Science.gov

Sample records for secondary end-use products

  1. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

    2004-09-25

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg

  2. A review on biomass production from C4 grasses: yield and quality for end-use.

    PubMed

    Tubeileh, Ashraf; Rennie, Timothy J; Goss, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    With a dry biomass production exceeding 40Mgha(-1) in many environments, Miscanthus spp. is the most productive perennial C4 grass species thanks to five advantages over North American prairie tallgrasses. However, miscanthus has a slower nutrient remobilization system, resulting in higher nutrient concentrations at harvest. Perennial C4 grasses benefit from soil microbial associations, reducing their nutrient needs. For combustion purposes, grasses with low moisture content, high lignin and low nutrients are desired. For ethanol, preferred feedstock will have lower lignin, higher sugars, starch, or cellulose/hemicellulose depending on the conversion method. Species with high stem-to-leaf ratio provide better biofuel conversion efficiency and quality. Recently-developed transgenic switchgrass lines have much higher ethanol yields and lower transformation costs. Further selection and breeding are needed to optimize biomass quality and nutrient cycling.

  3. Energy balances in the production and end use of alcohols derived from biomass. A fuels-specific comparative analysis of alternate ethanol production cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Considerable public interest and debate have been focused on the so-called energy balance issue involved in the conversion of biomass materials into ethanol for fuel use. This report addresses questions of net gains in premium fuels that can be derived from the production and use of ethanol from biomass, and shows that for the US alcohol fuel program, energy balance need not be a concern. Three categories of fuel gain are discussed in the report: (1) Net petroleum gain; (2) Net premium fuel gain (petroleum and natural gas); and (3) Net energy gain (for all fuels). In this study the investment of energy (in the form of premium fuels) in alcohol production includes all investment from cultivating, harvesting, or gathering the feedstock and raw materials, through conversion of the feedstock to alcohol, to the delivery to the end-user. To determine the fuel gains in ethanol production, six cases, encompassing three feedstocks, five process fuels, and three process variations, have been examined. For each case, two end-uses (automotive fuel use and replacement of petrochemical feedstocks) were scrutinized. The end-uses were further divided into three variations in fuel economy and two different routes for production of ethanol from petrochemicals. Energy requirements calculated for the six process cycles accounted for fuels used directly and indirectly in all stages of alcohol production, from agriculture through distribution of product to the end-user. Energy credits were computed for byproducts according to the most appropriate current use.

  4. New routes to plant secondary products

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, J.D.; Parr, A.J.; Rhodes, M.J.C.; Robins, R.J.; Walton, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    For some years, there has been great interest in the exploitation of plant cell cultures to produce fine chemicals. With a few exceptions, progress in commercialization has been slow, largely due to the low and/or unstable productivity of many undifferentiated cultures. Recent developments leading to the production of rapidly growing, organized, 'hairy' root cultures following the genetic transformation of plants with Agrobacterium rhizogenes may revolutionize certain areas of plant cell biotechnology. The application of hairy root technology to the production of plant secondary metabolites are discussed. (Refs. 45).

  5. Hairy root cultures for secondary metabolites production.

    PubMed

    Pistelli, Laura; Giovannini, Annalisa; Ruffoni, Barbara; Bertoli, Alessandra; Pistelli, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Hairy roots (HRs) are differentiated cultures of transformed roots generated by the infection of wounded higher plants with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. This pathogen causes the HR disease leading to the neoplastic growth of roots that are characterized by high growth rate in hormone free media and genetic stability. HRs produce the same phytochemicals pattern of the corresponding wild type organ. High stability and productivity features allow the exploitation of HRs as valuable biotechnological tool for the production of plant secondary metabolites. In addition, several elicitation methods can be used to further enhance their accumulation in both small and large scale production. However, in the latter case, cultivation in bioreactors should be still optimized. HRs can be also utilised as biological farm for the production of recombinant proteins, hence holding additional potential for industrial use. HR technology has been strongly improved by increased knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying their development. The present review summarizes updated aspects of the hairy root induction, genetics and metabolite production.

  6. Secondary Aluminum Production: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) for new and existing sources at secondary aluminum production facilities. Includes rule history, summary, federal register citations and implementation information.

  7. Secondary aerosol production from agricultural gas precursors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of air quality indicate that agricultural emissions may impact particulate mass concentrations through both primary and secondary processes. Increasing evidence from both laboratory and field work suggests that not only does ammonia produce secondary particulate matter, but some volatile org...

  8. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  9. Hybrid isoprenoid secondary metabolite production in terrestrial and marine actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kelley A; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R

    2010-12-01

    Terpenoids are among the most ubiquitous and diverse secondary metabolites observed in nature. Although actinomycete bacteria are one of the primary sources of microbially derived secondary metabolites, they rarely produce compounds in this biosynthetic class. The terpenoid secondary metabolites that have been discovered from actinomycetes are often in the form of biosynthetic hybrids called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs). HIs include significant structural diversity and biological activity and thus are important targets for natural product discovery. Recent screening of marine actinomycetes has led to the discovery of a new lineage that is enriched in the production of biologically active HI secondary metabolites. These strains represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and provide unique opportunities to study the evolutionary history and ecological functions of an unusual group of secondary metabolites.

  10. Marketing Secondary Information Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donald W.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the components of marketing (i.e., consumer markets, product development, sales, advertising and promotion, packaging, distribution, pricing, and market research), how information products and services relate to those components, and the pricing of products from a bibliographic database. Two figures and a 17-item reference list are…

  11. Extremely high secondary production of introduced snails in rivers.

    PubMed

    Hall, Robert O; Dybdahl, Mark F; VanderLoop, Maria C

    2006-06-01

    The functional importance of invasive animals may be measured as the degree to which they dominate secondary production, relative to native animals. We used this approach to examine dominance of invertebrate secondary production by invasive New Zealand mudsnails (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) in rivers. We measured secondary production of mudsnails and native invertebrates in three rivers in the Greater Yellowstone Area (Wyoming, USA): Gibbon River, Firehole River, and Polecat Creek. Potamopyrgus production was estimated by measuring in situ growth rates and multiplying by monthly biomass; native invertebrate production was estimated using size frequency and instantaneous growth methods. Mudsnail growth rates were high (up to 0.06 d(-1)) for juvenile snails and much lower for adult females (0.003 d(-1)). Potamopyrgus production in Polecat Creek (194 g x m(-2) x yr(-1)) was one of the highest values ever reported for a stream invertebrate. Native invertebrate production ranged from 4.4 to 51 g x m(-2) x yr(-1). Potamopyrgus was the most productive taxon and constituted 65-92% of total invertebrate productivity. Native invertebrate production was low in all streams. Based on a survey of production measures from uninvaded rivers, the distribution of secondary production across taxa was much more highly skewed toward the invasive dominant Potamopyrgus in the three rivers. We suggest that this invasive herbivorous snail is sequestering a large fraction of the carbon available for invertebrate production and altering food web function.

  12. Secondary antiproton production in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Ramaty, R.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility is investigated that the reported excess low energy antiproton component of the cosmic radiation results from proton-proton (p-p) interactions in relativistic plasmas. Because of both target and projectile motion in such plasmas, the antiproton production threshold in the frame of the plasma is much lower than the threshold of antiproton production in cosmic ray interactions with ambient matter. The spectrum of the resultant antiprotons therefore extends to much lower energy than in the cosmic ray case. The antiproton spectrum is calculated for relativistic thermal plasmas and the spectrum is estimated for relativistic nonthermal plasmas. As possible production sites, matter accreting onto compact objects located in the galaxy is considered. Possible overproduction of gamma rays from associated neutral pion production can be avoided if the site is optically thick to the photons but not to the antiprotons. A possible scenario involves a sufficiently large photon density that the neutral pion gamma rays are absorbed by photon-photon pair production. Escape of the antiprotons to the interstellar medium can be mediated by antineutron production.

  13. Teacher Qualifications and Productivity in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuls, James V.; Trivitt, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between observable teacher characteristics and productivity as measured by an increase in student achievement on a standardized test using a value-added approach. This analysis focused on teachers of algebra, geometry, and 11th grade English Language Arts in Arkansas. The authors generated a value-added score…

  14. Using Hairy Roots for Production of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize a wide variety of natural products, which are traditionally termed secondary metabolites and, more recently, coined specialized metabolites. While these chemical compounds are employed by plants for interactions with their environment, humans have long since explored and exploited plant secondary metabolites for medicinal and practical uses. Due to the tissue-specific and low-abundance accumulation of these metabolites, alternative means of production in systems other than intact plants are sought after. To this end, hairy root culture presents an excellent platform for producing valuable secondary metabolites. This chapter will focus on several major groups of secondary metabolites that are manufactured by hairy roots established from different plant species. Additionally, the methods for preservations of hairy roots will also be reviewed.

  15. Current approaches toward production of secondary plant metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Md. Sarfaraj; Fareed, Sheeba; Ansari, Saba; Rahman, Md. Akhlaquer; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Saeed, Mohd.

    2012-01-01

    Plants are the tremendous source for the discovery of new products with medicinal importance in drug development. Today several distinct chemicals derived from plants are important drugs, which are currently used in one or more countries in the world. Secondary metabolites are economically important as drugs, flavor and fragrances, dye and pigments, pesticides, and food additives. Many of the drugs sold today are simple synthetic modifications or copies of the naturally obtained substances. The evolving commercial importance of secondary metabolites has in recent years resulted in a great interest in secondary metabolism, particularly in the possibility of altering the production of bioactive plant metabolites by means of tissue culture technology. Plant cell and tissue culture technologies can be established routinely under sterile conditions from explants, such as plant leaves, stems, roots, and meristems for both the ways for multiplication and extraction of secondary metabolites. In vitro production of secondary metabolite in plant cell suspension cultures has been reported from various medicinal plants, and bioreactors are the key step for their commercial production. Based on this lime light, the present review is aimed to cover phytotherapeutic application and recent advancement for the production of some important plant pharmaceuticals. PMID:22368394

  16. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  17. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, André H.; Mateu, Vicent; Pietrulewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-22

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup −} → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  18. Biodiesel production from municipal secondary sludge.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Ghosh, Pooja; Khosla, Khushboo; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, feasibility of biodiesel production from freeze dried sewage sludge was studied and its yield was enhanced by optimization of the in situ transesterification conditions (temperature, catalyst and concentration of sludge solids). Optimized conditions (45°C, 5% catalyst and 0.16g/mL sludge solids) resulted in a 20.76±0.04% biodiesel yield. The purity of biodiesel was ascertained by GC-MS, FT-IR and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) spectroscopy. The biodiesel profile obtained revealed the predominance of methyl esters of fatty acids such as oleic, palmitic, myristic, stearic, lauric, palmitoleic and linoleic acids indicating potential use of sludge as a biodiesel feedstock.

  19. Marketing Agricultural Products. Curriculum Guide Developed for Secondary and Post Secondary Agriculture Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, W. Wade; And Others

    This curriculum guide can be used by secondary and postsecondary agriculture instructors for a semester course in marketing agricultural products or individual units can be incorporated in other courses. The curriculum guide consists of six units of study made up of two to eight lessons each. The units cover the following topics: (1) marketing…

  20. Genomic Analysis of Secondary Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its production of secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity displayed among strains. Certain st...

  1. Identifying Productive Resources in Secondary School Students' Discourse about Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrer, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    A growing program of research in science education acknowledges the beginnings of disciplinary reasoning in students' ideas and seeks to inform instruction that responds productively to these disciplinary progenitors in the moment to foster their development into sophisticated scientific practice. This dissertation examines secondary school…

  2. Farm Laboratory Aids Post-Secondary Instruction in Agricultural Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statler, Larry L.; Juhl, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Reports a farm laboratory of 1500 swine, 40 beef cattle, 52 sheep, a 300-crop acres, and a full line of leased new farm machinery for post-secondary agricultural production students. A student board of directors manages the demonstration farm. (DM)

  3. End-use taxes: Current EIA practices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-17

    There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

  4. Seasonality of primary and secondary production in an Arctic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M.; Huryn, A.; Deegan, L.

    2011-12-01

    Rivers and streams that freeze solid for 8-9 months each year provide excellent examples of the extreme seasonality of arctic habitats. The communities of organisms inhabiting these rivers must complete growth and development during summer, resulting in a rapid ramp-up and down of production over the short ice-free period. The effects of recent shifts in the timing of the spring thaw and autumn freeze-up on the duration and pattern of the period of active production are poorly understood. We are currently investigating: 1) the response of the biotic community of the Kuparuk River (Arctic Alaska) to shifts in the seasonality of the ice-free period, and 2) the community response to increases in phosphorous (P) supply anticipated as the volume of the permafrost active-layer increases in response to climate warming. Here algal production supports a 2-tier web of consumers. We tracked primary and secondary production from the spring thaw through mid-August in a reference reach and one receiving low-level P fertilization. Gross primary production/community respiration (GPP/R) ratios for both reaches were increasing through mid-July, with higher GPP/R in response to the P addition. Understanding the degree of synchrony between primary and secondary production in this Arctic river system will enhance further understanding of how shifts in seasonality affect trophic dynamics.

  5. Production of neutrinos and secondary electrons in cosmic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-Y.; Pohl, M.

    2008-05-01

    We study the individual contribution to secondary lepton production in hadronic interactions of cosmic rays (CRs) including resonances and heavier secondaries. For this purpose we use the same methodology discussed earlier [C.-Y. Huang, S.-E. Park, M. Pohl, C.D. Daniels, Astropart. Phys. 27 (2007) 429], namely the Monte-Carlo particle collision code DPMJET3.04 to determine the multiplicity spectra of various secondary particles with leptons as the final decay states, that result from inelastic collisions of cosmic-ray protons and Helium nuclei with the interstellar medium of standard composition. By combining the simulation results with parametric models for secondary particle (with resonances included) for incident cosmic-ray energies below a few GeV, where DPMJET appears unreliable, we thus derive production matrices for all stable secondary particles in cosmic-ray interactions with energies up to about 10 PeV. We apply the production matrices to calculate the radio synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons in a young shell-type SNR, RX J1713.7-3946, which is a measure of the age, the spectral index of hadronic cosmic rays, and most importantly the magnetic field strength. We find that the multi-mG fields recently invoked to explain the X-ray flux variations are unlikely to extend over a large fraction of the radio-emitting region, otherwise the spectrum of hadronic cosmic rays in the energy window 0.1-100 GeV must be unusually hard. We also use the production matrices to calculate the muon event rate in an IceCube-like detector that are induced by muon neutrinos from high-energy γ-ray sources such as RX J1713.7-3946, Vela Jr. and MGRO J2019+37. At muon energies of a few TeV, or in other word, about 10 TeV neutrino energy, an accumulation of data over about 5-10 years would allow testing the hadronic origin of TeV γ-rays.

  6. SECONDARY ELECTRON PRODUCTION AT THE SNS STORAGE RING COLLIMATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    Secondary electron (SE) production is briefly reviewed. If the collimator of the SNS storage ring allows proton beam scraping to take place, the electron yield might be quite large. At the AGS Booster, by steering the Au{sup 31+} ion beam into the electrostatic inflector, beam scraping effect on SE production is studied. The results of this experiment can be translated into the situation of proton beam scraping at the SNS collimator. It seems sufficient to support a new look of the SNS ring collimator design.

  7. End-use quality of soft kernel durum wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kernel texture is a major determinant of end-use quality of wheat. Durum wheat is known for its very hard texture, which influences how it is milled and for what products it is well suited. We developed soft kernel durum wheat lines via Ph1b-mediated homoeologous recombination with Dr. Leonard Joppa...

  8. Enhancement in secondary particulate matter production due to mountain trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Teng; Fung, J. C. H.; Ma, H.; Lau, A. K. H.; Chan, P. W.; Yu, J. Z.; Xue, J.

    2014-10-01

    As China's largest economic development zone, the Pearl River Delta (PRD) is subject to particulate matter (PM) and visibility deterioration problems. Due to high PM concentration, haze days impacting ambient visibility have occurred frequently in this region. Besides visibility impairment, PM pollution also causes a negative impact on public health. These negative impacts have heightened the need to improve our understanding of the PM pollution of the PRD region. One major cause of the PRD pollution problem is cold front passages in the winter; however, the mechanism of pollution formation stays unclear. In this study, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) is utilized to investigate the detailed PM production and transport mechanisms in the PRD. Simulated concentrations of PM2.5 species, which have a good correlation with observation, show that sulfate and nitrate are the dominant pollutants among different PM2.5 species. Before the cold front passage a large amount of gas-phase and particle-phase pollutants are transported to the mountainous regions in the north of the PRD, and become trapped by the terrain. Over the mountain regions, cloud driven by upwelling flow promotes aqueous-phase reactions including oxidations of PM precursors such as SO2 and NO2. By this process, production of secondary PM is enhanced. When the cold front continues to advance further south, PM is transported to the PRD cities, and suppressed into a thin layer near the ground by a low planetary boundary layer (PBL). Thus high PM concentration episodes take place in the PRD cities. After examining production and transportation pathways, this study presents that the complex terrain configuration would block pollutant dispersion, provide cloudy environment, and advance secondary PM production. Previous studies have pointed out that pollution emitted from outside this region largely influences the air quality in the PRD; however, this study shows that pollutants from the outside could be

  9. Production rate calculations for a secondary beam facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Back, B.B.; Rehm, K.E.

    1995-08-01

    In order to select the most cost-effective method for the production of secondary ion beams, yield calculations for a variety of primary beams were performed ranging in mass from protons to {sup 18}O with energies of 100-200 MeV/u. For comparison, production yields for 600-1000 MeV protons were also calculated. For light ion-(A < {sup 4}He) induced reactions at energies above 50 MeV/u the LAHET code was used while the low energy calculations were performed with LPACE. Heavy-ion-induced production rates were calculated with the ISAPACE program. The results of these codes were checked against each other and wherever possible a comparison with experimental data was performed. These comparisons extended to very exotic reaction channels, such as the production of {sup 100}Sn from {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Xe induced fragmentation reactions. These comparisons indicate that the codes are able to predict production rates to within one order of magnitude.

  10. Evaluation of culture media for the production of secondary metabolites in a natural products screening program.

    PubMed

    Vandermolen, Karen M; Raja, Huzefa A; El-Elimat, Tamam; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2013-12-17

    Variation in the growing environment can have significant impacts on the quantity and diversity of fungal secondary metabolites. In the industrial setting, optimization of growing conditions can lead to significantly increased production of a compound of interest. Such optimization becomes challenging in a drug-discovery screening situation, as the ideal conditions for one organism may induce poor metabolic diversity for a different organism. Here, the impact of different media types, including six liquid media and five solid media, on the secondary metabolite production of three fungal strains was examined in the context of the drug-discovery screening process. The relative production of marker compounds was used to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of each medium for the purpose of producing secondary metabolites.

  11. Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Cloud Processing of Glycolaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, M. J.; Seitzinger, S.; Turpin, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Organic particulate matter (PM) formed in the atmosphere (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) is a substantial yet poorly understood contributor to atmospheric PM. Cloud processing is a newly recognized SOA formation pathway. This study investigates the potential for aqueous glycolaldehyde oxidation to produce low volatility products that are retained in the particle phase upon cloud droplet evaporation, increasing PM concentrations aloft. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmation that aqueous oxidation of glycolaldehyde via the hydroxyl radical forms glyoxal and glycolic acid, as previously assumed. Subsequent reactions form formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and oxalic acid as expected. Unexpected products include malonic acid, succinic acid, and higher molecular weight compounds, including oligomers. Predictions of aerosol yields based on these bulk aqueous experiments are presented. Due to (1) the large source strength of glycolaldehyde from precursors such as isoprene and ethene, (2) its water solubility, and (3) the aqueous formation of low volatility products, we predict that cloud processing of glycolaldehyde is an important source of SOA and that incorporation of this SOA formation pathway in chemical transport models will help explain the current under- prediction of organic PM concentrations.

  12. Kinetics, products, and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Paul J; Atkinson, Roger

    2012-10-07

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources are oxidized by reactions with OH radicals, O(3), NO(3) radicals, or Cl atoms to form less volatile products that subsequently partition into aerosol particles. Once in particles, these organic compounds can undergo heterogenous/multiphase reactions to form more highly oxidized or oligomeric products. SOA comprises a large fraction of atmospheric aerosol mass and can have significant effects on atmospheric chemistry, visibility, human health, and climate. Previous articles have reviewed the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of atmospheric VOC reactions and the general chemistry and physics involved in SOA formation. In this article we present a detailed review of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase chemistry as they apply to SOA formation, with a focus on the effects of VOC molecular structure on the kinetics of initial reactions with the major atmospheric oxidants, the subsequent reactions of alkyl, alkyl peroxy, and alkoxy radical intermediates, and the composition of the resulting products. Structural features of reactants and products discussed include compound carbon number; linear, branched, and cyclic configurations; the presence of C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bonds and aromatic rings; and functional groups such as carbonyl, hydroxyl, ester, hydroxperoxy, carboxyl, peroxycarboxyl, nitrate, and peroxynitrate. The intention of this review is to provide atmospheric chemists with sufficient information to understand the dominant pathways by which the major classes of atmospheric VOCs react to form SOA products, and the further reactions of these products in particles. This will allow reasonable predictions to be made, based on molecular structure, about the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase reactions, including the effects of important variables such as VOC, oxidant, and NO

  13. Oxygenated products of sesquiterpenes in secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijck, A.; Kampf, C.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has a huge impact on air quality and climate change. It influences the Earth radiative budget through absorbing, scattering and reflecting radiation as well as the formation of clouds because the particulates can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Furthermore, it plays an important role for human health. SOA is formed from gaseous precursors which get oxidized by ozone, OH- and NO3-radicals in the atmosphere. Due to their low vapor pressure these degradation products can nucleate to form new particles or they can condense on existing aerosol particles. Despite the major progress in research during the last few years the actual chemical composition as well as the contribution of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the formation of secondary organic aerosol is still partially unknown. Recent studies indicate that sesquiterpenes play an important role in the formation of SOA because of the low volatility of their oxygenated products (Lee et al., 2006). Their emission is estimated to be about 14,8 Tg per year (Henze et al., 2008), however, these emission rates remain highly uncertain due to the lack of quantitative emission rate measurements. In addition, the knowledge about the actual atmospheric degradation mechanism and the main oxidation products of sesquiterpenes is quite limited. β-Caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-farnesene and β-farnesene are the most abundant sequiterpenes in many sesquiterpene emission profiles. But also aromadendren, α-bergamotene and δ-cadinene and germacrene-D can contribute significantly to some emission profiles (Duhl et al., 2008). To determine the major oxygenated products of sesquiterpenes in SOA, reaction chamber experiments with different sesquiterpenes and ozone were performed in a 100 L reaction chamber. To measure the time dependent formation of initial oxidation products, an APCI-IT-MS was directly connected to the reaction chamber. After 2 hours the APCI-IT-MS was replaced by a

  14. Secondary heavy quark production in jets through mass modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschacher, Simon; Hoang, Andre H.; Jemos, Ilaria; Pietrulewicz, Piotr

    2013-08-01

    We present an effective field theory method to determine secondary massive quark effects in jet production taking the thrust distribution for e+e- collisions in the dijet limit as a concrete example. The method is based on the field theoretic treatment of collinear and soft mass modes which have to be separated coherently from the collinear and ultrasoft modes related to massless quarks and gluons. For thrust the structure of the conceptual setup is closely related to the production of massive gauge bosons and involves four different effective field theories to describe all possible kinematic situations. The effective field theories merge into one another continuously and thus allow for a continuous description from infinitely heavy to arbitrarily small masses keeping the exact mass dependence of the most singular terms treated through factorization. The mass mode field theory method we present here is in the spirit of the variable fermion number scheme originally proposed by Aivazis, Collins, Olness and Tung and can also be applied in hadron collisions.

  15. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  16. Secondary production at the Polar Front, Barents Sea, August 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basedow, Sünnje L.; Zhou, Meng; Tande, Kurt S.

    2014-02-01

    To investigate spatial patterns of secondary production we sampled four core hydrographical regions of the Polar Front in the Barents Sea (Arctic Water, ArW; Polar Front Water, PFW; Atlantic Water, AtW; and Melt Water, MW) by towing an undulating instrument platform along a transect crossing the front from August 8-9, 2007. Sensors mounted on the platform provided data on the hydrography (CTD), fluorescence (Fluorometer, F) and zooplankton abundance in the size range between 0.1 and 30 mm (Laser Optical Plankton Counter, LOPC). These continuous, biophysical data with high-spatial resolution were supplemented by discrete water and zooplankton net samples at stations for sensor calibrations. After in depth quality assessments of the biophysical data, estimates were made of the vital rates based on biovolume spectrum theory. Five size groups were distinguished from the LOPC data: small (S), mainly Oithona spp. and the appendicularian Fritillaria sp.; medium (M), mainly Pseudocalanus spp. and Calanus spp. CI-CIII; large (L), mainly Calanus spp. CIV-CV; and extra large (XL and 2XL), juvenile and adult euphausids. Size groups were further divided based on transparency of organisms. Vital rates based on the biophysical in situ data in combination with biovolume spectrum theories agreed generally well with data from empirical and numerical models in the literature. ArW was characterised by subsurface maxima of chlorophyll a (chl a), and an estimated population growth of ca. 13 mg C m- 3 d- 1 for CI-CIII Calanus spp. and some older Pseudocalanus within the chl a maxima. Frontal waters were characterised by low chl a concentrations, but high abundances and production (around 1 g C m- 3 d- 1) of small copepods (Oithona spp.) and appendicularians (Fritillaria sp.). The estimated production of small-size zooplankton was an order of magnitude higher than the production of all other size groups combined, including large copepods. The high loss rates (- 166 to - 271 mg C m- 3 d- 1

  17. Impact of School Staff Health on Work Productivity in Secondary Schools in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alker, Heather J.; Wang, Monica L.; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school…

  18. Secondary crater fields from 24 large primary craters on Mars: Insights into nearby secondary crater production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; Hynek, Brian M.

    2011-10-01

    Crater statistics are used across a wide variety of applications on planetary surfaces, one of the most notable being estimating relative and absolute ages of those surfaces. This requires an assumed cratering rate over time and that craters be randomly distributed. Secondary craters - craters that form from the ejecta of an impact event - belie this assumption by creating greater crater density in a local area at a single time, significantly affecting crater statistics. There has been substantial debate over the relative importance of secondary craters, and our findings in this Mars study indicate that these events can be very significant and cannot be ignored when age-dating surfaces. We have analyzed secondary crater fields found close to 24 primary craters on Mars. Among other findings such as terrain control over secondary crater field characteristics, we conclude that a single large impact event (>100 km) can significantly affect crater statistics at the ˜1-5-km-diameter level over a non-trivial fraction of a planetary surface (minimum secondary crater diameters examined were ˜0.9 km; the minimum primary crater diameter was ˜20 km). We also suggest a potential way to avoid significant contamination by the majority of secondary craters that occur close to the primary impact event without the need to manually classify every crater as primary or secondary. Our findings are specific to Mars, but further work may show the patterns are applicable to other solid bodies.

  19. Electricity End Uses, Energy Efficiency, and Distributed Energy Resources Baseline

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Lisa; Wei, Max; Morrow, William; Deason, Jeff; Schiller, Steven R.; Leventis, Greg; Smith, Sarah; Leow, Woei Ling; Levin, Todd; Plotkin, Steven; Zhou, Yan

    2017-01-01

    This report was developed by a team of analysts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with Argonne National Laboratory contributing the transportation section, and is a DOE EPSA product and part of a series of “baseline” reports intended to inform the second installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER 1.2). QER 1.2 provides a comprehensive review of the nation’s electricity system and cover the current state and key trends related to the electricity system, including generation, transmission, distribution, grid operations and planning, and end use. The baseline reports provide an overview of elements of the electricity system. This report focuses on end uses, electricity consumption, electric energy efficiency, distributed energy resources (DERs) (such as demand response, distributed generation, and distributed storage), and evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) methods for energy efficiency and DERs.

  20. Rare earth elements: end use and recyclability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth elements are used in mature markets (such as catalysts, glassmaking, lighting, and metallurgy), which account for 59 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements, and in newer, high-growth markets (such as battery alloys, ceramics, and permanent magnets), which account for 41 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements. In mature market segments, lanthanum and cerium constitute about 80 percent of rare earth elements used, and in new market segments, dysprosium, neodymium, and praseodymium account for about 85 percent of rare earth elements used. Regardless of the end use, rare earth elements are not recycled in large quantities, but could be if recycling became mandated or very high prices of rare earth elements made recycling feasible.

  1. The POPOP4 library and codes for preparing secondary gamma-ray production cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, W. E., III

    1972-01-01

    The POPOP4 code for converting secondary gamma ray yield data to multigroup secondary gamma ray production cross sections and the POPOP4 library of secondary gamma ray yield data are described. Recent results of the testing of uranium and iron data sets from the POPOP4 library are given. The data sets were tested by comparing calculated secondary gamma ray pulse height spectra measured at the ORNL TSR-II reactor.

  2. Overview of secondary neutron production relevant to shielding inspace

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.; Nakamura, T.; Iwata, Y.; Kurosawa, T.; Iwase, H.; Townsend, L.W.

    2004-12-03

    An overview of experimental secondary neutron measurements relevant to space-related activities is presented. Stopping target yields and cross section measurements conducted at particle accelerators using heavy ions with energies >100 MeV per nucleon are discussed.

  3. Proceedings of Symposium on Utilization of Waste Glass in Secondary Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Papers are reported which were presented at the conference on waste glass recovery and re-use in secondary products. The uses considered include: road surfacing, asphaltic concretes, road construction, terrazzo, cement concrete, pozzolan, glass wool, glass-polymer composites, and tiles. Problems of recycling glass in remote areas, and the economics and markets for secondary glass products are discussed.

  4. Energy End-Use Technologies for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, S; Haegermark, H; Larsen, H; Morishita, M; Nakicenovic, N; Schock, R N; Suntola, T

    2005-04-13

    The World Energy Council's recent study examined the potential of energy end-use technologies and of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) into these technologies on a global scale. Surprises are likely, but nevertheless, current research and development offer a picture of what might happen in the future as new technologies face the competition of the marketplace. Given the breadth of energy end-use technologies and the differences between regions and economic conditions, the study focused on technologies that appear most important from today's vantage point. Globally, robust research and development followed by demonstrations of new end-use technologies can potentially save at least 110 EJ/year by 2020 and over 300 EJ/year by 2050. If achieved, this translates to worldwide energy savings of as much as 25% by 2020 and over 40% by 2050, over what may be required without these technologies. It is almost certain that no single technology, or even a small set of technologies, will dominate in meeting the needs of the globe in any foreseeable timeframe. Absent a significant joint government-industry effort on end-use technology RD&D, the technologies needed will not be ready for the marketplace in the timeframes required with even the most pessimistic scenarios. Based on previous detailed analyses for the United States, an international expenditure of $4 billion per year seems more than justified. The success of new energy end-use technologies depends on new RD&D investments and policy decisions made today. Governments, in close cooperation with industry, must carefully consider RD&D incentives that can help get technologies from the laboratory or test-bed to market. Any short-term impact areas are likely to benefit from focused RD&D. These include electricity transmission and distribution, distributed electricity production, transportation, the production of paper and pulp, iron and steel, aluminum, cement and chemicals, and information and communication

  5. Geography and end use drive the diversification of worldwide winter rye populations.

    PubMed

    Parat, Florence; Schwertfirm, Grit; Rudolph, Ulrike; Miedaner, Thomas; Korzun, Viktor; Bauer, Eva; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Tellier, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    To meet the current challenges in human food production, improved understanding of the genetic diversity of crop species that maximizes the selection efficacy in breeding programs is needed. The present study offers new insights into the diversity, genetic structure and demographic history of cultivated rye (Secale cereale L.). We genotyped 620 individuals from 14 global rye populations with a different end use (grain or forage) at 32 genome-wide simple sequence repeat markers. We reveal the relationships among these populations, their sizes and the timing of domestication events using population genetics and model-based inference with approximate Bayesian computation. Our main results demonstrate (i) a high within-population variation and genetic diversity, (ii) an unexpected absence of reduction in diversity with an increasing improvement level and (iii) patterns suggestive of multiple domestication events. We suggest that the main drivers of diversification of winter rye are the end use of rye in two early regions of cultivation: rye forage in the Mediterranean area and grain in northeast Europe. The lower diversity and stronger differentiation of eastern European populations were most likely due to more intensive cultivation and breeding of rye in this region, in contrast to the Mediterranean region where it was considered a secondary crop or even a weed. We discuss the relevance of our results for the management of gene bank resources and the pitfalls of inference methods applied to crop domestication due to violation of model assumptions and model complexity.

  6. Gender Differences of Popular Music Production in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramo, Joseph Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, the author investigated how students' gender affected their participation in a secondary popular music class in which participants wrote and performed original music. Three same-gendered rock groups and two mixed-gendered rock groups were observed. Would students of different genders rehearse and compose differently? How would…

  7. Variability of Polychaete Secondary Production in Intertidal Creek Networks along a Stream-Order Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tianjiang; Sheng, Qiang; Wang, Sikai; Wu, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic tidal creek networks are important habitats for sustaining biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in salt marsh wetlands. To evaluate the importance of creek heterogeneity in supporting benthic secondary production, we assess the spatial distribution and secondary production of a representative polychaete species (Dentinephtys glabra) in creek networks along a stream-order gradient in a Yangtze River estuarine marsh. Density, biomass, and secondary production of polychaetes were found to be highest in intermediate order creeks. In high order (3rd and 4th) creeks, the density and biomass of D. glabra were higher in creek edge sites than in creek bottom sites, whereas the reverse was true for low order (1st and 2nd) creeks. Secondary production was highest in 2nd order creeks (559.7 mg AFDM m−2 year−1) and was ca. 2 folds higher than in 1st and 4th order creeks. Top fitting AIC models indicated that the secondary production of D. glabra was mainly associated with geomorphological characters including cross-sectional area and bank slope. This suggests that hydrodynamic forces are essential factors influencing secondary production of macrobenthos in salt marshes. This study emphasizes the importance of microhabitat variability when evaluating secondary production and ecosystem functions. PMID:24817092

  8. United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shehabi, Arman; Morrow, William R.; Masanet, Eric

    2012-05-11

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to provide detailed data on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector. The survey is a sample of approximately 15,000 manufacturing establishments selected from the Economic Census - Manufacturing Sector. MECS provides statistics on the consumption of energy by end uses (e.g., boilers, process, electric drives, etc.) disaggregated by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) categories. The manufacturing sector (NAICS Sector 31-33) consists of all manufacturing establishments in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. According to the NAICS, the manufacturing sector comprises establishments engaged in the mechanical, physical, or chemical transformation of materials, substances, or components into new products. The establishments are physical facilities such as plants, factories, or mills. For many of the sectors in the MECS datasets, information is missing because the reported energy use is less than 0.5 units or BTUs, or is withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual establishments, or is withheld because the standard error is greater than 50%. We infer what the missing information likely are using several approximations techniques. First, much of the missing data can be easily calculated by adding or subtracting other values reported by MECS. If this is not possible (e.g. two data are missing), we look at historic MECS reports to help identify the breakdown of energy use in the past and assume it remained the same for the current MECS. Lastly, if historic data is also missing, we assume that 3 digit NAICS classifications predict energy use in their 4, 5, or 6 digit NAICS sub-classifications, or vice versa. Along with addressing data gaps, end use energy is disaggregated beyond the specified MECS allocations using additional industry specific energy consumption data. The result is a

  9. A Comment on Class Productions in Elite Secondary Schools in Twenty-First-Century Global Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Lois

    2014-01-01

    In this closing essay, Lois Weis offers a broad overview of the contributions of this Special Issue on class production in elite secondary schools in the twenty-first-century global context. Drawing upon her own research within US privileged secondary schools, Weis explores the contemporary social, economic and political landscape as connected to…

  10. [Secondary productivity of macrobenthos in intertidal flat of Luoyuan Bay, Fujian Province of East China].

    PubMed

    Yong-fen, Du; Shu, Gao; Zi-shan, Yu; Dan-dan, Wang; Qi, Ran

    2012-07-01

    Based on the survey data of macrobenthos in the intertidal flat of Luoyuan Bay in 2009, and by using Brey' s empirical formula, this paper estimated the macrobenthos secondary productivity, production/biomass (P/B) ratio, and their spatiotemporal distribution patterns in the flat. The annual secondary productivity and P/B ratio of the macrobenthos in the flat were estimated as 18.58 g AFDM (ash free dry mass) x m(-2) x a(-1) and 0.97, respectively, and the secondary productivity in the Spartina alterniflora marshes of the upper intertidal flat (8.97g AFDM x m(-2) a(-1)) was much lower than that in the bare flat of the lower intertidal zone (28.19 g AFDM x m(-2) x a(-1)). Since the introduction of S. alterniflora by the end of the 1980s, the secondary productivity of the macrobenthos in the flat had increased about 4 folds. Musculus senhousei, which inhabited in the lower bare flat, contributed 66.4% of the total macrobenthos secondary productivity in the entire intertidal flat. If the contribution from M. senhousei was not taken into account, the macrobenthos secondary productivity in the salt marshes would be significantly higher than that in the bare flat, and the macrobenthos secondary productivity in the intertidal flat would have less change. The successful colonization of M. senhousei was partly attributed to the changes of sediment composition enhanced by S. alterniflora due to its capability in trapping fine-grained materials; this species' feeding activities result in a remarkable increase of sediment chlorophyll a content. There was a significant positive correlation between the secondary productivity of macrobenthos and the sediment chlorophyll a and/or organic matter contents. These findings suggested that salt marshes had effects on the coastal wetland ecosystem via a number of physical and biological mechanisms.

  11. Heterologous production of fungal secondary metabolites in Aspergilli

    PubMed Central

    Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2015-01-01

    Fungal natural products comprise a wide range of compounds. Some are medically attractive as drugs and drug leads, some are used as food additives, while others are harmful mycotoxins. In recent years the genome sequence of several fungi has become available providing genetic information of a large number of putative biosynthetic pathways. However, compound discovery is difficult as the genes required for the production of the compounds often are silent or barely expressed under laboratory conditions. Furthermore, the lack of available tools for genetic manipulation of most fungal species hinders pathway discovery. Heterologous expression of the biosynthetic pathway in model systems or cell factories facilitates product discovery, elucidation, and production. This review summarizes the recent strategies for heterologous expression of fungal biosynthetic pathways in Aspergilli. PMID:25713568

  12. Shielding calculations for a production target for secondary beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Back, B.B.; Jiang, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    In order to estimate the amount of shielding required for a radioactive beam facility dose rate were performed. The calculations for production targets with different geometries were performed. The calculations were performed with the MSU shielding code assuming a 500-p{mu}A 200-MeV deuteron beam stopped in a thick Al target. The target and the ion-optical elements for beam extraction are located in a 2 m{sup 3} large volume at the center of the production cell. These dose rate calculations show that with a combination of Fe and concrete it is possible to reduce the dose rate expected at the surface of a 7-m-wide cube housing the production target to less than 2 mrem/hr.

  13. Characterization of salt cake from secondary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Badawy, Amro El; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Ford, Robert; Barlaz, Morton; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2014-05-30

    Salt cake is a major waste component generated from the recycling of secondary aluminum processing (SAP) waste. Worldwide, the aluminum industry produces nearly 5 million tons of waste annually and the end-of-life management of these wastes is becoming a challenge in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 39 SAP waste salt cake samples collected from 10 different facilities across the U.S. were determined. The results showed that aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride and its oxides, spinel and elpasolite are the dominant aluminum mineral phases in salt cake. The average total Al content was 14% (w/w). The overall percentage of the total leachable Al in salt cake was 0.6% with approximately 80% of the samples leaching at a level less than 1% of the total aluminum content. The extracted trace metal concentrations in deionized water were relatively low (μgL(-1) level). The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was employed to further evaluate leachability and the results indicated that the leached concentrations of toxic metals from salt cake were much lower than the EPA toxicity limit set by USEPA.

  14. Production of bioactive secondary metabolites by marine vibrionaceae.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Maria; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Vibrionaceae family are widespread in the marine environment. Today, 128 species of vibrios are known. Several of them are infamous for their pathogenicity or symbiotic relationships. Despite their ability to interact with eukaryotes, the vibrios are greatly underexplored for their ability to produce bioactive secondary metabolites and studies have been limited to only a few species. Most of the compounds isolated from vibrios so far are non-ribosomal peptides or hybrids thereof, with examples of N-containing compounds produced independent of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). Though covering a limited chemical space, vibrios produce compounds with attractive biological activities, including antibacterial, anticancer, and antivirulence activities. This review highlights some of the most interesting structures from this group of bacteria. Many compounds found in vibrios have also been isolated from other distantly related bacteria. This cosmopolitan occurrence of metabolites indicates a high incidence of horizontal gene transfer, which raises interesting questions concerning the ecological function of some of these molecules. This account underlines the pending potential for exploring new bacterial sources of bioactive compounds and the challenges related to their investigation.

  15. Production of L-carnitine by secondary metabolism of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Vicente; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Iborra, José L

    2007-01-01

    The increasing commercial demand for L-carnitine has led to a multiplication of efforts to improve its production with bacteria. The use of different cell environments, such as growing, resting, permeabilized, dried, osmotically stressed, freely suspended and immobilized cells, to maintain enzymes sufficiently active for L-carnitine production is discussed in the text. The different cell states of enterobacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Proteus sp., which can be used to produce L-carnitine from crotonobetaine or D-carnitine as substrate, are analyzed. Moreover, the combined application of both bioprocess and metabolic engineering has allowed a deeper understanding of the main factors controlling the production process, such as energy depletion and the alteration of the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio which are coupled to the end of the biotransformation. Furthermore, the profiles of key central metabolic activities such as the TCA cycle, the glyoxylate shunt and the acetate metabolism are seen to be closely interrelated and affect the biotransformation efficiency. Although genetically modified strains have been obtained, new strain improvement strategies are still needed, especially in Escherichia coli as a model organism for molecular biology studies. This review aims to summarize and update the state of the art in L-carnitine production using E. coli and Proteus sp, emphasizing the importance of proper reactor design and operation strategies, together with metabolic engineering aspects and the need for feed-back between wet and in silico work to optimize this biotransformation. PMID:17910757

  16. Genomes to natural products PRediction Informatics for Secondary Metabolomes (PRISM).

    PubMed

    Skinnider, Michael A; Dejong, Chris A; Rees, Philip N; Johnston, Chad W; Li, Haoxin; Webster, Andrew L H; Wyatt, Morgan A; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2015-11-16

    Microbial natural products are an invaluable source of evolved bioactive small molecules and pharmaceutical agents. Next-generation and metagenomic sequencing indicates untapped genomic potential, yet high rediscovery rates of known metabolites increasingly frustrate conventional natural product screening programs. New methods to connect biosynthetic gene clusters to novel chemical scaffolds are therefore critical to enable the targeted discovery of genetically encoded natural products. Here, we present PRISM, a computational resource for the identification of biosynthetic gene clusters, prediction of genetically encoded nonribosomal peptides and type I and II polyketides, and bio- and cheminformatic dereplication of known natural products. PRISM implements novel algorithms which render it uniquely capable of predicting type II polyketides, deoxygenated sugars, and starter units, making it a comprehensive genome-guided chemical structure prediction engine. A library of 57 tailoring reactions is leveraged for combinatorial scaffold library generation when multiple potential substrates are consistent with biosynthetic logic. We compare the accuracy of PRISM to existing genomic analysis platforms. PRISM is an open-source, user-friendly web application available at http://magarveylab.ca/prism/.

  17. Genomes to natural products PRediction Informatics for Secondary Metabolomes (PRISM)

    PubMed Central

    Skinnider, Michael A.; Dejong, Chris A.; Rees, Philip N.; Johnston, Chad W.; Li, Haoxin; Webster, Andrew L. H.; Wyatt, Morgan A.; Magarvey, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial natural products are an invaluable source of evolved bioactive small molecules and pharmaceutical agents. Next-generation and metagenomic sequencing indicates untapped genomic potential, yet high rediscovery rates of known metabolites increasingly frustrate conventional natural product screening programs. New methods to connect biosynthetic gene clusters to novel chemical scaffolds are therefore critical to enable the targeted discovery of genetically encoded natural products. Here, we present PRISM, a computational resource for the identification of biosynthetic gene clusters, prediction of genetically encoded nonribosomal peptides and type I and II polyketides, and bio- and cheminformatic dereplication of known natural products. PRISM implements novel algorithms which render it uniquely capable of predicting type II polyketides, deoxygenated sugars, and starter units, making it a comprehensive genome-guided chemical structure prediction engine. A library of 57 tailoring reactions is leveraged for combinatorial scaffold library generation when multiple potential substrates are consistent with biosynthetic logic. We compare the accuracy of PRISM to existing genomic analysis platforms. PRISM is an open-source, user-friendly web application available at http://magarveylab.ca/prism/. PMID:26442528

  18. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented.

  19. Intracellular cytokine production by dengue virus-specific T cells correlates with subclinical secondary infection.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Steven; Endy, Tim P; Thomas, Stephen; Mathew, Anuja; Potts, James; Pazoles, Pamela; Libraty, Daniel H; Gibbons, Robert; Rothman, Alan L

    2011-05-01

    The pathophysiology of dengue virus infection remains poorly understood, although secondary infection is strongly associated with more severe disease. In the present study, we performed a nested, case-control study comparing the responses of pre-illness peripheral blood mononuclear cells between children who would subsequently develop either subclinical or symptomatic secondary infection 6-11 months after the baseline blood samples were obtained and frozen. We analyzed intracellular cytokine production by CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in response to stimulation with dengue antigen. We found higher frequencies of dengue virus-specific TNFα, IFNγ-, and IL-2-producing T cells among schoolchildren who subsequently developed subclinical infection, compared with those who developed symptomatic secondary dengue virus infection. Although other studies have correlated immune responses during secondary infection with severity of disease, to our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate a pre-infection dengue-specific immune response that correlates specifically with a subclinical secondary infection.

  20. Microbial production of isoquinoline alkaloids as plant secondary metabolites based on metabolic engineering research

    PubMed Central

    SATO, Fumihiko; KUMAGAI, Hidehiko

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a variety of secondary metabolites that possess strong physiological activities. Unfortunately, however, their production can suffer from a variety of serious problems, including low levels of productivity and heterogeneous quality, as well as difficulty in raw material supply. In contrast, microorganisms can be used to produce their primary and some of their secondary metabolites in a controlled environment, thus assuring high levels of efficiency and uniform quality. In an attempt to overcome the problems associated with secondary metabolite production in plants, we developed a microbial platform for the production of plant isoquinoline alkaloids involving the unification of the microbial and plant metabolic pathways into a single system. The potential applications of this system have also been discussed. PMID:23666088

  1. Hairy root culture for mass-production of high-value secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2007-01-01

    Plant cell cultivations are being considered as an alternative to agricultural processes for producing valuable phytochemicals. Since many of these products (secondary metabolites) are obtained by direct extraction from plants grown in natural habitat, several factors can alter their yield. The use of plant cell cultures has overcome several inconveniences for the production of these secondary metabolites. Organized cultures, and especially root cultures, can make a significant contribution in the production of secondary metabolites. Most of the research efforts that use differentiated cultures instead of cell suspension cultures have focused on transformed (hairy) roots. Agrobacterium rhizogenes causes hairy root disease in plants. The neoplastic (cancerous) roots produced by A. rhizogenes infection are characterized by high growth rate, genetic stability and growth in hormone free media. These genetically transformed root cultures can produce levels of secondary metabolites comparable to that of intact plants. Hairy root cultures offer promise for high production and productivity of valuable secondary metabolites (used as pharmaceuticals, pigments and flavors) in many plants. The main constraint for commercial exploitation of hairy root cultivations is the development and scaling up of appropriate reactor vessels (bioreactors) that permit the growth of interconnected tissues normally unevenly distributed throughout the vessel. Emphasis has focused on designing appropriate bioreactors suitable to culture the delicate and sensitive plant hairy roots. Recent reactors used for mass production of hairy roots can roughly be divided as liquid-phase, gas-phase, or hybrid reactors. The present review highlights the nature, applications, perspectives and scale up of hairy root cultures for the production of valuable secondary metabolites.

  2. Secondary metabolism in simulated microgravity: beta-lactam production by Streptomyces clavuligerus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Koenig, D. W.; Demain, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Rotating bioreactors designed at NASA's Johnson Space Center were used to simulate a microgravity environment in which to study secondary metabolism. The system examined was beta-lactam antibiotic production by Streptomyces clavuligerus. Both growth and beta-lactam production occurred in simulated microgravity. Stimulatory effects of phosphate and L-lysine, previously detected in normal gravity, also occurred in simulated microgravity. The degree of beta-lactam antibiotic production was markedly inhibited by simulated microgravity.

  3. Uncovering the end uses of the rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T E

    2013-09-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging and conventional established technologies. However, quantitative knowledge of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in future availability of the resources. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supply vulnerable to short term disruption. We have drawn upon the published literature and unpublished materials in different languages to derive the first quantitative annual domestic production by end use of individual rare earth elements from 1995 to 2007. The information is illustrated in Sankey diagrams for the years 1995 and 2007. Other years are available in the supporting information. Comparing 1995 and 2007, the production of the rare earth elements in China, Japan, and the US changed dramatically in quantities and structure. The information can provide a solid foundation for industries, academic institutions and governments to make decisions and develop strategies.

  4. Effects of morpholine and boric acid implementation on secondary chemistry and corrosion product transport

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, D.P.; Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.; Clouse, M.E.

    1992-07-01

    This project expanded the database on the effects of morpholine use as a pH control additive in the secondary water system of pressurized water reactors. Tests carried out at Alabama Power`s Joseph M. Farley Units 1 and 2, Northern States Power`s Prairie Island Unit 2, and Commonwealth Edison`s Byron Unit 1 demonstrated that the use of morpholine reduced corrosion product transport in PWR secondary systems by up to a factor of 2. Further reductions were achieved by eliminating copper alloy tubing and increasing secondary cycles pH. Steam generator boric acid treatment in plants with all ferrous secondary cycles operated with morpholine was shown to have a minimal effect on iron transport.

  5. Effects of morpholine and boric acid implementation on secondary chemistry and corrosion product transport

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, D.P.; Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.; Clouse, M.E. )

    1992-07-01

    This project expanded the database on the effects of morpholine use as a pH control additive in the secondary water system of pressurized water reactors. Tests carried out at Alabama Power's Joseph M. Farley Units 1 and 2, Northern States Power's Prairie Island Unit 2, and Commonwealth Edison's Byron Unit 1 demonstrated that the use of morpholine reduced corrosion product transport in PWR secondary systems by up to a factor of 2. Further reductions were achieved by eliminating copper alloy tubing and increasing secondary cycles pH. Steam generator boric acid treatment in plants with all ferrous secondary cycles operated with morpholine was shown to have a minimal effect on iron transport.

  6. Plankton secondary productivity and biomass: Their relation to lake trophic state

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pederson, G.L.; Welch, E.B.; Litt, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The biomass and production of the most important zooplankton species were followed for two years in three lakes of varying trophic status in the Lake Washington watershed. Cladocerans and copepods were of equal importance in the biomass of lakes Findley and Chester Morse (both oligotrophic), whereas, copepods were the main biomass component in Lake Sammamish (mesotrophic). Cladocerans dominated production in lakes Sammamish and Chester Morse, while in Findley Lake their productive role, like that of biomass, was equal to that of the copepods. Rotifers contributed a relatively small biomass and production. Data from this study supported Hillbricht-Ilkowska's postulate that the energy transfer efficiency between the primary and secondary trophic levels decreases with increasing trophic state. Energy transfer efficiencies for the lakes of this study expressed as a two year mean of the ratio-secondary: primary production, were as follows: Findley Lake-0.13; Chester Morse Lake-0.08; and Lake Sammanish-0.04. On the other hand, the hypothesis of Patalas that the secondary productivity: biomass ratio (P/B) tended to increase in proportion to the productivity of a lake, could not be supported. Lake Sammamish, the most productive of the lakes studied, had a P/B ratio of 0.03 while lakes Findley and Chester Morse had P/B ratios of 0.04. ?? 1976 Dr. W. Junk b. v. Publishers.

  7. Propagation and secondary production of low energy antiprotons in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, T.; Moats, A.

    1985-01-01

    Current theories, in which the observed antiproton component is attributed strictly to secondary production in high energy inelastic collisions of protons with the interstellar medium or the atmosphere, apparently fail to explain the relatively high p vertical intensities measured at mountain and balloon altitudes. Therefore, a more careful calculation of the theoretical secondary intensity spectra is required before more exotic sources for these excess p's can be explored. A one dimensional diffusion equation is used to calculate the expected vertical intensity of p's due only to secondary production in the atmosphere; any assumed primary p spectrum is also included. Two adjustable parameters, the inelasticity and charge exchange in nucleon-nucleus collisions, were included in the algorithm. In order to obtain an independent estimate of their values the proton vertical intensities in the atmosphere were calculated, adjusting the parameters until the curves fit the experimental proton data, and then assumed that these values were identical in antinucleon-nucleus collisions.

  8. Extracellular superoxide production associated with secondary root growth following desiccation of Pisum sativum seedlings.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Kranner, Ilse

    2011-10-15

    The seedling stage is arguably the most vulnerable phase in the plant life cycle, where the young establishing plant is extremely sensitive to environmental stresses such as drought. Here, the production of superoxide (O(2)(-)), a molecule involved in stress signaling, was measured in response to desiccation of Pisum sativum L. seedlings. Following desiccation that was sufficient to kill the radicle meristem, viability could be retained by seedlings that grew secondary roots. Upon rehydration, secondary roots formed in a region that had displayed intense extracellular O(2)(-)production on desiccation. Treating partially desiccated seedlings with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) prevented viability loss. In summary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to participate in the signaling required for secondary root formation following desiccation stress of P. sativum seedlings.

  9. Secondary Metabolites from Penicillium roqueforti, A Starter for the Production of Gorgonzola Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Giardini, Alberto; Soncini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The presence of mold in food, although necessary for production, can involve the presence of secondary metabolites, which are sometimes toxic. Penicillium roqueforti is a common saprophytic fungus but it is also the essential fungus used in the production of Roquefort cheese and other varieties of blue cheese containing internal mold. The study was conducted on industrial batches of Penicillium roqueforti starters used in the production of the Gorgonzola cheese, with the aim to verify the production of secondary metabolites. Nine Penicillium roqueforti strains were tested. The presence of roquefortine C, PR toxin and mycophenolic acid was tested first in vitro, then on bread-like substrate and lastly in vivo in nine cheese samples produced with the same starters and ready to market. In vitro, only Penicillium out of nine produced roquefortine C, four starters showed mycophenolic acid production, while no significant amounts of PR toxin were detected. In the samples grown on bread-like substrate, Penicillium did not produce secondary metabolites, likewise with each cheese samples tested. To protect consumers’ health and safety, the presence of mycotoxins needs to be verified in food which is widely consumed, above all for products protected by the protected denomination of origin (DOP) label (i.e. a certificate guaranteeing the geographic origin of the product), such as Gorgonzola cheese. PMID:27800360

  10. Utilization of secondary-treated wastewater for the production of freshwater microalgae.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Serrano, C; Morales-Amaral, M M; Acién, F G; Escudero, R; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Molina-Grima, E

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we studied the potential use of secondary-treated wastewater as nutrient source in the production of freshwater microalgae strains. Experiments were performed indoors in a semicontinuous mode, at 0.3 day(-1), simulating outdoor conditions. We demonstrated that all the tested strains can be produced by using only secondary-treated wastewater as the nutrient source. The utilization of secondary-treated wastewater imposes nutrient-limiting conditions, with maximal biomass productivity dropping to 0.5 g l(-1) day(-1) and modifies the biochemical composition of the biomass by increasing the amount of lipids and carbohydrates while reducing the biomass protein content. We measured fatty acid content and productivity of up to 25 %d.wt. and 110 mg l(-1) day(-1), respectively. We demonstrated that all the tested strains were capable of completely removing the nitrogen and phosphorus contained in the secondary-treated wastewater, and while the use of this effluent reduced the cells' photosynthetic efficiency, the nitrogen and phosphorus coefficient yield increased. Muriellopsis sp. and S. subpicatus were selected as the most promising strains for outdoor production using secondary-treated wastewater as the culture medium; this was not only because of their high productivity but also their photosynthetic efficiency, of up to 2.5 %, along with nutrient coefficient yields of up to 96 gbiomass gN (-1) and 166 gbiomass gP (-1). Coupling microalgae production processes to tertiary treatment in wastewater treatment plants make it possible to recover nutrients contained in the water and to produce valuable biomass, especially where nutrient removal is required prior to wastewater discharge.

  11. In vitro culture of lavenders (Lavandula spp.) and the production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Sandra; Romano, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    Lavenders (Lavandula spp., Lamiaceae) are aromatic ornamental plants that are used widely in the food, perfume and pharmaceutical industries. The large-scale production of lavenders requires efficient in vitro propagation techniques to avoid the overexploitation of natural populations and to allow the application of biotechnology-based approaches for plant improvement and the production of valuable secondary metabolites. In this review we discuss micropropagation methods that have been developed in several lavender species, mainly based on meristem proliferation and organogenesis. Specific requirements during stages of micropropagation (establishment, shoot multiplication, root induction and acclimatization) and requisites for plant regeneration trough organogenesis, as an important step for the implementation of plant improvement programs, were revised. We also discuss different methods for the in vitro production of valuable secondary metabolites, focusing on the prospects for highly scalable cultures to meet the market demand for lavender-derived products.

  12. EMISSIONS OF TRACE PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION FROM A PILOT-SCALE INCINERATOR SECONDARY COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed on a 73 kW rotary kiln incinerator simulator equipped with a 73 kW secondary combustion chamber (SCC) to examine emissions of products of incomplete combustion (PICs) resulting from incineration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and dichlorometh...

  13. Effect of ammonia on ozone-initiated formation of indoor secondary products with emissions from cleaning products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Lee, Shun Cheng; Ho, Kin Fai; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Cao, Nanying; Cheng, Yan; Gao, Yuan

    2012-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from cleaning products and air fresheners indoors are prone to oxidation resulting in the formation of secondary pollutants that can pose health risks on residents. Ammonia (NH3) is ubiquitous in ambient and indoor environments. In this study, we investigated the effect of ammonia (NH3) on secondary pollutants formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from cleaning products including floor cleaner (FC), kitchen cleaner (KC) and dishwashing detergent (DD) in a large environmental chamber. Our results demonstrated that the presence of NH3 (maximum concentration is 240 ppb) could significantly enhance secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) formation from the ozonolysis of all the three categories of cleaning products. For example, for the FC sample, the maximum total particle concentration was up to 2.0 × 104 # cm-3 in the presence of NH3, while it was 1.3 × 104 # cm-3 which was 35% lower without NH3. However, it was found that the extent of NH3 effect on SOAs formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emissions was component-dependent. The presence of NH3 in the reaction systems could increase the consumptions of d-limonene that is the dominant BVOC species as identified in cleaning products. The percent yields (%) of secondary carbonyl compounds generated from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from three categories of cleaning products were identified in the presence and absence of NH3, respectively. The increase in SOAs particle number concentration can be attributed to the formation of condensable salts from reactions between NH3 and organic compounds generated from the BVOCs ozonolysis processes. By investigating the NH3 effect on the ozonolysis of BVOCs mixtures in contrast to the chemistry of individual compounds, a better assessment can be made of the overall impact cleaning products have on real indoor environments.

  14. Cleaning products and air fresheners: exposure to primary and secondary air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaroff, William W.; Weschler, Charles J.

    Building occupants, including cleaning personnel, are exposed to a wide variety of airborne chemicals when cleaning agents and air fresheners are used in buildings. Certain of these chemicals are listed by the state of California as toxic air contaminants (TACs) and a subset of these are regulated by the US federal government as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). California's Proposition 65 list of species recognized as carcinogens or reproductive toxicants also includes constituents of certain cleaning products and air fresheners. In addition, many cleaning agents and air fresheners contain chemicals that can react with other air contaminants to yield potentially harmful secondary products. For example, terpenes can react rapidly with ozone in indoor air generating many secondary pollutants, including TACs such as formaldehyde. Furthermore, ozone-terpene reactions produce the hydroxyl radical, which reacts rapidly with organics, leading to the formation of other potentially toxic air pollutants. Indoor reactive chemistry involving the nitrate radical and cleaning-product constituents is also of concern, since it produces organic nitrates as well as some of the same oxidation products generated by ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Few studies have directly addressed the indoor concentrations of TACs that might result from primary emissions or secondary pollutant formation following the use of cleaning agents and air fresheners. In this paper, we combine direct empirical evidence with the basic principles of indoor pollutant behavior and with information from relevant studies, to analyze and critically assess air pollutant exposures resulting from the use of cleaning products and air fresheners. Attention is focused on compounds that are listed as HAPs, TACs or Proposition 65 carcinogens/reproductive toxicants and compounds that can readily react to generate secondary pollutants. The toxicity of many of these secondary pollutants has yet to be evaluated. The inhalation

  15. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  16. Control of development and secondary metabolite production in streptomycetesand its possible importance in lignocellulose utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogell, B. M.

    1982-12-01

    Large scale fermentations for production of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites have focused on two groups of microorganisms: the streptomycetes, which are highly developed procaryotes, and fungi, eucaryotic organisms which go through a similar developmental cycle. Interestingly, these organisms provided the most active known degraders of lignocellulose. Examples include Streptomyces badius and the white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Since cellulose is ubiquitously found in nature linked with lignin, microorganisms that can simultaneously degrade both of these bipolymers are ideal for utilization of biomass for production of fuels, chemicals, and foodstuffs. The role of extrachromosomal DNA (plasmids) and specific endogenous effectors in the regulation of development and other secondary metabolite production in streptomycetes is of great interest. Approaches for engineering improved strains for biomass utilization are presented.

  17. Larvacean (Chordata, Tunicata) abundance and inferred secondary production off southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Leonardo K.; Lopes, Rubens M.

    2011-05-01

    We studied the temporal and vertical variability in larvacean abundance and secondary production on a fixed station off southeast Brazil, from January 2007 to December 2008. Larvacean biomass was derived from length-weight regressions, and growth rates were estimated from an empirical model. We identified eleven larvacean species. Oikopleura longicauda occurred throughout the studied period and was the most abundant species, followed by Oikopleura fusiformis. Fritillaria haplostoma, O. fusiformis and O. longicauda were found mainly above the thermocline, whereas Oikopleura dioica and Fritillaria pellucida preferred bottom layers. Higher abundance and biomass were observed in warmer months, when the water column was stratified as a result of the bottom intrusions of the cold and nutrient-rich South Atlantic Central Water. Secondary production mirrored the biomass seasonal pattern. Larvacean biomass equaled to less than 10% of copepod biomass during the same period, but larvacean production comprised on average 77% that of copepods, whereas the production of discarded houses and fecal pellets comprised up to 2800% of larvaceans secondary production. This confirms the potential significance of larvaceans in the carbon flux in tropical and subtropical coastal regions.

  18. Modeling of corrosion product migration in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with WWER-1200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.; Motkova, E. A.; Zelenina, E. V.; Prokhorov, N. A.; Gorbatenko, S. P.; Tsitser, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Models of corrosion and mass transfer of corrosion products in the pipes of the condensate-feeding and steam paths of the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 are presented. The mass transfer and distribution of corrosion products over the currents of the working medium of the secondary circuit were calculated using the physicochemical model of mass transfer of corrosion products in which the secondary circuit is regarded as a cyclic system consisting of a number of interrelated elements. The circuit was divided into calculated regions in which the change in the parameters (flow rate, temperature, and pressure) was traced and the rates of corrosion and corrosion products entrainment, high-temperature pH, and iron concentration were calculated. The models were verified according to the results of chemical analyses at Kalinin NPP and iron corrosion product concentrations in the feed water at different NPPs depending on pH at 25°C (pH25) for service times τ ≥ 5000 h. The calculated pH values at a coolant temperature t (pH t ) in the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 were presented. The calculation of the distribution of pH t and ethanolamine and ammonia concentrations over the condensate feed (CFC) and steam circuits is given. The models are designed for developing the calculation codes. The project solutions of ATOMPROEKT satisfy the safety and reliability requirements for power plants with WWER-1200. The calculated corrosion and corrosion product mass transfer parameters showed that the model allows the designer to choose between the increase of the correcting reagent concentration, the use of steel with higher chromium contents, and intermittent washing of the steam generator from sediments as the best solution for definite regions of the circuit.

  19. Indoor secondary pollutants from cleaning product and air freshener use in the presence of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Brett C.; Coleman, Beverly K.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    This study investigated the formation of secondary pollutants resulting from household product use in the presence of ozone. Experiments were conducted in a 50-m 3 chamber simulating a residential room. The chamber was operated at conditions relevant to US residences in polluted areas during warm-weather seasons: an air exchange rate of 1.0 h -1 and an inlet ozone concentration of approximately 120 ppb, when included. Three products were used in separate experiments. An orange oil-based degreaser and a pine oil-based general-purpose cleaner were used for surface cleaning applications. A plug-in scented-oil air freshener (AFR) was operated for several days. Cleaning products were applied realistically with quantities scaled to simulate residential use rates. Concentrations of organic gases and secondary organic aerosol from the terpene-containing consumer products were measured with and without ozone introduction. In the absence of reactive chemicals, the chamber ozone level was approximately 60 ppb. Ozone was substantially consumed following cleaning product use, mainly by homogeneous reaction. For the AFR, ozone consumption was weaker and heterogeneous reaction with sorbed AFR-constituent VOCs was of similar magnitude to homogeneous reaction with continuously emitted constituents. Formaldehyde generation resulted from product use with ozone present, increasing indoor levels by the order of 10 ppb. Cleaning product use in the presence of ozone generated substantial fine particle concentrations (more than 100 μg m -3) in some experiments. Ozone consumption and elevated hydroxyl radical concentrations persisted for 10-12 h following brief cleaning events, indicating that secondary pollutant production can persist for extended periods.

  20. Oxidative stress and carbon metabolism influence Aspergillus flavus transcriptome composition and secondary metabolite production

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Jake C.; Bajaj, Prasad; Pandey, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Yang, Liming; Kumar, Vinay; Jayale, Ashwin S.; Chitikineni, Anu; Zhuang, Weijian; Scully, Brian T.; Lee, R. Dewey; Kemerait, Robert C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of crops with aflatoxin is a serious global threat to food safety. Aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus is exacerbated by drought stress in the field and by oxidative stress in vitro. We examined transcriptomes of three toxigenic and three atoxigenic isolates of A. flavus in aflatoxin conducive and non-conducive media with varying levels of H2O2 to investigate the relationship of secondary metabolite production, carbon source, and oxidative stress. We found that toxigenic and atoxigenic isolates employ distinct mechanisms to remediate oxidative damage, and that carbon source affected the isolates’ expression profiles. Iron metabolism, monooxygenases, and secondary metabolism appeared to participate in isolate oxidative responses. The results suggest that aflatoxin and aflatrem biosynthesis may remediate oxidative stress by consuming excess oxygen and that kojic acid production may limit iron-mediated, non-enzymatic generation of reactive oxygen species. Together, secondary metabolite production may enhance A. flavus stress tolerance, and may be reduced by enhancing host plant tissue antioxidant capacity though genetic improvement by breeding selection. PMID:27941917

  1. Construction of a natural product library containing secondary metabolites produced by actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Motoki; Shin-Ya, Kazuo

    2012-09-01

    To construct a natural product library for drug screening, we isolated secondary metabolites from a wide variety of actinomycetes cultured from marine sponges. The results suggested that marine sponges are a promising source of actinomycetes with the potential to produce new metabolites. Furthermore, we evaluated the chemical space occupied by our natural product library (CB library) by multidimensional principal component analysis and compared it with a commercially available compound library (ZINC library), which was randomly selected from the ZINC library (approximately 30 000 000 compounds). The CB library occupied a wider chemical space than the ZINC library. Bioactive compounds in the CB library possessed a wide chemical space that was not covered by ZINC library. These results indicate that the CB library mainly comprises secondary metabolites from actinomycetes, and it has great potential as a source of compounds for drug screening.

  2. Alteration Products and Secondary Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, S. J.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    The martian meteorites contain alteration products and secondary minerals that are a critical part of understanding their near-surface histories on both Mars and Earth. In some martian meteorites, suspected martian preterrestrial alteration products can be distinguished from terrestrial weathering effects Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission SEM (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), we are studying natural fracture surfaces of ALH 84001 chips, including samples from both the interior and the exterior of the meteorite. Exterior samples include fusion crust surfaces, which are important in determining the extent of terrestrial weathering of meteorites. The focus of this study is weathering features and secondary minerals other than the distinctive carbonate globules that continue to be studied by many researchers.

  3. REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-12

    Two direct coal liquids were evaluated by linear programming analysis to determine their value as petroleum refinery feedstock. The first liquid, DL1, was produced from bitiuminous coal using the Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.(HTI) two-stage hydrogenation process in Proof of Concept Run No.1, POC-1. The second liquid, DL2,was produced from sub-bituminous coal using a three-stage HTI process in Proof of Concept Run No. 2, POC-2; the third stage being a severe hydrogenation process. A linear programming (LP) model was developed which simulates a generic 150,000 barrel per day refinery in the Midwest U.S. Data from upgrading tests conducted on the coal liquids and related petroleum fractions in the pilot plant testing phase of the Refining and End Use Study was inputed into the model. The coal liquids were compared against a generic petroleum crude feedstock. under two scenarios. In the first scenario, it was assumed that the refinery capacity and product slate/volumes were fixed. The coal liquids would be used to replace a portion of the generic crude. The LP results showed that the DL1 material had essentially the same value as the generic crude. Due to its higher quality, the DL2 material had a value of approximately 0.60 $/barrel higher than the petroleum crude. In the second scenario, it was assumed that a market opportunity exists to increase production by one-third. This requires a refinery expansion. The feedstock for this scenario could be either 100% petroleum crude or a combination of petroleum crude and the direct coal liquids. Linear programming analysis showed that the capital cost of the refinery expansion was significantly less when coal liquids are utilized. In addition, the pilot plant testing showed that both of the direct coal liquids demonstrated superior catalytic cracking and naphtha reforming yields. Depending on the coal liquid flow rate, the value of the DL1 material was 2.5-4.0 $/barrel greater than the base petroleum crude, while the DL2

  4. Bacterial diversity in relation to secondary production and succession on surfaces of the kelp Laminaria hyperborea.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Mia M; Sjøtun, Kjersti; Lanzén, Anders; Ovreås, Lise

    2012-12-01

    Kelp forests worldwide are known as hotspots for macroscopic biodiversity and primary production, yet very little is known about the biodiversity and roles of microorganisms in these ecosystems. Secondary production by heterotrophic bacteria associated to kelp is important in the food web as a link between kelp primary production and kelp forest consumers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between bacterial diversity and two important processes in this ecosystem; bacterial secondary production and primary succession on kelp surfaces. To address this, kelp, Laminaria hyperborea, from southwestern Norway was sampled at different geographical locations and during an annual cycle. Pyrosequencing (454-sequencing) of amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria was used to study bacterial diversity. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was used as a measure of bacterial production. Our data show that bacterial diversity (richness and evenness) increases with the age of the kelp surface, which corresponds to the primary succession of its bacterial communities. Higher evenness of bacterial operational taxonomical units (OTUs) is linked to higher bacterial production. Owing to the dominance of a few abundant OTUs, kelp surface biofilm communities may be characterized as low-diversity habitats. This is the first detailed study of kelp-associated bacterial communities using high-throughput sequencing and it extends current knowledge on microbial community assembly and dynamics on living surfaces.

  5. Secondary Plant Products Causing Photosensitization in Grazing Herbivores: Their Structure, Activity and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Jane C.; Kessell, Allan; Weston, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems. PMID:24451131

  6. The Research and Development of a Soluble Reactants and Products Secondary Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    A redox battery system which employs an aqueous dectrolyte is developed. Results are presented of the following experimental studies (1) measurement of the essential physical and chemical properties of the reactants and products; (2) evaluation of commerically available anion membranes as the cell separator, (3) determination of the composition and degradation mechanism of the anion membrane, and/or developing an anion membrane separator; and (4) evaluation of the performance of prototype secondary battery systems.

  7. Secondary plant products causing photosensitization in grazing herbivores: their structure, activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jane C; Kessell, Allan; Weston, Leslie A

    2014-01-21

    Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems.

  8. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

  9. Using association genetics to study rice end-use quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most crop end-use quality characteristics are complex traits under multi-gene control. Improvement of such traits is challenging due to the reliance on time consuming phenotyping methods and data that is confounded by environmental effects. Marker assisted methods lessen the challenges of breeding b...

  10. Basis for selecting soft wheat for end-use quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Within the United States, end-use quality of soft wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is determined by several genetically controlled components: milling yield, flour particle size, and baking characteristics related to flour water absorption caused by glutenin macropolymer, non-starch polysaccharides, and...

  11. Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

  12. Enhanced surface production in H- ion sources by introducing a negatively biased secondary electrodea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, YoungHwa; Jung, BongKi; Hwang, Y. S.

    2010-02-01

    A transformer coupled plasma negative hydrogen ion source with an external rf antenna has been developed at SNU, which is capable of continuous operation with long lifetime. A positively biased plasma electrode (PE) has been successfully used for the optimization of H- extraction. With molybdenum-coated stainless steel PE, the enhancement of H- production at the electrode surface was observed at the bias voltage lower than the plasma potential. However, the low bias voltage is unfavorable to H- beam extraction since the negative ions are repelled. A second electrode is inserted in front of the PE to enhance H- production at the electrode surface without impeding beam extraction. By biasing the secondary electrode (SE) more negatively, H- production is clearly enhanced although the SE itself reduces H- beam currents because of suppressed electron transport in front of the PE. In this configuration enhancement of surface productions is most pronounced in tantalum electrode among various electrode materials.

  13. Nitrogen fertilization of the host plant influences production and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea secondary inoculum.

    PubMed

    Abro, Manzoor Ali; Lecompte, François; Bryone, Florian; Nicot, Philippe C

    2013-03-01

    The influence of nitrogen (N) nutrition on a plant's susceptibility to Botrytis spp. and other pathogens is well documented. However, little is known of possible effects on sporulation of the pathogen on diseased tissue and on the pathogenicity of resulting secondary inoculum. To address this question, sporulation by two strains of Botrytis cinerea was quantified on tomato plants produced under different N irrigation regimes with inputs of NO(3)- at 0.5 to 45 mmol liter(-1) (mM). Sporulation decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing N fertilization up to NO(3)- at 15 to 30 mM. The secondary inoculum was collected and used to inoculate pruning wounds on tomato plants produced under a standard fertilization regime. Pathogenicity of the spores was significantly influenced by the nutritional status of their production substrate. Disease severity was highest with spores produced on plants with very low or very high N fertilization (NO(3)- at 0.5 or 30 mM). It was lowest for inoculum from plants with moderate levels of N fertilization. These results suggest that it may be possible to find an optimum level of N fertilization to reduce the production of secondary inoculum and its pathogenicity to tomato.

  14. Secondary Neutron Production from Space Radiation Interactions: Advances in Model and Experimental Data Base Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Braley, G. Scott; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    For humans engaged in long-duration missions in deep space or near-Earth orbit, the risk from exposure to galactic and solar cosmic rays is an important factor in the design of spacecraft, spacesuits, and planetary bases. As cosmic rays are transported through shielding materials and human tissue components, a secondary radiation field is produced. Neutrons are an important component of that secondary field, especially in thickly-shielded environments. Calculations predict that 50% of the dose-equivalent in a lunar or Martian base comes from neutrons, and a recent workshop held at the Johnson Space Center concluded that as much as 30% of the dose in the International Space Station may come from secondary neutrons. Accelerator facilities provide a means for measuring the effectiveness of various materials in their ability to limit neutron production, using beams and energies that are present in cosmic radiation. The nearly limitless range of beams, energies, and target materials that are present in space, however, means that accelerator-based experiments will not provide a complete database of cross sections and thick-target yields that are necessary to plan and design long-duration missions. As such, accurate nuclear models of neutron production are needed, as well as data sets that can be used to compare with, and verify, the predictions from such models. Improvements in a model of secondary neutron production from heavy-ion interactions are presented here, along with the results from recent accelerator-based measurements of neutron-production cross sections. An analytical knockout-ablation model capable of predicting neutron production from high-energy hadron-hadron interactions (both nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions) has been previously developed. In the knockout stage, the collision between two nuclei result in the emission of one or more nucleons from the projectile and/or target. The resulting projectile and target remnants, referred to as

  15. Secondary Production and Its Trophic Basis of Two Mayfly Species in a Subtropical Stream of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yunjun; Li, Xiaoyu

    2006-05-01

    During June 2003 to June 2004, an investigation on life cycle, production and trophic basis of two species of mayfly in a second-order river of Hanjiang River Basin, Hubei, China was conducted. The results showed Epeorus sinensis Umler and Caenis nigropunctata Wu both developed two generations a year. The mean annual production and P/B ratio of E. sinensis were 9.154 g m-2 a-1 dry weight and 16.0, and those of C. nigropunctata were 1.554 g m-2 a-1 and 9.6, respectively. For E. sinensis , the proportions contributing to secondary production of the main food types were: amorphous detritus 33.46%, fungi 10.8%, vascular plant detritus 1.8%, diatoms 53.9%; for C. nigropunctata , the proportions were 70.8%, 6.90%, 3.5% and 18.8%, respectively. Compared with those species reported in North America and Europe, although land use mode and local climate were greatly different in China, life history and trophic basis of the mayflies seemed roughly similar, yet secondary production appeared to be much higher.

  16. New insights on the development of Streptomyces and their relationships with secondary metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, P; Lopez-Garcia, M T; Rioseras, B; Sanchez, J; Manteca, A

    2012-01-01

    Streptomycetes are very important industrial bacteria, which produce two thirds of all clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Furthermore, they produce large numbers of eukaryotic cell differentiation and apoptosis inducers. Streptomyces is a mycelial soil bacterium characterized by a complex developmental cycle that includes programmed cell death (PCD) phenomena and sporulation in solid cultures. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains generally do not sporulate, and it was traditionally assumed that there was no differentiation. Recently, novel aspects concerning differentiation during the presporulation phases were described in solid and liquid cultures, as well as in natural soils. In this review, we analyze the status of knowledge regarding the above-named aspects of Streptomyces differentiation and their relationships with secondary metabolite production.

  17. Characteristics and optimum end uses of alternative energies

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.D.

    1980-12-01

    From the perspective of a consulting engineer to public-electric utilities, projections of growth in energy consumption by the year 2000 present both problems and opportunities. Consumption of energy to generate electricity will substantially increase its relative share and alternatives will have to compete with electricity generated from conventional sources in terms of end-use economics. Organizations having a direct interest in furthering coal-fired and nuclear generation have estimated their capabilities to expand. The resulting competition between the conventional technologies and alternative energies will be decided not by the wishes of ''soft path'' proponents but by the outcome of technical and economic feasibility studies. Comparisons are made of five alternative energy options (wind, wood, solar, geothermal and coal conversion) on the basis of four characteristics (schedule, cost, resource, environment). As it turns out, end-use and location may prove to be the overriding considerations.

  18. End-Use Efficiency to Lower Carbon Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Osborn, Julie; Webber, Carrie

    2001-03-01

    Compelling evidence demonstrating the warming trend in global temperatures and the mechanism behind it, namely the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHG), has spurred an international effort to reduce emissions of these gases. Despite improving efficiency of the U.S. economy in terms of energy cost per dollar of GDP since the signing of the Kyoto Protocol, energy consumption and carbon emissions are continuing to rise as the economy expands. This growing gap further emphasizes the importance of improving energy use efficiency as a component in the U.S. climate change mitigation program. The end-use efficiency research activities at Berkeley Lab incorporate residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors. This paper focuses on two successful U.S. programs that address end-use efficiency in residential and commercial demand: energy efficient performance standards established by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ENERGY STAR(registered trademark) program.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a promising cell factory for production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju Yeon; Yoo, Young Ji; Lim, Si-Kyu; Cha, Sun Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun; Roe, Jung-Hye; Kim, Jihyun F; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-02-10

    Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, which produces 12- and 14-membered ring macrolide antibiotics, is a platform strain for heterologous expression of secondary metabolites. Its 9.05-Mb genome sequence revealed an abundance of genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and their precursors, which should be useful for the production of bioactive compounds.

  20. REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

  1. Commercial building end-use energy metering inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Heidell, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Reilly, R.W.

    1985-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a comprehensive inventory of end-use metered data. The inventory did not discover many sources of metered end-use data; however, research into existing data bases and extensive discussions with professionals associated with building energy conservation have enabled a clear characterization to be developed of the types of metered data that are required to further energy conservation in commercial buildings. Based on the results of the inventory and this clarification of data requirements, the adequacy of existing data bases has been assessed, and recommendations have been developed for future federal data collection efforts. A summary of sources of existing metered end-use data is provided in Section 2.1 and its adequacy has been summarized. Collection of further end-use metered data is both desirable and valuable for many areas of building energy conservation research. Empirical data are needed to address many issues which to date have been addressed using only simulation techniques. The adequacy of using simulation techniques for various purposes needs to be assessed through comparison with measured data. While these data are expensive to acquire, it is cost-effective to do so in the long run, and the need is not being served by the private market. The preceding conclusion based on results from the inventory of existing data highlights two important facts: First, although the data are widely desired in the private sector, they are not widely available. Second, where suitable data are publicly available and contain the desired supporting information, their collection has generally been funded by government-sponsored research.

  2. SECONDARY PRODUCTION AS THE ORIGIN OF THE COSMIC-RAY POSITRON EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Kruskal, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Tarlé, G.

    2016-02-10

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer has released high-precision data for cosmic rays, and has verified an excess of positrons relative to expectations from cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium. An exciting and well-known possibility for the excess is production of electron–positron pairs by annihilating dark matter particles in the halo of the Galaxy. We have constructed a new scenario for the propagation of cosmic rays, based on the 2000 SMILI results and various other astrophysical observations and measurements in which the positron excess is due to secondary production. The scenario is studied from a simple heuristic perspective, and also within the constraints of a diffusion-reacceleration model using GALPROP. The conclusions of each approach agree with one another, showing that the scenario agrees well with the observed positron flux, without any need for dark matter or other exotic production mechanisms.

  3. Physical state and acidity of inorganic sulfate can regulate the production of secondary organic material from isoprene photooxidation products.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Mikinori; Liu, Yingjun; McKinney, Karena; Martin, Scot T

    2015-02-28

    The production of secondary organic material (SOM) by the reactive uptake of isoprene photooxidation products was investigated using partially to wholly neutralized sulfuric acid particles. The experiments were performed at a relative humidity (RH) of <5% and a temperature of 20 °C. The extent X of neutralization was adjusted from that of sulfuric acid (X = 0) to that of ammonium sulfate (X = 1). Significant SOM production was observed only for X < 0.7. The threshold of 0.7 corresponded to the transition point of the sulfate particles from aqueous to solid for <5% RH. The phase transition of inorganic sulfate therefore regulated the particle-phase reactions that produce isoprene SOM, at least for the investigated conditions. For aqueous particles, a decreasing extent of neutralization was associated with increasing production of SOM, including increased production of oligomers and organosulfates. These results can underpin treatments of phase-dependent SOM production within chemical transport models, thereby improving the accuracy of simulations of biogenic-anthropogenic interactions in the atmosphere and the associated impacts of aerosol particles on climate and air quality.

  4. Secondary production in waters influenced by upwelling off the coast of Somalia

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    During the southwest monsoon of 1979, plankton samples were collected between the equator and 12{degrees}N. Surface samples collected while the research vessel was surveying this area have been analyzed for the abundance of copepod nauplii, primarily the young of the copepod Calanoides carinatus. These samples revealed a sharp rise in the abundance of nauplii in regions where sea-surface temperatures were less than 10{degrees}C. The development state of the gonads of female C. carinatus also showed that reproduction was likely to be most intense nearshore in cold, recently upwelled water. Lipid content of females was inversely related to gonad development, suggesting that lipids sequestered at some earlier point in the life cycle were being used to synthesize eggs. Secondary production is therefore highest in the nearshore areas having cool sea-surface temperatures. Growth of phytoplankton and growth of C. carinatus seem to be closely coupled; daily ingestion rates estimated in nearshore areas where potential secondary production was high were equal to or greater than measured rates of primary production. This study was done of the waters influenced by upwelling off the coast of Somalia.

  5. Secondary production in waters influenced by upwelling off the coast of Somalia

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.L.

    1991-12-31

    During the southwest monsoon of 1979, plankton samples were collected between the equator and 12{degrees}N. Surface samples collected while the research vessel was surveying this area have been analyzed for the abundance of copepod nauplii, primarily the young of the copepod Calanoides carinatus. These samples revealed a sharp rise in the abundance of nauplii in regions where sea-surface temperatures were less than 10{degrees}C. The development state of the gonads of female C. carinatus also showed that reproduction was likely to be most intense nearshore in cold, recently upwelled water. Lipid content of females was inversely related to gonad development, suggesting that lipids sequestered at some earlier point in the life cycle were being used to synthesize eggs. Secondary production is therefore highest in the nearshore areas having cool sea-surface temperatures. Growth of phytoplankton and growth of C. carinatus seem to be closely coupled; daily ingestion rates estimated in nearshore areas where potential secondary production was high were equal to or greater than measured rates of primary production. This study was done of the waters influenced by upwelling off the coast of Somalia.

  6. Emission of reactive compounds and secondary products from wood-based furniture coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salthammer, T.; Schwarz, A.; Fuhrmann, F.

    Emissions of organic fragmentation products, so-called "secondary emission products" and reactive species from wood-based furniture coatings have been studied in 1 m 3 test chambers. the climatic conditions were representative of indoor environments. Relevant compounds and compound groups were the wetting agent 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-dicyne-4,7-diol (T4MDD), the plasticiser di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate (DEHP), aliphatic aldehydes, monoterpenes, photoinitiator fragments, acrylic monomers/reactive solvents and diisocyanate monomers. Such substances may affect human health in several ways. Aliphatic aldehydes and some photoinitiator fragments are of strong odour, while acrylates and diisocyanates cause irritation of skin, eyes and upper airways. Terpenes and reactive solvents like styrene undergo indoor chemistry in the presence of ozone, nitrogen oxides or hydroxy radicals. Secondary emission products and reactive species can achieve significant indoor concentrations. On the other hand, it has been reported that even small quantities can cause health effects. In the cases of indoor studies with special regard to emissions from furniture, chemical analysis should always include these compounds.

  7. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Thrane, Ulf; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in several diverse Aspergillus species. Here we take it one step further and show that our system can be used also in a phylogenetically distinct and largely unexplored species from the genus of Talaromyces. Specifically, we exploit CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing to identify a new gene in T. atroroseus responsible for production of polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid products, hence, linking fungal secondary metabolites to their genetic origin in a species where no genetic engineering has previously been performed. PMID:28056079

  8. Optimized Jasmonic Acid Production by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Reveals Formation of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Felipe; Haroth, Sven; Feussner, Kirstin; Meldau, Dorothea; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ischebeck, Till; Brodhun, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is a plant hormone that can be produced by the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae via submerged fermentation. From a biotechnological perspective jasmonic acid is a valuable feedstock as its derivatives serve as important ingredients in different cosmetic products and in the future it may be used for pharmaceutical applications. The objective of this work was to improve the production of jasmonic acid by L. theobromae strain 2334. We observed that jasmonic acid formation is dependent on the culture volume. Moreover, cultures grown in medium containing potassium nitrate as nitrogen source produced higher amounts of jasmonic acid than analogous cultures supplemented with ammonium nitrate. When cultivated under optimal conditions for jasmonic acid production, L. theobromae secreted several secondary metabolites known from plants into the medium. Among those we found 3-oxo-2-(pent-2-enyl)-cyclopentane-1-butanoic acid (OPC-4) and hydroxy-jasmonic acid derivatives, respectively, suggesting that fungal jasmonate metabolism may involve similar reaction steps as that of plants. To characterize fungal growth and jasmonic acid-formation, we established a mathematical model describing both processes. This model may form the basis of industrial upscaling attempts. Importantly, it showed that jasmonic acid-formation is not associated to fungal growth. Therefore, this finding suggests that jasmonic acid, despite its enormous amount being produced upon fungal development, serves merely as secondary metabolite. PMID:27907207

  9. Lincomycin at Subinhibitory Concentrations Potentiates Secondary Metabolite Production by Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Yu; Sato, Seizo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Ochi, Kozo

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have either bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity. However, they also induce considerable gene expression in bacteria when used at subinhibitory concentrations (below the MIC). We found that lincomycin, which inhibits protein synthesis by binding to the ribosomes of Gram-positive bacteria, was effective for inducing the expression of genes involved in secondary metabolism in Streptomyces strains when added to medium at subinhibitory concentrations. In Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), lincomycin at 1/10 of its MIC markedly increased the expression of the pathway-specific regulatory gene actII-ORF4 in the blue-pigmented antibiotic actinorhodin (ACT) biosynthetic gene cluster, which resulted in ACT overproduction. Intriguingly, S. lividans 1326 grown in the presence of lincomycin at a subinhibitory concentration (1/12 or 1/3 of its MIC) produced abundant antibacterial compounds that were not detected in cells grown in lincomycin-free medium. Bioassay and mass spectrometry analysis revealed that some antibacterial compounds were novel congeners of calcium-dependent antibiotics. Our results indicate that lincomycin at subinhibitory concentrations potentiates the production of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces strains and suggest that activating these strains by utilizing the dose-response effects of lincomycin could be used to effectively induce the production of cryptic secondary metabolites. In addition to these findings, we also report that lincomycin used at concentrations for markedly increased ACT production resulted in alteration of the cytoplasmic protein (FoF1 ATP synthase α and β subunits, etc.) profile and increased intracellular ATP levels. A fundamental mechanism for these unique phenomena is also discussed. PMID:25819962

  10. DETERMINATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL PRODUCTS FROM THE PHOTOOXIDATION OF TOLUENE AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN AMBIENT PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory study was carried out to investigate the secondary organic aerosol products from photooxidation of the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene. The laboratory experiments consisted of irradiating toluene/propylene/NOX/air mixtures in a smog chamber operated in the dynamic mode...

  11. Improving natural products identification through targeted LC-MS/MS in an untargeted secondary metabolomics workflow.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Krug, Daniel; Hüttel, Stephan; Müller, Rolf

    2014-11-04

    Tandem mass spectrometry is a widely applied and highly sensitive technique for the discovery and characterization of microbial natural products such as secondary metabolites from myxobacteria. Here, a data mining workflow based on MS/MS precursor lists targeting only signals related to bacterial metabolism is established using LC-MS data of crude extracts from shaking flask fermentations. The devised method is not biased toward specific compound classes or structural features and is capable of increasing the information content of LC-MS/MS analyses by directing fragmentation events to signals of interest. The approach is thus contrary to typical auto-MS(2) setups where precursor ions are usually selected according to signal intensity, which is regarded as a drawback for metabolite discovery applications when samples contain many overlapping signals and the most intense signals do not necessarily represent compounds of interest. In line with this, the method described here achieves improved MS/MS scan coverage for low-abundance precursor ions not captured by auto-MS(2) experiments and thereby facilitates the search for new secondary metabolites in complex biological samples. To underpin the effectiveness of the approach, the identification and structure elucidation of two new myxobacterial secondary metabolite classes is reported.

  12. Patulin and secondary metabolite production by marine-derived Penicillium strains.

    PubMed

    Vansteelandt, Marieke; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Blanchet, Elodie; Fossi Tankoua, Olivia; Robiou Du Pont, Thibaut; Joubert, Yolaine; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno; Frisvad, Jens C; Pouchus, Yves François; Grovel, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Genus Penicillium represents an important fungal group regarding to its mycotoxin production. Secondary metabolomes of eight marine-derived strains belonging to subgenera Furcatum and Penicillium were investigated using dereplication by liquid chromatography (LC)-Diode Array Detector (DAD)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS. Each strain was grown on six different culture media to enhance the number of observable metabolites. Thirty-two secondary metabolites were detected in crude extracts with twenty first observations for studied species. Patulin, a major mycotoxin, was classically detected in extracts of Penicillium expansum, and was also isolated from Penicillium antarcticum cultures, whose secondary metabolome is still to be done. These detections constituted the first descriptions of patulin in marine strains of Penicillium, highlighting the risk for shellfish and their consumers due to the presence of these fungi in shellfish farming areas. Patulin induced acute neurotoxicity on Diptera larvae, indicating the interest of this bioassay as an additional tool for detection of this major mycotoxin in crude extracts.

  13. Observations Suggestive of Ice Production through Secondary Processes in Convective Clouds in Southwest England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, J.; Leon, D.; Jackson, R.; Plummer, D. M.; Sulskis, J. A.; Lasher-Trapp, S.; Blyth, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Although the UK is well known for persistent drizzle, summertime in the UK is often accompanied by heavy convective precipitation. Summertime convective storms over the southwestern peninsula of the UK were the subject of the COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE), conducted in July and August of 2013. With an aim to improving quantitative precipitation forecasts, one of the primary objectives of COPE was to document the microphysical evolution of convective storms and unravel the contributions of the many microphysical pathways that can lead to heavy convective rainfall. Convective storms over southwest England are somewhat unusual, with low but cool cloud bases that can still provide ample time for development of precipitation through warm processes. The production of precipitation between cloud base through (and somewhat above) the 0 °C level plays an important role in the further microphysical evolution of the cloud as ascent continues. In some cases, we observed a rapid transition from cloud liquid to ice, presumably amplified through secondary ice production. In others, we found very little production of ice at similar temperature levels. Here we investigate details of the microphysics and dynamics from select cases on four days from COPE using in situ observations from an instrumented aircraft and high-resolution measurements from an airborne radar. In particular, we investigate how frozen raindrops in the Hallet-Mossop zone (-3 to -8 °C) influences the production of small ice crystals. We further investigate the expected time these frozen drops, or graupel embryos, persist in the H-M zone to understand the role updraft speed plays in secondary ice production leading to rapid glaciation of the cloud.

  14. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Characterizing residential thermal performance from high resolution end-use data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.E.; Pearson, E.W.; Stokes, G.M.; Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983. Prior to beginning the ELCAP, there was an abundance of information regarding total power consumption for residential structures in the Pacific Northwest and limited information regarding power consumption by various end uses. The purpose of ELCAP is to collect actual end-use load data from both residential and commercial buildings in the region. This report presents the methodology used in several statistical modeling studies carried out on the ELCAP data between 1986 and 1989. These studies involve the thermal characterization of homes and comparisons of building techniques and conservation measures by residential and commercial consumers within the Bonneville service area of the Pacific Northwest. Each data gathering technique was successful in extracting a specific set of consumer-related energy use information. The analytical techniques used in these studies are compiled in this methodology report and are to be used in conjunction with Volume 2 -- Analysis. This should facilitate ease of reference use during future analyses. It is anticipated that the data gathered on participating consumers could potentially be used to aid in decisions regarding the management of the Northwest's electrical energy resources. 7 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Biodegradability and methane production from secondary paper and pulp sludge: effect of fly ash and modeling.

    PubMed

    Huiliñir, César; Montalvo, Silvio; Guerrero, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    The effect of fly ash on biodegradability and methane production from secondary paper and pulp sludge, including its modeling, was evaluated. Three tests with fly ash concentrations of 0, 10 and 20 mg/L were evaluated at 32 °C. Methane production was modeled using the modified Gompertz equation. The results show that the doses used produce a statistically significant increase of accumulated methane, giving values greater than 225 mL of CH4 per gram of volatile solids (VS) added, and 135% greater than that obtained in the control assay. Biodegradability of VS increased 143% with respect to the control assays, giving values around 43%. The modified Gompertz model can describe well methane generation from residual sludge of the paper industry water treatment, with parameter values between those reported in the literature. Thus, the addition of fly ash to the process causes a significant increase of accumulated methane and VS removal, improving the biodegradability of paper and pulp sludge.

  16. Productivity in using school's resources: A case study of secondary school in Dumai, Riau Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozamuri, Arif Murti; Suradi, Nur Riza Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Definition of good school's differs for every individual. The performance of the school's has always been an interesting discussion topic. This situation requires parents to be more selective for choosing the best school's for their child, especially in the efficient management of resources. This study evaluated changes in total productivity, technology, technical efficiency, and scale efficiency among 12 school of Dumai City in Riau Indonesia using DEA Malmquist Index. The inputs include number of teacher's, number of students, and number of classrooms while output is the number of students that passed the national examination. The results show that average efficiency of secondary school in Dumai City from 2011 to 2013 recorded good changes in terms of technical efficiency, pure technical efficiency and scale efficiency. However, technological and total factor productivity change do not show a positive change.

  17. Gas concentration effects on secondary metabolite production by plant cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Linden, J C; Haigh, J R; Mirjalili, N; Phisaphalong, M

    2001-01-01

    One aspect of secondary metabolite production that has been studied relatively infrequently is the effect of gaseous compounds on plant cell behavior. The most influential gases are believed to be oxygen, carbon dioxide and other volatile hormones such as ethylene and methyl jasmonate. Organic compounds of interest include the promising antimalarial artemisinin (known as "qing hao su" in China where it has been a folk remedy for centuries) that is produced by Artemisia annua (sweet wormwood) and taxanes used for anticancer therapy that are produced by species of Taxus (yew). The suspension cultures of both species were grown under a variety of dissolved gas conditions in stoppered culture flasks and under conditions of continuous headspace flushing with known gas mixtures. An analysis is presented to show the culture conditions are such that equilibrium between the culture liquid and gas head-space is assured. The growth rate of the cells and their production rates of artemisinin and paclitaxel were determined. These and other parameters are correlated as functions of the gas concentrations. Interdependence of ethylene and methyl jasmonate is also explored with respect to regulation of secondary metabolite formation.

  18. Investigation of Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA missions will focus on deep space and Mars surface operations with large structures necessary for transportation of crew and cargo. In addition to the challenges of manufacturing these large structures, there are added challenges from the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, electronics, and vehicle materials. Primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle and the elements inside the vehicle. These interactions lead to the primary radiation being absorbed or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high-energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, which can be significant enough to cause concern. In a previous paper, we embarked upon our first steps toward studying neutron production from large vehicles by validating our radiation transport codes for neutron environments against flight data. The following paper will extend the previous work to focus on the deep space environment and the resulting neutron flux from large vehicles in this deep space environment.

  19. Production of secondary metabolites by some terverticillate penicillia on carbohydrate-rich and meat substrates.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Félix; Westphal, Carmen D; Bermúdez, Elena; Asensio, Miguel A

    2007-12-01

    Most terverticillate penicillia isolated from dry-cured meat products are toxigenic, but their ability to produce hazardous metabolites on meat-based substrates is not well known. The production of extrolites by selected terverticillate penicillia isolated from dry-cured ham has been studied on carbohydrate-rich media (malt extract agar, Czapek yeast autolysate agar, rice extract agar, and rice), meat extract triolein salt agar, and ham slices. Chloroform extracts from the selected strains grown on malt extract agar were toxic for the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae and VERO cells at a concentration of 2 mg/ml, but 0.02 mg/ml produced no toxic effect. Analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with photodiode array detection (DAD) or with mass spectrometry (MS) and an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source revealed different biologically active metabolites: cyclopiazonic acid and rugulovasine A from Penicillium commune; verrucosidin, anacine, puberuline, verrucofortine, and viridicatols from Penicillium polonicum; arisugacin and viridicatols from Penicillium echinulatum; and compactin and viridicatols from Penicillium solitum. Most of these metabolites, including the amino acid-derived compounds, were produced in the media containing high levels of carbohydrates. High concentrations of nitrogen compounds in the medium does not imply a greater production of the metabolites studied, not even those derived from the amino acids. However, molds growing on dry-cured ham are able to synthesize limited amounts of some secondary metabolites, a fact not previously reported. The combination of HPLC coupled with DAD and MS-APCI was useful for identification of closely related terverticillate Penicillium species from dry-cured ham. These techniques could be used to characterize the risk associated with the potential production of secondary metabolites in cured meats.

  20. A Comparison of Parameterizations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production: Global Budget and Spatiotemporal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Z.; Horowitz, L. W.; Carlton, A. M. G.; Fan, S.; Cheng, Y.; Ervens, B.; Fu, T. M.; He, C.; Tao, S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) have a profound influence on air quality and climate, but large uncertainties exist in modeling SOA on the global scale. In this study, five SOA parameterization schemes, including a two-product model (TPM), volatility basis-set (VBS) and three cloud SOA schemes (Ervens et al. (2008, 2014), Fu et al. (2008) , and He et al. (2013)), are implemented into the global chemical transport model (MOZART-4). For each scheme, model simulations are conducted with identical boundary and initial conditions. The VBS scheme produces the highest global annual SOA production (close to 35 Tg·y-1), followed by three cloud schemes (26-30 Tg·y-1) and TPM (23 Tg·y-1). Though sharing a similar partitioning theory to the TPM scheme, the VBS approach simulates the chemical aging of multiple generations of VOCs oxidation products, resulting in a much larger SOA source, particularly from aromatic species, over Europe, the Middle East and Eastern America. The formation of SOA in VBS, which represents the net partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds from vapor to condensed phase, is highly sensitivity to the aging and wet removal processes of vapor-phase organic compounds. The production of SOA from cloud processes (SOAcld) is constrained by the coincidence of liquid cloud water and water-soluble organic compounds. Therefore, all cloud schemes resolve a fairly similar spatial pattern over the tropical and the mid-latitude continents. The spatiotemporal diversity among SOA parameterizations is largely driven by differences in precursor inputs. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the evolution, wet removal, and phase partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds, particularly above remote land and oceanic areas, is critical to better constrain the global-scale distribution and related climate forcing of secondary organic aerosols.

  1. Formation and evolution of molecular products in α-pinene secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; McVay, Renee C; Huang, Dan D; Dalleska, Nathan F; Aumont, Bernard; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-11-17

    Much of our understanding of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from volatile organic compounds derives from laboratory chamber measurements, including mass yield and elemental composition. These measurements alone are insufficient to identify the chemical mechanisms of SOA production. We present here a comprehensive dataset on the molecular identity, abundance, and kinetics of α-pinene SOA, a canonical system that has received much attention owing to its importance as an organic aerosol source in the pristine atmosphere. Identified organic species account for ∼58-72% of the α-pinene SOA mass, and are characterized as semivolatile/low-volatility monomers and extremely low volatility dimers, which exhibit comparable oxidation states yet different functionalities. Features of the α-pinene SOA formation process are revealed for the first time, to our knowledge, from the dynamics of individual particle-phase components. Although monomeric products dominate the overall aerosol mass, rapid production of dimers plays a key role in initiating particle growth. Continuous production of monomers is observed after the parent α-pinene is consumed, which cannot be explained solely by gas-phase photochemical production. Additionally, distinct responses of monomers and dimers to α-pinene oxidation by ozone vs. hydroxyl radicals, temperature, and relative humidity are observed. Gas-phase radical combination reactions together with condensed phase rearrangement of labile molecules potentially explain the newly characterized SOA features, thereby opening up further avenues for understanding formation and evolution mechanisms of α-pinene SOA.

  2. Formation and evolution of molecular products in α-pinene secondary organic aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; McVay, Renee C.; Huang, Dan D.; Dalleska, Nathan F.; Aumont, Bernard; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from volatile organic compounds derives from laboratory chamber measurements, including mass yield and elemental composition. These measurements alone are insufficient to identify the chemical mechanisms of SOA production. We present here a comprehensive dataset on the molecular identity, abundance, and kinetics of α-pinene SOA, a canonical system that has received much attention owing to its importance as an organic aerosol source in the pristine atmosphere. Identified organic species account for ∼58–72% of the α-pinene SOA mass, and are characterized as semivolatile/low-volatility monomers and extremely low volatility dimers, which exhibit comparable oxidation states yet different functionalities. Features of the α-pinene SOA formation process are revealed for the first time, to our knowledge, from the dynamics of individual particle-phase components. Although monomeric products dominate the overall aerosol mass, rapid production of dimers plays a key role in initiating particle growth. Continuous production of monomers is observed after the parent α-pinene is consumed, which cannot be explained solely by gas-phase photochemical production. Additionally, distinct responses of monomers and dimers to α-pinene oxidation by ozone vs. hydroxyl radicals, temperature, and relative humidity are observed. Gas-phase radical combination reactions together with condensed phase rearrangement of labile molecules potentially explain the newly characterized SOA features, thereby opening up further avenues for understanding formation and evolution mechanisms of α-pinene SOA. PMID:26578760

  3. Effects of Regulation and Technology on End Uses of Nonfuel Mineral Commodities in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matos, Grecia R.

    2007-01-01

    The regulatory system and advancement of technologies have shaped the end-use patterns of nonfuel minerals used in the United States. These factors affected the quantities and types of materials used by society. Environmental concerns and awareness of possible negative effects on public health prompted numerous regulations that have dramatically altered the use of commodities like arsenic, asbestos, lead, and mercury. While the selected commodities represent only a small portion of overall U.S. materials use, they have the potential for harmful effects on human health or the environment, which other commodities, like construction aggregates, do not normally have. The advancement of technology allowed for new uses of mineral materials in products like high-performance computers, telecommunications equipment, plasma and liquid-crystal display televisions and computer monitors, mobile telephones, and electronic devices, which have become mainstream products. These technologies altered the end-use pattern of mineral commodities like gallium, germanium, indium, and strontium. Human ingenuity and people?s demand for different and creative services increase the demand for new materials and industries while shifting the pattern of use of mineral commodities. The mineral commodities? end-use data are critical for the understanding of the magnitude and character of these flows, assessing their impact on the environment, and providing an early warning of potential problems in waste management of products containing these commodities. The knowledge of final disposition of the mineral commodity allows better decisions as to how regulation should be tailored.

  4. Yield improvement strategies for the production of secondary metabolites in plant tissue culture: silymarin from Silybum marianum tissue culture.

    PubMed

    AbouZid, S

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell culture can be a potential source for the production of important secondary metabolites. This technology bears many advantages over conventional agricultural methods. The main problem to arrive at a cost-effective process is the low productivity. This is mainly due to lack of differentiation in the cultured cells. Many approaches have been used to maximise the yield of secondary metabolites produced by cultured plant cells. Among these approaches: choosing a plant with a high biosynthetic capacity, obtaining efficient cell line for growth and production of metabolite of interest, manipulating culture conditions, elicitation, metabolic engineering and organ culture. This article gives an overview of the various approaches used to maximise the production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites in plant cell cultures. Examples of using these different approaches are shown for the production of silymarin from Silybum marianum tissue culture.

  5. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Residential wood burning contributes to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas-phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming considerable quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA, and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle- and gas-phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings; however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ±2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high-load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average-load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average-load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in PAH and

  6. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2014-10-01

    Residential wood burning contributes significantly to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming significant quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle and gas phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings, however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ± 2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in

  7. Humus layer is the main locus of secondary SO4 production in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, Daniel; Marty, Charles; Duchesne, Louis; Gagnon, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Identifying the sources of S exported from catchments and the reactivity of the large soil organic S pool is crucial to understand the mid- or long-term response of forested catchments to decreasing atmospheric S deposition and global warming. Sulfur fluxes as well as S and O isotopes of SO4 were measured in precipitation, throughfall, soil solutions and streams at two boreal forest catchments respectively dominated by black spruce (BS) and balsam fir (BF) in Quebec, Canada. Overall, δ34S-SO4 signature showed relatively small variations among various solution types. However, at both sites, δ18O-SO4 in precipitation (averages of 10.5-11.1‰) was decreased by 3.5-3.6‰ in throughfall because of the production of secondary SO4 through oxidation of SO2 deposited on the canopy. Throughfall δ18O-SO4 was decreased by a further 5.4-6.6‰ in the solution leaving the humus layer which was attributed to the production of secondary SO4 under the action of soil microorganisms through the oxidation of organic S during which the S atom acquired O from water and gaseous O2 present in the soil. A mixing equation based on known isotopic signature of each source suggested that ˜67-81% of the S-SO4 leaving the catchments had interacted with the canopy and the humus layer. The stability of δ18O-SO4 in the mineral soil solution and in the stream of both sites, suggests that SO4 does not undergo reduction-oxidation cycles after its passage through the humus layer. Despite its huge size, the organic S reservoir within the mineral soil would be largely inert. Given the chemical nature of SO4 transformation in the canopy, the humus layer would be responsible for nearly 100% of the biological production of secondary SO4 in the whole watershed at both sites. Taking into account the substantial production of dissolved organic S in the humus layer further emphasizes the crucial importance of the latter in the S cycling of boreal forests.

  8. Secondary neutron-production cross sections from heavy-ioninteractions in composite targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.; Iwata, Y.; Iwase,H.; Murakami, T.; Sato, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.; Gudowska, I.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2005-12-19

    Secondary neutron-production cross-sections have been measured from interactions of 290 MeV/nucleon C and 600 MeV/nucleon Ne in a target composed of simulated Martian regolith and polyethylene, and from 400 MeV/nucleon Ne interactions in wall material from the International Space Station. The data were measured between 5 and 80 deg in the laboratory. We report the double-differential cross sections, angular distributions, and total neutron-production cross sections from all three systems. The spectra from all three systems exhibit behavior previously reported in other heavy-ion, neutron production experiments; namely, a peak at forward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, with the remaining spectra generated by pre-equilibrium and equilibrium processes. The double differential cross sections are fitted with a moving-source parameterization. Also reported are the data without corrections for neutron flux attenuation in the target and other intervening materials, and for neutron production in non-target materials near the target position. These uncorrected spectra are compared with SHIELD-HIT and PHITS transport model calculations. The transport model calculations reproduce the spectral shapes well, but, on average, underestimate the magnitudes of the cross sections.

  9. Enhanced surface production in H{sup -} ion sources by introducing a negatively biased secondary electrode

    SciTech Connect

    An, Young Hwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Hwang, Y. S.

    2010-02-15

    A transformer coupled plasma negative hydrogen ion source with an external rf antenna has been developed at SNU, which is capable of continuous operation with long lifetime. A positively biased plasma electrode (PE) has been successfully used for the optimization of H{sup -} extraction. With molybdenum-coated stainless steel PE, the enhancement of H{sup -} production at the electrode surface was observed at the bias voltage lower than the plasma potential. However, the low bias voltage is unfavorable to H{sup -} beam extraction since the negative ions are repelled. A second electrode is inserted in front of the PE to enhance H{sup -} production at the electrode surface without impeding beam extraction. By biasing the secondary electrode (SE) more negatively, H{sup -} production is clearly enhanced although the SE itself reduces H{sup -} beam currents because of suppressed electron transport in front of the PE. In this configuration enhancement of surface productions is most pronounced in tantalum electrode among various electrode materials.

  10. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Peterson, Kyle J.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Awe, Thomas James; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Savage, Mark E.; Smith, Ian C.; Stygar, William A.; Herrmann, Mark

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG · cm, a ~ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  11. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/−0.06) MG · cm, a ∼ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  12. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; ...

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used tomore » infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG · cm, a ~ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.« less

  13. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectraa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2015-05-01

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG . cm, a ˜ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  14. Regulation of a novel gene cluster involved in secondary metabolite production in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Hindra; Pak, Patricia; Elliot, Marie A

    2010-10-01

    Antibiotic biosynthesis in the streptomycetes is a complex and highly regulated process. Here, we provide evidence for the contribution of a novel genetic locus to antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. The overexpression of a gene cluster comprising four protein-encoding genes (abeABCD) and an antisense RNA-encoding gene (α-abeA) stimulated the production of the blue-pigmented metabolite actinorhodin on solid medium. Actinorhodin production also was enhanced by the overexpression of an adjacent gene (abeR) encoding a predicted Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP), while the deletion of this gene impaired actinorhodin production. We found the abe genes to be differentially regulated and controlled at multiple levels. Upstream of abeA was a promoter that directed the transcription of abeABCD at a low but constitutive level. The expression of abeBCD was, however, significantly upregulated at a time that coincided with the initiation of aerial development and the onset of secondary metabolism; this expression was activated by the binding of AbeR to four heptameric repeats upstream of a promoter within abeA. Expressed divergently to the abeBCD promoter was α-abeA, whose expression mirrored that of abeBCD but did not require activation by AbeR. Instead, α-abeA transcript levels were subject to negative control by the double-strand-specific RNase, RNase III.

  15. Indoor terpene emissions from cooking with herbs and pepper and their secondary organic aerosol production potential.

    PubMed

    Klein, Felix; Farren, Naomi J; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R; Kilic, Dogushan; Kumar, Nivedita K; Pieber, Simone M; Slowik, Jay G; Tuthill, Rosemary N; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S H; El Haddad, Imad

    2016-11-10

    Cooking is widely recognized as an important source of indoor and outdoor particle and volatile organic compound emissions with potential deleterious effects on human health. Nevertheless, cooking emissions remain poorly characterized. Here the effect of herbs and pepper on cooking emissions was investigated for the first time to the best of our knowledge using state of the art mass spectrometric analysis of particle and gas-phase composition. Further, the secondary organic aerosol production potential of the gas-phase emissions was determined by smog chamber aging experiments. The emissions of frying meat with herbs and pepper include large amounts of mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes as well as various terpenoids and p-cymene. The average total terpene emission rate from the use of herbs and pepper during cooking is estimated to be 46 ± 5 gg(-1)Herbs min(-1). These compounds are highly reactive in the atmosphere and lead to significant amounts of secondary organic aerosol upon aging. In summary we demonstrate that cooking with condiments can constitute an important yet overlooked source of terpenes in indoor air.

  16. Indoor terpene emissions from cooking with herbs and pepper and their secondary organic aerosol production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Felix; Farren, Naomi J.; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R.; Kilic, Dogushan; Kumar, Nivedita K.; Pieber, Simone M.; Slowik, Jay G.; Tuthill, Rosemary N.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.; El Haddad, Imad

    2016-11-01

    Cooking is widely recognized as an important source of indoor and outdoor particle and volatile organic compound emissions with potential deleterious effects on human health. Nevertheless, cooking emissions remain poorly characterized. Here the effect of herbs and pepper on cooking emissions was investigated for the first time to the best of our knowledge using state of the art mass spectrometric analysis of particle and gas-phase composition. Further, the secondary organic aerosol production potential of the gas-phase emissions was determined by smog chamber aging experiments. The emissions of frying meat with herbs and pepper include large amounts of mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes as well as various terpenoids and p-cymene. The average total terpene emission rate from the use of herbs and pepper during cooking is estimated to be 46 ± 5 gg-1Herbs min-1. These compounds are highly reactive in the atmosphere and lead to significant amounts of secondary organic aerosol upon aging. In summary we demonstrate that cooking with condiments can constitute an important yet overlooked source of terpenes in indoor air.

  17. Development of a Biosensor Concept to Detect the Production of Cluster-Specific Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Qian; Busche, Tobias; Rückert, Christian; Paulus, Constanze; Rebets, Yuriy; Novakova, Renata; Kalinowski, Jörn; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Kormanec, Jan; Sekurova, Olga N; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2017-03-03

    Genome mining of actinomycete bacteria aims at the discovery of novel bioactive secondary metabolites that can be developed into drugs. A new repressor-based biosensor to detect activated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters in Streptomyces was developed. Biosynthetic gene clusters for undecylprodigiosin and coelimycin in the genome of Streptomyces lividans TK24, which encoded TetR-like repressors and appeared to be almost "silent" based on the RNA-seq data, were chosen for the proof-of-principle studies. The bpsA reporter gene for indigoidine synthetase was placed under control of the promotor/operator regions presumed to be controlled by the cluster-associated TetR-like repressors. While the biosensor for undecylprodigiosin turned out to be nonfunctional, the coelimycin biosensor was shown to perform as expected, turning on biosynthesis of indigoidine in response to the concomitant production of coelimycin. The developed reporter system concept can be applied to those cryptic gene clusters that encode metabolite-sensing repressors to speed up discovery of novel bioactive compounds in Streptomyces.

  18. Indoor terpene emissions from cooking with herbs and pepper and their secondary organic aerosol production potential

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Felix; Farren, Naomi J.; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R.; Kilic, Dogushan; Kumar, Nivedita K.; Pieber, Simone M.; Slowik, Jay G.; Tuthill, Rosemary N.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.; El Haddad, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Cooking is widely recognized as an important source of indoor and outdoor particle and volatile organic compound emissions with potential deleterious effects on human health. Nevertheless, cooking emissions remain poorly characterized. Here the effect of herbs and pepper on cooking emissions was investigated for the first time to the best of our knowledge using state of the art mass spectrometric analysis of particle and gas-phase composition. Further, the secondary organic aerosol production potential of the gas-phase emissions was determined by smog chamber aging experiments. The emissions of frying meat with herbs and pepper include large amounts of mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes as well as various terpenoids and p-cymene. The average total terpene emission rate from the use of herbs and pepper during cooking is estimated to be 46 ± 5 gg-1Herbs min-1. These compounds are highly reactive in the atmosphere and lead to significant amounts of secondary organic aerosol upon aging. In summary we demonstrate that cooking with condiments can constitute an important yet overlooked source of terpenes in indoor air. PMID:27830718

  19. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation by Molecular-Weight Building Reactions of Biogenic Oxidation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsanti, K.; Guenther, A.; Matsunaga, S.; Smith, J.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the chemical composition of atmospheric organic aerosols (OA) remains one of the significant challenges to accurately representing OA in air quality and climate models. Meeting this challenge will require further understanding of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), of which biogenic emissions are thought to be major precursors. Of recent interest is the significance of higher-molecular weight (MW) compounds (i.e., "oligomers"). Theoretical, laboratory, and field study results suggest that relatively volatile oxidation products may contribute to SOA formation through multi-phase MW- building reactions. The significance of such reactions for biogenic SOA formation, including for newly considered precursors such as isoprene, is explored in this work. Theoretical and field studies are employed to: 1) identify MW-building reactions that may contribute to SOA formation in the atmosphere, 2) identify MW-building reaction products in ambient samples, and 3) parameterize atmospheric SOA formation by MW-building reactions of biogenic oxidation products. Likely reactions of biogenic oxidation products include ester, amide, and peroxyhemiacetal formation. Each of the proposed reactions involves known oxidation productions of biogenic precursors (e.g., carboxylic acids and aldehydes) reacting with one another and/or other atmospheric constituents (e.g., sulfuric acid and ammonia) to form higher-MW/lower-volatility products that can condense to form SOA. It has been suggested that products of MW-building reactions can revert to the parent reactants during sampling and analysis. Thus, relatively volatile compounds detected in ambient particle samples in fact may be decomposition products of higher-MW products. The contribution of relatively volatile biogenic oxidation products to SOA via ester, amide, and peroxyhemiacetal formation, as determined by studies based on fundamental thermodynamics and gas/particle partitioning theory, will be discussed; in addition to

  20. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  1. Is a Schools' Performance Related to Technical Change?--A Study on the Relationship between Innovations and Secondary School Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haelermans, Carla; Blank, Jos L. T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between innovations and productivity in Dutch secondary schools. Innovation clusters are directly included in the production model. In order to correct for differences between schools, we add school type, region and year controls. The results indicate that process innovations, teacher professionalization…

  2. Secondary production of neutral pi-mesons and the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Isobaric and scaling model predictions of the secondary spectra of neutral pi-mesons produced in proton-proton collisions, at energies between threshold and a few GeV, are compared on the basis of accelerator data and found to show the isobaric model to be superior. This model is accordingly used, in conjuction with a scaling model representation at high energies, in a recalculation of the pi exp (0) gamma-radiation's contribution to the diffuse galactic gamma background; the cosmic ray-induced production of photons (whose energy exceeds 100 MeV) by such radiation occurs at a rate of 1.53 x 10 to the -25 photons/(s-H atom). These results are compared with previous calculations of this process as well as with COS-B observations of the diffuse galactic gamma-radiation.

  3. Secondary organic aerosol production from aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde: Laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Mark J.; Seitzinger, Sybil; Turpin, Barbara J.

    Organic particulate matter (PM) formed in the atmosphere (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) is a substantial yet poorly understood contributor to atmospheric PM. Aqueous photooxidation in clouds, fogs and aerosols is a newly recognized SOA formation pathway. This study investigates the potential for aqueous glycolaldehyde oxidation to produce low volatility products that contribute SOA mass. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmation that aqueous oxidation of glycolaldehyde via the hydroxyl radical forms glyoxal and glycolic acid, as previously assumed. Subsequent reactions form formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and oxalic acid as expected. Unexpected products include malonic acid, succinic acid, and higher molecular weight compounds, including oligomers. Due to (1) the large source strength of glycolaldehyde from precursors such as isoprene and ethene, (2) its water solubility, and (3) the aqueous formation of low volatility products (organic acids and oligomers), we predict that aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde and other aldehydes in cloud, fog, and aerosol water is an important source of SOA and that incorporation of this SOA formation pathway in chemical transport models will help explain the current under-prediction of organic PM concentrations.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting similar behavior to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established, reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10-400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1-2.0 μm) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM 1.1) ranged from 10 to >300 μg m -3 and yields ranged from 5% to 37%. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were ˜10 cm -3 s -1 and ˜10 μg m -3 min -1, respectively.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  6. Production of Magnesium and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys from Recycled Secondary Aluminum Scrap Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesing, Adam J.; Das, Subodh K.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental proof of concept was demonstrated for a patent-pending and trademark-pending RE12™ process for extracting a desired amount of Mg from recycled scrap secondary Al melts. Mg was extracted by electrorefining, producing a Mg product suitable as a Mg alloying hardener additive to primary-grade Al alloys. This efficient electrorefining process operates at high current efficiency, high Mg recovery and low energy consumption. The Mg electrorefining product can meet all the impurity specifications with subsequent melt treatment for removing alkali contaminants. All technical results obtained in the RE12™ project indicate that the electrorefining process for extraction of Mg from Al melt is technically feasible. A techno-economic analysis indicates high potential profitability for applications in Al foundry alloys as well as beverage—can and automotive—sheet alloys. The combination of technical feasibility and potential market profitability completes a successful proof of concept. This economical, environmentally-friendly and chlorine-free RE12™ process could be disruptive and transformational for the Mg production industry by enabling the recycling of 30,000 tonnes of primary-quality Mg annually.

  7. Hygroscopicity of dicarbonyl-amine secondary organic aerosol products investigated with HTDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; de Haan, D. O.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the importance of amine-dicarbonyl chemistry as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathway, producing imines, imidazoles, and N-containing oligomers. Preliminary work in our group has suggested that some of these products may be surface active. Therefore, the presence of these products may result in important changes to submicron particle hygroscopicity that affect aerosol scattering and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, especially in regions with significant amine-containing particles. To investigate their hygroscopicity, we have designed a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) system around a 300 L Teflon chamber that allows for longer humidification times needed for some organic aerosol components that are only slightly hygroscopic. This modification provides a range of residence times from 2.5 minutes up to 1 hour, unlike previously published systems that vary from 2-30 seconds. Using the modified hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), we have measured the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of SOA formed from reactions of glyoxal (and methylglyoxal) with methylamine, ammonium sulfate, and several amino acids. Changes to inorganic aerosol HGF in response to the presence of SOA products are also investigated.

  8. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  9. Regulation of secondary antibody responses in rodents. I. Potentiation of IgG production by cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, R F; MacLennan, I C

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of a single dose of cyclophosphamide on specific IgG production in rats during an established secondary immune response. (PVG X Agus)F1 rats were immunized twice (days 0 and 28) with chicken erythrocytes (CRBC), received cyclophosphamide (100 mg/m2 of body surface area) on day 33 and were killed 8 days later. The production of anti-CRBC IgG antibodies was assessed by testing the supernatants of spleen cell cultures in a cytotoxicity assay with 51Cr-labelled CRBC as target cells and normal rat spleen cells as effector cells. In observations of fifty-nine pairs of treated and untreated rats from eight separate experiments, the administration of cyclophosphamide resulted in: (1) a decrease in the number of spleen cell to a median of 10(8.63) from a median of 10(8.7) (P less than 0.0025); (2) an increase in the anti-CRBC IgG antibody titre of the supernatants of cultured spleen cells to a median of 10(0.67) from a median of 10(0.27 (P less than 0.0025); and (3) the calculated anti-CRBC. IgG antibody production per spleen to be increased in the drug-treated rats to a median of 10(2.26) from a median of 10(2.0) (P less than 0.005). In a cyclophosphamide dose-response study, it was shown that some enhancement of antibody production was induced by doses between 12.5 and 50 mg/m2 and consistently elevated levels of antibody production were associated with doses between 100 and 400 mg/m2. PMID:487659

  10. Secondary organic aerosol production from diesel vehicle exhaust: impact of aftertreatment, fuel chemistry and driving cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, T. D.; Presto, A. A.; Nguyen, N. T.; Robertson, W. H.; Na, K.; Sahay, K. N.; Zhang, M.; Maddox, C.; Rieger, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Maldonado, H.; Maricq, M. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2013-09-01

    Environmental chamber ("smog chamber") experiments were conducted to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from dilute emissions from two medium-duty diesel vehicles (MDDVs) and three heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) under urban-like conditions. Some of the vehicles were equipped with emission control aftertreatment devices including diesel particulate filters (DPF), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC). Experiments were also performed with different fuels (100% biodiesel and low-, medium- or high-aromatic ultralow sulfur diesel) and driving cycles (Unified Cycle, Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, and creep+idle). During normal operation, vehicles with a catalyzed DPF emitted very little primary particulate matter (PM). Furthermore, photo-oxidation of dilute emissions from these vehicles produced essentially no SOA (below detection limit). However, significant primary PM emissions and SOA production were measured during active DPF regeneration experiments. Nevertheless, under reasonable assumptions about DPF regeneration frequency, the contribution of regeneration emissions to the total vehicle emissions is negligible, reducing PM trapping efficiency by less than 2%. Therefore, catalyzed DPFs appear to be very effective in reducing both primary and secondary fine particulate matter from diesel vehicles. For both MDDVs and HDDVs without aftertreatment substantial SOA formed in the smog chamber - with the emissions from some vehicles generating twice as much SOA as primary organic aerosol after three hours of oxidation at typical urban VOC : NOx ratios (3:1). Comprehensive organic gas speciation was performed on these emissions, but less than half of the measured SOA could be explained by traditional (speciated) SOA precursors. The remainder presumably originates from the large fraction (~30%) of the non-methane organic gas emissions that could not be speciated using traditional one-dimensional gas

  11. The importance of hydrothermal venting to water-column secondary production in the northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Brenda J.; Thomson, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to show that seafloor hydrothermal venting in the open northeast Pacific Ocean has a marked impact on secondary biomass and production within the overlying water column. Specifically, we use net tows and concurrently measured acoustic backscatter data collected over six summers to examine the effects of hydrothermal venting from the Endeavour Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge on macro-zooplankton biomass and production throughout the entire 2000 m depth range. Previous research shows that ontogenetic diapausing migrators and their predators from the upper ocean aggregate above the neutrally buoyant plumes in summer and resume feeding on plume and bottom upwelled particles, resulting in increased zooplankton reproductive output to the upper ocean. Within the limitations of our sampling methodology, net tows reveal a statistically significant exponential decline in total water-column biomass with increasing lateral distance from the vent fields. The acoustic backscatter data show a similar decline, but only below 800 m depth. Near-surface biomass was highly variable throughout the region, but values near vents consistently ranged higher than summer values found elsewhere in the offshore northeast Pacific. Water-column biomass was similar in magnitude above and below 800 m depth throughout the region. Because epiplume biomass can be advected a considerable distance from vent fields, biomass enhancement of the water column from hydrothermal venting may extend considerable distances to the west and northwest of the vent sites, in the prevailing directions of the subsurface flow. Based on the extensive acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data collected, and the strong correlation between zooplankton production derived from net sample biomass and acoustic backscatter intensity, we estimate that daily macro-zooplankton production in the upper 400 m of the water column within 10 km of the vent fields averages approximately 16% of photosynthetic

  12. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Characterizing residential thermal performance from high resolution end-use data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.E.; Williamson, M.A.; Bailey, S.A.; Pratt, R.G.; Stokes, G.M.; Sandusky, W.F.; Pearson, E.W.; Roberts, J.S.

    1991-06-01

    This document is part of a two-volume set describing a series of thermal analyses of the residential buildings monitored under the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program. Volume 1 describes in detail the thermal analysis methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the results of applying the methodology in a series of four distinct analyses: (1) an analysis of the first monitored heating season, 1985--1986; (2) an analysis of the second monitored heating season, (3) a comparison of first- and second-year analyses showing changes in residential consumption with changes in weather and evaluating the ability of the analytical technique to discriminate those changes; and (4) a continuation of the previous analyses evaluating the effects of foundation type and heating system type on the results.

  13. Effect of copper contaminated food on the life cycle and secondary production of Daphnia laevis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Giseli S; Tonietto, Alessandra E; Lombardi, Ana T; Melão, Maria da G G

    2016-11-01

    In aquatic environments, copper (Cu) plays important physiological roles in planktonic food chain, such as electron transfer in photosynthesis and constituting proteins that transport oxygen in some arthropods, while at higher concentrations it is toxic on these organisms and higher trophic levels. The combined effects of natural (e.g. volcanic activity) and anthropogenic sources (e.g. mining waste) contribute to the increase in copper pollution in different ecosystems and regions around the world. In the present study, we evaluated the bioaccumulation and effect of Cu on Raphidocelis subcapitata (freshwater algae), and the influence of Cu-contaminated food (algae) on Daphnia laevis (tropical cladoceran). The amount of copper accumulated in microalgae and cladoceran was quantified, and life-history parameters of D. laevis such as growth, reproduction and longevity were measured. The cell density of Cu exposed R. subcapitata declined, and cladoceran fed with contaminated food had lower longevity, production of eggs and neonates, and reduced secondary production. A concentration dependent increase in Cu accumulation was observed in the microalgae, while the opposite occurred in the animal, indicating a cellular metal regulatory mechanism in the latter. However, this regulation seems not to be sufficient to avoid metal induced damages in the cladoceran such as decreased longevity and reproduction. We conclude that diet is an important metal exposure route to this cladoceran, and the assessment of chronic contamination during the complete life cycle of cladoceran provides results that are similar to those observed in natural environments, especially when native organisms are investigated.

  14. Reconstituting Plant Secondary Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Production of High-Value Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Pyne, M E; Narcross, L; Fossati, E; Bourgeois, L; Burton, E; Gold, N D; Martin, V J J

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) constitute a diverse class of plant secondary metabolites that includes the opiate analgesics morphine and codeine. Collectively, BIAs exhibit a myriad of pharmacological activities, including antimicrobial, antitussive, antispasmodic, and anticancer properties. Despite 2500 known BIA products, only a small proportion are currently produced though traditional crop-based manufacturing, as complex stereochemistry renders chemical synthesis of BIAs largely unfeasible. The advent of synthetic biology and sophisticated microbial engineering coupled with recent advances in the elucidation of plant BIA metabolic networks has provided growing motivation for producing high-value BIAs in microbial hosts. Here, we provide a technical basis for reconstituting BIA biosynthetic pathways in the common yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methodologies outlined in this chapter include fundamental techniques for expressing and assaying BIA biosynthetic enzymes, bioprospecting large libraries of BIA enzyme variants, and reconstituting and optimizing complete BIA formation pathways in yeast. To expedite construction of superior BIA-producing yeast strains, we emphasize high-throughput techniques. Finally, we identify fundamental challenges impeding deployment of yeast-based BIA production platforms and briefly outline future prospects to overcome such barriers.

  15. ATR-FTIR microscopy in mapping mode for the study of verdigris and its secondary products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prati, S.; Bonacini, I.; Sciutto, G.; Genty-Vincent, A.; Cotte, M.; Eveno, M.; Menu, M.; Mazzeo, R.

    2016-01-01

    To study degradation processes occurring on painting materials, the use of high-resolution micro-analytical techniques is highly requested since it provides a detailed identification and localisation of both the original and deteriorated ingredients. Among the various pigments recently studied, the characterisation of verdigris has received a major interest. This pigment has not a unique chemical formula, but its composition depends on the recipe employed for its manufacturing. Moreover, verdigris paints are not stable and are subject to a colour change from blue-green to green, which occurs in the first few months after the application. In this paper, we focused our attention on the use of ATR-FTIR mapping as a useful method to identify verdigris secondary products and pathways. Several mock-ups and real samples have been analysed, and the correlation among the detected compounds and their spatial location, obtained by the application of ATR-FTIR microscopy in mapping mode, allowed formulating some hypotheses on the degradation pattern of verdigris, which may feed the discussion on the transformation and stability of this pigment. From an analytical point of view, we showed how FTIR mapping approaches may be extremely useful both for the identification of compounds in complex matrix in which single spectra may limit the exhaustive characterisations due to bands overlapping and for the study of degradation pathways by taking into consideration the relative distribution of degradation products.

  16. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  17. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  18. Residential End-use Energy Planning System (REEPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goett, A.; McFadden, D.

    1982-07-01

    The Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS) is described. REEPS is a forecasting model of residential energy patterns that is capable of evaluating the impacts of a broad range of energy conservation measures. REEPS forecasts appliance installations, operating efficiencies, and utilization patterns for space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and cooking. Each of these decisions is sensitive to energy prices, mandatory policies, and household/dwelling and geographical characteristics. The parameters of these choice models have been estimated statistically from national household survey data. The structure of the choice models and the results of the statistical analysis are reported in detail. REEPS forecasts energy choices for a large number of market segments representing households with different socioeconomic, dwelling, and geographical characteristics. These segments reflect the joint distribution of characteristics in the population. Aggregate forecasts are generated by summing up the decisions for all population segments. This technique provides a consistent method of obtaining aggregate forecasts from disaggregate, nonlinear choice models. Moreover, it permits evaluation of the distributional impacts of prospective conservation policies. The results of simulation of REEPS are described.

  19. Growth and secondary production of aquatic insects along a gradient of Zn contamination in Rocky Mountain streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlisle, D.M.; Clements, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Secondary production estimates from several Rocky Mountain streams were used to test hypotheses about the effects of chronic metal contamination on insect populations and ecosystem processes. Quantitative samples of chemistry, habitat, and benthic insects were collected monthly during the ice-free period (May-November) from five 2nd- to 3rd-order streams that varied primarily in Zn contamination. Secondary production was estimated for the 19 dominant taxa using increment-summation, size-frequency, and P/B methods. Uncertainty was estimated by bootstrapping estimates of mean abundance, biomass, and cohort production intervals. Secondary production of metal-sensitive Heptageniidae (Rhithrogena robusta, Cinygmula spp., and Epeorus longimanus) was lower in lightly to moderately contaminated streams than in reference streams. Experiments were done to determine whether herbivore growth was influenced by food quality in contaminated streams. Growth estimates from field and microcosm experiments revealed that low mayfly production in contaminated streams was caused mostly by reduced population abundances. Production of predatory stoneflies was also lower in contaminated streams than reference streams. Estimates of the trophic basis of production revealed that, although the relative contribution to community production from various food sources was similar among streams, total production attributable to algae and animal prey declined in contaminated streams. Much of the reduction in herbivory in contaminated streams was the result of lower production of heptageniids, especially R. robusta. Assemblage and taxon-specific estimates of secondary production were sensitive to variation in metal contamination and indicated that relatively low metal concentrations may have ecosystem-wide consequences for energy flow.

  20. Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Kocev, Dragi; Džeroski, Sašo; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The food- and airborne fungal genus Wallemia comprises seven xerophilic and halophilic species: W. sebi, W. mellicola, W. canadensis, W. tropicalis, W. muriae, W. hederae and W. ichthyophaga. All listed species are adapted to low water activity and can contaminate food preserved with high amounts of salt or sugar. In relation to food safety, the effect of high salt and sugar concentrations on the production of secondary metabolites by this toxigenic fungus was investigated. The secondary metabolite profiles of 30 strains of the listed species were examined using general growth media, known to support the production of secondary metabolites, supplemented with different concentrations of NaCl, glucose and MgCl2. In more than two hundred extracts approximately one hundred different compounds were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Although the genome data analysis of W. mellicola (previously W. sebi sensu lato) and W. ichthyophaga revealed a low number of secondary metabolites clusters, a substantial number of secondary metabolites were detected at different conditions. Machine learning analysis of the obtained dataset showed that NaCl has higher influence on the production of secondary metabolites than other tested solutes. Mass spectrometric analysis of selected extracts revealed that NaCl in the medium affects the production of some compounds with substantial biological activities (wallimidione, walleminol, walleminone, UCA 1064-A and UCA 1064-B). In particular an increase in NaCl concentration from 5% to 15% in the growth media increased the production of the toxic metabolites wallimidione, walleminol and walleminone. PMID:28036382

  1. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Kroflič, Ana; Čusak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4

  2. Secondary organic aerosol production from diesel vehicle exhaust: impact of aftertreatment, fuel chemistry and driving cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, T. D.; Presto, A. A.; Nguyen, N. T.; Robertson, W. H.; Na, K.; Sahay, K. N.; Zhang, M.; Maddox, C.; Rieger, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Maldonado, H.; Maricq, M. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2014-05-01

    Environmental chamber ("smog chamber") experiments were conducted to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from dilute emissions from two medium-duty diesel vehicles (MDDVs) and three heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) under urban-like conditions. Some of the vehicles were equipped with emission control aftertreatment devices, including diesel particulate filters (DPFs), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Experiments were also performed with different fuels (100% biodiesel and low-, medium- or high-aromatic ultralow sulfur diesel) and driving cycles (Unified Cycle,~Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, and creep + idle). During normal operation, vehicles with a catalyzed DPF emitted very little primary particulate matter (PM). Furthermore, photooxidation of dilute emissions from these vehicles produced essentially no SOA (below detection limit). However, significant primary PM emissions and SOA production were measured during active DPF regeneration experiments. Nevertheless, under reasonable assumptions about DPF regeneration frequency, the contribution of regeneration emissions to the total vehicle emissions is negligible, reducing PM trapping efficiency by less than 2%. Therefore, catalyzed DPFs appear to be very effective in reducing both primary PM emissions and SOA production from diesel vehicles. For both MDDVs and HDDVs without aftertreatment substantial SOA formed in the smog chamber - with the emissions from some vehicles generating twice as much SOA as primary organic aerosol after 3 h of oxidation at typical urban VOC / NOx ratios (3 : 1). Comprehensive organic gas speciation was performed on these emissions, but less than half of the measured SOA could be explained by traditional (speciated) SOA precursors. The remainder presumably originates from the large fraction (~30%) of the nonmethane organic gas emissions that could not be speciated using traditional one-dimensional gas chromatography. The

  3. [Secondary productivity of macrobenthos in mangrove and salt marsh in Gaoqiao of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province of South China].

    PubMed

    Cai, Li-Zhe; Xu, Peng; Fu, Su-Jing; Peng, Xin; Cao, Jing; Chen, Xin-Wei; Wu, Chen; Liu, Sha

    2012-04-01

    In order to understand the secondary productivity of macrobenthos in different botanic habitats in intertidal zone in Gaoqiao of Zhanjiang, the Brey's empirical formula was applied to calculate the secondary productivity based on the investigations in the habitats of Sonneratia apetala, Aegiceras corniculatum, Sporobolus virginicus, and Bruguiera conjugate in four seasons, 2010. The secondary productivity of the macrobenthos in the habitats in four seasons was averagely 11.77 g AFDM x m(-2) x a(-1), being the highest in S. apetala habitat (18.16 g AFDM x m(-2) x a(-1)), followed by in A. corniculatum habitat (17.67 g AFDM x m(-2) x a(-1)), S. virginicus habitat (8.34 g AFDM x m(-2) x a(-1)), and B. conjugate habitat (2.92 g AFDM x m(-2) x a(-1)). The P/B ratio of the macrobenthos was the highest in B. conjugate habitat (2.38), followed by in S. virginicus, S. virginicus, and A. corniculatum habitats, with the values of 1.23, 0.99, and 0.48, respectively. The differences in the secondary productivity and P/B ratio of the macrobenthos among the four botanic habitats were mainly related to the sediment total organic carbon, food type, and macrobenthos individual size.

  4. Secondary metabolite production by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf-5 confers protection against Naegleria americana in the wheat rhizosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria employ a variety of morphological and metabolic mechanisms to avoid protozoan predation. In Pseudomonas fluorescens strains SS101 and SBW25, cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) production served as a defense mechanism that limited predation by the amoeba-flagellate Naegleria americana, and secondary m...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  10. Allochthonous Organic Matter Subsidize the High Secondary Production of the Invasive Bivalve Corbicula fluminea in Minho Estuary (N-Portugal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea is one of the most invasive species in freshwater ecosystems. In Minho estuary, this species colonize all the middle and upper part of the estuary, dominating the abundance, biomass and secondary production in River Minho tidal freshwater area (T...

  11. Reading and Writing to Learn in Secondary Education: Online Processing Activity and Written Products in Summarizing and Synthesizing Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mateos, Mar; Martin, Elena; Villalon, Ruth; Luna, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The research reported here employed a multiple-case study methodology to assess the online cognitive and metacognitive activities of 15-year-old secondary students as they read informational texts and wrote a new text in order to learn, and the relation of these activities to the written products they were asked to generate. To investigate the…

  12. Preliminary Analysis of the (Process and Product) Quality of Physical Education in Flemish Secondary Schools: Implementation of IKLO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huts, K.; Van Hoecke, J.; De Knop, P.; Theeboom, M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold, namely implementing a multifunctional (self-) evaluation instrument for physical education in a sample of Flemish secondary schools (N=100), while simultaneously obtaining a preliminary picture of the subjects' product and process quality. Descriptive statistics revealed that P. E. teachers' engagement…

  13. Old meets new: using interspecies interactions to detect secondary metabolite production in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Traxler, Matthew F; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Actinomycetes, a group of filamentous, Gram-positive bacteria, have long been a remarkable source of useful therapeutics. Recent genome sequencing and transcriptomic studies have shown that these bacteria, responsible for half of the clinically used antibiotics, also harbor a large reservoir of gene clusters, which have the potential to produce novel secreted small molecules. Yet, many of these clusters are not expressed under common culture conditions. One reason why these clusters have not been linked to a secreted small molecule lies in the way that actinomycetes have typically been studied: as pure cultures in nutrient-rich media that do not mimic the complex environments in which these bacteria evolved. New methods based on multispecies culture conditions provide an alternative approach to investigating the products of these gene clusters. We have recently implemented binary interspecies interaction assays to mine for new secondary metabolites and to study the underlying biology of interactinomycete interactions. Here, we describe the detailed biological and chemical methods comprising these studies.

  14. Off-flavour masking of secondary lipid oxidation products by pea dextrin.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, S; Steinhäuser, U; Drusch, S

    2015-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the off-flavour masking potential of pea dextrin (PD) in emulsions rich in ω-3 and ω-6-fatty acids in comparison with maltodextrin (MD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD). After optimisation of the homogenisation procedure, stable emulsions were prepared and stored for up to eight weeks. The development of six secondary lipid oxidation products: propanal, 1-penten-3-one, 1-penten-3-ol, hexanal, (E,E)-2,4-heptadienal and (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal, was monitored via headspace gas chromatography after solid-phase microextraction. Sensory evaluation of the emulsions was performed by a trained panel. PD already showed masking properties for propanal, 1-penten-3-one, hexanal and (E,E)-2,4-heptadienal during validation of the gas chromatographic analysis, but not for 1-penten-3-ol or (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal. During storage, the course of lipid oxidation was similar in all emulsions as concluded from the hydroperoxide value. Results from the sensory evaluation confirmed a masking of rancid off-flavour. In conclusion, pea dextrin is suitable for masking off-flavour resulting from early stages of lipid oxidation.

  15. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum). The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol) and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines). Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites. PMID:22852578

  16. Bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck Simulation of Runaway Avalanche from Secondary Knock-on Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, S. C.; Chan, V. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Rosenbluth, M. N.

    1996-11-01

    It has been pointed out that secondary production of runaway electrons by knock-on collisions with very energetic confined electrons can significantly change the runaway rate,(M.N. Rosenbluth, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 40), 1804 (1995).^,(N.T. Besedin, I.M. Pankratov, Nucl. Fusion 26), 807 (1986).^,(R. Jaspers, K.H. Finden, G. Mank et al.), Nucl. Fusion 33, 1775 (1993). and is potentially a serious problem in reactors. Previous calculations of the effect have only partially included important effects such as toroidal trapping, synchrotron radiation, and bremsstrahlung. Furthermore, in a normal constant current operation, the increase of the density of runaway electrons causes a decrease of the ohmic field and all these effects can balance to a steady-state. The purpose of the present paper is to present results on bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck simulations of knock-on avalanching runaways including these effects. Initially, an energetic seed component is inserted to initiate knock-on avalanching. Results on the dependence of the steady-state runaway current on Z_eff, density, and radial location will be presented.

  17. Fungal secondary metabolites from Monascus spp. reduce rumen methane production in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, D P; Martin, C; Boudra, H

    2013-02-01

    Decreasing methanogenesis without affecting fermentation and digestion of feeds in the rumen can reduce the environmental impact of ruminant production and have a beneficial effect on feed conversion efficiency. In this work, metabolites produced by Monascus spp. molds were assayed for their antimethanogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. The capacity of 7 strains of Monascus to produce secondary metabolites was assessed in solid media. Monitored metabolites included the statins monacolin K, pravastatin, and mevastatin, and the mycotoxin citrinin. Ethanolic extracts from 5 different solid media from 2 selected strains were tested in vitro. Fermentation was not negatively affected by any treatment, but one extract decreased methane production (P < 0.05). This extract was further assayed in 3 consecutive batch incubations where a marked decrease in methane was observed in the third batch (P < 0.05). In contrast, methane produced in flasks with pure monacolin K was not different from controls (P > 0.05). Rice on which the selected Monascus sp. was grown also decreased methane production when used as substrate for in vitro incubations (P < 0.05). The effect of Monascus-fermented rice on methane production was then assayed in vivo. Six wethers were adapted to a diet containing rice grain and hay (1:1 ratio). Rice was then replaced by fermented rice and given to animals for nearly 2 wk. Animals were monitored for a further 2 wk after the treatment. Daily methane emissions decreased (P < 0.05) by 30% after 2 to 3 d into the treatment and remained low throughout the administration period. This change was associated with reduced ruminal acetate to propionate ratio and decreased numbers of methanogens as detected by quantitative PCR (P < 0.05). In contrast, no changes in the methanogenic community were observed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Total bacteria numbers increased (P < 0.05) with changes in the DGGE profile community, whereas protozoa were not

  18. [Popularity of "fast-food" products consumption by school youth in urban and country secondary schools from Mazowsze area].

    PubMed

    Kośmider, Anita; Gronowska-Senger, Anna

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of frequency intake of "fast-food" products by young people in urban and country secondary schools. The group of 282 pupils (14 years) was investigated. Frequency intake was estimated using questionnaire. In the populations of boys in town frequency of consuming "fast-food" products has risen in comparison with boys from country. Three groups comprised adolescent girls (for a change) have not difference in frequency of "fast-food" consumption.

  19. Reactive oxidation products promote secondary organic aerosol formation from green leaf volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Lewis, A. C.; Carey, T. J.; Wenger, J. C.; Garcia, E. Borrás. I.; Muñoz, A.

    2009-02-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are an important group of chemicals released by vegetation which have emission fluxes that can be significantly increased when plants are damaged or stressed. A series of simulation chamber experiments has been conducted at the European Photoreactor in Valencia, Spain, to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the atmospheric oxidation of the major GLVs cis-3-hexenylacetate and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to identify chemical species present in the SOA. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol proved to be a more efficient SOA precursor due to the high reactivity of its first generation oxidation product, 3-hydroxypropanal, which can hydrate and undergo further reactions with other aldehydes resulting in SOA dominated by higher molecular weight oligomers. The lower SOA yields produced from cis-3-hexenylacetate are attributed to the acetate functionality, which inhibits oligomer formation in the particle phase. Based on observed SOA yields and best estimates of global emissions, these compounds may be calculated to be a substantial unidentified global source of SOA, contributing 1-5 TgC yr-1, equivalent to around a third of that predicted from isoprene. Molecular characterization of the SOA, combined with organic mechanistic information, has provided evidence that the formation of organic aerosols from GLVs is closely related to the reactivity of their first generation atmospheric oxidation products, and indicates that this may be a simple parameter that could be used in assessing the aerosol formation potential for other unstudied organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  20. Reactive oxidation products promote secondary organic aerosol formation from green leaf volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Lewis, A. C.; Carey, T. J.; Wenger, J. C.; Garcia, E. Borrás. I.; Muñoz, A.

    2009-06-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are an important group of chemicals released by vegetation which have emission fluxes that can be significantly increased when plants are damaged or stressed. A series of simulation chamber experiments has been conducted at the European Photoreactor in Valencia, Spain, to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the atmospheric oxidation of the major GLVs cis-3-hexenylacetate and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to identify chemical species present in the SOA. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol proved to be a more efficient SOA precursor due to the high reactivity of its first generation oxidation product, 3-hydroxypropanal, which can hydrate and undergo further reactions with other aldehydes resulting in SOA dominated by higher molecular weight oligomers. The lower SOA yields produced from cis-3-hexenylacetate are attributed to the acetate functionality, which inhibits oligomer formation in the particle phase. Based on observed SOA yields and best estimates of global emissions, these compounds may be calculated to be a substantial unidentified global source of SOA, contributing 1-5 TgC yr-1, equivalent to around a third of that predicted from isoprene. Molecular characterization of the SOA, combined with organic mechanistic information, has provided evidence that the formation of organic aerosols from GLVs is closely related to the reactivity of their first generation atmospheric oxidation products, and indicates that this may be a simple parameter that could be used in assessing the aerosol formation potential for other unstudied organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  1. Impact of modern battery design and the implications for primary and secondary lead production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, M. W.; Manders, J. E.; Eckfeld, S.; Prengaman, R. D.

    The emerging change in the automobile industry with the advent of the 42 V electrical operating system will impose a revolutionary change not only on the car industry, but also on the battery industry overall. The implications of this change will be felt by the battery producers, most of whom will require new or advanced production techniques for 36 V batteries, and subsequently by their suppliers of raw material. The demand for batteries of higher quality—in particular, the valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery, which is the battery of choice for the new automotive system—will place much higher demands upon the quality of the raw materials used in battery manufacture. It has been well documented that high-quality raw materials, such as lead, acid and separators, are a requirement in order to guarantee battery performance. The presence of impurities (antimony, arsenic, tellurium, etc.) in the enclosed system of the VRLA battery will impart problems such as dry-out, self-discharge and negative-plate capacity loss which will result in premature failure of the battery. One major problem for both primary and secondary lead producers is the presence of these impurities in their metal streams. Of particular interest to the smelters are the levels of antimony and silver. The latter element is increasing to alarming levels. With changing battery technology, both elements will pose serious problems to the lead producers in maintaining high-quality lead under the present cost structure. Some of the challenges that face the lead industry in meeting the demands of VRLA battery producers for product of higher quality are examined in this paper.

  2. The Natural Product Domain Seeker NaPDoS: A Phylogeny Based Bioinformatic Tool to Classify Secondary Metabolite Gene Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ziemert, Nadine; Podell, Sheila; Penn, Kevin; Badger, Jonathan H.; Allen, Eric; Jensen, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    New bioinformatic tools are needed to analyze the growing volume of DNA sequence data. This is especially true in the case of secondary metabolite biosynthesis, where the highly repetitive nature of the associated genes creates major challenges for accurate sequence assembly and analysis. Here we introduce the web tool Natural Product Domain Seeker (NaPDoS), which provides an automated method to assess the secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene diversity and novelty of strains or environments. NaPDoS analyses are based on the phylogenetic relationships of sequence tags derived from polyketide synthase (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes, respectively. The sequence tags correspond to PKS-derived ketosynthase domains and NRPS-derived condensation domains and are compared to an internal database of experimentally characterized biosynthetic genes. NaPDoS provides a rapid mechanism to extract and classify ketosynthase and condensation domains from PCR products, genomes, and metagenomic datasets. Close database matches provide a mechanism to infer the generalized structures of secondary metabolites while new phylogenetic lineages provide targets for the discovery of new enzyme architectures or mechanisms of secondary metabolite assembly. Here we outline the main features of NaPDoS and test it on four draft genome sequences and two metagenomic datasets. The results provide a rapid method to assess secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene diversity and richness in organisms or environments and a mechanism to identify genes that may be associated with uncharacterized biochemistry. PMID:22479523

  3. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Progress in a study to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids is reported.

  4. Environmental assessment of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production--a case study in China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinglan; Li, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production. To confirm and add credibility to the study, uncertainty analysis was conducted. Results showed the impact generated from respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, global warming, and non-renewable energy categories had an important contribution to overall environmental impact, due to energy, clinker, and limestone production stages. Also, uncertainty analysis results showed the technology of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production had little or no effect on changing the overall environmental potential impact generated from general cement production. Accordingly, using the technology of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production is a good choice for reducing the pressure on the environment from dramatically increased sludge disposal. In addition, increasing electricity recovery rate, choosing natural gas fired electricity generation technology, and optimizing the raw material consumption in clinker production are highly recommended to reduce the adverse effects on the environment.

  5. Comparison and Validation of FLUKA and HZETRN as Tools for Investigating the Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals are focused on deep space travel and Mars surface operations. To accomplish these goals, large structures will be necessary to transport crew and logistics in the initial stages, and NASA will need to keep the crew and the vehicle safe during transport and any surface activities. One of the major challenges of deep space travel is the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, the electronics, and the vehicle materials. The primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle. These interactions lead to some of the primary radiation being absorbed, being modified, or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles that have large shielding masses, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, and this secondary radiation can be significant enough to cause concern. When considering surface operations, there is also a secondary radiation source from the surface of the planet, known as albedo, with neutrons being one of the most significant species. Given new vehicle designs for deep space and Mars missions, the secondary radiation environment and the implications of that environment is currently not well understood. Thus, several studies are necessary to fill the knowledge gaps of this secondary radiation environment. In this paper, we put forth the initial steps to increasing our understanding of neutron production from large vehicles by comparing the neutron production resulting from our radiation transport codes and providing a preliminary validation of our results against flight data. This paper will review the details of these results and discuss the finer points of the analysis.

  6. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Larson, James H; Richardson, William B; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, John C; Vallazza, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the USA and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: (1) How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and (2) Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee river mouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee river mouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee river mouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content

  7. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, J. C.; Vallazza, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the U.S. and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee rivermouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee rivermouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee rivermouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content in the

  8. Secondary product glucosyltransferase and putative glucosyltransferase expression during Citrus paradisi (c.v. Duncan) growth and development.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jala J; Owens, Daniel K; McIntosh, Cecilia A

    2011-10-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites that have significant roles in plant defense and human nutrition. Glucosyltransferases (GTs) catalyze the transfer of sugars from high energy sugar donors to other substrates. Several different secondary product GTs exist in the tissues of grapefruit making it a model plant for studying their structure and function. The goal of this investigation was to determine the expression patterns of seven putative secondary product GTs during grapefruit growth and development by quantifying mRNA expression levels in the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and mature fruit to establish whether the genes are expressed constitutively or if one or more could be expressed in a tissue specific manner and/or developmentally regulated. Six growth stages were defined from which RNA was extracted, and expression levels were quantified by standardized densitometry of gene-specific RT-PCR products. Results show that there were variable degrees of PGT expression in different tissues and at different developmental stages. These results add to the growing knowledge base of dynamics of expression and potential regulation of secondary metabolism in Citrus paradisi.

  9. LC-MS-Based Metabolomics Study of Marine Bacterial Secondary Metabolite and Antibiotic Production in Salinispora arenicola

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Utpal; Hewavitharana, Amitha K.; Ng, Yi Kai; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Fuerst, John A.; Hodson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    An LC-MS-based metabolomics approach was used to characterise the variation in secondary metabolite production due to changes in the salt content of the growth media as well as across different growth periods (incubation times). We used metabolomics as a tool to investigate the production of rifamycins (antibiotics) and other secondary metabolites in the obligate marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola, isolated from Great Barrier Reef (GBR) sponges, at two defined salt concentrations and over three different incubation periods. The results indicated that a 14 day incubation period is optimal for the maximum production of rifamycin B, whereas rifamycin S and W achieve their maximum concentration at 29 days. A “chemical profile” link between the days of incubation and the salt concentration of the growth medium was shown to exist and reliably represents a critical point for selection of growth medium and harvest time. PMID:25574739

  10. Gas phase emissions from cooking processes and their secondary aerosol production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen; Bruns, Emily; Termime-roussel, Brice; Detournay, Anais; Mohr, Claudia; Crippa, Monica; Slowik, Jay; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre; El Haddad, Imad

    2014-05-01

    Long before the industrial evolution and the era of fossil fuels, high concentrations of aerosol particles were alluded to in heavily populated areas, including ancient Rome and medieval London. Recent radiocarbon measurements (14C) conducted in modern megacities came as a surprise: carbonaceous aerosol (mainly organic aerosol, OA), a predominant fraction of particulate matter (PM), remains overwhelmingly non-fossil despite extensive fossil fuel combustion. Such particles are directly emitted (primary OA, POA) or formed in-situ in the atmosphere (secondary OA, SOA) via photochemical reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Urban levels of non-fossil OA greatly exceed the levels measured in pristine environments strongly impacted by biogenic emissions, suggesting a contribution from unidentified anthropogenic non-fossil sources to urban OA. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) techniques applied to ambient aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne) data identify primary cooking emissions (COA) as one of the main sources of primary non-fossil OA in major cities like London (Allan et al., 2010), New York (Sun et al., 2011) and Beijing (Huang et al., 2010). Cooking processes can also emit VOCs that can act as SOA precursors, potentially explaining in part the high levels of oxygenated OA (OOA) identified by the AMS in urban areas. However, at present, the chemical nature of these VOCs and their secondary aerosol production potential (SAPP) remain virtually unknown. The approach adopted here involves laboratory quantification of PM and VOC emission factors from the main primary COA emitting processes and their SAPP. Primary emissions from deep-fat frying, vegetable boiling, vegetable frying and meat cooking for different oils, meats and vegetables were analysed under controlled conditions after ~100 times dilution. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a high resolution proton transfer time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR

  11. Complexity of the transcriptional network controlling secondary wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Secondary walls in the form of wood and fibers are the most abundant biomass produced by vascular plants, and are important raw materials for many industrial uses. Understanding how secondary walls are constructed is of significance in basic plant biology and also has far-reaching implications in genetic engineering of plant biomass better suited for various end uses, such as biofuel production. Secondary walls are composed of three major biopolymers, i.e., cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin, the biosynthesis of which requires the coordinated transcriptional regulation of all their biosynthesis genes. Genomic and molecular studies have identified a number of transcription factors, whose expression is associated with secondary wall biosynthesis. We comprehensively review how these secondary wall-associated transcription factors function together to turn on the secondary wall biosynthetic program, which leads to secondary wall deposition in vascular plants. The transcriptional network regulating secondary wall biosynthesis employs a multi-leveled feed-forward loop regulatory structure, in which the top-level secondary wall NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) master switches activate the second-level MYB master switches and they together induce the expression of downstream transcription factors and secondary wall biosynthesis genes. Secondary wall NAC master switches and secondary wall MYB master switches bind to and activate the SNBE (secondary wall NAC binding element) and SMRE (secondary wall MYB-responsive element) sites, respectively, in their target gene promoters. Further investigation of what and how developmental signals trigger the transcriptional network to regulate secondary wall biosynthesis and how different secondary wall-associated transcription factors function cooperatively in activating secondary wall biosynthetic pathways will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the transcriptional control of secondary wall biosynthesis.

  12. Population structure and secondary production of Siriella clausii, a dominant detritus feeding mysid in Posidonia oceanica meadows (W Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberá, Carmen; Sanchez-Jerez, Pablo; Sorbe, Jean Claude

    2013-10-01

    Temporal trends in abundance, demographic structure of the population and secondary production of Siriella clausii were studied at three different sectors of Posidonia oceanica meadows in the SE Iberian Peninsula, with different levels of habitat complexity. Secondary production was calculated through three methods widely employed in marine invertebrates: the Hynes method (based on demographic structure data) and models by Morin-Bourassa and Brey (based on biomass data). This filter/grazer and detritus feeder is the most abundant mysid in P. oceanica seagrass meadows in the Mediterranean. The population structure was similar in the three sectors, but the temporal pattern of abundance was different, at times even opposite. This pattern may be related to the aggregated spatial distribution, metapopulation dynamics or stochastic factors, but other potential factors could be involved, such as habitat features or predation rates. The values of production oscillated between 25 and 60 mgAFDW/m2/year, depending on the calculation method that was applied, and showed differences between sites and seagrass complexity. The present values are intermediate between those characterising highly productive systems, such as estuaries, and systems of limited productivity (bathyal habitats). Compared to other peracarids, mysid production is greater than that of isopods and less than amphipod production. This is possibly related to the life cycle and reproductive strategies. Detritus feeders such as S. clausii may play an important trophic role due their capacity to use as food the biomass associated to detritus, which constitutes larges reservoirs of carbon derived from seagrass primary production.

  13. Genetic manipulation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis for improved production in Streptomyces and other actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Baltz, Richard H

    2016-03-01

    Actinomycetes continue to be important sources for the discovery of secondary metabolites for applications in human medicine, animal health, and crop protection. With the maturation of actinomycete genome mining as a robust approach to identify new and novel cryptic secondary metabolite gene clusters, it is critical to continue developing methods to activate and enhance secondary metabolite biosynthesis for discovery, development, and large-scale manufacturing. This review covers recent reports on promising new approaches and further validations or technical improvements of existing approaches to strain improvement applicable to a wide range of Streptomyces species and other actinomycetes.

  14. Systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species for the production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species continue to attract attention as a source of novel medicinal compounds. Despite a long history of studies on these microorganisms, they still have many biochemical mysteries to be elucidated. Investigations of novel secondary metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters have been more systematized with high-throughput techniques through inspections of correlations among components of the primary and secondary metabolisms at the genome scale. Moreover, up-to-date information on the genome of Streptomyces species with emphasis on their secondary metabolism has been collected in the form of databases and knowledgebases, providing predictive information and enabling one to explore experimentally unrecognized biological spaces of secondary metabolism. Herein, we review recent trends in the systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species.

  15. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  16. Carbon cycling and net ecosystem production at an early stage of secondary succession in an abandoned coppice forest.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Shizu, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Ai; Yashiro, Yuichiro; Koizumi, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Secondary mixed forests are one of the dominant forest cover types in human-dominated temperate regions. However, our understanding of how secondary succession affects carbon cycling and carbon sequestration in these ecosystems is limited. We studied carbon cycling and net ecosystem production (NEP) over 4 years (2004-2008) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest at an early stage of secondary succession (18 years after clear-cutting). Net primary production of the 18-year-old forest in this study was 5.2 tC ha(-1 )year(-1), including below-ground coarse roots; this was partitioned into 2.5 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) biomass increment, 1.6 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) foliage litter, and 1.0 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) other woody detritus. The total amount of annual soil surface CO(2) efflux was 6.8 tC ha(-1 )year(-1), which included root respiration (1.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)) and heterotrophic respiration (RH) from soils (4.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)). The 18-year forest at this study site exhibited a great increase in biomass pool as a result of considerable total tree growth and low mortality of tree stems. In contrast, the soil organic matter (SOM) pool decreased markedly (-1.6 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)), although further study of below-ground detritus production and RH of SOM decomposition is needed. This young 18-year forest was a weak carbon sink (0.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)) at this stage of secondary succession. The NEP of this 18-year forest is likely to increase gradually because biomass increases with tree growth and with the improvement of the SOM pool through increasing litter and dead wood production with stand development.

  17. Rethinking the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget: stronger production, faster removal, shorter lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, Alma; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Jo, Duseong S.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Madronich, Sasha; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent laboratory studies suggest that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation rates are higher than assumed in current models. There is also evidence that SOA removal by dry and wet deposition occurs more efficiently than some current models suggest and that photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation may be important (but currently ignored) SOA sinks. Here, we have updated the global GEOS-Chem model to include this new information on formation (i.e., wall-corrected yields and emissions of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds) and on removal processes (photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation). We compare simulated SOA from various model configurations against ground, aircraft and satellite measurements to assess the extent to which these improved representations of SOA formation and removal processes are consistent with observed characteristics of the SOA distribution. The updated model presents a more dynamic picture of the life cycle of atmospheric SOA, with production rates 3.9 times higher and sinks a factor of 3.6 more efficient than in the base model. In particular, the updated model predicts larger SOA concentrations in the boundary layer and lower concentrations in the upper troposphere, leading to better agreement with surface and aircraft measurements of organic aerosol compared to the base model. Our analysis thus suggests that the long-standing discrepancy in model predictions of the vertical SOA distribution can now be resolved, at least in part, by a stronger source and stronger sinks leading to a shorter lifetime. The predicted global SOA burden in the updated model is 0.88 Tg and the corresponding direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere is -0.33 W m-2, which is comparable to recent model estimates constrained by observations. The updated model predicts a population-weighed global mean surface SOA concentration that is a factor of 2 higher than in the base model, suggesting the need for a reanalysis of the contribution of

  18. Measurement of secondary particle production induced by particle therapy ion beams impinging on a PMMA target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Piersanti, L.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.

    2016-05-01

    Particle therapy is a technique that uses accelerated charged ions for cancer treatment and combines a high irradiation precision with a high biological effectiveness in killing tumor cells [1]. Informations about the secondary particles emitted in the interaction of an ion beam with the patient during a treatment can be of great interest in order to monitor the dose deposition. For this purpose an experiment at the HIT (Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center) beam facility has been performed in order to measure fluxes and emission profiles of secondary particles produced in the interaction of therapeutic beams with a PMMA target. In this contribution some preliminary results about the emission profiles and the energy spectra of the detected secondaries will be presented.

  19. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Food Products (Meats). (Program CIP: 01.0401 - Agricultural and Food Products Processing)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Curriculum Unit, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  20. Sensitivity of macrobenthic secondary production to trawling in the English sector of the Greater North Sea: A biological trait approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolam, S. G.; Coggan, R. C.; Eggleton, J.; Diesing, M.; Stephens, D.

    2014-01-01

    Demersal trawling constitutes the most significant human impact on both the structure and functioning of coastal seabed fauna. While a number of studies have assessed the impacts of trawling on faunal community structure and the degree to which different taxa are vulnerable to trawling, few have focused on how these impacts affect important ecological functions of the seabed. In this study, we use biological trait analysis (BTA) to assess the relative sensitivity of benthic macrofauna to trawling, in both the short- and long-term, and use this information to describe the spatial variation in sensitivity of secondary production for the Greater North Sea (GNS). Within the GNS, estimates of total production varied by almost three orders of magnitude, from 1.66 kJ m- 2 y- 1 to 968.9 kJ m- 2 y- 1. Large-scale patterns were observed in the proportion of secondary production derived from trawling-sensitive taxa. In the southern North Sea, total production is predominantly governed by taxa with low sensitivity to trawling, whereas production is relatively trawling-sensitive in the northern North Sea and western English Channel. In general, the more sensitive and productive regions are associated with poorly-sorted, gravelly or muddy sediments, while the less sensitive and less productive regions are associated with well-sorted, sandy substrates. These relationships between production sensitivity and environmental features are primarily due to variations in long-term recovery; total production of most assemblages is highly sensitive to the direct impacts of trawling. We discuss the implications of these findings for management 1decisions to improve the environmental sustainability of trawling.

  1. Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Activity Regulates Tomato Root Growth via Effects on Secondary Cell Wall Production1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Margaretha J.; Osorio, Sonia; Araújo, Wagner L.; Balbo, Ilse; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Maximova, Eugenia; Carrari, Fernando; Bunik, Victoria I.; Persson, Staffan; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’) plants independently expressing fragments of various genes encoding enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in antisense orientation have previously been characterized as exhibiting altered root growth. In this study, we evaluate the rates of respiration of roots from these lines in addition to determining their total dry weight accumulation. Given that these features were highly correlated, we decided to carry out an evaluation of the cell wall composition in the transformants that revealed a substantial reduction in cellulose. Since the bulk of cellulose is associated with the secondary cell walls in roots, we reasoned that the transformants most likely were deficient in secondary wall cellulose production. Consistent with these findings, cross-sections of the root collar (approximately 15 mm from the junction between root and stem) displayed reduced lignified secondary cell walls for the transformants. In contrast, cell and cell wall patterning displayed no differences in elongating cells close to the root tip. To further characterize the modified cell wall metabolism, we performed feeding experiments in which we incubated excised root tips in [U-14C]glucose in the presence or absence of phosphonate inhibitors of the reaction catalyzed by 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. Taken together, the combined results suggest that restriction of root respiration leads to a deficit in secondary cell wall synthesis. These data are discussed in the context of current models of biomass partitioning and plant growth. PMID:20118274

  2. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  3. Histories of Discipline: The Performative Re/Productions of Subjectivities of Secondary English Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanko, Rebecca Louise

    2012-01-01

    Research on teaching, and research about secondary English teachers in particular, has focused on classroom practice. This focus implicitly devalues knowledges beyond those related to classroom practice, and re/produces a public/private divide in the subjectivities of teachers in which "teacher identity" and "teacher knowledge"…

  4. Secondary production of the fiddler crab Uca rapax from mangrove areas under anthropogenic eutrophication in the Western Atlantic, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tarso de M M; Soares-Gomes, Abilio

    2015-12-30

    Fiddler crabs Uca rapax were analyzed in three mangrove areas located in both a lagoon and estuarine system in order to study the influence of eutrophication on their population dynamics and production. Populations at the three sites showed a biased sex ratio. Densities were similar at the three sites, but biomass was higher at the lagoon system. Despite biomass being higher at the most eutrophic site, this site exhibited the lowest production. Regarding age structure, the population inhabiting the less eutrophic site mainly comprised younger crabs. The lower production and smaller P/B ratio found in the more eutrophic site were most likely consequences of a high mortality rate and an aged population. Our study evidences the high plasticity of the fiddler crab U. rapax, and confirms secondary production and P/B ratio estimates as useful tools to assess the effects of environmental change.

  5. Survey-guided load research: An end-use analysis methodology test

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, W.M.

    1993-08-01

    Energy use by end-use equipment is a function of the rated capacity of the equipment, frequency of use, and duration of each use. Many end used include multiple states, each with a different capacity, frequency, and duration. Some equipment provides benefits that are related to other uses, resulting in an indirect linkage between the primary energy-using equipment and the end use. Water heaters are one example. End-use metering of energy-using equipment provides the most accurate measure of energy use. Nevertheless, this energy-use ``signal`` is buried in background ``noise`` due to variations in the capacity, frequency, and duration of each end use and end user. Reliable estimates of energy use depend on a variety of methods to increase the ``signal-to-noise`` ratio (i.e., reduce the variance). Research of the energy consumption of household end-uses contains some inherent sampling problems: intrusiveness, cost, extensive data generated, analyses are time and computationally intensive. The goal of the methodology test described in this paper was to address these problems through a method that focused end-use analyses on a limited set of issues and data for program evaluation purposes. The approach tested used a detailed survey of end-use metered subjects to identify the pattern of end-use behavior as an alternative to estimating the frequency and duration of each use from the end-use data itself.

  6. Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor and Monte Carlo coupled simulation of deuteron/triton transport and secondary products generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan-bo; Liu, Han-gang; Wang, Kan; Yang, Xin; Feng, Qi-jie

    2012-09-01

    Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor has being studied in China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). Current Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP and GEANT, are inadequate when applied in this multi-step reactions problems. A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) has been developed to simulate such coupled problem, from neutron absorption, to charged particle ionization and secondary neutron generation. "Forced particle production" variance reduction technique has been implemented to improve the calculation speed distinctly by making deuteron/triton induced secondary product plays a major role. Nuclear data is handled from ENDF or TENDL, and stopping power from SRIM, which described better for low energy deuteron/triton interactions. As a validation, accelerator driven mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source is employed, which has been deeply studied and includes deuteron transport and secondary neutron generation. Various parameters, including fusion neutron angle distribution, average neutron energy at different emission directions, differential and integral energy distributions, are calculated with our tool and traditional deterministic method as references. As a result, we present the calculation results of convertor with RSMC, including conversion ratio of 1 mm 6LiD with a typical thermal neutron (Maxwell spectrum) incidence, and fusion neutron spectrum, which will be used for our experiment.

  7. 7 CFR 782.12 - Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. 782.12... Certificate Program § 782.12 Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. (a) Each entity that imports wheat originating in Canada shall, for each entry into the U.S., obtain form FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for...

  8. 7 CFR 782.12 - Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. 782.12... Certificate Program § 782.12 Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. (a) Each entity that imports wheat originating in Canada shall, for each entry into the U.S., obtain form FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for...

  9. 7 CFR 782.12 - Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. 782.12... Certificate Program § 782.12 Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. (a) Each entity that imports wheat originating in Canada shall, for each entry into the U.S., obtain form FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for...

  10. 7 CFR 782.12 - Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. 782.12... Certificate Program § 782.12 Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. (a) Each entity that imports wheat originating in Canada shall, for each entry into the U.S., obtain form FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for...

  11. 7 CFR 782.12 - Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. 782.12... Certificate Program § 782.12 Filing FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for Wheat. (a) Each entity that imports wheat originating in Canada shall, for each entry into the U.S., obtain form FSA-750, End-Use Certificate for...

  12. Production of alkenes and novel secondary products by P450 OleTJE using novel H2 O2 -generating fusion protein systems.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Sarah; Tee, Kang Lan; Rattray, Nicholas J; McLean, Kirsty J; Leys, David; Parker, David A; Blankley, Richard T; Munro, Andrew W

    2017-03-01

    Jeotgalicoccus sp. 8456 OleTJE (CYP152L1) is a fatty acid decarboxylase cytochrome P450 that uses hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) to catalyse production of terminal alkenes, which are industrially important chemicals with biofuel applications. We report enzyme fusion systems in which Streptomyces coelicolor alditol oxidase (AldO) is linked to OleTJE . AldO oxidizes polyols (including glycerol), generating H2 O2 as a coproduct and facilitating its use for efficient OleTJE -dependent fatty acid decarboxylation. AldO activity is regulatable by polyol substrate titration, enabling control over H2 O2 supply to minimize oxidative inactivation of OleTJE and prolong activity for increased alkene production. We also use these fusion systems to generate novel products from secondary turnover of 2-OH and 3-OH myristic acid primary products, expanding the catalytic repertoire of OleTJE .

  13. The Importance of Production: An Expanding Focus in Secondary and Tertiary Science Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, T. S.

    1983-01-01

    Encourages science educators to consider engaging students in science projects resulting in socially useful products. Educational presentations meant to perform social functions (soft products) and preparation/execution of environmental manipulations (hard products) such as pollution analysis, plant breeding, or administering medical tests are…

  14. Secondary Neutron-Production Cross Sections from Heavy-IonInteractions between 230 and 600 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.H.; Zeitlin, C.J.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Iwase,H.; Nakamura, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Sato, H.; Yashima, H.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.

    2006-10-04

    Secondary neutron-production cross-sections have beenmeasured from interactions of 230 MeV/nucleon He, 400 MeV/nucleon N, 400MeV/nucleon Kr, 400 MeV/nucleon Xe, 500 MeV/nucleon Fe, and 600MeV/nucleon Ne interacting in a variety of elemental and compositetargets. We report the double-differential production cross sections,angular distributions, energy spectra, and total cross sections from allsystems. Neutron energies were measured using the time-of-flighttechnique, and were measured at laboratory angles between 5 deg and 80deg. The spectra exhibit behavior previously reported in otherheavy-ion-induced neutron production experiments; namely, a peak atforward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, withthe remaining spectra generated by preequilibrium and equilibriumprocesses. The double-differential spectra are fitted with amoving-source parameterization. Observations on the dependence of thetotal cross sections on target and projectile mass arediscussed.

  15. Lake secondary production fueled by rapid transfer of low molecular weight organic carbon from terrestrial sources to aquatic consumers.

    PubMed

    Berggren, M; Ström, L; Laudon, H; Karlsson, J; Jonsson, A; Giesler, R; Bergström, A-K; Jansson, M

    2010-07-01

    Carbon of terrestrial origin often makes up a significant share of consumer biomass in unproductive lake ecosystems. However, the mechanisms for terrestrial support of lake secondary production are largely unclear. By using a modelling approach, we show that terrestrial export of dissolved labile low molecular weight carbon (LMWC) compounds supported 80% (34-95%), 54% (19-90%) and 23% (7-45%) of the secondary production by bacteria, protozoa and metazoa, respectively, in a 7-km(2) boreal lake (conservative to liberal estimates in brackets). Bacterial growth on LMWC was of similar magnitude as that of primary production (PP), and grazing on bacteria effectively channelled the LMWC carbon to higher trophic levels. We suggest that rapid turnover of forest LMWC pools enables continuous export of fresh photosynthates and other labile metabolites to aquatic systems, and that substantial transfer of LMWC from terrestrial sources to lake consumers can occur within a few days. Sequestration of LMWC of terrestrial origin, thus, helps explain high shares of terrestrial carbon in lake organisms and implies that lake food webs can be closely dependent on recent terrestrial PP.

  16. Secondary-ion and electron production from surfaces bombarded by large polyatomic ions.

    PubMed

    Martens, J; Ens, W; Standing, K G; Verentchikov, A

    1992-02-01

    Heavy molecular ions with energies in the range 10-20 keV and masses from 276 u to 132,000 u, produced by matrix-assisted laser desorption, were used as primary projectiles to produce secondary-ion spectra from a variety of surfaces in a tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In the negative mode the ratio of electron emission to secondary-ion emission was found to decrease rapidly with increasing projectile mass. Ion emission was found to dominate for primary ions larger than approximately 10,000 u. Positive or negative molecular ions and cations were observed from several organic targets of masses up to 1140 u (gramicidin S) for incident projectiles up to mass 132,000 u, i.e., for projectile speeds down to approximately 7000 m/s. Other ions characteristic of the target were also observed for these projectiles. Thus, large polyatomic ions can cause secondary-ion desorption even at very low velocity. The background ions of both polarities are similar to those found in keV particle bombardment by monatomic projectiles. The same ions are observed for all the projectiles; most can be identified with hydrocarbon background. The relative intensities of the background positive ions are largely independent of projectile, and for both polarities the ratio of the ions characterizing the target to those forming the background is approximately constant for all the projectiles. These results strongly suggest that the background ions come from the usual layer of organic impurities attached to the target surface. No direct evidence for surface-induced dissociation was observed in this mass and energy range.

  17. Streptomycetes in micro-cultures: growth, production of secondary metabolites, and storage and retrieval in the 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Minas, W; Bailey, J E; Duetz, W

    2000-12-01

    Mycelium-forming Streptomyces strains were grown in one milliliter liquid micro-cultures in square deep-well microtiter plates. Growth was evaluated with respect to biomass formation and production of secondary metabolites which were found to be very similar in the micro-cultures, bioreactor, and shake flask cultivations, respectively. Despite repetitive sampling and extensive growth on the walls of the wells, no cross contamination occurred. Furthermore, we successfully employed cold storage at -20 degrees C of spore suspensions (in the 96-well format), directly prepared from cultures grown on agar in the microtitre plate. Cultures were retrieved by replicating aliquots from the frozen spore suspensions.

  18. Evaluation of energy deposition and secondary particle production in proton therapy of brain using a slab head phantom

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sayyed Bijan; Hadizadeh, Mohammad Hadi; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Loushab, Mahdy Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Aim Evaluation of energy deposition of protons in human brain and calculation of the secondary neutrons and photons produced by protons in proton therapy. Background Radiation therapy is one of the main methods of treating localized cancer tumors. The use of high energy proton beam in radiotherapy was proposed almost 60 years ago. In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in this subject in the context of radiation therapy. High energy protons suffer little angular deflection and have a well-defined penetration range, with a sharp increase in the energy loss at the end of their trajectories, namely the Bragg peak. Materials and methods A slab head phantom was used for the purpose of simulating proton therapy in brain tissue. In this study simulation was carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code. Results By using mono energetic proton pencil beams, energy depositions in tissues, especially inside the brain, as well as estimating the neutron and photon production as a result of proton interactions in the body, together with their energy spectra, were calculated or obtained. The amount of energy escaped from the head by secondary neutrons and photons was determined. Conclusions It was found that for high energy proton beams the amount of escaped energy by neutrons is almost 10 times larger than that by photons. We estimated that at 110 MeV beam energy, the overall proton energy “leaked” from the head by secondary photons and neutrons to be around 1%. PMID:25337410

  19. Importance and Implications of the Production of Phenolic Secondary Metabolites by Endophytic Fungi: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Negreiros de Carvalho, Patrícia Lunardelli; Silva, Eliane de Oliveira; Chagas-Paula, Daniela Aparecida; Hortolan Luiz, Jaine Honorata; Ikegaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    In the natural products research, a valuable approach is the prospection of uncommon sources and unexplored habitat. Special attention has been given to endophytic fungi because of their ability to produce new and interesting secondary metabolites, which have several biological applications. The endophytes establish exclusive symbiotic relationships with plants and the metabolic interactions may support the synthesis of some similar valuables compounds. Among secondary metabolites, phenol-derived structures are responsible for several bioactivities such as antioxidant, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, among others. Phenolic compounds might be biosynthesized from the shikimate pathway. Although shikimic acid is a common precursor in plants, it is described as rare in microorganisms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review about phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi and a comparison has been made with those produced by the plant host. This review covers 124 phenolic secondary metabolites produced by endophytic fungi. Considering the data analyzed by us, only seven of such compounds were isolated from fungi and from their hosts. These observations claim for more attention to phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi with a view to understand the real importance of these compounds to endophytes survival.

  20. Production of secondary particles and nuclei in cosmic rays collisions with the interstellar gas using the FLUKA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazziotta, M. N.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gaggero, D.; Loparco, F.; Sala, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The measured fluxes of secondary particles produced by the interactions of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with the astronomical environment play a crucial role in understanding the physics of CR transport. In this work we present a comprehensive calculation of the secondary hadron, lepton, gamma-ray and neutrino yields produced by the inelastic interactions between several species of stable or long-lived cosmic rays projectiles (p, D, T, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10Be, 10B, 11B, 12C, 13C, 14C, 14N, 15N, 16O, 17O, 18O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si) and different target gas nuclei (p, 4He, 12C, 14N, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, 28Si and 40Ar). The yields are calculated using FLUKA, a simulation package designed to compute the energy distributions of secondary products with large accuracy in a wide energy range. The present results provide, for the first time, a complete and self-consistent set of all the relevant inclusive cross sections regarding the whole spectrum of secondary products in nuclear collisions. We cover, for the projectiles, a kinetic energy range extending from 0.1 GeV/n up to 100 TeV/n in the lab frame. In order to show the importance of our results for multi-messenger studies about the physics of CR propagation, we evaluate the propagated spectra of Galactic secondary nuclei, leptons, and gamma rays produced by the interactions of CRs with the interstellar gas, exploiting the numerical codes DRAGON and GammaSky. We show that, adopting our cross section database, we are able to provide a good fit of a complete sample of CR observables, including: leptonic and hadronic spectra measured at Earth, the local interstellar spectra measured by Voyager, and the gamma-ray emissivities from Fermi-LAT collaboration. We also show a set of gamma-ray and neutrino full-sky maps and spectra.

  1. Toxic secondary metabolite production in genetically modified potatoes in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Derek; Jones, Huw; Gans, Paul; Coates, Steven; Smith, Lydia M J

    2005-10-05

    Potatoes produce a number of toxic secondary metabolites, which are divided into two groups: the sesquiterpenes and the glycoalkaloids (PGAs): whereas PGAs are largely preformed and present in toxic quantities in both the foliage and "green" potatoes, it is well documented that the levels of PGAs and sesquiterpenes are effected by many biotic an abiotic stresses. The development of genetically modified potato varieties has made it prudent to ascertain whether there may be changes in the amounts or types of these secondary metabolites either as a direct effect of the transgene or due to its interactions with environmental variables. Transgenic potato lines were exposed, along with nontransgenic lines, to a range of biotic and abiotic stresses and a range of environmental conditions in the field and store. Following stressing, a comparison was made of levels of potato glycoalkaloid and sesquiterpene levels between the two groups. Significant differences were observed in the levels of both glycoalkaloid and sesquiterpene levels between transgenic and control material and between infected and noninfected material.

  2. 15 CFR 744.2 - Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on certain nuclear end... POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.2 Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses. (a) General...” does not lessen or otherwise change the responsibilities of persons subject to the EAR. (1)...

  3. 15 CFR 744.5 - Restrictions on certain maritime nuclear propulsion end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... nuclear propulsion end-uses. 744.5 Section 744.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... nuclear propulsion end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for items... item is for use in connection with a foreign maritime nuclear propulsion project. This...

  4. 15 CFR 744.2 - Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restrictions on certain nuclear end... POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.2 Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses. (a) General...” does not lessen or otherwise change the responsibilities of persons subject to the EAR. (1)...

  5. 15 CFR 744.2 - Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restrictions on certain nuclear end... POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.2 Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses. (a) General...” does not lessen or otherwise change the responsibilities of persons subject to the EAR. (1)...

  6. 15 CFR 744.2 - Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restrictions on certain nuclear end... POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.2 Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses. (a) General...” does not lessen or otherwise change the responsibilities of persons subject to the EAR. (1)...

  7. 15 CFR 744.5 - Restrictions on certain maritime nuclear propulsion end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... nuclear propulsion end-uses. 744.5 Section 744.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... nuclear propulsion end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for items... item is for use in connection with a foreign maritime nuclear propulsion project. This...

  8. 15 CFR 744.5 - Restrictions on certain maritime nuclear propulsion end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... nuclear propulsion end-uses. 744.5 Section 744.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... nuclear propulsion end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for items... item is for use in connection with a foreign maritime nuclear propulsion project. This...

  9. 15 CFR 744.2 - Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restrictions on certain nuclear end... POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.2 Restrictions on certain nuclear end-uses. (a) General...” does not lessen or otherwise change the responsibilities of persons subject to the EAR. (1)...

  10. 77 FR 51459 - Suspension of End-Use Certificate Program Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Secretary of Agriculture to: (1) Establish end-use certificates for imports of wheat and barley from a foreign country that requires end-use certificates for imports of U.S. produced wheat or barley; and (2... (FSA-751). List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 782 Administrative practice and procedure, Barley,...

  11. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  12. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  13. 15 CFR 744.4 - Restrictions on certain chemical and biological weapons end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... biological weapons end-uses. 744.4 Section 744.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... and biological weapons end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for... biological weapons in or by any country or destination, worldwide. (b) Additional prohibition on...

  14. 15 CFR 744.4 - Restrictions on certain chemical and biological weapons end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... biological weapons end-uses. 744.4 Section 744.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... and biological weapons end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for... biological weapons in or by any country or destination, worldwide. (b) Additional prohibition on...

  15. 15 CFR 744.4 - Restrictions on certain chemical and biological weapons end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... biological weapons end-uses. 744.4 Section 744.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... and biological weapons end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for... biological weapons in or by any country or destination, worldwide. (b) Additional prohibition on...

  16. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  17. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  18. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  19. 15 CFR 744.4 - Restrictions on certain chemical and biological weapons end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... biological weapons end-uses. 744.4 Section 744.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... and biological weapons end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for... biological weapons in or by any country or destination, worldwide. (b) Additional prohibition on...

  20. 15 CFR 744.4 - Restrictions on certain chemical and biological weapons end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... biological weapons end-uses. 744.4 Section 744.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... and biological weapons end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for... biological weapons in or by any country or destination, worldwide. (b) Additional prohibition on...

  1. 15 CFR 744.5 - Restrictions on certain maritime nuclear propulsion end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... nuclear propulsion end-uses. 744.5 Section 744.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... nuclear propulsion end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for items... item is for use in connection with a foreign maritime nuclear propulsion project. This...

  2. 15 CFR 744.5 - Restrictions on certain maritime nuclear propulsion end-uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... nuclear propulsion end-uses. 744.5 Section 744.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... nuclear propulsion end-uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition to the license requirements for items... item is for use in connection with a foreign maritime nuclear propulsion project. This...

  3. 48 CFR 245.7001-6, - DD Form 1822, End Use Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DD Form 1822, End Use Certificate. 245.7001-6, Section 245.7001-6, Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION....7001-6, DD Form 1822, End Use Certificate. Use when directed by the plant clearance officer....

  4. Identification, recombinant expression, and biochemical analysis of putative secondary product glucosyltransferases from Citrus paradisi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoid and limonoid glycosides influence taste properties as well as marketability of citrus fruit and products, particularly in grapefruit. In this work, nine grapefruit putative natural product glucosyltransferases (PGTs) were resolved by either using degenerate primers against the semi-conser...

  5. Protein secondary-shell interactions enhance the photoinduced hydrogen production of cobalt protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Vaughn, Michael David; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2014-12-28

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel with potential for production scalability, provided that inexpensive, efficient molecular catalysts utilizing base metals can be developed for hydrogen production. Here we show for the first time that cobalt myoglobin (CoMyo) catalyzes hydrogen production in mild aerobic conditions with turnover number of 520 over 8 hours. Compared to free Co-protoporphyrin IX, incorporation into the myoglobin scaffold results in a 4-fold increase in photoinduced hydrogen production activity. Engineered variants in which specific histidine resides in proximity of the active site were mutated to alanine result in modulation of the catalytic activity, with the H64A/H97A mutant displaying activity 2.5-fold higher than wild type. Our results demonstrate that protein scaffolds can augment and modulate the intrinsic catalytic activity of molecular hydrogen production catalysts.

  6. Grazing processes and secondary production in the Arabian Sea: A simple food web synthesis with measurement constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Michael R.

    The Joint Global Ocean Flux Study in the Arabian Sea during the mid 1990s provides a rare opportunity to elucidate carbon flows in the lower food web of an open ocean ecosystem. Analysis of that data to date has, however, produced widely divergent perspectives on major flux pathways and roles of zooplankton: from zooplankton as controlling grazers tightly coupled to microbial processes to zooplankton as casual consumers who let a large fraction of production, mostly generated by picophytoplankton, flow directly to detritus and export. Synthesis of experimental grazing rates and production inferences for mesozooplankton and microzooplankton fit well in a conceptually simple food web, constrained by measured carbon flows through phytoplankton and bacteria. Microzooplankton dominate grazing processes, consuming over 70% of particulate primary production (PP), on average, and providing steady and significant supplemental nutrition to mesozooplankton. Direct grazing estimates of mesozooplankton, on the order of 25% of PP, are sufficient to balance the remaining particulate production, with additional transfer through a one- to two-step food chain of microzooplankton accounting for a total ingestion of ˜40% of PP required for mesozooplankton secondary production. Dissolved organic carbon fluxes to bacteria are provided mostly within the constraints of gross and net primary production. Contradictory results from inverse models are likely due to an assumption that exaggerates by approximately twofold the production contribution of picophytoplankton and to the failure to use measured rates of gross primary production as a system constraint. Grazing generally balances net particulate primary production in the Arabian Sea, but true grazer control of phytoplankton dynamics remains an open issue for further study.

  7. Inhibitory effects of devil's claw (secondary root of Harpagophytum procumbens) extract and harpagoside on cytokine production in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kazunori; Murata, Kazuya; Naruto, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2010-04-01

    Successive oral administration (50 mg/kg) of a 50% ethanolic extract (HP-ext) of devil's claw, the secondary root of Harpagophytum procumbens, showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect in the rat adjuvant-induced chronic arthritis model. HP-ext dose-dependently suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)] in mouse macrophage cells (RAW 264.7). Harpagoside, a major iridoid glycoside present in devil's claw, was found to be one of the active agents in HP-ext and inhibited the production of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha by RAW 264.7.

  8. Further Characterization of CELSS Wastes: A Review of Solid Wastes Present to Support Potential Secondary Biomass Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Matthew S.

    1996-01-01

    Controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) may one day play an essential role in extraterrestrial colonies. Key to the success of any CELSS will be the system's ability to approach a self-supporting status through recovery and reuse of basic resources. Primary CELSS solid wastes with potential to support secondary biomass production will be inedible plant biomass and metabolic human wastes. Solid waste production is summarized and reported as 765 g N per day per person, including 300 g C and 37 g N per day per person. One Resource Recovery configuration using the bioprocessing of solid wastes into a Tilapia feed stream is examined. Based on estimated conversion efficiencies, 12 g of protein per day per person is produced as a nutrition supplement. The unique tissue composition of crops produced at the Kennedy Space Center CELSS Program highlights the need to evaluate Resource Recovery components with data generated in the CELSS environment.

  9. Bioactive natural products from fungicolous Hawaiian isolates: secondary metabolites from a Phialemoniopsis sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amninder; Rogers, Kristina D.; Swenson, Dale E.; Dowd, Patrick F.; Wicklow, Donald T.; Gloer, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigations of two fungal isolates initially identified as members of the genus Phialemonium are described. Both isolates were obtained as colonists of other fungi collected on the island of Hawaii and were later assigned as P. curvatum. However, P. curvatum has recently been reclassified as a member of a new genus (Phialemoniopsis) and renamed as Phialemoniopsis curvata. Studies of solid–substrate fermentation cultures of one of these isolates afforded an oxirapentyn analogue and destruxin A4 as major components, while analysis of the second strain led to the isolation of several simple aromatic metabolites and a compound of mixed biogenetic origin called gabusectin that had previously been reported only in a patent. Structures were assigned mainly by detailed nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry analysis, and those of two of the major components were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. This report constitutes the first description of secondary metabolites from a member of the genus Phialemoniopsis. PMID:25379336

  10. Light-induced biochemical variations in secondary metabolite production and antioxidant activity in callus cultures of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Rab, Abdur; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (S. rebaudiana) is a very important species with worldwide medicinal and commercial uses. Light is one of the major elicitors that fluctuate morphogenic potential and biochemical responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolite production in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. Leaf explants were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and exposed to various spectral lights. 6-Benzyle adenine (BA) and 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D; 2.0 mgl(-1)) were used for callus induction. The control light (16/8h) produced optimum callogenic response (92.73%) than other colored lights. Compared to other colored lights, control grown cultures displayed maximum biomass accumulation (5.78 gl(-1)) during a prolonged log phase at the 18th day of growth kinetics. Cultures grown under blue light enhanced total phenolic content (TPC; 102.32 μg/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC; 22.07 μg/g DW) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 11.63 μg/g DW). On the contrary, green and red lights improved reducing power assay (RPA; 0.71Fe(II)g(-1) DW) and DPPH-radical scavenging activity (DRSA; 80%). Herein, we concluded that the utilization of colored lights is a promising strategy for enhanced production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana.

  11. New Synthetic Pyrazine Carboxamide Derivatives as Potential Elicitors in Production of Secondary Metabolite in In vitro Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tůmová, Lenka; Tůma, Jiří; Doležal, Martin; Dučaiová, Zuzana; Kubeš, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silymarin, an active polyphenolic fraction of Silybum marianum, and high flavonoid content of Fagopyrum possess various interesting biological activities. The substituted pyrazine-2-carboxamides were previously used as effective elicitors of studied secondary metabolites. Objective: To study the effect of new synthetic pyrazine carboxamide derivatives, N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-5-tert-butylpyrazine-2-carboxamide (1) and 3-(3-((trifluoromethyl) benzyl) amino) pyrazine-2-carboxamide (2), on flavonolignan and flavonoid production in S. marianum and Fagopyrumes culentum in vitro cultures. Materials and Methods: Callus and suspension cultures were cultured on MS medium containing α-naphtaleneacetic acid or 2,4-D. Three elicitor concentrations for different exposure times were tested. Dried and powdered samples of callus and suspension cultures were extracted with methanol and analyzed by DAD-HPLC. Results: Compound 1 showed as a good elicitor of taxifolin production. The effect on silymarin complex was less visible with a maximum between 24 and 48 h after 3.292 ×10−4 mol/L concentration. The detailed analysis showed that silychristin was the most abundant. Compound 2 was effective in rutin production only in callus culture with maximum 24 h and 168 h after application of 3.3756 ×10−3 mol/L concentration and 48 and 72 h after 3.3756 ×10−4 mol/L concentration. Conclusion: From the results of the performed experiments, it can be concluded that compound 1 shows to be suitable elicitor for enhanced production of taxifolin and silychristin in S. marianum, mainly when 3.292 ×10−4 mol/L concentration was used, and compound 2 is suitable for increase rutin production in callus cultures and less appropriate for suspension cultures of F. esculentum. SUMMARY The influence of two new synthetic pyrazine-2-carboxamidesderivatives on secondary metabolite content of Silybum marianum and Fagopyrum esculentum in vitro cultures was tested.In S. marianum, the derivate N-(4

  12. Environmental and genetic effects on yield and secondary metabolite production in Brassica rapa crops.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Marta; Cartea, María Elena; Butrón, Ana María; Sotelo, Tamara; Velasco, Pablo

    2012-06-06

    Twelve Brassica rapa varieties grown, such as turnip green and turnip top, were evaluated in seven environments to determine the environmental and genotypic variables that have an influence on crop production and on the content of glucosinolates and phenolic compounds. Factorial regression analysis showed that, in general, crop production was favored by high temperatures all along the crop cycle. However, the lack of a period of intense cold could be a limiting factor. The metabolite content seems to be regulated by extreme temperatures (daily maximum and minimum temperatures) rather than by average daily temperatures. With regard to genotypic covariables, turnip top production was significantly affected by traits related to the vegetative development and time to flowering. Meanwhile, turnip green production was largely affected by a sinapoyl derivative compound, which is a precursor of cell wall components. Cross-talk between glucosinolate biosynthesis and phenylpropanoid signaling pathways is suggested.

  13. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Study on Combustion of Secondary Pyrolysis Products from Various Coals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sunghwan

    In burning coal suspensions, non-uniform mixing and particle dispersion promote secondary pyrolysis and soot formation. The changes in volatile compositions affect volatiles combustion, which is responsible for flame propagation and pollutant formation during pulverized coal combustion. The lack of kinetic data on volatiles combustion is attributed to the complexity of fuel compositions and its close association with devolatilization and char oxidation, which cause difficulties in the isolation of volatiles combustion. This work attempts to determine global combustion rates of noncondensible volatiles by measuring laminar burning velocities. A radiant coal flow reactor generates combustible mixtures of noncondensibles, which are combusted in a constant volume combustion bomb to generate laminar burning velocities for the noncondensibles from Pit. #8 bituminous and Low. Kit. lv bituminous coals. The laminar burning velocities of noncondensible volatiles increase with the extent of secondary pyrolysis for both coals because the molar yields of H_2 and C_2H_2 increase during the conversion of tar into soot. For noncondensibles from Pit. #8 coal, the burning velocity at a fuel equivalence ratio of 1.2 and (N_2 + CO_2 + H_2 O):O_2 = 6.8, is quadrupled from 55 to 215 cm/s as the extent of sooting increases from 0.66 to 1.0. The combustion in air shows a similar variation. A correlation is developed using the equivalent concentrations of H_2 and CO with the adjustment of O_2 concentrations to convert hydrocarbons into CO: rm S_{u}^2 = Cxi_{O _2}(xi_{H_2} - alphaxi_{CO})exp({- }{Eover RT_{f}}) A single set of parameters describes the variation of burning velocities on the extent of sooting and coal types for four coals including Ill. #6 bituminous and Dietz subbituminous coals. Correlation parameters are C = 13.2 times 10^8 cm^2/s^2 , alpha = 1.0, and E = 27.4 kcal/mole. Numerical predictions of burning velocities with sensitivity analyses are performed using a detailed C

  15. Secondary organic aerosol production from aqueous reactions of atmospheric phenols with an organic triplet excited state.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy D; Sio, Vicky; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Qi; Anastasio, Cort

    2014-01-21

    Condensed-phase chemistry plays a significant role in the formation and evolution of atmospheric organic aerosols. Past studies of the aqueous photoformation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have largely focused on hydroxyl radical oxidation, but here we show that triplet excited states of organic compounds ((3)C*) can also be important aqueous oxidants. We studied the aqueous photoreactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol) with the aromatic carbonyl 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde (DMB); all of these species are emitted by biomass burning. Under simulated sunlight, DMB forms a triplet excited state that rapidly oxidizes phenols to form low-volatility SOA. Rate constants for these reactions are fast and increase with decreasing pH and increasing methoxy substitution of the phenols. Mass yields of aqueous SOA are near 100% for all three phenols. For typical ambient conditions in areas with biomass combustion, the aqueous oxidation of phenols by (3)C* is faster than by hydroxyl radical, although rates depend strongly on pH, oxidant concentrations, and the identity of the phenol. Our results suggest that (3)C* can be the dominant aqueous oxidant of phenols in areas impacted by biomass combustion and that this is a significant pathway for forming SOA.

  16. Comparative evaluation of two Trichoderma harzianum strains for major secondary metabolite production and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Vivek; Kumar, Jitendra; Rana, Virendra S; Sati, Om P; Walia, S

    2015-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to identify the major secondary metabolite, produced by two Trichoderma harzianum strains (T-4 and T-5) with their antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi using poison food technique. The ethyl acetate extract was subjected to column chromatography using n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol gradually. Chromatographic separation of ethyl acetate extract of T. harzianum (T-4) resulted in the isolation and identification of palmitic acid (1), 1,8-dihydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone (2), 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (3), 2(5H)-furanone (4), stigmasterol (5) and β-sitosterol (6), while T. harzianum (T-5) gave palmitic acid (1), 1-hydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone (7), δ-decanolactone (8), 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (3), ergosterol (9), harzianopyridone (10) and 6-methyl-1,3,8-trihydroxyanthraquinone (11) as major metabolites. Among compounds screened for antifungal activity, compound 10 was found to be most active (EC50 35.9-50.2 μg mL(-1)). In conclusion, the present investigation provided significant information about antifungal activity and compounds isolated from two different strains of T. harzianum obtained from two different Himalayan locations.

  17. Linking Load, Fuel, and Emission Controls to Photochemical Production of Secondary Organic Aerosol from a Diesel Engine.

    PubMed

    Jathar, Shantanu H; Friedman, Beth; Galang, Abril A; Link, Michael F; Brophy, Patrick; Volckens, John; Eluri, Sailaja; Farmer, Delphine K

    2017-02-07

    Diesel engines are important sources of fine particle pollution in urban environments, but their contribution to the atmospheric formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is not well constrained. We investigated direct emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and photochemical production of SOA from a diesel engine using an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). In less than a day of simulated atmospheric aging, SOA production exceeded POA emissions by an order of magnitude or more. Efficient combustion at higher engine loads coupled to the removal of SOA precursors and particle emissions by aftertreatment systems reduced POA emission factors by an order of magnitude and SOA production factors by factors of 2-10. The only exception was that the retrofitted aftertreatment did not reduce SOA production at idle loads where exhaust temperatures were low enough to limit removal of SOA precursors in the oxidation catalyst. Use of biodiesel resulted in nearly identical POA and SOA compared to diesel. The effective SOA yield of diesel exhaust was similar to that of unburned diesel fuel. While OFRs can help study the multiday evolution, at low particle concentrations OFRs may not allow for complete gas/particle partitioning and bias the potential of precursors to form SOA.

  18. Oxidative stress and carbon metabolism influence Aspergillus flavus transcriptome composition and secondary metabolite production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of crops with aflatoxin is a serious threat to global food safety. Aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus has been shown to be exacerbated by drought stress in the field and by oxidative stress in vitro. We examined the transcriptomes of three toxigenic and three atoxigenic isolate...

  19. Measuring Aspirations, Belonging, and Productivity in Secondary Students: Validation of the Student School Engagement Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazel, Cynthia E.; Vazirabadi, G. Emma; Gallagher, John

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a model of student school engagement, comprising aspirations, belonging, and productivity. From this model, items for the Student School Engagement Measure (SSEM) were developed. The SSEM was validated with data from 396 eighth graders in an urban school district. Utilizing structural equation modeling, the second-order…

  20. Influence of Leadership Style on Teacher's Job Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Taraba State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamaki, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to find out the appropriate leadership style that could make teachers to be effective in their job productivity. One hundred and sixty-five teachers were used in the study. Frequency counts, percentage and chi-square test were used in data analysis. Research survey was used as a method of research and stratified…

  1. Dermal Exposure Associated with Occupational End Use of Pesticides and the Role of Protective Measures

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, Ewan; Carey, Renee; Keegel, Tessa; El-Zaemay, Sonia; Fritschi, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupational end users of pesticides may experience bodily absorption of the pesticide products they use, risking possible health effects. The purpose of this paper is to provide a guide for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers working in the field of agricultural health or other areas where occupational end use of pesticides and exposure issues are of interest. Methods This paper characterizes the health effects of pesticide exposure, jobs associated with pesticide use, pesticide-related tasks, absorption of pesticides through the skin, and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for reducing exposure. Conclusions Although international and national efforts to reduce pesticide exposure through regulatory means should continue, it is difficult in the agricultural sector to implement engineering or system controls. It is clear that use of PPE does reduce dermal pesticide exposure but compliance among the majority of occupationally exposed pesticide end users appears to be poor. More research is needed on higher-order controls to reduce pesticide exposure and to understand the reasons for poor compliance with PPE and identify effective training methods. PMID:24106643

  2. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  3. Techno-economic analysis for the evaluation of three UCG synthesis gas end use approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Kempka, Thomas; Burchart-Korol, Dorota; Krawczyk, Piotr; Kapusta, Krzysztof; Stańczyk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) enables the utilization of coal reserves that are economically not exploitable because of complex geological boundary conditions. In the present study we investigate UCG as a potential economic approach for conversion of deep-seated coals into a synthesis gas and its application within three different utilization options. Related to geological boundary conditions and the chosen gasification agent, UCG synthesis gas composes of varying methane, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide amounts. In accordance to its calorific value, the processed UCG synthesis gas can be utilized in different manners, as for electricity generation in a combined cycle power plant or for feedstock production making use of its various chemical components. In the present study we analyze UCG synthesis gas utilization economics in the context of clean electricity generation with an integrated carbon capture and storage process (CCS) as well as synthetic fuel and fertilizer production (Kempka et al., 2010) based on a gas composition achieved during an in situ UCG trial in the Wieczorek Mine. Hereby, we also consider chemical feedstock production in order to mitigate CO2 emissions. Within a sensitivity analysis of UCG synthesis gas calorific value variations, we produce a range of capital and operational expenditure bandwidths that allow for an economic assessment of different synthesis gas end use approaches. To carry out the integrated techno-economic assessment of the coupled systems and the sensitivity analysis, we adapted the techno-economic UCG-CCS model developed by Nakaten et al. (2014). Our techno-economic modeling results demonstrate that the calorific value has a high impact on the economics of UCG synthesis gas utilization. In the underlying study, the synthesis gas is not suitable for an economic competitive electricity generation, due to the relatively low calorific value of 4.5 MJ/Nm³. To be a profitable option for electricity

  4. Enhancement of methane production in mesophilic anaerobic digestion of secondary sewage sludge by advanced thermal hydrolysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Abelleira-Pereira, Jose M; Pérez-Elvira, Sara I; Sánchez-Oneto, Jezabel; de la Cruz, Roberto; Portela, Juan R; Nebot, Enrique

    2015-03-15

    Studies on the development and evolution of anaerobic digestion (AD) pretreatments are nowadays becoming widespread, due to the outstanding benefits that these processes could entail in the management of sewage sludge. Production of sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an extremely important environmental issue. The work presented in this paper is a continuation of our previous studies with the aim of understanding and developing the advanced thermal hydrolysis (ATH) process. ATH is a novel AD pretreatment based on a thermal hydrolysis (TH) process plus hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) addition that takes advantage of a peroxidation/direct steam injection synergistic effect. The main goal of the present research was to compare the performance of TH and ATH, conducted at a wide range of operating conditions, as pretreatments of mesophilic AD with an emphasis on methane production enhancement as a key parameter and its connection with the sludge solubilization. Results showed that both TH and ATH patently improved methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP (biochemical methane potential) tests in comparison with BMP control tests (raw secondary sewage sludge). Besides other interesting results and discussions, a promising result was obtained since ATH, operated at temperature (115 °C), pretreatment time (5 min) and pressure (1 bar) considerably below those typically used in TH (170 °C, 30 min, 8 bar), managed to enhance the methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP tests [biodegradability factor (fB) = cumulative CH4production/cumulative CH4production (Control) = 1.51 ± 0.01] to quite similar levels than conventional TH pretreatment [fB = 1.52 ± 0.03].

  5. Effects of inorganic seed aerosols on the particulate products of aged 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mingqiang; Hao, Liqing; Cai, Shunyou; Gu, Xuejun; Zhang, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Wang, Zhenya; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2017-03-01

    Inorganic aerosols such as (NH4)2SO4, NaNO3 and CaCl2 are commonly present in the Chinese urban atmosphere. They could significantly affect the formation and aging of ambient secondary organic aerosols (SOA), but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this work we studied SOA formation from the photooxidation reaction of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135-TMB) with 100 μg/m3 of the above three types of inorganic aerosols as seeds in a laboratory chamber. We focused on the aging products of SOA particles by exposing them to high levels of oxidizing hydroxyl radicals (OH). The particulate products of SOA were measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) and Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) were applied to organic mass spectra for clustering. In the presence of (NH4)2SO4 seeds, 4-methyl-1H-imidazole, 4-methyl-imidazole-2-acetaldehyde and other imidazole derivative compounds formed from reactions of NH4+ with methylglyoxal were detected as new aged products. We also observed aromatic nitrogen-containing organic compounds as the major aged products in the presence of NaNO3 seeds as a consequence of reaction with OH and NO2 radicals, which were generated by UV irradiation of acidic aqueous nitrate, inducing nitration reactions with phenolic compounds. As CaCl2 has the strongest hygroscopic properties of the three salt particles tested, the greater water content on the surface of the aerosol may facilitate the condensing of more gas-phase organic acid products to the hygroscopic CaCl2 seeds, forming H+ ions that catalyze the heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes, products of photooxidation of 135-TMB, and forming high-molecular-weight (HMW) compounds. These results provide new insight into the aromatic SOA aging mechanisms.

  6. Formation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls on Secondary Copper Production Fly Ash: Mechanistic Aspects and Correlation to Other Persistent Organic Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Guorui; Wang, Mei; Zheng, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Emission of unintentionally formed polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from industrial thermal processes is a global issue. Because the production and use of technical PCB mixtures has been banned, industrial thermal processes have become increasingly important sources of PCBs. Among these processes, secondary copper smelting is an important PCB source in China. In the present study, the potential for fly ash-mediated formation of PCBs in the secondary copper industry, and the mechanisms involved, were studied in laboratory thermochemical experiments. The total PCB concentrations were 37–70 times higher than the initial concentrations. Thermochemical reactions on the fly ash amplified the potential toxic equivalents of PCBs. The formation of PCBs over time and the effect of temperature were investigated. Based on analyses of PCB homologue profiles with different reaction conditions, a chlorination mechanism was proposed for forming PCBs in addition to a de novo synthesis mechanism. The chlorination pathway was supported by close correlations between each pair of adjacent homologue groups. Formation of PCBs and multiple persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated naphthalenes, occurred during the tests, indicating that these compounds may share similar formation mechanisms. PMID:26374495

  7. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-07-14

    Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

  8. Formation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls on Secondary Copper Production Fly Ash: Mechanistic Aspects and Correlation to Other Persistent Organic Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Guorui; Wang, Mei; Zheng, Minghui

    2015-09-01

    Emission of unintentionally formed polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from industrial thermal processes is a global issue. Because the production and use of technical PCB mixtures has been banned, industrial thermal processes have become increasingly important sources of PCBs. Among these processes, secondary copper smelting is an important PCB source in China. In the present study, the potential for fly ash-mediated formation of PCBs in the secondary copper industry, and the mechanisms involved, were studied in laboratory thermochemical experiments. The total PCB concentrations were 37-70 times higher than the initial concentrations. Thermochemical reactions on the fly ash amplified the potential toxic equivalents of PCBs. The formation of PCBs over time and the effect of temperature were investigated. Based on analyses of PCB homologue profiles with different reaction conditions, a chlorination mechanism was proposed for forming PCBs in addition to a de novo synthesis mechanism. The chlorination pathway was supported by close correlations between each pair of adjacent homologue groups. Formation of PCBs and multiple persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated naphthalenes, occurred during the tests, indicating that these compounds may share similar formation mechanisms.

  9. Recent advances in plant biotechnology and genetic engineering for production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sheludko, Y V

    2010-01-01

    For a long time people are using plants not only as crop cultures but also for obtaining of various chemicals. Currently plants remain one of the most important and essential sources of biologically active compounds in spite of progress in chemical or microbial synthesis. In our review we compare potentials and perspectives of modern genetic engineering approaches for pharmaceutical biotechnology and give examples of actual biotechnological systems used for production of several promising natural compounds: artemisinin, paclitaxel and scopolamine.

  10. Secondary production, calcification and CO2 fluxes in the cirripedes Chthamalus montagui and Elminius modestus.

    PubMed

    Golléty, Claire; Gentil, Franck; Davoult, Dominique

    2008-02-01

    Calcification, a process common to numerous marine taxa, has traditionally been considered to be a significant source of CO(2) in tropical waters only. A number of relatively recent studies, however, have shown that significant amounts of CO(2) are also produced in temperate waters, although none of these studies was carried out on rocky shores, which are considered to be very productive systems. We compared the CO(2) fluxes due to respiration and calcification in two temperate species, the cirripedes Chthamalus montagui and Elminius modestus. The population dynamics of both species were estimated at two sites during a 1-year experimental period in order to establish mean organic (ash-free dry weight) and CaCO(3) (dry shell weight) production. Based on these parameters, we estimated the CO(2) fluxes due to respiration and calcification. CaCO(3) production was estimated to be 481.0 and 1,803.9 g(CaCO3) m(-2) year(-1) at each site, representing 3.4 and 12.7 mol(CO2) m(-2) year(-1) respectively, of released CO(2). These fluxes represent each 47% of the CO(2) released as a result of respiration and calcification. The production of CaCO(3) at the high-density site was: (1) among the highest values obtained for temperate organisms, and (2) comparable to the estimated CO(2) fluxes for coral reefs. As calcifying organisms are well represented in temperate ecosystems in terms of both density and biomass, our results provide clear evidence that calcification of temperate organisms should not be underestimated. Additional studies on other rocky shore taxa are needed before the relative importance of calcification in rocky intertidal carbon budgets can be generalized.

  11. Efficient Multi-Level Modeling and Monitoring of End-use Energy Profile in Commercial Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhaoyi

    In this work, modeling and monitoring of end-use power consumption in commercial buildings are investigated through both Top-Down and Bottom-Up approaches. In the Top-Down approach, an adaptive support vector regression (ASVR) model is developed to accommodate the nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the macro-level time series, thus providing a framework for the modeling and diagnosis of end-use power consumption. In the Bottom-Up approach, an appliance-data-driven stochastic model is built to predict each end-use sector of a commercial building. Power disaggregation is studied as a technique to facilitate Bottom-Up prediction. In Bottom-Up monitoring and diagnostic detection, a new dimensionality reduction technique is explored to facilitate the analysis of multivariate binary behavioral signals in building end-uses.

  12. Room-Temperature Reactivity Of Silicon Nanocrystals With Solvents: The Case Of Ketone And Hydrogen Production From Secondary Alcohols: Catalysis?

    PubMed

    El-Demellawi, Jehad K; Holt, Christopher R; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Al-Talla, Zeyad A; Saih, Youssef; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-07-01

    Although silicon nanoparticles dispersed in liquids are used in various applications ranging from biolabeling to hydrogen production, their reactivities with their solvents and their catalytic properties remain still unexplored. Here, we discovered that, because of their surface structures and mechanical strain, silicon nanoparticles react strongly with their solvents and may act as catalysts for the dehydrogenation, at room temperature, of secondary alcohols (e.g., isopropanol) into ketones and hydrogen. This catalytic reaction was monitored by gas chromatography, pH measurements, mass spectroscopy, and solid-state NMR. This discovery provides new understanding of the role played by silicon nanoparticles, and nanosilicon in general, in their reactivity in solvents in general, as well as being candidates in catalysis.

  13. Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

    1990-07-01

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Effect of drying temperature and air flow on the production and retention of secondary metabolites in saffron.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Matthew J; Menary, Robert C; Davies, Noel W

    2005-07-27

    Safranal is the compound most responsible for the aroma of saffron spice and is, together with the suite of crocin pigments, the major determinant of the product quality. The content of safranal and pigments in saffron is determined by the method of postharvest treatment of the Crocus stigmas. A range of drying treatments involving different temperatures, with or without air flow, was applied to stigmas from three harvest dates. Dual solvent extractions combined with quantitative measurement using GC and HPLC-UV-vis techniques were used to analyze the secondary metabolite contents of the products. It was demonstrated that these methods overcame the previously reported problems in measuring the concentration of both pigments and safranal in saffron caused by the very different polarities and thus solubilities of these compounds. The results showed that a brief (20 min) initial period at a relatively high temperature (between 80 and 92 degrees C) followed by continued drying at a lower temperature (43 degrees C) produced saffron with a safranal content up to 25 times that of saffron dried only at lower temperatures. Evidence was provided suggesting that drying with significant air flow reduced the safranal concentration. The results, moreover, indicated that high-temperature treatment had allowed greater retention of crocin pigments than in saffron dried at intermediate temperatures (46-58 degrees C). The biochemical implications of the various treatments are discussed in relation to the potential for optimizing color and fragrance quality in the product.

  15. High-time resolved measurements of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors and products in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2016-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are present in the atmosphere entirely in the gas phase are directly emitted by biogenic (~1089 Tg yr-1) and anthropogenic sources (~185 Tg yr-1). However, the sources and molecular speciation of intermediate VOCs (IVOCs), which are for the most part also present almost entirely in the gas phase, are not well characterized. The VOCs and IVOCs participate in reactions that form ozone and semivolatile OC (SVOC) that partition into the aerosol phase. Formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are part of a complex dynamic process that depends on the molecular speciation and concentration of VOCs, IVOCs, primary organic aerosol (POA), and the level of oxidants (NO3, OH, O3). The current lack of understanding of OA properties and their impact on radiative forcing, ecosystems, and human health is partly due to limitations of models to predict SOA production on local, regional, and global scales. More accurate forecasting of SOA production requires high-temporal resolution measurement and molecular characterization of SOA precursors and products. For the subject study, the IVOCs and aerosol-phase organic matter were collected using the high-volume sampling technique and were analyzed by multidimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The IVOCs included terpenes, terpenoids, n-alkanes, branched alkanes, isoprenoids, alkylbenzenes, cycloalkylbenzenes, PAH, alkyl PAH, and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Diurnal variations of OA species containing multiple oxygenated functionalities and selected SOA tracers of isorprene, α-pinene, toluene, cyclohexene, and n-dodecane oxidation were also quantified. The data for SOA precursor and oxidation products presented here will be useful for evaluating the ability of molecular-specific SOA models to forecast SOA production in and downwind of urban areas.

  16. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  17. Growth and secondary production of an eventual reef fish during mangrove residency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunce, Craig H.; Serafy, Joseph E.

    2008-08-01

    Hierarchical data frameworks have been proposed to determine the relative value of fish habitats. Although conceptually accurate, judgments as to which habitat is more "essential" are limited by a lack of available information. This work provides much needed growth and production rates for gray snapper ( Lutjanus griseus), an ontogenetic habitat shifting reef fish, during mangrove residency. Ages were estimated using modal progression analysis of length-frequency distributions coupled with a biologically-realistic spawning date. Growth estimates place age-1 L. griseus at 155 mm (TL), age-2 at 243, and age-3 at 302 mm. These size-at-age estimates are consistent with otolith-based studies and are a natural extension of linear growth models for early juveniles. Lutjanus griseus primarily use southeastern Florida mangrove shoreline habitats for approximately 2 years between 0.86 and 2.84 years of age. Corresponding production:biomass ratios for these cohorts were 1.51 and 0.90. While these values are similar to other estimates for fishes inhabiting vegetated coastal wetlands in North America, they are much less than new estimates from a Bahamian mangrove creek system. These new data highlight important differences between the habitat value of mangrove shorelines of continental (low-relief) and island (high-relief) systems.

  18. Secondary succession is influenced by belowground insect herbivory on a productive site.

    PubMed

    Schädler, Martin; Jung, Gertraud; Brandl, Roland; Auge, Harald

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of insect herbivory on a plant community of a productive old-field community by applying foliar and soil insecticides in a full factorial design. During the first 3 years of succession, insecticide treatments had only minor effects on total cover abundance and species richness. However, species ranking within the plant community was strongly affected by soil insecticide but not by foliar insecticide. Creeping thistle, Cirsium arvense, dominated the experimental plots with reduced root herbivory, while square-stemmed willow-herb, Epilobium adnatum, dominated the control and the plots with foliar insecticide. When soil insecticide was applied, cover abundance of monocarpic forbs increased and cover abundance of polycarpic herbs decreased compared to the control. However, this effect was due to a few abundant plant species and is not based on a consistent difference between life history groups. Instead, application of soil insecticide promoted persistence of species that established at the start of succession, and suppressed species that established in the following years. We conclude that below-ground herbivory reduces competitive ability of resident species and, thus, facilitates colonization by late-successional species. Hence, soil insects can exert strong top-down effects on the vegetation of productive sites by affecting dominant plant species and altering competitive balances.

  19. Identification, Recombinant Expression, and Biochemical Analysis of Putative Secondary Product Glucosyltransferases from Citrus paradisi.

    PubMed

    Devaiah, Shivakumar P; Owens, Daniel K; Sibhatu, Mebrahtu B; Sarkar, Tapasree Roy; Strong, Christy L; Mallampalli, Venkata K P S; Asiago, Josephat; Cooke, Jennifer; Kiser, Starla; Lin, Zhangfan; Wamucho, Anye; Hayford, Deborah; Williams, Bruce E; Loftis, Peri; Berhow, Mark; Pike, Lee M; McIntosh, Cecilia A

    2016-03-09

    Flavonoid and limonoid glycosides influence taste properties as well as marketability of Citrus fruit and products, particularly grapefruit. In this work, nine grapefruit putative natural product glucosyltransferases (PGTs) were resolved by either using degenerate primers against the semiconserved PSPG box motif, SMART-RACE RT-PCR, and primer walking to full-length coding regions; screening a directionally cloned young grapefruit leaf EST library; designing primers against sequences from other Citrus species; or identifying PGTs from Citrus contigs in the harvEST database. The PGT proteins associated with the identified full-length coding regions were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and/or Pichia pastoris and then tested for activity with a suite of substrates including flavonoid, simple phenolic, coumarin, and/or limonoid compounds. A number of these compounds were eliminated from the predicted and/or potential substrate pool for the identified PGTs. Enzyme activity was detected in some instances with quercetin and catechol glucosyltransferase activities having been identified.

  20. Storm-induced changes in coastal geomorphology control estuarine secondary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Comeau, Luc A.; Grant, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are highly sensitive not only to projected effects of climate change such as ocean warming, acidification, and sea-level rise but also to the incidence of nor'easter storms and hurricanes. The effects of storms and hurricanes can be extreme, with immediate impact on coastal geomorphology and water circulation, which is integral to estuarine function and consequently to provision of ecosystem services. In this article, we present the results of a natural estuarine-scale experiment on the effects of changes in coastal geomorphology on hydrodynamics and aquaculture production. A bay in Prince Edward Island, Canada, was altered when a nor'easter storm eroded a second tidal inlet through a barrier island. Previous field and modeling studies allowed a comparison of prestorm and post-storm circulation, food limitation by cultured mussels, and aquaculture harvest. Dramatic increases in mussel production occurred in the year following the opening of the new inlet. Model studies showed that post-storm circulation reduced food limitation for cultured mussels, allowing greater growth. Climate change is expected to have severe effects on the delivery of marine ecosystem services to human populations by changing the underlying physical-biological coupling inherent to their functioning.

  1. Activation of dormant secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin resistance into the deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-07-29

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(D-Pro-D-Phe) (1), cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-L-prolinate (3), cyclo(L-Ile-L-Pro) (4), cyclo(L-Leu-L-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1-6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent fungal

  2. Activation of Dormant Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin Resistance into the Deep-Sea Fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-01-01

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(d-Pro-d-Phe) (1), cyclo(d-Tyr-d-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-l-prolinate (3), cyclo(l-Ile-l-Pro) (4), cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1–6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent

  3. Factors affecting the formation of disinfection by-products during chlorination and chloramination of secondary effluent for the production of high quality recycled water.

    PubMed

    Doederer, Katrin; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Farré, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    During the production of high quality recycled water by reverse osmosis membrane filtration secondary effluent must be disinfected to limit biofouling on the membrane surface. Advanced Water Treatment Plants in South East Queensland, Australia use disinfectant contact times ranging from 30 min up to 24 h. Disinfectants such as chlorine and chloramines react with effluent organic matter to generate disinfection by-products (DBPs) which could be potentially hazardous to human health if the water is destined for supplementing public water supplies. In this context, secondary effluents are of concern because of their high total organic carbon content which can act as DBP precursors. Also, effluent organic matter may form different DBPs to those formed from natural organic matter during conventional drinking water treatment, either in quantity, identity or simply in the abundance of different DBPs relative to each other. It cannot be assumed per se with certainty that DBP formation will be affected in the same way by operational changes as in drinking water production. Response surface modelling has been employed in this study at the bench scale to investigate the effect of reaction time (0-24 h), pH (5.5-8.5), temperature (23-35 °C), disinfection strategy (chlorine vs chloramines used prior to membrane treatment) and the interaction between these different parameters on DBP formation during disinfection of secondary effluent. The concentration of halogenated DBPs formed during the first 24 h of reaction with the different disinfectants followed the order chlorination > in line-formed monochloramine > pre-formed monochloramine. Contact time with chlorine was the major influencing factor on DBP formation during chlorination, except for the bromine-containing trihalomethanes and dibromoacetonitrile for which pH was more significant. Chlorination at high pH led to an increased formation of chloral hydrate, trichloronitromethane, dibromoacetonitrile and the four

  4. Evidence for methane-subsidised secondary production in a groundwater-fed lowland river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimmer, M.; Grey, J.; Hildrew, A.; Jackson, M.

    2009-04-01

    We are probably familiar with the chemosynthetic ecosystems of the deep Pacific, where life in the dark is coupled to the oxidation of sulphur from ‘black smokers' rather than the sun, but few, if any, would suspect such a mode of life in the classic chalk rivers of southern England. We measured the delta13C values of dominant primary consumers and their potential food sources in a groundwater-fed lowland river. The delta13C of most consumers, such as Gammarus and Simulium, reflected that of the dominant forms of photosynthetic production, whereas the cased larvae of two caddis flies (Agapetus and Silo) were consistently 13C-depleted throughout the year. The river water was supersaturated (50-60 times atmospheric) with methane, reflecting both supersaturation in the groundwater and local production in fine sediments. We measured significant rates of methane oxidation, which generates 13C-depleted organic carbon, in the biofilms on gravel, on the caddis fly cases, and on the bottom of larger rocks. In addition, there was a marked difference in the ratio of methane oxidising potential to chlorophyll a across those substrata. This ratio was below detection in the biofilm (i.e. no methane oxidation) on the tops of rocks, greater on the bottom of rocks, and maximal for the gravels and the caddis cases. If the caddis larvae acquire most of their carbon by grazing the tops of such rocks (where they are normally found), then they must acquire their depleted delta13C values by occasionally grazing biofilm where the ratio of methane oxidation to chlorophyll was much greater, and the most likely candidate is from their own cases. Grazing methane oxidising bacteria could provide the caddis larvae with up to 30 % of their carbon, which could represent a true subsidy from an ancient groundwater source.

  5. Kinetics, Mechanism, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Yield of Aqueous Phase Photo-oxidation of α-Pinene Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Aljawhary, Dana; Zhao, Ran; Lee, Alex K Y; Wang, Chen; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-03-10

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) involves atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of which are emitted from biogenic sources. Oxidation can occur not only in the gas-phase but also in atmospheric aqueous phases such as cloudwater and aerosol liquid water. This study explores for the first time the aqueous-phase OH oxidation chemistry of oxidation products of α-pinene, a major biogenic VOC species emitted to the atmosphere. The kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and formation of SOA compounds in the aqueous phase of two model compounds, cis-pinonic acid (PIN) and tricarballylic acid (TCA), were investigated in the laboratory; TCA was used as a surrogate for 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known α-pinene oxidation product. Aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS) was used to follow the kinetics and reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. Room-temperature second-order rate constants of PIN and TCA were determined to be 3.3 (± 0.5) × 10(9) and 3.1 (± 0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, from which were estimated their condensed-phase atmospheric lifetimes. Aerosol-ToF-CIMS detected a large number of products leading to detailed reaction mechanisms for PIN and MBTCA. By monitoring the particle size distribution after drying, the amount of SOA material remaining in the particle phase was determined. An aqueous SOA yield of 40 to 60% was determined for PIN OH oxidation. Although recent laboratory studies have focused primarily on aqueous-phase processing of isoprene-related compounds, we demonstrate that aqueous formation of SOA materials also occurs from monoterpene oxidation products, thus representing an additional source of biogenically driven aerosol formation.

  6. Use of soybean oil and ammonium sulfate additions to optimize secondary metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Junker, B; Mann, Z; Gailliot, P; Byrne, K; Wilson, J

    1998-12-05

    A valine-overproducing mutant (MA7040, Streptomyces hygroscopicus) was found to produce 1.5 to 2.0 g/L of the immunoregulant, L-683,590, at the 0.6 m3 fermentation scale in a simple batch process using soybean oil and ammonium sulfate-based GYG5 medium. Levels of both lower (L-683,795) and higher (HH1 and HH2) undesirable homolog levels were controlled adequately. This batch process was utilized to produce broth economically at the 19 m3 fermentation scale. Material of acceptable purity was obtained without the multiple pure crystallizations previously required for an earlier culture, MA6678, requiring valine supplementation for impurity control. Investigations at the 0.6 m3 fermentation scale were conducted, varying agitation, pH, initial soybean oil/ammonium sulfate charges, and initial aeration rate to further improve growth and productivity. Mid-cycle ammonia levels and lipase activity appeared to have an important role. Using mid-cycle soybean oil additions, a titer of 2.3 g/L of L-683,590 was obtained, while titers reached 2.7 g/L using mid-cycle soybean oil and ammonium sulfate additions. Both higher and lower homolog levels remained acceptable during this fed-batch process. Optimal timing of mid-cycle oil and ammonium sulfate additions was considered a critical factor to further titer improvements.

  7. Castor oil as secondary carbon source for production of sophorolipids using Starmerella bombicola NRRL Y-17069.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Vinit Kamalkishor; Annapure, Uday S

    2015-01-01

    Sophorolipids (SLs), a prominent member of the biosurfactants family are produced in acidic and/or lactonic form by yeast Starmerella bombicola NRRL Y-17069 when grown on hydrophilic or hydrophobic or both carbon sources. In current study, ricinoleic acid rich castor oil (10%) was used as hydrophobic and glycerol (10%) was used as hydrophilic carbon source. The yields of 24.5 ± 0.25 g/l sophorolipids were analyzed by anthrone and HPLC method which further increased upto 40.24 ± 0.76 g/l sophorolipids using fed batch process at 5L fermenter level. The structures of sophorolipids synthesized on castor oil were elucidated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS), (13)C and (1)H NMR. The results indicated that the ricinoleic acid (RA) gets hydroxylated at ω-1 position but incorporated into sophorolipids through already available hydroxyl group at 12(th) position. It resulted in the production of a novel sophorolipids with hydroxyl fatty acid as side chain and has applications as surfactant for novel drug delivery, anti microbial agent, cosmetic ingredient and emulsifier.

  8. Differential effects of nutrient-limited primary production on primary, secondary or tertiary consumers.

    PubMed

    Malzahn, Arne M; Hantzsche, Florian; Schoo, Katherina L; Boersma, Maarten; Aberle, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional imbalances between predator and prey are the rule rather than the exception at the lower end of food webs. We investigated the role of different grazers in the propagation of nutritionally imbalanced primary production by using the same primary producers in a three-trophic-level food chain and a four-trophic-level food chain experimental setup. The three-trophic-level food chain consisted of a classic single-cell primary producer (Rhodomonas salina), a metazoan grazer (the copepod Acartia tonsa) and a top predator (the jellyfish Gonionemus vertens), while we added a protozoan grazer (Oxyrrhis marina) as primary consumer to the food chain to establish the four-trophic-level food chain. This setup allowed us to investigate how nutrient-limitation effects change from one trophic level to another, and to investigate the performance of two components of our experimental food chains in different trophic positions. Stoichiometry and fatty acid profiles of the algae showed significant differences between the nutrient-depleted [no N and no P addition (-P), respectively] and the nutrient-replete (f/2) treatments. The differences in stoichiometry could be traced when O. marina was the first consumer. Copepods feeding on these flagellates were not affected by the nutritional imbalance of their prey in their stoichiometry, their respiration rates nor in their developmental rates. In contrast, when copepods were the primary consumer, those reared on the -P algae showed significantly higher respiration rates along with significantly lower developmental rates. In neither of our two experimental food chains did the signals from the base of the food chains travel up to jelly fish, our top predator.

  9. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

    2006-06-01

    This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

  10. Estimation of aboveground net primary productivity in secondary tropical dry forests using the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach (CASA) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Sanchez-Azofeifa, GA; Duran, SM; Calvo-Rodriguez, S.

    2016-07-01

    Although tropical dry forests (TDFs) cover roughly 42% of all tropical ecosystems, extensive deforestation and habitat fragmentation pose important limitations for their conservation and restoration worldwide. In order to develop conservation policies for this endangered ecosystem, it is necessary to quantify their provision of ecosystems services such as carbon sequestration and primary production. In this paper we explore the potential of the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach (CASA) for estimating aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in a secondary TDF located at the Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP), Costa Rica. We calculated ANPP using the CASA model (ANPPCASA) in three successional stages (early, intermediate, and late). Each stage has a stand age of 21 years, 32 years, and 50+ years, respectively, estimated as the age since land abandonment. Our results showed that the ANPPCASA for early, intermediate, and late successional stages were 3.22 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, 8.90 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, and 7.59 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, respectively, which are comparable with rates of carbon uptake in other TDFs. Our results indicate that key variables that influence ANPP in our dry forest site were stand age and precipitation seasonality. Incident photosynthetically active radiation and temperature were not dominant in the ANPPCASA. The results of this study highlight the potential of the use of remote sensing techniques and the importance of incorporating successional stage in accurate regional TDF ANPP estimation.

  11. Energy End-Use Patterns in Full-Service Hotels: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Placet, Marylynn; Katipamula, Srinivas; Liu, Bing; Dirks, James A.; Xie, YuLong; Sullivan, Greg; Walent, Jim; Williamson, Rebecca

    2010-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated a program -- Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) -- to work with private-sector companies in the design of highly-efficient retrofit and new construction projects. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting a project with a major hotel company to retrofit a full-service, large hotel with the goal of reducing energy consumption by at least 30%. The first step of the project was an intensive metering and monitoring effort aimed at understanding energy end use patterns in the hotel. About 10% of the guest rooms (32), as well as circuits for most of the end uses in public spaces (lighting, elevators, air handlers and other HVAC system components, and various equipment), were equipped with meters. Data are being collected at 1- or 5-minute intervals and downloaded on a monthly basis for analysis. This paper presents results from the first four months of the monitoring effort, which revealed energy end-use consumption patterns, variability of guest room energy use, daily load curves, monthly variations, and other aspects of hotel energy use. Metered end-use data for hotels at this level of detail are not available from any currently-available public sources. This study presents unique information and insight into energy end-use patterns in the lodging sector of commercial buildings and can also serve as a case study of a complex sub-metering project.

  12. Quantifying the influence of environmental and water conservation attitudes on household end use water consumption.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rachelle M; Stewart, Rodney A; Panuwatwanich, Kriengsak; Williams, Philip R; Hollingsworth, Anna L

    2011-08-01

    Within the research field of urban water demand management, understanding the link between environmental and water conservation attitudes and observed end use water consumption has been limited. Through a mixed method research design incorporating field-based smart metering technology and questionnaire surveys, this paper reveals the relationship between environmental and water conservation attitudes and a domestic water end use break down for 132 detached households located in Gold Coast city, Australia. Using confirmatory factor analysis, attitudinal factors were developed and refined; households were then categorised based on these factors through cluster analysis technique. Results indicated that residents with very positive environmental and water conservation attitudes consumed significantly less water in total and across the behaviourally influenced end uses of shower, clothes washer, irrigation and tap, than those with moderately positive attitudinal concern. The paper concluded with implications for urban water demand management planning, policy and practice.

  13. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  14. Analysis of PG E's residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1992-06-01

    It is generally acknowledged that improvements to end-use load shape and peak demand forecasts for electricity are limited primarily by the absence of reliable end-use data. In this report we analyze recent end-use metered data collected by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company from more than 700 residential customers to develop new inputs for the load shape and peak demand electricity forecasting models used by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the California Energy Commission. Hourly load shapes are normalized to facilitate separate accounting (by the models) of annual energy use and the distribution of that energy use over the hours of the day. Cooling electricity consumption by central air-conditioning is represented analytically as a function of climate. Limited analysis of annual energy use, including unit energy consumption (UEC), and of the allocation of energy use to seasons and system peak days, is also presented.

  15. SU-E-T-521: Investigation of the Uncertainties Involved in Secondary Neutron/gamma Production in Geant4/MCNP6 Monte Carlo Codes for Proton Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzakhanian, L; Enger, S; Giusti, V

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A major concern in proton therapy is the production of secondary neutrons causing secondary cancers, especially in young adults and children. Most utilized Monte Carlo codes in proton therapy are Geant4 and MCNP. However, the default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 do not have suitable cross sections or physical models to properly handle secondary particle production in proton energy ranges used for therapy. In this study, default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 were modified to better handle production of secondaries by adding the TENDL-2012 cross-section library. Methods: In-water proton depth-dose was measured at the “The Svedberg Laboratory” in Uppsala (Sweden). The proton beam was mono-energetic with mean energy of 178.25±0.2 MeV. The measurement set-up was simulated by Geant4 version 10.00 (default and modified version) and MCNP6. Proton depth-dose, primary and secondary particle fluence and neutron equivalent dose were calculated. In case of Geant4, the secondary particle fluence was filtered by all the physics processes to identify the main process responsible for the difference between the default and modified version. Results: The proton depth-dose curves and primary proton fluence show a good agreement between both Geant4 versions and MCNP6. With respect to the modified version, default Geant4 underestimates the production of secondary neutrons while overestimates that of gammas. The “ProtonInElastic” process was identified as the main responsible process for the difference between the two versions. MCNP6 shows higher neutron production and lower gamma production than both Geant4 versions. Conclusion: Despite the good agreement on the proton depth dose curve and primary proton fluence, there is a significant discrepancy on secondary neutron production between MCNP6 and both versions of Geant4. Further studies are thus in order to find the possible cause of this discrepancy or more accurate cross-sections/models to handle the nuclear

  16. Simulated moose (Alces alces L.) browsing increases accumulation of secondary metabolites in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Bergström, Roger; Wallgren, Märtha; Suominen, Otso; Danell, Kjell

    2012-10-01

    We have addressed the impact of moose (Alces alces L.) on accumulation of secondary metabolites, lignin, and nitrogen in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation. The study was conducted within a long-term research project on direct and indirect impacts of moose on the ecosystem. In the experiment, browsing, defecation, and urination corresponding to four different moose densities were simulated for eight years before bilberry tissue was collected and analyzed. Some quantitatively dominant flavonoids were affected by the simulated moose browsing and by habitat productivity and light. The content of flavonoids increased with increasing moose density and light, and decreased with increasing habitat productivity. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in bilberry from nutrient-poor sites may have resulted from the increased photosynthesis relative to growth, which facilitated secondary metabolism. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in plants subjected to simulated moose- herbivory might have been caused in part by loss of biomass. In addition, in areas with high biomass loss, i.e., high moose density, a more open canopy was created and more solar radiation could have induced secondary metabolism.

  17. Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling, An

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is investigating the potential benefits of incorporating interval electricity data into its residential energy end use models. This includes interval smart meter and submeter data from utility assets and systems. It is expected that these data will play a significant role in informing residential energy efficiency policies in the future. Therefore, a long-term strategy for improving the RECS end-use models will not be complete without an investigation of the current state of affairs of submeter data, including their potential for use in the context of residential building energy modeling.

  18. Secondary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Secondary hypertension Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Secondary hypertension (secondary high blood pressure) is high blood pressure that's caused by another medical condition. Secondary hypertension can be caused by conditions that affect your ...

  19. An optimal defense strategy for phenolic glycoside production in Populus trichocarpa--isotope labeling demonstrates secondary metabolite production in growing leaves.

    PubMed

    Massad, Tara Joy; Trumbore, Susan E; Ganbat, Gantsetseg; Reichelt, Michael; Unsicker, Sybille; Boeckler, Andreas; Gleixner, Gerd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ruehlow, Steffen

    2014-07-01

    Large amounts of carbon are required for plant growth, but young, growing tissues often also have high concentrations of defensive secondary metabolites. Plants' capacity to allocate resources to growth and defense is addressed by the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis and the optimal defense hypothesis, which make contrasting predictions. Isotope labeling can demonstrate whether defense compounds are synthesized from stored or newly fixed carbon, allowing a detailed examination of these hypotheses. Populus trichocarpa saplings were pulse-labeled with 13CO2 at the beginning and end of a growing season, and the 13C signatures of phenolic glycosides (salicinoids), sugars, bulk tissue, and respired CO2 were traced over time. Half of the saplings were also subjected to mechanical damage. Populus trichocarpa followed an optimal defense strategy, investing 13C in salicinoids in expanding leaves directly after labeling. Salicinoids turned over quickly, and their production continued throughout the season. Salicin was induced by early-season damage, further demonstrating optimal defense. Salicinoids appear to be of great value to P. trichocarpa, as they command new C both early and late in the growing season, but their fitness benefits require further study. Export of salicinoids between tissues and biochemical pathways enabling induction also needs research. Nonetheless, the investigation of defense production afforded by isotope labeling lends new insights into plants' ability to grow and defend simultaneously.

  20. Data on energy end-use patterns and energy efficiencies in major CO sub 2 emitting countries

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hsing C.

    1990-08-01

    This is a report of the basic data regarding energy end-uses and efficiencies in major CO{sub 2} emitting countries. The task is part of the multi-lab carbon dioxide energy system research program. Fossil energy production and use are the largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions. To gain an insight into the relationship between CO{sub 2} emission and energy use, the global energy consumption patterns and the changing energy efficiencies must be better analyzed and understood. This work attempts to collect and organize the data on energy use and energy efficiency for the ten major CO{sub 2} emitting countries: USA, USSR, the People's Republic of China, Japan, the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Italy, and Australia. A wide variety of information sources have been examined. The data base is presented in tabular format. It is documented by three main parts, the first shows the total final energy consumption by fuel type and end-use sector for each nation. The second shows the detailed energy use by fuel type and function for each end-use sector: residential, commercial, transportation and industrial. The third part shows the country-specific energy balances for electricity generation and use. The data base is a living document and will be updated as additional information becomes available. The data base is to be used to accomplish the ultimate objective of improving the reliability of future CO{sub 2}-emissions estimates. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

  1. Student Work Products as a Teaching Tool for Nature of Science Pedagogical Knowledge: A Professional Development Project with In-Service Secondary Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Erin Peters

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to examine NOS knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge about NOS of in-service secondary science teachers. Data sources included Views of Science and Education scale, lesson plans with rationales for choices, examples of student work products, videotapes of lesson peer reviews, and interviews conducted after the experience.…

  2. Impact of In-Service Training and Staff Development on Workers' Job Performance and Optimal Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Osun State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fejoh, Johnson; Faniran, Victoria Loveth

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of in-service training and staff development on workers' job performance and optimal productivity in public secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study used the ex-post-facto research design. Three research questions and three hypotheses were generated and tested using questionnaire items adapted from…

  3. An Analysis of Efficiency in Senior Secondary Schools in the Gambia 2006-2008: Educational Inputs and Production of Credits in English and Mathematics Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillah, B. M. S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper employs a stochastic production frontier model to assess the efficiency of the senior secondary schools in the Gambia. It examines their efficiency in using and mixing the educational inputs of average teacher salary, average teacher education, average teacher experience and students-to-teacher ratio in producing the number of students…

  4. A Simulation Model for Studying Effects of Pollution and Freshwater Inflow on Secondary Productivity in an Ecosystem. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model of an ecosystem is developed. Secondary productivity is evaluated in terms of man related and controllable factors. Information from an existing physical parameters model is used as well as pertinent biological measurements. Predictive information of value to estuarine management is presented. Biological, chemical, and physical parameters measured in order to develop models of ecosystems are identified.

  5. Rapid method for determining malondialdehyde as secondary oxidation product in palm olein system by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, M E S; Che Man, Y B; Jinap, S; Baharin, B S; Bakar, J

    2002-01-01

    A simple and rapid Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method has been developed for the quantitative determination of malondialdehyde as secondary oxidation product in a palm olein system. The FTIR method was based on a sodium chloride transmission cell and utilised a partial least square statistical approach to derive a calibration model. The frequency region combinations that gave good calibration were 2900-2800, and 1800-1600 cm-1. The precision and accuracy, in the range 0-60 mumol malondialdehyde/kg oil, were comparable to those of the modified distillation method with a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.9891 and standard error of calibration of 1.49. The calibration was cross-validated and produced an r2 of 0.9786 and standard error of prediction of 2.136. The results showed that the FTIR method is versatile, efficient and accurate, and suitable for routine quality control analysis with the result obtainable in about 2 min from a sample of less than 2 mL.

  6. Effect of Water on the Physicomechanical Properties of Composites Containing Secondary Polyethylene and Linen Yarn Production Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajaks, J. A.; Reihmane, S. A.; Lejnieks, J. E.

    2002-07-01

    The effect of the amount of absorbed water on the physicomechanical indices (tensile modulus, tensile strength, and ultimate strain) of composites based on secondary polyethylene (SPE) of two trademarks and linen yarn production waste (LW), both with and without a coupling agent (diphenylmetane diisocyanate - DIC), is evaluated. It is shown that the strength properties considerably depend on the time of water sorption and on the blend composition. The tensile strength decreases with increased amount of absorbed water (with increased time of exposure to distilled water) and with increased content of LW in the composites. This can be explained by the plasticizing effect of water molecules, which is confirmed by the increase in the ultimate strain of specimens after their exposure to water. The slight increase in the strength observed for the systems modified with DIC is probably caused by cross-linking of the free diisocyanate in the system under the action of moisture. The diisocyanate intensifies the interfacial interaction and retards the water-sorption process. Therefore, the resulting strength indices of these systems are higher than those of the unmodified compositions.

  7. Benthic invertebrate density, biomass, and instantaneous secondary production along a fifth-order human-impacted tropical river.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Anna Carolina Fornero; Gücker, Björn; Brauns, Mario; Hille, Sandra; Boëchat, Iola Gonçalves

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess land use effects on the density, biomass, and instantaneous secondary production (IP) of benthic invertebrates in a fifth-order tropical river. Invertebrates were sampled at 11 stations along the Rio das Mortes (upper Rio Grande, Southeast Brazil) in the dry and the rainy season 2010/2011. Invertebrates were counted, determined, and measured to estimate their density, biomass, and IP. Water chemical characteristics, sediment heterogeneity, and habitat structural integrity were assessed in parallel. Total invertebrate density, biomass, and IP were higher in the dry season than those in the rainy season, but did not differ significantly among sampling stations along the river. However, taxon-specific density, biomass, and IP differed similarly among sampling stations along the river and between seasons, suggesting that these metrics had the same bioindication potential. Variability in density, biomass, and IP was mainly explained by seasonality and the percentage of sandy sediment in the riverbed, and not directly by urban or agricultural land use. Our results suggest that the consistently high degradation status of the river, observed from its headwaters to mouth, weakened the response of the invertebrate community to specific land use impacts, so that only local habitat characteristics and seasonality exerted effects.

  8. Enhancement of microbial density and methane production in advanced anaerobic digestion of secondary sewage sludge by continuous removal of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bing; Donnelly, Joanne; Oliveira, Ivo; Anthony, Ruth; Wilson, Victoria; Esteves, Sandra R

    2017-05-01

    Ammonia inhibition mitigation in anaerobic digestion of high solids content of thermally hydrolysed secondary sewage sludge by the NH4(+) affinitive clinoptilolite and a strong acid type ion-exchange resin S957 was investigated. Continuous NH4(+)-N removal was achieved through ion-exchanging at both temperatures with average removals of 50 and 70% for the clinoptilolite and resin dosed reactors, respectively. Approximate 0.2-0.5unit of pH reduction was also observed in the dosed reactors. The synergy of NH4(+)-N removal and pH reduction exponentially decreased free NH3 concentration, from 600 to 90mg/L at 43°C, which mitigated ammonia inhibition and improved methane yields by approximately 54%. Microbial community profiling suggested that facilitated by ammonia removal, the improvement in methane production was mainly achieved through the doubling in bacterial density and a 6-fold increase in population of the Methanosarcinaceae family, which in turn improved the degradation of residual volatile fatty acids, proteins and carbohydrates.

  9. Characterization of particulate products for aging of ethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Jiahui; Cai, Shunyou; Liao, Yingmin; Zhao, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-09-01

    Aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from OH- initiated oxidation of ethylbenzene in the presence of high mass (100-300μg/m(3)) concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol was investigated in a home-made smog chamber in this study. The chemical composition of aged ethylbenzene SOA particles was measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) coupled with a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Experimental results showed that nitrophenol, ethyl-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, methyl glyoxylic acid, 5-ethyl-6-oxo-2,4-hexadienoic acid, 2-ethyl-2,4-hexadiendioic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-ethyl-6-oxo-4-hexenoic acid, 1H-imidazole, hydrated N-glyoxal substituted 1H-imidazole, hydrated glyoxal dimer substituted imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde, N-glyoxal substituted hydrated 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components were the predominant products in the aged particles. Compared to the previous aromatic SOA aging studies, imidazole compounds, which can absorb solar radiation effectively, were newly detected in aged ethylbenzene SOA in the presence of high concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol. These findings provide new information for discussing aromatic SOA aging mechanisms.

  10. Secondary production of freshwater zooplankton communities exposed to a fungicide and to a petroleum distillate in outdoor pond mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Bayona, Yannick; Roucaute, Ana; Roucaute, Marc; Gorzerino, Caroline; Cailleaud, Kevin; Lagadic, Laurent; Bassères, Anne; Caquet, Thierry

    2014-04-01

    Ecological risk assessment of chemicals in mesocosms requires measurement of a large number of parameters at the community level. Studies on invertebrate communities usually focus on taxonomic approaches, which only provide insights into taxonomic structure changes induced by chemicals. In the present study, abundance, biomass (B), theoretical production (P), and instantaneous P/B ratio were used as endpoints to assess the effects of the commercial form of the dithiocarbamate fungicide thiram (35 µg/L and 170 µg/L nominal concentrations) and of the hydrocarbon water accommodated fraction (HWAF) of a petroleum distillate (0.01 mg/L, 0.4 mg/L, 2 mg/L, and 20 mg/L loadings) on the zooplankton community in freshwater pond mesocosms. Endpoints were measured during a 4-wk treatment period (1 pulse/wk) followed by a 5-mo posttreatment period to evaluate zooplankton population recovery. The chlorophyll a concentration in water was significantly increased after treatment with HWAF, whereas it was not affected by thiram treatment. Zooplankton abundance-based analysis showed effects on a limited number of taxa, whereas other endpoints (mainly the P/B ratio) revealed that more taxa were impacted, with recovery depending on the chemical and concentration. Exposure to HWAF mainly had a negative impact on cladocerans, which resulted in top-down effects (between cladocerans and phytoplankton). Thiram negatively affected rotifers and copepods, suggesting more direct toxic effects. The results show that the use of secondary production as an endpoint provides a more comprehensive assessment of potential direct and indirect effects of chemicals on a community, and they also support evidence of alteration in functional processes.

  11. Primary gas- and particle-phase emissions and secondary organic aerosol production from gasoline and diesel off-road engines.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Timothy D; Tkacik, Daniel S; Presto, Albert A; Zhang, Mang; Jathar, Shantanu H; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Massetti, John; Truong, Tin; Cicero-Fernandez, Pablo; Maddox, Christine; Rieger, Paul; Chattopadhyay, Sulekha; Maldonado, Hector; Maricq, M Matti; Robinson, Allen L

    2013-12-17

    Dilution and smog chamber experiments were performed to characterize the primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gasoline and diesel small off-road engines (SOREs). These engines are high emitters of primary gas- and particle-phase pollutants relative to their fuel consumption. Two- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs emit much more (up to 3 orders of magnitude more) nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs), primary PM and organic carbon than newer on-road gasoline vehicles (per kg of fuel burned). The primary emissions from a diesel transportation refrigeration unit were similar to those of older, uncontrolled diesel engines used in on-road vehicles (e.g., premodel year 2007 heavy-duty diesel trucks). Two-strokes emitted the largest fractional (and absolute) amount of SOA precursors compared to diesel and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs; however, 35-80% of the NMOG emissions from the engines could not be speciated using traditional gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. After 3 h of photo-oxidation in a smog chamber, dilute emissions from both 2- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs produced large amounts of semivolatile SOA. The effective SOA yield (defined as the ratio of SOA mass to estimated mass of reacted precursors) was 2-4% for 2- and 4-stroke SOREs, which is comparable to yields from dilute exhaust from older passenger cars and unburned gasoline. This suggests that much of the SOA production was due to unburned fuel and/or lubrication oil. The total PM contribution of different mobile source categories to the ambient PM burden was calculated by combining primary emission, SOA production and fuel consumption data. Relative to their fuel consumption, SOREs are disproportionately high total PM sources; however, the vastly greater fuel consumption of on-road vehicles renders them (on-road vehicles) the dominant mobile source of ambient PM in the Los Angeles area.

  12. Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L.; Geller, H.; Nadel, S.

    1992-03-01

    In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

  13. Oxidative gelation measurement and influence on soft wheat batter viscosity and end-use quality.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viscosity is an important end-use attribute for some soft wheat flour formulations. Specifically, in formulations with minimal gluten development, such as batters (cake, pancake and doughnut) and coatings (tempura), viscosity is important to leavening gas retention and flow characteristics. Current ...

  14. Modeling end-use quality in U. S. soft wheat germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    End-use quality in soft wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) can be assessed by a wide array of measurements, generally categorized into grain, milling, and baking characteristics. Samples were obtained from four regional nurseries. Selected parameters included: test weight, kernel hardness, kernel size, ke...

  15. 7 CFR 782.10 - Identification of commodities subject to end-use certificate regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certificate regulations. (a) The regulations in this part are applicable to wheat and barley, respectively... wheat or barley. (b) Because Canada is the only country with such requirements on wheat, and no country has an end-use certificate requirement for barley, only wheat originating in Canada is affected by...

  16. 7 CFR 782.10 - Identification of commodities subject to end-use certificate regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate regulations. (a) The regulations in this part are applicable to wheat and barley, respectively... wheat or barley. (b) Because Canada is the only country with such requirements on wheat, and no country has an end-use certificate requirement for barley, only wheat originating in Canada is affected by...

  17. 7 CFR 782.10 - Identification of commodities subject to end-use certificate regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certificate regulations. (a) The regulations in this part are applicable to wheat and barley, respectively... wheat or barley. (b) Because Canada is the only country with such requirements on wheat, and no country has an end-use certificate requirement for barley, only wheat originating in Canada is affected by...

  18. 7 CFR 782.10 - Identification of commodities subject to end-use certificate regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certificate regulations. (a) The regulations in this part are applicable to wheat and barley, respectively... wheat or barley. (b) Because Canada is the only country with such requirements on wheat, and no country has an end-use certificate requirement for barley, only wheat originating in Canada is affected by...

  19. 7 CFR 782.10 - Identification of commodities subject to end-use certificate regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificate regulations. (a) The regulations in this part are applicable to wheat and barley, respectively... wheat or barley. (b) Because Canada is the only country with such requirements on wheat, and no country has an end-use certificate requirement for barley, only wheat originating in Canada is affected by...

  20. Estimating end-use emissions factors for policy analysis: the case of space cooling and heating.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Grant D

    2014-06-17

    This paper provides the first estimates of end-use specific emissions factors, which are estimates of the amount of a pollutant that is emitted when a unit of electricity is generated to meet demand from a specific end-use. In particular, this paper provides estimates of emissions factors for space cooling and heating, which are two of the most significant end-uses. The analysis is based on a novel two-stage regression framework that estimates emissions factors that are specific to cooling or heating by exploiting variation in cooling and heating demand induced by weather variation. Heating is associated with similar or greater CO2 emissions factor than cooling in all regions. The difference is greatest in the Midwest and Northeast, where the estimated CO2 emissions factor for heating is more than 20% larger than the emissions factor for cooling. The minor differences in emissions factors in other regions, combined with the substantial difference in the demand pattern for cooling and heating, suggests that the use of overall regional emissions factors is reasonable for policy evaluations in certain locations. Accurately quantifying the emissions factors associated with different end-uses across regions will aid in designing improved energy and environmental policies.

  1. Activation of the silent secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin-resistance in a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Yi, Le; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wang, Nan; Han, Xiao

    2015-04-22

    Introduction of neomycin-resistance into a marine-derived, wild-type Penicillium purpurogenum G59 resulted in activation of silent biosynthetic pathways for the secondary metabolite production. Upon treatment of G59 spores with neomycin and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a total of 56 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of mutants to neomycin was testified by the resistance test. In contrast to the G59 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 28 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that the 28 mutants have acquired the capability to produce bioactive metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses further indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the bioactive mutant extracts. Followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that five bioactive secondary metabolites, curvularin (1), citrinin (2), penicitrinone A (3), erythro-23-O-methylneocyclocitrinol (4) and 22E-7α-methoxy-5α, 6α-epoxyergosta-8(14),22-dien-3β-ol (5), were newly produced by a mutant, 4-30, compared to the G59 strain. All 1-5 were also not yet found in the secondary metabolites of other wild type P. purpurogenum strains. Compounds 1-5 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60, HeLa and BGC-823 cells to varying extents. Both present bioassays and chemical investigations demonstrated that the introduction of neomycin-resistance into the marine-derived fungal G59 strain could activate silent secondary metabolite production. The present work not only extended the previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi both in DMSO concentrations and antibiotics, but also additionally exemplified effectiveness of this method for activating silent fungal secondary metabolites. This method could be applied to other fungal isolates to elicit their metabolic potentials to investigate secondary metabolites from silent biosynthetic pathways.

  2. Hybrid life-cycle environmental and cost inventory of sewage sludge treatment and end-use scenarios: a case study from China.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ashley; Horvath, Arpad; Nelson, Kara L

    2008-05-01

    Sewage sludge management poses environmental, economic, and political challenges for wastewater treatment plants and municipalities around the globe. To facilitate more informed and sustainable decision making, this study used life-cycle inventory (LCI) to expand upon previous process-based LCIs of sewage sludge treatmenttechnologies. Additionally, the study evaluated an array of productive end-use options for treated sewage sludge, such as fertilizer and as an input into construction materials, to determine how the sustainability of traditional manufacturing processes changes with sludge as a replacement for other raw inputs. The inclusion of the life-cycle of necessary inputs (such as lime) used in sludge treatment significantly impacts the sustainability profiles of different treatment and end-use schemes. Overall, anaerobic digestion is generally the optimal treatment technology whereas incineration, particularly if coal-fired, is the most environmentally and economically costly. With respect to sludge end use, offsets are greatest for the use of sludge as fertilizer, but all of the productive uses of sludge can improve the sustainability of conventional manufacturing practices. The results are intended to help inform and guide decisions about sludge handling for existing wastewater treatment plants and those that are still in the planning phase in cities around the world. Although additional factors must be considered when selecting a sludge treatment and end-use scheme, this study highlights how a systems approach to planning can contribute significantly to improving overall environmental sustainability.

  3. Synthesis and Analysis of Putative Terpene Oxidation Products and the Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles that Form from Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebben, C. J.; Strick, B. F.; Upshur, M.; Shrestha, M.; Velarde, L.; Lu, Z.; Wang, H.; Xiao, D.; Batista, V. S.; Martin, S. T.; Thomson, R. J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The terpenes isoprene and α-pinene are abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by trees and oxidized in the atmosphere. However, the chemical processes involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles from VOCs are not well understood. In this work, we use a combined synthetic, analytical, and theoretical approach to gain a molecular level understanding of the chemistry involved in the formation of SOA particles from VOC precursors. To this end, we have synthesized putative products of isoprene and α-pinene oxidation and the oligomers that form from them. Specifically, we have focused on the epoxide and 2-methyltetraols that form from isoprene oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, as well as products of α-pinene ozonolysis. In our analysis, we utilize a spectroscopic technique called sum frequency generation (SFG). SFG is a coherent, surface-specific, vibrational spectroscopy that uses infrared and visible laser light fields, overlapped spatially and temporally at a surface, to probe vibrational transitions within molecules. Our use of this technique allows us to assess the chemical identity of aerosol-forming components at their surfaces, where interactions with the gas phase occur. The spectral responses from these compounds are compared to those of synthetic isoprene- and α-pinene-derived aerosol particles, as well as natural aerosol particles collected in tropical and boreal forests to begin to predict the constituents that may be present at the surfaces of these particles. In addition, isotope editing is utilized to gain a better understanding of α-pinene. The rigidity of this molecule makes it difficult to understand spectroscopically. The combination of synthesis with deuterium labeling, theory, and broadband and high-resolution SFG spectroscopy in the C-H and C-D stretching regions allow us to determine the orientation of this important molecule on a surface, which could have implications for its reactivity in the

  4. Known Unknowns Explained: Hono Daytime Production from the Anion-Catalyzed Uptake of NO2 on Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the decay of NO2 in urban air and the related production of HONO at daytime involve unidentified multiphase reactions. Here we address these issues and analyze the results of field campaigns from the perspective of our laboratory studies on interfacial NO2 chemistry. We note that the similar (~ 4 hr) NO2 decay lifetimes inferred from satellite sightings over megacities ranging from 2° N to 40° N at all seasons are incompatible with the conventional view that NO2 is removed (as HNO3) by gas-phase OH-radicals whose concentrations depend on solar irradiance. This insight also applies to the daytime source of HONO, a non-photochemical process that reaches its maximal strength at noon. Herein, we present new laboratory experiments and quantum mechanical calculations confirming that the reactive uptake of gaseous NO2 on aqueous interfaces is generally catalyzed by anions, and show that the preceding observations can be accounted for by the disproportionation of NO2 (via 2 NO2 + H2O = H+ + NO3- + HONO) on secondary organic aerosol particles containing carboxylate ion loadings that peak at noon, as reported elsewhere.IGURE 1 - Left axis: The frequencies of O(1D) atom production from the solar photolysis of ozone, J(O1D), at zero elevation under an ozone column of 300 Dobson units at noon on (from left to right) Feb. 1st, May 1st, Aug. 1st and Nov. 1st over: (1) Singapore 1.3° N, (2) Pearl River Delta 22.5° N, (3) Riyadh 24.6° N, (4) Isfahan 32.6° N, (5) Los Angeles 34° N, (6) Tokyo 35.6° N, (7) Four Corners 36.7° N, (8) Madrid 40.4° N and (9) Moscow 55.8° N. Right axis (note the logarithmic scale): red dashes correspond to the ratios J(O1D)mid-summer/J(O1D)mid-winter (herein midsummer is Aug. 1st, midwinter is Feb. 1st).

  5. End-Use Opportunity Analysis from Progress Indicator Results for ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.; Xie, YuLong

    2014-12-01

    This report and an accompanying spreadsheet (PNNL 2014a) compile the end use building simulation results for prototype buildings throughout the United States. The results represent he energy use of each edition of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ASHRAE 2004, 2007, 2010, 2013). PNNL examined the simulation results to determine how the remaining energy was used.

  6. A Crosswalk of Mineral Commodity End Uses and North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barry, James J.; Matos, Grecia R.; Menzie, W. David

    2015-09-14

    The links between the end uses of mineral commodities and the NAICS codes provide an instrument for analyzing the use of mineral commodities in the economy. The crosswalk is also a guide, highlighting those industrial sectors in the economy that rely heavily on mineral commodities. The distribution of mineral commodities across the economy is dynamic and does differ from year to year. This report reflects a snapshot of the state of the economy and mineral commodities in 2010.

  7. End-use energy consumption estimates for US commercial buildings, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs within the Department of Energy, by utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Billing data for electricity and natural gas were first decomposed into weather and nonweather dependent loads. Subsequently, Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type with annual data. The SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption. End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 5,876 buildings in the 1989 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for eleven separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock.

  8. End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Initial and secondary oxidation products on the Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface identified by atomic force microscopy and first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Onoda, Jo Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel

    2014-03-31

    We investigate the initial and secondary oxidation products on the Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface at room-temperature using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and density functional theory calculations. At the initial oxidation stages, we find that there are two types of bright spots in AFM images. One of them is identified as a Si adatom with one O atom inserted into one of the backbonds, while the other is ascribed to a Si adatom with two inserted O atoms. We observe that the latter one turns into the secondary oxidation product by a further coming O{sub 2} molecule, which appears as a more protruded bright spot. The atomic configuration of this product is identified as Si adatom whose top and all three backbonds make bonds with O atoms. The appearances of initial and secondary oxidation products are imaged as bright and dark sites by scanning tunneling microscopy, respectively. It is revealed that AFM gives us the topographic information close to the real atomic corrugation of adsorbed structures on the semiconductor surfaces.

  10. Evaluation of the potential end use of oils produced by the ROPE copyright process from California tar sand

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

    1989-12-01

    The oil products produced by the rope process from Process Development Unit (PDU) run SPR-111 were evaluated for potential end use. This run was a five-day test using Arroyo Grande tar sand from California as the feed to the PDU. The distillate from knockout {number sign}2 was hydrotreated to produce a series of process intermediates. One of the intermediates was evaluated as a feedstock for the production of transportation fuels. The heavy product oil was distilled to produce a residue that was evaluated as an asphalt. Analysis of a selected process intermediate shows that it is not suitable for the production of gasoline or for use as a gasoline-blending feedstock. The process intermediate was not suitable for the production of aviation turbine fuels because of a high concentration of alkanes. However, the presence of alkanes does make the oil valuable as a feedstock for the production of diesel fuel. The heavy oil product as received from the PDU is not suitable for the production of an asphaltic material because it contains a large amount of very fine solid material. However, after filtration and distillation, the application of ASTM D-3381 specification tests to the +410{degree}C residue shows that all of the requirements are met except for the trichloroethylene solubility requirement. This value is below specification because a small amount of mineral matter was not removed during the filtrations process. Also, the residue had a very high aging index. Results from successive freeze-thaw cycling also show that the residue is comparable to petroleum asphalts when it is coated on the same appropriate aggregate. 14 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Secondary amenorrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... of periods - secondary Images Secondary amenorrhea Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) Absence of menstruation (amenorrhea) References Bulun SE. Physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  12. Effect of low doses γ-irradiation on oxidative stress and secondary metabolites production of rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.) callus culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Beltagi, Hossam S.; Ahmed, Osama K.; El-Desouky, Wael

    2011-09-01

    Effect of various γ-irradiation doses (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 G) on the enhancement of secondary metabolites production and antioxidant properties of rosemary callus culture was investigated. The obtained data showed a highly metabolic modification of chemical constituents and various antioxidant defense enzymes (APX, CAT, SOD and GR), which gradually increased in response to radiation doses, while reduced (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, total soluble protein, total soluble amino acids, total soluble sugars and PAL activity positively correlated with the increased doses. On the other hands the high irradiation levels significantly increased the accumulation of various oxidative burst (MDA, H 2O 2 and O 2-). Meanwhile, higher doses of gamma irradiation positively enhanced secondary products accumulation of total phenols and total flavonoids in rosemary callus culture.

  13. Secondary metabolites isolation in natural products chemistry: comparison of two semipreparative chromatographic techniques (high pressure liquid chromatography and high performance thin-layer chromatography).

    PubMed

    Do, Thi Kieu Tiên; Hadji-Minaglou, Francis; Antoniotti, Sylvain; Fernandez, Xavier

    2014-01-17

    Chemical investigations on secondary metabolites in natural products chemistry require efficient isolation techniques for characterization purpose as well as for the evaluation of their biological properties. In the case of phytochemical studies, the performance of the techniques is critical (resolution and yield) since the products generally present a narrow range of polarity and physicochemical properties. Several techniques are currently available, but HPLC (preparative and semipreparative) is the most widely used. To compare the performance of semipreparative HPLC and HPTLC for the isolation of secondary metabolites in different types of extracts, we have chosen carvone from spearmint essential oil (Mentha spicata L.), resveratrol from Fallopia multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson, and rosmarinic acid from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extracts. The comparison was based on the chromatographic separation, the purity and quantity of isolated compounds, the solvent consumption, the duration and the cost of the isolation operations. The results showed that semipreparative HPTLC can in some case offer some advantages over conventional semipreparative HPLC.

  14. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Characterization of Aqueous Photochemistry Products of Common Types of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-03-19

    A significant fraction of atmospheric organic compounds is predominantly found in condensed phases, such as aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Many of these compounds are photolabile and can degrade through direct photolysis or indirect photooxidation processes on time scales that are comparable to the typical lifetimes of aqueous droplets (hours) and particles (days). This paper presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d- limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features, and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx generated SOA had more unique visual appearance, and indicated a lower extent of products overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents

  15. High-resolution mass spectrometry and molecular characterization of aqueous photochemistry products of common types of secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Romonosky, Dian E; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2015-03-19

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow-tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx-generated SOA had more unique visual appearance and indicated a lower extent of product overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen-containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone-driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents before and after photolysis showed the tendency to reduce the average number of atoms in the SOA compounds without a significant effect on the overall O/C and H/C ratios. SOA prepared by OH/NOx photooxidation of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and guaiacol were more resilient to photolysis despite being the most light-absorbing. The composition of SOA prepared by ozonolysis of

  16. Secondary production of Ampelisca mississippiana Soliman and Wicksten 2007 (Amphipoda, Crustacea) in the head of the Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Y. S.; Rowe, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    Annual production was calculated for the dominant ampeliscid amphipod Ampelisca mississippiana [Soliman, Y., Wicksten, M., 2007. Ampelisca mississippiana a new species (Amphipoda: Gammaredea) dominated the head of the Mississippi Canyon (Northern Gulf of Mexico). Zootaxa, submitted] at the head of the Mississippi Canyon in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Average densities were 12,094±2499 ind m -2, with secondary production of 6.93 g dry wt m -2 yr -1, based on the "size-frequency method" [Hynes-Hamilton, H.B.N., Coleman, M., 1968. A simple method for assessing the annual production of stream benthos. Limnology and Oceanography 13, 569-573; Menzies, C.A., 1980. A note on the Hynes-Hamilton method of estimating secondary production. Limnology and Oceanography 25(4), 770-773], with a production/biomass ( P/ B) ratio of 3.11. Growth rates of this magnitude are comparable to available data for freshwater and shallow marine ampeliscids, but are unexpectedly high for deep-ocean habitats. Growth efficiency appeared to be approximately 35% (Growth/Assimilation×100).

  17. Measurement of secondary products during oxidation reactions of terpenes and ozone based on the PTR-MS analysis: effects of coexistent carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Yusuke; Tokumura, Masahiro; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2010-11-01

    Continuous measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) can be used to describe the production processes of secondary products during ozone induced oxidation of terpenes. Terpenes are emitted from woody building materials, and ozone is generated from ozone air purifiers and copy machines in indoor environments. Carbonyl compounds (CCs) are emitted by human activities such as smoking and drinking alcohol. Moreover, CCs are generated during ozone oxidation of terpenes. Therefore, coexistent CCs should affect the ozone oxidation. This study has focused on the measurement of secondary products during the ozone oxidation of terpenes based on the use of PTR-MS analysis and effects of coexistent CCs on oxidized products. Experiments were performed in a fluoroplastic bag containing α-pinene or limonene as terpenes, ozone and acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as coexistent CCs adjusted to predetermined concentrations. Continuous measurements by PTR-MS were conducted after mixing of terpenes, ozone and CCs, and time changes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations were monitored. Results showed that, high-molecular weight intermediates disappeared gradually with elapsed time, though the production of high-molecular weight intermediates was observed at the beginning. This phenomenon suggested that the ozone oxidation of terpenes generated ultrafine particles. Coexistent CCs affected the ozone oxidation of α-pinene more than limonene.

  18. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda)

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Karim, Rezaul; Tan, Yew Seong; Teh, Huey Fang; Danial, Asma Dazni; Ho, Li Sim; Khalid, Norzulaani; Appleton, David Ross; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger) has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery) callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin), shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue. PMID:27258536

  19. End-use matching for solar industrial process heat. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.C.; Hooker, D.W.; Rabl, A.; Stadjuhar, S.A.; West, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the large energy demand of industry (37% of US demand) and the wide spectrum of temperatures at which heat is required, the industrial sector appears to be very suitable for the matching of solar thermal technology with industrial process heat (IPH) requirements. A methodology for end-use matching has been devised, complete with required data bases and an evaluation program PROSYS/ECONMAT. Six cities in the United States were selected for an analysis of solar applications to IPH. Typical process heat requirements for 70% of the industrial plants in each city were identified and evaluated in conjunction with meteorological and economic data for each site to determine lowest-cost solar systems for each application. The flexibility and scope of PROSYS/ECONMAT is shown in a variety of sensitivity studies that expand the results of the six-city analysis. Case studies of two industrial plants were performed to evaluate the end-use matching procedure; these results are reported.

  20. Project on Restaurant Energy Performance: end-use monitoring and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Although energy bills for restaurants throughout the United States exceed 5 billion dollars annually, very little has been documented with respect to when and how restaurants use energy, or how such use can be reduced cost-effectively. This report summarizes the results of a multiyear collaborative research effort, designed to collect information on end-use energy consumption. Objective is to reveal the quantities and profiles of energy consumption of typical food service operations by time of day and end use. This information, when examined in conjunction with building characteristics, allows detailed study of energy use cause and effect and energy conservation potential. Seven representative monitoring sites were selected, a computerized data acquisition network was designed and implemented, and detailed energy performance was compiled for a 1 year period (July 1983 through June 1984). Each of the seven facilities monitored was selected to represent the seven most common restaurant types and to provide information on a wide variety of commonly used restaurant equipment. Preliminary findings are presented.

  1. How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying marketfailures in the end use of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

    2007-09-01

    "Getting the price right" is a goal of many market-orientedenergy policies. However, there are situations where the consumer payingfor the energy is separate from the owner of the energy-using device.Economists call this a "principal agent problem". A team organised by theInternational Energy Agency examined seven end uses and one sector whereprincipal agent problems existed: refrigerators, water heating, spaceheating, vending machines, commercial HVAC, company cars, lighting, andfirms. These investigations took place in Australia, Japan, theNetherlands, Norway, and the United States. About 2 100 percent of theenergy consumed in the end uses examined was affected by principal agentproblems. The size (and sometimes even the existence) varied greatly fromone country to another but all countries had significant amounts ofenergy affected by principal agent problems. The presence of a marketfailure does not mean that energy use would fall substantially if thefailure were eliminated; however it does suggest that raising energyprices such as in the form of carbon taxes will not necessarily increaseefficiency investments.

  2. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G. Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J.; and others

    2015-08-15

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He and D(T,n){sup 4}He occur, as the primary fusion products {sup 3}He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm{sup 2}), the secondary D-{sup 3}He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  3. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Tregillis, I. L.; Batha, S. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (˜5-100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  4. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; ...

    2015-08-25

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (~ 5–100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosionsmore » on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions,and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 x and 0.33 x the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.« less

  5. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Tregillis, I. L.; Batha, S. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2015-08-25

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (~ 5–100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions,and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 x and 0.33 x the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  6. End-use quality of CIMMYT-derived soft kernel durum wheat germplasm. I. Grain, milling and soft wheat quality.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat kernel texture is used in part to define U.S. wheat market class due to its importance in end-use quality and utilization. Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. durum) has lower demand and fewer culinary end-uses compared to bread wheat because of its extremely hard kernel texture, which precl...

  7. Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.; Eto, J.

    1997-09-01

    Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

  8. Correlation of different spectral lights with biomass accumulation and production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of medicinally important Prunella vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Ahmad, Nisar; Ali, Syed Shujait; Akbar, Fazal; Kanwal, Farina

    2016-06-01

    Light is one of the key elicitors that directly fluctuates plant developmental processes and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. In this study, the effects of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of Prunella vulgaris were investigated. Among different spectral lights, green light induced the maximum callogenic response (95%). Enhanced fresh biomass accumulation was observed in log phases on day-35, when callus cultures were exposed to yellow and violet lights. Yellow light induced maximum biomass accumulation (3.67g/100ml) from leaf explants as compared to control (1.27g/100ml). In contrast, violet lights enhanced biomass accumulation (3.49g/100ml) from petiole explant. Maximum total phenolics content (TPC; 23.9mg/g-DW) and total flavonoids content (TFC; 1.65mg/g-DW) were observed when cultures were grown under blue lights. In contrast, green and yellow lights enhanced total phenolics production (TPP; 112.52g/100ml) and total flavonoids production (TFP; 9.64g/100ml) as compared to control. The calli grown under green, red and blue lights enhanced DPPH-free radical scavenging activity (DFRSA; 91.3%, 93.1% and 93%) than control (56.44%) respectively. The DFRSA was correlated either with TPC and TFC or TPP and TFP. Furthermore, yellow lights enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and protease activities, however, the content of total protein (CTP) was higher in control cultures (186μg BSAE/mg FW) as compared to spectral lights. These results suggest that the exposure of callus cultures to various spectral lights have shown a key role in biomass accumulation and production of antioxidant secondary metabolites.

  9. Time temperature transformation diagram for secondary crystal products of Co-based Co-Fe-B-Si-Nb-Mn soft magnetic nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    DeGeorge, V. Zoghlin, E.; Keylin, V.; McHenry, M.

    2015-05-07

    Secondary crystallization is the subject of much investigation in magnetic amorphous and nanocomposites (MANCs) as it limits the long term and thermal stability of their operation in device applications, including power electronics, sensors, and electric motors. Secondary crystal products [Blazquez et al., Philos. Mag. Lett. 82(7), 409–417 (2002); Ohodnicki et al., Phys. Rev. B 78, 144414 (2008); Willard et al., Metall. Mater. Trans. A 38, 725 (2007)], nanostructure and crystallization kinetics [Hsiao et al., IEEE Trans. Magn. 38(5), 3039 (2002); McHenry et al., Scr. Mater. 48(7), 881 (2003)], and onset temperatures and activation energies [Ohodnicki et al., Acta. Mater. 57, 87 (2009); Long et al., J. Appl. Phys. 101, 09N114 (2007)] at constant heating have been reported for similar alloys. However, a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram for isothermal crystallization, more typical of application environments, has not been reported in literature. Here, a TTT diagram for the Co based, Co-Fe-Si-Nb-B-Mn MANC system is presented, along with a method for determining such. The method accounts for the presence of primary crystal phases and yields crystal fraction of secondary phase(s) by using a novel four stage heating profile. The diagram, affirmed by Kissinger activation energy analysis, reports thermal stability of the MANC for millennia at conventional device operating temperatures, and stability limits less than a minute at elevated temperatures. Both extremes are necessary to be able to avoid secondary crystalline products and establish operating limits for this mechanically attractive, high induction soft magnetic nanocomposite.

  10. The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2007-11-27

    This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the

  11. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

  12. Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

  13. Emissions from Residential Combustion considering End-Uses and Spatial Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, T. C.; Lam, N. L.; Winijkul, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cooking, heating, and other activities in the residential sector are major sources of indoor and outdoor air pollution, especially when solid fuels provide energy. Because of these deleterious effects, multinational strategies to alter technology and reduce emissions have been proposed, but to date, they have ignored many constraints on feasibility. We describe a framework to apportion national energy consumption among land types and household end-uses, to calculate emissions, and to evaluate mitigation strategies. We provide year-2010 emissions of particulate matter, black carbon, organic carbon, nitrogen oxides, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The study area includes regions where solid biomass fuel provides more than 50% of total residential energy: Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Using nightlight data and population density, we classify land types as urban, electrified rural with and without forest access, and non-electrified rural with and without forest access. We apportion national-level residential fuel consumption among land types and end-uses, and assign technologies to each combination. About 13% of energy is consumed in urban areas, and 45% in non-urban land near forests. About half the energy is consumed in land without access to electricity. Cooking accounts for 54% of consumption, heating 9%, and lighting only 2%, with unidentified uses making up the remainder. We examine possible policies, considering realistic factors that constrain mitigation. Scenarios explored are: (1) cleanest current stove, where plausible existing technology is deployed; (2) stove standards, where stoves are designed to meet performance standards; and (3) clean fuels, where users adopt the cleanest plausible fuels; we assume that people living in forest access areas continue to use wood. For cleaner stoves, emission reductions range from 25-82%, depending on the pollutant. The clean-fuels scenario reduces emissions by 18-25%.

  14. Biomass production and nitrogen and phosphorus removal by the green alga Neochloris oleoabundans in simulated wastewater and secondary municipal wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Lan, Christopher Q

    2011-05-01

    Biomass productivity of 350 mg DCW L(-1)day(-1) with a final biomass concentration of 3.15 g DCW L(-1) was obtained with Neochloris oleoabundans grown in artificial wastewater at sodium nitrate and phosphate concentrations of 140 and 47 mg L(-1), respectively, with undetectable levels of residual N and P in effluents. In secondary municipal wastewater effluents enriched with 70 mg N L(-1), the alga achieved a final biomass concentration of 2.1 g DCW L(-1) and a biomass productivity of 233.3 mg DCW L(-1)day(-1). While N removal was very sensitive to N:P ratio, P removal was independent of N:P ratio in the tested range. These results indicate that N. oleoabundans could potentially be employed for combined biofuel production and wastewater treatment.

  15. An Insight into the Secondary Metabolism of Muscodor yucatanensis: Small-Molecule Epigenetic Modifiers Induce Expression of Secondary Metabolism-Related Genes and Production of New Metabolites in the Endophyte.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Masroor; Nalli, Yedukondalu; Jain, Shreyans K; Chaubey, Asha; Ali, Asif; Strobel, Gary A; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Riyaz-Ul-Hassan, Syed

    2016-12-06

    factors associated with its host plant which may help to explain the enormous chemical diversity of secondary metabolic products found in Muscodor spp.

  16. Effects of oxyanions, natural organic matter, and bacterial cell numbers on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and the formation of secondary mineralization products.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Edward J; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2010-06-15

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides results in the production of Fe(II) and may lead to the subsequent formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products including magnetite, siderite, vivianite, chukanovite (ferrous hydroxy carbonate (FHC)), and green rust; however, the factors controlling the formation of specific Fe(II) phases are often not well-defined. This study examined effects of (i) a range of inorganic oxyanions (arsenate, borate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, and tungstate), (ii) natural organic matter (citrate, oxalate, microbial extracellular polymeric substances [EPS], and humic substances), and (iii) the type and number of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite and formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products. The bioreduction kinetics clustered into two distinct Fe(II) production profiles. "Fast" Fe(II) production kinetics [19-24 mM Fe(II) d(-1)] were accompanied by formation of magnetite and FHC in the unamended control and in systems amended with borate, oxalate, gellan EPS, or Pony Lake fulvic acid or having "low" cell numbers. Systems amended with arsenate, citrate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, tungstate, EPS from Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, or humic substances derived from terrestrial plant material or with "high" cell numbers exhibited comparatively slow Fe(II) production kinetics [1.8-4.0 mM Fe(II) d(-1)] and the formation of green rust. The results are consistent with a conceptual model whereby competitive sorption of more strongly bound anions blocks access of bacterial cells and reduced electron-shuttling compounds to sites on the iron oxide surface, thereby limiting the rate of bioreduction.

  17. Effects of oxyanions, natural organic matter, and bacterial cell numbers on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH) and the formation of secondary mineralization products.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, E. J.; Gorski, C. A.; Scherer, M. M.; Boyanov, M. I.; Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Iowa

    2010-06-15

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides results in the production of Fe(II) and may lead to the subsequent formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products including magnetite, siderite, vivianite, chukanovite (ferrous hydroxy carbonate (FHC)), and green rust; however, the factors controlling the formation of specific Fe(II) phases are often not well-defined. This study examined effects of (i) a range of inorganic oxyanions (arsenate, borate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, and tungstate), (ii) natural organic matter (citrate, oxalate, microbial extracellular polymeric substances [EPS], and humic substances), and (iii) the type and number of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite and formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products. The bioreduction kinetics clustered into two distinct Fe(II) production profiles. 'Fast' Fe(II) production kinetics [19-24 mM Fe(II) d-1] were accompanied by formation of magnetite and FHC in the unamended control and in systems amended with borate, oxalate, gellan EPS, or Pony Lake fulvic acid or having 'low' cell numbers. Systems amended with arsenate, citrate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, tungstate, EPS from Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, or humic substances derived from terrestrial plant material or with 'high' cell numbers exhibited comparatively slow Fe(II) production kinetics [1.8-4.0 mM Fe(II) d-1] and the formation of green rust. The results are consistent with a conceptual model whereby competitive sorption of more strongly bound anions blocks access of bacterial cells and reduced electron-shuttling compounds to sites on the iron oxide surface, thereby limiting the rate of bioreduction.

  18. Engineering the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 to improve phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kaiming; Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Haixia; Sun, Shuang; Fang, Yunling; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is an important component of the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. We used a combined method involving gene, promoter, and protein engineering to modify the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways in the PCA-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201. The PCA yield of the resulting strain PA-IV was increased 54.6-fold via the following strategies: (1) blocking PCA conversion and enhancing PCA efflux pumping; (2) increasing metabolic flux towards the PCA biosynthetic pathway through the over-production of two DAHP synthases and blocking the synthesis of 21 secondary metabolites; (3) increasing the PCA precursor supply through the engineering of five chorismate-utilizing enzymes; (4) engineering the promoters of two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters. Strain PA-IV produced 9882 mg/L PCA in fed-batch fermentation, which is twice as much as that produced by the current industrial strain. Strain PA-IV was also genetically stable and comparable to Escherichia coli in cytotoxicity.

  19. Impact of antioxidants on the formation of volatile secondary lipid oxidation products in oil-in-water emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food emulsions are particularly susceptible to lipid oxidation, which leads to the formation of off-flavors and odors, and ultimately, shorter product shelf lives. Here we examine antioxidants for use in emulsions from a variety of different sources, including natural product extracts as well as rat...

  20. Dietary consequences of recommending reduced-fat dairy products in the weight-loss context: a secondary analysis with practical implications for registered dietitians.

    PubMed

    Nolan-Clark, Deborah; Mathers, Elizabeth; Probst, Yasmine; Charlton, Karen; Batterham, Marijka; Tapsell, Linda C

    2013-03-01

    Replacing full-fat dairy products with reduced-fat varieties is a dietetic strategy for reducing energy intake while maintaining nutritional adequacy. This study aimed to explore the dietary outcomes of this recommendation in the context of weight loss. This study involved a secondary analysis of diet-history data for 86 adults (23 males and 63 females; body mass index=31.1±3.4) who had completed 3 months of a weight-loss trial in 2009, including advice to consume reduced-fat dairy products. Dairy food intake was categorized using the Australian 1995 National Nutrition Survey food hierarchy. Paired t tests and Wilcoxon signed rank tests determined dairy product consumption change after dietetic intervention. Total fat and energy per day from dairy products decreased significantly, from 14.1±1.2 g to 5.8±0.6 g and 283±20 kcal to 223±14 kcal, respectively, and total carbohydrate from dairy products increased significantly (P=0.04). Only 19.7% of participants met their dietary target of two to three servings of dairy foods per day at 3 months. When analyzed by sex, males decreased their intake of dairy products significantly, from 377.63±62.3 g/day to 357.3±46.7 g/day. Despite consuming less fat from dairy products, females did not significantly reduce energy intake from these foods (P=0.05). This study indicated that men and women responded differently to advice to change from regular to reduced-fat dairy products. Of more concern, however, is that in a weight-loss context, both men and women might choose to consume fewer servings of this food category with significant nutritional implications. Overall, this research highlights the need to consider the impact of sex and the background diet when recommending reduced-fat dairy products in the weight-loss context.

  1. Genetically engineering Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 for the sustainable production of the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Dan; Daddy, Soumana; He, Qingfang

    2014-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid is the precursor of phenylpropanoids, which are plant secondary metabolites that are beneficial to human health. Tyrosine ammonia lyase catalyzes the production of p-coumaric acid from tyrosine. Because of their photosynthetic ability and biosynthetic versatility, cyanobacteria are promising candidates for the production of certain plant metabolites, including phenylpropanoids. Here, we produced p-coumaric acid in a strain of transgenic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis 6803). Whereas a strain of Synechocystis 6803 genetically engineered to express sam8, a tyrosine ammonia lyase gene from the actinomycete Saccharothrix espanaensis, accumulated little or no p-coumaric acid, a strain that both expressed sam8 and lacked slr1573, a native hypothetical gene shown here to encode a laccase that oxidizes polyphenols, produced ∼82.6 mg/L p-coumaric acid, which was readily purified from the growth medium.

  2. Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

  3. Mobile Methane Measurements of Natural Gas Distribution and End-use Emissions in Indianapolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. K.; Roscioli, J. R.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Ferrara, T.

    2015-12-01

    Indianapolis is the site of the INFLUX program to investigate greenhouse gas emissions from a large metropolitan area. A key question in INFLUX is the relative contributions of methane emissions from the local gas distribution system in comparison to biogenic sources, such as the wastewater treatment system and landfills, and of end use emissions from furnaces and other combustion devices downstream of customer gas meters. During February and March, 2015, the Aerodyne van was used to measure methane, ethane, CO2 and other trace gases during mobile sampling traverses through a number of urban and suburban Indianapolis neighborhoods. Signatures of distinct natural gas emissions, biogenic emissions, and combustion emissions were observed in small plumes. In a number of cases, these sources were identified as manhole covers in city streets, where nearby leaks can seep into the local wastewater system. Quantification of ethane and methane from 45 manholes reveal that some had emissions that were clearly biogenic while others had a distinct natural gas signature. This paper describes the results from the analysis of these mobile data in the context of the current Indianapolis methane emission inventory.

  4. The Role of End-Use in Integrated Urban Energy and Water System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stercke, Simon; Mijic, Ana; Buytaert, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    The global trend of urbanisation is concentrating an increasing demand for services in cities, augmenting the global demand for resources such as freshwater and energy. At the same time, those resources are posing limits due to their availability or because their use is made prohibitive because of environmental pressures through e.g. global warming. Whereas planning for the provision of water and energy systems in cities has historically generally been separate, in the face of the present environmental challenges with important and intensifying socio-economic impacts, and because of their important interlinkages, both need to be integrated. The work presented introduces a combined urban energy/water model developed using system dynamics as a method, with an explicit and partially endogenous representation of the end-use demand. The model is used to illustrate how energy-related policies can affect the water sector and vice versa, the implications for planning of both systems which follow from that, and the important role demand side management plays. Data requirements are examined and the utility of the model to decisionmakers is discussed. The context of this work is the United Kingdom and London in particular, but changes to the model are suggested in order for it to apply to cities in other countries as well.

  5. Activation and products of the cryptic secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters by rifampin resistance (rpoB) mutations in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Kasahara, Ken; Hirose, Yutaka; Murakami, Kiriko; Kugimiya, Rie; Ochi, Kozo

    2013-07-01

    A subset of rifampin resistance (rpoB) mutations result in the overproduction of antibiotics in various actinomycetes, including Streptomyces, Saccharopolyspora, and Amycolatopsis, with H437Y and H437R rpoB mutations effective most frequently. Moreover, the rpoB mutations markedly activate (up to 70-fold at the transcriptional level) the cryptic/silent secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters of these actinomycetes, which are not activated under general stressful conditions, with the exception of treatment with rare earth elements. Analysis of the metabolite profile demonstrated that the rpoB mutants produced many metabolites, which were not detected in the wild-type strains. This approach utilizing rifampin resistance mutations is characterized by its feasibility and potential scalability to high-throughput studies and would be useful to activate and to enhance the yields of metabolites for discovery and biochemical characterization.

  6. Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

  7. Estimating benthic secondary production from aquatic insect emergence in streams affected by mountaintop removal coal mining, West Virginia USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining recountours the Appalachian landscape, buries headwater stream channels, and degrades downstream water quality. The goal of this study was to compare benthic community production estimates, based on seasonal insect emergen...

  8. Imprint Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Monitoring Secondary Metabolites Production during Antagonistic Interaction of Fungi.

    PubMed

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo; Campos, Michel L; Bayfield, Mark A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ifa, Demian R

    2015-12-15

    Direct analysis of microbial cocultures grown on agar media by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is quite challenging. Due to the high gas pressure upon impact with the surface, the desorption mechanism does not allow direct imaging of soft or irregular surfaces. The divots in the agar, created by the high-pressure gas and spray, dramatically change the geometry of the system decreasing the intensity of the signal. In order to overcome this limitation, an imprinting step, in which the chemicals are initially transferred to flat hard surfaces, was coupled to DESI-MS and applied for the first time to fungal cocultures. Note that fungal cocultures are often disadvantageous in direct imaging mass spectrometry. Agar plates of fungi present a complex topography due to the simultaneous presence of dynamic mycelia and spores. One of the most devastating diseases of cocoa trees is caused by fungal phytopathogen Moniliophthora roreri. Strategies for pest management include the application of endophytic fungi, such as Trichoderma harzianum, that act as biocontrol agents by antagonizing M. roreri. However, the complex chemical communication underlying the basis for this phytopathogen-dependent biocontrol is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the metabolic exchange that takes place during the antagonistic interaction between M. roreri and T. harzianum. Using imprint-DESI-MS imaging we annotated the secondary metabolites released when T. harzianum and M. roreri were cultured in isolation and compared these to those produced after 3 weeks of coculture. We identified and localized four phytopathogen-dependent secondary metabolites, including T39 butenolide, harzianolide, and sorbicillinol. In order to verify the reliability of the imprint-DESI-MS imaging data and evaluate the capability of tape imprints to extract fungal metabolites while maintaining their localization, six representative plugs along the entire M. roreri/T. harzianum

  9. Emissions from residential combustion considering end-uses and spatial constraints: Part II, emission reduction scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winijkul, Ekbordin; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-01-01

    Cooking, heating, and other activities in the residential sector are major sources of indoor and outdoor air pollution, especially when solid fuels are used to provide energy. Because of their deleterious effects on the atmosphere and human health, multinational strategies to reduce emissions have been proposed. This study examines the effects of some possible policies, considering realistic factors that constrain mitigation: end-uses, spatial constraints involving proximity to forest or electricity, existing technology, and assumptions about user behavior. Reduction scenarios are applied to a year-2010, spatially distributed baseline of emissions of particulate matter, black carbon, organic carbon, nitrogen oxides, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Scenarios explored are: (1) cleanest current stove, where we assume that existing technology in each land type is applied to burn existing fuels; (2) stove standards, where we assume that stoves are designed to meet performance standards; and (3) clean fuels, where users adopt the cleanest fuels plausible in each land type. We assume that people living in forest access areas continue to use wood regardless of available fuels, so the clean-fuels scenario leads to a reduction in emissions of 18-25%, depending on the pollutant, across the study region. Cleaner stoves preferentially affect land types with forest access, where about half of the fuel is used; emission reductions range from 25 to 82%, depending on the pollutant. If stove performance standards can be met, particulate matter emissions are reduced by 62% for the loosest standards and 95% for the tightest standards, and carbon monoxide is reduced by 40% and 62% for the loosest and tightest standards. Reductions in specific regions and countries depend on the existing fuel mixture and the population division among land types, and are explored for Latin America, Africa, East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.

  10. Beyond conventional energy use: A regionally based end-use approach for the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, Deborah R.

    In the United States, the dominant energy discourse is supply-oriented and focused on the large-scale use of fossil fuel and nuclear electricity energy resources. Fossil fuels and nuclear electricity are valued for the convenience, quality of life, and services that they provide. Despite these qualities, the laws of thermodynamics tell us that fossil fuels and nuclear electricity are not required for all end-use needs. Concentrated high quality energy sources such as fossil fuels and electricity are degraded when used for tasks such as water and space heating. The degraded energy is released into the environment as waste heat and pollution and contribute to scarcity in many realms. This dissertation suggests an alternative discourse on energy that calls on three frameworks of thinking: the nexus of relations, end-use analysis, and regional geography. The nexus of relations is a device for showing how different relations in society construct uses of energy that lead most naturally to scarcity and environmental degradation. End-use analysis is a framework for matching energy sources and end-uses based on thermodynamic quality, and regional geography is useful for identifying localized renewable energy sources and end-use needs. By combining these three approaches, a new framework has been created that matches thermodynamically appropriate renewable resources to end-use needs. This approach offers a new perspective on resource use that emphasizes how energy demands can be met, while minimizing scarcity and environmental degradation. To illustrate this regionally based end-use framework, a case study was conducted at three sites within Centre County, Pennsylvania. At each study site, the flux density of solar, wind, and water resources was evaluated and matched with local end-use needs. This exercise resulted in several findings: one, fossil fuel/nuclear electricity savings are possible at each study site; two, geographically-specific renewable resources can be used to

  11. Short-term effects on soil properties and wheat production from secondary paper sludge application on two Mediterranean agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Rato Nunes, J; Cabral, F; López-Piñeiro, A

    2008-07-01

    This study was conducted under greenhouse conditions to evaluate the potential use of SPS as a fertilizer, amendment and/or liming agent for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two representative Mediterranean agricultural soils, a Cambic Arenosol (cmAR) and a Cromic Cambisol (crCM) were used. Treatments included four sludge rates ranging from 0 to 40 g kg(-1) (equivalent of 0, 38, 88 and 120 Mg ha(-1)). A significant increment in soil pH, organic carbon, N total, available P and exchangeable K were observed in both soils. Sludge application significantly increased N and decreased Zn, Mn and Cu concentrations in wheat. Wheat grain yields were reduced by 33% and 37% when 120 Mg SPS ha(-1) was applied to cmAR and crCM soils, respectively, due apparently to unavailability of Mg. However, straw yields, with much lower Mg requirements, increased significantly with SPS rates. Secondary pulp mill sludge seems to be a potential source of organic matter, N, P, K and a potential soil amendment liming agent for acid soils, when appropriate supplemental fertilizer was provided. For grain crops grown in these soils, addition of Mg is required for proper nutrient balance.

  12. Removal of selected endocrine disrupting chemicals and personal care products in surface waters and secondary wastewater by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kheng Soo; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Abas, Mhd Radzi Bin

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the removal of parabens, N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), and phthalates by ozonation. The second-order rate constants for the reaction between selected compounds with ozone at pH 7 were of (2.2 +/-0.2) X 10(6) to (2.9 +/-0.3) X 10(6) M 1/s for parabens, (2.1+/- 0.3) to (3.9 +/-0.5) M-1/s for phthalates, and (5.2 +/-0.3) M-1/s for DEET. The rate constants for the reaction between selected compounds with hydroxyl radical ranged from (2.49 +/-0.06) x 10(9) to (8.5 +/-0.2) x 10(9) M-1/s. Ozonation of selected compounds in secondary wastewater and surface waters revealed that ozone dose of 1 and 3 mg/L yielded greater than 99% depletion of parabens and greater than 92% DEET and phthalates, respectively. In addition, parabens were found to transform almost exclusively through the reaction with ozone, while DEET and phthalates were transformed almost entirely by hydroxyl radicals (.OH).

  13. Design of a secondary ionization target for direct production of a C(-) beam from CO2 pulses for online AMS.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gary; Ognibene, Ted

    2013-01-01

    We designed and optimized a novel device "target" that directs a CO2 gas pulse onto a Ti surface where a Cs(+) beam generates C(-) from the CO2. This secondary ionization target enables an accelerator mass spectrometer to ionize pulses of CO2 in the negative mode to measure (14)C/(12)C isotopic ratios in real time. The design of the targets were based on computational flow dynamics, ionization mechanism and empirical optimization. As part of the ionization mechanism, the adsorption of CO2 on the Ti surface was fitted with the Jovanovic-Freundlich isotherm model using empirical and simulation data. The inferred adsorption constants were in good agreement with other works. The empirical optimization showed that amount of injected carbon and the flow speed of the helium carrier gas improve the ionization efficiency and the amount of (12)C(-) produced until reaching a saturation point. Linear dynamic range between 150 and 1000 ng of C and optimum carrier gas flow speed of around 0.1 mL/min were shown. It was also shown that the ionization depends on the area of the Ti surface and Cs(+) beam cross-section. A range of ionization efficiency of 1-2.5% was obtained by optimizing the described parameters.

  14. Mutagenicity of secondary oxidation products of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-hydroxy-2'- deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate).

    PubMed

    Hori, Mika; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Minakawa, Noriaki; Matsuda, Akira; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    8-Oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-hydroxyguanine) is oxidized more easily than normal nucleobases, which can produce spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and guanidinohydantoin (Gh). These secondary oxidation products of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine are highly mutagenic when formed within DNA. To evaluate the mutagenicity of the corresponding oxidation products of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-hydroxy-2'- deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate) in the nucleotide pool, Escherichia coli cells deficient in the mutT gene were treated with H(2)O(2), and the induced mutations were analyzed. Moreover, the 2'-deoxyriboside 5'-triphosphate derivatives of Sp and Gh were also introduced into competent E. coli cells. The H(2)O(2) treatment of mutT E. coli cells resulted in increase of G:C → T:A and A:T → T:A mutations. However, the incorporation of exogenous Sp and Gh 2'-deoxyribonucleotides did not significantly increase the mutation frequency. These results suggested that the oxidation product(s) of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate induces G:C → T:A and A:T → T:A mutations, and that the 2'-deoxyriboside 5'-triphosphate derivatives of Sp and Gh exhibit quite weak mutagenicity, in contrast to the bases in DNA.

  15. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Agriculture Production (Program CIP: 01.0301--Agricultural Prod. Workers & Mgrs.). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for agriculture production I and II. Presented first are a program…

  16. PRODUCTION IMPROVEMENT FROM INCREASED PERMEABILITY USING ENGINEERED BIOCHEMICAL SECONDARY RECOVERY METHODOLOGY IN MARGINAL WELLS OF THE EAST TEXAS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Bassett; William S. Botto

    2005-04-29

    A combination of a regenerating biochemical mixture and an organic surfactant has been applied to wells in the East Texas Field with the goal of restoring permeability, reversing formation damage, mobilizing hydrocarbons, and ultimately increasing production. Initial work in task 1 was designed to open the perforations and remove blockages of scale, asphaltene, and other corrosion debris. This was accomplished on three wells that produce from the Woodbine, and was necessary to prepare the wells for more substantial future treatments. Secondly, in task 2, two wells were treated with much larger quantities of the biochemical mixture, e.g. 25 gallons, with a 2% KCl carrier solution that carried the active biochemical solution into the near wellbore area adjacent to producing reservoir. After a 7 to 10 day acclamation and reaction period, the wells were put back into production. The biochemical solution successfully broke down the scale, paraffin and other binders blocking permeability and released significant debris, which was immediately produced into the flow lines and separators. Oil production was clearly improved and the removed debris was a maintenance issue until the surface equipment could be modified. In task 3 the permeability restrictions in a cylindrical area of 10 to 20 feet from the wellbore within the reservoir were treated with the biochemical solution. Fluid was forced into the producing horizon using the hydraulic head of the well filled with 2 % KCl solution, allowed to acclimate, and then withdrawn by pumping. The chloride content of the produce water was measured and production of oil and water monitored. The most significant effect in improving permeability and removing scale and high molecular weight hydrocarbons was accomplished in the wellbore perforations and near wellbore treatments of tasks 1 and 2. The effect the deeper insertion of solution in task 3 had minimal impact on production.

  17. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1998-04-08

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

  18. Composition of phytoplankton communities and their contribution to secondary productivity in Carolina Bays on the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.B. . Dept. of Natural Sciences)

    1989-08-01

    The overall goal of this three-year project is to determine the importance of phytoplankton (microscopic algae) as a component of the food chain base in SRS Carolina Bays (shallow temporary ponds endemic to the Southeastern US). Previous investigations and ongoing SREL studies have determined the importance of Carolina bay zooplankton (microscopic crustacean herbivores) to the early life stages of amphibians. Our project is testing the hypothesis that phytoplankton are the primary component of zooplankton diets in these bays. Carolina Bays represent critical habitats for a whole class of vertebrates at SRS, the amphibians. Details of phytoplankton dynamics and productivity gained from our project will advance our understanding of ecological energetics within Carolina Bay systems. These results will also help determine the potential impact that these minute, but productive plants can have on SRS biota beyond the bounds of these aquatic ecosystems. Additional implications can be made concerning chemical elemental uptake and transfer from phytoplankton to higher trophic levels. 12 figs.

  19. High-resolution MS, MS/MS, and UV database of fungal secondary metabolites as a dereplication protocol for bioactive natural products.

    PubMed

    El-Elimat, Tamam; Figueroa, Mario; Ehrmann, Brandie M; Cech, Nadja B; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2013-09-27

    A major problem in the discovery of new biologically active compounds from natural products is the reisolation of known compounds. Such reisolations waste time and resources, distracting chemists from more promising leads. To address this problem, dereplication strategies are needed that enable crude extracts to be screened for the presence of known compounds before isolation efforts are initiated. In a project to identify anticancer drug leads from filamentous fungi, a significant dereplication challenge arises, as the taxonomy of the source materials is rarely known, and, thus, the literature cannot be probed to identify likely known compounds. An ultraperformance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-high-resolution tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-PDA-HRMS-MS/MS) method was developed for dereplication of fungal secondary metabolites in crude culture extracts. A database was constructed by recording HRMS and MS/MS spectra of fungal metabolites, utilizing both positive- and negative-ionization modes. Additional details, such as UV-absorption maxima and retention times, were also recorded. Small-scale cultures that showed cytotoxic activities were dereplicated before engaging in the scale-up or purification processes. Using these methods, approximately 50% of the cytotoxic extracts could be eliminated from further study after the confident identification of known compounds. The specific attributes of this dereplication methodology include a focus on bioactive secondary metabolites from fungi, the use of a 10 min chromatographic method, and the inclusion of both HRMS and MS/MS data.

  20. Effects of polysaccharide elicitors on secondary metabolite production and antioxidant response in Hypericum perforatum L. shoot cultures.

    PubMed

    Gadzovska Simic, Sonja; Tusevski, Oliver; Maury, Stéphane; Delaunay, Alain; Joseph, Claude; Hagège, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of polysaccharide elicitors such as chitin, pectin, and dextran on the production of phenylpropanoids (phenolics and flavonoids) and naphtodianthrones (hypericin and pseudohypericin) in Hypericum perforatum shoot cultures were studied. Nonenzymatic antioxidant properties (NEAOP) and peroxidase (POD) activity were also observed in shoot extracts. The activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone-flavanone isomerase (CHFI) were monitored to estimate channeling in phenylpropanoid/flavonoid pathways of elicited shoot cultures. A significant suppression of the production of total phenolics and flavonoids was observed in elicited shoots from day 14 to day 21 of postelicitation. This inhibition of phenylpropanoid production was probably due to the decrease in CHFI activity in elicited shoots. Pectin and dextran promoted accumulation of naphtodianthrones, particularly pseudohypericin, within 21 days of postelicitation. The enhanced accumulation of naphtodianthrones was positively correlated with an increase of PAL activity in elicited shoots. All tested elicitors induced NEAOP at day 7, while chitin and pectin showed increase in POD activity within the entire period of postelicitation. The POD activity was in significantly positive correlation with flavonoid and hypericin contents, suggesting a strong perturbation of the cell redox system and activation of defense responses in polysaccharide-elicited H. perforatum shoot cultures.

  1. PRODUCTION IMPROVEMENT FROM INCREASED PERMEABILITY USING ENGINEERED BIOCHEMICAL SECONDARY RECOVERY METHODOLOGY IN MARGINAL WELLS OF THE EAST TEXAS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Bassett; William S. Botto

    2004-07-14

    A regenerating biochemical mixture and organic surfactant has been applied to wells in the East Texas Field with the goal of restoring permeability, reversing formation damage, mobilizing hydrocarbons, and ultimately increasing production. Initial work in task 1 was designed to open the perforations and remove blockages of scale, asphaltene, and other corrosion debris. This was accomplished on three wells that produce from the Woodbine, and was necessary to prepare the wells for more substantial future treatments. Secondly, in task 2, two wells were treated with much larger quantities of the biochemical mixture, e.g. 25 gallons, followed by approximately 140 barrels of a 2% KCl solution that carried the active biochemical solution into the near wellbore area and into the producing reservoir. After a 7 to 10 day acclamation and reaction period, the wells were put back into production. The biochemical solution successfully broke down the scale, paraffin and other binders blocking permeability and released significant debris which was immediately produced into the flowlines and separators. Oil production was clearly improved and the removed debris was a maintenance issue until the surface equipment could be modified. Next steps include larger treatments and tracer tests to better understand the fluid flow dynamics.

  2. Effects of Polysaccharide Elicitors on Secondary Metabolite Production and Antioxidant Response in Hypericum perforatum L. Shoot Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gadzovska Simic, Sonja; Maury, Stéphane; Delaunay, Alain; Joseph, Claude; Hagège, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of polysaccharide elicitors such as chitin, pectin, and dextran on the production of phenylpropanoids (phenolics and flavonoids) and naphtodianthrones (hypericin and pseudohypericin) in Hypericum perforatum shoot cultures were studied. Nonenzymatic antioxidant properties (NEAOP) and peroxidase (POD) activity were also observed in shoot extracts. The activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone-flavanone isomerase (CHFI) were monitored to estimate channeling in phenylpropanoid/flavonoid pathways of elicited shoot cultures. A significant suppression of the production of total phenolics and flavonoids was observed in elicited shoots from day 14 to day 21 of postelicitation. This inhibition of phenylpropanoid production was probably due to the decrease in CHFI activity in elicited shoots. Pectin and dextran promoted accumulation of naphtodianthrones, particularly pseudohypericin, within 21 days of postelicitation. The enhanced accumulation of naphtodianthrones was positively correlated with an increase of PAL activity in elicited shoots. All tested elicitors induced NEAOP at day 7, while chitin and pectin showed increase in POD activity within the entire period of postelicitation. The POD activity was in significantly positive correlation with flavonoid and hypericin contents, suggesting a strong perturbation of the cell redox system and activation of defense responses in polysaccharide-elicited H. perforatum shoot cultures. PMID:25574489

  3. The PacC transcription factor regulates secondary metabolite production and stress response, but has only minor effects on virulence in the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhibing; Ren, Hui; Mousa, Jarrod J; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Zhang, Yongjun; Bruner, Steven D; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2017-02-01

    The PacC transcription factor is an important component of the fungal ambient pH-responsive regulatory system. Loss of pacC in the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana resulted in an alkaline pH-dependent decrease in growth and pH-dependent increased susceptibility to osmotic (salt, sorbitol) stress and SDS. Extreme susceptibility to Congo Red was noted irrespective of pH, and ΔBbpacC conidia showed subtle increases in UV susceptibility. The ΔBbPacC mutant showed a reduced ability to acidify media during growth due to failure to produce oxalic acid. The ΔBbPacC mutant also did not produce the insecticidal compound dipicolinic acid, however, production of a yellow-colored compound was noted. The compound, named bassianolone B, was purified and its structure determined. Despite defects in growth, stress resistance, and oxalate/insecticidal compound production, only a small decrease in virulence was seen for the ΔBbpacC strain in topical insect bioassays using larvae from the greater waxmoth, Galleria mellonella or adults of the beetle, Tenebrio molitor. However, slightly more pronounced decreases were seen in virulence via intrahemcoel injection assays (G. mellonella) and in assays using T. molitor larvae. These data suggest important roles for BbpacC in mediating growth at alkaline pH, regulating secondary metabolite production, and in targeting specific insect stages.

  4. Phosphate Limitation Induces Drastic Physiological Changes, Virulence-Related Gene Expression, and Secondary Metabolite Production in Pseudovibrio sp. Strain FO-BEG1

    PubMed Central

    González, José M.; Bondarev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus is a vital nutrient for living organisms and is obtained by bacteria primarily via phosphate uptake. However, phosphate is often scarcely accessible in nature, and there is evidence that in many areas of the ocean, its concentration limits bacterial growth. Surprisingly, the phosphate starvation response has been extensively investigated in different model organisms (e.g., Escherichia coli), but there is a dearth of studies on heterotrophic marine bacteria. In this work, we describe the response of Pseudovibrio sp. strain FO-BEG1, a metabolically versatile alphaproteobacterium and potential symbiont of marine sponges, to phosphate limitation. We compared the physiology, protein expression, and secondary metabolite production under phosphate-limited conditions to those under phosphate surplus conditions. We observed that phosphate limitation had a pleiotropic effect on the physiology of the strain, triggering cell elongation, the accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoate, the degradation of polyphosphate, and the exchange of membrane lipids in favor of phosphorus-free lipids such as sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerols. Many proteins involved in the uptake and degradation of phospho-organic compounds were upregulated, together with subunits of the ABC transport system for phosphate. Under conditions of phosphate limitation, FO-BEG1 secreted compounds into the medium that conferred an intense yellow coloration to the cultures. Among these compounds, we identified the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid. Finally, toxin-like proteins and other proteins likely involved in the interaction with the eukaryotic host were also upregulated. Altogether, our data suggest that phosphate limitation leads to a pronounced reorganization of FO-BEG1 physiology, involving phosphorus, carbon, and sulfur metabolism; cell morphology; secondary metabolite production; and the expression of virulence-related genes. PMID:25769826

  5. [Secondary rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Duron, J-B; Nguyen, P S; Bardot, J; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Secondary rhinoplasty is very usual. Some patients are not satisfied by the previous surgery because the result is poor with obvious defaults but, sometimes, the result is good but the patient expects perfection. These two different situations will not lead to the same answer from the surgeon. Techniques of secondary rhinoplasty are the same than primary, but are often more difficult to perform because of scar tissue, retraction and loss of lining. The authors analyse the more frequent deformities in secondary rhinoplasty and the way they fix them.

  6. Conversion of secondary pulp/paper sludge powder to liquid oil products for energy recovery by direct liquefaction in hot-compressed water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunbao; Lancaster, Jody

    2008-03-01

    The present work demonstrated that secondary pulp/paper sludge powder, with a higher heating value of 18.3MJ/kg on a dry basis, could be effectively converted into liquid oil products by direct liquefaction in hot-compressed water with and without catalyst. Treatments of secondary pulp/paper sludge in water at 250-380 degrees C for 15-120min in the presence of N(2) atmosphere resulted in yields of water-soluble oils at 20-45wt% and yields of heavy oils at 15-25wt%, with higher heating values of 10-15 and >35MJ/kg, respectively. The higher caloric values for the heavy oil products were accounted for by their compositions of long-chain carboxylic acids, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds and phenolic compounds and derivatives as evidenced by the gas chromatograph (GC)/MS measurements. The liquefaction product yields were significantly influenced by the liquefaction temperature, the residence time, the initial biomass concentration, catalysts and the liquefaction atmosphere (inert or reducing). Within the temperature range (250-380 degrees C) tested, the lowest temperature produced the highest yield of total oils (at 60wt%), while the greatest yield of heavy oil (at about 24wt%) was obtained at 350 degrees C. If the temperature was fixed at 280 degrees C, a greater yield of heavy oil (reaching as high as 25wt% for 120min) was obtained as the length of reaction time increased. Similarly, a higher initial biomass concentration produced a greater yield of heavy oil but a reduced yield of water-soluble oil. The presence of 0.1M K(2)CO(3) dramatically enhanced organic conversion, but suppressed the formation of both heavy oil and water-soluble oil. The use of the two alkaline earth metal catalysts, i.e., Ca(OH)(2) and Ba(OH)(2), did not alter organic conversion, but it catalyzed the formation of water-soluble oil and produced higher yields of total oil products. It was also demonstrated that the reducing atmosphere (i.e., H(2)) in the liquefaction process promoted the heavy

  7. Emission and Photochemical Evolution of Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs): from Consumer Products to Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Kacarab, M.; Chen, C. L.; Price, D.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Missing emission sources contribute to potential problems in air quality modeling and human health. Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs) are widely used in consumer products and currently receive VOC exemptions based on their vapor pressure. However, 58.5 TPD LVP-VOC is estimated to emit in 2020 from consumer products in California based on government and industry inventory data. This work investigates the emission and photochemical evolution of major LVP-VOCs in consumer products to demonstrate LVP-VOC impacts on criteria air pollutants. LVP-VOC emission potential is investigated by offline gravimetric and online headspace tracking pure compounds and consumer product mixtures under ambient relevant conditions. Only 3 of the 14 pure LVP-VOCs were found to be atmospherically unavailable. All target LVP-VOCs are observed to evaporate from tested consumer product mixtures. We found improved thermodynamic parameters to predict LVP-VOC evaporation rate. LVP-VOCs photochemical evolution and their impact on ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation are evaluated by integrating SAPRC-11 modeling with laboratory studies in a 90 m3 dual environmental chamber at UC Riverside/CE-CERT. Simultaneous photooxidation experiments, with and without the LVP-VOC, are conducted in the presence of reactive organic gas (ROG) surrogate representing urban chemical smog. Further, LVP-VOC photochemical evolution pathway is investigated under various atmospheric activity (LVP + H2O2, LVP+NO or LVP+H2O2+NO) in the environmental chamber. Gas phase and particle phase mass spectrometers (SIFT-MS, Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrum and HR-ToF-MS, High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol mass Spectrometer) are applied to monitor the evolution of LVP-VOCs in the controlled atmosphere. The potential of LVP-VOC oxidation into ELVOC is also illustrated. We finally interpret the health risk and environmental concern related to LVP-VOC emission and photoxidation.

  8. Secondary Metabolites Production and Plant Growth Promotion by Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. aurantiaca Strains Isolated from Cactus, Cotton, and Para Grass.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Izzah; Rizwan, Muhammad; Baig, Deeba Noreen; Saleem, Rahman Shahzaib; Malik, Kauser A; Mehnaz, Samina

    2017-03-28

    Fluorescent pseudomonads have been isolated from halophytes, mesophytes, and xerophytes of Pakistan. Among these, eight isolates, GS-1, GS-3, GS-4, GS-6, GS-7, FS-2 (cactus), ARS-38 (cotton), and RP-4 (para grass), showed antifungal activity and were selected for detailed study. Based on biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequences, these were identified as strains of P. chlororaphis subsp. chlororaphis and aurantiaca. Secondary metabolites of these strains were analyzed by LC-MS. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), 2-hydroxy-phenazine, Cyclic Lipopeptide (white line-inducing principle (WLIP)), and lahorenoic acid A were detected in variable amounts in these strains. P. aurantiaca PB-St2 was used as a reference as it is known for the production of these compounds. The phzO and PCA genes were amplified to assure that production of these compounds is not an artifact. Indole acetic acid production was confirmed and quantified by HPLC. HCN and siderophore production by all strains was observed by plate assays. These strains did not solubilize phosphate, but five strains were positive for zinc solubilization. Wheat seedlings were inoculated with these strains to observe their effect on plant growth. P. aurantiaca strains PB-St2 and GS-6 and P. chlororaphis RP-4 significantly increased both root and shoot dry weights, as compared with uninoculated plants. However, P. aurantiaca strains FS-2 and ARS-38 significantly increased root and shoot dry weights, respectively. All strains except PB-St2 and ARS-38 significantly increased the root length. This is the first report of the isolation of P. aurantiaca from cotton and cactus, P. chlororaphis from para grass, WLIP and lahorenoic acid A production by P. chlororaphis, and zinc solubilization by P. chlororaphis and P. aurantiaca.

  9. Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1992-06-01

    It is generally acknowledged that improvements to end-use load shape and peak demand forecasts for electricity are limited primarily by the absence of reliable end-use data. In this report we analyze recent end-use metered data collected by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company from more than 700 residential customers to develop new inputs for the load shape and peak demand electricity forecasting models used by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the California Energy Commission. Hourly load shapes are normalized to facilitate separate accounting (by the models) of annual energy use and the distribution of that energy use over the hours of the day. Cooling electricity consumption by central air-conditioning is represented analytically as a function of climate. Limited analysis of annual energy use, including unit energy consumption (UEC), and of the allocation of energy use to seasons and system peak days, is also presented.

  10. Characterization of an urban-rural CO 2 /temperature gradient and associated changes in initial plant productivity during secondary succession

    SciTech Connect

    Ziska, L. H.; Bunce, J. A.; Goins, E. W.

    2004-05-01

    To examine the impact of climate change on vegetative productivity, we exposed fallow agricultural soil to an in situ temperature and CO2 gradient between urban, suburban and rural areas in 2002. Along the gradient, average daytime CO2 concentration increased by 21% and maximum (daytime) and minimum (nighttime) daily temperatures increased by 1.6 and 3.3°C, respectively in an urban relative to a rural location. Consistent location differences in soil temperature were also ascertained. No other consistent differences in meteorological variables (e.g. wind speed, humidity, PAR, tropospheric ozone) as a function of urbanization were documented. The urban-induced environmental changes that were observed were consistent with most short-term (~50 year) global change scenarios regarding CO2 concentration and air temperature. Productivity, determined as final above-ground biomass, and maximum plant height were positively affected by daytime and soil temperatures as well as enhanced [CO2], increasing 60 and 115% for the suburban and urban sites, respectively, relative to the rural site. While long-term data are needed, these initial results suggest that urban environments may act as a reasonable surrogate for investigating future climatic change in vegetative communities.

  11. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which

  12. Technology data characterizing refrigeration in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    In the United States, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of the refrigeration end use in terms of specific technologies, however, is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of refrigeration cases and systems is quite large. Also, energy use is a complex function of the refrigeration-case properties and the refrigeration-system properties. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. Expanding end-use forecasting models so that they address individual technology options requires characterization of the present floorstock in terms of service requirements, energy technologies used, and cost-efficiency attributes of the energy technologies that consumers may choose for new buildings and retrofits. This report describes the process by which we collected refrigeration technology data. The data were generated for COMMEND 4.0 but are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

  13. Modeling the primary and secondary productions of the southern Benguela upwelling system: A comparative study through two biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koné, V.; Machu, E.; Penven, P.; Andersen, V.; GarçOn, V.; FréOn, P.; Demarcq, H.

    2005-12-01

    A three-dimensional primitive equation model, the Regional Ocean Modeling Systems (ROMS), coupled to two biogeochemical configurations (NPZD and N2P2Z2D2) was used to study the dynamics of the first trophic levels of the pelagic food web in the southern Benguela upwelling system. The domain extends from the Agulhas Bank bordered by the Agulhas Current to 27°S on the west coast of South Africa. The circulation is driven by monthly climatologies of atmospheric forcing fields. The NPZD ecosystem model consists of four state variables: nutrient (nitrate), phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. In the N2P2Z2D2 model, ammonium has been added and the three other variables have been divided into small and large organisms or detritus. Both models are able to reproduce the spatio-temporal phytoplankton distribution. Along the west coast, chlorophyll concentrations maxima are associated to surface waters. Westward dominating winds generate the lowest chlorophyll concentrations encountered in winter. The small phytoplankton organisms simulated by the N2P2Z2D2 model are responsible for a weaker chlorophyll inshore/offshore gradient, in closer agreement with observations. Transitions from a regime dominated by new production (high f ratio) to one dominated by regenerated production (low f ratio) happen to be abrupt, underlying the constant competition between small and large organisms with regard to upwelling induced nutrient inputs. On the Agulhas Bank, the summer enrichment is associated with subsurface maxima, while in winter, mixing by storms results in a homogeneous phytoplankton distribution in the water column. Regenerated production plays an important role in maintaining the total phytoplankton growth. Zooplankton biomass reflects the overall patterns of chlorophyll a concentrations with differences between the west coast and the Agulhas Bank, consistent with data, and its distribution exhibits a clear seasonal contrast. The seasonality of small and large zooplankton

  14. Salinity stress increases lipid, secondary metabolites and enzyme activity in Amphora subtropica and Dunaliella sp. for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    BenMoussa-Dahmen, Ines; Chtourou, Haifa; Rezgui, Fatma; Sayadi, Sami; Dhouib, Abdelhafidh

    2016-10-01

    Amphora subtropica and Dunaliella sp. isolated from Tunisian biotopes were retained for their high lipid contents. Respective optimized parameters for rapid growth were: pH 9 and 10, light period 21 and 24h and temperature 31 and 34°C, respectively. After optimization, Amphora subtropica growth rate increased from 0.2 to 0.5day(-1) and Dunaliella sp. growth rate increased from 0.38 to 0.7day(-1). Amphora subtropica biomass production, productivity and lipid content increased from 0.3 to 0.7gL(-1)(dw), 69-100mgL(-1)d(-1)(dw) and 150-190gkg(-1)(dw), respectively, and Dunaliella sp. from 0.5 to 1.4gL(-1)(dw), 124-200mgL(-1)d(-1) (dw) and 190-280gkg(-1)(dw), respectively. Often to overcome trade-off between microalgae rapid growth and high lipid content which are often conflicting and very difficult to obtain at the same time, separation in a growth stage and a lipid accumulation stage is obvious. Salinity stress in a single stage of culture was studied. Compared to the optimal concentration of growth, excess or deficiency of NaCl engendered the same cellular responses by implication of oxidative stress systems and reactivation of defense and storage systems. Indeed, increasing salinity from 1M to 2M for Amphora subtropica or decreasing salinity from 3M to 2M for Dunaliella sp. have both increased lipids content from (220 and 280) to (350 and 430)gkg(-1), carotenoids from (1.8 and 2.4) to (2.3 and 3.7)pgcell(-1), TBARS amount from (10.4 and 5.3) to (12.1 and 10.7)nmolmg(-1) proteins and SOD activity from of (46.6 and 61.8) to (71.6 and 79.4)Umg(-1) proteins, respectively. With further improved fatty acids profile, the microalgae strains could be potent candidates for biofuel production.

  15. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

    2003-02-06

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  16. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

    1999-11-02

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  17. Mapping the global flow of aluminum: from liquid aluminum to end-use goods.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Jonathan M; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Demand for aluminum in final products has increased 30-fold since 1950 to 45 million tonnes per year, with forecasts predicting this exceptional growth to continue so that demand will reach 2-3 times today's levels by 2050. Aluminum production uses 3.5% of global electricity and causes 1% of global CO2 emissions, while meeting a 50% cut in emissions by 2050 against growing demand would require at least a 75% reduction in CO2 emissions per tonne of aluminum produced--a challenging prospect. In this paper we trace the global flows of aluminum from liquid metal to final products, revealing for the first time a complete map of the aluminum system and providing a basis for future study of the emissions abatement potential of material efficiency. The resulting Sankey diagram also draws attention to two key issues. First, around half of all liquid aluminum (~39 Mt) produced each year never reaches a final product, and a detailed discussion of these high yield losses shows significant opportunities for improvement. Second, aluminum recycling, which avoids the high energy costs and emissions of electrolysis, requires signification "dilution" (~ 8 Mt) and "cascade" (~ 6 Mt) flows of higher aluminum grades to make up for the shortfall in scrap supply and to obtain the desired alloy mix, increasing the energy required for recycling.

  18. Primary emissions and secondary formation of volatile organic compounds from natural gas production in five major U.S. shale plays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Lui, R.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Murphy, S. M.; Alvarez, S. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Min, K. E.; Brown, S. S.; Roberts, J. M.; Osthoff, H. D.; Hatch, C. D.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    According to the U.S. Energy and Information Administration (EIA), domestic production of natural gas from shale formations is currently at the highest levels in U.S. history. Shale gas production may also result in the production of natural gas plant liquids (NGPLs) such as ethane and propane as well as natural gas condensate composed of a complex mixture of non-methane hydrocarbons containing more than ~5 carbon atoms (e.g., hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene). The amounts of natural gas liquids and condensate produced depends on the particular reservoir. The source signature of primary emissions of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere within each shale play will therefore depend on the composition of the raw natural gas as well as the industrial processes and equipment used to extract, separate, store, and transport the raw materials. Characterizing the primary emissions of VOCs from natural gas production is critical to assessing the local and regional atmospheric impacts such as the photochemical formation of ozone and secondary formation of organic aerosol. This study utilizes ground-based measurements of a full suite of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in two western U.S. basins, the Uintah (2012-2014 winter measurements only) and Denver-Julesburg (winter 2011 and summer 2012), and airborne measurements over the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale basins (summer 2013). By comparing the observed VOC to propane enhancement ratios, we show that each basin has a unique VOC source signature associated with oil and natural gas operations. Of the shale basins studied, the Uintah basin had the largest overall VOC to propane enhancement ratios while the Marcellus had the lowest. For the western basins, we will compare the composition of oxygenated VOCs produced from photochemical oxidation of VOC precursors and contrast the oxygenated VOC mixture to a "typical" summertime urban VOC mixture. The relative roles of alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, and cycloalkanes as

  19. Composition of phytoplankton communities and their contribution to secondary productivity in Carolina Bays on the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.B.

    1990-08-01

    This three-year collaborative project with Savannah River Ecology Lab (SREL) has an overall goal to determine the importance of phytoplankton (microscopic algae) as a component of the food chain base in SRS Carolina Bays. The importance of zooplankton (microscopic crustacean herbivores) to the early life stages of amphibians in these Carolina Bays has been determined by previous investigators and ongoing SREL studies. Our project is testing hypotheses that phytoplankton compose the most important part of zooplankton diets in SRS bays. Considerable progress has been made on each of the YEAR TWO proposal objectives. Proposed work for one of the objectives will not be completed by the end of the project year due to the high work volume required for the stable isotope sampling. All sampling for primary productivity and stable isotope analyses has been completed. However, scheduled samples for the hotter summer temperatures during July were not collected due to the fact that Flamingo, Ellenton, and Rainbow Bays had already dried up. Progress for each of the Proposal Year One objectives is summarized in this report along with summaries for supplemental objectives. Detailed discussions of methodology and results are also found in the report. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1997-10-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  1. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

    1999-11-03

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  2. Shielding experiments by the JASMIN Collaboration at Fermilab (II) - radioactivity measurement induced by secondary particles from the anti-proton production target

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi, Yashima; Norihiro, Matsuda; Yoshimi, Kasugai; Hiroshi, Nakashima; Yukio, Sakamoto; Hiroshi, Matsumura; Hiroshi, Iwase; Norikazu, Kinoshita; David, Boehnlein; Gary, Lautenschlager; Anthony, Leveling; Nikolai, Mokhov; Kamran, Vaziri; Koji, Oishi

    2011-08-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has performed an experiment to conduct measurements of nuclear reaction rates around the anti-proton production (Pbar) target at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). At the Pbar target station, the target, consisting of an Inconel 600 cylinder, was irradiated by a 120 GeV/c proton beam from the FNAL Main Injector. The beam intensity was 3.6 x 1012 protons per second. The samples of Al, Nb, Cu, and Au were placed near the target to investigate the spatial and energy distribution of secondary particles emitted from it. After irradiation, the induced activities of the samples were measured by studying their gamma ray spectra using HPGe detectors. The production rates of 30 nuclides induced in Al, Nb, Cu, Au samples were obtained. These rates increase for samples placed in a forward (small angle) position relative to the target. The angular dependence of these reaction rates becomes larger for increasing threshold energy. These experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The calculated results generally agree with the experimental results to within a factor of 2 to 3.

  3. Shielding experiments by the JASMIN collaboration at Fermilab (II) - Radioactivity measurement induced by secondary particles from the anti-proton production target

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Iwase, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Boehnlein, David; Lauten, Gary; Leveling, Anthony; Mokhov, Nikolai; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab /Shimizu, Tokyo /JAEA, Ibaraki

    2011-01-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has performed an experiment to conduct measurements of nuclear reaction rates around the anti-proton production (Pbar) target at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). At the Pbar target station, the target, consisting an Inconel 600 cylinder, was irradiated by a 120 GeV/c proton beam from the FNAL Main Injector. The beam intensity was 3.6 x 10{sub 12} protons per second. Samples of Al, Nb, Cu, and Au were placed near the target to investigate the spatial and energy distribution of secondary particles emitted from it. After irradiation, the induced activities of the samples were measured by studying their gamma ray spectra using HPGe detectors. The production rates of 30 nuclides induced in Al, Nb, Cu, Au samples were obtained. These rates increase for samples placed in a forward (small angle) position relative to the target. The angular dependence of these reaction rates becomes larger for increasing threshold energy. These experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The calculated results generally agree with the experimental results to within a factor of 2 to 3.

  4. Shielding experiments by the JASMIN Collaboration at Fermilab (II) - radioactivity measurement induced by secondary particles from the anti-proton production target

    DOE PAGES

    Hiroshi, Yashima; Norihiro, Matsuda; Yoshimi, Kasugai; ...

    2011-08-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has performed an experiment to conduct measurements of nuclear reaction rates around the anti-proton production (Pbar) target at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). At the Pbar target station, the target, consisting of an Inconel 600 cylinder, was irradiated by a 120 GeV/c proton beam from the FNAL Main Injector. The beam intensity was 3.6 x 1012 protons per second. The samples of Al, Nb, Cu, and Au were placed near the target to investigate the spatial and energy distribution of secondary particles emitted from it. After irradiation, the induced activities of the samples were measured bymore » studying their gamma ray spectra using HPGe detectors. The production rates of 30 nuclides induced in Al, Nb, Cu, Au samples were obtained. These rates increase for samples placed in a forward (small angle) position relative to the target. The angular dependence of these reaction rates becomes larger for increasing threshold energy. These experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The calculated results generally agree with the experimental results to within a factor of 2 to 3.« less

  5. mrflbA, encoding a putative FlbA, is involved in aerial hyphal development and secondary metabolite production in Monascus ruber M-7.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Li, Li; Li, Xin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2012-02-01

    FlbA (fluffy low brlA expression), a regulator of the G protein signalling (RGS) pathway, has been implicated in the control of hyphal development, sporulation, mycotoxin/pigment production in many kinds of filamentous fungi and yeasts. In the current study, a FlbA-like protein gene mrflbA (Monascus ruber flbA) was isolated, sequenced, and disrupted in order to investigate the RGS function in M. ruber. The results revealed that the derived protein of the mrflbA gene consisted of 734 amino acids and had the conserved RGS domain at the C-terminus and two DEP (dishevelled, Egl-10, pleckstrin) domains at the N-terminus similar to the structure of RGS proteins in other filamentous fungi. Deletion of the mrflbA gene resulted in the formation of an abnormal colony phenotype with fluffy aerial hyphae that autolyzed as the colony grew on potato dextrose agar (PDA) at 28°C. Additionally, mrflbA deletion could repress conidial germination and pigment/citrinin production in M. ruber M-7. Real-time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the transcription level of the G protein α subunit (Gα) was remarkably increased in the mrflbA deletion strain. These results suggest that mrflbA is involved in the modulation of aerial hyphal development and secondary metabolism, as well as, negative regulation of Gα subunit expression in M. ruber M-7.

  6. Red waters of Myrionecta rubra are biogeochemical hotspots for the Columbia River estuary with impacts on primary/secondary productions and nutrient cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; McCue, Lee Ann; Needoba, Joe A.; Crump, Byron C.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Campbell, Victoria; Zuber, Peter A.

    2012-02-29

    The localized impact of blooms of the mixotrophic ciliate Myrionecta rubra in the Columbia River estuary during 2007-2010 was evaluated with biogeochemical, light microscopy, physiological and molecular data. M. rubra affected surrounding estuarine nutrient cycles, as indicated by high and low concentrations of organic nutrients and inorganic nitrogen, respectively, associated with red waters. M. rubra blooms also altered the energy transfer pattern in patches of the estuarine water that contain the ciliate by creating areas characterized by high primary production and elevated levels of fresh autochthonous particulate organic matter, therefore shifting the trophic status in emergent red water areas of the estuary from net heterotrophy towards autotrophy. The pelagic estuarine bacterial community structure was unaffected by M. rubra abundance, but red waters of the ciliate do offer a possible link between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes since they were associated with elevated dissolved organic matter and enhanced microbial secondary production. Taken together these findings suggest that M. rubra red waters are biogeochemical hotspots of the Columbia River estuary.

  7. Simulating cosmic radiation absorption and secondary particle production of solar panel layers of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite with GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Veske, Doǧa; Nilüfer Öztürk, Zeynep; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat

    2016-07-01

    All devices which operate in space are exposed to cosmic rays during their operation. The resulting radiation may cause fatal damages in the solid structure of devices and the amount of absorbed radiation dose and secondary particle production for each component should be calculated carefully before the production. Solar panels are semiconductor solid state devices and are very sensitive to radiation. Even a short term power cut-off may yield a total failure of the satellite. Even little doses of radiation can change the characteristics of solar cells. This deviation can be caused by rarer high energetic particles as well as the total ionizing dose from the abundant low energy particles. In this study, solar panels planned for a specific LEO satellite, IMECE, are analyzed layer by layer. The Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) database and GEANT4 simulation software are used to simulate the layers of the panels. The results obtained from the simulation will be taken in account to determine the amount of radiation protection and resistance needed for the panels or to revise the design of the panels.

  8. Biosynthesis of the High-Value Plant Secondary Product Benzyl Isothiocyanate via Functional Expression of Multiple Heterologous Enzymes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feixia; Yang, Han; Wang, Limin; Yu, Bo

    2016-12-16

    Plants produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites that are highly nutraceutically and pharmaceutically important. Isothiocyanates, which are found abundantly in cruciferous vegetables, are believed to reduce the risk of several types of cancers and cardiovascular diseases. The challenges arising from the structural diversity and complex chemistry of these compounds have spurred great interest in producing them in large amounts in microbes. In this study, we aimed to synthesize benzyl isothiocyanate in Escherichia coli via gene mining, pathway engineering, and protein modification. Two chimeric cytochrome P450 enzymes were constructed and functionally expressed in E. coli. The E. coli cystathionine β-lyase was used to replace the plant-derived C-S lyase; its active form cannot be expressed in E. coli. Suitable desulfoglucosinolate:PAPS sulfotransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Col-0 and myrosinase from Brevicoryne brassicae were successfully mined from the database. Biosynthesis of benzyl isothiocyanate by the combined expression of the optimized enzymes in vitro was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. This study provided a proof of concept for the production of benzyl isothiocyanate by microbially produced enzymes and, importantly, laid the groundwork for further metabolic engineering of microbial cells for the production of isothiocyanates.

  9. Material flow analysis of scarce metals: sources, functions, end-uses and aspects for future supply.

    PubMed

    Peiró, Laura Talens; Méndez, Gara Villalba; Ayres, Robert U

    2013-03-19

    A number of metals that are now important to the electronic industry (and others) will become much more important in the future if current trends in technology continue. Most of these metals are byproducts (or hitch-hikers) of a small number of important industrial metals (attractors). By definition, the metals in the hitch-hiker group are not mined by themselves, and thus their production is limited by the demand for the major attractors. This article presents a material flow analysis (MFA) of the complex inter-relationships between these groups of metals. First, it surveys the main sources of geologically scarce (byproduct) metals currently considered critical by one or other of several recent studies. This is followed by a detailed survey of their major functions and the quantities contained in intermediate and end-products. The purpose is to identify the sectors and products where those metals are used and stocked and thus potentially available for future recycling. It concludes with a discussion of the limitations of possible substitution and barriers to recycling.

  10. Long-term trends of primary and secondary NO 2 production in the Athens area. Variation of the NO 2 /NOx ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, I.; Chaloulakou, A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines the contribution of primary and secondary NO 2 production in NOx concentrations and offers a comprehensive analysis of the long-term trends of NOx, NO 2 and O 3 concentrations, as well as of the NO 2/NOx ratio, in the Athens urban conurbation. Long-term pollutant concentration time series show that NO 2 concentrations in Athens have decreased since 1987 but at a slower rate than those of NOx, resulting to an increasing NO 2/NOx concentration ratio. However, this increasing trend is much smaller than those observed in urban areas of other European countries. The possible causes of this trend are examined and especially the interaction with ozone and the amount of direct NO 2 traffic emissions. The results indicate that the increasing NO 2/NOx ratio in the Athens area is mainly attributable to an increased secondary formation of NO 2 through photochemical reactions in the atmosphere. More specifically, two different empirical methodologies were applied to examine the primary NO 2 concentration fraction in Athens, using ambient monitoring data from a kerbside station. Both methods indicate that the primary NO 2 concentration share has not altered significantly between 1998 and 2006. This is mainly attributed to the fact that in the Athens area diesel passenger cars are not allowed and after-treatment technologies such as particle filters and oxidation catalysts are not yet applied in Greece. A probable future penetration of diesel passenger cars in Athens should be combined with inventories of primary NO 2 emissions and with the development of appropriate policies to reduce ambient NO 2 concentrations below the EU limit values.

  11. Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

    1995-12-01

    In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

  12. Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

  13. Laboratory studies of oxidation of primary emissions: Oxidation of organic molecular markers and secondary organic aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, Emily A.

    vehicle markers. Aerosol composition is a key influence on reaction rate constants, perhaps more significant than external influences. Alkenoic acid concentrations in the meat grease particles appear to influence cholesterol oxidation rates. Also, the reaction rate constants for new motor oil were faster than those of the more viscous used motor oil. The measured reaction rate constants were used to oxidize source profiles that were subsequently run in the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model. Oxidizing the molecular markers in the meat-cooking profile led to unrealistically high meat-cooking aerosol contributions to the total organic carbon (OC), often more than 100%. This suggests that there is either unaccounted for sources of meat-cooking molecular markers in the ambient samples, or there is some property of atmospheric aerosols that significantly inhibits reaction that was not captured in this study. Oxidation of motor vehicle profiles led to both higher estimates of total vehicle OC and a quadrupling of gasoline OC, while the diesel contribution changed very little. The increase in gasoline OC changes gasoline vehicle emissions from a relatively minor source to a major one. Thus, oxidation of molecular markers can have a significant impact on receptor model predictions. The second objective was to investigate SOA formation from the photo-oxidation of whole diesel exhaust. Diluted exhaust from a diesel engine was photo-oxidized in a smog chamber to investigate SOA production. Photochemical oxidation rapidly produced significant SOA, almost doubling the organic aerosol contribution of primary emissions after several hours of processing. Less than 10% of the SOA mass could be explained using a SOA model and the measured oxidation of known precursors, such as light aromatics. However, the ultimate yield of SOA is uncertain because it is sensitive to treatment of particle and vapor losses to the chamber walls. Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) mass spectra reveal that the

  14. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Thornton, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas and particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO-HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25-50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of

  15. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; Kroll, J. H.; Worsnop, D.; Thornton, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25-50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of

  16. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; ...

    2015-02-18

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gasmore » and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the

  17. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; ...

    2015-07-16

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas andmore » particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO–HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the

  18. Impact of the Mountain Pine Beetle on the net Ecosystem Productivity of Lodgepole Pine Stands and the Role of Secondary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Black, T.; Nesic, Z.; Spilttlehouse, D.; Trofymow, T.; Fredeen, A.; Egginton, V.; Burton, P.; Grant, N.

    2009-05-01

    British Columbia, Canada is experiencing a severe mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic extending over an area of 135,000 km2. The widespread mortality of lodgepole pine caused by the beetle is having severe implications for Canada's carbon (C) budget. This study used the eddy-covariance technique to examine how the beetle is affecting the net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of two attacked lodgepole pine stands in the central interior of BC over 2 years. MPB-KS is an 83-year-old stand that was first attacked in 2006. By the start of 2007, roughly 60% of the canopy had been beetle attacked and by August 2008 only 21% of the canopy remained healthy. MPB-CR, a 110-year-old stand, first attacked by the beetle in 2003, had >95% pine mortality in 2007, and also differed from MPB-KS in that it had a developed secondary structure (seedlings, saplings, sub- canopy and canopy trees that survive a beetle attack) (SS) and deciduous ground layer. In 2007, MPB-KS had an annual and growing season (GS) NEP of -55 and 36 g C m-2, and in 2008, an annual and GS NEP of -42 and 34 g C m-2, respectively. MPB-CR had an annual and GS NEP of -22 and 23 g C m-2 in 2007 and 2 and 75 g C m-2 in 2008. In both years, MPB-KS was a GS C sink due to the productivity of the healthy portion of the canopy, the many seedlings and the mossy surface layer. Between 2007 and 2008, MPB-CR experienced a reduction in LAI (from 0.91 to 0.78), due to needle-fall, which led to an opening up of the canopy and resulted in a high SS C uptake in 2008. These results were confirmed by foliar CO2 exchange measurements which showed a high productivity for the SS and deciduous vegetation.

  19. Refining and end use study of coal liquids I - pilot plant studies

    SciTech Connect

    Erwin, J.; Moulton, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Office of Fossil Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center is examining the ways in which coal liquids may best be integrated into the refinery of the 2000-2015 time frame and what performance and emission properties will prevail among the slate of fuels produced. The study consists of a Basic Program administered by Bechtel Group, Inc. to build a linear programming refinery model and provide processing and fuel properties data through subcontractors Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and M.W. Kellogg Company. The model will be used in an Option 1 to devise a slate of test fuels meeting advanced specifications, which will be produced and tested for physical ASTM-type properties, engine performance, and vehicle emissions. Three coal liquids will be included: a direct liquid from bituminous coal, another from subbituminous, and a Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction product. This paper reports the work to date on fractions of the first direct liquid including naphtha hydrotreating, heavy distillate hydrotreating, FCC of the heavy distillate hydrotreater products. Also reported are the first stages of work on the indirect liquefaction wax including feed preparation and FCC tests of blends with petroleum FCC feed.

  20. Mapping the global flow of steel: from steelmaking to end-use goods.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Jonathan M; Allwood, Julian M; Bambach, Margarita D

    2012-12-18

    Our society is addicted to steel. Global demand for steel has risen to 1.4 billion tonnes a year and is set to at least double by 2050, while the steel industry generates nearly a 10th of the world's energy related CO₂ emissions. Meeting our 2050 climate change targets would require a 75% reduction in CO₂ emissions for every tonne of steel produced and finding credible solutions is proving a challenge. The starting point for understanding the environmental impacts of steel production is to accurately map the global steel supply chain and identify the biggest steel flows where actions can be directed to deliver the largest impact. In this paper we present a map of global steel, which for the first time traces steel flows from steelmaking, through casting, forming, and rolling, to the fabrication of final goods. The diagram reveals the relative scale of steel flows and shows where efforts to improve energy and material efficiency should be focused.

  1. Refining and end use study of coal liquids II - linear programming analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, C.; Tam, S.

    1995-12-31

    A DOE-funded study is underway to determine the optimum refinery processing schemes for producing transportation fuels that will meet CAAA regulations from direct and indirect coal liquids. The study consists of three major parts: pilot plant testing of critical upgrading processes, linear programming analysis of different processing schemes, and engine emission testing of final products. Currently, fractions of a direct coal liquid produced form bituminous coal are being tested in sequence of pilot plant upgrading processes. This work is discussed in a separate paper. The linear programming model, which is the subject of this paper, has been completed for the petroleum refinery and is being modified to handle coal liquids based on the pilot plant test results. Preliminary coal liquid evaluation studies indicate that, if a refinery expansion scenario is adopted, then the marginal value of the coal liquid (over the base petroleum crude) is $3-4/bbl.

  2. Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also ...

  3. Fast and comprehensive analysis of secondary metabolites in cocoa products using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography directly after pressurized liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Damm, Irina; Enger, Eileen; Chrubasik-Hausmann, Sigrun; Schieber, Andreas; Zimmermann, Benno F

    2016-08-01

    Fast methods for the extraction and analysis of various secondary metabolites from cocoa products were developed and optimized regarding speed and separation efficiency. Extraction by pressurized liquid extraction is automated and the extracts are analyzed by rapid reversed-phase ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography methods. After extraction, no further sample treatment is required before chromatographic analysis. The analytes comprise monomeric and oligomeric flavanols, flavonols, methylxanthins, N-phenylpropenoyl amino acids, and phenolic acids. Polyphenols and N-phenylpropenoyl amino acids are separated in a single run of 33 min, procyanidins are analyzed by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography within 16 min, and methylxanthins require only 6 min total run time. A fourth method is suitable for phenolic acids, but only protocatechuic acid was found in relevant quantities. The optimized methods were validated and applied to 27 dark chocolates, one milk chocolate, two cocoa powders and two food supplements based on cocoa extract.

  4. Production of induced secondary metabolites by a co-culture of sponge-associated actinomycetes, Actinokineospora sp. EG49 and Nocardiopsis sp. RV163.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Yousef; Grkovic, Tanja; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Hentschel, Ute; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-05-22

    Two sponge-derived actinomycetes, Actinokineospora sp. EG49 and Nocardiopsis sp. RV163, were grown in co-culture and the presence of induced metabolites monitored by ¹H NMR. Ten known compounds, including angucycline, diketopiperazine and β-carboline derivatives 1-10, were isolated from the EtOAc extracts of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 and Nocardiopsis sp. RV163. Co-cultivation of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 and Nocardiopsis sp. RV163 induced the biosynthesis of three natural products that were not detected in the single culture of either microorganism, namely N-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-acetamide (11), 1,6-dihydroxyphenazine (12) and 5a,6,11a,12-tetrahydro-5a,11a-dimethyl[1,4]benzoxazino[3,2-b][1,4]benzoxazine (13a). When tested for biological activity against a range of bacteria and parasites, only the phenazine 12 was active against Bacillus sp. P25, Trypanosoma brucei and interestingly, against Actinokineospora sp. EG49. These findings highlight the co-cultivation approach as an effective strategy to access the bioactive secondary metabolites hidden in the genomes of marine actinomycetes.

  5. Macroinvertebrate assemblages and secondary production in three wood-poor, second-growth, headwater streams in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entrekin, S. A.; Rosi-Marshall, E. J.; Tank, J. L.; Lamberti, G. A.

    2005-05-01

    Benthic organic matter (BOM) is retained by in-stream wood in forested streams and is often the primary food resource for aquatic macroinvertebrates. We sampled BOM and macroinvertebrates in three, forested headwater streams within the same watershed and predicted that BOM standing stocks would be high and, therefore, macroinvertebrate functional feeding groups would be dominated by shredders and gatherers. However, all streams had low annual average standing stocks of BOM (75 to 166 gAFDM m-2), and low shredder biomass (<5% of total) and gatherer biomass (<10%). Shane and Walton Creek macroinvertebrate biomass was dominated by predators (48% of total), scrapers (20%), and filterers (13%). Macroinvertebrate abundance peaked in June-July and again in November, while biomass peaked in November. In contrast, State Creek was dominated by scrapers (51%) and predators (33%), and abundance and biomass peaked in March and May, respectively. State Creek had the highest annual mean abundance (1198 individuals m-2), biomass (427 mgDM m-2), and secondary production (1000 mgDM m-2 yr-1). Macroinvertebrates in State Creek likely relied on algae and bryophytes for food and habitat. We conclude that macroinvertebrate communities in these streams are limited by BOM that was not retained in-stream because of reduced wood inputs from past logging.

  6. Identification and characterization of promoters and cis-regulatory elements of genes involved in secondary metabolites production in hop (Humulus lupulus. L).

    PubMed

    Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Kocabek, Tomas; Matoušek, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    Molecular and biochemical studies have shown that gene contains single or combination of different cis-acting regulatory elements are actively controlling the transcriptional regulation of associated genes, downstream effects of these result in the modulation of various biological pathways such as biotic/abiotic stress responses, hormonal responses to growth and development processes and secondary metabolite production. Therefore, the identification of promoters and their cis-regulatory elements is one of intriguing area to study the dynamic complex regulatory network of genes activities by integrating computational, comparative, structural and functional genomics. Several bioinformatics servers or database have been established to predict the cis-acting elements present in the promoter region of target gene and their association with the expression profiles in the TFs. The aim of this study is to predict possible cis-acting regulatory elements that have putative role in the transcriptional regulation of a dynamic network of metabolite gene activities controlling prenylflavonoid and bitter acids biosynthesis in hop (Humulus lupulus). Recent release of hop draft genome enabled us to predict the possible cis-acting regulatory elements by extracting 2kbp of 5' regulatory regions of genes important for lupulin metabolome biosynthesis, using Plant CARE, PLACE and Genomatix Matinspector professional databases. The result reveals the plausible role of cis-acting regulatory elements in the regulation of gene expression primarily involved in lupulin metabolome biosynthesis including under various stress conditions.

  7. Intermediate Volatility Organic Compound Emissions from On-Road Diesel Vehicles: Chemical Composition, Emission Factors, and Estimated Secondary Organic Aerosol Production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Presto, Albert A; Hennigan, Christopher J; May, Andrew A; Robinson, Allen L

    2015-10-06

    Emissions of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) from five on-road diesel vehicles and one off-road diesel engine were characterized during dynamometer testing. The testing evaluated the effects of driving cycles, fuel composition and exhaust aftertreatment devices. On average, more than 90% of the IVOC emissions were not identified on a molecular basis, instead appearing as an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) during gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry analysis. Fuel-based emissions factors (EFs) of total IVOCs (speciated + unspeciated) depend strongly on aftertreatment technology and driving cycle. Total-IVOC emissions from vehicles equipped with catalyzed diesel particulate filters (DPF) are substantially lower (factor of 7 to 28, depending on driving cycle) than from vehicles without any exhaust aftertreatment. Total-IVOC emissions from creep and idle operations are substantially higher than emissions from high-speed operations. Although the magnitude of the total-IVOC emissions can vary widely, there is little variation in the IVOC composition across the set of tests. The new emissions data are combined with published yield data to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. SOA production from unspeciated IVOCs is estimated using surrogate compounds, which are assigned based on gas-chromatograph retention time and mass spectral signature of the IVOC UCM. IVOCs contribute the vast majority of the SOA formed from exhaust from on-road diesel vehicles. The estimated SOA production is greater than predictions by previous studies and substantially higher than primary organic aerosol. Catalyzed DPFs substantially reduce SOA formation potential of diesel exhaust, except at low speed operations.

  8. Secondary osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is –2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  9. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photo-oxidation under a range of controlled conditions (relative humidity or RH ~65-89%, volatile organic compound-to-NOx or VOC / NOx ~3-9 and NOx ~2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measurable amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e. in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photo-oxidation products of the minor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally isoprene-emitting landscapes in Southeast

  10. An exploratory study on the influence of socio-demographic characteristics on water end uses inside buildings.

    PubMed

    Matos, Cristina; Teixeira, Carlos A; Bento, Ricardo; Varajão, João; Bentes, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Any strategy of water demand management needs the collaboration of the population involved and so it is important to know how characteristics as residence area, number of residents, presence/absence of children/elders, income level, and educational level, among others, may influence the use of water. Empirical studies that quantify relationship between socio-demographic factors and the water end use patterns inside buildings are still largely lacking. To help to fill this gap this paper gathers information about the characterization of water end use per domestic device in three regions of north of Portugal with different socio-demographic characteristics. The main research goal was to establish indoor water end use patterns per domestic device and to evaluate possible relations between these patterns with the socio-demographic characteristics of the area where the household is, namely the number of residents, the presence/absence of children/elders, the income level and educational level. The washbasin is in average the domestic device with more number of uses in a day (responsible for 34% of the total use), close followed by the kitchen sink (32%), the toilet flush (23%), the bathtub (6%) and finally the dishwasher (3%) and the washing machine (2%). The results found might reflect differences in rural and urban lifestyles once that, with the exception of the kitchen sink, Valpaços is the city that registers the lowest number of uses in the appliances monitored. Significant correlations were found in the following cases: between the residence area and the number of uses in washbasin and in the toilet flush; between the presence of children in the household and the use in the dishwasher; between the income level and the number of uses in the washbasin, in the bathtub, in the washing machine and in the dishwasher.

  11. Optimal urban water conservation strategies considering embedded energy: coupling end-use and utility water-energy models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escriva-Bou, A.; Lund, J. R.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Spang, E. S.; Loge, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Although most freshwater resources are used in agriculture, a greater amount of energy is consumed per unit of water supply for urban areas. Therefore, efforts to reduce the carbon footprint of water in cities, including the energy embedded within household uses, can be an order of magnitude larger than for other water uses. This characteristic of urban water systems creates a promising opportunity to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions, particularly given rapidly growing urbanization worldwide. Based on a previous Water-Energy-CO2 emissions model for household water end uses, this research introduces a probabilistic two-stage optimization model considering technical and behavioral decision variables to obtain the most economical strategies to minimize household water and water-related energy bills given both water and energy price shocks. Results show that adoption rates to reduce energy intensive appliances increase significantly, resulting in an overall 20% growth in indoor water conservation if household dwellers include the energy cost of their water use. To analyze the consequences on a utility-scale, we develop an hourly water-energy model based on data from East Bay Municipal Utility District in California, including the residential consumption, obtaining that water end uses accounts for roughly 90% of total water-related energy, but the 10% that is managed by the utility is worth over 12 million annually. Once the entire end-use + utility model is completed, several demand-side management conservation strategies were simulated for the city of San Ramon. In this smaller water district, roughly 5% of total EBMUD water use, we found that the optimal household strategies can reduce total GHG emissions by 4% and utility's energy cost over 70,000/yr. Especially interesting from the utility perspective could be the "smoothing" of water use peaks by avoiding daytime irrigation that among other benefits might reduce utility energy costs by 0.5% according to our

  12. Emissions from residential combustion considering end-uses and spatial constraints: Part I, methods and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winijkul, Ekbordin; Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a framework to attribute national-level atmospheric emissions in the year 2010 from the residential sector, one of the largest energy-related sources of aerosol emissions. We place special emphasis on end-uses, dividing usage into cooking, heating, lighting, and others. This study covers regions where solid biomass fuel provides more than 50% of total residential energy: Latin America, Africa, and Asia (5.2 billion people in 2010). Using nightlight data and population density, we classify five land types: urban, electrified rural with forest access, electrified rural without forest access, non-electrified rural with forest access, and non-electrified rural without forest access. We then apportion national-level residential fuel consumption among all land-types and end-uses, and assign end-use technologies to each combination. The resulting calculation gives spatially-distributed emissions of particulate matter, black carbon, organic carbon, nitrogen oxides, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Within this study region, about 13% of the energy is consumed in urban areas, and 45% in non-urban land near forests. About half the energy is consumed in land without access to electricity. Cooking accounts for 54% of the consumption, heating for 9%, and lighting only 2%, with unidentified uses making up the remainder. Because biofuel use is assumed to occur preferentially where wood is accessible and electricity is not, our method shifts emissions to land types without electrification, compared with previous methods. The framework developed here is an important first step in acknowledging the role of household needs and local constraints in choosing energy provision. Although data and relationships described here need further development, this structure offers a more physically-based understanding of residential energy choices and, ultimately, opportunities for emission reduction.

  13. Coatings for secondary containment

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisor, M.W.

    1995-12-31

    Federal environmental legislation has established minimum requirements for secondary containment of both hazardous wastes and petroleum products for aboveground storage tanks. Of the systems listed, the most commonly used containment is the concrete vault. Regulations require that the vault must be protected with an impermeable lining that is also compatible with the stored waste. This paper explores the selection criteria for such linings and the various types of linings on the market today.

  14. Experiences with a large load research project in the Pacific Northwest: ELCAP (End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Gillman, R.A.; Sandusky, W.F.; Patton, J.E.; Hauser, S.G.

    1989-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in August, 1983, to support demand side planning, forecasting, and demand side program development and delivery. This project, conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated for the Department of Energy by the Battelle Memorial Institute, involves the collection and analysis of hourly end-use electricity usage data together with detailed characteristics from approximately 400 residences and 100 commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The purpose of this paper is to relate our experiences with the ELCAP from its early days to its current status. This paper will explore Bonneville's and PNL's experiences ranging from project formulation to technology development to current management issues. We will specifically cover knowledge gained from the development of data loggers, loggers installation, measurement protocols, and data quality assurance. Additionally, the more global issues associated with managing the ELCAP and maintaining agency support in a time of cost-consciousness will be discussed. These issues include the areas of budgets, perceptions, producing useful results, and data availability. 3 refs.

  15. Planning for the recreational end use of a future LLR waste mound in Canada - Leaving an honourable legacy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleb, H.R.; Zelmer, R.L.

    2007-07-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office was established in 1982 to carry out the federal government's responsibilities for low-level radioactive (LLR) waste management in Canada. In this capacity, the Office operates programs to characterize, delineate, decontaminate and consolidate historic LLR waste for interim and long-term storage. The Office is currently the proponent of the Port Hope Area Initiative; a program directed at the development and implementation of a safe, local long-term management solution for historic LLR waste in the Port Hope area. A legal agreement between the Government of Canada and the host community provides the framework for the implementation of the Port Hope Project. Specifically, the agreement requires that the surface of the long-term LLR waste management facility be 'conducive to passive and active recreational uses such as soccer fields and baseball diamonds'. However, there are currently no examples of licensed LLR waste management facilities in Canada that permit recreational use. Such an end use presents challenges with respect to engineering and design, health and safety and landscape planning. This paper presents the cover system design, the environmental effects assessment and the landscape planning processes that were undertaken in support of the recreational end use of the Port Hope long-term LLR waste management facility. (authors)

  16. Transcriptional Regulatory Elements in Fungal Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenbing; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce a variety of secondary metabolites of diverse beneficial and detrimental activities to humankind. The genes encoding the enzymatic machinery required to make these metabolites are typically clustered in fungal genomes. There is considerable evidence that secondary metabolite gene regulation is, in part, by transcriptional control through hierarchical levels of transcriptional regulatory elements involved in secondary metabolite cluster regulation. Identification of secondary metabolism regulatory elements could potentially provide a means of increasing production of beneficial metabolites, decreasing production of detrimental metabolites, aid in the identification of ‘silent’ natural products and also contribute to a broader understanding of molecular mechanisms by which secondary metabolites are produced. This review summarizes regulation of secondary metabolism associated on transcriptional regulatory elements from a broad view as well as tremendous advances in discovery of cryptic or novel secondary metabolites by genomic mining in the basis of this knowledge. PMID:21717315

  17. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, H. Corby; Broz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g., amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH), enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported. PMID:25709603

  18. Genetic analysis of grain attributes, milling performance, and end-use quality traits in hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat kernel texture dictates U.S. wheat market class and culinary end-uses. Of interest to wheat breeders is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for wheat kernel texture, milling performance, or end-use quality because it is imperative for wheat breeders to ascertain the genetic architecture ...

  19. Comparison and heritability of major rice end-use quality traits among diverse accessions grown in both tropical and temperate USA environments and genetic marker implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing environment has been well-documented as playing a large role in effecting the end-use quality traits of rice. Apparent amylose content (AAC) and gelatinization temperature (GT) are considered to be the two most important end-use quality characteristics in rice, defining the major classes tha...

  20. Production and purification of anti-bacterial biometabolite from wild-type Lactobacillus, isolated from fermented bamboo shoot: future suggestions and a proposed system for secondary metabolite onsite recovery during continuous fermentation.

    PubMed

    Badwaik, Laxmikant S; Borah, Pallab Kumar; Deka, Sankar C

    2015-02-01

    Wild-type lactobacillus isolated form Khorisa, a fermented bamboo shoot product of Assam, India were evaluated for production anti-bacterial secondary biometabolites, against Staphylococcus aureus. Submerged fermentation technique was used for the production of secondary anti-microbial biometabolite by a single wild-type lactobacillus strain, which tested positive for the release of anti-bacterial factor(s). Crude cell-free supernatant was obtained, followed by extraction in water-immiscible solvents viz., chloroform, hexane, petroleum ether. Chloroform extract of cell-free crude supernatant showed maximum yield (0.054 g/ml) and inhibited all indicator bacterial strains viz., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus. Yields of hexane and petroleum ether extract were 0.052 and 0.026 g/ml, respectively. Minimum lethal dose concentration assay of the chloroform extract showed LDmin values at 27, 1.68, and 1.68 mg/ml for E. coli, S. aureus, and B. cereus, respectively. Kill time for all the indicator bacterial strains were less than 12 h. The efficacy of the anti-bacterial substance seemed to depend on the presence of organic acids, particularly lactic acid. Conceptual-based suggestion for the development of an onsite secondary metabolites recovery system during continuous fermentation has also been attempted.

  1. [Relationship between production input and secondary succession of earthworm population in salinity transforming region of north China--a case study in Quzhou County].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Y; Wu, W

    2001-06-01

    The analysis on earthworm diversity in the farmland ecosystem of salinity transforming region in Quzhou County, Hebei Province, showed that the secondary succession of earthworm population had a close relationship with the input of fertilizer and manure. An optimum input, especially manure input, could accelerate the secondary succession. The general trend of earthworm distribution was in the order of second experimental district > first experimental district > third experimental district > original area. The distribution, biomass and amount of earthworm varied in different types of land-use, and the relationship was in the order of vegetable field > crop field > orchard and margin land.

  2. Accomplished the task of production of primary and secondary mirrors of Devasthal Optical Telescope under the project ARIES (India, Belgium, Russia): fabrication features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Alexander P.

    2012-09-01

    Basing on the contract with firm AMOS LZOS, JSC has accomplished the manufacturing works of the Primary and Secondary Mirrors of Devasthal Optical Telescope (DOT) for Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES). The Primary mirror specifications is as follows: diameter 3700 mm, vertex radius 14639 mm (F/1.96), conical constant -1.03296, asphericity 111 microns. The Secondary mirror specifications is as follows: diameter 980 mm, vertex radius 4675 mm (F/1.78), conical constant -2.79561, asphericity 47 microns. The results of works under this project are presented in this paper.

  3. Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent storage in energy end-uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett; Archer, Cristina L.; Dhanju, Amardeep; Garvine, Richard W.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2007-01-01

    We develop methods for assessing offshore wind resources, using a model of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over water and a wind-electric technology analysis linking turbine and tower limitations to bathymetry and continental shelf geology. These methods are tested by matching the winds of the Middle-Atlantic Bight (MAB) to energy demand in the adjacent states (Massachusetts through North Carolina, U.S.A.). We find that the MAB wind resource can produce 330 GW average electrical power, a resource exceeding the region's current summed demand for 73 GW of electricity, 29 GW of light vehicle fuels (now gasoline), and 83 GW of building fuels (now distillate fuel oil and natural gas). Supplying these end-uses with MAB wind power would reduce by 68% the region's CO2 emissions, and reduce by 57% its greenhouse gas forcing. These percentages are in the range of the global reductions needed to stabilize climate.

  4. Characterization of changes in commercial building structure, equipment, and occupants: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.; Miller, N.E.; Pratt, R.G.

    1990-12-01

    Changes in commercial building structure, equipment, and occupants result in changes in building energy use. The frequency and magnitude of those changes have substantial implications for conservation programs and resource planning. For example, changes may shorten the useful lifetime of a conservation measure as well as impact the savings from that measure. This report summarizes the frequency of changes in a commercial building sample that was end-use metered under the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP). The sample includes offices, dry good retails, groceries, restaurants, warehouses, schools, and hotels. Two years of metered data, site visit records, and audit data were examined for evidence of building changes. The observed changes were then classified into 12 categories, which included business type, equipment, remodel, vacancy, and operating schedule. The analysis characterized changes in terms of frequency of types of change; relationship to building vintage and floor area; and variation by building type. The analysis also examined the energy impacts of various changes. The analysis determined that the rate of change in commercial buildings is high--50% of the buildings experienced one type of change during the 2 years for which monitoring data were examined. Equipment changes were found to be most frequent in offices and retail stores. Larger, older office buildings tend to experience a wider variety of changes more frequently than the smaller, newer buildings. Key findings and observations are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides the underlying motivation and objectives. In Section 4, the methodology used is documented, including the commercial building sample and the data sources used. Included are the definitions of change events and the overall approach taken. Results are analyzed in Section 5, with additional technical details in Appendixes. 2 refs., 46 figs., 22 tabs. (JF)

  5. The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions from energy use in industrialized countries: an end-use analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, L.; Ting, M.; Khrushch, M.; Unander, F.; Monahan, P.; Golove, W.

    1996-08-01

    There has been much attention drawn to plans for reductions or restraint in future C02 emissions, yet little analysis of the recent history of those emissions by end use or economic activity. Understanding the components of C02 emissions, particularly those related to combustion of fossil fuels, is important for judging the likely success of plans for dealing with future emissions. Knowing how fuel switching, changes in economic activity and its structure, or changes in energy-use efficiency affected emissions in the past, we can better judge both the realism of national proposals to restrain future emissions and the outcome as well. This study presents a first step in that analysis. The organization of this paper is as follows. We present a brief background and summarize previous work analyzing changes in energy use using the factorial method. We then describe our data sources and method. We then present a series of summary results, including a comparison of C02 emissions in 1991 by end use or sector. We show both aggregate change and change broken down by factor, highlighting briefly the main components of change. We then present detailed results, sector by sector. Next we highlight recent trends. Finally, we integrate our results, discussing -the most important factors driving change - evolution in economic structure, changes in energy intensities, and shifts in the fuel mix. We discuss briefly some of the likely causes of these changes - long- term technological changes, effects of rising incomes, the impact of overall changes in energy prices, as well as changes in the relative prices of energy forms.

  6. Using secondary nuclear products for inferring the fuel areal density, convergence, and electron temperatures of deuterium filled implosions on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Kabadi, N. V.; Sutcliffe, G.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hartouni, E. P.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sayre, D. B.; Yeamans, C. B.; Khan, S. F.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lepape, S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Meezan, N.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.

    2016-10-01

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, 0.82 MeV 3He and 1.01 MeV T born from the primary DD reaction branches can undergo fusion reactions with the thermal deuterium plasma to create secondary D3He protons and DT neutrons respectively. In regimes of moderate fuel areal density (ρR 5 - 100 mg/cm2) the ratio of both of these secondary yields to the primary yield can be used to infer the fuel ρR, convergence, and an electron temperature (Te) simultaneously. This technique has been used on a myriad of deuterium filled implosion experiments on the NIF using the nuclear time of flight (NTOF) diagnostics to measure the secondary DT neutrons and CR-39 based wedge range filters (WRFs) to measure the secondary D3He protons. Additionally, a comparative study is conducted between the nuclear inferred convergence and x-ray inferred convergence obtained on these experiments. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  7. An integrated microalgal growth model and its application to optimize the biomass production of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 in open pond under the nutrient level of domestic secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yin-Hu; Li, Xin; Yu, Yin; Hu, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Li, Feng-Min

    2013-09-01

    Microalgal growth is the key to the coupled system of wastewater treatment and microalgal biomass production. In this study, Monod model, Droop model and Steele model were incorporated to obtain an integrated growth model describing the combined effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and light intensity on the growth rate of Scenedesmus sp. LX1. The model parameters were obtained via fitting experimental data to these classical models. Furthermore, the biomass production of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 in open pond under nutrient level of secondary effluent was analyzed based on the integrated model, predicting a maximal microalgal biomass production rate about 20 g m(-2) d(-1). In order to optimize the biomass production of open pond the microalgal biomass concentration, light intensity on the surface of open pond, total depth of culture medium and hydraulic retention time should be 500 g m(-3), 16,000 lx, 0.2 m and 5.2 d in the conditions of this study, respectively.

  8. Interaction between Polymeric Additives and Secondary Fluids in Capillary Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Boris; Braunschweig, Björn; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-02-16

    Capillary suspensions are ternary systems including a solid and two liquid phases representing a novel formulation platform for pastes with unique processing and end-use properties. Here we have investigated aqueous suspensions of non-Brownian graphite particles including different polymers commonly used as thickening agents or binders in paste formulations. We have studied the interaction between these additives and organic solvents in order to elucidate its effect on the characteristic formation of a particle network structure in corresponding ternary capillary suspension systems. Organic solvents with different polarity have been employed, and in the presence of nonadsorbing poly(ethylene oxide), all of them, whether they preferentially wet the graphite surface or not, induce the formation of a network structure within the suspension as indicated by a strong change in rheological properties. However, when the adsorbing polymers carboxymethylcellulose and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are included, the drastic change in rheological behavior occurs only when polar organic solvents are used as secondary liquids. Obviously, these solvents can form pendular bridges, finally resulting in a sample-spanning particle network. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy provides evidence that these polar liquids remove the adsorbed polymer from the graphite particles. In contrast, nonpolar and nonwetting solvents do not force polymer desorption. In these cases, the formation of a percolating network structure within the suspensions is presumably prevented by the strong steric repulsion among graphite particles, not allowing for the formation of particle clusters encapsulating the secondary liquid. Accordingly, polymeric additives and secondary fluids have to be carefully selected in capillary suspension formulations, then offering a new pathway to customize paste formulations. The polymer may serve to adjust an appropriate viscosity level, and the capillary bridging induces the

  9. Molecular cloning of a cysteine proteinase cDNA from adult Ancylostoma ceylanicum by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Mieszczanek, J; Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2000-12-01

    The hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum is a parasite of great importance in human and veterinary medicine. The most promising vaccination trials against hookworm infections are based on antigens belonging to the proteinase family. The aim of the present research was to isolate a cysteine proteinase gene from A. ceylanicum. This was achieved by rapid amplification of cDNA ends using polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). A set of consensus oligonucleotide primers was designed to anneal to the conserved coding regions of cysteine proteinase. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The novel sequence displayed a high degree of homology with genes of cysteine proteinases known from other hookworm species. In the coding region the nucleotide identity with accp-1, the cysteine proteinase gene of A. caninum, reaches 84.3%. Analysis of the expression of acey-1. the cysteine proteinase gene of A. ceylanicum, suggests that it is produced exclusively in the gland cells of either adult worms or blood-feeding stages of A. ceylanicum.

  10. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; ...

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. nigermore » has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.« less

  11. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  12. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P Deepa S; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E; Frisvad, Jens C; Nielsen, Kristian F; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  13. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.J.

    2015-01-01

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. PMID:26566947

  14. Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings` EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

  15. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using secondary vertex b tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys.

    2006-11-01

    We report a new measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using events with one charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and jets. Using 425 pb{sup -1} of data collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and enhancing the t{bar t} content of the sample by tagging b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm, the t{bar t} production cross section is measured to be: {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}+X} = 6.6 {+-} 0.9(stat + syst) {+-} 0.4(lum) pb. This cross section is the most precise D0 measurement to date for t{bar t} production and is in good agreement with standard model expectations.

  16. Paralysis: Secondary Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5pm ET. 1-800-539-7309 ☰ Living with Paralysis Get Support Get Involved Research Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Health > Secondary conditions Secondary conditions Secondary conditions refer ...

  17. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using missing E(T) + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV which uses events with an inclusive signature of significant missing transverse energy and jets. This is the first measurement which makes no explicit lepton identification requirements, so that sensitivity to W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays is maintained. Heavy flavor jets from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 311 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab they measure a production cross section of 5.8 {+-} 1.2(stat.){sub -0.7}{sup +0.9}(syst.) pb for a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with previous determinations and standard model predictions.

  18. Measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV using missing E(T) + jets events with secondary vertex b tagging.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-05-26

    We present a measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV which uses events with an inclusive signature of significant missing transverse energy and jets. This is the first measurement which makes no explicit lepton identification requirements, so that sensitivity to W --> tau nu decays is maintained. Heavy flavor jets from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 311 pb(-1) of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, we measure a production cross section of 5.8 +/- 1.2(stat)(-0.7)(+0.9)(syst) pb for a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous determinations and standard model predictions.

  19. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. liquefied natural gas exports: implications for end uses.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Leslie S; Samaras, Constantine; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott

    2015-03-03

    This study analyzes how incremental U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports affect global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We find that exported U.S. LNG has mean precombustion emissions of 37 g CO2-equiv/MJ when regasified in Europe and Asia. Shipping emissions of LNG exported from U.S. ports to Asian and European markets account for only 3.5-5.5% of precombustion life cycle emissions, hence shipping distance is not a major driver of GHGs. A scenario-based analysis addressing how potential end uses (electricity and industrial heating) and displacement of existing fuels (coal and Russian natural gas) affect GHG emissions shows the mean emissions for electricity generation using U.S. exported LNG were 655 g CO2-equiv/kWh (with a 90% confidence interval of 562-770), an 11% increase over U.S. natural gas electricity generation. Mean emissions from industrial heating were 104 g CO2-equiv/MJ (90% CI: 87-123). By displacing coal, LNG saves 550 g CO2-equiv per kWh of electricity and 20 g per MJ of heat. LNG saves GHGs under upstream fugitive emissions rates up to 9% and 5% for electricity and heating, respectively. GHG reductions were found if Russian pipeline natural gas was displaced for electricity and heating use regardless of GWP, as long as U.S. fugitive emission rates remain below the estimated 5-7% rate of Russian gas. However, from a country specific carbon accounting perspective, there is an imbalance in accrued social costs and benefits. Assuming a mean social cost of carbon of $49/metric ton, mean global savings from U.S. LNG displacement of coal for electricity generation are $1.50 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf) of gaseous natural gas exported as LNG ($.028/kWh). Conversely, the U.S. carbon cost of exporting the LNG is $1.80/Mcf ($.013/kWh), or $0.50-$5.50/Mcf across the range of potential discount rates. This spatial shift in embodied carbon emissions is important to consider in national interest estimates for LNG exports.

  20. Uncertainty in life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from United States natural gas end-uses and its effects on policy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Aranya; Jaramillo, Paulina; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott

    2011-10-01

    Increasing concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States have spurred interest in alternate low carbon fuel sources, such as natural gas. Life cycle assessment (LCA) methods can be used to estimate potential emissions reductions through the use of such fuels. Some recent policies have used the results of LCAs to encourage the use of low carbon fuels to meet future energy demands in the U.S., without, however, acknowledging and addressing the uncertainty and variability prevalent in LCA. Natural gas is a particularly interesting fuel since it can be used to meet various energy demands, for example, as a transportation fuel or in power generation. Estimating the magnitudes and likelihoods of achieving emissions reductions from competing end-uses of natural gas using LCA offers one way to examine optimal strategies of natural gas resource allocation, given that its availability is likely to be limited in the future. In this study, the uncertainty in life cycle GHG emissions of natural gas (domestic and imported) consumed in the U.S. was estimated using probabilistic modeling methods. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to obtain sample distributions representing life cycle GHG emissions from the use of 1 MJ of domestic natural gas and imported LNG. Life cycle GHG emissions per energy unit of average natural gas consumed in the U.S were found to range between -8 and 9% of the mean value of 66 g CO(2)e/MJ. The probabilities of achieving emissions reductions by using natural gas for transportation and power generation, as a substitute for incumbent fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and coal were estimated. The use of natural gas for power generation instead of coal was found to have the highest and most likely emissions reductions (almost a 100% probability of achieving reductions of 60 g CO(2)e/MJ of natural gas used), while there is a 10-35% probability of the emissions from natural gas being higher than the incumbent if it were used as a

  1. Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities in the PG&E service area

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

    1993-12-01

    This project represents a unique research effort to address the commercial sector end-use energy forecasting data needs of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The object of the project was to develop an updated set of commercial sector end-use energy use intensity (EUI) data that has been fully reconciled with measured data. The research was conducted in two stages. First, we developed reconciled electricity end-use EUIs and load shapes for each of the 11 building types in the inland and coastal regions of the PG&E service territory using information collected in 1986. Second, we developed procedures to translate these results into a consistent set of commercial sector forecasting model inputs recognizing the separate modeling conventions used by PG&E and CEC. EUIs have been developed for: II commercial building types; up to 10 end uses; up to 3 fuel types; 2 and 5 subservice territory forecasting regions (as specified by the PG&E and CEC forecasting models, respectively); and up to 2 distinct vintages corresponding to the period prior to and immediately following the adoption of the first generation of California building and equipment standards. For the electricity end uses, 36 sets of daily load shapes have been developed representing average weekday, average weekend, and peak weekday electricity use for each month of the year by building type for both the inland and coastal climate zones.

  2. Development and validation of a fast and optimized screening method for enhanced production of secondary metabolites using the marine Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain LF580 producing anti-cancer active scopularide A and B.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Annemarie; Paun, Linda; Imhoff, Johannes F; Kempken, Frank; Labes, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Natural compounds from marine fungi are an excellent source for the discovery and development of new drug leads. The distinct activity profiles of the two cyclodepsipeptides scopularide A and B against cancer cell lines set their marine producer strain Scopulariopsis brevicaulis LF580 into the focus of the EU project MARINE FUNGI. One of the main goals was the development of a sustainable biotechnological production process for these compounds. The secondary metabolite production of strain LF580 was optimized by random mutagenesis employing UV radiation. For a fast and reliable detection of the intracellular secondary metabolite production level, a miniaturized bioactivity-independent screening method was developed, as the random mutagenesis yielded a large number of mutants to be analysed quantitatively and none of the existing hyphenated bioassay-dependent screening systems could be applied. The method includes decreased cultivation volume, a fast extraction procedure as well as an optimized LC-MS analysis. We show that deviation could be specifically reduced at each step of the process: The measuring deviation during the analysis could be minimized to 5% and technical deviation occurring in the downstream part to 10-15%. Biological variation during the cultivation process still has the major influence on the overall variation. However, the approach led to a 10-fold reduction of time and similar effects on costs and effort compared to standard reference screening methods. The method was applied to screen the UV-mutants library of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis LF580. For validation purposes, the occurring variations in the miniaturized scale were compared to those in the classical Erlenmeyer flask scale. This proof of concept was performed using the wild type strain and 23 randomly selected mutant strains. One specific mutant strain with an enhanced production behavior could be obtained.

  3. Disruption of the copper efflux pump (CopA) of Serratia marcescens ATCC 274 pleiotropically affects copper sensitivity and production of the tripyrrole secondary metabolite, prodigiosin.

    PubMed

    Williamson, N R; Simonsen, H T; Harris, A K P; Leeper, F J; Salmond, George P C

    2006-02-01

    The prodigiosin biosynthetic gene cluster (pig cluster) of Serratia marcescens ATCC 274 (Sma 274) is flanked by cueR/copA homologues. Inactivation of the copA homologue resulted in an increased sensitivity to copper, confirming that CopA is involved in copper homeostasis in Sma 274. The effect of copper on the biosynthesis of prodigiosin in Sma 274 and the copA mutant strain was investigated. Increased levels of copper were found to reduce prodigiosin production in the wild type Sma 274, but increase production in the copA mutant strain. The physiological implications for CopA mediated prodigiosin production are discussed. We also demonstrate that the gene products of pigB-pigE of Sma 274 are sufficient for the biosynthesis of 2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole and condensation with 4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carboxyaldehyde to form prodigiosin, as we have shown for Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

  4. Discovering the secondary metabolite potential encoded within Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses the secondary metabolite potential of the insect pathogens Metarhizium and Beauveria, including a bioinformatics analysis of secondary metabolite genes for which no products are yet identified....

  5. Calcium and Potassium Supplementation Enhanced Growth, Osmolyte Secondary Metabolite Production, and Enzymatic Antioxidant Machinery in Cadmium-Exposed Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Abdel Latef, Arafat A.; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Hashem, Abeer; Sarwat, Maryam; Anjum, Naser A.; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    This work examined the role of exogenously applied calcium (Ca; 50 mM) and potassium (K; 10 mM) (alone and in combination) in alleviating the negative effects of cadmium (Cd; 200 μM) on growth, biochemical attributes, secondary metabolites and yield of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). Cd stress significantly decreased the length and weight (fresh and dry) of shoot and root and yield attributes in terms of number of pods and seed yield (vs. control). Exhibition of decreases in chlorophyll (Chl) a, Chl b, and total Chl was also observed with Cd-exposure when compared to control. However, Cd-exposure led to an increase in the content of carotenoids. In contrast, the exogenous application of Ca and K individually as well as in combination minimized the extent of Cd-impact on previous traits. C. arietinum seedlings subjected to Cd treatment exhibited increased contents of organic solute (proline, Pro) and total protein; whereas, Ca and K-supplementation further enhanced the Pro and total protein content. Additionally, compared to control, Cd-exposure also caused elevation in the contents of oxidative stress markers (hydrogen peroxidase, H2O2; malondialdehyde, MDA) and in the activity of antioxidant defense enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; ascorbate peroxidase, APX; glutathione reductase, GR). Ca, K, and Ca + K supplementation caused further enhancements in the activity of these enzymes but significantly decreased contents of H2O2 and MDA, also that of Cd accumulation in shoot and root. The contents of total phenol, flavonoid and mineral elements (S, Mn, Mg, Ca and K) that were also suppressed in Cd stressed plants in both shoot and root were restored to appreciable levels with Ca- and K-supplementation. However, the combination of Ca + K supplementation was more effective in bringing the positive response as compared to individual effect of Ca and K on Cd-exposed C. arietinum. Overall, this investigation suggests that application of Ca and/or K can

  6. Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use

    SciTech Connect

    Limbach, L.K.

    1982-06-01

    Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

  7. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120 as platform biocatalyst for the production of isobutyric acid and other secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the recent years the production of Ehrlich pathway derived chemicals was shown in a variety of hosts such as Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and yeast. Exemplarily the production of isobutyric acid was demonstrated in Escherichia coli with remarkable titers and yields. However, these examples suffer from byproduct formation due to the fermentative growth mode of the respective organism. We aim at establishing a new aerobic, chassis for the synthesis of isobutyric acid and other interesting metabolites using Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120, an obligate aerobe organism, as host strain. Results The overexpression of kivd, coding for a 2-ketoacid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis in Ps. sp. strain VLB120 enabled for the production of isobutyric acid and isobutanol via the valine synthesis route (Ehrlich pathway). This indicates the existence of chromosomally encoded alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases catalyzing the reduction and oxidation of isobutyraldehyde. In addition we showed that the strain possesses a complete pathway for isobutyric acid metabolization, channeling the compound via isobutyryl-CoA into valine degradation. Three key issues were addressed to allow and optimize isobutyric acid synthesis: i) minimizing isobutyric acid degradation by host intrinsic enzymes, ii) construction of suitable expression systems and iii) streamlining of central carbon metabolism finally leading to production of up to 26.8 ± 1.5 mM isobutyric acid with a carbon yield of 0.12 ± 0.01 g gglc-1. Conclusion The combination of an increased flux towards isobutyric acid using a tailor-made expression system and the prevention of precursor and product degradation allowed efficient production of isobutyric acid in Ps. sp. strain VLB120. This will be the basis for the development of a continuous reaction process for this bulk chemicals. PMID:24397404

  8. Enrichment of Secondary Wastewater Sludge for Production of Hydrogen from Crude Glycerol and Comparative Evaluation of Mono-, Co- and Mixed-Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pachapur, Vinayak Laxman; Kutty, Prianka; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Ramirez, Antonio Avalos

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion using mixed-culture with broader choice of pretreatments for hydrogen (H2) production was investigated. Pretreatment of wastewater sludge by five methods, such as heat, acid, base, microwave and chloroform was conducted using crude glycerol (CG) as substrate. Results for heat treatment (100 °C for 15 min) showed the highest H2 production across the pretreatment methods with 15.18 ± 0.26 mmol/L of medium at 30 °C in absence of complex media and nutrient solution. The heat-pretreated inoculum eliminated H2 consuming bacteria and produced twice as much as H2 as compared to other pretreatment methods. The fermentation conditions, such as CG concentration (1.23 to 24 g/L), percentage of inoculum size (InS) (1.23% to 24% v/v) along with initial pH (2.98 to 8.02) was tested using central composite design (CCD) with H2 production as response parameter. The maximum H2 production of 29.43 ± 0.71 mmol/L obtained at optimum conditions of 20 g/L CG, 20% InS and pH 7. Symbiotic correlation of pH over CG and InS had a significant (p-value: 0.0011) contribution to H2 production. The mixed-culture possessed better natural acclimatization activity for degrading CG, at substrate inhibition concentration and provided efficient inoculum conditions in comparison to mono- and co-culture systems. The heat pretreatment step used across mixed-culture system is simple, cheap and industrially applicable in comparison to mono-/co-culture systems for H2 production. PMID:26771607

  9. Enrichment of Secondary Wastewater Sludge for Production of Hydrogen from Crude Glycerol and Comparative Evaluation of Mono-, Co- and Mixed-Culture Systems.

    PubMed

    Pachapur, Vinayak Laxman; Kutty, Prianka; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Ramirez, Antonio Avalos

    2016-01-13

    Anaerobic digestion using mixed-culture with broader choice of pretreatments for hydrogen (H₂) production was investigated. Pretreatment of wastewater sludge by five methods, such as heat, acid, base, microwave and chloroform was conducted using crude glycerol (CG) as substrate. Results for heat treatment (100 °C for 15 min) showed the highest H₂ production across the pretreatment methods with 15.18 ± 0.26 mmol/L of medium at 30 °C in absence of complex media and nutrient solution. The heat-pretreated inoculum eliminated H₂ consuming bacteria and produced twice as much as H₂ as compared to other pretreatment methods. The fermentation conditions, such as CG concentration (1.23 to 24 g/L), percentage of inoculum size (InS) (1.23% to 24% v/v) along with initial pH (2.98 to 8.02) was tested using central composite design (CCD) with H₂ production as response parameter. The maximum H₂ production of 29.43 ± 0.71 mmol/L obtained at optimum conditions of 20 g/L CG, 20% InS and pH 7. Symbiotic correlation of pH over CG and InS had a significant (p-value: 0.0011) contribution to H₂ production. The mixed-culture possessed better natural acclimatization activity for degrading CG, at substrate inhibition concentration and provided efficient inoculum conditions in comparison to mono- and co-culture systems. The heat pretreatment step used across mixed-culture system is simple, cheap and industrially applicable in comparison to mono-/co-culture systems for H₂ production.

  10. End-use quality of CIMMYT-derived soft kernel durum wheat germplasm. II. Dough strenth and pan bread quality.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) is considered unsuitable for the majority of commercial bread production because its weak gluten strength combined with flour particle size and flour starch damage after milling are not commensurate with hexaploid wheat flours. Recently a new durum cultivar...

  11. Liver failure secondary to poisoning by a homemade product made of star and green anise in a 4-month-old infant.

    PubMed

    Obando Pacheco, Pablo; Martínez-Martínez, Patricia Luisa; Pérez de Eulate Bazán, Yolanda; de la Mota Ybancos, José Luis; Milano Manso, Guillermo; Sierra Salinas, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Intoxications in pediatric age represent a frequent cause of visit to the hospital emergency unit. Herb-made products can be toxic for the infant. The neurotoxic properties of the star anise (Illicium verum) have been widely described, although it is a classic product used to treat the infantile colic. Hepatic failure due to the consumption of anise herb elaborated infusions is presented as an exceptional finding in our environment. A case of a 4-month-old infant with hypertransaminasemia, severe coagulopathy, non ketotic hypoglycemia, moderated metabolic acidosis and neurologic symptoms such as seizures and nistagmus is described. After discarding infectious, metabolic and autoimmune etiology and through a meticulous anamnesis, the family referred having administered in the last two months a daily star anise and green anise (Pimpinella anisum) infusion to the patient. It is important to emphasize the serious risk of administering homemade herb infusions to infants.

  12. Atmospheric reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a biomass burning emitted compound: Secondary organic aerosol formation and gas-phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Deboudt, Karine; Fourmentin, Marc; Choël, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Methoxyphenols are low molecular weight semi-volatile polar aromatic compounds produced from the pyrolysis of wood lignin. The reaction of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the LPCA simulation chamber at (294 ± 2) K, atmospheric pressure, low relative humidity (RH < 1%) and under high-NOx conditions using CH3ONO as OH source. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer); the SOA yields were in the range from 0.003 to 0.87 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM) Electron Microscopy observations were performed to characterize the physical state of SOA produced from the OH reaction with guaiacol; they display both liquid and solid particles (in an amorphous state). GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detection) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) analysis show the formation of nitroguaiacol isomers as main oxidation products in the gas- and aerosol-phases. In the gas-phase, the formation yields were (10 ± 2) % for 4-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-4-nitrobenzene; 4-NG) and (6 ± 2) % for 3- or 6-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene or 1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene; 3/6-NG; the standards are not commercially available so both isomers cannot be distinguished) whereas in SOA their yield were much lower (≤0.1%). To our knowledge, this work represents the first identification of nitroguaiacols as gaseous oxidation products of the OH reaction with guaiacol. As the reactivity of nitroguaiacols with atmospheric oxidants is probably low, we suggest using them as biomass burning emission gas tracers. The atmospheric implications of the guaiacol + OH reaction are also discussed.

  13. The effect of efficiency standards on water use and water heating energy use in the US: A detailed end-use treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Koomey, J.G.; Dunham, C.; Lutz, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    Water heating is an important end-use, accounting for roughly 16% of total primary energy consumption in the US residential sector. Recently enacted efficiency standards on water heaters and hot water-using equipment (e.g., dishwashers, clothes washers, showerheads, and faucets) will substantially affect the energy use of water heaters in the future. Assessment of current and future utility programs and government policies requires that regulators, resource planners, and forecasters understand the effects of these regulations. In order to quantify these impacts, this paper presents a detailed end-use breakdown of household hot and cold water use developed for the US Department of Energy. This breakdown is based on both previous studies and new data and analysis. It is implemented in a spreadsheet forecasting framework, which allows significant flexibility in specifying end-use demands and linkages between water heaters and hot water-using appliances. We disaggregate total hot and cold water use (gallons per day) into their component parts: showers, baths, faucets (flow dominated and volume dominated), toilets, landscaping/other, dishwashers, and clotheswashers. We then use the end-use breakdown and data on equipment characteristics to assess the impacts of current efficiency standards on hot water use and water heater energy consumption.

  14. New durum wheat with soft kernel texture: milling performance and end-use quality analysis of the Hardness locus in Triticum turgidum ssp. durum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat kernel texture dictates U.S. wheat market class. Durum wheat has limited demand and culinary end-uses compared to bread wheat because of its extremely hard kernel texture which preclude conventional milling. ‘Soft Svevo’, a new durum cultivar with soft kernel texture comparable to a soft white...

  15. New durum wheat with soft kernel texture: end-use quality analysis of the Hardness locus in Triticum turgidum ssp. durum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat kernel texture dictates U.S. wheat market class. Durum wheat has limited demand and culinary end-uses compared to bread wheat because of its extremely hard kernel texture which precludes conventional milling. ‘Soft Svevo’, a new durum cultivar with soft kernel texture comparable to a soft whit...

  16. Haplotype variation of Glu-D1 locus and the origin of Glu-D1d allele conferring superior end-use qualities in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In common wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD), the Glu-D1 locus possesses multiple alleles, with Glu-D1a (coding for 1Dx2 and 1Dy12 subunits) and Glu-D1d (encoding 1Dx5 and 1Dy10 subunits) being intensively used in the genetic improvement of end-use qualities. Here, we studied the molecular variatio...

  17. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 744 - Countries Not Subject to Certain Nuclear End-Use Restrictions in § 744.2(a)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Countries Not Subject to Certain... Supplement No. 3 to Part 744—Countries Not Subject to Certain Nuclear End-Use Restrictions in § 744.2(a... Marino and Holy See) Japan Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Spain Sweden Turkey...

  18. The relationship between heavy alcohol use and work productivity loss in active duty military personnel: a secondary analysis of the 1995 Department of Defense Worldwide Survey.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C A; Hoffman, K J; Austin-Lane, J; Kao, T C

    2000-05-01

    This cross-sectional study examines the association between heavy alcohol use among active duty military personnel and five work productivity loss events that may have an adverse effect on military performance and readiness. Data for light (N = 3,147) and heavy (N = 2,242) drinkers, categorized by gender and pay grade, were obtained from the 1995 Department of Defense Worldwide Survey. Drinking classification was predefined using a standard algorithm that factored quantity and frequency of wine, beer, and liquor consumed. The relative risks of experiencing a productivity loss event at a particular level and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by applying the Mantel-Haenszel method after adjusting for age. The relative risks for increased self-reported lateness, leaving early, low performance, and on-the-job injury were all higher for heavy drinkers than for light drinkers. This association between the heavy-drinking population and four of five work productivity loss events indicates that prevention programs should target all personnel.

  19. Phytoremediation of agriculture runoff by filamentous algae poly-culture for biomethane production, and nutrient recovery for secondary cultivation of lipid generating microalgae.

    PubMed

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Chow, Steven; Ketter, Ben; Fung Shek, Coral; Yacar, Dean; Tang, Yuting; Zivojnovich, Mark; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Bouwer, Edward J

    2016-12-01

    An integrated system was implemented for water phytoremediation and biofuel production through sequential cultivation of filamentous algae followed by cultivation of lipid-producing microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana. Natural poly-culture of filamentous algae was grown in agricultural stormwater using the Algal Turf Scrubber®, harvested and subjected for lipid extraction and/or methane production using anaerobic digestion (AD). While filamentous algae lipid content was too low for feasible biodiesel production (<2%), both whole biomass and lipid-extracted algal residues (LEA) yielded ∼0.2LmethanepergVS at loading rates up to 5gVS/L-day. Importantly, essential macro-nutrients and trace elements captured from stormwater were released into the AD effluent as soluble nutrients and were successfully tested as fertilizer replacement for cultivation of lipid-accumulating C. sorokiniana in a subsequent stage. Accordingly, filamentous algae poly-culture was exploited for waste nutrient capturing and biofuel feedstock generation. These nutrients were recovered and reused as a concentrated supplement for potentially high-value microalgae.

  20. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

  1. A Measurement of the production cross section of t$\\bar{t}$ in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using secondary vertex b-tagging.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachacou, Henri

    2004-12-01

    A measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ pair production cross section is presented using 162 pb -1 of data collected by the CDF experiment during Run II at the Tevatron. t$\\bar{t}$} events in the lepton+jets channel are isolated by identifying electrons and muons, reconstructing jets and transverse missing energy, and identifying b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. The efficiency of the algorithm is measured in a control sample using a novel technique that is less dependent on the simulation. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2 , a cross section of σt$\\bar{t}$ = 5.6$+1.2\\atop{-1.1}$(stat.)$+0.9\\atop{-0.6}$(syst.)pb is measured.

  2. Keratinase production and biodegradation of polluted secondary chicken feather wastes by a newly isolated multi heavy metal tolerant bacterium-Alcaligenes sp. AQ05-001.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Ibrahim; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Phang, Lai Yee; Syed, Mohd Arif; Shamaan, Nor Aripin; Abdul Khalil, Khalilah; Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2016-12-01

    Biodegradation of agricultural wastes, generated annually from poultry farms and slaughterhouses, can solve the pollution problem and at the same time yield valuable degradation products. But these wastes also constitute environmental nuisance, especially in Malaysia where their illegal disposal on heavy metal contaminated soils poses a serious biodegradation issue as feather tends to accumulate heavy metals from the surrounding environment. Further, continuous use of feather wastes as cheap biosorbent material for the removal of heavy metals from effluents has contributed to the rising amount of polluted feathers, which has necessitated the search for heavy metal-tolerant feather degrading strains. Isolation, characterization and application of a novel heavy metal-tolerant feather-degrading bacterium, identified by 16S RNA sequencing as Alcaligenes sp. AQ05-001 in degradation of heavy metal polluted recalcitrant agricultural wastes, have been reported. Physico-cultural conditions influencing its activities were studied using one-factor-at-a-time and a statistical optimisation approach. Complete degradation of 5 g/L feather was achieved with pH 8, 2% inoculum at 27 °C and incubation period of 36 h. The medium optimisation after the response surface methodology (RSM) resulted in a 10-fold increase in keratinase production (88.4 U/mL) over the initial 8.85 U/mL when supplemented with 0.5% (w/v) sucrose, 0.15% (w/v) ammonium bicarbonate, 0.3% (w/v) skim milk, and 0.01% (w/v) urea. Under optimum conditions, the bacterium was able to degrade heavy metal polluted feathers completely and produced valuable keratinase and protein-rich hydrolysates. About 83% of the feathers polluted with a mixture of highly toxic metals were degraded with high keratinase activities. The heavy metal tolerance ability of this bacterium can be harnessed not only in keratinase production but also in the bioremediation of heavy metal-polluted feather wastes.

  3. Population dynamics and secondary production of the cockle Cerastoderma edule: A comparison between Merja Zerga (Moroccan Atlantic Coast) and Arcachon Bay (French Atlantic Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gam, Mériame; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Bazairi, Hocein

    2010-04-01

    Cockle ( Cerastoderma edule) population dynamics were studied at the southern limit of the distribution of this marine bivalve in Merja Zerga, Morocco. Parameters such as growth, mortality, and production were compared with those of a population at Arcachon Bay (France) a site in the center of the cockle's range. At each sampling period between two and three cohorts were simultaneously observed at each site and the average total abundance was usually higher at Merja Zerga. Recruitment occurred at both sites in spring when temperature rose above 19 °C, independently of the month. In Merja Zerga, winter recruitment was also observed at one occasion, following high sediment disturbance. The first year (2005-06) at Merja Zerga, the mortality rate was close to nil for juveniles and was Z = 1.5 yr - 1 for adults, providing a high production (64 g dry weight m - 2 yr - 1 ). At Arcachon during the same period, the juvenile mortality rate was Z = 10.9 yr - 1 , the adult mortality rate was 3.4 yr - 1 and production was 26 gDW m -2 yr - 1 . The second year (2006-07), mortality after recruitment was much higher ( Z = 8.6 yr - 1 , for juveniles) and similar to what was observed at Arcachon ( Z = 8.4 yr - 1 ). Mortality rate of adults was higher at Merja Zerga ( Z = 3.0 yr - 1 ) than at Arcachon ( Z = 1.5 yr - 1 ). Production was lower at Arcachon than at Merja Zerga although growth performances were higher at Arcachon. The higher growth performance at Arcachon ( Φ' = 3.3) was mainly due to high asymptotic length ( L∞ = 38 mm) and was related to low intraspecific competition compared to Merja Zerga where cockle abundance was higher ( Φ' = 3.1, L∞ = 31 mm). P/B was low in both sites and slightly higher at Arcachon (1.1-1.5 against 1.0-1.1 yr - 1 ). At Arcachon, recruitment was correlated with temperature, a peak occurring when temperature rose above 19 °C (June-July). At Merja Zerga, recruitment was already 2-3 months earlier but was not significantly correlated to

  4. Ionization of molecular hydrogen and stripping of oxygen atoms and ions in collisions of Oq++H2 (q = 0- 8): Data for secondary electron production from ion precipitation at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ozak, N.; Cravens, T. E.; Gharibnejad, H.

    2017-01-01

    Energetic oxygen and sulfur ion precipitation into the atmosphere of Jupiter is thought to produce an X-ray aurora as well as to contribute to ionization, heating, and dissociation of the molecules of the atmosphere. At high energy, stripping of electrons from these ions by atmospheric gas molecules results in the production of high charge states throughout a portion of this passage through the atmosphere. Therefore, to enable modeling of the effects of secondary electrons produced by this ion precipitation, from either the solar wind or magnetospheric sources such as the Galilean moons, a large range of ionization and stripping data is calculated and tabulated here that otherwise is not available. The present data are for the abundant precipitating species, oxygen, colliding with the dominant upper atmosphere gas, molecular hydrogen, and cover the principal reaction channels leading to secondary electron production (single and double ionization, transfer ionization, and double capture followed by autoionization, and single and double stripping of electrons from the projectile). Since the ions possess initial energies at the upper atmosphere in the keV to MeV range, and are then slowed as they pass through the atmosphere, results are calculated for 1-2000 keV/u Oq++H2 (q =0-8). In addition to the total cross sections for ionization and stripping processes, models require the distribution in energy and angle of the ejected electrons, so cross sections differential in these parameters are also calculated. The data may be used to model the energy deposited by ion precipitation in Jupiter's atmosphere and thereby contribute to the elucidation of the ionosphere-atmosphere coupling.

  5. Simultaneous airborne nitric acid and formic acid measurements using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer around the UK: Analysis of primary and secondary production pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, Michael; Bacak, Asan; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Xiao, Ping; Shallcross, Beth M. A.; Batt, Rory; Cooke, Michael C.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Percival, Carl J.

    2014-02-01

    The first simultaneous measurements of formic and nitric acid mixing ratios around the United Kingdom were measured on the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer using I- reagent ions at 0.8 Hz. Analysis of the whole dataset shows that formic acid and nitric acid are positively correlated as illustrated by other studies (e.g. Veres et al., 2011). However, initial evidence indicates a prominent direct source of formic acid and also a significant source when O3 levels are high, suggesting the importance of the ozonolysis of 1-alkenes. A trajectory model was able to reproduce the formic acid concentrations by both the inclusion of a primary vehicle source and production via ozonolysis of propene equivalent 1-alkene levels. Inspection of data archives implies these levels of 1-alkene are possible after 11 am, but formic acid and nitric acid plumes early in the flight are too high for the model to replicate. These data show the relationship between nitric acid and formic acid cannot solely be attributed to related photochemical production. The simultaneous measurement of HCOOH and HNO3 has been implemented to estimate OH levels along the flight track assuming a relationship between formic and nitric acid in photochemical plumes and a constant source of 1-alkene.

  6. Simultaneous nutrient removal, optimised CO2 mitigation and biofuel feedstock production by Chlorogonium sp. grown in secondary treated non-sterile saline sewage effluent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan Yin; Ng, Tsz Wai; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Kwan, Ka Ki; Chan, King Ming; Huang, Guocheng; Yip, Ho Yin; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-10-30

    The phycoremediation process has great potential for effectively addressing environmental pollution. To explore the capabilities of simultaneous algal nutrient removal, CO2 mitigation and biofuel feedstock production from spent water resources, a Chlorogonium sp. isolated from a tilapia pond in Hong Kong was grown in non-sterile saline sewage effluent for a bioremediation study. With high removal efficiencies of NH3-N (88.35±14.39%), NO3(-)-N (85.39±14.96%), TN (93.34±6.47%) and PO4(3-)-P (91.80±17.44%), Chlorogonium sp. achieved a CO2 consumption rate of 58.96 mg L(-1) d(-1), which was optimised by the response surface methodology. Under optimised conditions, the lipid content of the algal biomass reached 24.26±2.67%. Overall, the isolated Chlorogonium sp. showed promising potential in the simultaneous purification of saline sewage effluent in terms of tertiary treatment and CO2 sequestration while delivering feedstock for potential biofuel production in a waste-recycling manner.

  7. Modification of the 3H-leucine Incorporation Technique for Quantifying Rates of Bacterial Secondary Production on Decaying Wetland Plant Litter: Effectiveness of Microdialysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. E.; Francoeur, S. N.; Kuehn, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    The radiolabelled 3H-leucine incorporation technique for quantifying rates of bacterial production has increased in popularity since its original description for bacterioplankton communities. Prior studies addressing incorporation conditions (e.g., substrate saturation) for bacterial communities in other habitats, such as decaying plant litter, have reported a wide range of final leucine concentrations (400nM to 50,000nM) to achieve saturation-level uptake. We assessed the application of the 3H-leucine incorporation procedure for measuring bacterial production on decaying wetland plant litter. Substrate saturation experiments (9 concentrations, 10nM to 50,000nM final leucine) were conducted for bacterial communities colonizing submerged litter of three emergent plant species (Typha angustifolia, Schoenoplectus validus, and Phragmites australis). A modified 3H-leucine protocol was developed by coupling previously described incubation and extraction protocols with microdialysis (500MWCO) of the final radiolabelled protein extract. Incorporation of 3H-leucine into protein exhibited a biphasic saturation curve, with lower Km values ranging from 400nM to 1200nM depending on the plant species studied. Upper Km values ranged from 4000nM to 6000nM. Dialysis of the crude protein extract significantly improved counting precision and the signal-to-noise ratio. These results suggest differential uptake by litter associated microbial assemblages, with lower Km values possibly representing bacterial uptake and higher Km values representing non-bacterial uptake.

  8. Analyzing Residential End-Use Energy Consumption Data to Inform Residential Consumer Decisions and Enable Energy Efficiency Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Derrick R.

    consumption, which suggests significant diminishing returns for parties interested in monitoring appliance level electricity consumption. Another way to improve understanding of residential energy consumption is through the development of residential use phase energy vectors for use in the Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) model. The EIO-LCA model is a valuable scoping tool to predict the environmental impacts of economic activity. This tool has a gap in its capabilities as residential use phase energy is outside the scope of the model. Adding use phase energy vectors to the EIO-LCA model will improve the modeling, provide a more complete estimation of energy impacts and allow for embedded energy to be compared to use phase energy for the purchase of goods and services in the residential sector. This work adds 21 quads of energy to the residential energy sector for the model and 15 quads of energy for personal transportation. These additions represent one third of the total energy consumption of the United States and a third of the total energy in the EIO-LCA model. This work also demonstrates that for many products such as electronics and household appliances use phase energy demands are much greater than manufacturing energy demands and dominate the life cycles for these products. A final way in which this thesis improves upon the understanding of how use phase energy is consumed in a home is through the exploration of potential energy reductions in a home. This analysis selects products that are used or consumed in a home, and explores the potential for reductions in the embedded manufacturing and use phase energy of that product using EIO-LCA and the energy vectors created in Chapter 3. The results give consumers an understanding of where energy is consumed in the lifecycle of products that they purchase and provide policy makers with valuable information on how to focus or refocus policies that are aimed and reducing energy in the residential sector

  9. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Second quarter 1995 technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products.

  10. Engineering of Secondary Metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Secondary (specialized) metabolites, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants, and other organisms, exhibit enormous structural variation, and consequently display a wide range of biological activities. Secondary metabolism improves and modulates the phenotype of the host producer. Furthermore, these biological activities have resulted in the use of secondary metabolites in a variety of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Metabolic engineering presents a powerful strategy to improve access to these valuable molecules. A critical overview of engineering approaches in secondary metabolism is presented, both in heterologous and native hosts. The recognition of the increasing role of compartmentalization in metabolic engineering is highlighted. Engineering approaches to modify the structure of key secondary metabolite classes are also critically evaluated.

  11. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photooxidation under a range of controlled conditions (RH ∼65-89%, VOC/NOx ∼3-9 and NOx ∼2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line, chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene, but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measureable amounts of SOA via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e., in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photooxidation products of the minor VOCs co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally-isoprene emitting landscapes in Southeast Asia. Moreover, in general the amount of aerosol mass produced from the emissions of the principally

  12. Potential use of secondary products of the agri-food industry for topical formulations and comparative analysis of antioxidant activity of grape leaf polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Dresch, Roger Remy; Dresch, Maria Terezinha Kreinecker; Biegelmeyer, Renata; Argenta, Débora Fretes; da Rocha, Ricardo Fagundes; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha

    2017-04-13

    The aim of the present study was to develop a phytocosmetic using Vitis waste by-products, for use as a topical formulation for skin protection against ultraviolet radiation damage. The study also evaluates the free radical scavenger activity of the crude extracts of dried leaves of Vitis vinifera and Vitis labrusca, as well as the anthocyanins, flavonoid fraction and isolated compounds. Next, release and permeation studies of hydrogels were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells. Flavonoid acted more intensively in TRAP and conjugated dienes antioxidant assays, whereas anthocyanins had higher antioxidant activity in hydroxyl and nitric oxide assay. Only quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (5) was released from hydrogels, and the flavonoid retention in porcine ear skin after eight hours of permeation was below of limit of quantification for this compound. The polyphenols present in Vitis are capable of absorbing UV and visible light, justifying their potential as sunscreens for the development of a phytocosmetic.

  13. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Thomas C.

    2000-07-28

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  14. Note: Photodissociation of CH3COCN at 308 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Is CO a primary or secondary product?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-06-01

    This Note aims to clarify the source of CO in photodissociation of acetyl cyanide (CH3COCN) at 308 nm. From the theoretical aspects, a new pathway via isomerization transition state (TS) at 391 ± 8 kJ/mol is found leading to the CO + CH3NC products. An amount of 60% reactant molecules at 300 K is estimated to successfully surpass the average TS barrier lying above the excitation energy by 3.5 kJ/mol. Further, a prior distribution method is conducted to characterize the vibrational energy distribution of CO on a statistical basis. The pathway to CH3NC + CO yields a vibrational branching ratio (v = 0:v = 1:v = 2:v = 3˜0.63:0.25:0.093:0.032) in excellent agreement with the observation (0.62:0.25:0.09:0.05).

  15. Chemical process modelling of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) and evaluation of produced gas quality for end use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korre,