodic boundary conditions is characterized

  18. Gauge Theories of Massless Antisymmetric Tensor-Spinor Fields of Higher Ranks and Superspace Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najima, R.; Hiroki, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Kimura, T.

    1986-01-01

    Gauge theories of antisymmetric tensor-spinor fields of higher ranks are investigated. The manifestly covariant BRS and anti-BRS invariant theories of these spinor gauge fields are formulated in Bonora and Tonin's superspace formalism.

  19. Robust stability of second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a robust control design using strictly positive realness for second-order dynamic systems. The robust strictly positive real controller allows the system to be stabilized with only acceleration measurements. An important property of this design is that stabilization of the system is independent of the system parameters. The control design connects a virtual system to the given plant. The combined system is positive real regardless of system parameter uncertainty. Then any strictly positive real controllers can be used to achieve robust stability. A spring-mass system example and its computer simulations are presented to demonstrate this controller design.

  20. Anomalous transport in second order hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Valle, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    We study the non-dissipative transport effects appearing at second order in the hydrodynamic expansion for a non-interacting gas of chiral fermions by using the partition function formalism. We discuss some features of the corresponding constitutive relations, derive the explicit expressions for the conductivities and compare with existing results in the literature. Talk given by E. Megías at the 4th International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics (ICNFP 2015), 23-30 August 2015, Kolymbari, Crete, Greece.

  1. Second-order conditioning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in Drosophila melanogaster has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning (SOC) protocol that further demonstrates the flexibility of fly behavior. In SOC, a previously conditioned stimulus (CS1) is used as reinforcement for a second conditioned stimulus (CS2) in associative learning. This higher-order context presents an opportunity for reassessing the roles of known learning and memory genes and neuronal networks in a new behavioral paradigm. PMID:21441302

  2. Optical velocimeter by second order correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Yaji; Feng, Yaming; Xu, Da-xiao; Wan, Wenjie

    2017-06-01

    Motional information can be buried inside the temporal statistics of scattering light. Here we explore the second order correlation of scattering light to trace back the transverse velocity of objects, verifying the inverse relationship between the coherence time and the velocity. Based on this principle, a new type of optical velocimeter is demonstrated, which has been further applied to study the fluid flow inside a microfluidic channel. This new noninvasive and easy-to-implement velocimeter may offer a new avenue in many applications.

  3. Second order optical nonlinearity in silicon by symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzanelli, Massimo; Schilling, Joerg

    2016-03-15

    Although silicon does not possess a dipolar bulk second order nonlinear susceptibility due to its centro-symmetric crystal structure, in recent years several attempts were undertaken to create such a property in silicon. This review presents the different sources of a second order susceptibility (χ{sup (2)}) in silicon and the connected second order nonlinear effects which were investigated up to now. After an introduction, a theoretical overview discusses the second order nonlinearity in general and distinguishes between the dipolar contribution—which is usually dominating in non-centrosymmetric structures—and the quadrupolar contribution, which even exists in centro-symmetric materials. Afterwards, the classic work on second harmonic generation from silicon surfaces in reflection measurements is reviewed. Due to the abrupt symmetry breaking at surfaces and interfaces locally a dipolar second order susceptibility appears, resulting in, e.g., second harmonic generation. Since the bulk contribution is usually small, the study of this second harmonic signal allows a sensitive observation of the surface/interface conditions. The impact of covering films, strain, electric fields, and defect states at the interfaces was already investigated in this way. With the advent of silicon photonics and the search for ever faster electrooptic modulators, the interest turned to the creation of a dipolar bulk χ{sup (2)} in silicon. These efforts have been focussing on several experiments applying an inhomogeneous strain to the silicon lattice to break its centro-symmetry. Recent results suggesting the impact of electric fields which are exerted from fixed charges in adjacent covering layers are also included. After a subsequent summary on “competing” concepts using not Si but Si-related materials, the paper will end with some final conclusions, suggesting possible future research direction in this dynamically developing field.

  4. Robust stability of second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C.-H.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown recently how virtual passive controllers can be designed for second-order dynamic systems to achieve robust stability. The virtual controllers were visualized as systems made up of spring, mass and damping elements. In this paper, a new approach emphasizing on the notion of positive realness to the same second-order dynamic systems is used. Necessary and sufficient conditions for positive realness are presented for scalar spring-mass-dashpot systems. For multi-input multi-output systems, we show how a mass-spring-dashpot system can be made positive real by properly choosing its output variables. In particular, sufficient conditions are shown for the system without output velocity. Furthermore, if velocity cannot be measured then the system parameters must be precise to keep the system positive real. In practice, system parameters are not always constant and cannot be measured precisely. Therefore, in order to be useful positive real systems must be robust to some degrees. This can be achieved with the design presented in this paper.

  5. First- and second-order Poisson spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, William R.; Shirley, Eric L.; Migdall, Alan L.; Polyakov, Sergey V.; Hendrix, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    Although Thomas Young is generally given credit for being the first to provide evidence against Newton's corpuscular theory of light, it was Augustin Fresnel who first stated the modern theory of diffraction. We review the history surrounding Fresnel's 1818 paper and the role of the Poisson spot in the associated controversy. We next discuss the boundary-diffraction-wave approach to calculating diffraction effects and show how it can reduce the complexity of calculating diffraction patterns. We briefly discuss a generalization of this approach that reduces the dimensionality of integrals needed to calculate the complete diffraction pattern of any order diffraction effect. We repeat earlier demonstrations of the conventional Poisson spot and discuss an experimental setup for demonstrating an analogous phenomenon that we call a "second-order Poisson spot." Several features of the diffraction pattern can be explained simply by considering the path lengths of singly and doubly bent paths and distinguishing between first- and second-order diffraction effects related to such paths, respectively.

  6. Second-order superintegrable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.; Kalnins, E. G.; Kress, J. M.

    2007-03-15

    A classical (or quantum) superintegrable system on an n-dimensional Riemannian manifold is an integrable Hamiltonian system with potential that admits 2n - 1 functionally independent constants of the motion that are polynomial in the momenta, the maximum number possible. If these constants of the motion are all quadratic, then the system is second-order superintegrable, the most tractable case and the one we study here. Such systems have remarkable properties: multi-integrability and separability, a quadratic algebra of symmetries whose representation theory yields spectral information about the Schroedinger operator, and deep connections with expansion formulas relating classes of special functions. For n = 2 and for conformally flat spaces when n = 3, we have worked out the structure of the classical systems and shown that the quadratic algebra always closes at order 6. Here, we describe the quantum analogs of these results. We show that, for nondegenerate potentials, each classical system has a unique quantum extension.

  7. Nonlocal diffusion second order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, I.; Loi, N. V.; Malaguti, L.; Taddei, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper deals with a second order integro-partial differential equation in Rn with a nonlocal, degenerate diffusion term. Nonlocal conditions, such as the Cauchy multipoint and the weighted mean value problem, are investigated. The existence of periodic solutions is also studied. The dynamic is transformed into an abstract setting and the results come from an approximation solvability method. It combines a Schauder degree argument with an Hartman-type inequality and it involves a Scorza-Dragoni type result. The compact embedding of a suitable Sobolev space in the corresponding Lebesgue space is the unique amount of compactness which is needed in this discussion. The solutions are located in bounded sets and they are limits of functions with values in finitely dimensional spaces.

  8. Cascaded Second-Order Nonlinearities in Waveguides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundheimer, Michael Lee

    The cascaded second-order nonlinearity arising from the second-harmonic generation process in noncentrosymmetric media is a novel approach to achieving the nonlinear phase shifts required for all-optical signal processing. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated and measured the cascaded second-order nonlinearity for the first time in viable integrated optical waveguide formats. Cascaded self-phase modulation was measured in potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO_4 or KTP) segmented quasi-phasematched waveguides at wavelengths near 855 nm and in the optical fiber telecommunications window near 1.585 μm using picosecond and femtosecond pulses, respectively. Spectral modulation and broadening were observed on the output fundamental spectrum and compared to predictions from pulsed second -harmonic generation theory under conditions of group-velocity mismatch (temporal walk-off) and group-velocity dispersion. Peak cascaded phase shifts of the fundamental of approximately pi at 855 nm were inferred with 690 W of peak guided power. Peak cascaded phase shifts of approximately pi/2 were inferred at 1.585 μm with 760 W of peak power in the guide. Direct interferometric measurements of the magnitude and sign of the cascaded nonlinear phase shift of the fundamental were performed in temperature-tuned lithium niobate (LiNbO _3) channel waveguides at 1.32 mum. The cascaded phase shift was shown to change sign upon passing through the phasematching condition, as required by theory. Peak cascaded phase shifts of +0.53 pi and -0.13 pi were measured for 86 W peak power in these waveguides. A non-uniform temperature profile along the waveguide led to a non-uniform wavevector-mismatch along the guide, resulting in an enhanced positive phase shift and an increased temperature bandwidth for the phase shift. The phase shifts achieved in this research are large enough to be suitable for some all-optical signal processing functions.

  9. Second-order temporal modulation transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, C; Soares, C; Vonner, T

    2001-08-01

    Detection thresholds were measured for a sinusoidal modulation applied to the modulation depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) white noise carrier as a function of the frequency of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f'm). The SAM noise acted therefore as a "carrier" stimulus of frequency fm, and sinusoidal modulation of the SAM-noise modulation depth generated two additional components in the modulation spectrum: fm-f'm and fm+f'm. The tracking variable was the modulation depth of the sinusoidal variation applied to the "carrier" modulation depth. The resulting "second-order" temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) measured on four listeners for "carrier" modulation frequencies fm of 16, 64, and 256 Hz display a low-pass segment followed by a plateau. This indicates that sensitivity to fluctuations in the strength of amplitude modulation is best for fluctuation rates f'm below about 2-4 Hz when using broadband noise carriers. Measurements of masked modulation detection thresholds for the lower and upper modulation sideband suggest that this capacity is possibly related to the detection of a beat in the sound's temporal envelope. The results appear qualitatively consistent with the predictions of an envelope detector model consisting of a low-pass filtering stage followed by a decision stage. Unlike listeners' performance, a modulation filterbank model using Q values > or = 2 should predict that second-order modulation detection thresholds should decrease at high values of f'm due to the spectral resolution of the modulation sidebands (in the modulation domain). This suggests that, if such modulation filters do exist, their selectivity is poor. In the latter case, the Q value of modulation filters would have to be less than 2. This estimate of modulation filter selectivity is consistent with the results of a previous study using a modulation-masking paradigm [S. D. Ewert and T. Dau, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181

  10. Curvature tensors and unified field equations on SEX/sub n/

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.T.; Lee, I.L.

    1988-09-01

    We study the curvature tensors and field equations in the n-dimensional SE manifold SEX/sub n/. We obtain several basic properties of the vectors S/sublambda/ and U/sub lambda/ and then of the SE curvature tensor and its contractions, such as a generalized Ricci identity, a generalized Bianchi identity, and two variations of the Bianchi identity satisfied by the SE Einstein tensor. Finally, a system of field equations is discussed in SEX/sub n/ an done of its particular solutions is constructed and displayed.

  11. Conservation laws and stress-energy-momentum tensors for systems with background fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gratus, Jonathan; Obukhov, Yuri N.; Tucker, Robin W.

    2012-10-15

    This article attempts to delineate the roles played by non-dynamical background structures and Killing symmetries in the construction of stress-energy-momentum tensors generated from a diffeomorphism invariant action density. An intrinsic coordinate independent approach puts into perspective a number of spurious arguments that have historically lead to the main contenders, viz the Belinfante-Rosenfeld stress-energy-momentum tensor derived from a Noether current and the Einstein-Hilbert stress-energy-momentum tensor derived in the context of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Emphasis is placed on the role played by non-dynamical background (phenomenological) structures that discriminate between properties of these tensors particularly in the context of electrodynamics in media. These tensors are used to construct conservation laws in the presence of Killing Lie-symmetric background fields. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of background fields in diffeomorphism invariant actions is demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interrelations between different stress-energy-momentum tensors are emphasised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Abraham and Minkowski electromagnetic tensors are discussed in this context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation laws in the presence of nondynamic background fields are formulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The discussion is facilitated by the development of a new variational calculus.

  12. High T{sub c} superconducting second-order gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kittel, A.; Kouznetsov, K.A.; McDermott, R.; Oh, B.; Clarke, J. |

    1998-10-01

    A planar, second-order gradiometer was fabricated from single-layer YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} films. The gradiometer consists of a symmetric flux transformer with an overall length of 80 mm inductively coupled to a directly coupled magnetometer, and has a baseline of 31 mm. The mutual inductance between the flux transformer and the magnetometer is adjusted mechanically to reduce the response to a uniform magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the plane of the gradiometer to typically 50 ppm. From an independent measurement, the residual first-order gradient response was determined to be at most 1.4{percent} relative to the second-order gradient response. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. First- and second-order charged particle optics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-07-01

    Since the invention of the alternating gradient principle there has been a rapid evolution of the mathematics and physics techniques applicable to charged particle optics. In this publication we derive a differential equation and a matrix algebra formalism valid to second-order to present the basic principles governing the design of charged particle beam transport systems. A notation first introduced by John Streib is used to convey the essential principles dictating the design of such beam transport systems. For example the momentum dispersion, the momentum resolution, and all second-order aberrations are expressed as simple integrals of the first-order trajectories (matrix elements) and of the magnetic field parameters (multipole components) characterizing the system. 16 references, 30 figures.

  14. A Finite Field Method for Calculating Molecular Polarizability Tensors for Arbitrary Multipole Rank

    PubMed Central

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Duke, Robert; Darden, Thomas; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2011-01-01

    A finite field method for calculating spherical tensor molecular polarizability tensors αlm;l′m′ = ∂Δlm/∂ϕl′m′* by numerical derivatives of induced molecular multipole Δlm with respect to gradients of electrostatic potential ϕl′m′* is described for arbitrary multipole ranks l and l′. Inter-conversion formulae for transforming multipole moments and polarizability tensors between spherical and traceless Cartesian tensor conventions are derived. As an example, molecular polarizability tensors up to the hexadecapole-hexadecapole level are calculated for water at the HF, B3LYP, MP2, and CCSD levels. In addition, inter-molecular electrostatic and polarization energies calculated by molecular multipoles and polarizability tensors are compared to ab initio reference values calculated by the Reduced Variation Space (RVS) method for several randomly oriented small molecule dimers separated by a large distance. It is discussed how higher order molecular polarizability tensors can be used as a tool for testing and developing new polarization models for future force fields. PMID:21915883

  15. Vacuum stress-energy tensor of a massive scalar field in a wormhole spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Khusnutdinov, N. R.; Sushkov, S. V.

    2010-04-15

    The vacuum average value of the stress-energy tensor of a massive scalar field with nonminimal coupling {xi} to the curvature on the short-throat flat-space wormhole background is calculated. The final analysis is made numerically. It was shown that the energy-momentum tensor does not violate the null energy condition near the throat. Therefore, the vacuum polarization cannot self-consistently support the wormhole.

  16. Noether symmetries, energy-momentum tensors, and conformal invariance in classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Josep M.

    2011-01-15

    In the framework of classical field theory, we first review the Noether theory of symmetries, with simple rederivations of its essential results, with special emphasis given to the Noether identities for gauge theories. With this baggage on board, we next discuss in detail, for Poincare invariant theories in flat spacetime, the differences between the Belinfante energy-momentum tensor and a family of Hilbert energy-momentum tensors. All these tensors coincide on shell but they split their duties in the following sense: Belinfante's tensor is the one to use in order to obtain the generators of Poincare symmetries and it is a basic ingredient of the generators of other eventual spacetime symmetries which may happen to exist. Instead, Hilbert tensors are the means to test whether a theory contains other spacetime symmetries beyond Poincare. We discuss at length the case of scale and conformal symmetry, of which we give some examples. We show, for Poincare invariant Lagrangians, that the realization of scale invariance selects a unique Hilbert tensor which allows for an easy test as to whether conformal invariance is also realized. Finally we make some basic remarks on metric generally covariant theories and classical field theory in a fixed curved background.

  17. A GENERALIZED DIFFUSION TENSOR FOR FULLY ANISOTROPIC DIFFUSION OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN THE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, F.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.; Barra, S.; Kleimann, J.; Strauss, R. D.

    2012-05-10

    The spatial diffusion of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields can, in the most general case, be fully anisotropic, i.e., one has to distinguish three diffusion axes in a local, field-aligned frame. We reexamine the transformation for the diffusion tensor from this local to a global frame, in which the Parker transport equation for energetic particles is usually formulated and solved. Particularly, we generalize the transformation formulae to allow for an explicit choice of two principal local perpendicular diffusion axes. This generalization includes the 'traditional' diffusion tensor in the special case of isotropic perpendicular diffusion. For the local frame, we describe the motivation for the choice of the Frenet-Serret trihedron, which is related to the intrinsic magnetic field geometry. We directly compare the old and the new tensor elements for two heliospheric magnetic field configurations, namely the hybrid Fisk and Parker fields. Subsequently, we examine the significance of the different formulations for the diffusion tensor in a standard three-dimensional model for the modulation of galactic protons. For this, we utilize a numerical code to evaluate a system of stochastic differential equations equivalent to the Parker transport equation and present the resulting modulated spectra. The computed differential fluxes based on the new tensor formulation deviate from those obtained with the 'traditional' one (only valid for isotropic perpendicular diffusion) by up to 60% for energies below a few hundred MeV depending on heliocentric distance.

  18. Optical Probes of the Quantum Vacuum: the Photon Polarization Tensor in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Roessler, Lars; Döbrich, Babette; Gies, Holger

    2012-07-01

    The photon polarization tensor is the central building block of an effective theory description of photon propagation in the quantum vacuum. It accounts for the vacuum fluctuations of the underlying theory, and in the presence of external electromagnetic fields, gives rise to such striking phenomena as vacuum birefringence and dichroism. Standard approximations of the polarization tensor are often restricted to on-the-light-cone dynamics in homogeneous electromagnetic fields, and are limited to certain momentum regimes only. We devise two different strategies to go beyond these limitations: First, we aim at obtaining novel analytical insights into the photon polarization tensor for homogeneous fields, while retaining its full momentum dependence. Second, we employ wordline numerical methods to surpass the constant-field limit.

  19. Local ζ -functions, stress-energy tensor, field fluctuations, and all that, in curved static spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Valter

    This is a quick review on some technology concerning the local zeta function applied to Quantum Field Theory in curved static (thermal) spacetime to regularize the stress energy tensor and the field fluctuations. Dedicated to Prof. Emilio Elizalde on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  20. Relativistic second-order dissipative fluid dynamics at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Friman, Bengt; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    We employ a Chapman-Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium to solve the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and subsequently derive second-order evolution equations for dissipative charge currentand shear stress tensor for a system of massless quarks and gluons. We use quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions to calculate the transport coefficients. We show that, the second-order evolution equations for the dissipative charge current and the shear stress tensor can be decoupled. We find that, for large chemical potential, the charge conductivity is small compared to the shear viscosity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the limiting behaviour of the ratio of heat conductivity to shear viscosity is identicalto that obtained for a strongly coupled conformal plasma.

  1. Counterpart of the Weyl tensor for Rarita-Schwinger type fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Friedemann

    2017-04-01

    In dimensions larger than 3 a modified field strength for Rarita-Schwinger type fields is constructed whose components are not constrained by the field equations. In supergravity theories the result provides a modified (supercovariant) gravitino field strength related by supersymmetry to the (supercovariantized) Weyl tensor. In various cases, such as for free Rarita-Schwinger type gauge fields and for gravitino fields in several supergravity theories, the modified field strength coincides on-shell with the usual field strength. A corresponding result for first order derivatives of Dirac type spinor fields is also presented.

  2. Navier-Stokes computation of compressible turbulent flows with a second order closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingus, C.; Kollmann, W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was the development of a complete second order closure for wall bounded flows, including all components of the dissipation rate tensor and a numerical solution procedure for the resulting system of equations. The main topics discussed are the closure of the pressure correlations and the viscous destruction terms in the dissipation rate equations and the numerical solution scheme based on a block-tridiagonal solver for the nine equations required for the prediction of plane or axisymmetric flows.

  3. A preliminary compressible second-order closure model for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Sarkar, Sutanu

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary version of a compressible second-order closure model that was developed in connection with the National Aero-Space Plane Project is presented. The model requires the solution of transport equations for the Favre-averaged Reynolds stress tensor and dissipation rate. Gradient transport hypotheses are used for the Reynolds heat flux, mass flux, and turbulent diffusion terms. Some brief remarks are made about the direction of future research to generalize the model.

  4. Second-Order Fermi Acceleration and Emission in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations, adopt it for 1ES 1101-232, and Mrk 421. The Fermi-II model with radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient can reproduce the spectra from the radio to the gamma-ray regime. For Mrk 421, an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 begin{math} {times} 10 (38) erg s (-1) is required to agree with the observed GeV flux. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  5. Communications: Ab initio second-order nonlinear optics in solids.

    PubMed

    Luppi, Eleonora; Hübener, Hannes; Véniard, Valérie

    2010-06-28

    We present a first-principles theory for the calculation of the macroscopic second-order susceptibility chi((2)), based on the time-dependent density-functional theory approach. Our method allows to include straightforwardly the many-body effects, such as crystal local fields and excitons. We apply the theory to the computation of the second-harmonic generation spectroscopy. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of this approach we present spectra for the cubic semiconductor GaAs for which we obtain a very good agreement with the experimental results. We point out that crystal local fields are not sufficient to reproduce the experimental results. Only when we account for the excitonic effects we obtain a very good agreement with the experimental second-harmonic generation spectrum.

  6. Retrieving Source-Time Function and Seismic Moment Tensor From Near Field Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Catalina; Ruiz, Javier A.; Ortega, Francisco; Rivera, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Retrieve earthquake source parameters from seismological or geodetic data is an important aspect in the rapid characterization of the earthquake source, which is particularly relevant in real-time operations. The inversion of seismic moment tensors and slip distributions of large earthquakes is a recurrent and important topic in seismology because it allows to know the source properties and rupture process. Several methodologies allow to make these inferences assuming different levels of complexity of the earthquake source, for instance, the Global Centroid Moment Tensor compute routinely the centroid moment tensor from global seismic data, on the other hand, agencies such as the National Earthquake Information Center have implemented methodologies to retrieve the moment tensor in real-time (e.g the W-Phase). However, the joint inversion of the moment tensor and the source-time function using regional and near-field data is a promising approach to characterize source parameters. Several methodologies allow to invert the seismic moment tensor using broadband regional data assuming a simple source-time function (e.g. impulsive, or with a triangular shape), but are usually limited because broadband stations get saturated near the source for moderate and large earthquakes. Yagi and Nishimura (2011) proposed a method that inverts the moment tensor and the half duration using strong motion data. Weber (2009) computes the seismic moment tensor as a function of time using broadband regional data, applying a inverse method that minimize the L1-norm, and then retrieves the source-time function. The aim of this study is to develop a method and a computational tool that allows to jointly invert the moment tensor and the source-time function using strong motion and broadband regional data. The inverse method is applied in two steps, (1) we invert the moment tensor assuming a triangular source-time function and, (2) minimizing the L2-norm, we invert the amplitude of a series of

  7. Magnetic Compensation for Second-Order Doppler Shift in LITS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tjoelker, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainty in the frequency of a linear-ion-trap frequency standard (LITS) can be reduced substantially by use of a very small magnetic inhomogeneity tailored to compensate for the residual second-order Doppler shift. An effect associated with the relativistic time dilatation, one cause of the second-order Doppler shift, is ion motion that is attributable to the trapping radio-frequency (RF)electromagnetic field used to trap ions. The second-order Doppler shift is reduced by using a multi-pole trap; however it is still the largest source of systematic frequency shift in the latest generation of LITSs, which are among the most stable clocks in the world. The present compensation scheme reduces the frequency instability of the affected LITS to about a tenth of its previous value. The basic principles of prior generation LITSs were discussed in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. Below are recapitulated only those items of basic information necessary to place the present development in context. A LITS includes a microwave local oscillator, the frequency of which is stabilized by comparison with the frequency of the ground state hyperfine transition of 199Hg+ ions. The comparison involves a combination of optical and microwave excitation and interrogation of the ions in a linear ion trap in the presence of a nominally uniform magnetic field. In the current version of the LITS, there are two connected traps (see figure): (1) a quadrupole trap wherein the optical excitation and measurement take place and (2) a 12-pole trap (denoted the resonance trap), wherein the microwave interrogation takes place. The ions are initially loaded into the quadrupole trap and are thereafter shuttled between the two traps. Shuttling ions into the resonance trap allows sensitive microwave interrogation to take place well away from loading interference. The axial magnetic field for the resonance trap is generated by an electric current in a finely wound wire coil surrounded by

  8. Model to localize gauge and tensor fields on thick branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumbes, A. E. R.; Hoff da Silva, J. M.; Hott, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    It is shown that the introduction of a suitable function in the higher-dimensional gauge field action may be used in order to achieve gauge bosons localization on a thick brane. The model is constructed upon analogies to the effective coupling of neutral scalar field to electromagnetic field and to the Friedberg-Lee model for hadrons. After that we move forward studying the localization of the Kalb-Ramond field via this procedure.

  9. A not so short note on the Klein Gordon equation at second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Karim A.

    2007-03-01

    We give the governing equations for multiple scalar fields in a flat Friedmann Robertson Walker (FRW) background spacetime on all scales, allowing for metric and field perturbations up to second order. We then derive the Klein Gordon equation at second order in closed form in terms of gauge-invariant perturbations of the fields in the uniform curvature gauge. We also give a simplified form of the Klein Gordon equation using the slow-roll approximation.

  10. Energy-momentum tensors in classical field theories — A modern perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicu, Nicoleta

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a general geometric approach to energy-momentum tensors in Lagrangian field theories, based on a global Hilbert-type definition. The approach is consistent with the ones defining energy-momentum tensors in terms of hypermomentum maps given by the diffeomorphism invariance of the Lagrangian — and, in a sense, complementary to these, with the advantage of an increased simplicity of proofs and also, opening up new insights on the topic. A special attention is paid to the particular cases of metric and metric-affine theories.

  11. Polarization tensor of a photon in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    The polarization operator is investigated at arbitrary photon energy in a constant and homogeneous electric field of the strength E. When the photon energy is less than the vacuum energy = eEℏ / mc , the found probability describes the absorption of a soft photon by virtual electron and positron in an electric field. At this energy, the main contribution to the probability gives the process of the absorption of a soft photon by real electron and positron produced by an electric field.

  12. Second order closure modeling of turbulent buoyant wall plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Gang; Lai, Ming-Chia; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1992-01-01

    Non-intrusive measurements of scalar and momentum transport in turbulent wall plumes, using a combined technique of laser Doppler anemometry and laser-induced fluorescence, has shown some interesting features not present in the free jet or plumes. First, buoyancy-generation of turbulence is shown to be important throughout the flow field. Combined with low-Reynolds-number turbulence and near-wall effect, this may raise the anisotropic turbulence structure beyond the prediction of eddy-viscosity models. Second, the transverse scalar fluxes do not correspond only to the mean scalar gradients, as would be expected from gradient-diffusion modeling. Third, higher-order velocity-scalar correlations which describe turbulent transport phenomena could not be predicted using simple turbulence models. A second-order closure simulation of turbulent adiabatic wall plumes, taking into account the recent progress in scalar transport, near-wall effect and buoyancy, is reported in the current study to compare with the non-intrusive measurements. In spite of the small velocity scale of the wall plumes, the results showed that low-Reynolds-number correction is not critically important to predict the adiabatic cases tested and cannot be applied beyond the maximum velocity location. The mean and turbulent velocity profiles are very closely predicted by the second-order closure models. but the scalar field is less satisfactory, with the scalar fluctuation level underpredicted. Strong intermittency of the low-Reynolds-number flow field is suspected of these discrepancies. The trends in second- and third-order velocity-scalar correlations, which describe turbulent transport phenomena, are also predicted in general, with the cross-streamwise correlations better than the streamwise one. Buoyancy terms modeling the pressure-correlation are shown to improve the prediction slightly. The effects of equilibrium time-scale ratio and boundary condition are also discussed.

  13. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  14. Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Imaging of Chiral Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, David J.; Wanapun, Debbie; Simpson, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC) is an emerging technique for crystal imaging and characterization. We provide a brief overview of the origin of second harmonic generation signals in SONICC and discuss recent studies using SONICC for biological applications. Given that they provide near-complete suppression of any background, SONICC images can be used to determine the presence or absence of protein crystals through both manual inspection and automated analysis. Because SONICC creates high-resolution images, nucleation and growth kinetics can also be observed. SONICC can detect metastable, homochiral crystalline forms of amino acids crystallizing from racemic solutions, which confirms Ostwald’s rule of stages for crystal growth. SONICC’s selectivity, based on order, and sensitivity, based on background suppression, make it a promising technique for numerous fields concerned with chiral crystal formation. PMID:21469954

  15. Galaxy bias and gauges at second order in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Wands, David

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the question of gauge choice when analysing relativistic density perturbations at second order. We compare Newtonian and general relativistic approaches. Some misconceptions in the recent literature are addressed. We show that the comoving-synchronous gauge is the unique gauge in general relativity that corresponds to the Lagrangian frame and is entirely appropriate to describe the matter overdensity at second order. The comoving-synchronous gauge is the simplest gauge in which to describe Lagrangian bias at second order.

  16. GravitoMagnetic Field in Tensor-Vector-Scalar Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2013-04-01

    We study the gravitomagnetism in the TeVeS theory. We compute the gravitomagnetic field that a slow moving mass distribution produces in its Newtonian regime. We report that the consistency between the TeVeS gravitomagnetic field and that predicted by the Einstein-Hilbert theory leads to a relation between the vector and scalar coupling constants of the theory. We translate the Lunar Laser Ranging measurement's data into a constraint on the deviation from this relation.

  17. Large tensor mode, field range bound and consistency in generalized G-inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kunimitsu, Taro; Suyama, Teruaki; Watanabe, Yuki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: suyama@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: yokoyama@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-08-01

    We systematically show that in potential driven generalized G-inflation models, quantum corrections coming from new physics at the strong coupling scale can be avoided, while producing observable tensor modes. The effective action can be approximated by the tree level action, and as a result, these models are internally consistent, despite the fact that we introduced new mass scales below the energy scale of inflation. Although observable tensor modes are produced with sub-strong coupling scale field excursions, this is not an evasion of the Lyth bound, since the models include higher-derivative non-canonical kinetic terms, and effective rescaling of the field would result in super-Planckian field excursions. We argue that the enhanced kinetic term of the inflaton screens the interactions with other fields, keeping the system weakly coupled during inflation.

  18. Building a holographic superconductor with a scalar field coupled kinematically to Einstein tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    We study the holographic dual description of a superconductor in which the gravity sector consists of a Maxwell field and a charged scalar field which except its minimal coupling to gravity it is also coupled kinematically to Einstein tensor. As the strength of the new coupling is increased, the critical temperature below which the scalar field condenses is lowering, the condensation gap decreases faster than the temperature, the width of the condensation gap is not proportional to the size of the condensate and at low temperatures the condensation gap tends to zero for the strong coupling. These effects which are the result of the presence of the coupling of the scalar field to the Einstein tensor in the gravity bulk, provide a dual description of impurities concentration in a superconducting state on the boundary.

  19. Quantum Theory of Antisymmetric Higher Rank Tensor Gauge Field in Higher Dimensional Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.

    1981-01-01

    In a higher dimensional space-time, the Lagrangian formalism and the canonical operator formalism of covariant quantization of the antisymmetric tensor gauge field of higher rank are formulated consistently by introducing BRS transformation and Lagrangian multiplier fields From the effective Lagrangian, the numbers of the physical components and the effective ghosts are counted correctly without referring to a special reference frame. The confinement of unphysical components is assured from the viewpoint of the ``quartet mechanism'' of Kugo and Ojima.

  20. Logarithmic conformal field theory, log-modular tensor categories and modular forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzig, Thomas; Gannon, Terry

    2017-10-01

    The two pillars of rational conformal field theory and rational vertex operator algebras are modularity of characters, and the interpretation of its category of modules as a modular tensor category. Overarching these pillars is the Verlinde formula. In this paper we consider the more general class of logarithmic conformal field theories and C 2-cofinite vertex operator algebras. We suggest logarithmic variants of those pillars and of Verlinde’s formula. We illustrate our ideas with the \

  1. Probing strong-field scalar-tensor gravity with gravitational wave asteroseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2004-10-15

    We present an alternative way of tracing the existence of a scalar field based on the analysis of the gravitational wave spectrum of a vibrating neutron star. Scalar-tensor theories in strong-field gravity can potentially introduce much greater differences in the parameters of a neutron star than the uncertainties introduced by the various equations of state. The detection of gravitational waves from neutron stars can set constraints on the existence and the strength of scalar fields. We show that the oscillation spectrum is dramatically affected by the presence of a scalar field, and can provide unique confirmation of its existence.

  2. A planar second-order DC SQUID gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Carelli, P; Chiaventi, L; Leoni, R; Pullano, M; Schirripa Spagnolo, G

    1991-01-01

    In this work we describe a DC SQUID gradiometer, sensitive to the second spatial derivative of the magnetic field. The sensitive area of the gradiometer is the inductive body of the DC SQUID itself. The isoflux line distribution generated by a dipolar source, obtained by performing magnetic measurements with an array of such detectors, is relatively complicated, but its localisation capability is similar to that one usually achieves with axial detector arrays. Planar gradiometers also show a better resolution for near sources and a stronger rejection of far disturbances. The final device is expected to have an inductance of a few hundreds of pH in order to obtain performances typical of a low noise DC SQUID. The pick-up coils will be the combination of four square holes of 500 microns side with a 1.05 cm baseline. Due to the magnetic field concentration (in the final device it can be a factor 10) the gradiometer will have a sensitivity of 10(-11) T m-2 Hz-1/2 and a field sensitivity of about 2 fT Hz-1/2. Some preliminary results, obtained on detectors with an intermediate area between the prototype and final device, are reported here. The process used to fabricate this second-order gradiometer is based on Nb-NbO chi-PbAuIn Josephson tunnel junctions. Some possible improvements will also be described.

  3. Second-order focusing parallel electron energy magnetic sector analyzer designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khursheed, Anjam

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents parallel magnetic sector analyzer designs that are predicted to have second-order or better focusing properties. Simulation results indicate that by reducing the gap between excitation plates in a compact parallel energy magnetic sector box design, second-order focusing regions in the detected energy spectrum can be obtained. A method for combining a first-order focusing magnetic box sector unit with a larger magnet sector unit is also presented in which, the field strength varies relatively slowly. Simulations predict that using a combination of such magnetic sector units, focusing properties better than second order can be achieved for most of the detected energy range.

  4. Gaussian Mixtures on Tensor Fields for Segmentation: Applications to Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Luis-García, Rodrigo; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for tensor field segmentation based on the definition of mixtures of Gaussians on tensors as a statistical model. Working over the well-known Geodesic Active Regions segmentation framework, this scheme presents several interesting advantages. First, it yields a more flexible model than the use of a single Gaussian distribution, which enables the method to better adapt to the complexity of the data. Second, it can work directly on tensor-valued images or, through a parallel scheme that processes independently the intensity and the local structure tensor, on scalar textured images. Two different applications have been considered to show the suitability of the proposed method for medical imaging segmentation. First, we address DT-MRI segmentation on a dataset of 32 volumes, showing a successful segmentation of the corpus callosum and favourable comparisons with related approaches in the literature. Second, the segmentation of bones from hand radiographs is studied, and a complete automatic-semiautomatic approach has been developed that makes use of anatomical prior knowledge to produce accurate segmentation results. PMID:20932717

  5. Gaussian mixtures on tensor fields for segmentation: applications to medical imaging.

    PubMed

    de Luis-García, Rodrigo; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for tensor field segmentation based on the definition of mixtures of Gaussians on tensors as a statistical model. Working over the well-known Geodesic Active Regions segmentation framework, this scheme presents several interesting advantages. First, it yields a more flexible model than the use of a single Gaussian distribution, which enables the method to better adapt to the complexity of the data. Second, it can work directly on tensor-valued images or, through a parallel scheme that processes independently the intensity and the local structure tensor, on scalar textured images. Two different applications have been considered to show the suitability of the proposed method for medical imaging segmentation. First, we address DT-MRI segmentation on a dataset of 32 volumes, showing a successful segmentation of the corpus callosum and favourable comparisons with related approaches in the literature. Second, the segmentation of bones from hand radiographs is studied, and a complete automatic-semiautomatic approach has been developed that makes use of anatomical prior knowledge to produce accurate segmentation results.

  6. A pseudospectral matrix method for time-dependent tensor fields on a spherical shell

    SciTech Connect

    Brügmann, Bernd

    2013-02-15

    We construct a pseudospectral method for the solution of time-dependent, non-linear partial differential equations on a three-dimensional spherical shell. The problem we address is the treatment of tensor fields on the sphere. As a test case we consider the evolution of a single black hole in numerical general relativity. A natural strategy would be the expansion in tensor spherical harmonics in spherical coordinates. Instead, we consider the simpler and potentially more efficient possibility of a double Fourier expansion on the sphere for tensors in Cartesian coordinates. As usual for the double Fourier method, we employ a filter to address time-step limitations and certain stability issues. We find that a tensor filter based on spin-weighted spherical harmonics is successful, while two simplified, non-spin-weighted filters do not lead to stable evolutions. The derivatives and the filter are implemented by matrix multiplication for efficiency. A key technical point is the construction of a matrix multiplication method for the spin-weighted spherical harmonic filter. As example for the efficient parallelization of the double Fourier, spin-weighted filter method we discuss an implementation on a GPU, which achieves a speed-up of up to a factor of 20 compared to a single core CPU implementation.

  7. Energy-momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toptygin, I. N.; Levina, K.

    2016-02-01

    We study the relation between the energy-momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field and the group velocity of quasi-monochromatic waves in a nonabsorptive, isotropic, spatially and temporally dispersive dielectric. It is shown that the Abraham force acting on a dielectric is not needed for the momentum conservation law to hold if the dielectric is free of external charges and currents and if the Abraham momentum density is used. The energy-momentum tensor turns out to be symmetric, and the Maxwell stress tensor is expressed either in terms of the momentum density vector and the group velocity or in terms of the energy density and the group velocity. The stress tensor and the energy density are essentially dependent on the frequency and wave vector derivatives of the functions that describe the electromagnetic properties of the medium (i.e., the dielectric permittivity and the magnetic permeability). The obtained results are applicable to both ordinary and left-handed media. The results are compared with those of other authors. The pressure a wave exerts on the interface between two media is calculated. For both ordinary and left-handed media, either 'radiation pressure' or 'radiation attraction' can occur at the interface, depending on the material parameters of the two media. For liquid dielectrics, the striction effect is considered.

  8. Notes on Translational and Rotational Properties of Tensor Fields in Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoeglazov, V. V.

    Recently, several discussions on the possible observability of 4-vector fields have been published in literature. Furthermore, several authors recently claimed existence of the helicity=0 fundamental field. We re-examine the theory of antisymmetric tensor fields and 4-vector potentials. We study the massless limits. In fact, a theoretical motivation for this venture is the old papers of Ogievetskiĭ and Polubarinov, Hayashi, and Kalb and Ramond. Ogievetskiĭ and Polubarinov proposed the concept of the notoph, whose helicity properties are complementary to those of the photon. We analyze the quantum field theory with taking into account mass dimensions of the notoph and the photon. It appears to be possible to describe both photon and notoph degrees of freedom on the basis of the modified Bargmann-Wigner formalism for the symmetric second-rank spinor. Next, we proceed to derive equations for the symmetric tensor of the second rank on the basis of the Bargmann-Wigner formalism in a straightforward way. The symmetric multispinor of the fourth rank is used. Due to serious problems with the interpretation of the results obtained on using the standard procedure we generalize it and obtain the spin-2 relativistic equations, which are consistent with the general relativity. Thus, in fact we deduced the gravitational field equations from relativistic quantum mechanics. The relations of this theory with the scalar-tensor theories of gravitation and f(R) are discussed. Particular attention has been paid to the correct definitions of the energy-momentum tensor and other Nöther currents in the electromagnetic theory, the relativistic theory of gravitation, the general relativity, and their generalizations. We estimate possible interactions, fermion-notoph, graviton-notoph, photon-notoph, and we conclude that they can probably be seen in experiments in the next few years.

  9. Continuum tensor network field states, path integral representations and spatial symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, David; Brockt, Christoph; Haegeman, Jutho; Osborne, Tobias J.; Verstraete, Frank

    2015-06-01

    A natural way to generalize tensor network variational classes to quantum field systems is via a continuous tensor contraction. This approach is first illustrated for the class of quantum field states known as continuous matrix-product states (cMPS). As a simple example of the path-integral representation we show that the state of a dynamically evolving quantum field admits a natural representation as a cMPS. A completeness argument is also provided that shows that all states in Fock space admit a cMPS representation when the number of variational parameters tends to infinity. Beyond this, we obtain a well-behaved field limit of projected entangled-pair states (PEPS) in two dimensions that provide an abstract class of quantum field states with natural symmetries. We demonstrate how symmetries of the physical field state are encoded within the dynamics of an auxiliary field system of one dimension less. In particular, the imposition of Euclidean symmetries on the physical system requires that the auxiliary system involved in the class’ definition must be Lorentz-invariant. The physical field states automatically inherit entropy area laws from the PEPS class, and are fully described by the dissipative dynamics of a lower dimensional virtual field system. Our results lie at the intersection many-body physics, quantum field theory and quantum information theory, and facilitate future exchanges of ideas and insights between these disciplines.

  10. Stochastic modeling and generation of random fields of elasticity tensors: A unified information-theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staber, Brian; Guilleminot, Johann

    2017-06-01

    In this Note, we present a unified approach to the information-theoretic modeling and simulation of a class of elasticity random fields, for all physical symmetry classes. The new stochastic representation builds upon a Walpole tensor decomposition, which allows the maximum entropy constraints to be decoupled in accordance with the tensor (sub)algebras associated with the class under consideration. In contrast to previous works where the construction was carried out on the scalar-valued Walpole coordinates, the proposed strategy involves both matrix-valued and scalar-valued random fields. This enables, in particular, the construction of a generation algorithm based on a memoryless transformation, hence improving the computational efficiency of the framework. Two applications involving weak symmetries and sampling over spherical and cylindrical geometries are subsequently provided. These numerical experiments are relevant to the modeling of elastic interphases in nanocomposites, as well as to the simulation of spatially dependent wood properties for instance.

  11. Application of a second-order projection method to the study of shear layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Glaz, H.M.; Solomon, J.M.; Szymczak, W.G.

    1988-06-01

    In this paper we apply a second-order projection method for the time-dependent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations to the study of shear layers. The algorithm represents a higher-order extension of Chorin's projection algorithm. In Chorin's algorithm one first solves the Navier-Stokes equations ignoring the pressure term and then projects the resulting velocity field onto discretely divergence-free vector fields. Our method introduces more coupling between the diffusion-convection step and the projection to obtain second-order temporal accuracy. Furthermore, the algorithm incorporates a second-order Godunov method that provides a robust treatment of the nonlinear terms at high Reynolds number. These features combine to give a method that is second-order accurate for smooth flows and remains stable for singular initial data such as cortex sheets, even in the limit of vanishing viscosity. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Tensor of the nonlinear polarizability of anisotropic medium and ``local'' field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavric, V. V.; Ovander, L. N.; Shunyakov, V. T.

    1983-08-01

    The nonlinear polarizability tensor (NPT) for a molecular crystal of arbitrary symmetry has been obtained within the framework of polariton theory. Use of the Göppert-Mayer unitary transformation for the Hamiltonian of the crystal plus quantized electromagnetic field system made it possible to represent finally the result for the NPT in a compact form and to compare with results of semiphenomenological calculation of the NPT and to go out of the framework of the Gaitler-London approximation.

  13. Problems with the F-tensor in electric field gradient calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnambalam, M. J.

    1990-08-01

    A rigorous derivation of the F-tensor coefficient Fij-relating the strain to the electric field gradient (EFG) — is given for polyvalent FCC and BCC hosts. It is shown that Faulkner’s results are valid only for a monovalent FCC host. Results for Fij are also obtained when the inter-ionic potential is screened Coulomb type. Comparing these with those in the literature, errors are pointed out and problems are discussed.

  14. Electron spin relaxation due to reorientation of a permanent zero field splitting tensor.

    PubMed

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2004-09-15

    Electron spin relaxation of transition metal ions with spin S> or =1 results primarily from thermal modulation of the zero field splitting (zfs) tensor. This occurs both by distortion of the zfs tensor due to intermolecular collisions and, for complexes with less than cubic symmetry, by reorientational modulation of the permanent zfs tensor. The reorientational mechanism is much less well characterized in previous work than the distortional mechanism although it is an important determinant of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) paramagnetic relaxation enhancement phenomena (i.e., the enhancement of NMR relaxation rates produced by paramagnetic ions in solution or NMR-PRE). The classical density matrix theory of spin relaxation does not provide an appropriate description of the reorientational mechanism at low Zeeman field strengths because the zero-order spin wave functions are stochastic functions of time. Using spin dynamics simulation techniques, the time correlation functions of the spin operators have been computed and used to determine decay times for the reorientational relaxation mechanism for S=1. In the zfs limit of laboratory field strengths (H(Zeem)tensor is cylindrical, the spin decay is exponential, the spin relaxation time, tau(S) (composite function) approximately 0.53tau(R)((1)), where tau(R)((1)) is the reorientational correlation time of a molecule-fixed vector. The value of tau(S) (composite function) is independent of the magnitude of the cylindrical zfs parameter (D), but it depends strongly on low symmetry zfs terms (the E/D ratio). Other spin dynamics (SD) simulations examined spin decay in the intermediate regime of field strengths where H(Zeem) approximately H(zfs) (composite function), and in the vicinity of the Zeeman limit. The results demonstrate that the reorientational electron spin relaxation mechanism is often significant when H(zfs) (composite function)> or =H(Zeem), and that its neglect

  15. Optimal second order sliding mode control for nonlinear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a chattering free optimal second order sliding mode control (OSOSMC) method is proposed to stabilize nonlinear systems affected by uncertainties. The nonlinear optimal control strategy is based on the control Lyapunov function (CLF). For ensuring robustness of the optimal controller in the presence of parametric uncertainty and external disturbances, a sliding mode control scheme is realized by combining an integral and a terminal sliding surface. The resulting second order sliding mode can effectively reduce chattering in the control input. Simulation results confirm the supremacy of the proposed optimal second order sliding mode control over some existing sliding mode controllers in controlling nonlinear systems affected by uncertainty.

  16. A study of second-order supersonic flow theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1952-01-01

    Second-order solutions of supersonic-flow problems are sought by iteration, using the linearized solution as the first step. For plane and axially symmetric flows, particular solutions of the iteration equation are discovered which reduce the second-order problem to an equivalent linearized problem. Comparison of second-order solutions with exact and numerical results shows great improvement over linearized theory. For full three-dimensional flow, only a partial particular solution is found. The inclined cone is solved, and the possibility of treating more general problems is considered.

  17. Method to render second order beam optics programs symplectic

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    We present evidence that second order matrix-based beam optics programs violate the symplectic condition. A simple method to avoid this difficulty, based on a generating function approach to evaluating transfer maps, is described. A simple example illustrating the non-symplectricity of second order matrix methods, and the effectiveness of our solution to the problem, is provided. We conclude that it is in fact possible to bring second order matrix optics methods to a canonical form. The procedure for doing so has been implemented in the program DIMAT, and could be implemented in programs such as TRANSPORT and TURTLE, making them useful in multiturn applications. 15 refs.

  18. Smart structure control in matrix second order form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwekar, Anjali M.; Yedavalli, Rama K.

    1995-05-01

    Matrix second order systems arise in a variety of structural dynamics and control problems. The analysis and design of such systems is traditionally done in frequency domain or in time domain (state space framework). The formulation of the control design problem in matrix second order form (i.e., configuration space framework) has many advantages over first order state space form. In this paper, a novel approach for designing a stabilizing controller in a second-order model of piezoelectrically controlled flexible beam is proposed.

  19. Smart structure control in matrix second-order form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwekar, Anjali M.; Yedavalli, Rama K.

    1996-08-01

    Matrix second-order systems arise in a variety of structural dynamics and control problems. The analysis and design of such systems is traditionally done in the frequency domain or in the time domain (state space framework). The formulation of the control design problem in matrix second-order form (i.e. configuration space framework) has many advantages over first-order state-space form. In this paper, a novel approach for designing a stabilizing controller in a second-order model of a piezoelectrically controlled flexible beam is proposed.

  20. Study of second order upwind differencing in a recirculating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy and stability of the second order upwind differencing scheme was investigated. The solution algorithm employed is based on a coupled solution of the nonlinear finite difference equations by the multigrid technique. Calculations have been made of the driven cavity flow for several Reynolds numbers and finite difference grids. In comparison with the hybrid differencing, the second order upwind differencing is somewhat more accurate but it is not monotonically accurate with mesh refinement. Also, the convergence of the solution algorithm deteriorates with the use of the second order upwind differencing.

  1. The second-order luminosity-redshift relation in a generic inhomogeneous cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Marozzi, Giovanni; Veneziano, Gabriele; Nugier, Fabien E-mail: giovanni.marozzi@unige.ch E-mail: gabriele.veneziano@cern.ch

    2012-11-01

    After recalling a general non-perturbative expression for the luminosity-redshift relation holding in a recently proposed 'geodesic light-cone' gauge, we show how it can be transformed to phenomenologically more convenient gauges in which cosmological perturbation theory is better understood. We present, in particular, the complete result on the luminosity-redshift relation in the Poisson gauge up to second order for a fairly generic perturbed cosmology, assuming that appreciable vector and tensor perturbations are only generated at second order. This relation provides a basic ingredient for the computation of the effects of stochastic inhomogeneities on precision dark-energy cosmology whose results we have anticipated in a recent letter. More generally, it can be used in connection with any physical information carried by light-like signals traveling along our past light-cone.

  2. On the state estimation of structures with second order observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control synthesis techniques implies the availability of full state feedback. For vibration control of structures, usually only a limited number of states are measured from which an observer model reconstructs the full state. It is shown that using second order observers is a viable technique for reconstructing the unmeasured states of structures under mildly restrictive conditions. Moreover, the computational advantages of the second order observer as compared to a first order observer indicate that significantly larger observer models may be utilized. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the performance of second order observers. The implications of second order observers in the development of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is discussed.

  3. Second-order nonlinear optical metamaterials: ABC-type nanolaminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloatti, L.; Kieninger, C.; Froelich, A.; Lauermann, M.; Frenzel, T.; Köhnle, K.; Freude, W.; Leuthold, J.; Wegener, M.; Koos, C.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a concept for second-order nonlinear metamaterials that can be obtained from non-metallic centrosymmetric constituents with inherently low optical absorption. The concept is based on iterative atomic-layer deposition of three different materials, A = Al2O3, B = TiO2, and C = HfO2. The centrosymmetry of the resulting ABC stack is broken since the ABC and the inverted CBA sequences are not equivalent—a necessary condition for non-zero second-order nonlinearity. In our experiments, we find that the bulk second-order nonlinear susceptibility depends on the density of interfaces, leading to a nonlinear susceptibility of 0.26 pm/V at a wavelength of 800 nm. ABC-type nanolaminates can be deposited on virtually any substrate and offer a promising route towards engineering of second-order optical nonlinearities at both infrared and visible wavelengths.

  4. Second-Order Structured Deformations: Relaxation, Integral Representation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, Ana Cristina; Matias, José; Morandotti, Marco; Owen, David R.

    2017-09-01

    Second-order structured deformations of continua provide an extension of the multiscale geometry of first-order structured deformations by taking into account the effects of submacroscopic bending and curving. We derive here an integral representation for a relaxed energy functional in the setting of second-order structured deformations. Our derivation covers inhomogeneous initial energy densities (i.e., with explicit dependence on the position); finally, we provide explicit formulas for bulk relaxed energies as well as anticipated applications.

  5. Predicting the effects of deep brain stimulation with diffusion tensor based electric field models.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of movement disorders, and has shown promising results for the treatment of a wide range of other neurological disorders. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of DBS or the volume of brain tissue affected by stimulation. We have developed methods that use anatomical and diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) data to predict the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during DBS. We co-register the imaging data with detailed finite element models of the brain and stimulating electrode to enable anatomically and electrically accurate predictions of the spread of stimulation. One critical component of the model is the DTI tensor field that is used to represent the 3-dimensionally anisotropic and inhomogeneous tissue conductivity. With this system we are able to fuse structural and functional information to study a relevant clinical problem: DBS of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of Parkinsons disease (PD). Our results show that inclusion of the tensor field in our model caused significant differences in the size and shape of the VTA when compared to a homogeneous, isotropic tissue volume. The magnitude of these differences was proportional to the stimulation voltage. Our model predictions are validated by comparing spread of predicted activation to observed effects of oculomotor nerve stimulation in a PD patient. In turn, the 3D tissue electrical properties of the brain play an important role in regulating the spread of neural activation generated by DBS.

  6. Energy-momentum tensor renormalization for vector fields in Robertson-Walker backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chimento, L.P.; Cossarini, A.E. )

    1990-05-15

    In this paper we generalize the Stueckelberg formalism of flat spacetime to describe vector fields propagating in a Robertson-Walker spatially flat background. In the zero-mass limit of the regularized energy-momentum tensor we recover the usual vacuum-polarization terms of the massless Maxwell theory. Further on we investigate particle creation and the renormalizability of the energy-momentum tensor expectation value in the vacuum state which minimizes the metric Hamiltonian. In the massive case we found that the last one corresponds to that obtained through the Higgs mechanism and that it is not renormalizable in general. In the massless case we found that both quantities are finite and are in agreement with those in the literature obtained by different regularization methods, the resulting vacuum being the standard conformal one.

  7. Decay b{yields}s{gamma} in the presence of a constant antisymmetric tensor field

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuatzin, G.; Bautista, I.; Hernandez-Lopez, J. A.; Toscano, J. J.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.

    2010-09-01

    A constant antisymmetric 2-tensor can arise in general relativity with spontaneous symmetry breaking or in field theories formulated in a noncommutative space-time. In this work, the one-loop contribution of a nonstandard WW{gamma} vertex on the flavor violating quark transition q{sub i}{yields}q{sub j}{gamma} is studied in the context of the electroweak Yang-Mills sector extended with a Lorentz-violating constant 2-tensor. An exact analytical expression for the on-shell case is presented. It is found that the loop amplitude is gauge independent, electromagnetic gauge invariant, and free of ultraviolet divergences. The dipolar contribution to the b{yields}s{gamma} transition together with the experimental data on the B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} decay is used to derive the constraint {Lambda}{sub LV}>1.96 TeV on the Lorentz-violating scale.

  8. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-06-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form ‑K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated ‑K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface.

  9. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-01-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form −K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated −K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface. PMID:27246631

  10. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Timopheev, A A; Sousa, R; Chshiev, M; Nguyen, H T; Dieny, B

    2016-06-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form -K2cos(4)θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial -K1cos(2)θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated -K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from "easy-axis" to "easy-cone" regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface.

  11. Modeling Second-Order Chemical Reactions using Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, N. E.; Barton, C. C.; Seybold, P. G.; Rizki, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Cellular automata (CA) are discrete, agent-based, dynamic, iterated, mathematical computational models used to describe complex physical, biological, and chemical systems. Unlike the more computationally demanding molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo approaches, which use "force fields" to model molecular interactions, CA models employ a set of local rules. The traditional approach for modeling chemical reactions is to solve a set of simultaneous differential rate equations to give deterministic outcomes. CA models yield statistical outcomes for a finite number of ingredients. The deterministic solutions appear as limiting cases for conditions such as a large number of ingredients or a finite number of ingredients and many trials. Here we present a 2-dimensional, probabilistic CA model of a second-order gas phase reaction A + B → C, using a MATLAB basis. Beginning with a random distribution of ingredients A and B, formation of C emerges as the system evolves. The reaction rate can be varied based on the probability of favorable collisions of the reagents A and B. The model permits visualization of the conversion of reagents to products, and allows one to plot concentration vs. time for A, B and C. We test hypothetical reaction conditions such as: limiting reagents, the effects of reaction probabilities, and reagent concentrations on the reaction kinetics. The deterministic solutions of the reactions emerge as statistical averages in the limit of the large number of cells in the array. Modeling results for dynamic processes in the atmosphere will be presented.

  12. Second order multidimensional sign-preserving remapping for ALE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Ryan N; Szmelter, J.

    2010-12-15

    A second-order conservative sign-preserving remapping scheme for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods is developed utilising concepts of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The algorithm is inherently multidimensional, and so does not introduce splitting errors. The remapping is implemented in a two-dimensional, finite element ALE solver employing staggered quadrilateral meshes. The MPDATA remapping uses a finite volume discretization developed for volume coordinates. It is applied for the remapping of density and internal energy arranged as cell centered, and velocity as nodal, dependent variables. In the paper, the advection of scalar fields is examined first for test cases with prescribed mesh movement. A direct comparison of MPDATA with the performance of the van Leer MUSCL scheme indicates advantages of a multidimensional approach. Furthermore, distinctly different performance between basic MPDATA and the infinite gauge option is illustrated using benchmarks involving transport of a sign changing velocity field. Further development extends the application of MPDATA remapping to the full ALE solver with a staggered mesh arrangement for density, internal energy and momentum using volume coordinates. At present, two options of the algorithm - basic and infinite gauge - are implemented. To ensure a meaningful assessment, an identical Lagrangian solver and computational mesh update routines are used with either MPDATA or van Leer MUSCL remapping. The evaluation places particular focus on the abilities of both schemes to accurately model multidimensional problems. Theoretical considerations are supported with numerical examples. In addition to the prescribed mesh movement cases for advection of scalars, the demonstrations include two-dimensional Eulerian and ALE flow simulations on quadrilateral meshes with both fixed and variable timestep control. The key comparisons include the standard test cases of Sod and Noh

  13. Matérn Class Tensor-Valued Random Fields and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonenko, Nikolai; Malyarenko, Anatoliy

    2017-09-01

    We construct classes of homogeneous random fields on a three-dimensional Euclidean space that take values in linear spaces of tensors of a fixed rank and are isotropic with respect to a fixed orthogonal representation of the group of 3× 3 orthogonal matrices. The constructed classes depend on finitely many isotropic spectral densities. We say that such a field belongs to either the Matérn or the dual Matérn class if all of the above densities are Matérn or dual Matérn. Several examples are considered.

  14. Mixed Symmetry-Tipe (k,1) Massless Tensor Fields. Consistent Interactions Of Dual Linearized Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizdadea, C.; Saliu, S. O.; Toma, M.

    2012-12-01

    A particular case of interactions of a single massless tensor field with the mixed symmetry corresponding to a two-column Young diagram (k,1) with k=4, dual to linearized gravity in D=7, is considered in the context of: self-couplings, cross-interactions with a Pauli-Fierz field, cross-couplings to purely matter theories, and interactions with an Abelian 1-form. The general approach relies on the deformation of the solution to the master equation from the antifield-BRST formalism by means of the local cohomology of the BRST differential.

  15. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (I) Photon polarization tensor with all the Landau levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2013-03-15

    Photons propagating in strong magnetic fields are subject to a phenomenon called the 'vacuum birefringence' where refractive indices of two physical modes both deviate from unity and are different from each other. We compute the vacuum polarization tensor of a photon in a static and homogeneous magnetic field by utilizing Schwinger's proper-time method, and obtain a series representation as a result of double integrals analytically performed with respect to proper-time variables. The outcome is expressed in terms of an infinite sum of known functions which is plausibly interpreted as summation over all the Landau levels of fermions. Each contribution from infinitely many Landau levels yields a kinematical condition above which the contribution has an imaginary part. This indicates decay of a sufficiently energetic photon into a fermion-antifermion pair with corresponding Landau level indices. Since we do not resort to any approximation, our result is applicable to the calculation of refractive indices in the whole kinematical region of a photon momentum and in any magnitude of the external magnetic field. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vacuum birefringence is studied in the presence of externally applied magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A general framework is given on the basis of a vacuum polarization tensor of photon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A resummed vacuum polarization tensor is calculated analytically and exactly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contributions of all the Landau levels are obtained in the form of an infinite sum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Threshold behavior of real-photon decay is obtained at the each Landau level.

  16. Second-order quasinormal mode of the Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ioka, Kunihito

    2007-10-01

    We formulate and calculate the second-order quasinormal modes (QNMs) of a Schwarzschild black hole (BH). Gravitational waves (GW) from a distorted BH, the so-called ringdowns, are well understood as QNMs in general relativity. Since QNMs from binary BH mergers will be detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio by GW detectors, it is also possible to detect the second perturbative order of QNMs, generated by nonlinear gravitational interaction near the BH. In the BH perturbation approach, we derive the master Zerilli equation for the metric perturbation to second order and explicitly regularize it at the horizon and spatial infinity. We numerically solve the second-order Zerilli equation by implementing the modified Leaver continued fraction method. The second-order QNM frequencies are found to be twice the first-order ones, and the GW amplitude is up to ˜10% that of the first order for the binary BH mergers. Since the second-order QNMs always exist, we can use their detections (i) to test the nonlinearity of general relativity, in particular, the no-hair theorem, (ii) to remove fake events in the data analysis of QNM GWs, and (iii) to measure the distance to the BH.

  17. Deflection of light to second order in conformal Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sultana, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    We reexamine the deflection of light in conformal Weyl gravity obtained in Sultana and Kazanas (2010), by extending the calculation based on the procedure by Rindler and Ishak, for the bending angle by a centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution, to second order in M/R, where M is the mass of the source and R is the impact parameter. It has recently been reported in Bhattacharya et al. (JCAP 09 (2010) 004; JCAP 02 (2011) 028), that when this calculation is done to second order, the term γr in the Mannheim-Kazanas metric, yields again the paradoxical contribution γR (where the bending angle is proportional to the impact parameter) obtained by standard formalisms appropriate to asymptotically flat spacetimes. We show that no such contribution is obtained for a second order calculation and the effects of the term γr in the metric are again insignificant as reported in our earlier work.

  18. Spacecraft attitude determination using a second-order nonlinear filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vathsal, S.

    1987-01-01

    The stringent attitude determination accuracy and faster slew maneuver requirements demanded by present-day spacecraft control systems motivate the development of recursive nonlinear filters for attitude estimation. This paper presents the second-order filter development for the estimation of attitude quaternion using three-axis gyro and star tracker measurement data. Performance comparisons have been made by computer simulation of system models and filter mechanization. It is shown that the second-order filter consistently performs better than the extended Kalman filter when the performance index of the root sum square estimation error of the quaternion vector is compared. The second-order filter identifies the gyro drift rates faster than the extended Kalman filter. The uniqueness of this algorithm is the online generation of the time-varying process and measurement noise covariance matrices, derived as a function or the process and measurement nonlinearity, respectively.

  19. Weak value amplification via second-order correlated technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Cui; Jing-Zheng, Huang; Xiang, Liu; Gui-Hua, Zeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new framework combining weak measurement and second-order correlated technique. The theoretical analysis shows that weak value amplification (WVA) experiment can also be implemented by a second-order correlated system. We then build two-dimensional second-order correlated function patterns for achieving higher amplification factor and discuss the signal-to-noise ratio influence. Several advantages can be obtained by our proposal. For instance, detectors with high resolution are not necessary. Moreover, detectors with low saturation intensity are available in WVA setup. Finally, type-one technical noise can be effectively suppressed. Project supported by the Union Research Centre of Advanced Spaceflight Technology (Grant No. USCAST2013-05), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61170228, 61332019, and 61471239), and the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122901).

  20. Second-order wave effects on TLP tendon tension responses

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, H.; Mercier, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a general procedure for analyzing the second-order wave effects on the tendon tension responses of a TLP. The approach solves both first- and second-order equation of motions for a TLP system in frequency domain. Viscous effects are included in the form of statistically linearized damping coefficients. An efficient algorithm has been devised for reducing the burden of second-order wave diffraction analysis, which selects the interacting frequency pairs according to springing frequency of interest to minimize the cost of computing quadratic transfer functions (QTFs) and allow accurate interpolation of QTFs. Moment statistics of the tension process are computed through an eigenvalue analysis. The developed method is applied to analyze the tendon tension responses of a TLP design in water depth of 3,000 ft.

  1. Some restrictions on the existence of second order limit language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Yusof, Yuhani; Fong, Wan Heng

    2015-10-01

    The cut and paste phenomenon on DNA molecules with the presence of restriction enzyme and appropriate ligase has led to the formalism of mathematical modelling of splicing system. A type of splicing system named Yusof-Goode splicing system is used to present the transparent behaviour of the DNA splicing process. The limit language that is defined as the leftover molecules after the system reaches its equilibrium point has been extended to a second order limit language. The non-existence of the second order limit language biologically has lead to this study by using mathematical approach. In this paper, the factors that restrict the formation of the second order limit language are discussed and are presented as lemmas and theorem using Y-G approach. In addition, the discussion focuses on Yusof- Goode splicing system with at most two initial strings and two rules with one cutting site and palindromic crossing site and recognition sites.

  2. Second order closure for variable density free shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandromme, D.; Kollmann, W.

    A full second order closure turbulence model for the prediction of free shear flows with variable density is developed. The importance of density fluctuations due to inhomogeneities in fluid composition is emphasized. Some simplicity is achieved by using density weighted averaging to account implicitly for density fluctuation effects. Transport equations for various second order correlations - such as Reynolds stress, turbulent mass fluxes or density velocity correlations - are derived, modelled and solved, together with the mean equations for momentum and species conservation. Solutions of these equations are compared with the two different sets of experimental data for low speed free mixing layers (helium into nitrogen and freon 12 into air).

  3. Second order limit language in variants of splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan; Yusof, Yuhani

    2014-07-01

    The cutting and pasting processes that occur in DNA molecules have led to the formulation of splicing system. Since then, there are few models used to model the splicing system. The splicing language, which is the product of splicing system, can be categorized into two, namely the adult and limit language. In this research, limit language is extended to the second order limit language. Few problems are approached which lead to the formation of second order limit language which is then analyzed using various types of splicing system.

  4. Solution of second order supersymmetrical intertwining relations in Minkowski plane

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, M. V. Kolevatova, E. V.

    2016-08-15

    Supersymmetrical (SUSY) intertwining relations are generalized to the case of quantum Hamiltonians in Minkowski space. For intertwining operators (supercharges) of second order in derivatives, the intertwined Hamiltonians correspond to completely integrable systems with the symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta. In terms of components, the intertwining relations correspond to the system of nonlinear differential equations which are solvable with the simplest—constant—ansatzes for the “metric” matrix in second order part of the supercharges. The corresponding potentials are built explicitly both for diagonalizable and nondiagonalizable form of “metric” matrices, and their properties are discussed.

  5. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  6. Solution of second order supersymmetrical intertwining relations in Minkowski plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, M. V.; Kolevatova, E. V.; Nishnianidze, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    Supersymmetrical (SUSY) intertwining relations are generalized to the case of quantum Hamiltonians in Minkowski space. For intertwining operators (supercharges) of second order in derivatives, the intertwined Hamiltonians correspond to completely integrable systems with the symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta. In terms of components, the intertwining relations correspond to the system of nonlinear differential equations which are solvable with the simplest—constant—ansatzes for the "metric" matrix in second order part of the supercharges. The corresponding potentials are built explicitly both for diagonalizable and nondiagonalizable form of "metric" matrices, and their properties are discussed.

  7. Human cooperation: second-order free-riding problem solved?

    PubMed

    Fowler, James H

    2005-09-22

    Panchanathan and Boyd describe a model of indirect reciprocity in which mutual aid among cooperators can promote large-scale human cooperation without succumbing to a second-order free-riding problem (whereby individuals receive but do not give aid). However, the model does not include second-order free riders as one of the possible behavioural types. Here I present a simplified version of their model to demonstrate how cooperation unravels if second-round defectors enter the population, and this shows that the free-riding problem remains unsolved.

  8. Preface to the special issue on "Regional moment tensors and stress field in South and Central America"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, Franck; Zahradnik, Jiri; Assumpção, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    This special issue follows from the Symposium ;Regional Moment Tensor Solutions: advances and new applications; held in Bogotá, Colombia, at the I Regional Assembly of the IASPEI's Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission (LACSC) in 2014. Seven papers are presented dealing with determination of moment tensors, focal mechanisms and the stress field in Central and South America. The study areas of each paper are indicated in the index Map of Fig. 1.

  9. A second-order projection method for the incompressible Navier Stokes equations on quadrilateral grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Solomon, J.M.; Szymczak, W.G.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes a second-order projection method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on a logically-rectangular quadrilateral grid. The method uses a second-order fractional step scheme in which one first solves diffusion-convection equations to predict intermediate velocities which are then projected onto the space of divergence-free vector fields. The spatial discretization of the diffusion-convection equations is accomplished by formally transforming the equations to a uniform computational space. The diffusion terms are then discretized using standard finite-difference approximations. The convection terms are discretized using a second-order Godunov method that provides a robust discretization of these terms at high Reynolds number. The projection is approximated using a Galerkin procedure that uses a local basis for discretely divergence-free vector fields. Numerical results are presented illustrating the performance of the method. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Consistency of Equations in the Second-Order Gauge-Invariant Cosmological Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.

    2009-06-01

    Along the general framework of the gauge-invariant perturbation theory developed in the papers [K.~Nakamura, Prog.~Theor.~Phys. 110 (2003), 723; Prog.~Theor.~Phys. 113 (2005), 481], we rederive the second-order Einstein equation on four-dimensional homogeneous isotropic background universe in a gauge-invariant manner without ignoring any mode of perturbations. We consider the perturbations both in the universe dominated by the single perfect fluid and in that dominated by the single scalar field. We also confirmed the consistency of all the equations of the second-order Einstein equation and the equations of motion for matter fields, which are derived in the paper [K.~Nakamura, arXiv:0804.3840]. This confirmation implies that all the derived equations of the second order are self-consistent and these equations are correct in this sense.

  11. A uniformly second order fast sweeping method for eikonal equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Songting

    2013-05-01

    A uniformly second order method with a local solver based on the piecewise linear discontinuous Galerkin formulation is introduced to solve the eikonal equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The method utilizes an interesting phenomenon, referred as the superconvergence phenomenon, that the numerical solution of monotone upwind schemes for the eikonal equation is first order accurate on both its value and gradient when the solution is smooth. This phenomenon greatly simplifies the local solver based on the discontinuous Galerkin formulation by reducing its local degrees of freedom from two (1-D) (or three (2-D), or four (3-D)) to one with the information of the gradient frozen. When considering the eikonal equation with point-source conditions, we further utilize a factorization approach to resolve the source singularities of the eikonal by decomposing it into two parts, either multiplicatively or additively. One part is known and captures the source singularities; the other part serves as a correction term that is differentiable at the sources and satisfies the factored eikonal equations. We extend the second order method to solve the factored eikonal equations to compute the correction term with second order accuracy, then recover the eikonal with second order accuracy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  12. Modeling Ability Differentiation in the Second-Order Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Dylan; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present factor models to test for ability differentiation. Ability differentiation predicts that the size of IQ subtest correlations decreases as a function of the general intelligence factor. In the Schmid-Leiman decomposition of the second-order factor model, we model differentiation by introducing heteroscedastic residuals,…

  13. Forward and Backward Second-Order Pavlovian Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussaini, Syed Abid; Komischke, Bernhard; Menzel, Randolf; Lachnit, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Second-order conditioning (SOC) is the association of a neutral stimulus with another stimulus that had previously been combined with an unconditioned stimulus (US). We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in honeybees ("Apis mellifera") with odors (CS) and sugar (US). Previous SOC experiments in bees were…

  14. Second-order accurate nonoscillatory schemes for scalar conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1989-01-01

    Explicit finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of nonlinear scalar conservation laws is presented and analyzed. These schemes are uniformly second-order accurate and nonoscillatory in the sense that the number of extrema of the discrete solution is not increasing in time.

  15. A New Factorisation of a General Second Order Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A factorisation of a general second order ordinary differential equation is introduced from which the full solution to the equation can be obtained by performing two integrations. The method is compared with traditional methods for solving these type of equations. It is shown how the Green's function can be derived directly from the factorisation…

  16. Second-order nonlinear optical metamaterials: ABC-type nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Alloatti, L. Kieninger, C.; Lauermann, M.; Köhnle, K.; Froelich, A.; Wegener, M.; Frenzel, T.; Freude, W.; Leuthold, J.; Koos, C.

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrate a concept for second-order nonlinear metamaterials that can be obtained from non-metallic centrosymmetric constituents with inherently low optical absorption. The concept is based on iterative atomic-layer deposition of three different materials, A = Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B = TiO{sub 2}, and C = HfO{sub 2}. The centrosymmetry of the resulting ABC stack is broken since the ABC and the inverted CBA sequences are not equivalent—a necessary condition for non-zero second-order nonlinearity. In our experiments, we find that the bulk second-order nonlinear susceptibility depends on the density of interfaces, leading to a nonlinear susceptibility of 0.26 pm/V at a wavelength of 800 nm. ABC-type nanolaminates can be deposited on virtually any substrate and offer a promising route towards engineering of second-order optical nonlinearities at both infrared and visible wavelengths.

  17. Second-order accurate difference schemes on highly irregular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Manteuffel, T.A.; White, A.B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper compact-as-possible second-order accurate difference schemes will be constructed for boundary-value problems of arbitrary order on highly irregular meshes. It will be shown that for equations of order (K) these schemes will have truncation error of order (3/endash/K). This phenomena is known as supraconvergence. 7 refs.

  18. Solving Second-Order Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmer, A., III; Costa, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed in which an analytical solution is obtained for certain classes of second-order differential equations with variable coefficients. By the use of transformations and by repeated iterated integration, a desired solution is obtained. This alternative method represents a different way to acquire a solution from classic power…

  19. Second-order sliding mode control with experimental application.

    PubMed

    Eker, Ilyas

    2010-07-01

    In this article, a second-order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed for second-order uncertain plants using equivalent control approach to improve the performance of control systems. A Proportional + Integral + Derivative (PID) sliding surface is used for the sliding mode. The sliding mode control law is derived using direct Lyapunov stability approach and asymptotic stability is proved theoretically. The performance of the closed-loop system is analysed through an experimental application to an electromechanical plant to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed second-order sliding mode control and factors involved in the design. The second-order plant parameters are experimentally determined using input-output measured data. The results of the experimental application are presented to make a quantitative comparison with the traditional (first-order) sliding mode control (SMC) and PID control. It is demonstrated that the proposed 2-SMC system improves the performance of the closed-loop system with better tracking specifications in the case of external disturbances, better behavior of the output and faster convergence of the sliding surface while maintaining the stability.

  20. Forward and Backward Second-Order Pavlovian Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussaini, Syed Abid; Komischke, Bernhard; Menzel, Randolf; Lachnit, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Second-order conditioning (SOC) is the association of a neutral stimulus with another stimulus that had previously been combined with an unconditioned stimulus (US). We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in honeybees ("Apis mellifera") with odors (CS) and sugar (US). Previous SOC experiments in bees were…

  1. Generalized Second-Order Partial Derivatives of 1/r

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The generalized second-order partial derivatives of 1/r, where r is the radial distance in three dimensions (3D), are obtained using a result of the potential theory of classical analysis. Some non-spherical-regularization alternatives to the standard spherical-regularization expression for the derivatives are derived. The utility of a…

  2. Generalized Second-Order Partial Derivatives of 1/r

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The generalized second-order partial derivatives of 1/r, where r is the radial distance in three dimensions (3D), are obtained using a result of the potential theory of classical analysis. Some non-spherical-regularization alternatives to the standard spherical-regularization expression for the derivatives are derived. The utility of a…

  3. Modeling Ability Differentiation in the Second-Order Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Dylan; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present factor models to test for ability differentiation. Ability differentiation predicts that the size of IQ subtest correlations decreases as a function of the general intelligence factor. In the Schmid-Leiman decomposition of the second-order factor model, we model differentiation by introducing heteroscedastic residuals,…

  4. Digital second-order phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. K.; Carl, C. C.; Tagnelia, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Actual tests with second-order digital phase-locked loop at simulated relative Doppler shift of 1x0.0001 produced phase lock with timing error of 6.5 deg and no appreciable Doppler bias. Loop thus appears to achieve subcarrier synchronization and to remove bias due to Doppler shift in range of interest.

  5. Second-Order Conditioning during a Compound Extinction Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineno, Oskar; Zilski, Jessica M.; Schachtman, Todd R.

    2007-01-01

    Two conditioned taste aversion experiments with rats were conducted to establish if a target taste that had received a prior pairing with illness could be subject to second-order conditioning during extinction treatment in compound with a flavor that also received prior conditioning. In these experiments, the occurrence of second-order…

  6. Second-Order Conditioning of Human Causal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Elvia; Vila, Javier; Maldonado, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This article provides the first demonstration of a reliable second-order conditioning (SOC) effect in human causal learning tasks. It demonstrates the human ability to infer relationships between a cause and an effect that were never paired together during training. Experiments 1a and 1b showed a clear and reliable SOC effect, while Experiments 2a…

  7. Second-Order Conditioning of Human Causal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Elvia; Vila, Javier; Maldonado, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This article provides the first demonstration of a reliable second-order conditioning (SOC) effect in human causal learning tasks. It demonstrates the human ability to infer relationships between a cause and an effect that were never paired together during training. Experiments 1a and 1b showed a clear and reliable SOC effect, while Experiments 2a…

  8. Second-order variational equations for N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno; Tamayo, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    First-order variational equations are widely used in N-body simulations to study how nearby trajectories diverge from one another. These allow for efficient and reliable determinations of chaos indicators such as the Maximal Lyapunov characteristic Exponent (MLE) and the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO). In this paper we lay out the theoretical framework to extend the idea of variational equations to higher order. We explicitly derive the differential equations that govern the evolution of second-order variations in the N-body problem. Going to second order opens the door to new applications, including optimization algorithms that require the first and second derivatives of the solution, like the classical Newton's method. Typically, these methods have faster convergence rates than derivative-free methods. Derivatives are also required for Riemann manifold Langevin and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods which provide significantly shorter correlation times than standard methods. Such improved optimization methods can be applied to anything from radial-velocity/transit-timing-variation fitting to spacecraft trajectory optimization to asteroid deflection. We provide an implementation of first- and second-order variational equations for the publicly available REBOUND integrator package. Our implementation allows the simultaneous integration of any number of first- and second-order variational equations with the high-accuracy IAS15 integrator. We also provide routines to generate consistent and accurate initial conditions without the need for finite differencing.

  9. Neumann problems for second order ordinary differential equations across resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Li; Huaizhong, Wang

    1995-05-01

    This paper deals with the existence-uniqueness problem to Neumann problems for second order ordinary differential equations probably across resonance. By the optimal control theory method, some global optimality results about the unique solvability for such boundary value problems are established.

  10. Gravitational collapse of a homogeneous scalar field coupled kinematically to Einstein tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoumbas, George; Ntrekis, Konstantinos; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios; Tsoukalas, Minas

    2017-02-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field that, besides its coupling to curvature, is also kinematically coupled to the Einstein tensor. This coupling is a part of the Horndeski theory and we investigate its effect on the collapsing process. We find that the time required for the scalar field to collapse depends on the value of the derivative coupling and the singularity is protected by a horizon. Matching the internal solution with an external Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter metric we show that a black hole is formed, while the weak energy condition is satisfied during the collapsing process. The scalar field takes on a finite value at the singularity.

  11. Specificity of brain reactions to second-order visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Vitaly V; Ermakov, Pavel N

    2015-01-01

    The second-order visual mechanisms perform the operation of integrating the spatially distributed local visual information. Their organization is traditionally considered within the framework of the filter-rectify-filter model. These are the second-order filters that provide the ability to detect texture gradients. However, the question of the mechanisms' selectivity to the modulation dimension remains open. The aim of this investigation is to answer the above question by using visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Stimuli were textures consisting of staggered Gabor patches. The base texture was nonmodulated (NM). Three other textures represented the base texture which was sinusoidally modulated in different dimensions: contrast, orientation, or spatial frequency. EEG was recorded with 20 electrodes. VEPs of 500 ms duration were obtained for each of the four textures. After that, VEP to the NM texture was subtracted from VEP to each modulated texture. As a result, three different waves (d-waves) were obtained for each electrode site. Each d-wave was then averaged across all the 48 observers. The revealed d-waves have a latency of about 200 ms and, in our opinion, reflect the second-order filters reactivation through the feedback connection. The d-waves for different modulation dimensions were compared with each other in time, amplitude, topography, and localization of the sources of activity that causes the d-wave (with sLORETA). We proceeded from the assumption that the d-wave (its first component) represents functioning of the second-order visual mechanisms and activity changes at the following processing stages. It was found that the d-waves for different modulation dimensions significantly differ in all parameters. The obtained results indicate that the spatial modulations of different texture parameters caused specific changes in the brain activity, which could be evidence supporting the specificity of the second-order visual mechanisms to modulation dimension.

  12. Preliminary study in phase tensor analysis of magnetotelluric data: Case study of "X" geothermal field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, Mayvita; Widodo, Raharjo, Imam B.

    2017-07-01

    Magnetotelluric method is commonly used for geothermal investigation due to its ability to image changes in resistivity distribution from the greater depth. However, the field magnetotelluric data is affected by distribution of geometry and conductivity heterogeneity near the surface. It can distort the magnetotelluric data response. In order to resolve the problem, the phase tensor analysis has been conducted in this paper. Phase tensor analysis has been implemented to "X" geothermal field data. The results show that the dimensionality of the area is closed to 2D from the frequency of 0.5 to 10-2 Hz, and is 3-D for lower frequency. While, the resistivity analysis has shown that the strike direction of the measurement area is N0°E - N18°E, with 90° ambiguity, or N90°E-N108°E. The resistivity increases with the depth and a conductive layer detected on the southern part of the study area.

  13. Separation of field-independent and field-dependent susceptibility tensors using a sequence of fully automated AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studynka, J.; Chadima, M.; Hrouda, F.; Suza, P.

    2013-12-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility of diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals as well as that of pure magnetite and all single-domain ferromagnetic (s.l.) minerals is field-independent. In contrast, magnetic susceptibility of multi-domain pyrrhotite, hematite and titanomagnetite may significantly depend on the field intensity. Hence, the AMS data acquired in various fields have a great potential to separate the magnetic fabric carried by the latter group of minerals from the whole-rock fabric. The determination of the field variation of AMS consist of separate measurements of each sample in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range and subsequent processing in which the field-independent and field-dependent susceptibility tensors are calculated. The disadvantage of this technique is that each sample must be measured several times in various positions, which is relatively laborious and time consuming. Recently, a new 3D rotator was developed for the MFK1 Kappabridges which rotates the sample simultaneously about two axes with different velocities. The measurement is fully automated in such a way that, once the sample is mounted into the rotator, it requires no additional positioning to measure the full AMS tensor. The important advantage of the 3D rotator is that it enables to measure AMS in a sequence of pre-set field intensities without any operator manipulation. Whole procedure is computer-controlled and, once a sequence of measurements is finished, the acquired data are immediately processed and visualized. Examples of natural rocks demonstrating various types of field dependence of AMS are given.

  14. Determining the values of second-order surface nonlinearities by measurements with wave plates of different retardations.

    PubMed

    Valev, Ventsislav K; Foerier, Stijn; Verbiest, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    We measured the second harmonic generation response of a thin film consisting of chiral molecules with four wave plates having different retardation coefficients. By means of the fitting procedure described in a previously reported formalism, we demonstrated that a single set of tensor components of second order surface nonlinearities fits all the data. Our results provide clear experimental evidence for the validity of this method, which can find applications in the studies of chiral structures and achiral anisotropic materials.

  15. Quantum calculation of the second-order hyperpolarizability of chiral molecules in the "one-electron" model.

    PubMed

    Hache, F

    2010-09-23

    Quantum calculation of the hyperpolarizabilty tensor is carried out for chiral molecules displaying a "one-electron" chirality. Calculation is made possible by introducing a chiral perturbation term in the potential energy surface. We show that a one-electron chiral molecule is intrinsically nonlinear and diplays a nonzero electric chiral hyperpolarizability. Existence of magnetic contributions is discussed, and it is shown that higher-order perturbation terms are necessary to introduce such magnetic effects in the second-order hyperpolarizability.

  16. A bimodular theory for finite deformations: Comparison of orthotropic second-order and exponential stress constitutive equations for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Klisch, Stephen M

    2006-06-01

    Cartilaginous tissues, such as articular cartilage and the annulus fibrosus, exhibit orthotropic behavior with highly asymmetric tensile-compressive responses. Due to this complex behavior, it is difficult to develop accurate stress constitutive equations that are valid for finite deformations. Therefore, we have developed a bimodular theory for finite deformations of elastic materials that allows the mechanical properties of the tissue to differ in tension and compression. In this paper, we derive an orthotropic stress constitutive equation that is second-order in terms of the Biot strain tensor as an alternative to traditional exponential type equations. Several reduced forms of the bimodular second-order equation, with six to nine parameters, and a bimodular exponential equation, with seven parameters, were fit to an experimental dataset that captures the highly asymmetric and orthotropic mechanical response of cartilage. The results suggest that the bimodular second-order models may be appealing for some applications with cartilaginous tissues.

  17. Regional Analysis of Tensor Fields on the Sphere by Slepian Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Katrin; Plattner, Alain; Simons, Frederik J.; Michel, Volker

    2017-04-01

    For scalar and vectorial data on the sphere spatially concentrated and spectrally limited, or spatially limited and spectrally concentrated functions have proven to be a viable and versatile tool. These functions are called Slepian functions. They have been applied in a variety of fields including geodesy, planetary magnetism, cosmology, and biomedical imaging. Their concentration within a chosen region on the planet allows for local inversions, when only regional data are available or are of desired quality, or they enable us to extract regional information. We focus on the analysis of tensorial fields, as they occur e.g. for the GRACE mission, by means of Slepian functions. Furthermore, we present a method for an efficient construction of tensor Slepian functions for symmetric regions such as spherical caps. In this context we are able to construct a localized basis on the spherical cap for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Here, we also can separate the polarization into an electric and a magnetic component.

  18. First- and second-order backscattering from clouds illuminated by finite beams.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Browell, E V

    1972-06-01

    Calculations have been carried out for first- and second-order backscattering from water clouds illuminated by a continuous 0.9-micro beam with a finite divergence angle. In the single-scattering calculations several cloud types were used, while only an approximation to fair weather cumulus clouds was used for double scattering. It was found that the intensity and hence the reflectivity varied with the transceiver-cloud distance for both orders of scattering. Second-order backscattering also varied with field of view. From these results a criterion is suggested for determining when the plane parallel atmosphere theories can be used with finite beams.

  19. Second-order infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabitov, I Kh

    2014-12-31

    We study infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles. We begin by considering the minimal possible smoothness class C{sup 1} both for surfaces and for deformation fields. Conditions are formulated for a given harmonic of a first-order infinitesimal bending to be extendable into a second order infinitesimal bending. We finish by stating a criterion for nonrigidity of second order for closed surfaces of revolution in the analytic class. We also give the first concrete example of such a nonrigid surface. Bibliography: 15 entries.

  20. Rapid 3-D forward modeling of gravity and gravity gradient tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longwei, C.; Dai, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional inversion are the key process in gravity exploration. In the commonly used scheme of inversion, the subsurface of the earth is usually divided into many small prism blocks (or grids) with variable density values. A key task in gravity inversion is to calculate the composite fields (gravity and gravity gradient tensor) generated by all these grids, this is known as forward modeling. In general forward modeling is memory-demanding and time-consuming. One scheme to rapidly calculate the fields is to implement it in Fourier domain and use fast Fourier transform algorithm. The advantage of the Fourier domain method is, obviously, much faster. However, the intrinsic edge effect of the Fourier domain method degrades the precision of the calculated fields. We have developed an innovative scheme to directly calculate the fields in spatial domain. There are two key points in this scheme. One key point is spatial discretization. Spatial convolution formula is discretized using an approach similar to normal difference method. A key idea during discretization is to use the analytical formula of a cubic prism, and this makes the resultant discrete formula have clear physical meaning: it embodies the superposition principle of the fields and is the exact formula to calculate the fields generated by all grids. The discretization only requires the grids have the same dimension in horizontal directions, and grids in different layers may have different dimension in vertical direction, and this offers more flexibility for inversion. Another key point is discrete convolution calculation. We invoke a high efficient two-dimensional discrete convolution algorithm, and it guarantees both time-saving and memory-saving. Its memory cost has the same order as the number of grids. Numerical test result shows that for a model with a dimension of 1000x1000x201 grids, it takes about 300s to calculate the fields on 1000x1000 field points in a personal computer with 3.4-GHz CPU

  1. Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M; Popovych, Roman O; Shapoval, Nataliya M

    2013-01-01

    Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients are exhaustively described over both the complex and real fields. The exact lower and upper bounds for the dimensions of the maximal Lie invariance algebras possessed by such systems are obtained using an effective algebraic approach.

  2. Second-Order Theoretical Analysis: A Method for Constructing Theoretical Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shkedi, Asher

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a model is offered that allows for the construction of a theoretical explanation on the basis of data accumulated in the field for the purpose of constructing a meaningful description. In this endeavour a distinction is proposed between two methods of theoretical analysis: first-order analysis and second-order analysis. First-order…

  3. Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M.; Popovych, Roman O.; Shapoval, Nataliya M.

    2013-01-01

    Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients are exhaustively described over both the complex and real fields. The exact lower and upper bounds for the dimensions of the maximal Lie invariance algebras possessed by such systems are obtained using an effective algebraic approach. PMID:23564972

  4. Second-order radio frequency kinetic theory revisited: Resolving inconsistency with conventional fluid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2013-08-15

    The second-order velocity distribution function was calculated from the second-order rf kinetic theory [Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 641 (2000)]. However, the nonresonant ponderomotive force in the radial direction derived from the theory is inconsistent with that from the fluid theory. The inconsistency arises from that the multiple-timescale-separation assumption fails when the second-order Vlasov equation is directly integrated along unperturbed particle orbits. A slowly ramped wave field including an adiabatic turn-on process is applied in the modified kinetic theory in this paper. Since this modification leads only to additional reactive/nonresonant response relevant with the secular resonant response from the previous kinetic theory, the correct nonresonant ponderomotive force can be obtained while all the resonant moments remain unchanged.

  5. Feasibility of a second-order gravitational red-shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J.; Vessot, R. F. C.

    1976-01-01

    The number of gravitation experiments undertaken since the advent of Einstein's theory of gravitation is quite small, with, so far, only the famous perihelion-advance experiment and a recent lunar-laser-ranging experiment being capable of measuring a nonlinear, second-order effect. It now appears that another distinct test of the second-order term may be feasible through the use of very stable atomic clocks. This experiment, which would measure the second-order gravitational red-shift, is a bona fide test of the field equations of gravity, not just a test of the underlying principle of equivalence. The nature of such an experiment, the basic equations, model-orbit calculations, and some tracking-accuracy requirements are presented. It is concluded that current space-probe tracking capabilities cannot determine all the necessary orbital parameters with sufficient accuracy for this experiment at the present time.

  6. First- or second-order transition in the melting of repeat sequence DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Z; Prohofsky, E W

    1994-01-01

    Both theoretical analysis and observation of the continuity of the melted fraction of base pairs indicate that the melting transition in DNA is second order. Analysis of the salt dependence of the transition by polyelectrolyte limiting laws, however, has first-order dynamics imbedded in the analysis. This paper proposes that the observation taken to be a latent heat of melting in the limiting law analysis could instead be a specific heat anomaly associated with a second-order transition. The limiting laws can be reconstructed based on a second-order transition with a specific heat anomaly. The T2M dependence of this excess heat is also consistent with its being a specific heat anomaly of a system displaying classical critical behavior. Classical critical behavior indicates that theoretical mean field approaches such as MSPA should be particularly appropriate to helix melting studies. PMID:8130338

  7. Part A: Nonprincipal-plane scattering from flat plates: Second-order and corner diffractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.

    1989-01-01

    Two models of a flat plate for nonprincipal-plane scattering are explored. The first is a revised version of the Physical Optics/Physical Theory of Diffraction (PO/PTD) model with second-order PTD equivalent currents included to account for second-order interactions among the plate edges. The second model uses a heurisitcally derived corner diffraction coefficient to account for the corner scattering mechanism. The patterns obtained using the newer models were compared to the data of previously reported models, the Moment Method (MM), and experimental results. Near normal incidence, all the models agreed; however, near grazing incidence a need for higher-order and corner diffraction mechanisms was noted. In many instances the second-order and corner-scattered fields which were formulated improved the results.

  8. Theoretical study of second-order hyperpolarizability for nitrogen radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    We report calculations of the static and dynamic hyperpolarizabilities of the nitrogen radical cation in doublet state. The electronic contributions were computed analytically using density functional theory and multi-configurational self-consistent field method with extended basis sets for non-resonant excitation. The open-shell electronic system of nitrogen radical cation provides negative second-order optical nonlinearity, suggesting that the hyperpolarizability coefficient, {{γ }(2)}, in the non-resonant regime is mainly composed of combinations of virtual one-photon transitions rather than two-photon transitions. The second-order optical properties of nitrogen radical cation have been calculated as a function of bond length starting with the neutral molecular geometry (S0 minimum) and stretching the N-N triple bond, reaching the ionic D0 relaxed geometry all the way toward dissociation limit, to investigate the effect of internuclear bond distance on second-order hyperpolarizability.

  9. Feasibility of a second-order gravitational red-shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J.; Vessot, R. F. C.

    1976-01-01

    The number of gravitation experiments undertaken since the advent of Einstein's theory of gravitation is quite small, with, so far, only the famous perihelion-advance experiment and a recent lunar-laser-ranging experiment being capable of measuring a nonlinear, second-order effect. It now appears that another distinct test of the second-order term may be feasible through the use of very stable atomic clocks. This experiment, which would measure the second-order gravitational red-shift, is a bona fide test of the field equations of gravity, not just a test of the underlying principle of equivalence. The nature of such an experiment, the basic equations, model-orbit calculations, and some tracking-accuracy requirements are presented. It is concluded that current space-probe tracking capabilities cannot determine all the necessary orbital parameters with sufficient accuracy for this experiment at the present time.

  10. Optimal second order sliding mode control for linear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-11-01

    In this paper an optimal second order sliding mode controller (OSOSMC) is proposed to track a linear uncertain system. The optimal controller based on the linear quadratic regulator method is designed for the nominal system. An integral sliding mode controller is combined with the optimal controller to ensure robustness of the linear system which is affected by parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. To achieve finite time convergence of the sliding mode, a nonsingular terminal sliding surface is added with the integral sliding surface giving rise to a second order sliding mode controller. The main advantage of the proposed OSOSMC is that the control input is substantially reduced and it becomes chattering free. Simulation results confirm superiority of the proposed OSOSMC over some existing.

  11. On homogeneous second order linear general quantum difference equations.

    PubMed

    Faried, Nashat; Shehata, Enas M; El Zafarani, Rasha M

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solutions of the β-Cauchy problem of second order β-difference equations [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text], in a neighborhood of the unique fixed point [Formula: see text] of the strictly increasing continuous function β, defined on an interval [Formula: see text]. These equations are based on the general quantum difference operator [Formula: see text], which is defined by [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]. We also construct a fundamental set of solutions for the second order linear homogeneous β-difference equations when the coefficients are constants and study the different cases of the roots of their characteristic equations. Finally, we drive the Euler-Cauchy β-difference equation.

  12. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-01

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources.

  13. Second-order centrality correlation in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Meilei; Guo, Xinling; Chen, Jiaquan; Lu, Zhe-Ming; Nie, Tingyuan

    2015-02-01

    Scale-free networks in which the degree displays a power-law distribution can be classified into assortative, disassortative, and neutral networks according to their degree-degree correlation. The second-order centrality proposed in a distributed computation manner is quick-calculated and accurate to identify critical nodes. We explore the second-order centrality correlation (SOC) for each type of the scale-free networks. The SOC-SOC correlation in assortative network and neutral network behaves similarly to the degree-degree correlation, while it behaves an apparent difference in disassortative networks. Experiments show that the invulnerability of most of scale-free networks behaves similarly under the node removal ordering by SOC centrality and degree centrality, respectively. The netscience network and the Yeast network behave a little differently because they are native disconnecting networks.

  14. Phase transitions, inhomogeneous horizons and second-order hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attems, Maximilian; Bea, Yago; Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; Triana, Miquel; Zilhão, Miguel

    2017-06-01

    We use holography to study the spinodal instability of a four-dimensional, strongly-coupled gauge theory with a first-order thermal phase transition. We place the theory on a cylinder in a set of homogeneous, unstable initial states. The dual gravity configurations are black branes afflicted by a Gregory-Laflamme instability. We numerically evolve Einstein's equations to follow the instability until the system settles down to a stationary, inhomogeneous black brane. The dual gauge theory states have constant temperature but non-constant energy density. We show that the time evolution of the instability and the final states are accurately described by second-order hydrodynamics. In the static limit, the latter reduces to a single, second-order, non-linear differential equation from which the inhomogeneous final states can be derived.

  15. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-17

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources.

  16. Robust eigensystem assignment for second-order estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1990-01-01

    An approach for the robust eigensystem assignment of flexible structures using full state or output feedback is developed. Using the second-order dynamic equations, the approach can assign the eigenvalues of the system via velocity and displacement feedbacks, or acceleration and velocity feedbacks. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system are assigned, via the second-order eigenvalue problem for the structural system, in two steps. First, an orthonormal basis spanning the attainable closed-loop eigenvector space corresponding to each desired closed-loop eigenvalue is generated using the Singular Value or QR decompositions. Second, a sequential procedure is used to choose a set of closed-loop eigenvectors that are as close as possible to the column space of a well-conditioned target matrix. Among the possible choices of the target matrix, the closest unitary matrix to the open-loop eigenvector matrix appears to be a suitable choice. A numerical example is given to illustrate the proposed algorithm.

  17. Second-order envelope equation of graphene electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji

    2014-10-01

    A treatment of graphene's electronic states based on the tight-binding method is presented. Like Dirac equation, this treatment uses envelope functions to eliminate crystal potential. Besides, a density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham (KS) orbital of an isolated carbon atom is employed. By locally expanding envelope functions into second-order polynomials and by involving up to third-nearest atoms in calculating orbital integrals, the second-order envelope equation is obtained. This equation does not contain any experimental data except graphene's crystal structure, and its coefficients are determined through several kinds of integrals of the carbon KS orbital. As an improvement, it leads to more accurate energy dispersion than Dirac equation including the triangular warping effect and asymmetry for electrons and holes, and gives the Fermi velocity which is in good agreement with the experimental value.

  18. Quasiparticle second-order viscous hydrodynamics from kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo; Jaiswal, Amaresh; Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2017-03-01

    We present the derivation of second-order relativistic viscous hydrodynamics from an effective Boltzmann equation for a system consisting of quasiparticles of a single species. We consider temperature-dependent masses of the quasiparticles and devise a thermodynamically consistent framework to formulate second-order evolution equations for shear and bulk viscous pressure corrections. The main advantage of this formulation is that one can consistently implement a realistic equation of state of the medium within the framework of kinetic theory. Specializing to the case of a one-dimensional purely longitudinal boost-invariant expansion, we study the effect of this new formulation on the viscous hydrodynamic evolution of strongly interacting matter formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  19. First and second order convex approximation strategies in structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleury, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, various methods based on convex approximation schemes are discussed that have demonstrated strong potential for efficient solution of structural optimization problems. First, the convex linearization method (Conlin) is briefly described, as well as one of its recent generalizations, the method of moving asymptotes (MMA). Both Conlin and MMA can be interpreted as first-order convex approximation methods that attempt to estimate the curvature of the problem functions on the basis of semiempirical rules. Attention is next directed toward methods that use diagonal second derivatives in order to provide a sound basis for building up high-quality explicit approximations of the behavior constraints. In particular, it is shown how second-order information can be effectively used without demanding a prohibitive computational cost. Various first-order and second-order approaches are compared by applying them to simple problems that have a closed form solution.

  20. Bounded solutions of a second order evolution equation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, Hugo

    2001-02-01

    In this paper we study the following abstract second order differential equation with dissipation in a Hilbert space H: u″+cu'+dA u+kG(u)=P(t), u∈H, t∈R, where c, d and k are positive constants, G:H→H is a Lipschitzian function and P:R→H is a continuous and bounded function. A:D(A)⊂H→H is an unbounded linear operator which is self-adjoint, positive definite and has compact resolvent. Under these conditions we prove that for some values of d, c and k this system has a bounded solution which is exponentially asymptotically stable. Moreover; if P(t) is almost periodic, then this bounded solution is also almost periodic. These results are applied to a very well known second order system partial differential equations; such as the sine-Gordon equation, The suspension bridge equation proposed by Lazer and McKenna, etc.

  1. Second order modeling of boundary-free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Lumley, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of realizable second order models for boundary-free turbulent flows is presented. The constraints on second order models based on the realizability principle are re-examined. The rapid terms in the pressure correlations for both the Reynolds stress and the passive scalar flux equations are constructed to exactly satisfy the joint realizability. All other model terms (return-to-isotropy, third moments, and terms in the dissipation equations) already satisfy realizability. To correct the spreading rate of the axisymmetric jet, an extra term is added to the dissipation equation which accounts for the effect of mean vortex stretching on dissipation. The test flows used in this study are the mixing shear layer, plane jet, axisymmetric jet, and plane wake. The numerical solutions show that the unified model equations predict all these flows reasonably. It is expected that these models would be suitable for more complex and critical flows.

  2. Thermoconvective Instability of a Second-Order Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávalos, Luis Antonio O.; Manero, Octavio

    1986-02-01

    The non-linear three-dimensional thermoconvective instability of a second-order fluid layer between two parallel semi-infinite walls is analyzed under the fixed-heat flux boundary condition. In the analysis, the Boussinesq approximation is used to account for density changes in the system. It is shown that the non-linear time-dependent equation that governs the convective motion is of the same form as those obtained by Chapman and Proctor in the two-dimensional case and by Proctor (for infinitely thickwalls) in the three-dimensional case for Newtonian fluids. This result shows that the theorems of Tanner and Giesekus for planar, creeping flow of incompressible second-order fluids can be extended to three-dimensional, non-linear, time-dependent thermoconvective phenomena.

  3. Bioethics as public discourse and second-order discipline.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2009-06-01

    Bioethics is best viewed as both a second-order discipline and also part of public discourse. Since their goals differ, some bioethical activities are more usefully viewed as advancing public discourse than academic disciplines. For example, the "Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights" sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization seeks to promote ethical guidance on bioethical issues. From the vantage of philosophical ethics, it fails to rank or specify its stated principles, justify controversial principles, clarify key terms, or say what is meant by calling potentially conflicting norms "foundational." From the vantage of improving the public discourse about bioethical problems and seeking ethical solutions in the public arena, however, this document may have an important role. The goals and relations between bioethics as a second-order discipline and public discourse are explored.

  4. Second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin -Chiang; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-06-01

    A new second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for solving Euler equations for compressible inviscid fluid or gas flows is proposed. Similar to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), the method represents fluid cells with Lagrangian particles and is suitable for the simulation of complex free surface / multiphase flows. The main contributions of our method, which is different from SPH in all other aspects, are (a) significant improvement of approximation of differential operators based on a polynomial fit via weighted least squares approximation and the convergence of prescribed order, (b) an upwind second-order particle-based algorithm with limiter, providing accuracy and long term stability, and (c) accurate resolution of states at free interfaces. In conclusion, numerical verification tests demonstrating the convergence order for fixed domain and free surface problems are presented.

  5. Second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for Euler equations

    DOE PAGES

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin -Chiang; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-06-01

    A new second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for solving Euler equations for compressible inviscid fluid or gas flows is proposed. Similar to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), the method represents fluid cells with Lagrangian particles and is suitable for the simulation of complex free surface / multiphase flows. The main contributions of our method, which is different from SPH in all other aspects, are (a) significant improvement of approximation of differential operators based on a polynomial fit via weighted least squares approximation and the convergence of prescribed order, (b) an upwind second-order particle-based algorithm with limiter, providing accuracy and longmore » term stability, and (c) accurate resolution of states at free interfaces. In conclusion, numerical verification tests demonstrating the convergence order for fixed domain and free surface problems are presented.« less

  6. Conformally-invariant scalar field with trace-free energy-momentum tensor in Robertson-Walker models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. I.; Singh, N. B.

    1992-02-01

    Exact solutions of Einstein's field equations for a conformally-invariant scalar field with trace-free energy-momentum tensor is presented for the Robertson-Walker models with K = + 1, - 1. The physical properties of the solution are also studied

  7. Second-order evaluations of orthogonal and symplectic Yangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanyan, D. R.; Kirschner, R.

    2017-08-01

    Orthogonal or symplectic Yangians are defined by the Yang-Baxter RLL relation involving the fundamental R-matrix with the corresponding so( n) or sp(2 m) symmetry. We investigate the second-order solution conditions, where the expansion of L( u) in u -1 is truncated at the second power, and we derive the relations for the two nontrivial terms in L( u).

  8. Gravitational waves from global second order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier; Vlcek, Brian E-mail: larryp@caltech.edu E-mail: bvlcek@uwm.edu

    2012-11-01

    Global second-order phase transitions are expected to produce scale-invariant gravitational wave spectra. In this manuscript we explore the dynamics of a symmetry-breaking phase transition using lattice simulations. We explicitly calculate the stochastic gravitational wave background produced during the transition and subsequent self-ordering phase. We comment on this signal as it compares to the scale-invariant spectrum produced during inflation.

  9. Second order parametric processes in nonlinear silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Han, Ming; Wang, Anbo; Liu, Zhiwen; Heflin, James R

    2008-04-25

    We analyze second order parametric processes in a silica microsphere coated with radially aligned nonlinear optical molecules. In a high-Q nonlinear microsphere, we discover that it is possible to achieve ultralow threshold parametric oscillation that obeys the rule of angular momentum conservation. Based on symmetry considerations, one can also implement parametric processes that naturally generate quantum entangled photon pairs. Practical issues regarding implementation of the nonlinear microsphere are also discussed.

  10. Stabilisation of second-order nonlinear equations with variable delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezansky, Leonid; Braverman, Elena; Idels, Lev

    2015-08-01

    For a wide class of second-order nonlinear non-autonomous models, we illustrate that combining proportional state control with the feedback that is proportional to the derivative of the chaotic signal allows to stabilise unstable motions of the system. The delays are variable, which leads to more flexible controls permitting delay perturbations; only delay bounds are significant for stabilisation by a delayed control. The results are applied to the sunflower equation which has an infinite number of equilibrium points.

  11. Asymptotic analysis of perturbed dust cosmologies to second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Wainwright, John

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear perturbations of Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmologies with dust and a cosmological constant Λ >0 have recently attracted considerable attention. In this paper our first goal is to compare the evolution of the first and second order perturbations by determining their asymptotic behaviour at late times in ever-expanding models. We show that in the presence of spatial curvature K or a cosmological constant, the density perturbation approaches a finite limit both to first and second order, but the rate of approach depends on the model, being power law in the scale factor if Λ >0 but logarithmic if Λ =0 and K<0. Scalar perturbations in general contain a growing and a decaying mode. We find, somewhat surprisingly, that if Λ >0 the decaying mode does not die away, i.e. it contributes on an equal footing as the growing mode to the asymptotic expression for the density perturbation. On the other hand, the future asymptotic regime of the Einstein-de Sitter universe (K=Λ =0) is completely different, as exemplified by the density perturbation which diverges; moreover, the second order perturbation diverges faster than the first order perturbation, which suggests that the Einstein-de Sitter universe is unstable to perturbations, and that the perturbation series do not converge towards the future. We conclude that the presence of spatial curvature or a cosmological constant stabilizes the perturbations. Our second goal is to derive an explicit expression for the second order density perturbation that can be used to study the effects of including a cosmological constant and spatial curvature.

  12. Second order filter response with series coupled silica microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, A.; Iitchenko, V. S.; Handley, T.; Maleki, L.

    2002-01-01

    We have demonstrated an approach for fabricating a photonic filter with second order response function. The filter consists of two germania-doped silica microtoroidal or microspherical resonators cascaded in series. We use UV irradiation to tune the mode of one microcavity to bring it close to the mode of the second microcavity. This approach produces a filter function with much sharper rolloff than can be obtained with the individual microresonators.

  13. Extensions and applications of a second-order landsurface parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreou, S. A.; Eagleson, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    Extensions and applications of a second order land surface parameterization, proposed by Andreou and Eagleson are developed. Procedures for evaluating the near surface storage depth used in one cell land surface parameterizations are suggested and tested by using the model. Sensitivity analysis to the key soil parameters is performed. A case study involving comparison with an "exact" numerical model and another simplified parameterization, under very dry climatic conditions and for two different soil types, is also incorporated.

  14. Superquantile/CVaR Risk Measures: Second-Order Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-31

    superquantiles have recently been explored in some settings, but key parts of the theory have been lacking: descriptions of the associated risk en...2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Superquantile/CVaR Risk Measures: Second-Order Theory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...recently been explored in some settings, but key parts of the theory have been lacking: descriptions of the associated risk en- velopes and risk identi ers

  15. Maintaining Limited-Range Connectivity Among Second-Order Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-07

    we consider ad-hoc networks of robotic agents with double integrator dynamics. For such networks, the connectivity maintenance problems are: (i) do...hoc networks of mobile autonomous agents. This loose ter- minology refers to groups of robotic agents with limited mobility and communica- tion...connectivity can be preserved. 3.1. Networks of robotic agents with second-order dynamics and the connectivity maintenance problem. We begin by

  16. Method for estimating the stress field from seismic moment tensor data based on the flow rule in plasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.

    2016-09-01

    The stress field is a key factor controlling earthquake occurrence and crustal evolution. In this study, we propose an approach for determining the stress field in a region using seismic moment tensors, based on the classical equation in plasticity theory. Seismic activity is a phenomenon that relaxes crustal stress and creates plastic strain in a medium because of faulting, which suggests that the medium could behave as a plastic body. Using the constitutive relation in plastic theory, the increment of the plastic strain tensor is proportional to the deviatoric stress tensor. Simple mathematical manipulation enables the development of an inversion method for estimating the stress field in a region. The method is tested on shallow earthquakes occurring on Kyushu Island, Japan.

  17. Noise masking reveals channels for second-order letters

    PubMed Central

    Oruç, İpek; Landy, Michael S.; Pelli, Denis G.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the channels underlying identification of second-order letters using a critical-band masking paradigm. We find that observers use a single 1–1.5 octave-wide channel for this task. This channel’s best spatial frequency (c/letter) did not change across different noise conditions (indicating the inability of observers to switch channels to improve signal-to-noise ratio) or across different letter sizes (indicating scale invariance), for a fixed carrier frequency (c/letter). However, the channel’s best spatial frequency does change with stimulus carrier frequency (both in c/letter); one is proportional to the other. Following Majaj et al. (Majaj, N. J., Pelli, D. G., Kurshan, P., & Palomares, M. (2002). The role of spatial frequency channels in letter identification. Vision Research, 42, 1165–1184), we define “stroke frequency” as the line frequency (strokes/deg) in the luminance image. That is, for luminance-defined letters, stroke frequency is the number of lines (strokes) across each letter divided by letter width. For second-order letters, letter texture stroke frequency is the number of carrier cycles (luminance lines) within the letter ink area divided by the letter width. Unlike the nonlinear dependence found for first-order letters (implying scale-dependent processing), for second-order letters the channel frequency is half the letter texture stroke frequency (suggesting scale-invariant processing). PMID:16203023

  18. Magicity of the Ca52 and Ca54 isotopes and tensor contribution within a mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Marcella

    2014-03-01

    I investigate the magicity of the isotopes Ca52 and Ca54, which was recently confirmed by two experimental measurements, and relate it to like-particle and neutron-proton tensor effects within a mean-field description. By analyzing Ca isotopes, it is shown that the like-particle tensor contribution induces shell effects that render these nuclei more magic than would be predicted by neglecting it. In particular, such induced shell effects are stronger in the Ca52 nucleus, and the single-particle gaps are increased in both isotopes due to the tensor force. By studying N =32 and N =34 isotones, neutron-proton tensor effects may be isolated and their role analyzed. It is shown that neutron-proton tensor effects lead to increasing N =32 and N =34 gaps, when going along isotonic chains, from Fe58 to Ca52 and from Fe60 to Ca54, respectively. Mean-field calculations are perfomed by employing one Skyrme parameter set, which was introduced in a previous work by fitting the tensor parameters together with the spin-orbit strength. The signs and values of the tensor strengths are thus checked within this specific application. The obtained results indicate that the employed parameter set, even if generated with a partial adjustment of the parameters of the force, leads to the correct shell behavior and provides, in particular, a description of the magicity of Ca52 and Ca54 within a pure mean-field picture with the effective two-body Skyrme interaction.

  19. 3D extension of Tensorial Polar Decomposition. Application to (photo-)elasticity tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmorat, Rodrigue; Desmorat, Boris

    2016-06-01

    The orthogonalized harmonic decomposition of symmetric fourth-order tensors (i.e. having major and minor indicial symmetries, such as elasticity tensors) is completed by a representation of harmonic fourth-order tensors H by means of two second-order harmonic (symmetric deviatoric) tensors only. A similar decomposition is obtained for non-symmetric tensors (i.e. having minor indicial symmetry only, such as photo-elasticity tensors or elasto-plasticity tangent operators) introducing a fourth-order major antisymmetric traceless tensor Z. The tensor Z is represented by means of one harmonic second-order tensor and one antisymmetric second-order tensor only. Representations of totally symmetric (rari-constant), symmetric and major antisymmetric fourth-order tensors are simple particular cases of the proposed general representation. Closed-form expressions for tensor decomposition are given in the monoclinic case. Practical applications to elasticity and photo-elasticity monoclinic tensors are finally presented. xml:lang="fr"

  20. ElaStic: A tool for calculating second-order elastic constants from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golesorkhtabar, Rostam; Pavone, Pasquale; Spitaler, Jürgen; Puschnig, Peter; Draxl, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Elastic properties play a key role in materials science and technology. The elastic tensors at any order are defined by the Taylor expansion of the elastic energy or stress in terms of the applied strain. In this paper, we present ElaStic, a tool that is able to calculate the full second-order elastic stiffness tensor for any crystal structure from ab initio total-energy and/or stress calculations. This tool also provides the elastic compliances tensor and applies the Voigt and Reuss averaging procedure in order to obtain an evaluation of the bulk, shear, and Young moduli as well as the Poisson ratio of poly-crystalline samples. In a first step, the space-group is determined. Then, a set of deformation matrices is selected, and the corresponding structure files are produced. In a next step, total-energy or stress calculations for each deformed structure are performed by a chosen density-functional theory code. The computed energies/stresses are fitted as polynomial functions of the applied strain in order to get derivatives at zero strain. The knowledge of these derivatives allows for the determination of all independent components of the elastic tensor. In this context, the accuracy of the elastic constants critically depends on the polynomial fit. Therefore, we carefully study how the order of the polynomial fit and the deformation range influence the numerical derivatives, and we propose a new approach to obtain the most reliable results. We have applied ElaStic to representative materials for each crystal system, using total energies and stresses calculated with the full-potential all-electron codes exciting and WIEN2k as well as the pseudo-potential code Quantum ESPRESSO.

  1. Localization and mass spectra of various matter fields on scalar-tensor brane

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Qun-Ying; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Zhong, Yi; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Xiang-Nan

    2015-03-10

    Recently, a new scalar-tensor braneworld model was presented in [http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.127502]. It not only solves the gauge hierarchy problem but also reproduces a correct Friedmann-like equation on the brane. In this new model, there are two different brane solutions, for which the mass spectra of gravity on the brane are the same. In this paper, we investigate localization and mass spectra of various bulk matter fields (i.e., scalar, vector, Kalb-Ramond, and fermion fields) on the brane. It is shown that the zero modes of all the matter fields can be localized on the positive tension brane under some conditions, and the mass spectra of each kind of bulk matter field for the two brane solutions are different except for some special cases, which implies that the two brane solutions are not physically equivalent. When the coupling constants between the dilaton and bulk matter fields take special values, the mass spectra for both solutions are the same, and the scalar and vector zero modes are localized on the negative tension brane, while the KR zero mode is still localized on the positive tension brane.

  2. Invitation to Random Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    This article is preface to the SIGMA special issue ''Tensor Models, Formalism and Applications'', http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/Tensor_Models.html. The issue is a collection of eight excellent, up to date reviews on random tensor models. The reviews combine pedagogical introductions meant for a general audience with presentations of the most recent developments in the field. This preface aims to give a condensed panoramic overview of random tensors as the natural generalization of random matrices to higher dimensions.

  3. Gauge field theory coherent states (GCS): IV. Infinite tensor product and thermodynamical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, T.; Winkler, O.

    2001-12-01

    In the canonical approach to Lorentzian quantum general relativity in four spacetime dimensions an important step forward has been made by Ashtekar, Isham and Lewandowski some eight years ago through the introduction of a Hilbert space structure, which was later proved to be a faithful representation of the canonical commutation and adjointness relations of the quantum field algebra of diffeomorphism invariant gauge field theories by Ashtekar, Lewandowski, Marolf, Mourão and Thiemann. This Hilbert space, together with its generalization due to Baez and Sawin, is appropriate for semi-classical quantum general relativity if the spacetime is spatially compact. In the spatially non-compact case, however, an extension of the Hilbert space is needed in order to approximate metrics that are macroscopically nowhere degenerate. For this purpose, in this paper we apply the theory of the infinite tensor product (ITP) of Hilbert Spaces, developed by von Neumann more than sixty years ago, to quantum general relativity. The cardinality of the number of tensor product factors can take the value of any possible Cantor aleph, making this mathematical theory well suited to our problem in which a Hilbert space is attached to each edge of an arbitrarily complicated, generally infinite graph. The new framework opens access to a new arsenal of techniques, appropriate to describe fascinating physics such as quantum topology change, semi-classical quantum gravity, effective low-energy physics etc from the universal point of view of the ITP. In particular, the study of photons and gravitons propagating on fluctuating quantum spacetimes should now be in reach.

  4. A critique of some recent second-order turbulence closure models for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, M. W.; Crisalli, A. J.; Horstman, C. C.; Acharya, M.; Lanfranco, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Computations based on two recently developed second-order turbulence closure models are compared with a series of boundary-layer experiments and with predictions of these experiments using an algebraic mixing length model. One of the models employs an eddy viscosity, whereas the other evaluates components of the Reynolds stress tensor. For flat plates, the computations are compared with the van Driest skin-friction transformation to assess the handling of compressibility. For boundary layers in pressure gradients, four experiments at Mach 4 and one at Mach 6.7 are used as the bases for comparison. In general, both models represent mean velocities and skin friction reasonably well, but represent the turbulence shear stress less accurately.

  5. Realistic Electric Field Mapping of Anisotropic Muscle During Electrical Stimulation Using a Combination of Water Diffusion Tensor and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bup Kyung; Oh, Tong In; Sajib, Saurav Zk; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-04-01

    To realistically map the electric fields of biological tissues using a diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT) method to estimate tissue response during electrical stimulation. Imaging experiments were performed using chunks of bovine muscle. Two silver wire electrodes were positioned inside the muscle tissue for electrical stimulation. Electric pulses were applied with a 100-V amplitude and 100-μs width using a voltage stimulator. During electrical stimulation, we collected DT-MREIT data from a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We adopted the projected current density method to calculate the electric field. Based on the relation between the water diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor, we computed the position-dependent scale factor using the measured magnetic flux density data. Then, a final conductivity tensor map was reconstructed using the multiplication of the water diffusion tensor and the scale factor. The current density images from DT-MREIT data represent the internal current flows that exist not only in the electrodes but also in surrounding regions. The reconstructed electric filed map from our anisotropic conductivity tensor with the projected current density shows coverage that is more than 2 times as wide, and higher signals in both the electrodes and surrounding tissues, than the previous isotropic method owing to the consideration of tissue anisotropy. An electric field map obtained by an anisotropic reconstruction method showed different patterns from the results of the previous isotropic reconstruction method. Since accurate electric field mapping is important to correctly estimate the coverage of the electrical treatment, future studies should include more rigorous validations of the new method through in vivo and in situ experiments.

  6. Realistic Electric Field Mapping of Anisotropic Muscle During Electrical Stimulation Using a Combination of Water Diffusion Tensor and Electrical Conductivity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To realistically map the electric fields of biological tissues using a diffusion tensor magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (DT-MREIT) method to estimate tissue response during electrical stimulation. Methods Imaging experiments were performed using chunks of bovine muscle. Two silver wire electrodes were positioned inside the muscle tissue for electrical stimulation. Electric pulses were applied with a 100-V amplitude and 100-μs width using a voltage stimulator. During electrical stimulation, we collected DT-MREIT data from a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We adopted the projected current density method to calculate the electric field. Based on the relation between the water diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor, we computed the position-dependent scale factor using the measured magnetic flux density data. Then, a final conductivity tensor map was reconstructed using the multiplication of the water diffusion tensor and the scale factor. Results The current density images from DT-MREIT data represent the internal current flows that exist not only in the electrodes but also in surrounding regions. The reconstructed electric filed map from our anisotropic conductivity tensor with the projected current density shows coverage that is more than 2 times as wide, and higher signals in both the electrodes and surrounding tissues, than the previous isotropic method owing to the consideration of tissue anisotropy. Conclusions An electric field map obtained by an anisotropic reconstruction method showed different patterns from the results of the previous isotropic reconstruction method. Since accurate electric field mapping is important to correctly estimate the coverage of the electrical treatment, future studies should include more rigorous validations of the new method through in vivo and in situ experiments. PMID:28446015

  7. Adaptive second-order sliding mode control with uncertainty compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, G.; Levant, A.; Pisano, A.; Usai, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper endows the second-order sliding mode control (2-SMC) approach with additional capabilities of learning and control adaptation. We present a 2-SMC scheme that estimates and compensates for the uncertainties affecting the system dynamics. It also adjusts the discontinuous control effort online, so that it can be reduced to arbitrarily small values. The proposed scheme is particularly useful when the available information regarding the uncertainties is conservative, and the classical `fixed-gain' SMC would inevitably lead to largely oversized discontinuous control effort. Benefits from the viewpoint of chattering reduction are obtained, as confirmed by computer simulations.

  8. Time regularity of the solutions to second order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Tamotu; Taglialatela, Giovanni

    2011-04-01

    We consider the Cauchy problem for a second order weakly hyperbolic equation, with coefficients depending only on the time variable. We prove that if the coefficients of the equation belong to the Gevrey class γ^{s0} and the Cauchy data belong to γ^{s1}, then the Cauchy problem has a solution in γ^{s0}([0,T^{*}];γ^{s1}({R})) for some T *>0, provided 1≤ s 1≤2-1/ s 0. If the equation is strictly hyperbolic, we may replace the previous condition by 1≤ s 1≤ s 0.

  9. Galaxy number counts to second order and their bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dio, Enea Di; Durrer, Ruth; Marozzi, Giovanni; Montanari, Francesco E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch E-mail: Francesco.Montanari@unige.ch

    2014-12-01

    We determine the number counts to second order in cosmological perturbation theory in the Poisson gauge and allowing for anisotropic stress. The calculation is performed using an innovative approach based on the recently proposed ''geodesic light-cone'' gauge. This allows us to determine the number counts in a purely geometric way, without using Einstein's equation. The result is valid for general dark energy models and (most) modified gravity models. We then evaluate numerically some relevant contributions to the number counts bispectrum. In particular we consider the terms involving the density, redshift space distortion and lensing.

  10. Supersonic second order analysis and optimization program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at supersonic and moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to conceptual configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical codes were developed for analysis and design of relatively general three dimensional geometries. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes. Case computational time of one minute on a CDC 176 are typical for practical aircraft arrangement.

  11. Second-order kinetic Kohn-Sham lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solórzano, S.; Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we introduce a semi-implicit second-order correction scheme to the kinetic Kohn-Sham lattice model. This approach is validated by performing realistic exchange-correlation energy calculations of atoms and dimers of the first two rows of the Periodic Table, finding good agreement with the expected values. Additionally, we simulate the ethane molecule, where we recover the bond lengths and compare the results with standard methods. Finally, we discuss the current applicability of pseudopotentials within the lattice kinetic Kohn-Sham approach.

  12. Octonic second-order equations of relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, Victor L.; Mironov, Sergey V.

    2009-01-15

    We demonstrate a generalization of relativistic quantum mechanics using eight-component value ''octons'' that generate an associative noncommutative spatial algebra. It is shown that the octonic second-order equation for the eight-component octonic wave function, obtained from the Einstein relation for energy and momentum, describes particles with spin 1/2. It is established that the octonic wave function of a particle in the state with defined spin projection has a specific spatial structure that takes the form of an octonic oscillator with two spatial polarizations: longitudinal linear and transverse circular.

  13. A second order derivative scheme based on Bregman algorithm class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Rosanna; Crisci, Serena; Cuomo, Salvatore; Galletti, Ardelio; Marcellino, Livia

    2016-10-01

    The algorithms based on the Bregman iterative regularization are known for efficiently solving convex constraint optimization problems. In this paper, we introduce a second order derivative scheme for the class of Bregman algorithms. Its properties of convergence and stability are investigated by means of numerical evidences. Moreover, we apply the proposed scheme to an isotropic Total Variation (TV) problem arising out of the Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) denoising. Experimental results confirm that our algorithm has good performance in terms of denoising quality, effectiveness and robustness.

  14. A second-order impact model for forest fire regimes.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Stefano; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    We present a very simple "impact" model for the description of forest fires and show that it can mimic the known characteristics of wild fire regimes in savannas, boreal forests, and Mediterranean forests. Moreover, the distribution of burned biomasses in model generated fires resemble those of burned areas in numerous large forests around the world. The model has also the merits of being the first second-order model for forest fires and the first example of the use of impact models in the study of ecosystems.

  15. A simple second-order digital phase-locked loop.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegnelia, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    A simple second-order digital phase-locked loop has been designed for the Viking Orbiter 1975 command system. Excluding analog-to-digital conversion, implementation of the loop requires only an adder/subtractor, two registers, and a correctable counter with control logic. The loop considers only the polarity of phase error and corrects system clocks according to a filtered sequence of this polarity. The loop is insensitive to input gain variation, and therefore offers the advantage of stable performance over long life. Predictable performance is guaranteed by extreme reliability of acquisition, yet in the steady state the loop produces only a slight degradation with respect to analog loop performance.

  16. A framework for second-order parton showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai Tao; Skands, Peter

    2017-08-01

    A framework is presented for including second-order perturbative corrections to the radiation patterns of parton showers. The formalism allows to combine O (αs2)-corrected iterated 2 → 3 kernels for ;ordered; gluon emissions with tree-level 2 → 4 kernels for ;unordered; ones. The combined Sudakov evolution kernel is thus accurate to O (αs2). As a first step towards a full-fledged implementation of these ideas, we develop an explicit implementation of 2 → 4 shower branchings in this letter.

  17. Langevin dynamics of financial systems: A second-order analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.

    2001-07-01

    We address the issue of stock market fluctuations within Langevin Dynamics (LD) and the thermodynamics definitions of multifractality in order to study its second-order characterization given by the analogous specific heat Cq, where q is an analogous temperature relating the moments of the generating partition function for the financial data signals. Due to non-linear and additive noise terms within the LD, we found that Cq can display a shoulder to the right of its main peak as also found in the S&P500 historical data which may resemble a classical phase transition at a critical point.

  18. Second-order type theory for first-class environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizaki, Shin-ya

    2017-05-01

    An environment is an assignment of variables to values, which is one of the fundamental notions in programming languages. A first-class entity is an object which can be passed to a function and returned as a result, such as an integer. We have studied an environment calculus, a lambda calculus with first-class environments for several years. We studied a simple type theory and ML-polymorphic type system for the environment calculus. In this paper, we propose an environment calculus with a Church-style second-order type system, and study its fundamental properties.

  19. Second-order neutral impulsive stochastic evolution equations with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yong; Sun, Dandan

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we study the second-order neutral stochastic evolution equations with impulsive effect and delay (SNSEEIDs). We establish the existence and uniqueness of mild solutions to SNSEEIDs under non-Lipschitz condition with Lipschitz condition being considered as a special case by the successive approximation. Furthermore, we give the continuous dependence of solutions on the initial data by means of corollary of the Bihari inequality. An application to the stochastic nonlinear wave equation with impulsive effect and delay is given to illustrate the theory.

  20. Spacetimes with Killing tensors. [for Einstein-Maxwell fields with certain spinor indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughston, L. P.; Sommers, P.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of the Killing equation and the Killing tensor are discussed. A conformal Killing tensor is of interest inasmuch as it gives rise to a quadratic first integral for null geodesic orbits. The Einstein-Maxwell equations are considered together with the Bianchi identity and the conformal Killing tensor. Two examples for the application of the considered relations are presented, giving attention to the charged Kerr solution and the charged C-metric.

  1. Spacetimes with Killing tensors. [for Einstein-Maxwell fields with certain spinor indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughston, L. P.; Sommers, P.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of the Killing equation and the Killing tensor are discussed. A conformal Killing tensor is of interest inasmuch as it gives rise to a quadratic first integral for null geodesic orbits. The Einstein-Maxwell equations are considered together with the Bianchi identity and the conformal Killing tensor. Two examples for the application of the considered relations are presented, giving attention to the charged Kerr solution and the charged C-metric.

  2. Sachs-Wolfe at second order: the CMB bispectrum on large angular scales

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Creminelli, Paolo; D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: creminel@ictp.it E-mail: norena@sissa.it

    2009-08-01

    We calculate the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy bispectrum on large angular scales in the absence of primordial non-Gaussianities, assuming exact matter dominance and extending at second order the classic Sachs-Wolfe result δT/T = Φ/3. The calculation is done in Poisson gauge. Besides intrinsic contributions calculated at last scattering, one must consider integrated effects. These are associated to lensing, and to the time dependence of the potentials (Rees-Sciama) and of the vector and tensor components of the metric generated at second order. The bispectrum is explicitly computed in the flat-sky approximation. It scales as l{sup −4} in the scale invariant limit and the shape dependence of its various contributions is represented in 3d plots. Although all the contributions to the bispectrum are parametrically of the same order, the full bispectrum is dominated by lensing. In the squeezed limit it corresponds to f{sub NL}{sup local} = −1/6−cos(2θ), where θ is the angle between the short and the long modes; the angle dependent contribution comes from lensing. In the equilateral limit it corresponds to f{sub NL}{sup equil} ≅ 3.13.

  3. Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry and second-order correlations of inflaton quanta

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2011-01-15

    The quantum theory of optical coherence is applied to the scrutiny of the statistical properties of the relic inflaton quanta. After adapting the description of the quantized scalar and tensor modes of the geometry to the analysis of intensity correlations, the normalized degrees of first-order and second-order coherence are computed in the concordance paradigm and are shown to encode faithfully the statistical properties of the initial quantum state. The strongly bunched curvature phonons are not only super-Poissonian but also superchaotic. Testable inequalities are derived in the limit of large-angular scales and can be physically interpreted in the light of the tenets of Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry. The quantum mechanical results are compared and contrasted with different situations including the one where intensity correlations are the result of a classical stochastic process. The survival of second-order correlations (not necessarily related to the purity of the initial quantum state) is addressed by defining a generalized ensemble where super-Poissonian statistics is an intrinsic property of the density matrix and turns out to be associated with finite volume effects which are expected to vanish in the thermodynamic limit.

  4. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  5. Second-order modeling of arsenite transport in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Magdi Selim, H.

    2011-11-01

    Rate limited processes including kinetic adsorption-desorption can greatly impact the fate and behavior of toxic arsenic compounds in heterogeneous soils. In this study, miscible displacement column experiments were carried out to investigate the extent of reactivity during transport of arsenite in soils. Arsenite breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Olivier and Windsor soils exhibited strong retardation with diffusive effluent fronts followed by slow release or tailing during leaching. Such behavior is indicative of the dominance of kinetic retention reactions for arsenite transport in the soil columns. Sharp decrease or increase in arsenite concentration in response to flow interruptions (stop-flow) further verified that non-equilibrium conditions are dominant. After some 40-60 pore volumes of continued leaching, 30-70% of the applied arsenite was retained by the soil in the columns. Furthermore, continued arsenite slow release for months was evident by the high levels of residual arsenite concentrations observed during leaching. In contrast, arsenite transport in a reference sand material exhibited no retention where complete mass recovery in the effluent solution was attained. A second-order model (SOM) which accounts for equilibrium, reversible, and irreversible retention mechanisms was utilized to describe arsenite transport results from the soil columns. Based on inverse and predictive modeling results, the SOM model successfully depicted arsenite BTCs from several soil columns. Based on inverse and predictive modeling results, a second-order model which accounts for kinetic reversible and irreversible reactions is recommended for describing arsenite transport in soils.

  6. Stochastic evaluation of second-order Dyson self-energies.

    PubMed

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Kim, Kwang S; Hirata, So

    2013-04-28

    A stochastic method is proposed that evaluates the second-order perturbation corrections to the Dyson self-energies of a molecule (i.e., quasiparticle energies or correlated ionization potentials and electron affinities) directly and not as small differences between two large, noisy quantities. With the aid of a Laplace transform, the usual sum-of-integral expressions of the second-order self-energy in many-body Green's function theory are rewritten into a sum of just four 13-dimensional integrals, 12-dimensional parts of which are evaluated by Monte Carlo integration. Efficient importance sampling is achieved with the Metropolis algorithm and a 12-dimensional weight function that is analytically integrable, is positive everywhere, and cancels all the singularities in the integrands exactly and analytically. The quasiparticle energies of small molecules have been reproduced within a few mEh of the correct values with 10(8) Monte Carlo steps. Linear-to-quadratic scaling of the size dependence of computational cost is demonstrated even for these small molecules.

  7. Second-order perturbation theory: The problem of infinite mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jeremy; Wardell, Barry; Pound, Adam

    2016-11-01

    Second-order self-force computations, which will be essential in modeling extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, involve two major new difficulties that were not present at first order. One is the problem of large scales, discussed in Pound [Phys. Rev. D 92, 104047 (2015)]. Here we discuss the second difficulty, which occurs instead on small scales: if we expand the field equations in spherical harmonics, then because the first-order field contains a singularity, we require an arbitrarily large number of first-order modes to accurately compute even a single second-order mode. This is a generic feature of nonlinear field equations containing singularities, allowing us to study it in the simple context of a scalar toy model in flat space. Using that model, we illustrate the problem and demonstrate a robust strategy for overcoming it.

  8. Communication: Electronic UV-Vis transient spectra of the ∙OH reaction products of uracil, thymine, cytosine, and 5,6-dihydrouracil by using the complete active space self-consistent field second-order perturbation (CASPT2//CASSCF) theory.

    PubMed

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2013-08-21

    Addition of ∙OH radicals to pyrimidine nucleobases is a common reaction in DNA/RNA damage by reactive oxygen species. Among several experimental techniques, transient absorption spectroscopy has been during the last decades used to characterize such compounds. Discrepancies have however appeared in the assignment of the adduct or adducts responsible for the reported transient absorption UV-Vis spectra. In order to get an accurate assignment of the transient spectra and a unified description of the absorption properties of the ∙OH reaction products of pyrimidines, a systematic complete active space self-consistent field second-order perturbation (CASPT2//CASSCF) theory study has been carried out on the uracil, thymine, and cytosine ∙OH addition adducts, as well as on the 5,6-dihydrouracil hydrogen abstraction products. With the obtained findings, the C5OH contributions to the lowest-energy band can be finally discarded. Instead, a bright (2)(π2) state of the C6OH adducts is determined to be the main responsible in all compounds for the absorption band in the Vis range.

  9. Vacuum Averages of the Energy-Momentum Tensor of a Scalar Field in Homogeneous Spaces with a Conformal Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breev, A. I.; Kozlov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the method of orbits, expressions have been obtained for the vacuum averages of the energy-momentum tensor of a scalar field with an arbitrary coupling constant in a spacetime with a nonstationary metric of Robertson-Walker type, where space is a homogeneous Riemannian manifold. It is shown that the vacuum averages of the energy-momentum tensor are determined by the complete set of solutions of the reduced equation with a smaller number of independent variables and with algebraic characteristics of homogeneous space.

  10. Field determination of the three dimensional hydraulic conductivity tensor of anisotropic media: 1. Theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul A.; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    1985-01-01

    A field method is proposed for determining the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity tensor and specific storage of an anisotropic porous or fractured medium. The method, known as cross-hole testing (to distinguish it from conventional single-hole packer tests), consists of injecting fluid into (or withdrawing fluid from) packed-off intervals in a number of boreholes and monitoring the transient head response in similar intervals in neighboring boreholes. The directions of the principal hydraulic conductivities need not be known prior to the test, and the boreholes may have arbitrary orientations (e.g., they can all be vertical). An important aspect of the proposed method is that it provides direct field information on whether it is proper to regard the medium as being uniform and anisotropic on the scale of the test. The first paper presents theoretical expressions describing transient and steady state head response in monitoring intervals of arbitrary lengths and orientations, to constant-rate injection into (or withdrawal from) intervals having similar or different lengths and orientations. The conditions under which these intervals can be treated mathematically as points are investigated by an asymptotic analysis. The effect of planar no-flow and constant-head boundaries on the response is analyzed by the theory of images. The second paper describes the field methodology and shows how the proposed approach works in the case of fractured granitic rocks.

  11. Second order distorted born approximation for backscattering from a layer of discrete random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Saatchi, Sasan S.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in scattering and depolarization characteristics of the vegetation canopies. Scattering models applied to the microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopies showed that multiple scattering effects can be important in simulating the backscattering coefficients correctly. In particular, in most applications, the cross-polarized backscattering coefficients are often underestimated by single scattering models. Recently, there have been concerted efforts to include the second order terms in the radiative transfer models of vegetation canopies in order to account for multiple scattering within the canopy. The coherent wave theory approach is extended to include multiple scattering effects to predict the coherent and incoherent backscattering contributions from a layer of vegetation canopy. The problem is initially formulated in terms of the exact equation for the correlation function of the field, i.e., the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Using fractional volume as a small parameter, a Foldy type approximation is made to obtain a more manageable correlation equation. This equation is iterated to obtain first and second order solutions. The iteration procedure assumes the variance of the field fluctuations are small compared to the coherent intensity. This assumption proved to be particularly successful in computing backscattering coefficients. First and second order backscattering coefficients are calculated from the iterants of the correlation equation. It is shown that the first order coefficients are the same as the distorted Born results used previously by the authors. These results contained enhancement terms in the direct-reflected contributions. The important contributions to second order backscattering are examined and interpreted in terms of scattering diagrams. Examples of situations in which second order backscattering coefficients are important are given.

  12. Calculation of the magnetic gradient tensor from total magnetic anomaly field based on regularized method in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gang; Zhang, Yingtang; Mi, Songlin; Fan, Hongbo; Li, Zhining

    2016-11-01

    To obtain accurate magnetic gradient tensor data, a fast and robust calculation method based on regularized method in frequency domain was proposed. Using the potential field theory, the transform formula in frequency domain was deduced in order to calculate the magnetic gradient tensor from the pre-existing total magnetic anomaly data. By analyzing the filter characteristics of the Vertical vector transform operator (VVTO) and Gradient tensor transform operator (GTTO), we proved that the conventional transform process was unstable which would zoom in the high-frequency part of the data in which measuring noise locate. Due to the existing unstable problem that led to a low signal-to-noise (SNR) for the calculated result, we introduced regularized method in this paper. By selecting the optimum regularization parameters of different transform phases using the C-norm approach, the high frequency noise was restrained and the SNR was improved effectively. Numerical analysis demonstrates that most value and characteristics of the calculated data by the proposed method compare favorably with reference magnetic gradient tensor data. In addition, calculated magnetic gradient tensor components form real aeromagnetic survey provided better resolution of the magnetic sources and original profile.

  13. The Schouten tensor as a connection in the unfolding of 3D conformal higher-spin fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Thomas; Bonezzi, Roberto; Boulanger, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    A first-order differential equation is provided for a one-form, spin- s connection valued in the two-row, width-( s - 1) Young tableau of GL(5). The connection is glued to a zero-form identified with the spin- s Cotton tensor. The usual zero-Cotton equation for a symmetric, conformal spin- s tensor gauge field in 3D is the flatness condition for the sum of the GL(5) spin- s and background connections. This presentation of the equations allows to reformulate in a compact way the cohomological problem studied in arXiv:1511.07389, featuring the spin- s Schouten tensor. We provide full computational details for spin 3 and 4 and present the general spin- s case in a compact way.

  14. Multireference second order perturbation theory with a simplified treatment of dynamical correlation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Enhua; Zhao, Dongbo; Li, Shuhua

    2015-10-13

    A multireference second order perturbation theory based on a complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) function or density matrix renormalized group (DMRG) function has been proposed. This method may be considered as an approximation to the CAS/A approach with the same reference, in which the dynamical correlation is simplified with blocked correlated second order perturbation theory based on the generalized valence bond (GVB) reference (GVB-BCPT2). This method, denoted as CASCI-BCPT2/GVB or DMRG-BCPT2/GVB, is size consistent and has a similar computational cost as the conventional second order perturbation theory (MP2). We have applied it to investigate a number of problems of chemical interest. These problems include bond-breaking potential energy surfaces in four molecules, the spectroscopic constants of six diatomic molecules, the reaction barrier for the automerization of cyclobutadiene, and the energy difference between the monocyclic and bicyclic forms of 2,6-pyridyne. Our test applications demonstrate that CASCI-BCPT2/GVB can provide comparable results with CASPT2 (second order perturbation theory based on the complete active space self-consistent-field wave function) for systems under study. Furthermore, the DMRG-BCPT2/GVB method is applicable to treat strongly correlated systems with large active spaces, which are beyond the capability of CASPT2.

  15. A novel unsplit perfectly matched layer for the second-order acoustic wave equation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youneng; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2014-08-01

    When solving acoustic field equations by using numerical approximation technique, absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) are widely used to truncate the simulation to a finite space. The perfectly matched layer (PML) technique has exhibited excellent absorbing efficiency as an ABC for the acoustic wave equation formulated as a first-order system. However, as the PML was originally designed for the first-order equation system, it cannot be applied to the second-order equation system directly. In this article, we aim to extend the unsplit PML to the second-order equation system. We developed an efficient unsplit implementation of PML for the second-order acoustic wave equation based on an auxiliary-differential-equation (ADE) scheme. The proposed method can benefit to the use of PML in simulations based on second-order equations. Compared with the existing PMLs, it has simpler implementation and requires less extra storage. Numerical results from finite-difference time-domain models are provided to illustrate the validity of the approach.

  16. Second-order dipolar order in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jacco D; Hemmi, Adrian; Ernst, Matthias; Meier, Beat H

    2011-10-21

    Generating dipolar order under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions is explored for different pulse sequences and dipolar-coupling networks. It is shown that under MAS second-order dipolar order can be generated reliably with 10% to 30% efficiency using the Jeener-Broekaert sequence in systems where the second-order average Hamiltonian is a (near) constant of the motion. When using adiabatic demagnetization and remagnetization, second-order dipolar order can be generated and reverted back to Zeeman order with up to 60% efficiency. This requires a maximum field strength with a nutation frequency that is less than one-quarter of the rotor frequency, and that the spin system can be properly spinlocked under such conditions. A simple coherent description accounts for the principal features of the spin dynamics, even using the smallest possible system of three coupled spins. For the systems investigated, the lifetime of second-order dipolar order under MAS was found to be on the order of T(1). © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  17. Magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Lesur, Vincent; Lane, Richard; Wang, Huilin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the mathematical and computational aspects of the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system (SCS). This work is relevant for 3-D modelling that is performed with lithospheric vertical scales and global, continent or large regional horizontal scales. The curvature of the Earth is significant at these scales and hence, a SCS is more appropriate than the usual Cartesian coordinate system (CCS). The 3-D arrays of spherical prisms (SP; `tesseroids') can be used to model the response of volumes with variable magnetic properties. Analytical solutions do not exist for these model elements and numerical or mixed numerical and analytical solutions must be employed. We compared various methods for calculating the response in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The methods were (1) the spherical coordinate magnetic dipole method (MD), (2) variants of the 3-D Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration method (3-D GLQI) with (i) different numbers of nodes in each of the three directions, and (ii) models where we subdivided each SP into a number of smaller tesseroid volume elements, (3) a procedure that we term revised Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration (3-D RGLQI) where the magnetization direction which is constant in a SCS is assumed to be constant in a CCS and equal to the direction at the geometric centre of each tesseroid, (4) the Taylor's series expansion method (TSE) and (5) the rectangular prism method (RP). In any realistic application, both the accuracy and the computational efficiency factors must be considered to determine the optimum approach to employ. In all instances, accuracy improves with increasing distance from the source. It is higher in the percentage terms for potential than the vector or tensor response. The tensor errors are the largest, but they decrease more quickly with distance from the source. In our comparisons of relative computational efficiency, we found

  18. Solar System constraints on massless scalar-tensor gravity with positive coupling constant upon cosmological evolution of the scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-09-01

    Scalar-tensor theories of gravity modify general relativity by introducing a scalar field that couples nonminimally to the metric tensor, while satisfying the weak-equivalence principle. These theories are interesting because they have the potential to simultaneously suppress modifications to Einstein's theory on Solar System scales, while introducing large deviations in the strong field of neutron stars. Scalar-tensor theories can be classified through the choice of conformal factor, a scalar that regulates the coupling between matter and the metric in the Einstein frame. The class defined by a Gaussian conformal factor with a negative exponent has been studied the most because it leads to spontaneous scalarization (i.e. the sudden activation of the scalar field in neutron stars), which consequently leads to large deviations from general relativity in the strong field. This class, however, has recently been shown to be in conflict with Solar System observations when accounting for the cosmological evolution of the scalar field. We here study whether this remains the case when the exponent of the conformal factor is positive, as well as in another class of theories defined by a hyperbolic conformal factor. We find that in both of these scalar-tensor theories, Solar System tests are passed only in a very small subset of coupling parameter space, for a large set of initial conditions compatible with big bang nucleosynthesis. However, while we find that it is possible for neutron stars to scalarize, one must carefully select the coupling parameter to do so, and even then, the scalar charge is typically 2 orders of magnitude smaller than in the negative-exponent case. Our study suggests that future work on scalar-tensor gravity, for example in the context of tests of general relativity with gravitational waves from neutron star binaries, should be carried out within the positive coupling parameter class.

  19. Predictions of single field inflation for the tensor/scalar ratio and the running spectral index

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2006-09-15

    We study the single field slow-roll inflation models that better agree with the available CMB and LSS data including the three years WMAP data: new inflation and hybrid inflation. We study these models as effective field theories in the Ginsburg-Landau context: a trinomial potential turns out to be a simple and well motivated model. The spectral index n{sub s} of the adiabatic fluctuations, the ratio r of tensor to scalar fluctuations and the running index dn{sub s}/dlnk are studied in detail. We derive explicit formulas for n{sub s}, r and dn{sub s}/dlnk and provide relevant plots. In new inflation, and for the chosen central value n{sub s}=0.95, we predict 0.03field {sigma} coupled to the inflaton. For {mu}{sub 0}{sup 2}<{lambda}{sub 0}M{sub Pl}{sup 2}/192, where {lambda}{sub 0} is the cosmological constant, hybrid inflation yields a blue tilted n{sub s}>1 behavior. Hybrid inflation for {mu}{sub 0}{sup 2}>{lambda}{sub 0}M{sub Pl}{sup 2}/192 fulfills all the present CMB+LSS data for a large enough initial inflaton amplitude. Even if chaotic inflation predicts n{sub s} values compatible with the data, chaotic inflation is disfavored since it predicts a too high value r{approx_equal}0.27 for the ratio of tensor to scalar fluctuations. The model which best agrees with the current data and which best prepares the way to the expected data r(less-or-similar sign)0.1, is the trinomial potential with negative mass term: new inflation.

  20. Experimental study of non-linear second-order analytical data with focus on the second-order advantage.

    PubMed

    Culzoni, María J; Damiani, Patricia C; García-Reiriz, Alejandro; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2007-07-01

    Three different experimental systems have been studied regarding the determination of analytes in complex samples, using non-linear second-order instrumental data, which are intrinsically able to provide the second-order advantage. This permits the quantitation of calibrated analytes in the presence of unexpected sample components, although a suitable algorithm is required. The recently described combination of artificial neural networks with post-training residual bilinearization has been applied to the three data sets, with successful results concerning prediction accuracy and precision, as well as profile recovery for the potential interferents in test samples. The studies involve: (1) the determination of two pharmaceuticals in the presence of an unexpected excipient by absorbance-pH matrix measurements, (2) the quantitation of iron(II) by its catalytic effect on the kinetics of the bromate oxidation of a colorant in the presence of a second interfering organic dye, and (3) the analysis of the antibiotic amoxicillin by fluorescence excitation-emission matrices in the presence of a fluorescent anti-inflammatory. The prediction results were compared and shown to be significantly better than those yielded by the unfolded partial least-squares/residual bilinearization model, due to the non-linear nature of the studied data.

  1. New implicitly solvable potential produced by second order shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M.V.; Kolevatova, E.V.; Nishnianidze, D.N.

    2015-05-15

    The procedure proposed recently by Bougie et al. (2010) to study the general form of shape invariant potentials in one-dimensional Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM) is generalized to the case of Higher Order SUSY QM with supercharges of second order in momentum. A new shape invariant potential is constructed by this method. It is singular at the origin, it grows at infinity, and its spectrum depends on the choice of connection conditions in the singular point. The corresponding Schrödinger equation is solved explicitly: the wave functions are constructed analytically, and the energy spectrum is defined implicitly via the transcendental equation which involves Confluent Hypergeometric functions. - Highlights: • New potential with 2nd order irreducible shape invariance was constructed. • The connection conditions at the singularity of potential were obtained. • The explicit expressions for all wave functions were derived. • The implicit equation for the energy spectrum was obtained.

  2. Analysis of implicit second-order upwind-biased stencils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Thomas W.; Warren, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Truncation error and stability properties of several implicit upwind schemes for the two-dimensional Euler equations are examined. The schemes use linear data reconstruction methods to achieve second-order flux integrations where the implicit Jacobian operators are first order. The stability properties of the schemes are examined by a Von Neumann analysis of the linearized, constant-coefficient Euler equations. The choice of the data reconstruction method used to evaluate the flux integral has a dramatic effect on the convergence properties of the implicit solution method. In particular, the typical one-dimensional data reconstruction methods used with structured grids exhibit poor convergence properties compared to the unstructured grid method considered. Of the schemes examined, the one with the superior convergence properties is well-suited for both unstructured and structured grids, which has important implications for the design of implicit methods.

  3. Second-Order Accurate Projective Integrators for Multiscale Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S L; Gear, C W

    2005-05-27

    We introduce new projective versions of second-order accurate Runge-Kutta and Adams-Bashforth methods, and demonstrate their use as outer integrators in solving stiff differential systems. An important outcome is that the new outer integrators, when combined with an inner telescopic projective integrator, can result in fully explicit methods with adaptive outer step size selection and solution accuracy comparable to those obtained by implicit integrators. If the stiff differential equations are not directly available, our formulations and stability analysis are general enough to allow the combined outer-inner projective integrators to be applied to black-box legacy codes or perform a coarse-grained time integration of microscopic systems to evolve macroscopic behavior, for example.

  4. Absorbing boundary conditions for second-order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wong, Yau Shu

    1990-01-01

    A uniform approach to construct absorbing artificial boundary conditions for second-order linear hyperbolic equations is proposed. The nonlocal boundary condition is given by a pseudodifferential operator that annihilates travelling waves. It is obtained through the dispersion relation of the differential equation by requiring that the initial-boundary value problem admits the wave solutions travelling in one direction only. Local approximation of this global boundary condition yields an nth-order differential operator. It is shown that the best approximations must be in the canonical forms which can be factorized into first-order operators. These boundary conditions are perfectly absorbing for wave packets propagating at certain group velocities. A hierarchy of absorbing boundary conditions is derived for transonic small perturbation equations of unsteady flows. These examples illustrate that the absorbing boundary conditions are easy to derive, and the effectiveness is demonstrated by the numerical experiments.

  5. Measurement of the second-order coherence of pseudothermal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom A.

    2017-04-01

    We describe photon statistics experiments using pseudothermal light that can be performed in an undergraduate physics laboratory. We examine the light properties in terms of a second-order coherence function, as determined either by measuring the light intensity as a function of time or via coincidence analysis of a pair of photon detectors. We determine the coherence time and intensity distribution of the pseudothermal light source that exhibits either Gaussian or non-Gaussian statistics as a function of their optical parameters, and then compare the results with theoretical predictions. The simple photodiode method can be used for the qualitative analysis of the coherence time, but more accurate measurements are achieved using the coincidence method.

  6. Digital adaptive controllers using second order models with transport lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    Design of a discrete optimal regulator requires the a priori knowledge of a mathematical model for the system of interest. Because a second-order model with transport lag is very amenable to control computations and because this type of model has been used previously to represent certain high order single input-single output processes, an adaptive controller was designed based upon adjustment of controls computed for such a model. An extended Kalman filter was utilized for tracking the model parameters which were subsequently used to update a set of optimal control gains. Favorable results were obtained in applying this procedure to the control of several examples including a ninth order nonlinear process.

  7. Digital second-order phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holes, J. K.; Carl, C.; Tegnelia, C. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A digital second-order phase-locked loop is disclosed in which a counter driven by a stable clock pulse source is used to generate a reference waveform of the same frequency as an incoming waveform, and to sample the incoming waveform at zero-crossover points. The samples are converted to digital form and accumulated over M cycles, reversing the sign of every second sample. After every M cycles, the accumulated value of samples is hard limited to a value SGN = + or - 1 and multiplied by a value delta sub 1 equal to a number of n sub 1 of fractions of a cycle. An error signal is used to advance or retard the counter according to the sign of the sum by an amount equal to the sum.

  8. "H"-shape second order NLO polymers: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong'an; Hu, Pan; Yu, Gui; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Zuoquan; Liu, Yunqi; Ye, Cheng; Qin, Jingui; Li, Zhen

    2009-02-28

    In this work, two "H"-shape and one "AB"-type second order nonlinear optical (NLO) polymers were prepared for the first time. The linkage positions of chromophores in the "H"-shape polymers were shoulder-to-shoulder, in which the chromophore moieties were part of the polymeric backbone. The subtle structure could be easily modified by the introduction of different isolation groups, to adjust the property of the resultant polymers. All the polymers exhibited good film-forming ability and thermal stability. The second harmonic generation (SHG) experiments demonstrated that the two "H"-shape polymers (P1 and P2) exhibited large SHG coefficients of d(33) values (up to 90 pm V(-1)), and P2 even demonstrated relatively good long-term temporal stability.

  9. Second-order nonlinear optical effects of spin currents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Bang-Fen; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2010-06-25

    Pure spin currents carry information in spintronics and signify novel quantum spin phenomena such as topological insulators. Measuring pure spin currents, however, is difficult since they have no direct electromagnetic induction. Noticing that a longitudinal spin current, in which electrons move along their spin directions, is a chiral quantity, we envisage that it has a chiral sum-frequency optical effect. A systematic symmetry analysis confirms this idea and reveals the second-order optical effects of general spin currents with unique polarization dependence. Microscopic calculations based on the eight-band model of III-V compound semiconductors show that the susceptibility is sizable under realistic conditions. These findings form a basis for "seeing" spin currents where and while they flow with standard nonlinear optical spectroscopy, providing a toolbox to explore a wealth of physics connecting spins and photons.

  10. Absorbing boundary conditions for second-order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wong, Yau Shu

    1989-01-01

    A uniform approach to construct absorbing artificial boundary conditions for second-order linear hyperbolic equations is proposed. The nonlocal boundary condition is given by a pseudodifferential operator that annihilates travelling waves. It is obtained through the dispersion relation of the differential equation by requiring that the initial-boundary value problem admits the wave solutions travelling in one direction only. Local approximation of this global boundary condition yields an nth-order differential operator. It is shown that the best approximations must be in the canonical forms which can be factorized into first-order operators. These boundary conditions are perfectly absorbing for wave packets propagating at certain group velocities. A hierarchy of absorbing boundary conditions is derived for transonic small perturbation equations of unsteady flows. These examples illustrate that the absorbing boundary conditions are easy to derive, and the effectiveness is demonstrated by the numerical experiments.

  11. Perfectly matched layers for Maxwell's equations in second order formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Petersson, A

    2004-07-26

    We consider the two-dimensional Maxwell's equations in domains external to perfectly conducting objects of complex shape. The equations are discretized using a node-centered finite-difference scheme on a Cartesian grid and the boundary condition are discretized to second order accuracy employing an embedded technique which does not suffer from a ''small-cell'' time-step restriction in the explicit time-integration method. The computational domain is truncated by a perfectly matched layer (PML). We derive estimates for both the error due to reflections at the outer boundary of the PML, and due to discretizing the continuous PML equations. Using these estimates, we show how the parameters of the PML can be chosen to make the discrete solution of the PML equations converge to the solution of Maxwell's equations on the unbounded domain, as the grid size goes to zero. Several numerical examples are given.

  12. Second-order schedules and the problem of conditioned reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D. Alan

    1971-01-01

    Thirteen pigeons were exposed to a variety of second-order schedules in which responding under a component schedule was reinforced according to a schedule of reinforcement. Under different conditions, completion of each component resulted in either (1) the brief presentation of a stimulus also present during reinforcement (pairing operation), (2) the brief presentation of a stimulus not present during reinforcement (nonpairing operation), or (3) no brief stimulus presentation (tandem). Brief-stimulus presentations engendered a pattern of responding within components similar to that engendered by food. Patterning was observed when fixed-interval and fixed-ratio components were maintained under fixed- and variable-ratio and fixed- and variable-interval schedules. There were no apparent differences in performance under pairing and nonpairing conditions in any study. The properties of the stimuli presented in brief-stimulus operations produced different effects on response patterning. In one study, similar effects on performance were found whether brief-stimulus presentations were response-produced or delivered independently of responding. Response patterning did not occur when the component schedule under which a nonpaired stimulus was produced occurred independently of the food schedule. The results suggest a reevaluation of the role of conditioned reinforcement in second-order schedule performance. The similarity of behavior under pairing and nonpairing operations is consistent with two hypotheses: (1) the major effect is due to the discriminative properties of the brief stimulus; (2) the scheduling operation under which the paired or nonpaired stimulus is presented can establish it as a reinforcer. PMID:16811549

  13. WEAK GALERKIN METHODS FOR SECOND ORDER ELLIPTIC INTERFACE PROBLEMS.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Wei, Guowei; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Weak Galerkin methods refer to general finite element methods for partial differential equations (PDEs) in which differential operators are approximated by their weak forms as distributions. Such weak forms give rise to desirable flexibilities in enforcing boundary and interface conditions. A weak Galerkin finite element method (WG-FEM) is developed in this paper for solving elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Theoretically, it is proved that high order numerical schemes can be designed by using the WG-FEM with polynomials of high order on each element. Extensive numerical experiments have been carried to validate the WG-FEM for solving second order elliptic interface problems. High order of convergence is numerically confirmed in both L2 and L∞ norms for the piecewise linear WG-FEM. Special attention is paid to solve many interface problems, in which the solution possesses a certain singularity due to the nonsmoothness of the interface. A challenge in research is to design nearly second order numerical methods that work well for problems with low regularity in the solution. The best known numerical scheme in the literature is of order [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] for the solution itself in L∞ norm. It is demonstrated that the WG-FEM of the lowest order, i.e., the piecewise constant WG-FEM, is capable of delivering numerical approximations that are of order [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] in the L∞ norm for C(1) or Lipschitz continuous interfaces associated with a C(1) or H(2) continuous solution.

  14. WEAK GALERKIN METHODS FOR SECOND ORDER ELLIPTIC INTERFACE PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    MU, LIN; WANG, JUNPING; WEI, GUOWEI; YE, XIU; ZHAO, SHAN

    2013-01-01

    Weak Galerkin methods refer to general finite element methods for partial differential equations (PDEs) in which differential operators are approximated by their weak forms as distributions. Such weak forms give rise to desirable flexibilities in enforcing boundary and interface conditions. A weak Galerkin finite element method (WG-FEM) is developed in this paper for solving elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Theoretically, it is proved that high order numerical schemes can be designed by using the WG-FEM with polynomials of high order on each element. Extensive numerical experiments have been carried to validate the WG-FEM for solving second order elliptic interface problems. High order of convergence is numerically confirmed in both L2 and L∞ norms for the piecewise linear WG-FEM. Special attention is paid to solve many interface problems, in which the solution possesses a certain singularity due to the nonsmoothness of the interface. A challenge in research is to design nearly second order numerical methods that work well for problems with low regularity in the solution. The best known numerical scheme in the literature is of order O(h) to O(h1.5) for the solution itself in L∞ norm. It is demonstrated that the WG-FEM of the lowest order, i.e., the piecewise constant WG-FEM, is capable of delivering numerical approximations that are of order O(h1.75) to O(h2) in the L∞ norm for C1 or Lipschitz continuous interfaces associated with a C1 or H2 continuous solution. PMID:24072935

  15. Perceptual learning of second order cues for layer decomposition.

    PubMed

    Dövencioğlu, Dicle N; Welchman, Andrew E; Schofield, Andrew J

    2013-01-25

    Luminance variations are ambiguous: they can signal changes in surface reflectance or changes in illumination. Layer decomposition-the process of distinguishing between reflectance and illumination changes-is supported by a range of secondary cues including colour and texture. For an illuminated corrugated, textured surface the shading pattern comprises modulations of luminance (first order, LM) and local luminance amplitude (second-order, AM). The phase relationship between these two signals enables layer decomposition, predicts the perception of reflectance and illumination changes, and has been modelled based on early, fast, feed-forward visual processing (Schofield et al., 2010). However, while inexperienced viewers appreciate this scission at long presentation times, they cannot do so for short presentation durations (250 ms). This might suggest the action of slower, higher-level mechanisms. Here we consider how training attenuates this delay, and whether the resultant learning occurs at a perceptual level. We trained observers to discriminate the components of plaid stimuli that mixed in-phase and anti-phase LM/AM signals over a period of 5 days. After training, the strength of the AM signal needed to differentiate the plaid components fell dramatically, indicating learning. We tested for transfer of learning using stimuli with different spatial frequencies, in-plane orientations, and acutely angled plaids. We report that learning transfers only partially when the stimuli are changed, suggesting that benefits accrue from tuning specific mechanisms, rather than general interpretative processes. We suggest that the mechanisms which support layer decomposition using second-order cues are relatively early, and not inherently slow. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Numerical validation of velocity gradient tensor particle tracking velocimetry for highly deformed flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Masa-aki; Murai, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Fujio

    2000-06-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has recently been recognized as quite an effective engineering research tool for understanding multi-dimensional fluid flow structures. There are, however, still a number of unsettled problems in the practical use of PTV, i.e. the lack of generality of the PTV algorithm for various types of flows and the measurement uncertainty with respect to spatial resolution. The authors have developed a generalized PTV algorithm named the velocity gradient tensor (VGT) method in order to accurately track the tracer particles in a flow field with strong local deformation rates. The performance of the VGT method has already been examined for several simple flow fields, such as linear shearing and Taylor-Green vortex flows. In this paper, the applicability of the VGT method for complicated flows, which include a wide dynamic range in wavenumber, is quantitatively examined by simulation of Rankine vortex flows, Karman vortex-shedding flows around a rectangular cylinder and homogeneous turbulent flows, which are numerically solved by using the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the VGT technique, using only two frames to estimate velocity, performs better than does the four-frame PTV technique and has a remarkably higher tracking performance than those of typical conventional PTV algorithms.

  17. Linear ion trap for second-order Doppler shift reduction in frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Janik, Gary R.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    The authors have designed and are presently testing a novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced. The authors have succeeded in trapping mercury ions and xenon ions in the presence of helium buffer gas. Trap times as long as 2000 s have been measured.

  18. Second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids: Relativistic effects of pressure, multicomponent, curvature, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2007-11-15

    velocity perturbations including the rotation coincide with the ones in Newton's gravity. All equations in this work include the cosmological constant in the background world model. We emphasize that our relativistic/Newtonian correspondences in several situations and pure general relativistic corrections in the context of Newtonian equations are mainly about the dynamic equations of density and velocity perturbations without using the gravitational potential (metric perturbations). Consequently, our relativistic/Newtonian correspondences do not imply the absence of many space-time (i.e., pure general relativistic) effects like frame dragging, and redshift and deflection of photons even in such cases. We also present the case of multiple minimally coupled scalar fields, and properly derive the large-scale conservation properties of curvature perturbation variable in various temporal gauge conditions to the second order.

  19. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Khandelwal, G S; Wilson, J W

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarisability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilising both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison.

  20. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarizability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilizing both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison.

  1. Defining Meyer's loop–temporal lobe resections, visual field deficits and diffusion tensor tractography

    PubMed Central

    Yogarajah, M.; Focke, N. K.; Bonelli, S.; Cercignani, M.; Acheson, J.; Parker, G. J. M.; Alexander, D. C.; McEvoy, A. W.; Symms, M. R.; Koepp, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is often complicated by superior quadrantic visual field deficits (VFDs). In some cases this can be severe enough to prohibit driving, even if a patient is free of seizures. These deficits are caused by damage to Meyer's loop of the optic radiation, which shows considerable heterogeneity in its anterior extent. This structure cannot be distinguished using clinical magnetic resonance imaging sequences. Diffusion tensor tractography is an advanced magnetic resonance imaging technique that enables the parcellation of white matter. Using seed voxels antero-lateral to the lateral geniculate nucleus, we applied this technique to 20 control subjects, and 21 postoperative patients. All patients had visual fields assessed with Goldmann perimetry at least three months after surgery. We measured the distance from the tip of Meyer's loop to the temporal pole and horn in all subjects. In addition, we measured the size of temporal lobe resection using postoperative T1-weighted images, and quantified VFDs. Nine patients suffered VFDs ranging from 22% to 87% of the contralateral superior quadrant. In patients, the range of distance from the tip of Meyer's loop to the temporal pole was 24–43 mm (mean 34 mm), and the range of distance from the tip of Meyer's loop to the temporal horn was −15 to +9 mm (mean 0 mm). In controls the range of distance from the tip of Meyer's loop to the temporal pole was 24–47 mm (mean 35 mm), and the range of distance from the tip of Meyer's loop to the temporal horn was −11 to +9 mm (mean 0 mm). Both quantitative and qualitative results were in accord with recent dissections of cadaveric brains, and analysis of postoperative VFDs and resection volumes. By applying a linear regression analysis we showed that both distance from the tip of Meyer's loop to the temporal pole and the size of resection were significant predictors of the postoperative VFDs. We conclude that there is considerable variation in the

  2. Regularized positive-definite fourth order tensor field estimation from DW-MRI.

    PubMed

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Hwang, Min Sig; Howland, Dena; Forder, John R; Vemuri, Baba C

    2009-03-01

    In Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Image (DW-MRI) processing, a 2nd order tensor has been commonly used to approximate the diffusivity function at each lattice point of the DW-MRI data. From this tensor approximation, one can compute useful scalar quantities (e.g. anisotropy, mean diffusivity) which have been clinically used for monitoring encephalopathy, sclerosis, ischemia and other brain disorders. It is now well known that this 2nd-order tensor approximation fails to capture complex local tissue structures, e.g. crossing fibers, and as a result, the scalar quantities derived from these tensors are grossly inaccurate at such locations. In this paper we employ a 4th order symmetric positive-definite (SPD) tensor approximation to represent the diffusivity function and present a novel technique to estimate these tensors from the DW-MRI data guaranteeing the SPD property. Several articles have been reported in literature on higher order tensor approximations of the diffusivity function but none of them guarantee the positivity of the estimates, which is a fundamental constraint since negative values of the diffusivity are not meaningful. In this paper we represent the 4th-order tensors as ternary quartics and then apply Hilbert's theorem on ternary quartics along with the Iwasawa parametrization to guarantee an SPD 4th-order tensor approximation from the DW-MRI data. The performance of this model is depicted on synthetic data as well as real DW-MRIs from a set of excised control and injured rat spinal cords, showing accurate estimation of scalar quantities such as generalized anisotropy and trace as well as fiber orientations.

  3. Regularized Positive-Definite Fourth Order Tensor Field Estimation from DW-MRI★

    PubMed Central

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Vemuri, Baba C.; Howland, Dena; Forder, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Image (DW-MRI) processing, a 2nd order tensor has been commonly used to approximate the diffusivity function at each lattice point of the DW-MRI data. From this tensor approximation, one can compute useful scalar quantities (e.g. anisotropy, mean diffusivity) which have been clinically used for monitoring encephalopathy, sclerosis, ischemia and other brain disorders. It is now well known that this 2nd-order tensor approximation fails to capture complex local tissue structures, e.g. crossing fibers, and as a result, the scalar quantities derived from these tensors are grossly inaccurate at such locations. In this paper we employ a 4th order symmetric positive-definite (SPD) tensor approximation to represent the diffusivity function and present a novel technique to estimate these tensors from the DW-MRI data guaranteeing the SPD property. Several articles have been reported in literature on higher order tensor approximations of the diffusivity function but none of them guarantee the positivity of the estimates, which is a fundamental constraint since negative values of the diffusivity are not meaningful. In this paper we represent the 4th-order tensors as ternary quartics and then apply Hilbert’s theorem on ternary quartics along with the Iwasawa parametrization to guarantee an SPD 4th-order tensor approximation from the DW-MRI data. The performance of this model is depicted on synthetic data as well as real DW-MRIs from a set of excised control and injured rat spinal cords, showing accurate estimation of scalar quantities such as generalized anisotropy and trace as well as fiber orientations. PMID:19063978

  4. Second order transport coefficient from the chiral anomaly at weak coupling: Diagrammatic resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2015-07-01

    We compute one of the second order transport coefficients arising from the chiral anomaly in a high-temperature weakly coupled regime of quark-gluon plasma. This transport coefficient is responsible for the C P -odd current that is proportional to the time derivative of the magnetic field, and can be considered as a first correction to the chiral magnetic conductivity at finite, small frequency. We observe that this transport coefficient has a nonanalytic dependence on the coupling as ˜1 /(g4log (1 /g )) at the weak coupling regime, which necessitates a resummation of infinite ladder diagrams with leading pinch singularities to get a correct leading log result, a feature quite similar to what one finds in the computation of electric conductivity. We formulate and solve the relevant C P -odd Schwinger-Dyson equation in real-time perturbation theory that reduces to a coupled set of second order differential equations at leading log order. Our result for this second order transport coefficient indicates that chiral magnetic current has some resistance to the time change of the magnetic field; this shall be called the "chiral induction effect." We also discuss the case of color current induced by a color magnetic field.

  5. Hierarchy of second order gyrokinetic Hamiltonian models for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, N.; Bottino, A.; Chandre, C.; Sonnendruecker, E.

    2017-06-01

    The reduced particle model is the central element for the systematic derivation of the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations from first principles. Coupled to the fields inside the gyrokinetic field-particle Lagrangian, the reduced particle model defines polarization and magnetization effects appearing in the gyrokinetic Maxwell equations. It is also used for the reconstruction of the gyrokinetic Vlasov equation from the particle characteristics. Various representations of reduced particle models are available according to the choice of the gyrokinetic phase space coordinates. In this paper, the Hamiltonian representation of the reduced particle dynamics at an order suitable for the implementation in particle-in-cell simulations is explicitly derived from the general reduction procedure. The second-order (with respect to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields), full finite Larmor radius (FLR) Hamiltonian gyrokinetic particle model as well as the second-order model suitable specifically for the long-wavelength approximation (i.e., containing up to the second-order FLR corrections), are derived and compared to the model recently implemented in the particle-in-cell code ORB5. We show that the same long-wavelength approximate equations can also be derived by taking the proper limit of the full FLR model.

  6. Nanoengineering the second order susceptibility in semiconductor quantum dot heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Marcin; Winter, Shoshana; Kolkowski, Radoslaw; Nogues, Claude; Oron, Dan; Zyss, Joseph; Chauvat, Dominique

    2011-03-28

    We study second-harmonic generation from single CdTe/CdS core/shell rod-on-dot nanocrystals with different geometrical parameters, which allow to fine tune the nonlinear properties of the nanostructure. These hybrid semiconductor-semiconductor nanoparticles exhibit extremely strong and stable second-harmonic emission, although the size of CdTe core is still within the strong quantum confinement regime. The orientation sensitive polarization response is analyzed by means of a pointwise additive model of the third-order tensors associated to the nanoparticle components. These findings prove that engineering of semiconducting complex heterostructures at the single nanoparticle scale can lead to extremely bright nanometric nonlinear light sources.

  7. Tensor-based morphometry with stationary velocity field diffeomorphic registration: Application to ADNI

    PubMed Central

    Bossa, Matias; Zacur, Ernesto; Olmos, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) is an analysis technique where anatomical information is characterized by means of the spatial transformations mapping a customized template with the observed images. Therefore, accurate inter-subject non-rigid registration is an essential prerequisite for both template estimation and image warping. Subsequent statistical analysis on the spatial transformations is performed to highlight voxel-wise differences. Most of previous TBM studies did not explore the influence of the registration parameters, such as the parameters defining the deformation and the regularization models. In this work performance evaluation of TBM using stationary velocity field (SVF) diffeomorphic registration was performed in a subset of subjects from Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. A wide range of values of the registration parameters that define the transformation smoothness and the balance between image matching and regularization were explored in the evaluation. The proposed methodology provided brain atrophy maps with very detailed anatomical resolution and with a high significance level compared with results recently published on the same data set using a non-linear elastic registration method. PMID:20211269

  8. Scalar-tensor cosmologies: Fixed points of the Jordan frame scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Jaerv, Laur; Kuusk, Piret; Saal, Margus

    2008-10-15

    We study the evolution of homogeneous and isotropic, flat cosmological models within the general scalar-tensor theory of gravity with arbitrary coupling function and potential. After introducing the limit of general relativity we describe the details of the phase space geometry. Using the methods of dynamical systems for the decoupled equation of the Jordan frame scalar field we find the fixed points of flows in two cases: potential domination and matter domination. We present the conditions on the mathematical form of the coupling function and potential which determine the nature of the fixed points (attractor or other). There are two types of fixed points, both are characterized by cosmological evolution mimicking general relativity, but only one of the types is compatible with the Solar System parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) constraints. The phase space structure should also carry over to the Einstein frame as long as the transformation between the frames is regular which however is not the case for the latter (PPN compatible) fixed point.

  9. Atomic layer deposited second-order nonlinear optical metamaterial for back-end integration with CMOS-compatible nanophotonic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Hermans, Artur; Solano, Eduardo; Dendooven, Jolien; Koskinen, Kalle; Kauranen, Martti; Brainis, Edouard; Detavernier, Christophe; Baets, Roel

    2015-11-15

    We report the fabrication of artificial unidimensional crystals exhibiting an effective bulk second-order nonlinearity. The crystals are created by cycling atomic layer deposition of three dielectric materials such that the resulting metamaterial is noncentrosymmetric in the direction of the deposition. Characterization of the structures by second-harmonic generation Maker-fringe measurements shows that the main component of their nonlinear susceptibility tensor is about 5 pm/V, which is comparable to well-established materials and more than an order of magnitude greater than reported for a similar crystal [Appl. Phys. Lett.107, 121903 (2015)APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.4931492]. Our demonstration opens new possibilities for second-order nonlinear effects on CMOS-compatible nanophotonic platforms.

  10. Second-order perturbation theory: Problems on large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2015-11-01

    In general-relativistic perturbation theory, a point mass accelerates away from geodesic motion due to its gravitational self-force. Because the self-force is small, one can often approximate the motion as geodesic. However, it is well known that self-force effects accumulate over time, making the geodesic approximation fail on long time scales. It is less well known that this failure at large times translates to a failure at large distances as well. At second perturbative order, two large-distance pathologies arise: spurious secular growth and infrared-divergent retarded integrals. Both stand in the way of practical computations of second-order self-force effects. Utilizing a simple flat-space scalar toy model, I develop methods to overcome these obstacles. The secular growth is tamed with a multiscale expansion that captures the system's slow evolution. The divergent integrals are eliminated by matching to the correct retarded solution at large distances. I also show how to extract conservative self-force effects by taking local-in-time "snapshots" of the global solution. These methods are readily adaptable to the physically relevant case of a point mass orbiting a black hole.

  11. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-15

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell–Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell–Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell–Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  12. Second order evolution equations which describe pseudospherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano Ferraioli, D.; de Oliveira Silva, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Second order evolution differential equations that describe pseudospherical surfaces are considered. These equations are equivalent to the structure equations of a metric with Gaussian curvature K = - 1, and can be seen as the compatibility condition of an associated sl (2 , R) -valued linear problem, also referred to as a zero curvature representation. Under the assumption that the linear problem is defined by 1-forms ωi =fi1 dx +fi2 dt, i = 1 , 2 , 3, with fij depending on (x , t , z ,z1 ,z2) and such that f21 = η, η ∈ R, we give a complete and explicit classification of equations of the form zt = A (x , t , z) z2 + B (x , t , z ,z1) . According to the classification, these equations are subdivided in three main classes (referred to as Types I-III) together with the corresponding linear problems. Explicit examples of differential equations of each type are determined by choosing certain arbitrary differentiable functions. Svinolupov-Sokolov equations admitting higher weakly nonlinear symmetries, Boltzmann equation and reaction-diffusion equations like Murray equation are some known examples of such equations. Other explicit examples are presented, as well.

  13. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low β- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (βx*100mm - βy* 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (δp/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  14. Modal cost analysis for linear matrix-second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reduced models and reduced controllers for systems governed by matrix-second-order differential equations are obtained by retaining those modes which make the largest contributions to quadratic control objectives. Such contributions, expressed in terms of modal data, used as mode truncation criteria, allow the statement of the specific control objectives to influence the early model reduction from very high order models which are available, for example, from finite element methods. The relative importance of damping, frequency, and eigenvector in the mode truncation decisions are made explicit for each of these control objectives: attitude control, vibration suppression and figure control. The paper also shows that using modal cost analysis (MCA) on the closed loop modes of the optimally controlled system allows the construction of reduced control policies which feedback only those closed loop modal coordinates which are most critical to the quadratic control performance criterion. In this way, the modes which should be controlled (and hence the modes which must be observable by choice of measurements), are deduced from truncations of the optimal controller.

  15. Characterising the stabilisability for second-order linear switched systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Shen

    2013-03-01

    The stabilisability of second-order linear switched systems is the topic focused on in a number of papers, however, some of its fundamental characteristics are still unrevealed. In this article, regarding a pair of subsystems, we are interested in characterising this problem from both the state-triggering and time-domain viewpoints and in revealing the inherent connection between them. To this end, we first use polar coordinates to represent the geometric property of switching and the dynamical behaviours caused by it, and then put the geometrised switching control into correspondence with the implicit stabilisation mechanism behind it. Doing this in a strong way relies on classifying switching control into two types intuitively, namely, chattering switching and spinning switching, and then clarifying their distinction and properties rigorously. Furthermore, the uniform convergence of the forced trajectory is shown by presenting estimation on its decay rate; and the limit cycles and sliding motions generated by switching are also accounted for. The results are illustrated by elaborate examples.

  16. Second order optimization for the inference of gene regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Das, Mouli; Murthy, Chivukula A; De, Rajat K

    2014-02-01

    With the increasing availability of experimental data on gene interactions, modeling of gene regulatory pathways has gained special attention. Gradient descent algorithms have been widely used for regression and classification applications. Unfortunately, results obtained after training a model by gradient descent are often highly variable. In this paper, we present a new second order learning rule based on the Newton's method for inferring optimal gene regulatory pathways. Unlike the gradient descent method, the proposed optimization rule is independent of the learning parameter. The flow vectors are estimated based on biomass conservation. A set of constraints is formulated incorporating weighting coefficients. The method calculates the maximal expression of the target gene starting from a given initial gene through these weighting coefficients. Our algorithm has been benchmarked and validated on certain types of functions and on some gene regulatory networks, gathered from literature. The proposed method has been found to perform better than the gradient descent learning. Extensive performance comparison with the extreme pathway analysis method has underlined the effectiveness of our proposed methodology.

  17. Neural basis for stereopsis from second-order contrast cues.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Ohzawa, Izumi

    2006-04-19

    Humans and animals use visual cues such as brightness and color boundaries to identify objects and navigate through environments. However, even when these cues are not available, we can effortlessly perform these tasks by using second-order cues such as contrast variation (envelope) of patterns on surfaces. Previously, numerous psychophysical studies examined properties of binocular depth processing based on the contrast-envelope cues and suggested the existence of a stereo system that uses these cues. However, its physiological substrate has not been identified yet. Here, we show that a subset of cortical neurons in cat area 18 show binocular interactions for the contrast-envelope stimuli. These neurons are capable of representing a variety of depths in the three-dimensional space based on the information available from contrast cues alone. Furthermore, these neurons show similar disparity-tuning curves for borders defined by both luminance and contrast cues. This cue-invariant tuning is consistent with a linear binocular convergence model for monocular luminance and contrast-envelope processing pathways.

  18. Polarization opposition effect and second-order ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Videen, Gorden

    2002-08-20

    I develop a second-order ray-tracing model of the light scattered by a cloud of randomly oriented facets having sizes much larger than the incident wavelength. My results suggest that both symmetric and asymmetric branches of the polarization opposition effect can be produced by the same mechanism responsible for the photometric opposition effect, i.e., constructive interference of light rays traversing reciprocal paths that is associated with coherent backscattering enhancement. The model provides a greatly simplified representation of the physical phenomena to isolate the two mechanisms that may be responsible for the effect. The shapes and positions of the two branches of the polarization opposition effect calculated with the model are consistent with observation, so the model may provide a rapid technique to characterize the optical and physical properties of a scattering system. I note, however, that the model is a gross simplification containing only two physical mechanisms, Fresnel reflections and coherent interference, and it is possible that it represents a nonphysical description of particles smaller than the wavelength or that other mechanisms contributing to the polarization opposition effect are not included.

  19. Modal cost analysis for linear matrix-second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reduced models and reduced controllers for systems governed by matrix-second-order differential equations are obtained by retaining those modes which make the largest contributions to quadratic control objectives. Such contributions, expressed in terms of modal data, used as mode truncation criteria, allow the statement of the specific control objectives to influence the early model reduction from very high order models which are available, for example, from finite element methods. The relative importance of damping, frequency, and eigenvector in the mode truncation decisions are made explicit for each of these control objectives: attitude control, vibration suppression and figure control. The paper also shows that using modal cost analysis (MCA) on the closed loop modes of the optimally controlled system allows the construction of reduced control policies which feedback only those closed loop modal coordinates which are most critical to the quadratic control performance criterion. In this way, the modes which should be controlled (and hence the modes which must be observable by choice of measurements), are deduced from truncations of the optimal controller.

  20. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  2. Practical considerations for a second-order directional hearing aid microphone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen C.

    2003-04-01

    First-order directional microphone systems for hearing aids have been available for several years. Such a system uses two microphones and has a theoretical maximum free-field directivity index (DI) of 6.0 dB. A second-order microphone system using three microphones could provide a theoretical increase in free-field DI to 9.5 dB. These theoretical maximum DI values assume that the microphones have exactly matched sensitivities at all frequencies of interest. In practice, the individual microphones in the hearing aid always have slightly different sensitivities. For the small microphone separation necessary to fit in a hearing aid, these sensitivity matching errors degrade the directivity from the theoretical values, especially at low frequencies. This paper shows that, for first-order systems the directivity degradation due to sensitivity errors is relatively small. However, for second-order systems with practical microphone sensitivity matching specifications, the directivity degradation below 1 kHz is not tolerable. A hybrid order directive system is proposed that uses first-order processing at low frequencies and second-order directive processing at higher frequencies. This hybrid system is suggested as an alternative that could provide improved directivity index in the frequency regions that are important to speech intelligibility.

  3. Existence and Stability Results for Second-Order Stochastic Equations Driven by Fractional Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, P.; Sakthivel, R.; Song, D.-Y.; Ren, Yong; Zhang, Pei

    2013-09-01

    Fractional Brownian motion has been widely used to model a number of phenomena in diverse fields of science and engineering. In this article, we investigate the existence, uniqueness and stability of mild solutions for a class of second-order nonautonomous neutral stochastic evolution equations with infinite delay driven by fractional Brownian motion (fBm) with Hurst parameter H ∈ (1/2, 1) in Hilbert spaces. More precisely, using semigroup theory and successive approximation approach, we establish a set of sufficient conditions for obtaining the required result under the assumption that coefficients satisfy non-Lipschitz condition with Lipschitz condition being considered as a special case. Further, the result is deduced to study the second-order autonomous neutral stochastic equations with fBm. The results generalize and improve some known results. Finally, as an application, stochastic wave equation with infinite delay driven by fractional Brownian motion is provided to illustrate the obtained theory.

  4. First and second-order features for detection of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Cha, Kenny; Helvie, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel methods for prescreening of mass candidates in computer-aided detection (CAD) system for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). With IRB approval and written informed consent, 186 views from 94 breasts were imaged using a GE GEN2 prototype DBT system. The data set was randomly separated into training and test sets by cases. Gradient field convergence features based on first-order features were used to select the initial set of mass candidates. Eigenvalues based on second-order features from the Hessian matrix were extracted for the mass candidate locations in the DBT volume. The features from the first- and second-order analysis form the feature vector that was input to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier to generate a candidate-likelihood score. The likelihood scores were ranked and the top N candidates were passed onto the subsequent detection steps. The improvement between using only first-order features and the combination of first and second-order features was analyzed using a rank-sensitivity plot. 3D objects were obtained with two-stage 3D clustering followed by active contour segmentation. Morphological, gradient field, and texture features were extracted and feature selection was performed using stepwise feature selection. A combination of LDA and rule-based classifiers was used for FP reduction. The LDA classifier output a masslikelihood score for each object that was used as a decision variable for FROC analysis. At breast-based sensitivities of 70% and 80%, prescreening using first-order and second-order features resulted in 0.7 and 1.0 FPs/DBT.

  5. Regional gravity field recovery using the GOCE gravity gradient tensor and heterogeneous gravimetry and altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yihao; Zhou, Hao; Zhong, Bo; Luo, Zhicai

    2017-08-01

    A regional approach using Poisson wavelets is applied for gravity field recovery using the GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) gravity gradient tensor, heterogeneous gravimetry data, and altimetry measurements. The added value to the regional model introduced by GOCE data is validated and quantified. The performances of the solutions modeled with different diagonal components of GOCE data and their combinations are investigated. Numerical experiments in a region in Europe show that the effects introduced by GOCE data demonstrate long-wavelength patterns on the centimeter scale in terms of quasi-geoid heights, which may allow reducing the remaining long-wavelength errors in ground-based data, and improve the regional model. The accuracy of the gravimetric quasi-geoid computed with a combination of three diagonal components is improved by 0.6 cm (0.5 cm) in the Netherlands (Belgium) compared to that derived from gravimetry and altimetry data alone, when GOCO05s is used as the reference model. Moreover, the added value from GOCE data reduces the mean values of the misfit between the gravimetric solution and GPS/leveling data. Performances of different components and their combinations are not identical, and the solution with vertical gradients is best when a single component is used. The incorporation of multiple components shows further improvements, and the combination of three components best fits the local GPS/leveling data. Further comparison shows that our solution is the highest quality and may be substituted for existing models for engineering purposes and geophysical investigations over the target area.

  6. Crustal stress field in the Greek region inferred from inversion of moment tensor solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Heidbach, Oliver; Oncken, Onno; Suppe, John

    2016-04-01

    The Hellenic region is the seismically most active area in Europe, having experienced numerous large magnitude catastrophic earthquakes and associated devastating tsunamis. A means of mitigating these potential hazards is by better understanding the patterns of spatial and temporal deformation of the crust across the Hellenic orogenic system, over timescales that range from individual earthquakes to several tens of years. In this study for the first time we make collective use of the Global CMT (GCMT), Regional CMT (RCMT) and National Observatory of Athens (NOA) moment tensor databases in order to extract focal mechanism solutions that will be used to infer crustal stresses in the Greek region at an unprecedented resolution. We focus on the shallow seismicity within the upper plate (down to 42 km) and select solutions with good waveform fits and well-resolved hypocentral depths. In this way we obtained 1,614 focal mechanism solutions covering western Greece up to southern Albania, central and southern Greece, northern Aegean as well as the subduction trench west and east of Crete. These solutions are used as input to a regional-scale damped stress inversion over a grid whose node spacing is 0.35 degrees for the purpose of recovering the three principal stress axes and the stress ratio R for each node. Several sensitivity tests are performed where parameters such as damping, hypocentral depth, magnitude range are varied, in order to ascertain the robustness of our results. The final stress field model is then compared to the GPS-derived strain field revealing an excellent agreement between the two datasets. Additionally, maximum and minimum stress axes orientations are correlated with the strike and dip of known faults in order to improve our understanding of future fault rupture and corresponding seismic hazard.

  7. Serpentine: Finite Difference Methods for Wave Propagation in Second Order Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2012-03-26

    second order system is significantly smaller. Another issue with re-writing a second order system into first order form is that compatibility conditions often must be imposed on the first order form. These (Saint-Venant) conditions ensure that the solution of the first order system also satisfies the original second order system. However, such conditions can be difficult to enforce on the discretized equations, without introducing additional modeling errors. This project has previously developed robust and memory efficient algorithms for wave propagation including effects of curved boundaries, heterogeneous isotropic, and viscoelastic materials. Partially supported by internal funding from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, many of these methods have been implemented in the open source software WPP, which is geared towards 3-D seismic wave propagation applications. This code has shown excellent scaling on up to 32,768 processors and has enabled seismic wave calculations with up to 26 Billion grid points. TheWPP calculations have resulted in several publications in the field of computational seismology, e.g.. All of our current methods are second order accurate in both space and time. The benefits of higher order accurate schemes for wave propagation have been known for a long time, but have mostly been developed for first order hyperbolic systems. For second order hyperbolic systems, it has not been known how to make finite difference schemes stable with free surface boundary conditions, heterogeneous material properties, and curvilinear coordinates. The importance of higher order accurate methods is not necessarily to make the numerical solution more accurate, but to reduce the computational cost for obtaining a solution within an acceptable error tolerance. This is because the accuracy in the solution can always be improved by reducing the grid size h. However, in practice, the available computational resources might not be large enough to solve the problem with a

  8. Atomic layer deposited second-order nonlinear optical metamaterial for back-end integration with CMOS-compatible nanophotonic circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Hermans, Artur; Solano, Eduardo; Dendooven, Jolien; Koskinen, Kalle; Kauranen, Martti; Brainis, Edouard; Detavernier, Christophe; Baets, Roel

    2015-11-01

    We report the fabrication of artificial unidimensional crystals exhibiting an effective bulk second-order nonlinearity. The crystals are created by cycling atomic layer deposition of three dielectric materials such that the resulting metamaterial is non-centrosymmetric in the direction of the deposition. Characterization of the structures by second-harmonic generation Maker-fringe measurements shows that the main component of their nonlinear susceptibility tensor is about 5 pm/V which is comparable to well-established materials and more than an order of magnitude greater than reported for a similar crystal [1-Alloatti et al, arXiv:1504.00101[cond-mat.mtrl- sci

  9. Forward and backward second-order Pavlovian conditioning in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Hussaini, Syed Abid; Komischke, Bernhard; Menzel, Randolf; Lachnit, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Second-order conditioning (SOC) is the association of a neutral stimulus with another stimulus that had previously been combined with an unconditioned stimulus (US). We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in honeybees (Apis mellifera) with odors (CS) and sugar (US). Previous SOC experiments in bees were inconclusive, and, therefore, we attempted to demonstrate SOC in the following three experiments: (Experiment 1) After differential conditioning (pairing odor A with US and presenting odor B without US), the bees experienced two pairs of partially overlapping odors, either a new odor C followed by a previously reinforced odor A (C-A) or a new odor C followed by a previously nonreinforced odor B (C-B). (Experiment 2) After differential conditioning, bees were presented with C-A or A-C. (Experiment 3) Bees were first presented with C-A or A-C before differential conditioning and were tested with odor C. We observed: (Experiment 1) 40% of the bees showed PER to the C-A presentation, but only 20% showed PER to the C-B presentation. (Experiment 2) 40% of the bees showed PER to the C-A presentation, while only 20% showed PER to the reversed sequence A-C. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that a previously reinforced odor can be a secondary reinforcer for excitatory SOC only with forward-pairing. (Experiment 3) PER toward C was lower (15%) in bees presented with A-C than with C-A (25%). This showed that backward SOC is not as effective as forward SOC. These results help to delineate different conditions that are critical for the phenomenon of SOC. PMID:17911371

  10. Second-order structure function scaling derivation from the Euler and magnetohydrodynamic equations.

    PubMed

    Beronov, Kamen N

    2002-06-01

    An anomalous scaling paradigm that has recently come to be canonical has two features limiting its range of applicability: The driving and driven fields are separated dyamically and the driving field statistics is prescribed, in terms of the (inertial subrange) scaling of its second-order structure functions and of white-noise statistics in time. Then the spectrum of scaling exponents for the driven field, scalar or vector, depends parametrically on the driving. Here, the coupling of turbulent vorticity to the driving velocity field is considered. Using simple approximations and no white-noise statistics assumption, equations are derived for the evolution of two-point second-order correlations. The turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) case is treated in an analogous fashion. In the neutral case, the kinematic coupling between vorticity and velocity leads to a unique prediction for the scaling exponent of the second-order structure functions of the two turbulent fields. The velocity scaling exponent estimate is zeta(2)=3(1/2)-1 approximately equal to 0.732, i.e., close to experimental data. Unlike Kolmogorov scaling, this result is systematically derived from the Euler equations. The analogous scaling of MHD fields is now treated beyond the dynamo theory approximation. In contrast to the uniqueness found in the neutral case, predicted MHD scalings depend on one parameter, similar to the "plasma beta" parameter beta(T) relating kinetic to magnetic energy. The nature of predicted dependence of inertial-range scaling exponents on beta(T) agrees with an observed dichotomy between high-beta(T) and low-beta(T) turbulence regimes.

  11. A Second Order Continuum Theory of Fluids - Beyond the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolucci, Samuel

    2016-11-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations have proved very valuable in modeling fluid flows over the last two centuries. However, there are some cases where it has been demonstrated that they do not provide accurate results. In such cases, very large variations in velocity and/or thermal fields occur in the flows. It is recalled that the Navier-Stokes equations result from linear approximations of constitutive quantities. Using continuum mechanics principles, we derive a second order constitutive theory that application of which should provide more accurate results is such cases. One important case is the structure of gas-dynamic shock waves. It has been demonstrated experimentally that the Navier-Stokes formulation yields incorrect shock profiles even at moderate Mach numbers. Current continuum theories, and indeed most statistical mechanics theories, that have been advanced to reconcile such discrepancies have not been fully successful. Thus, application of the second order theory based solely on a continuum formulation provides an excellent test problem. Results of the second-order equations applied to the shock structure are obtained for monatomic and diatomic gases over a large range of Mach numbers and are compared to experimental results.

  12. Second-order many-body perturbation expansions of vibrational Dyson self-energies.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2013-07-21

    Second-order many-body perturbation theories for anharmonic vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies of molecules are formulated, implemented, and tested. They solve the vibrational Dyson equation self-consistently by taking into account the frequency dependence of the Dyson self-energy in the diagonal approximation, which is expanded in a diagrammatic perturbation series up to second order. Three reference wave functions, all of which are diagrammatically size consistent, are considered: the harmonic approximation and diagrammatic vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) methods with and without the first-order Dyson geometry correction, i.e., XVSCF[n] and XVSCF(n), where n refers to the truncation rank of the Taylor-series potential energy surface. The corresponding second-order perturbation theories, XVH2(n), XVMP2[n], and XVMP2(n), are shown to be rigorously diagrammatically size consistent for both total energies and transition frequencies, yield accurate results (typically within a few cm(-1) at n = 4 for water and formaldehyde) for both quantities even in the presence of Fermi resonance, and have access to fundamentals, overtones, and combinations as well as their relative intensities as residues of the vibrational Green's functions. They are implemented into simple algorithms that require only force constants and frequencies of the reference methods (with no basis sets, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization at any stage of the calculation). The rules for enumerating and algebraically interpreting energy and self-energy diagrams are elucidated in detail.

  13. Quantum-enhanced tunable second-order optical nonlinearity in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanfeng; Mao, Li; Jones, Aaron M; Yao, Wang; Zhang, Chuanwei; Xu, Xiaodong

    2012-04-11

    Second order optical nonlinear processes involve the coherent mixing of two electromagnetic waves to generate a new optical frequency, which plays a central role in a variety of applications, such as ultrafast laser systems, rectifiers, modulators, and optical imaging. However, progress is limited in the mid-infrared (MIR) region due to the lack of suitable nonlinear materials. It is desirable to develop a robust system with a strong, electrically tunable second order optical nonlinearity. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that AB-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) can exhibit a giant and tunable second order nonlinear susceptibility χ((2)) once an in-plane electric field is applied. χ((2)) can be electrically tuned from 0 to ~10(5) pm/V, 3 orders of magnitude larger than the widely used nonlinear crystal AgGaSe(2). We show that the unusually large χ((2)) arise from two different quantum enhanced two-photon processes thanks to the unique electronic spectrum of BLG. The tunable electronic bandgap of BLG adds additional tunability on the resonance of χ((2)), which corresponds to a tunable wavelength ranging from ~2.6 to ~3.1 μm for the up-converted photon. Combined with the high electron mobility and optical transparency of the atomically thin BLG, our scheme suggests a new regime of nonlinear photonics based on BLG. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  14. Quantum stress tensor for a massive vector field in the space-time of a cylindrical black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez Piedra, Owen Pavel; Matyjasek, Jerzy

    2010-09-15

    The components of the renormalized quantum energy-momentum tensor for a massive vector field coupled to the gravitational field configuration of static 3+1 dimensional black strings in anti-de Sitter space are analytically evaluated using the Schwinger-DeWitt approximation. The general results are employed to investigate the pointwise energy conditions for the quantized matter field, and it is shown that they are violated at some regions of the space-time, in particular the horizon of the black hole.

  15. Second-order motion perception in peripheral vision: limits of early filtering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Z; Hess, R F; Baker, C L

    1997-12-01

    Spatial and temporal analysis of contrast-modulated sine-wave gratings reveals that the second-order motion stimulus contains two sidebands, with equal energy but moving in opposite directions, flanking a stationary carrier. Any early linear spatial filtering process in the visual system that attenuates one sideband more than the other will be detrimental to the balance between the two sidebands, so that the perceived direction of the carrier might be opposite to that of the envelope motion. We tested this hypothesis by using contrast-modulated gratings presented centrally or at 20 deg in the horizontal nasal field with a two-alternative forced-choice staircase paradigm. We found that when the envelope frequency was close to that of the carrier, a second-order stimulus whose envelope motion direction was correctly identified in the fovea appeared to drift in the opposite direction in the periphery. Further increasing the envelope spatial frequency resulted in a reversed motion percept in both central and peripheral viewing conditions. For subjects to identify correctly the direction of motion of the envelope, the spatial frequency ratio of the carrier to the envelope had to be more than 2 in the fovea and more than 6 in the periphery. These phenomena in second-order motion perception can be explained by a linear model of motion detection with an early spatial filtering process. Further experiments and computer simulation show that undersampling of the carrier has little effect on second-order motion perception in the periphery, as long as the carrier is detectable.

  16. White matter fiber tractography based on a directional diffusion field in diffusion tensor MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, S.; Yoshiura, T.; Arimura, H.; Mihara, F.; Honda, H.; Higashida, Y.; Toyofuku, F.

    2006-03-01

    Diffusion tensor (DT) MRI provides the directional information of water molecular diffusion, which can be utilized to estimate the connectivity of white matter tract pathways in the human brain. Several white matter tractography methods have been developed to reconstruct the white matter fiber tracts using DT-MRI. With conventional methods (e.g., streamline techniques), however, it would be very difficult to trace the white matter tracts passing through the fiber crossing and branching regions due to the ambiguous directional information with the partial volume effect. The purpose of this study was to develop a new white matter tractography method which permits fiber tract branching and passing through crossing regions. Our tractography method is based on a three-dimensional (3D) directional diffusion function (DDF), which was defined by three eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors of DT in each voxel. The DDF-based tractography (DDFT) consists of the segmentation of white matter tract region and fiber tracking process. The white matter tract regions were segmented by thresholding the 3D directional diffusion field, which was generated by the DDF. In fiber tracking, the DDFT method estimated the local tract direction based on overlap of the DDFs instead of the principal eigenvector, which has been used in conventional methods, and reconstructed tract branching by means of a one-to-many relation model. To investigate the feasibility and usefulness of the DDFT method, we applied it to DT-MRI data of five normal subjects and seven patients with a brain tumor. With the DDFT method, the detailed anatomy of white matter tracts was depicted more appropriately than the conventional methods.

  17. Invariant slow-roll parameters in scalar-tensor theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusk, Piret; Rünkla, Mihkel; Saal, Margus; Vilson, Ott

    2016-10-01

    A general scalar-tensor theory can be formulated in different parametrizations that are related by a conformal rescaling of the metric and a scalar field redefinition. We compare formulations of slow-roll regimes in the Einstein and Jordan frames using quantities that are invariant under the conformal rescaling of the metric and transform as scalar functions under the reparametrization of the scalar field. By comparing spectral indices, calculated up to second order, we find that the frames are equivalent up to this order, due to the underlying assumptions.

  18. Second-order lower radial tangent derivatives and applications to set-valued optimization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bihang; Peng, Zhenhua; Xu, Yihong

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concepts of second-order radial composed tangent derivative, second-order radial tangent derivative, second-order lower radial composed tangent derivative, and second-order lower radial tangent derivative for set-valued maps by means of a radial tangent cone, second-order radial tangent set, lower radial tangent cone, and second-order lower radial tangent set, respectively. Some properties of second-order tangent derivatives are discussed, using which second-order necessary optimality conditions are established for a point pair to be a Henig efficient element of a set-valued optimization problem, and in the expressions the second-order tangent derivatives of the objective function and the constraint function are separated.

  19. A square-loop Helmholtz coil system for the evaluation of a single-layer second-order high- Tc SQUID gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soon-Gul; Kang, Chan Seok; Chang, Jung Won

    2007-09-01

    We have designed and fabricated a square-loop Helmholtz coil system to balance and calibrate a second-order SQUID gradiometer, and measured the field distribution in the midplane. It consists of two pairs of identical square loops, one for generating uniform fields, which is a Helmholtz coil pair, and the other for generating the second-order field gradient by subtracting the Helmholtz coils’ field with equal magnitude at the center. We obtained analytical expressions in power series up to the fourth-order of the fields in the midplane and along the coil axis, and measured the field distributions for both Helmholtz and second-order gradient modes.

  20. Second-order dissipative hydrodynamics for plasma with chiral asymmetry and vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Rybalka, D. O.; Shovkovy, I. A.

    2017-05-01

    By making use of the chiral kinetic theory in the relaxation-time approximation, we derive an Israel-Stewart type formulation of the hydrodynamic equations for a chiral relativistic plasma made of neutral particles (e.g., neutrinos). The effects of chiral asymmetry are captured by including an additional continuity equation for the axial charge, as well as the leading-order quantum corrections due to the spin of particles. In a formulation of the chiral kinetic theory used, we introduce a symmetric form of the energy-momentum tensor that is suitable for the description of a weakly nonuniform chiral plasma. By construction, the energy and momentum are conserved to the same leading order in the Planck constant as the kinetic equation itself. By making use of such a chiral kinetic theory and the Chapman-Enskog approach, we obtain a set of second-order dissipative hydrodynamic equations. The effects of the fluid vorticity and velocity fluctuations on the dispersion relations of chiral vortical waves are analyzed.

  1. A second-order differential equation for a point charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torromé, Ricardo Gallego

    A model for the dynamics of a classical point charged particle interacting with higher order jet fields is introduced. In this model, the dynamics of the charged particle is described by an implicit ordinary second-order differential equation. Such equation is free of run-away and pre-accelerated solutions of Dirac’s type. The theory is Lorentz invariant, compatible with the first law of Newton and Larmor’s power radiation formula. Few implications of the new equation in the phenomenology of non-neutral plasmas is considered.

  2. Action approach to cosmological perturbations: the second-order metric in matter dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Creminelli, Paolo; Vernizzi, Filippo; Norena, Jorge

    2008-08-15

    We study nonlinear cosmological perturbations during post-inflationary evolution, using the equivalence between a perfect barotropic fluid and a derivatively coupled scalar field with Lagrangian [-({partial_derivative}{phi}){sup 2}]{sup (1+w)/2w}. Since this Lagrangian is just a special case of k-inflation, this approach is analogous to the one employed in the study of non-Gaussianities from inflation. We use this method to derive the second-order metric during matter dominance in the comoving gauge directly as a function of the primordial inflationary perturbation {zeta}. Going to Poisson gauge, we recover the metric previously derived in the literature.

  3. Tensor mode backreaction during slow-roll inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozzi, G.; Vacca, G. P.

    2014-08-01

    We consider the backreaction of the long wavelength tensor modes produced during a slow-roll inflationary regime driven by a single scalar field in a spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background geometry. We investigate the effects on nonlocal observables such as the effective (averaged) expansion rate and equation of state at second order in cosmological perturbation theory. The coupling between scalar and tensor perturbations induces at second-order new tensor backreaction terms beyond the one already present in a de Sitter background. We analyze in detail the effects seen by the class of observers comoving with the inflaton field (taken as a clock) and the class of free-falling observers. In both cases the quantum backreaction is at least 1/ɛ (with ɛ the slow-roll parameter) larger than the one which can be naively inferred from a de Sitter background. In particular, we compute the effect for a free massive inflaton model and obtain in both cases a quantum correction on the background expansion rate of the order of H4/(m2MPl2). A short discussion on the issue of the breakdown of perturbation theory is given.

  4. Second-order planar gradiometer composed of concentric superconductive loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriki, S.; Isobe, Y.; Mizutani, Y.

    1987-01-15

    A planar gradiometer composed of three concentric superconductive loops is analyzed. The gradiometer performs the second derivative with a rotational symmetry in a form of partial/sup 2/B/sub z//partialr/sup 2/, where r/sup 2/ = x/sup 2/+y/sup 2/. In response to the biomagnetic field generated by a current dipole, an isoflux line distribution which resembles well the magnetic field distribution is obtained. The location and the strength of the current-dipole source can readily be estimated from the isoflux pattern. Reduction of the magnetic field noise from distant sources with respect to the signal of a near source is calculated to be comparable with that of conventional axial gradiometers.

  5. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields: Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    2007-06-01

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose stress fields vanish. We explain that a grain boundary (a dislocation wall satisfying Frank’s formula) has vanishing stress in the continuum limit. We show that the general stress-free state can be written explicitly as a (perhaps continuous) superposition of flat Frank walls. We show that the stress-free states are also naturally interpreted as configurations generated by a general spatially dependent rotational deformation. Finally, we propose a least-squares definition for the spatially dependent rotation field of a general (stressful) dislocation density field.

  6. The effects of librations on the 13C chemical shift and 2H electric field gradient tensors in β-calcium formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, Kevin J.; Lee, Dong Kuk; Ramamoorthy, A.

    2000-12-01

    The magnitudes and orientations of the principal elements of the 13C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor in the molecular frame of the formate ion in β-calcium formate is determined using one-dimensional dipolar-shift spectroscopy. The magnitudes of the principal elements of the 13C CSA tensor are σ11C=104 ppm, σ22C=179 ppm, and σ33C=233 ppm. The least shielding element of the 13C CSA tensor, σ33C, is found to be collinear with the C-H bond. The temperature dependence of the 13C CSA and the 2H quadrupole coupling tensors in β-calcium formate are analyzed for a wide range of temperature (173-373 K). It was found that the span of the 13C CSA and the magnitude of the 2H quadrupole coupling interactions are averaged with the increasing temperature. The experimental results also show that the 2H quadrupole coupling tensor becomes more asymmetric with increasing temperature. A librational motion about the σ22C axis of the 13C CSA tensor is used to model the temperature dependence of the 13C CSA tensor. The temperature dependence of the mean-square amplitude of the librational motion is found to be <α2>=2.6×10-4(T) rad2 K-1. The same librational motion also accounts for the temperature-dependence of the 2H quadrupole coupling tensor after the relative orientation of the 13C CSA and 2H electric field gradient tensors are taken into account. Reconsideration of the results of a previous study found that the librational motion, not the vibrational motion, accounts for an asymmetry in the 1H-13C dipolar coupling tensor of α-calcium formate at room temperature.

  7. Effects of Deception on Children's Understanding of Second-Order False Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined two questions: effects of deception on children's understanding of second-order false belief, and possible effects of number of siblings on second-order performance. Kindergarten children responded to 3 second-order problems that varied in the presence and the nature of deception. Performance was better on the problems…

  8. The Second-Order Factor Structure of the 16 PF: A Four Factor Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marth, Joseph R.; Newman, Isadore

    A review of the research into the second-order factor structure of the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16 PF) indicates disagreement about the number and meaning of the second-order factors. However, repeated analyses of the second-order factor structure have consistently found fewer than the eight factors suggested by Catell (1973) and the…

  9. A second order cone complementarity approach for the numerical solution of elastoplasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. L.; Li, J. Y.; Zhang, H. W.; Pan, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for solving elastoplastic problems as second order cone complementarity problems (SOCCPs). Specially, two classes of elastoplastic problems, i.e. the J 2 plasticity problems with combined linear kinematic and isotropic hardening laws and the Drucker-Prager plasticity problems with associative or non-associative flow rules, are taken as the examples to illustrate the main idea of our new approach. In the new approach, firstly, the classical elastoplastic constitutive equations are equivalently reformulated as second order cone complementarity conditions. Secondly, by employing the finite element method and treating the nodal displacements and the plasticity multiplier vectors of Gaussian integration points as the unknown variables, we obtain a standard SOCCP formulation for the elastoplasticity analysis, which enables the using of general SOCCP solvers developed in the field of mathematical programming be directly available in the field of computational plasticity. Finally, a semi-smooth Newton algorithm is suggested to solve the obtained SOCCPs. Numerical results of several classical plasticity benchmark problems confirm the effectiveness and robustness of the SOCCP approach.

  10. Entropy and magnetocaloric effects in ferromagnets undergoing first- and second-order magnetic phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, E. Z.

    2009-02-15

    The exchange striction model is invoked to derive an expression for the entropy of ferromagnetic materials undergoing first- and second-order magnetic phase transitions. The magnetocaloric and barocaloric effects are calculated for the ferromagnet La(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.12}){sub 13} undergoing a first-order phase transition. The calculated results are in fair agreement with experimental data. The ferromagnet La(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.12}){sub 13} is used as an example to predict the changes in magnetic and magnetocaloric properties associated with gradual increase in the magnetoelastic coupling constant (i.e., with passage from first- to second-order magnetic transition region). It is shown that stronger magnetoelastic coupling leads to stronger magnetocaloric effects and changes their dependence on magnetic field and pressure. Expressions are obtained for the maximum field- and pressure-induced entropy changes. An analysis is presented of the mechanism responsible for the increase in magnetocaloric and barocaloric effects associated with change from the second- to first-order magnetic phase transition.

  11. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of nonelectrically poled DR1-PMMA guest-host polymers.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Atsushi; Sato, Yasuaki; Ito, Kazuma; Murakami, Kenta; Tamaki, Yasuaki; Mase, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Tasaka, Shigeru

    2013-11-27

    Guest-host nonlinear optical polymers have attracted considerable interest due to their applications in fast electro-optical modulators and wavelength converters. In general, the electrical poling procedures, for which high DC external fields are applied, are necessary for aligning guest chromophores in polar order and activating the second-order nonlinearity. We present the nonelectrical poling behaviors for guest-host polymers: DR1 (4-[ethyl (2-hydroxyethyl) amino]-4'-nitroazobenzene) is the guest, and PMMA (poly (methyl methacrylate)) is the host. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility was induced in the conventional guest-host polymers after annealing at temperatures above the glass transition points of the host polymer even without applying the external fields. This phenomenon did not occur in the side-chain polymers, where the guests were directly bonded to the host chains. The guest polar alignments were most likely generated from the guest hydroxyl groups chemisorbing on the substrates. The polar alignments of the guest formed not only near the surface of the substrate, but also inside the host polymers. The optimized conditions for the SHG conversion were examined in the context of the polymer film thickness and guest concentration. The nonelectrical poling techniques described in this study are useful for enhancing the surface nonlinearity in the several materials, and they will be useful for further developments in nanophotonics and plasmonics.

  12. Second-order nonlinear optical microscopy of spider silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Hien, Khuat Thi Thu; Mizutani, Goro; Rutt, Harvey N.

    2017-06-01

    Asymmetric β-sheet protein structures in spider silk should induce nonlinear optical interaction such as second harmonic generation (SHG) which is experimentally observed for a radial line and dragline spider silk using an imaging femtosecond laser SHG microscope. By comparing different spider silks, we found that the SHG signal correlates with the existence of the protein β-sheets. Measurements of the polarization dependence of SHG from the dragline indicated that the β-sheet has a nonlinear response depending on the direction of the incident electric field. We propose a model of what orientation the β-sheet takes in spider silk.

  13. An analysis of stream channel cross section technique as a means to determine anthropogenic change in second order streams at the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Meagher County, Montana

    Treesearch

    Jeff Boice

    1999-01-01

    Five second order tributaries to Tenderfoot Creek were investigated: Upper Tenderfoot Creek, Sun Creek, Spring Park Creek, Bubbling Creek, and Stringer Creek. Second order reaches were initially located on 7.5 minute topographic maps using techniques first applied by Strahler (1952). Reach breaks were determined in the field through visual inspection. Vegetation type (...

  14. An explicit reconstruction algorithm for the transverse ray transform of a second rank tensor field from three axis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Naeem M.; Lionheart, William R. B.

    2016-11-01

    We give an explicit plane-by-plane filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithm for the transverse ray transform of symmetric second rank tensor fields on Euclidean three-space, using data from rotation about three orthogonal axes. We show that in the general case two-axis data is insufficient, but we give an explicit reconstruction procedure for the potential case with two-axis data. We describe a numerical implementation of the three-axis algorithm and give reconstruction results for simulated data.

  15. Coleman-Weinberg symmetry breaking in SU(8) induced by a third rank antisymmetric tensor scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Stephen L.

    2016-08-01

    We study SU(8) symmetry breaking induced by minimizing the Coleman-Weinberg effective potential for a third rank antisymmetric tensor scalar field in the 56 representation. Instead of breaking {SU}(8)\\supset {SU}(3)× {SU}(5), we find that the stable minimum of the potential breaks the original symmetry according to {SU}(8)\\supset {SU}(3)× {Sp}(4). Using both numerical and analytical methods, we present results for the potential minimum, the corresponding Goldstone boson structure and BEH mechanism, and the group-theoretic classification of the residual states after symmetry breaking.

  16. Method to compute the stress-energy tensor for a quantum field outside a black hole that forms from collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul; Evans, Charles

    2017-01-01

    A method to compute the stress-energy tensor for a quantized massless minimally coupled scalar field outside the event horizon of a 4-D black hole that forms from the collapse of a spherically symmetric null shell is given. The method is illustrated in the corresponding 2-D case which is mathematically similar but is simple enough that the calculations can be done analytically. The approach to the Unruh state at late times is discussed. National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1505875 to Wake Forest University and National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1506182 to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  17. First- and second-order stimulus length selectivity in New World monkey striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Bourne, J A; Lui, L; Tweedale, R; Rosa, M G P

    2004-01-01

    Motion is a powerful cue for figure-ground segregation, allowing the recognition of shapes even if the luminance and texture characteristics of the stimulus and background are matched. In order to investigate the neural processes underlying early stages of the cue-invariant processing of form, we compared the responses of neurons in the striate cortex (V1) of anaesthetized marmosets to two types of moving stimuli: bars defined by differences in luminance, and bars defined solely by the coherent motion of random patterns that matched the texture and temporal modulation of the background. A population of form-cue-invariant (FCI) neurons was identified, which demonstrated similar tuning to the length of contours defined by first- and second-order cues. FCI neurons were relatively common in the supragranular layers (where they corresponded to 28% of the recorded units), but were absent from layer 4. Most had complex receptive fields, which were significantly larger than those of other V1 neurons. The majority of FCI neurons demonstrated end-inhibition in response to long first- and second-order bars, and were strongly direction selective. Thus, even at the level of V1 there are cells whose variations in response level appear to be determined by the shape and motion of the entire second-order object, rather than by its parts (i.e. the individual textural components). These results are compatible with the existence of an output channel from V1 to the ventral stream of extrastriate areas, which already encodes the basic building blocks of the image in an invariant manner.

  18. Second Order Total Generalized Variation (TGV) for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Florian; Bredies, Kristian; Pock, Thomas; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Total Variation (TV) was recently introduced in many different MRI applications. The assumption of TV is that images consist of areas, which are piecewise constant. However, in many practical MRI situations, this assumption is not valid due to the inhomogeneities of the exciting B1 field and the receive coils. This work introduces the new concept of Total Generalized Variation (TGV) for MRI, a new mathematical framework, which is a generalization of the TV theory and which eliminates these restrictions. Two important applications are considered in this paper, image denoising and image reconstruction from undersampled radial data sets with multiple coils. Apart from simulations, experimental results from in vivo measurements are presented where TGV yielded improved image quality over conventional TV in all cases. PMID:21264937

  19. Models, figures and gravitational moments of Jupiter’s satellite Io: Effects of the second order approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, V. N.; Gudkova, T. V.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of the equilibrium figure theory to within terms of the second order in a small parameter α on figure parameters and gravitational moments of the Galilean satellite Io have been considered. Integro-differential equations of the theory of figure to second order have been first solved numerically. Relations between the low-order coefficients of the gravitational field for satellites in hydrostatic equilibrium are generalized according to the second order theory. To show the effects of the second approximation, two three-layer trial models of Io are used. The considered models of the Io's interiors differ by the size and density of the core, while having the same thickness and density of the crust, and the mantle density difference is only 20 kg/m 3. The corrections of second order in smallness to the gravitational moments J2 and C22 decrease the third decimal digit of model gravitational moments by two units. As the effects of third and forth harmonics are determined mostly by outer layers of Io, to distinguish between model mantle density, the gravitational moments J4, C42 and C44 should be determined to accuracy with three or four decimal digits. The second order corrections mostly effect the semi-axis a, and less the semi-axes b and c.

  20. Spin-orbit contributions in high-spin nitrenes/carbenes: a hybrid CASSCF/MRMP2 study of zero-field splitting tensors.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Kenji; Toyota, Kazuo; Sato, Kazunobu; Shiomi, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Masahiro; Takui, Takeji

    2010-10-04

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensors (D tensors) of organic high-spin oligonitrenes/oligocarbenes up to spin-septet are quantitatively determined on the basis of quantum chemical calculations. The spin-orbit contributions, D(SO) tensors are calculated in terms of a hybrid CASSCF/MRMP2 approach, which was recently proposed by us. The spin-spin counterparts, D(SS) tensors are computed based on McWeeny-Mizuno's equation in conjunction with the RODFT spin densities. The present calculations show that more than 10% of ZFS arises from spin-orbit interactions in the high-spin nitrenes under study. Contributions of spin-bearing site-site interactions are estimated with the aid of a semi-empirical model for the D tensors and found to be ca. 5% of the D(SO) tensor. The analysis of intermediate states reveal that the largest contributions to the calculated D(SO) tensors are attributed to intra-site spin flip excitations and delocalized π and π* orbitals play an important role in the inter-site spin-orbit interactions.

  1. Canonical single field slow-roll inflation with a non-monotonic tensor-to-scalar ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Sussman, Roberto A.

    2016-05-01

    We take a pragmatic, model independent approach to single field slow-roll canonical inflation by imposing conditions, not on the potential, but on the slow-roll parameter epsilon(phi) and its derivatives epsilon'(phi) and epsilon''(phi), thereby extracting general conditions on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r and the running nsk at phiH where the perturbations are produced, some 50-60 e-folds before the end of inflation. We find quite generally that for models where epsilon(phi) develops a maximum, a relatively large r is most likely accompanied by a positive running while a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio implies negative running. The definitive answer, however, is given in terms of the slow-roll parameter ξ2(phi). To accommodate a large tensor-to-scalar ratio that meets the limiting values allowed by the Planck data, we study a non-monotonic epsilon(phi) decreasing during most part of inflation. Since at phiH the slow-roll parameter epsilon(phi) is increasing, we thus require that epsilon(phi) develops a maximum for phi > phiH after which epsilon(phi) decrease to small values where most e-folds are produced. The end of inflation might occur trough a hybrid mechanism and a small field excursion Δphie ≡ |phiH-phie| is obtained with a sufficiently thin profile for epsilon(phi) which, however, should not conflict with the second slow-roll parameter η(phi). As a consequence of this analysis we find bounds for Δphie, rH and for the scalar spectral index nsH. Finally we provide examples where these considerations are explicitly realised.

  2. Optimization of microscopic and macroscopic second order optical nonlinearities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, Seth R.; Perry, Joseph W.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear optical materials (NLO) can be used to extend the useful frequency range of lasers. Frequency generation is important for laser-based remote sensing and optical data storage. Another NLO effect, the electro-optic effect, can be used to modulate the amplitude, phase, or polarization state of an optical beam. Applications of this effect in telecommunications and in integrated optics include the impression of information on an optical carrier signal or routing of optical signals between fiber optic channels. In order to utilize these effects most effectively, it is necessary to synthesize materials which respond to applied fields very efficiently. In this talk, it will be shown how the development of a fundamental understanding of the science of nonlinear optics can lead to a rational approach to organic molecules and materials with optimized properties. In some cases, figures of merit for newly developed materials are more than an order of magnitude higher than those of currently employed materials. Some of these materials are being examined for phased-array radar and other electro-optic switching applications.

  3. SECOND-ORDER SOLUTIONS OF COSMOLOGICAL PERTURBATION IN THE MATTER-DOMINATED ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim; Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2012-06-10

    We present the growing mode solutions of cosmological perturbations to the second order in the matter-dominated era. We also present several gauge-invariant combinations of perturbation variables to the second order in the most general fluid context. Based on these solutions, we study the Newtonian correspondence of relativistic perturbations to the second order. In addition to the previously known exact relativistic/Newtonian correspondence of density and velocity perturbations to the second order in the comoving gauge, here we show that in the sub-horizon limit we have the correspondences for density, velocity, and potential perturbations in the zero-shear gauge and in the uniform-expansion gauge to the second order. Density perturbation in the uniform-curvature gauge also shows the correspondence to the second order in the sub-horizon scale. We also identify the relativistic gravitational potential that shows exact correspondence to the Newtonian one to the second order.

  4. The second-order differential phase contrast and its retrieval for imaging with x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yi; Tang Xiangyang

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The x-ray differential phase contrast imaging implemented with the Talbot interferometry has recently been reported to be capable of providing tomographic images corresponding to attenuation-contrast, phase-contrast, and dark-field contrast, simultaneously, from a single set of projection data. The authors believe that, along with small-angle x-ray scattering, the second-order phase derivative {Phi}{sup Double-Prime }{sub s}(x) plays a role in the generation of dark-field contrast. In this paper, the authors derive the analytic formulae to characterize the contribution made by the second-order phase derivative to the dark-field contrast (namely, second-order differential phase contrast) and validate them via computer simulation study. By proposing a practical retrieval method, the authors investigate the potential of second-order differential phase contrast imaging for extensive applications. Methods: The theoretical derivation starts at assuming that the refractive index decrement of an object can be decomposed into {delta}={delta}{sub s}+{delta}{sub f}, where {delta}{sub f} corresponds to the object's fine structures and manifests itself in the dark-field contrast via small-angle scattering. Based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory, the analytic formulae to characterize the contribution made by {delta}{sub s}, which corresponds to the object's smooth structures, to the dark-field contrast are derived. Through computer simulation with specially designed numerical phantoms, an x-ray differential phase contrast imaging system implemented with the Talbot interferometry is utilized to evaluate and validate the derived formulae. The same imaging system is also utilized to evaluate and verify the capability of the proposed method to retrieve the second-order differential phase contrast for imaging, as well as its robustness over the dimension of detector cell and the number of steps in grating shifting. Results: Both analytic formulae and computer

  5. Gravitational effective action at second order in curvature and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Capozziello, Salvatore; Pryer, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    We consider the full effective theory for quantum gravity at second order in curvature including non-local terms. We show that the theory contains two new degrees of freedom beyond the massless graviton: namely a massive spin-2 ghost and a massive scalar field. Furthermore, we show that it is impossible to fine-tune the parameters of the effective action to eliminate completely the classical spin-2 ghost because of the non-local terms in the effective action. Being a classical field, it is not clear anyway that this ghost is problematic. It simply implies a repulsive contribution to Newton's potential. We then consider how to extract the parameters of the effective action and show that it is possible to measure, at least in principle, the parameters of the local terms independently of each other using a combination of observations of gravitational waves and measurements performed by pendulum type experiments searching for deviations of Newton's potential.

  6. Gravitational effective action at second order in curvature and gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Calmet, Xavier; Capozziello, Salvatore; Pryer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We consider the full effective theory for quantum gravity at second order in curvature including non-local terms. We show that the theory contains two new degrees of freedom beyond the massless graviton: namely a massive spin-2 ghost and a massive scalar field. Furthermore, we show that it is impossible to fine-tune the parameters of the effective action to eliminate completely the classical spin-2 ghost because of the non-local terms in the effective action. Being a classical field, it is not clear anyway that this ghost is problematic. It simply implies a repulsive contribution to Newton's potential. We then consider how to extract the parameters of the effective action and show that it is possible to measure, at least in principle, the parameters of the local terms independently of each other using a combination of observations of gravitational waves and measurements performed by pendulum type experiments searching for deviations of Newton's potential.

  7. Second order gradiometer and dc SQUID integrated on a planar substrate

    SciTech Connect

    van Nieuwenhuyzen, G.J.; de Waal, V.J.

    1985-02-15

    An integrated system of a thin-film niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and a second order gradiometer on a planar substrate is described. The system consists of a dc SQUID with eight loops in parallel, each sensitive to the second derivative partial/sup 2/B/sub z//partialx/sup 2/ of the magnetic field. The calculated SQUID inductance is 1.3 nH. With an overall size of 16 x 16.5 mm/sup 2/ a sensitivity of 1.5 x 10/sup -9/ Tm/sup -2/ Hz/sup -1//sup ///sup 2/ is obtained. The measured transfer function for uniform fields perpendicular to the plane of the gradiometer is 2.1 x 10/sup -7/ T Phi/sup -1//sub 0/.

  8. Optical flow based deformable volume registration using a novel second-order regularization prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbić, Saša; Urschler, Martin; Pock, Thomas; Bischof, Horst

    2010-03-01

    Nonlinear image registration is an initial step for a large number of medical image analysis applications. Optical flow based intensity registration is often used for dealing with intra-modality applications involving motion differences. In this work we present an energy functional which uses a novel, second-order regularization prior of the displacement field. Compared to other methods our scheme is robust to non-Gaussian noise and does not penalize locally affine deformation fields in homogeneous areas. We propose an efficient and stable numerical scheme to find the minimizer of the presented energy. We implemented our algorithm using modern consumer graphics processing units and thereby increased the execution performance dramatically. We further show experimental evaluations on clinical CT thorax data sets at different breathing states and on dynamic 4D CT cardiac data sets.

  9. First and second order cosmological perturbations in light mass Galileon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Wali

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the first and second order cosmological perturbations in the light mass Galileon (LMG) scenario. LMG action includes the cubic Galileon term along with the standard kinetic term and a potential that is added phenomenologically to achieve late time acceleration. The scalar field is nonminimally coupled to matter in the Einstein frame. Integral solutions of growing and decaying modes are obtained. The effect of the conformal coupling constant (β ), at the perturbation level, has been studied. In this regard, we have studied the linear power spectrum and bispectrum. Though different values of β have different effects on the power spectrum on the reduced bispectrum the effect is not significant. It has been found that the redshift-space distortions data can be very useful to constrain β . In this study we consider potentials that can lead to tracker behavior of the scalar field.

  10. Second-order hydrodynamics and universality in non-conformal holographic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, Philipp; Probst, Jonas

    2016-12-01

    We study second-order hydrodynamic transport in strongly coupled non-conformal field theories with holographic gravity duals in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space. We first derive new Kubo formulae for five second-order transport coefficients in non-conformal fluids in (3 + 1) dimensions. We then apply them to holographic RG flows induced by scalar operators of dimension Δ = 3. For general background solutions of the dual bulk geometry, we find explicit expressions for the five transport coefficients at infinite coupling and show that a specific combination, tilde{H}=2η {τ}_{π }-2(κ -{κ}^{ast})-{λ}_2 , always vanishes. We prove analytically that the Haack-Yarom identity H = 2 ητ π - 4λ1 - λ2 = 0, which is known to be true for conformal holographic fluids at infinite coupling, also holds when taking into account leading non-conformal corrections. The numerical results we obtain for two specific families of RG flows suggest that H vanishes regardless of conformal symmetry. Our work provides further evidence that the Haack-Yarom identity H = 0 may be universally satisfied by strongly coupled fluids.

  11. Nonlinear gravitational self-force: Second-order equation of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2017-05-01

    When a small, uncharged, compact object is immersed in an external background spacetime, at zeroth order in its mass, it moves as a test particle in the background. At linear order, its own gravitational field alters the geometry around it, and it moves instead as a test particle in a certain effective metric satisfying the linearized vacuum Einstein equation. In the letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 051101 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.051101], using a method of matched asymptotic expansions, I showed that the same statement holds true at second order: if the object's leading-order spin and quadrupole moment vanish, then through second order in its mass, it moves on a geodesic of a certain smooth, locally causal vacuum metric defined in its local neighborhood. Here I present the complete details of the derivation of that result. In addition, I extend the result, which had previously been derived in gauges smoothly related to Lorenz, to a class of highly regular gauges that should be optimal for numerical self-force computations.

  12. Cascaded second-order processes for the efficient generation of narrowband terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirmi, Giovanni; Hemmer, Michael; Ravi, Koustuban; Reichert, Fabian; Zapata, Luis E.; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Çankaya, Hüseyin; Ahr, Frederike; Mücke, Oliver D.; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2017-02-01

    The generation of high-energy narrowband terahertz radiation has gained heightened importance in recent years due to its potentially transformative impact on spectroscopy, high-resolution radar and more recently electron acceleration. Among various applications, such terahertz radiation is particularly important for table-top free electron lasers, which are at the moment a subject of extensive research. Second-order nonlinear optical methods are among the most promising techniques to achieve the required coherent radiation with energy > 10 mJ, peak field > 100 MV m‑1, and frequency between 0.1 and 1 THz. However, they are conventionally thought to suffer from low efficiencies < ∼10‑3, due to the high ratio between optical and terahertz photon energies, in what is known as the Manley-Rowe limitation. In this paper, we review the current second-order nonlinear optical methods for the generation of narrowband terahertz radiation. We explain how to employ spectral cascading to increase the efficiency beyond the Manley-Rowe limit and describe the first experimental results in the direction of a terahertz-cascaded optical parametric amplifier, a novel technique which promises to fully exploit spectral cascading to generate narrowband terahertz radiation with few percent optical-to-terahertz conversion efficiency.

  13. Toroidal figures of equilibrium from a second-order accurate, accelerated SCF method with subgrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huré, J.-M.; Hersant, F.

    2017-02-01

    We compute the structure of a self-gravitating torus with polytropic equation of state (EOS) rotating in an imposed centrifugal potential. The Poisson solver is based on isotropic multigrid with optimal covering factor (fluid section-to-grid area ratio). We work at second order in the grid resolution for both finite difference and quadrature schemes. For soft EOS (i.e. polytropic index n ≥ 1), the underlying second order is naturally recovered for boundary values and any other integrated quantity sensitive to the mass density (mass, angular momentum, volume, virial parameter, etc.), i.e. errors vary with the number N of nodes per direction as ˜1/N2. This is, however, not observed for purely geometrical quantities (surface area, meridional section area, volume), unless a subgrid approach is considered (i.e. boundary detection). Equilibrium sequences are also much better described, especially close to critical rotation. Yet another technical effort is required for hard EOS (n < 1), due to infinite mass density gradients at the fluid surface. We fix the problem by using kernel splitting. Finally, we propose an accelerated version of the self-consistent field (SCF) algorithm based on a node-by-node pre-conditioning of the mass density at each step. The computing time is reduced by a factor of 2 typically, regardless of the polytropic index. There is a priori no obstacle to applying these results and techniques to ellipsoidal configurations and even to 3D configurations.

  14. Second order x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    X-ray phase imaging is sensitive to structural variation of soft tissue, and offers excellent contrast resolution for characterization of cancerous tissues. Also, the cross-section of x-ray phase shift is a thousand times greater than that of x-ray attenuation in soft tissue over the diagnostic energy range, allowing a much higher signal-to-noise ratio at a substantially lower radiation dose than attenuation-based x-ray imaging. In this paper, we present a second order approximation model with respect to phase shift based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory, and also discuss in-line dark-field imaging based on the second order model. This proposed model accurately establishes a quantitative correspondence between phases and recorded intensity images, outperforming the linear phase approximation model widely used in the conventional methods of x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging. This new model can be iteratively solved using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). The state of the art compressive sensing ingredients can be incorporated to achieve high quality image reconstruction. Our numerical simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach that is more accurate and stable, and more robust against noise than the conventional approach.

  15. Black holes in vector-tensor theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Minamitsuji, Masato; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2017-08-01

    We study static and spherically symmetric black hole (BH) solutions in second-order generalized Proca theories with nonminimal vector field derivative couplings to the Ricci scalar, the Einstein tensor, and the double dual Riemann tensor. We find concrete Lagrangians which give rise to exact BH solutions by imposing two conditions of the two identical metric components and the constant norm of the vector field. These exact solutions are described by either Reissner-Nordström (RN), stealth Schwarzschild, or extremal RN solutions with a non-trivial longitudinal mode of the vector field. We then numerically construct BH solutions without imposing these conditions. For cubic and quartic Lagrangians with power-law couplings which encompass vector Galileons as the specific cases, we show the existence of BH solutions with the difference between two non-trivial metric components. The quintic-order power-law couplings do not give rise to non-trivial BH solutions regular throughout the horizon exterior. The sixth-order and intrinsic vector-mode couplings can lead to BH solutions with a secondary hair. For all the solutions, the vector field is regular at least at the future or past horizon. The deviation from General Relativity induced by the Proca hair can be potentially tested by future measurements of gravitational waves in the nonlinear regime of gravity.

  16. Measurement of second order turbulence statistics in an axial-flow compressor via 3-component LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancey, Clinton L.

    1990-07-01

    The complete Reynolds stress tensor was measured in the rotor passage of a small scale, low speed (2900 rpm), axial-flow research compressor. Measurements of three nonorthogonal components of the instantaneous velocity were obtained at selected locations within the rotor passage with a three-color, three-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA). Contour maps of the turbulent kinetic energy within the passage are presented along with contour plots of other covariances. This work compliments previous work with this LDA system where the three dimensional mean velocity field was obtained.

  17. Invariant perfect tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youning; Han, Muxin; Grassl, Markus; Zeng, Bei

    2017-06-01

    Invariant tensors are states in the SU(2) tensor product representation that are invariant under SU(2) action. They play an important role in the study of loop quantum gravity. On the other hand, perfect tensors are highly entangled many-body quantum states with local density matrices maximally mixed. Recently, the notion of perfect tensors has attracted a lot of attention in the fields of quantum information theory, condensed matter theory, and quantum gravity. In this work, we introduce the concept of an invariant perfect tensor (IPT), which is an n-valent tensor that is both invariant and perfect. We discuss the existence and construction of IPTs. For bivalent tensors, the IPT is the unique singlet state for each local dimension. The trivalent IPT also exists and is uniquely given by Wigner’s 3j symbol. However, we show that, surprisingly, 4-valent IPTs do not exist for any identical local dimension d. On the contrary, when the dimension is large, almost all invariant tensors are asymptotically perfect, which is a consequence of the phenomenon of the concentration of measure for multipartite quantum states.

  18. Chern-Simons soliton and a critical study of the energy momentum tensor in noncommutative field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subir . E-mail: subir_ghosh2@rediffmail.com

    2005-08-01

    We have shown unambiguously the existence of solitons in the non-commutative (NC) extension of Chern-Simons-Higgs model. The analysis is done at the classical level (since solitons are essentially classical objects) and in the first non-trivial order in {theta}, the only spatial noncommutativity parameter. At the same time, we have exposed an inadequacy in the conventional definitions of the energy momentum tensor (EMT) in the present context but this pathology appears to be generic to NC field theories. This is reflected in the fact that the BPS soliton equations (obtained from the EMT) are not compatible with the full variational equations of motion, requiring further imposition a restriction on the form of the Higgs field, contrary to the commutative spacetime case. Both in the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of the problem, we concentrate on the canonical and symmetric forms of the energy-momentum tensor. In the Hamiltonian scheme, constraint analysis and the induced Dirac brackets are derived. In fact the EMT behaves properly as the spacetime translation generators and their actions on the fields are discussed in detail. The effects of noncommutativity on the soliton solutions have been analyzed carefully and we have come up with some interesting results. Comparing the relative strengths of the noncommutative effects, we have shown that there is a universal character in the noncommutative correction to the magnetic field-it depends only on {theta}. On the other hand, in the cases of all other observables of physical interest, such as the potential profile, soliton mass or the electric field, the parameters {theta} as well as {tau} (the latter comprising solely of commutative Chern-Simons-Higgs model parameters) appear with similar weightage.

  19. 14N Quadrupole Resonance in the presence of a weak static magnetic field. Direct determination of the electric field gradient tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Canet, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The electric field gradient tensor (considered here at the level of a nitrogen nucleus) can be described by two parameters: the largest element in the (x, y, z) principal axis system, denoted by Vzz, and the asymmetry parameter η=(Vyy-Vxx)/Vzz. The frequencies of the three nitrogen-14 NQR transitions depend on both parameters and two of them are, a priori, necessary for their determination. We demonstrate that, if a weak static magnetic field is applied during a NQR experiment, both parameters can be obtained from a single transition thus alleviating the difficulties for finding out 14N Quadrupole Resonance lines.

  20. Second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) for computing exactly and efficiently first- and second-order sensitivities in large-scale linear systems: II. Illustrative application to a paradigm particle diffusion problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacuci, Dan G.

    2015-03-01

    following major impacts on the computed moments of the response distribution: (a) they cause the "expected value of the response" to differ from the "computed nominal value of the response"; and (b) they contribute decisively to causing asymmetries in the response distribution. Indeed, neglecting the second-order sensitivities would nullify the third-order response correlations, and hence would nullify the skewness of the response. Consequently, any events occurring in a response's long and/or short tails, which are characteristic of rare but decisive events (e.g., major accidents, catastrophes), would likely be missed. The 2nd-ASAM is expected to affect significantly other fields that need efficiently computed second-order response sensitivities, e.g., optimization, data assimilation/adjustment, model calibration, and predictive modeling.

  1. xTENSOR:. a Free Fast Abstract Tensor Manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-García, José M.

    2008-09-01

    The package xTensor is introduced, a very fast and general manipulator of tensor expressions for Mathematica. Manifolds and vector bundles can be defined containing tensor fields with arbitrary symmetry, connections of any type, metrics and other objects. Based on the Penrose abstract-index notation, xTensor has a single canonicalizer which fully simplifies all expressions, using highly efficient techniques of computational group theory. A number of companion packages have been developed to address particular problems in General Relativity, like metric perturbation theory or the manipulation of the Riemann tensor.

  2. Stability of Horndeski vector-tensor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Durrer, Ruth; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Thorsrud, Mikjel E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch E-mail: mikjel.thorsrud@astro.uio.no

    2013-10-01

    We study the Horndeski vector-tensor theory that leads to second order equations of motion and contains a non-minimally coupled abelian gauge vector field. This theory is remarkably simple and consists of only 2 terms for the vector field, namely: the standard Maxwell kinetic term and a coupling to the dual Riemann tensor. Furthermore, the vector sector respects the U(1) gauge symmetry and the theory contains only one free parameter, M{sup 2}, that controls the strength of the non-minimal coupling. We explore the theory in a de Sitter spacetime and study the presence of instabilities and show that it corresponds to an attractor solution in the presence of the vector field. We also investigate the cosmological evolution and stability of perturbations in a general FLRW spacetime. We find that a sufficient condition for the absence of ghosts is M{sup 2} > 0. Moreover, we study further constraints coming from imposing the absence of Laplacian instabilities. Finally, we study the stability of the theory in static and spherically symmetric backgrounds (in particular, Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter). We find that the theory, quite generally, do have ghosts or Laplacian instabilities in regions of spacetime where the non-minimal interaction dominates over the Maxwell term. We also calculate the propagation speed in these spacetimes and show that superluminality is a quite generic phenomenon in this theory.

  3. Real-time fringe pattern demodulation with a second-order digital phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Gdeisat, M A; Burton, D R; Lalor, M J

    2000-10-10

    The use of a second-order digital phase-locked loop (DPLL) to demodulate fringe patterns is presented. The second-order DPLL has better tracking ability and more noise immunity than the first-order loop. Consequently, the second-order DPLL is capable of demodulating a wider range of fringe patterns than the first-order DPLL. A basic analysis of the first- and the second-order loops is given, and a performance comparison between the first- and the second-order DPLL's in analyzing fringe patterns is presented. The implementation of the second-order loop in real time on a commercial parallel image processing system is described. Fringe patterns are grabbed and processed, and the resultant phase maps are displayed concurrently.

  4. Periodic Orbits in a Second-Order Discontinuous System with an Elliptic Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liping; Luo, Albert C. J.

    2016-12-01

    This paper develops the analytical conditions for the onset and disappearance of motion passability and sliding along an elliptic boundary in a second-order discontinuous system. A periodically forced system, described by two different linear subsystems, is considered mainly to demonstrate the methodology. The passable, sliding and grazing conditions of a flow to the elliptic boundary in the discontinuous dynamical system are provided through the analysis of the corresponding vector fields and G-functions. Moreover, by constructing appropriate generic mappings, periodic orbits in such a discontinuous system are predicted analytically. Finally, three different cases are discussed to illustrate the existence of periodic orbits with passable and/or sliding flows. The results obtained in this paper can be applied to the sliding mode control in discontinuous dynamical systems.

  5. Approach Detect Sensor System by Second Order Derivative of Laser Irradiation Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tomohide; Yano, Yoshikazu; Tsuda, Norio; Yamada, Jun

    In recent years, as a result of a large amount of greenhouse gas emission, atmosphere temperature at ground level gradually rises. Therefore the Kyoto Protocol was adopted to solve the matter in 1997. By the energy-saving law amended in 1999, it is advisable that an escalator is controlled to pause during no user. Now a photo-electric sensor is used to control escalator, but a pole to install the sensor is needed. Then, a new type of approach detection sensor using laser diode, CCD camera and CPLD, which can be built-in escalator, has been studied. This sensor can derive the irradiated area of laser beam by simple processing in which the laser beam is irradiated in only the odd field of the interlace video signal. By second order derivative of laser irradiated area, this sensor can detect only the approaching target but can not detect the target which crosses and stands in the sensing area.

  6. Composite second-order performance improvement in optical fibre CATV transmission system using chirped fibre grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Liu, Feng; Cai, Hai-Wen; Qu, Rong-Hui; Fang, Zu-Jie

    2005-05-01

    Theoretically, we analyse the dispersion compensation characteristics of the chirped fibre grating (CFG) in an optical fibre cable television (CATV) system and obtain the analytic expression of the composite second-order (CSO) distortion using the time-domain form of the field envelope wave equation. The obtained result is in good agreement with the numerical simulation result. Experimentally, we verify the result by making use of the tunable characteristics of CFG to change the dispersion compensation amount and obtain an optimal CSO performance in a 125km fibre transmission link. Both the theoretical and experimental results show that the CSO performance can be improved by properly choosing the dispersion compensation amount for a certain fibre transmission link.

  7. Bioethics as a second-order discipline: who is not a bioethicist?

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2006-12-01

    A dispute exists about whether bioethics should become a new discipline with its own methods, competency standards, duties, honored texts, and core curriculum. Unique expertise is a necessary condition for disciplines. Using the current literature, different views about the sort of expertise that might be unique to bioethicists are critically examined to determine if there is an expertise that might meet this requirement. Candidates include analyses of expertise based in "philosophical ethics," "casuistry," "atheoretical or situation ethics," "conventionalist relativism," "institutional guidance," "regulatory guidance and compliance," "political advocacy," "functionalism," and "principlism." None succeed in identifying a unique area of expertise for successful bioethicists that could serve as a basis for making it a new discipline. Rather expertise in bioethics is rooted in many professions, disciplines and fields and best understood as a second-order discipline.

  8. Second-Order-accurate Schemes for Magnetohydrodynamics with Divergence-free Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2004-03-01

    While working on an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme for divergence-free magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), Balsara discovered a unique strategy for the reconstruction of divergence-free vector fields. Balsara also showed that for one-dimensional variations in flow and field quantities the reconstruction reduces exactly to the total variation diminishing (TVD) reconstruction. In a previous paper by Balsara the innovations were put to use in studying AMR-MHD. While the other consequences of the invention especially as they pertain to numerical scheme design were mentioned, they were not explored in any detail. In this paper we begin such an exploration. We study the problem of divergence-free numerical MHD and show that the work done so far still has four key unresolved issues. We resolve those issues in this paper. It is shown that the magnetic field can be updated in divergence-free fashion with a formulation that is better than the one in Balsara & Spicer. The problem of reconstructing MHD flow variables with spatially second-order accuracy is also studied. Some ideas from weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction, as they apply to numerical MHD, are developed. Genuinely multidimensional reconstruction strategies for numerical MHD are also explored. The other goal of this paper is to show that the same well-designed second-order-accurate schemes can be formulated for more complex geometries such as cylindrical and spherical geometry. Being able to do divergence-free reconstruction in those geometries also resolves the problem of doing AMR in those geometries; the appendices contain detailed formulae for the same. The resulting MHD scheme has been implemented in Balsara's RIEMANN framework for parallel, self-adaptive computational astrophysics. The present work also shows that divergence-free reconstruction and the divergence-free time update can be done for numerical MHD on unstructured meshes. As a result, we establish important analogies between

  9. Flocking of Second-Order Multiagent Systems With Connectivity Preservation Based on Algebraic Connectivity Estimation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hao; Wei, Yue; Chen, Jie; Xin, Bin

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flocking of second-order multiagent systems with connectivity preservation is investigated in this paper. First, for estimating the algebraic connectivity as well as the corresponding eigenvector, a new decentralized inverse power iteration scheme is formulated. Then, based on the estimation of the algebraic connectivity, a set of distributed gradient-based flocking control protocols is built with a new class of generalized hybrid potential fields which could guarantee collision avoidance, desired distance stabilization, and the connectivity of the underlying communication network simultaneously. What is important is that the proposed control scheme allows the existing edges to be broken without violation of connectivity constraints, and thus yields more flexibility of motions and reduces the communication cost for the multiagent system. In the end, nontrivial comparative simulations and experimental results are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and highlight the advantages of the proposed estimation scheme and control algorithm.

  10. Differential effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on second-order texture contrast sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Barbot, Antoine; Landy, Michael S.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    The visual system can use a rich variety of contours to segment visual scenes into distinct perceptually coherent regions. However, successfully segmenting an image is a computationally expensive process. Previously we have shown that exogenous attention—the more automatic, stimulus-driven component of spatial attention—helps extract contours by enhancing contrast sensitivity for second-order, texture-defined patterns at the attended location, while reducing sensitivity at unattended locations, relative to a neutral condition. Interestingly, the effects of exogenous attention depended on the second-order spatial frequency of the stimulus. At parafoveal locations, attention enhanced second-order contrast sensitivity to relatively high, but not to low second-order spatial frequencies. In the present study we investigated whether endogenous attention—the more voluntary, conceptually-driven component of spatial attention—affects second-order contrast sensitivity, and if so, whether its effects are similar to those of exogenous attention. To that end, we compared the effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on the sensitivity to second-order, orientation-defined, texture patterns of either high or low second-order spatial frequencies. The results show that, like exogenous attention, endogenous attention enhances second-order contrast sensitivity at the attended location and reduces it at unattended locations. However, whereas the effects of exogenous attention are a function of the second-order spatial frequency content, endogenous attention affected second-order contrast sensitivity independent of the second-order spatial frequency content. This finding supports the notion that both exogenous and endogenous attention can affect second-order contrast sensitivity, but that endogenous attention is more flexible, benefitting performance under different conditions. PMID:22895879

  11. Intensity interferometry and the second-order correlation function g(2) in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foellmi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Most observational techniques in astronomy can be understood as exploiting the various forms of the first-order correlation function g(1). As demonstrated by the Narrabri stellar intensity interferometer back in the 1960s by Hanbury Brown & Twiss, the first experiment to measure the second-order correlation function g(2), light can carry more information than simply its intensity, spectrum, and polarization. Since this experiment, theoretical and laboratory studies of non-classical properties of light have become a very active field of research, called quantum optics. Despite the variety of results in this field, astrophysics remained focused essentially on first-order coherence. In this paper, we study the possibility that quantum properties of light could be observed in cosmic sources. We provide the basic mathematical ingredients about the first and the second order correlation functions, applied to the modern context of astronomical observations. We aim at replacing the Hanbury Brown & Twiss experiment in this context, and present two fundamental limitations of an intensity interferometer: the requirement of a chaotic light source and the rapid decrease of the amount of correlated fluctuations with the surface temperature. The first of these limitations paradoxically emphasizes that the exploitation of g(2) is richer than what a modern intensity interferometer could bring and is particularly interesting for sources of nonthermal light. We also discuss new photon-counting avalanche photodiodes currently being developed in Grenoble, and their impact on limiting magnitudes of an intensity interferometer. We conclude by briefly presenting why microquasars in our galaxy and their extragalactic parents can represent an excellent first target in the optical/near-infrared where to observe nonthermal light and to test the use of g(2) in astrophysical sources.

  12. The known unknowns: neural representation of second-order uncertainty, and ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Hulme, Oliver; Penny, William D.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Predictions provided by action-outcome probabilities entail a degree of (first-order) uncertainty. However, these probabilities themselves can be imprecise and embody second-order uncertainty. Tracking second-order uncertainty is important for optimal decision making and reinforcement learning. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging investigations of second-order uncertainty in humans have drawn on an economic concept of ambiguity, where action-outcome associations in a gamble are either known (unambiguous) or completely unknown (ambiguous). Here, we relaxed the constraints associated with a purely categorical concept of ambiguity and varied the second-order uncertainty of gambles continuously, quantified as entropy over second-order probabilities. We show that second-order uncertainty influences decisions in a pessimistic way by biasing second-order probabilities, and that second-order uncertainty is negatively correlated with posterior cingulate cortex activity. The category of ambiguous (compared to non-ambiguous) gambles also biased choice in a similar direction, but was associated with distinct activation of a posterior parietal cortical area; an activation that we show reflects a different computational mechanism. Our findings indicate that behavioural and neural responses to second-order uncertainty are distinct from those associated with ambiguity and may call for a reappraisal of previous data. PMID:21451019

  13. Linear matrix inequalities for analysis and control of linear vector second-order systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adegas, Fabiano D.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-10-06

    Many dynamical systems are modeled as vector second-order differential equations. This paper presents analysis and synthesis conditions in terms of LMI with explicit dependence in the coefficient matrices of vector second-order systems. These conditions benefit from the separation between the Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices by introducing matrix multipliers, which potentially reduce conservativeness in hard control problems. Multipliers facilitate the usage of parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions as certificates of stability of uncertain and time-varying vector second-order systems. The conditions introduced in this work have the potential to increase the practice of analyzing and controlling systems directly in vector second-order form.

  14. Detection, discrimination and integration of second-order orientation information in strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Behzad; Allen, Harriet A; Hess, Robert F

    2005-08-01

    To better understand the nature of the cortical deficit in amblyopia we undertook a systematic investigation of second-order processing in 8 amblyopic and 8 normal observers. We investigated local detection, discrimination and global integration. Our local stimulus consisted of a Gaussian patch of fractal noise multiplied by a 1-d sinusoidal modulator. Our global stimulus consisted of an array of such elements. We revealed second-order detection deficits for stimuli with equi-visible carriers. Orientation discrimination for an isolated second-order patch was comparable in normal and amblyopic eyes. We showed that pure integration of second-order patterns can be normal in amblyopia.

  15. Diffusion Tensor Image Registration Using Hybrid Connectivity and Tensor Features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Most existing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) registration methods estimate structural correspondences based on voxelwise matching of tensors. The rich connectivity information that is given by DTI, however, is often neglected. In this article, we propose to integrate complementary information given by connectivity features and tensor features for improved registration accuracy. To utilize connectivity information, we place multiple anchors representing different brain anatomies in the image space, and define the connectivity features for each voxel as the geodesic distances from all anchors to the voxel under consideration. The geodesic distance, which is computed in relation to the tensor field, encapsulates information of brain connectivity. We also extract tensor features for every voxel to reflect the local statistics of tensors in its neighborhood. We then combine both connectivity features and tensor features for registration of tensor images. From the images, landmarks are selected automatically and their correspondences are determined based on their connectivity and tensor feature vectors. The deformation field that deforms one tensor image to the other is iteratively estimated and optimized according to the landmarks and their associated correspondences. Experimental results show that, by using connectivity features and tensor features simultaneously, registration accuracy is increased substantially compared with the cases using either type of features alone. PMID:24293159

  16. Ladder and cross terms in second-order distorted Born approximation. [for bounded layer of random discrete scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Y. Q.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    In the strong fluctuation theory for a bounded layer of random discrete scatterers, the second moments of the fields in the second-order distorted Born approximation are obtained for copolarized and cross-polarized fields. The backscattering cross sections per unit area are calculated by including the mutual coherence of the fields due to the coincidental ray paths, and that due to the opposite ray paths, corresponding to the ladder and cross terms in the Feynman diagramatic representation. It is proved that the contributions from ladder and cross terms for the copolarized backscattering cross sections are the same, while the contributions for the cross-polarized backscattering cross sections are of the same order. The bistatic scattering coefficients in the second-order approximation for both the ladder and cross terms are also obtained. The contributions from the cross terms explain the enhancement in the backscattering direction.

  17. Study on generation mechanisms of second-order nonlinear signals in surface acoustic wave devices and their suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Ryo; Kyoya, Haruki; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kihara, Takashi; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we examine the generation mechanisms of the second-order nonlinear signals in surface acoustic wave resonators/duplexers fabricated on a 42°YX-LiTaO3 substrate. It is shown that the crystal asymmetry of the substrate can generate the second-order nonlinear signals. The following two mechanisms mainly contribute to their generation: (a) self-mixing of the electrostatic field and (b) mixing of the electrostatic field with the strain field associated with laterally propagating modes. Both of them occur at the gaps between the electrode tip and the dummy electrode. In addition, an interdigital transducer design that cancels this asymmetry is proposed. The design is applied to a one-port resonator and a duplexer, and the effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated.

  18. Evaluation of bayesian tensor estimation using tensor coherence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jin; Kim, In-Young; Jeong, Seok-Oh; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2009-06-21

    Fiber tractography, a unique and non-invasive method to estimate axonal fibers within white matter, constructs the putative streamlines from diffusion tensor MRI by interconnecting voxels according to the propagation direction defined by the diffusion tensor. This direction has uncertainties due to the properties of underlying fiber bundles, neighboring structures and image noise. Therefore, robust estimation of the diffusion direction is essential to reconstruct reliable fiber pathways. For this purpose, we propose a tensor estimation method using a Bayesian framework, which includes an a priori probability distribution based on tensor coherence indices, to utilize both the neighborhood direction information and the inertia moment as regularization terms. The reliability of the proposed tensor estimation was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations in terms of accuracy and precision with four synthetic tensor fields at various SNRs and in vivo human data of brain and calf muscle. Proposed Bayesian estimation demonstrated the relative robustness to noise and the higher reliability compared to the simple tensor regression.

  19. The maintenance of the second-order advantage: second-order calibration of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence for quantitative analysis of herbicide napropamide in various environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Na; Wu, Hai-Long; Qing, Xiang-Dong; Nie, Chong-Chong; Li, Shu-Fang; Yu, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Rong; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2011-07-15

    A rapid non-separative spectrofluorometric method based on the second-order calibration of excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence was proposed for the determination of napropamide (NAP) in soil, river sediment, and wastewater as well as river water samples. With 0.10 mol L(-1) sodium citrate-hydrochloric acid (HCl) buffer solution of pH 2.2, the system of NAP has a large increase in fluorescence intensity. To handle the intrinsic fluorescence interferences of environmental samples, the alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) algorithm as an efficient second-order calibration method was employed. Satisfactory results have been achieved for NAP in complex environmental samples. The limit of detection obtained for NAP in soil, river sediment, wastewater and river water samples were 0.80, 0.24, 0.12, 0.071 ng mL(-1), respectively. Furthermore, in order to fully investigate the performance of second-order calibration method, we test the second-order calibration method using different calibration approaches including the single matrix model, the intra-day various matrices model and the global model based on the APTLD algorithm with nature environmental datasets. The results showed the second-order calibration methods also enable one or more analyte(s) of interest to be determined simultaneously in the samples with various types of matrices. The maintenance of second-order advantage has been demonstrated in simultaneous determinations of the analyte of interests in the environmental samples of various matrices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ambient Noise Cross-Correlation Green's Tensor Analysis at The Geysers Geothermal Field, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A.; Taira, T.; Dreger, D. S.; Gritto, R.

    2016-12-01

    We retrieve empirical Green's Functions at The Geysers (TG) in the frequency range from 0.2 to 0.9 Hz for a wide range of interstation distances ranging between 1 to 25 km, corresponding to 0.23 to 5.7 times the wavelength. The Green's functions are estimated from the cross-correlation of ambient noise recorded by a variety of sensors (surface short-period, broadband, accelerometers, and borehole geophones) in and around the reservoir area. The methodology preserves the relative amplitudes of the different components of the 9-component Green's Tensor that allows us to directly compare Noise-derived Green's Functions (NGFs) with normalized displacement waveforms of complete single-force Synthetic Green's Functions (SGFs) computed assuming various 1D and 3D velocity models. In the T-Tangential, R-Radial, Z-Vertical reference frame the TT, RR, RZ, ZR and ZZ components (1st component: force direction, 2nd component: response direction) of NGFs show clear surface waves and even body wave phases for many station pairs and are remarkably similar to SGFs in waveform shape and relative amplitude at all distances. The NGFs are found to be broadly consistent with seismic velocity features inferred from body wave travel-times, and the TT component exhibits body wave geometrical spreading decay at distances < 3.5 km and surface wave decay at distances beyond 3.5 km. We find large anomalous amplitudes in TR, TZ, RT and ZT components of NGFs at small distances (< 4 km) that can be attributed to 10°-30° sensor misalignments at many stations inferred from analysis of long period teleseismic waveforms. After correcting for sensor misalignments, many NGFs for longer paths (> 8 km) across the center of the reservoir area still show significant amplitudes in these components. This region marks an increase in seismic velocities from the NW section to the SE section of TG along with a prominent low VP/VS ratio anomaly, and the 3D velocity model incorporating these features is able to

  1. Vacuum polarization of massive spinor fields in static black-string backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez Piedra, Owen Pavel; Cabo Montes de Oca, Alejandro

    2008-01-15

    The renormalized mean value of the quantum Lagrangian and the corresponding components of the energy-momentum tensor for massive spinor fields coupled to an arbitrary gravitational field configuration having cylindrical symmetry are analytically evaluated using the Schwinger-DeWitt approximation, up to second order in the inverse mass value. The general results are employed to explicitly derive compact analytical expressions for the quantum mean Lagrangian and Energy-Momentum tensor in the particular background of the black-string spacetime.

  2. Testing second order cyclostationarity in the squared envelope spectrum of non-white vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.; Pennacchi, P.; Ricci, R.; Chatterton, S.

    2013-10-01

    Cyclostationary models for the diagnostic signals measured on faulty rotating machineries have proved to be successful in many laboratory tests and industrial applications. The squared envelope spectrum has been pointed out as the most efficient indicator for the assessment of second order cyclostationary symptoms of damages, which are typical, for instance, of rolling element bearing faults. In an attempt to foster the spread of rotating machinery diagnostics, the current trend in the field is to reach higher levels of automation of the condition monitoring systems. For this purpose, statistical tests for the presence of cyclostationarity have been proposed during the last years. The statistical thresholds proposed in the past for the identification of cyclostationary components have been obtained under the hypothesis of having a white noise signal when the component is healthy. This need, coupled with the non-white nature of the real signals implies the necessity of pre-whitening or filtering the signal in optimal narrow-bands, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and the risk of losing diagnostic information or introducing biases on the result. In this paper, the authors introduce an original analytical derivation of the statistical tests for cyclostationarity in the squared envelope spectrum, dropping the hypothesis of white noise from the beginning. The effect of first order and second order cyclostationary components on the distribution of the squared envelope spectrum will be quantified and the effectiveness of the newly proposed threshold verified, providing a sound theoretical basis and a practical starting point for efficient automated diagnostics of machine components such as rolling element bearings. The analytical results will be verified by means of numerical simulations and by using experimental vibration data of rolling element bearings.

  3. Second-order nonlinear optical response of zigzag BN single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    A theory based on the two-band tight-binding approximation for π electrons is developed to describe the second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of arrays of uniformly sized and well-aligned boron-nitride single-walled nanotubes (BN-SWNTs) with a zigzag achiral structure. It is assumed that the coherent light beam at frequency ω , incident upon the nanotube sample, is linearly polarized along the symmetry axis of the nanotubes. The long-axis NLO susceptibility χ(2)(ω) of those nanotubes is calculated within the independent nanotube approximation and in neglecting local-field effects. Using the perturbation-theory formalism in the crystal-momentum representation, we derive an explicit analytic expression for the χ(2)(ω) and apply it to study three distinct second-order NLO effects possible in the BN-SWNTs due to their noncentrosymmetric structure—namely, second-harmonic generation (SHG), linear electro-optical (LEO) effect, and nonlinear optical rectification (NOR). The theory is illustrated by numerical model calculations of the SHG, LEO, and NOR susceptibility spectra for several representative BN-SWNT ensembles consisting of large-diameter nanotubes. The calculated SHG spectra are found to be dominated by the highly peaked 2ω resonance at half the band-gap energy of the BN-SWNTs, where the absorption of light is negligible. Distinct features are also found in the LEO and NOR susceptibility spectra, e.g., a sudden switching of the susceptibility from a positive peak value to a negative peak one in the near vicinity of the fundamental absorption edge. A fairly large magnitude of those susceptibilities, reaching the order of 10-7esu under off-resonant conditions and up to 10-6esu in the resonant case, suggests that BN-SWNTs are a promising material for various electro-optical device applications.

  4. Operator Factorization and the Solution of Second-Order Linear Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of second-order linear ordinary differential equations is reviewed from the standpoint of the operator factorization approach to the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODE). Using the operator factorization approach, the general second-order linear ODE is solved, exactly, in quadratures and the resulting…

  5. A Comparison Study of Second-Order Screening Designs and Their Extension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    40 vii Page III. Effect of Heredity and Sparsity on Second-Order Screening Design Performance...second- order screening designs with respect to the assumptions of both sparsity (factor or effect) and heredity (strong or weak). To date, evaluation of...screening design per- formance has assumed both factor sparsity and strong effect heredity . The article is currently under review for publication in

  6. Simplifying Second-Order Belief Attribution: What Facilitates Children's Performance on Measures of Conceptual Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coull, Greig J.; Leekam, Susan R.; Bennett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated how 4- to 7-year-old children's second-order belief attribution might be facilitated by either reducing information processing or varying the sequence of task questions. In Experiment 1, compared with Perner and Wimmer's (1985) original second-order false-belief task, a new task with reduced information-processing demands…

  7. Post processing with first- and second-order hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghva, Kazem; Poudel, Srijana; Malreddy, Spandana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the implementation and evaluation of first order and second order Hidden Markov Models to identify and correct OCR errors in the post processing of books. Our experiments show that the first order model approximately corrects 10% of the errors with 100% precision, while the second order model corrects a higher percentage of errors with much lower precision.

  8. A comparison of second order derivative based models for time domain reflectometry wave form analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adaptive waveform interpretation with Gaussian filtering (AWIGF) and second order bounded mean oscillation operator Z square 2(u,t,r) are TDR analysis methods based on second order differentiation. AWIGF was originally designed for relatively long probe (greater than 150 mm) TDR waveforms, while Z s...

  9. Operator Factorization and the Solution of Second-Order Linear Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of second-order linear ordinary differential equations is reviewed from the standpoint of the operator factorization approach to the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODE). Using the operator factorization approach, the general second-order linear ODE is solved, exactly, in quadratures and the resulting…

  10. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aucar, I. Agustín Gomez, Sergio S.; Giribet, Claudia G.; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C.

    2014-11-21

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH{sup +} (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH{sup +} systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found.

  11. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gomez, Sergio S; Giribet, Claudia G; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C

    2014-11-21

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH(+) (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH(+) systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found.

  12. Assessing Stability and Change in a Second-Order Confirmatory Factor Model of Meaning in Life.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal; Hayward, R David

    2014-04-01

    Research indicates that meaning in life is an important correlate of health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about the way a sense of meaning may change over time. The purpose of this study is to explore two ways of assessing change in meaning within a second-order confirmatory factor analysis framework. First, tests are conducted to see if the first and second-order factor loadings and measurement error terms are invariant over time. Second, a largely overlooked technique is used to assess change and stability in meaning at the second-order level. Findings from a nationwide survey reveal that the first and second-order factor loadings are invariant of time. Moreover, the second-order measurement error terms, but not the first-order measurement error terms, are invariant, as well. The results further reveal that standard ways of assessing stability mask significant change in meaning that is due largely to regression to the mean.

  13. Optimality Conditions in Differentiable Vector Optimization via Second-Order Tangent Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Bienvenido Novo, Vicente

    2004-03-15

    We provide second-order necessary and sufficient conditions for a point to be an efficient element of a set with respect to a cone in a normed space, so that there is only a small gap between necessary and sufficient conditions. To this aim, we use the common second-order tangent set and the asymptotic second-order cone utilized by Penot. As an application we establish second-order necessary conditions for a point to be a solution of a vector optimization problem with an arbitrary feasible set and a twice Frechet differentiable objective function between two normed spaces. We also establish second-order sufficient conditions when the initial space is finite-dimensional so that there is no gap with necessary conditions. Lagrange multiplier rules are also given.

  14. Second order gravitational effects on CMB temperature anisotropy in {lambda} dominated flat universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-05-15

    We study second order gravitational effects of local inhomogeneities on the cosmic microwave background radiation in flat universes with matter and a cosmological constant {lambda}. We find that the general relativistic correction to the Newtonian approximation is negligible at second order provided that the size of the inhomogeneous region is sufficiently smaller than the horizon scale. For a spherically symmetric top-hat type quasilinear perturbation, the first order temperature fluctuation corresponding to the linear integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is enhanced (suppressed) by the second order one for a compensated void (lump). As a function of redshift of the local inhomogeneity, the second order temperature fluctuations due to evolution of the gravitational potential have a peak before the matter-{lambda} equality epoch for a fixed comoving size and a density contrast. The second order gravitational effects from local quasilinear inhomogeneities at a redshift z{approx}1 may significantly affect the cosmic microwave background.

  15. Second-order diffraction forces on an array of vertical cylinders in bichromatic bidirectional waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, J.H.; Williams, A.N.

    1995-02-01

    A complete second-order solution is presented for the hydrodynamic forces due to the action of bichromatic, bidirectional waves on an array of bottom-mounted, surface-piercing cylinders of arbitrary cross section in water of uniform finite depth. Based on the constant structural cross section, the first-order problem is solved utilizing a two-dimensional Green function approach, while an assisting radiation potential approach is used to obtain the hydrodynamic loads due to the second-order potential. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of wave directionality on the second-order sum and difference frequency hydrodynamic forces on a two-cylinder array. It is found that wave directionality may have a significant influence on the second-order hydrodynamic forces on these arrays and that the assumption of unidirectional waves does not always lead to conservative estimates of the second-order loading.

  16. Seismic activity and stress tensor inversion at Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua-Vera, Yanet; Lermo-Samaniego, Javier; Quintanar-Robles, Luis; Campos-Enríquez, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    We analyze local earthquakes occurring between 2003 and 2012 at the Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (TVVGF) to establish their temporal and spatial distribution, and relationships with local and regional fault systems, water injection, acid stimulation and steam production tests. We obtained focal mechanisms and inverted data for the stress tensor to understand the local and regional stress fields. We analyzed 423 local earthquakes with magnitudes between 0.1 and 2.9 Mc and hypocentral depths from 0.2 to 7.4 km b.s.l. The cutoff depth at ~ 7.4 km possibly delineates the brittle-ductile transition zone. We identified seven swarms (from 1 to 7). Swarms 1 (December 2009), 2 (May 2010), 3 (June-July 2010) and 7 (December 2012) are strongly correlated with injection processes; whereas swarms 5 (April 2012) and 6 (September 2012) are correlated with local tectonic faults. Stress inversion showed NW-SE, E-W and NE-SW extensional orientations (Shmin), in agreement with the local tectonic stress field; while NE-SW compressional orientations (SHmax) are correlated with the regional tectonic stress field.

  17. ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T₂) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T₂(⁎)).

  18. Effects of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Semisubmersible Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of the system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the MARIN offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST in the future. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method has been applied to the OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. The loads and response of the system due to the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads and induced response data are compared to the loads and motions induced by aerodynamic loading as solved by FAST.

  19. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  20. Electro-osmosis of nematic liquid crystals under weak anchoring and second-order surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Antarip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-07-01

    Advent of nematic liquid crystal flows has attracted renewed attention in view of microfluidic transport phenomena. Among various transport processes, electro-osmosis stands as one of the efficient flow actuation mechanisms through narrow confinements. In the present study, we explore the electrically actuated flow of an ordered nematic fluid with ionic inclusions, taking into account the influences from surface-induced elasticity and electrical double layer (EDL) phenomena. Toward this, we devise the coupled flow governing equations from fundamental free-energy analysis, considering the contributions from first- and second-order elastic, dielectric, flexoelectric, charged surface polarization, ionic and entropic energies. The present study focuses on the influence of surface charge and elasticity effects in the resulting linear electro-osmosis through a slit-type microchannel whose surfaces are chemically treated to display a homeotropic-type weak anchoring state. An optical periodic stripe configuration of the nematic director has been observed, especially for higher electric fields, wherein the Ericksen number for the dynamic study is restricted to the order of unity. Contrary to the isotropic electrolytes, the EDL potential in this case was found to be dependent on the external field strength. Through a systematic investigation, we brought out the fact that the wavelength of the oscillating patterns is dictated mainly by the external field, while the amplitude depends on most of the physical variables ranging from the anchoring strength and the flexoelectric coefficients to the surface charge density and electrical double layer thickness.