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Sample records for secondary host resistances

  1. Thalidomide enhances both primary and secondary host resistances to Listeria monocytogenes infection by a neutrophil-related mechanism in female B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Tai L. . E-mail: tlguo@hsc.vcu.edu; Chi, Rui P.; Karrow, Niel A.; Zhang, Ling X.; Pruett, Stephen B.; Germolec, Dori R.; White, Kimber L.

    2005-12-15

    Previously, we have reported that thalidomide can modulate the immune responses in female B6C3F1 mice. Furthermore, thalidomide immunomodulation increased primary host resistance to intravenously infected Listeria monocytogenes. The present study was intended to evaluate the mechanisms underlying the enhanced host resistance to L. monocytogenes by focusing on the neutrophils. Female B6C3F1 mice were treated intraperitoneally with thalidomide (100 mg/kg) for 15 days. Exposure to thalidomide increased the numbers of neutrophils in the spleens and livers of L. monocytogenes-infected mice when compared to the L. monocytogenes-infected control mice. Additionally, the percentage of neutrophils was also significantly increased after Thd treatment in L. monocytogenes-infected mice. Further studies using antibodies to deplete corresponding cells indicated that thalidomide-mediated increase in primary host resistance (both the moribundity and colony counts in the liver and spleen) to L. monocytogenes infection was due to its effect on neutrophils but not CD8{sup +} T cells or NK cells. Finally, Thd exposure also increased host resistance to secondary host resistance to L. monocytogenes infection, and depletion of neutrophils abolished the protective effect. In conclusion, thalidomide enhanced host resistance to both primary and secondary L. monocytogenes infections by a neutrophil-related mechanism in female B6C3F1 mice.

  2. Approaches to assessing host resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, S G; Morahan, P S

    1982-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that chronic, subclinical exposure to certain environmental pollutants may upset immune responsiveness and alter susceptibility of animals to infectious agents. Environmental chemicals or drugs may affect diverse aspects of the immune system, leading to immunosuppression, immunopotentiation, hypersensitivity or perturbed innate host resistance. A variety of infectious models is available that involves relatively well defined target organs and host defense mechanisms; for example, infections with encephalomyocarditis virus, Herpesvirus simplex, Listeria monocytogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli or Plasmodium berghei. Important variables in infectious models used to assess immunotoxicity include species and strain of animal used, their age and sex, the route of exposure, and dose of the chemical. No one infectious model has yet emerged as a routine screening tool to detect and assess the subtle effects that may occur in immune responses when animals are exposed to doses of environmental pollutants that cause no adverse effect at a gross level. The selection of useful test systems is complicated because it is difficult to measure the effects of chronic, subclinical exposure to chemicals and sublethal challenges of microorganisms. PMID:6277617

  3. Dynamics of Mycobacteriophage-Mycobacterial Host Interaction: Evidence for Secondary Mechanisms for Host Lethality.

    PubMed

    Samaddar, Sourabh; Grewal, Rajdeep Kaur; Sinha, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Shrestha; Roy, Soumen; Das Gupta, Sujoy K

    2015-10-16

    Mycobacteriophages infect mycobacteria, resulting in their death. Therefore, the possibility of using them as therapeutic agents against the deadly mycobacterial disease tuberculosis (TB) is of great interest. To obtain better insight into the dynamics of mycobacterial inactivation by mycobacteriophages, this study was initiated using mycobacteriophage D29 and Mycobacterium smegmatis as the phage-host system. Here, we implemented a goal-oriented iterative cycle of experiments on one hand and mathematical modeling combined with Monte Carlo simulations on the other. This integrative approach lends valuable insight into the detailed kinetics of bacterium-phage interactions. We measured time-dependent changes in host viability during the growth of phage D29 in M. smegmatis at different multiplicities of infection (MOI). The predictions emerging out of theoretical analyses were further examined using biochemical and cell biological assays. In a phage-host interaction system where multiple rounds of infection are allowed to take place, cell counts drop more rapidly than expected if cell lysis is considered the only mechanism for cell death. The phenomenon could be explained by considering a secondary factor for cell death in addition to lysis. Further investigations reveal that phage infection leads to the increased production of superoxide radicals, which appears to be the secondary factor. Therefore, mycobacteriophage D29 can function as an effective antimycobacterial agent, the killing potential of which may be amplified through secondary mechanisms.

  4. Host resistance factors in human milk.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A S; Smith, C W

    1973-06-01

    This paper discusses the nature of host resistance factors in human milk and epidemiologic studies regarding infections and mortality rates in breastfed and nonbreastfed babies. The defense factors and their proposed modes of action are: 1) a growth enhancer of lactobacilli, which interferes with intestinal colonization of enteric pathogens; 2) antistaphylococcal factors, which inhibit staphylococci; 3) secretory IgA and other immunoglobulins, which protect the gut and respiratory tract; 4) C4 and C3 (complement components; C3 fragments have opsonic, chemotactic, and anaphylatoxic activities); 5) lysozome, lysis of bacterial cell wall; 6) lactoperoxidase, killing of streptococci; 7) lactoferrin, kills microorganism by chelating iron, and 8) macrophages and lymphocytes, phagocytosis and cell-mediated immunity. Although it can be postulated that the breastfed infant's resistance to infection would be superior on account of the greater presence of these factors in human milk compared to cow's milk, little is known about the effects of these defense factors on the infant. Epidemiologic studies have reported on the lower morbidity and mortality rates of breastfed infants as compared to bottlefed infants. Other studies have focused on the protective effects of human milk upon the infant, but these have been inconclusive. In countries with poor sanitation and high infection rates, the incidence of bacterial infections is lowest in breastfed infants. The advantages of human milk however are difficult to demonstrate in societies with high standards of sanitation and low infection rates. Infection and mortality rates in infants have in fact declined in developed countries as the practice of breastfeeding declined. Until it is established that immunity to common pathogens is transmitted to the infant by human milk, it will not be known whether human milk does have protective effects.

  5. Host lifespan and the evolution of resistance to multiple parasites.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, R; White, A; Boots, M

    2017-03-01

    Hosts are typically challenged by multiple parasites, but to date theory on the evolution of resistance has mainly focused on single infections. We develop a series of models that examine the impact of multiple parasites on the evolution of resistance under the assumption that parasites coexist at the host population scale as a consequence of superinfection. In this way, we are able to explicitly examine the impact of ecological dynamics on the evolutionary outcome. We use our models to address a key question of how host lifespan affects investment in resistance to multiple parasites. We show that investment in costly resistance depends on the specificity of the immune response and on whether or not the focal parasite leads to more acute infection than the co-circulating parasite. A key finding is that investment in resistance always increases as the immune response becomes more general independently of whether it is the focal or the co-circulating parasite that exploits the host most aggressively. Long-lived hosts always invest more than short-lived hosts in both general resistance and resistance that is specific to relatively acute focal parasites. However, for specific resistance to parasites that are less acute than co-circulating parasites it is the short-lived hosts that are predicted to invest most. We show that these results apply whatever the mode of defence, that is whether it is through avoidance or through increased recovery, with or without acquired immunity, or through acquired immunity itself. As a whole, our results emphasize the importance of considering multiple parasites in determining optimal immune investment in eco-evolutionary systems.

  6. Host plant resistance to parasitic weeds; recent progress and bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Yoder, John I; Scholes, Julie D

    2010-08-01

    Parasitic witchweeds (Striga spp.) and broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) directly invade the roots of crop plants connecting to the vascular system and abstracting nutrients and water. As a consequence they cause devastating losses in crop yield. Genetic resistance to parasitic weeds is a highly desirable component of any control strategy. Resistance to parasitic plants can occur at different stages of the parasite lifecycle: before attachment to the host, during penetration of the root or after establishment of vascular connections. New studies are beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in plant-plant resistance. The first resistance gene to Striga, encoding a CC-NBS-LRR Resistance protein (R) has been identified and cloned suggesting that host plants resist attack from parasitic plants using similar surveillance mechanisms as those used against fungal and bacterial pathogens. It is becoming clear that the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway plays an important role in resistance to parasitic plants and genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are upregulated in a number of the resistant interactions. New strategies for engineering resistance to parasitic plants are also being explored, including the expression of parasite-specific toxins in host roots and RNAi to silence parasite genes crucial for development.

  7. Specialization for resistance in wild host-pathogen interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Luke G; Encinas-Viso, Francisco; Burdon, Jeremy J; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Properties encompassed by host-pathogen interaction networks have potential to give valuable insight into the evolution of specialization and coevolutionary dynamics in host-pathogen interactions. However, network approaches have been rarely utilized in previous studies of host and pathogen phenotypic variation. Here we applied quantitative analyses to eight networks derived from spatially and temporally segregated host (Linum marginale) and pathogen (Melampsora lini) populations. First, we found that resistance strategies are highly variable within and among networks, corresponding to a spectrum of specialist and generalist resistance types being maintained within all networks. At the individual level, specialization was strongly linked to partial resistance, such that partial resistance was effective against a greater number of pathogens compared to full resistance. Second, we found that all networks were significantly nested. There was little support for the hypothesis that temporal evolutionary dynamics may lead to the development of nestedness in host-pathogen infection networks. Rather, the common patterns observed in terms of nestedness suggests a universal driver (or multiple drivers) that may be independent of spatial and temporal structure. Third, we found that resistance networks were significantly modular in two spatial networks, clearly reflecting spatial and ecological structure within one of the networks. We conclude that (1) overall patterns of specialization in the networks we studied mirror evolutionary trade-offs with the strength of resistance; (2) that specific network architecture can emerge under different evolutionary scenarios; and (3) network approaches offer great utility as a tool for probing the evolutionary and ecological genetics of host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Host life history and host-parasite syntopy predict behavioural resistance and tolerance of parasites.

    PubMed

    Sears, Brittany F; Snyder, Paul W; Rohr, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    There is growing interest in the role that life-history traits of hosts, such as their 'pace-of-life', play in the evolution of resistance and tolerance to parasites. Theory suggests that, relative to host species that have high syntopy (local spatial and temporal overlap) with parasites, host species with low syntopy should have lower selection pressures for more constitutive (always present) and costly defences, such as tolerance, and greater reliance on more inducible and cheaper defences, such as behaviour. Consequently, we postulated that the degree of host-parasite syntopy, which is negatively correlated with host pace-of-life (an axis reflecting the developmental rate of tadpoles and the inverse of their size at metamorphosis) in our tadpole-parasitic cercarial (trematode) system, would be a negative and positive predictor of behavioural resistance and tolerance, respectively. To test these hypotheses, we exposed seven tadpole species to a range of parasite (cercarial) doses crossed with anaesthesia treatments that controlled for anti-parasite behaviour. We quantified host behaviour, successful and unsuccessful infections, and each species' reaction norm for behavioural resistance and tolerance, defined as the slope between cercarial exposure (or attempted infections) and anti-cercarial behaviours and mass change, respectively. Hence, tolerance is capturing any cost of parasite exposure. As hypothesized, tadpole pace-of-life was a significant positive predictor of behavioural resistance and negative predictor of tolerance, a result that is consistent with a trade-off between behavioural resistance and tolerance across species that warrants further investigation. Moreover, these results were robust to considerations of phylogeny, all possible re-orderings of the three fastest or slowest paced species, and various measurements of tolerance. These results suggest that host pace-of-life and host-parasite syntopy are powerful drivers of both the strength and type

  9. Interferon-Inducible GTPases in Host Resistance, Inflammation and Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilla-Moffett, Danielle; Barber, Matthew F; Taylor, Gregory A; Coers, Jörn

    2016-08-28

    Cell-autonomous immunity is essential for host organisms to defend themselves against invasive microbes. In vertebrates, both the adaptive and the innate branches of the immune system operate cell-autonomous defenses as key effector mechanisms that are induced by pro-inflammatory interferons (IFNs). IFNs can activate cell-intrinsic host defenses in virtually any cell type ranging from professional phagocytes to mucosal epithelial cells. Much of this IFN-induced host resistance program is dependent on four families of IFN-inducible GTPases: the myxovirus resistance proteins, the immunity-related GTPases, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), and the very large IFN-inducible GTPases. These GTPase families provide host resistance to a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens through the sequestration of microbial proteins, manipulation of vesicle trafficking, regulation of antimicrobial autophagy (xenophagy), execution of intracellular membranolytic pathways, and the activation of inflammasomes. This review discusses our current knowledge of the molecular function of IFN-inducible GTPases in providing host resistance, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory Crohn's disease. While substantial advances were made in the recent past, few of the known functions of IFN-inducible GTPases have been explored in any depth, and new functions await discovery. This review will therefore highlight key areas of future exploration that promise to advance our understanding of the role of IFN-inducible GTPases in human diseases.

  10. The molecular pathways underlying host resistance and tolerance to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    Breeding livestock that are better able to withstand the onslaught of endemic- and exotic pathogens is high on the wish list of breeders and farmers world-wide. However, the defense systems in both pathogens and their hosts are complex and the degree of genetic variation in resistance and tolerance will depend on the trade-offs that they impose on host fitness as well as their life-histories. The genes and pathways underpinning resistance and tolerance traits may be distinct or intertwined as the outcome of any infection is a result of a balance between collateral damage of host tissues and control of the invading pathogen. Genes and molecular pathways associated with resistance are mainly expressed in the mucosal tract and the innate immune system and control the very early events following pathogen invasion. Resistance genes encode receptors involved in uptake of pathogens, as well as pattern recognition receptors (PRR) such as the toll-like receptor family as well as molecules involved in strong and rapid inflammatory responses which lead to rapid pathogen clearance, yet do not lead to immunopathology. In contrast tolerance genes and pathways play a role in reducing immunopathology or enhancing the host's ability to protect against pathogen associated toxins. Candidate tolerance genes may include cytosolic PRRs and unidentified sensors of pathogen growth, perturbation of host metabolism and intrinsic danger or damage associated molecules. In addition, genes controlling regulatory pathways, tissue repair and resolution are also tolerance candidates. The identities of distinct genetic loci for resistance and tolerance to infectious pathogens in livestock species remain to be determined. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and phenotypes associated with resistance and tolerance should ultimately help to improve livestock health and welfare. PMID:23403960

  11. Heritable variation in host tolerance and resistance inferred from a wild host-parasite system.

    PubMed

    Mazé-Guilmo, Elise; Loot, Géraldine; Páez, David J; Lefèvre, Thierry; Blanchet, Simon

    2014-03-22

    Hosts have evolved two distinct defence strategies against parasites: resistance (which prevents infection or limit parasite growth) and tolerance (which alleviates the fitness consequences of infection). However, heritable variation in resistance and tolerance and the genetic correlation between these two traits have rarely been characterized in wild host populations. Here, we estimate these parameters for both traits in Leuciscus burdigalensis, a freshwater fish parasitized by Tracheliastes polycolpus. We used a genetic database to construct a full-sib pedigree in a wild L. burdigalensis population. We then used univariate animal models to estimate inclusive heritability (i.e. all forms of genetic and non-genetic inheritance) in resistance and tolerance. Finally, we assessed the genetic correlation between these two traits using a bivariate animal model. We found significant heritability for resistance (H = 17.6%; 95% CI: 7.2-32.2%) and tolerance (H = 18.8%; 95% CI: 4.4-36.1%), whereas we found no evidence for the existence of a genetic correlation between these traits. Furthermore, we confirm that resistance and tolerance are strongly affected by environmental effects. Our results demonstrate that (i) heritable variation exists for parasite resistance and tolerance in wild host populations, and (ii) these traits can evolve independently in populations.

  12. Addicted? Reduced host resistance in populations with defensive symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Cogni, Rodrigo; Cao, Chuan; Smith, Sophie; Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    Heritable symbionts that protect their hosts from pathogens have been described in a wide range of insect species. By reducing the incidence or severity of infection, these symbionts have the potential to reduce the strength of selection on genes in the insect genome that increase resistance. Therefore, the presence of such symbionts may slow down the evolution of resistance. Here we investigated this idea by exposing Drosophila melanogaster populations to infection with the pathogenic Drosophila C virus (DCV) in the presence or absence of Wolbachia, a heritable symbiont of arthropods that confers protection against viruses. After nine generations of selection, we found that resistance to DCV had increased in all populations. However, in the presence of Wolbachia the resistant allele of pastrel—a gene that has a major effect on resistance to DCV—was at a lower frequency than in the symbiont-free populations. This finding suggests that defensive symbionts have the potential to hamper the evolution of insect resistance genes, potentially leading to a state of evolutionary addiction where the genetically susceptible insect host mostly relies on its symbiont to fight pathogens. PMID:27335421

  13. Addicted? Reduced host resistance in populations with defensive symbionts.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Julien; Cogni, Rodrigo; Cao, Chuan; Smith, Sophie; Illingworth, Christopher J R; Jiggins, Francis M

    2016-06-29

    Heritable symbionts that protect their hosts from pathogens have been described in a wide range of insect species. By reducing the incidence or severity of infection, these symbionts have the potential to reduce the strength of selection on genes in the insect genome that increase resistance. Therefore, the presence of such symbionts may slow down the evolution of resistance. Here we investigated this idea by exposing Drosophila melanogaster populations to infection with the pathogenic Drosophila C virus (DCV) in the presence or absence of Wolbachia, a heritable symbiont of arthropods that confers protection against viruses. After nine generations of selection, we found that resistance to DCV had increased in all populations. However, in the presence of Wolbachia the resistant allele of pastrel-a gene that has a major effect on resistance to DCV-was at a lower frequency than in the symbiont-free populations. This finding suggests that defensive symbionts have the potential to hamper the evolution of insect resistance genes, potentially leading to a state of evolutionary addiction where the genetically susceptible insect host mostly relies on its symbiont to fight pathogens.

  14. Sugarcane aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): Host range and sorghum resistance including cross-resistance from greenbug sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The graminous host range, and sources of sorghum plant resistance including cross resistance from greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rond.) sorghums, [Sorghum bicolor L.) Moench], were studied for the newly emerging sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari, (Zehntner) in greenhouse no-choice experiments and ...

  15. The host model Galleria mellonella is resistant to taylorellae infection.

    PubMed

    Hébert, L; Rincé, I; Sanna, C; Laugier, C; Rincé, A; Petry, S

    2014-10-01

    The genus Taylorella is composed of two species: (i) Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative agent of CEM, a venereally transmitted infection of Equidae and (ii) Taylorella asinigenitalis, a closely related species considered to be nonpathogenic, although experimental infection of mares with this bacterium resulted in clinical signs of vaginitis, cervicitis or endometritis. Currently, there is a need for an alternative host model to further study the taylorellae species. In this context, we explored Galleria mellonella larvae as potential alternative model hosts for taylorellae. Our results showed that infection of G. mellonella larvae with a high concentration of taylorellae did not induce overt G. mellonella mortality and that taylorellae were not able to proliferate within G. mellonella. In conclusion, G. mellonella larvae are resistant to taylorellae infection and therefore do not constitute a relevant alternative system for studying the virulence of taylorellae species. Significance and impact of the study: To date, the pathogenicity and host colonization capacity of Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM) and T. asinigenitalis, the second species within the Taylorella genus, remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of Galleria mellonella as an infection model for taylorellae; we showed that G. mellonella are resistant to taylorellae infection and therefore do not constitute a suitable host model for taylorellae.

  16. Severe steroid-resistant thrombocytopenia secondary to cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Takashi; Kubota, Yasushi; Wakayama, Kazuo; Kimura, Shinya

    2012-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia secondary to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is rare in immunocompetent hosts. We describe a case of severe thrombocytopenia secondary to CMV infection in an immunocompetent 30-year-old man who presented with pyrexia and bleeding tendency. A diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) was made following hematological and serological testing, and bone marrow aspiration. Acute CMV infection was confirmed by serological testing, antigenemia, and detection of CMV-DNA. Corticosteroid therapy was ineffective and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was therefore administered. This resulted in immediate recovery of the platelet count and cessation of nasal bleeding. Early IVIG administration should be considered in steroid-resistant cases.

  17. Enhancing Integrated Pest Management in GM Cotton Systems Using Host Plant Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Trapero, Carlos; Wilson, Iain W.; Stiller, Warwick N.; Wilson, Lewis J.

    2016-01-01

    Cotton has lost many ancestral defensive traits against key invertebrate pests. This is suggested by the levels of resistance to some pests found in wild cotton genotypes as well as in cultivated landraces and is a result of domestication and a long history of targeted breeding for yield and fiber quality, along with the capacity to control pests with pesticides. Genetic modification (GM) allowed integration of toxins from a bacteria into cotton to control key Lepidopteran pests. Since the mid-1990s, use of GM cotton cultivars has greatly reduced the amount of pesticides used in many cotton systems. However, pests not controlled by the GM traits have usually emerged as problems, especially the sucking bug complex. Control of this complex with pesticides often causes a reduction in beneficial invertebrate populations, allowing other secondary pests to increase rapidly and require control. Control of both sucking bug complex and secondary pests is problematic due to the cost of pesticides and/or high risk of selecting for pesticide resistance. Deployment of host plant resistance (HPR) provides an opportunity to manage these issues in GM cotton systems. Cotton cultivars resistant to the sucking bug complex and/or secondary pests would require fewer pesticide applications, reducing costs and risks to beneficial invertebrate populations and pesticide resistance. Incorporation of HPR traits into elite cotton cultivars with high yield and fiber quality offers the potential to further reduce pesticide use and increase the durability of pest management in GM cotton systems. We review the challenges that the identification and use of HPR against invertebrate pests brings to cotton breeding. We explore sources of resistance to the sucking bug complex and secondary pests, the mechanisms that control them and the approaches to incorporate these defense traits to commercial cultivars. PMID:27148323

  18. Enhancing Integrated Pest Management in GM Cotton Systems Using Host Plant Resistance.

    PubMed

    Trapero, Carlos; Wilson, Iain W; Stiller, Warwick N; Wilson, Lewis J

    2016-01-01

    Cotton has lost many ancestral defensive traits against key invertebrate pests. This is suggested by the levels of resistance to some pests found in wild cotton genotypes as well as in cultivated landraces and is a result of domestication and a long history of targeted breeding for yield and fiber quality, along with the capacity to control pests with pesticides. Genetic modification (GM) allowed integration of toxins from a bacteria into cotton to control key Lepidopteran pests. Since the mid-1990s, use of GM cotton cultivars has greatly reduced the amount of pesticides used in many cotton systems. However, pests not controlled by the GM traits have usually emerged as problems, especially the sucking bug complex. Control of this complex with pesticides often causes a reduction in beneficial invertebrate populations, allowing other secondary pests to increase rapidly and require control. Control of both sucking bug complex and secondary pests is problematic due to the cost of pesticides and/or high risk of selecting for pesticide resistance. Deployment of host plant resistance (HPR) provides an opportunity to manage these issues in GM cotton systems. Cotton cultivars resistant to the sucking bug complex and/or secondary pests would require fewer pesticide applications, reducing costs and risks to beneficial invertebrate populations and pesticide resistance. Incorporation of HPR traits into elite cotton cultivars with high yield and fiber quality offers the potential to further reduce pesticide use and increase the durability of pest management in GM cotton systems. We review the challenges that the identification and use of HPR against invertebrate pests brings to cotton breeding. We explore sources of resistance to the sucking bug complex and secondary pests, the mechanisms that control them and the approaches to incorporate these defense traits to commercial cultivars.

  19. Genetic architecture of resistance in Daphnia hosts against two species of host-specific parasites

    PubMed Central

    Routtu, J; Ebert, D

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of host resistance is key for understanding the evolution of host–parasite interactions. Evolutionary models often assume simple genetics based on few loci and strong epistasis. It is unknown, however, whether these assumptions apply to natural populations. Using a quantitative trait loci (QTL) approach, we explore the genetic architecture of resistance in the crustacean Daphnia magna to two of its natural parasites: the horizontally transmitted bacterium Pasteuria ramosa and the horizontally and vertically transmitted microsporidium Hamiltosporidium tvaerminnensis. These two systems have become models for studies on the evolution of host–parasite interactions. In the QTL panel used here, Daphnia's resistance to P. ramosa is controlled by a single major QTL (which explains 50% of the observed variation). Resistance to H. tvaerminnensis horizontal infections shows a signature of a quantitative trait based in multiple loci with weak epistatic interactions (together explaining 38% variation). Resistance to H. tvaerminnensis vertical infections, however, shows only one QTL (explaining 13.5% variance) that colocalizes with one of the QTLs for horizontal infections. QTLs for resistance to Pasteuria and Hamiltosporidium do not colocalize. We conclude that the genetics of resistance in D. magna are drastically different for these two parasites. Furthermore, we infer that based on these and earlier results, the mechanisms of coevolution differ strongly for the two host–parasite systems. Only the Pasteuria–Daphnia system is expected to follow the negative frequency-dependent selection (Red Queen) model. How coevolution works in the Hamiltosporidium–Daphnia system remains unclear. PMID:25335558

  20. Associations between host characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ruddat, I; Tietze, E; Ziehm, D; Kreienbrock, L

    2014-10-01

    A collection of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates obtained from sporadic salmonellosis cases in humans from Lower Saxony, Germany between June 2008 and May 2010 was used to perform an exploratory risk-factor analysis on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) using comprehensive host information on sociodemographic attributes, medical history, food habits and animal contact. Multivariate resistance profiles of minimum inhibitory concentrations for 13 antimicrobial agents were analysed using a non-parametric approach with multifactorial models adjusted for phage types. Statistically significant associations were observed for consumption of antimicrobial agents, region type and three factors on egg-purchasing behaviour, indicating that besides antimicrobial use the proximity to other community members, health consciousness and other lifestyle-related attributes may play a role in the dissemination of resistances. Furthermore, a statistically significant increase in AMR from the first study year to the second year was observed.

  1. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D.; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R.; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The MHC class I Dk molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds Dk, are required to control viral spread. The extent of Dk-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust Dk-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen. PMID:26845690

  2. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K.; Doerrler, William T.; Boinett, Christine J.; Fookes, Maria C.; Parkhill, Julian; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5 insertions and measured mutant depletion upon exposure to three clinically relevant antimicrobials (colistin, imipenem or ciprofloxacin) by Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing (TraDIS). Using this high-throughput approach, we defined three sets of chromosomal non-essential genes essential for growth during exposure to colistin (n = 35), imipenem (n = 1) or ciprofloxacin (n = 1) in addition to known resistance determinants, collectively termed the “secondary resistome”. As proof of principle, we demonstrated that inactivation of a non-essential gene not previously found linked to colistin resistance (dedA) restored colistin susceptibility by reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration from 8 to 0.5 μg/ml, 4-fold below the susceptibility breakpoint (S ≤ 2 μg/ml). This finding suggests that the secondary resistome is a potential target for developing antimicrobial “helper” drugs that restore the efficacy of existing antimicrobials. PMID:28198411

  3. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K; Doerrler, William T; Boinett, Christine J; Fookes, Maria C; Parkhill, Julian; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5 insertions and measured mutant depletion upon exposure to three clinically relevant antimicrobials (colistin, imipenem or ciprofloxacin) by Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing (TraDIS). Using this high-throughput approach, we defined three sets of chromosomal non-essential genes essential for growth during exposure to colistin (n = 35), imipenem (n = 1) or ciprofloxacin (n = 1) in addition to known resistance determinants, collectively termed the "secondary resistome". As proof of principle, we demonstrated that inactivation of a non-essential gene not previously found linked to colistin resistance (dedA) restored colistin susceptibility by reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration from 8 to 0.5 μg/ml, 4-fold below the susceptibility breakpoint (S ≤ 2 μg/ml). This finding suggests that the secondary resistome is a potential target for developing antimicrobial "helper" drugs that restore the efficacy of existing antimicrobials.

  4. Colistin heteroresistance in Enterobacter cloacae is associated with cross-resistance to the host antimicrobial lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Napier, Brooke A; Band, Victor; Burd, Eileen M; Weiss, David S

    2014-09-01

    Here, we describe the first identification of colistin-heteroresistant Enterobacter cloacae in the United States. Treatment of this isolate with colistin increased the frequency of the resistant subpopulation and induced cross-resistance to the host antimicrobial lysozyme. This is the first description of heteroresistance conferring cross-resistance to a host antimicrobial and suggests that clinical treatment with colistin may inadvertently select for bacteria that are resistant to components of the host innate immune system.

  5. Colistin Heteroresistance in Enterobacter cloacae Is Associated with Cross-Resistance to the Host Antimicrobial Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Brooke A.; Band, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe the first identification of colistin-heteroresistant Enterobacter cloacae in the United States. Treatment of this isolate with colistin increased the frequency of the resistant subpopulation and induced cross-resistance to the host antimicrobial lysozyme. This is the first description of heteroresistance conferring cross-resistance to a host antimicrobial and suggests that clinical treatment with colistin may inadvertently select for bacteria that are resistant to components of the host innate immune system. PMID:24982068

  6. A combined within-host and between-hosts modelling framework for the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Legros, Mathieu; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The spread of drug resistance represents a significant challenge to many disease control efforts. The evolution of resistance is a complex process influenced by transmission dynamics between hosts as well as infection dynamics within these hosts. This study aims to investigate how these two processes combine to impact the evolution of resistance in malaria parasites. We introduce a stochastic modelling framework combining an epidemiological model of Plasmodium transmission and an explicit within-human infection model for two competing strains. Immunity, treatment and resistance costs are included in the within-host model. We show that the spread of resistance is generally less likely in areas of intense transmission, and therefore of increased competition between strains, an effect exacerbated when costs of resistance are higher. We also illustrate how treatment influences the spread of resistance, with a trade-off between slowing resistance and curbing disease incidence. We show that treatment coverage has a stronger impact on disease prevalence, whereas treatment efficacy primarily affects resistance spread, suggesting that coverage should constitute the primary focus of control efforts. Finally, we illustrate the importance of feedbacks between modelling scales. Overall, our results underline the importance of concomitantly modelling the evolution of resistance within and between hosts.

  7. Size and shape selectivity of host networks built based on tunable secondary building units.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dohyun; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2005-03-21

    By modulating the secondary building units derived from the primary building units, N-acylsalicylhydrazides (H3 xshz), we have been able to construct isostructural but tunable host networks, [Mn6(xshz)6(dmf)2(bpea)2], with different cavity sizes and shapes where the secondary building units, [Mn6(xshz)6], were linked through exo-bidentate bridging ligand, 1,2-bis(pyridyl)ethane (bpea) to form 3-D networks. With a short length linear N-acyl side chain at the primary building unit, the host networks have a 3-D network with three-dimensional cavities. With an appropriate length linear N-acyl side chain at the primary building unit, the host network keeps the isostructural 3-D network but with two types of one-dimensional channels of reduced cavity volume. The tuned host networks showed not only size selectivity for the guest molecules but also shape selectivity. While the three-dimensional channeled host showed selectivity depending on the length of the podal guests, the one-dimensional channeled host showed selectivity depending on both the length and/or the podality of the guest molecules.

  8. Intra-arterial Methylprednisolone Infusion in Treatment-Resistant Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, Joshua L. Belanger, Adam R.; Sung, Chris C.; Stangl, P. Anondo; Nowakowski, F. Scott; Lookstein, Robert L.

    2010-06-15

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a potentially fatal complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Standard primary therapy for acute GVHD includes systemic steroids, often in combination with other agents. Unfortunately, primary treatment failure is common and carries a high mortality. There is no generally accepted secondary therapy for acute GVHD. Although few data on localized therapy for GVHD have been published, intra-arterial injection of high-dose corticosteroids may be a viable option. We treated 11 patients with steroid-resistant GVHD using a single administration of intra-arterial high-dose methylprednisolone. Three patients (27%) died periprocedurally. Four patients (36%) had a partial response to intra-arterial treatment and were discharged on total parenteral nutrition and oral medication. Four patients (36%) had a complete response and were discharged on oral diet and oral medication. No immediate treatment or procedure-related complications were noted. Twenty-seven percent of patients survived long-term. Our preliminary results suggest that regional intra-arterial treatment of steroid-resistant GVHD is a safe and potentially viable secondary therapy in primary treatment-resistant GVHD.

  9. Parenthood and Host Resistance to the Common Cold

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sheldon; Turner, Ronald B.; Doyle, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if parenthood predicts host resistance to the common cold among healthy volunteers experimentally exposed to a common cold virus. Methods Subjects were 795 healthy participants (age range 18–55) enrolled in one of 3 viral-challenge studies conducted from 1993–2004. After reporting parenthood status, participants were quarantined, administered nasal drops containing one of four common cold viruses, and monitored for the development of a clinical cold (infection in the presence of objective signs of illness) on the day before and for 5–6 days after exposure. All analyses included controls for immunity to the experimental virus (pre-challenge specific antibody titers), viral strain, season, age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, body mass, study, employment status and education. Results Parents were less likely to develop colds than non-parents (OR=0.48; 95% CI, 0.31–0.73). This was true for both parents with 1–2 children (OR=0.52; 95% CI, 0.33–0.83) and 3 or more children (OR=0.39; 95% CI, 0.22–0.70). Parenthood was associated with a decreased risk of colds for both those with at least one child living at home (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.24–0.87), and those whose children all lived away from home (OR=0.27; 95% CI, 0.12–0.60). The relationship between parenthood and colds was not observed in parents ages 18–24, but was pronounced among older parents. Conclusion Parenthood was associated with greater host resistance to common cold viruses. PMID:22773866

  10. Rate of resistance evolution and polymorphism in long- and short-lived hosts.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Emily; Hood, Michael E; Antonovics, Janis

    2015-02-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that long-lived hosts are expected to evolve higher equilibrium levels of disease resistance than shorter-lived hosts, but questions of how longevity affects the rate of resistance evolution and the maintenance of polymorphism remain unanswered. Conventional wisdom suggests that adaptive evolution should occur more slowly in long-lived organisms than in short-lived organisms. However, the opposite may be true for the evolution of disease-resistance traits where exposure to disease, and therefore the strength of selection for resistance increases with longevity. In a single locus model of innate resistance to a frequency-dependent, sterilizing disease, longer lived hosts evolved resistance more rapidly than short-lived hosts. Moreover, resistance in long-lived hosts could only be polymorphic for more costly and more extreme resistance levels than short-lived hosts. The increased rate of evolution occurred in spite of longer generation times because longer-lived hosts had both a longer period of exposure to disease as well as higher disease prevalence. Qualitatively similar results were found when the model was extended to mortality-inducing diseases, or to density-dependent transmission modes. Our study shows that the evolutionary dynamics of host resistance is determined by more than just levels of resistance and cost, but is highly sensitive to the life-history traits of the host.

  11. Modeling of secondary radiation damage in LIGA PMMA resist exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Aili

    2003-01-01

    Secondary radiation during LIGA PMMA resist exposure adversely affects feature definition, sidewall taper and overall sidewall offset. Additionally, it can degrade the resist adjacent to the substrate, leading to the loss of free-standing features through undercutting during resist development or through mechanical failure of the degraded material. The source of this radiation includes photoelectrons, Auger electrons, fluorescence photons, etc. Sandia"s Integrated Tiger Series (ITS), a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code, was used to compute dose profiles within 1 to 2 microns of the absorber edge and near the interface of the resist with a metallized substrate. The difficulty of sub-micron resolution requirement was overcome by solving a few local problems having carefully designed micron-scale geometries. The results indicate a 2-μm dose transition region near the absorber edge resulting from PMMA"s photoelectrons. This region leads to sidewall offset and to tapered sidewalls following resist development. The results also show a dose boundary layer of around 1 μm near the substrate interface due to electrons emitted from the substrate metallization layer. The maximum dose at the resist bottom under the absorber can be very high and can lead to feature loss during development. This model was also used to investigate those resist doses resulting from multi-layer substrate.

  12. Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora hosts for heterologous expression of secondary metabolite gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Baltz, Richard H

    2010-08-01

    Natural products discovery from actinomycetes has been on the decline in recent years, and has suffered from a lack of innovative ways to discover new secondary metabolites within a background of the thousands of known compounds. Recent advances in whole genome sequencing have revealed that actinomycetes with large genomes encode multiple secondary metabolite pathways, most of which remain cryptic. One approach to address the expression of cryptic pathways is to first identify novel pathways by bioinformatics, then clone and express them in well-characterized hosts with known secondary metabolomes. This process should eliminate the tedious dereplication process that has hampered natural products discovery. Several laboratory and industrial production strains have been used for heterologous production of secondary metabolite pathways. This review discusses the results of these studies, and the pros and cons of using various Streptomyces and one Saccharopolyspora strain for heterologous expression. This information should provide an experimental basis to help researchers choose hosts for current application and future development to express heterologous secondary metabolite pathways in yields sufficient for rapid scale-up, biological testing, and commercial production.

  13. Mini Review: Potential Applications of Non-host Resistance for Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghee; Whitaker, Vance M.; Hutton, Samuel F.

    2016-01-01

    Plant breeding for disease resistance is crucial to sustain global crop production. For decades, plant breeders and researchers have extensively used host plant resistance genes (R-genes) to develop disease resistant cultivars. However, the general instability of R-genes in crop cultivars when challenged with diverse pathogen populations emphasizes the need for more stable means of resistance. Alternatively, non-host resistance is recognized as the most durable, broad-spectrum form of resistance against the majority of potential pathogens in plants and has gained great attention as an alternative target for managing resistance. While transgenic approaches have been utilized to transfer non-host resistance to host species, conventional breeding applications have been more elusive. Nevertheless, avenues for discovery and deployment of genetic loci for non-host resistance via hybridization are increasingly abundant, particularly when transferring genes among closely related species. In this mini review, we discuss current and developing applications of non-host resistance for crop improvement with a focus on the overlap between host and non-host mechanisms and the potential impacts of new technology. PMID:27462329

  14. Molecular networks associated with host resistance to gastrointestional nematodes in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasitism by gastrointestinal nematodes is a disease severely affecting productivity in ruminants. To unravel mechanisms of host resistance to parasitic infection, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of the cattle populations displaying resistance phenotypes in response to experimental Coope...

  15. Efficient transfer of two large secondary metabolite pathway gene clusters into heterologous hosts by transposition

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Wenzel, Silke C.; Perlova, Olena; Wang, Junping; Gross, Frank; Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A. Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2008-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer by transposition has been widely used for transgenesis in prokaryotes. However, conjugation has been preferred for transfer of large transgenes, despite greater restrictions of host range. We examine the possibility that transposons can be used to deliver large transgenes to heterologous hosts. This possibility is particularly relevant to the expression of large secondary metabolite gene clusters in various heterologous hosts. Recently, we showed that the engineering of large gene clusters like type I polyketide/nonribosomal peptide pathways for heterologous expression is no longer a bottleneck. Here, we apply recombineering to engineer either the epothilone (epo) or myxochromide S (mchS) gene cluster for transpositional delivery and expression in heterologous hosts. The 58-kb epo gene cluster was fully reconstituted from two clones by stitching. Then, the epo promoter was exchanged for a promoter active in the heterologous host, followed by engineering into the MycoMar transposon. A similar process was applied to the mchS gene cluster. The engineered gene clusters were transferred and expressed in the heterologous hosts Myxococcus xanthus and Pseudomonas putida. We achieved the largest transposition yet reported for any system and suggest that delivery by transposon will become the method of choice for delivery of large transgenes, particularly not only for metabolic engineering but also for general transgenesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:18701643

  16. Secondary Effects of Glyphosate Action in Phelipanche aegyptiaca: Inhibition of Solute Transport from the Host Plant to the Parasite.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Tal; Rubin, Baruch; Plakhine, Dina; Gal, Shira; Amir, Rachel; Hacham, Yael; Wolf, Shmuel; Eizenberg, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    It is currently held that glyphosate efficiently controls the obligate holoparasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Egyptian broomrape) by inhibiting its endogenous shikimate pathway, thereby causing a deficiency in aromatic amino acids (AAA). While there is no argument regarding the shikimate pathway being the primary site of the herbicide's action, the fact that the parasite receives a constant supply of nutrients, including proteins and amino acids, from the host does not fit with an AAA deficiency. This apparent contradiction implies that glyphosate mechanism of action in P. aegyptiaca is probably more complex and does not end with the inhibition of the AAA biosynthetic pathway alone. A possible explanation would lie in a limitation of the translocation of solutes from the host as a secondary effect. We examined the following hypotheses: (a) glyphosate does not affects P. aegyptiaca during its independent phase and (b) glyphosate has a secondary effect on the ability of P. aegyptiaca to attract nutrients, limiting the translocation to the parasite. By using a glyphosate-resistant host plant expressing the "phloem-mobile" green fluorescent protein (GFP), it was shown that glyphosate interacts specifically with P. aegyptiaca, initiating a deceleration of GFP translocation to the parasite within 24 h of treatment. Additionally, changes in the entire sugars profile (together with that of other metabolites) of P. aegyptiaca were induced by glyphosate. In addition, glyphosate did not impair germination or seedling development of P. aegyptiaca but begun to exert its action only after the parasite has established a connection to the host vascular system and became exposed to the herbicide. Our findings thus indicate that glyphosate does indeed have a secondary effect in P. aegyptiaca, probably as a consequence of its primary target inhibition-via inhibition of the translocation of phloem-mobile solutes to the parasite, as was simulated by the mobile GFP. The observed

  17. Secondary Effects of Glyphosate Action in Phelipanche aegyptiaca: Inhibition of Solute Transport from the Host Plant to the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Tal; Rubin, Baruch; Plakhine, Dina; Gal, Shira; Amir, Rachel; Hacham, Yael; Wolf, Shmuel; Eizenberg, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    It is currently held that glyphosate efficiently controls the obligate holoparasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Egyptian broomrape) by inhibiting its endogenous shikimate pathway, thereby causing a deficiency in aromatic amino acids (AAA). While there is no argument regarding the shikimate pathway being the primary site of the herbicide's action, the fact that the parasite receives a constant supply of nutrients, including proteins and amino acids, from the host does not fit with an AAA deficiency. This apparent contradiction implies that glyphosate mechanism of action in P. aegyptiaca is probably more complex and does not end with the inhibition of the AAA biosynthetic pathway alone. A possible explanation would lie in a limitation of the translocation of solutes from the host as a secondary effect. We examined the following hypotheses: (a) glyphosate does not affects P. aegyptiaca during its independent phase and (b) glyphosate has a secondary effect on the ability of P. aegyptiaca to attract nutrients, limiting the translocation to the parasite. By using a glyphosate-resistant host plant expressing the “phloem-mobile” green fluorescent protein (GFP), it was shown that glyphosate interacts specifically with P. aegyptiaca, initiating a deceleration of GFP translocation to the parasite within 24 h of treatment. Additionally, changes in the entire sugars profile (together with that of other metabolites) of P. aegyptiaca were induced by glyphosate. In addition, glyphosate did not impair germination or seedling development of P. aegyptiaca but begun to exert its action only after the parasite has established a connection to the host vascular system and became exposed to the herbicide. Our findings thus indicate that glyphosate does indeed have a secondary effect in P. aegyptiaca, probably as a consequence of its primary target inhibition—via inhibition of the translocation of phloem-mobile solutes to the parasite, as was simulated by the mobile GFP. The observed

  18. Engineered Streptomyces avermitilis host for heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene cluster for secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, MAMORU; KOMATSU, KYOKO; KOIWAI, HANAE; YAMADA, YUUKI; KOZONE, IKUKO; IZUMIKAWA, MIHO; HASHIMOTO, JUNKO; TAKAGI, MOTOKI; OMURA, SATOSHI; SHIN-YA, KAZUO; CANE, DAVID E.; IKEDA, HARUO

    2014-01-01

    An industrial microorganism Streptomyces avermitilis, which is a producer of anthelmintic macrocyclic lactones, avermectins, has been constructed as a versatile model host for heterologous expression of genes encoding secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Twenty of the entire biosynthetic gene clusters for secondary metabolites were successively cloned and introduced into a versatile model host S. avermitilis SUKA17 or 22. Almost all S. avermitilis transformants carrying the entire gene cluster produced metabolites as a result of the expression of biosynthetic gene clusters introduced. A few transformants were unable to produce metabolites but their production was restored by the expression of biosynthetic genes using an alternative promoter or the expression of a regulatory gene in the gene cluster that controls the expression of biosynthetic genes in the cluster using an alternative promoter. Production of metabolites in some transformants of the versatile host was higher than that of the original producers and cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters in the original producer were also expressed in a versatile host. PMID:23654282

  19. Interspecific variation in resistance of two host tree species to spruce budworm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentealba, Alvaro; Bauce, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Woody plants regularly sustain biomass losses to herbivorous insects. Consequently, they have developed various resistance mechanisms to cope with insect attack. However, these mechanisms of defense and how they are affected by resource availability are not well understood. The present study aimed at evaluating and comparing the natural resistance (antibiosis and tolerance) of balsam fir (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill.) and white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench) Voss] to spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.), and how drainage site quality as a component of resource availability affects the expression of resistance over time (6 years). Our results showed that there are differences in natural resistance between the two tree species to spruce budworm, but it was not significantly affected by drainage quality. Balsam fir exhibited higher foliar toxic secondary compounds concentrations than white spruce in all drainage classes, resulting in lower male pupal mass, survival and longer male developmental time. This, however, did not prevent spruce budworm from consuming more foliage in balsam fir than in white spruce. This response suggests that either natural levels of measured secondary compounds do not provide sufficient toxicity to reduce defoliation, or spruce budworm has developed compensatory mechanisms, which allow it to utilize food resources more efficiently or minimize the toxic effects that are produced by its host's defensive compounds. Larvae exhibited lower pupal mass and higher mortality in rapidly drained and subhygric sites. Drainage class also affected the amount of foliage destroyed but its impact varied over the years and was probably influenced by climatic variables. These results demonstrate the complexity of predicting the effect of resource availability on tree defenses, especially when other confounding environmental factors can affect tree resource allocation and utilization.

  20. Determining larval host plant use by a polyphagous lepidopteran through analysis of adult moths for plant secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Orth, Robert G; Head, Graham; Mierkowski, Mary

    2007-06-01

    Many polyphagous insect species are important economic pests on one or more of their crop hosts. For most important insect pests, the common crop hosts are well-known, but knowledge of weedy and unmanaged hosts is limited. Furthermore, the relative contribution of different hosts to local and regional populations has rarely been ascertained because this requires having some way to determine which plant hosts are the source of the adult moths observed ovipositing in a crop field at a given place and time. One way of determining the larval host of polyphagous pest species is to analyze for several plant-derived chemicals that are each specific to a different small set of related plant species and are preserved in detectable amounts in adult moths. In this paper, we describe novel methods for analyzing adults of the polyphagous lepidopteran, the tobacco budworm (TBW) Heliothis virescens (F.), for plant secondary metabolites, specifically cotinine and gossypol, which are diagnostic for larval feeding on tobacco and cotton, respectively. Cotinine was extracted from individual TBW moths with acetic acid and methanol, then concentrated and analyzed directly by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The same moths then were analyzed for bound gossypol by creating a Schiff's base that used aniline, and the resulting dianilino-gossypol complex was quantified using high pressure chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) as the detector. Based on analysis of standards, the detection limit for the cotinine was less than 1.5 ppb by dry weight. Comparable standards were not available for the gossypol derivative so a quantitative limit of detection could not be calculated. When TBW moths reared on known hosts were analyzed for gossypol and/or cotinine, all of the moths reared on tobacco or cotton were correctly identified, although some false positives were recorded with the gossypol method. Analysis of TBW moths of various ages and at various

  1. Host resistance selects for traits unrelated to resistance-breaking that affect fitness in a plant virus.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Aurora; Hily, Jean-Michel; Pagán, Israel; Pacios, Luis F; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2014-04-01

    The acquisition by parasites of the capacity to infect resistant host genotypes, that is, resistance-breaking, is predicted to be hindered by across-host fitness trade-offs. All analyses of costs of resistance-breaking in plant viruses have focused on within-host multiplication without considering other fitness components, which may limit understanding of virus evolution. We have reported that host range expansion of tobamoviruses on L-gene resistant pepper genotypes was associated with severe within-host multiplication penalties. Here, we analyze whether resistance-breaking costs might affect virus survival in the environment by comparing tobamovirus pathotypes differing in infectivity on L-gene resistance alleles. We predicted particle stability from structural models, analyzed particle stability in vitro, and quantified virus accumulation in different plant organs and virus survival in the soil. Survival in the soil differed among tobamovirus pathotypes and depended on differential stability of virus particles. Structure model analyses showed that amino acid changes in the virus coat protein (CP) responsible for resistance-breaking affected the strength of the axial interactions among CP subunits in the rod-shaped particle, thus determining its stability and survival. Pathotypes ranked differently for particle stability/survival and for within-host accumulation. Resistance-breaking costs in survival add to, or subtract from, costs in multiplication according to pathotype. Hence, differential pathotype survival should be considered along with differential multiplication to understand the evolution of the virus populations. Results also show that plant resistance, in addition to selecting for resistance-breaking and for decreased multiplication, also selects for changes in survival, a trait unrelated to the host-pathogen interaction that may condition host range expansion.

  2. Resistance to Arrenurus spp. Parasitism in Odonates: Patterns Across Species and Comparisons Between a Resistant and Susceptible Host

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, Wade B.

    2016-01-01

    Some adult odonates resist parasitism by larval water mites (Arrenurus spp.) with melanotic encapsulation, in which the mite’s stylestome is clogged and the mite starves. In summer 2014, we counted the engorged and resisted mites on 2,729 adult odonates sampled by aerial net at 11 water bodies in Greenville Co. and Pickens Co., SC, and tested the hypothesis that the frequency and intensity of resistance correlates with parasite prevalence (the percentage of parasitized hosts). Resistance prevalence (the percentage of parasitized hosts that resisted at least one mite) varied significantly among host species, exceeding 60% for Argia fumipennis (Burmeister) and Celithemis fasciata Kirby but less than 20% for other species. However, neither resistance prevalence nor mean resistance intensity (mean percentage of resisted mites on resisting hosts) correlated with parasite prevalence. We described potential effects of parasitism on host development of A. fumipennis and Pachydiplax longipennis (Burmeister) by comparing the percent asymmetry of forewing lengths between parasitized and unparasitized individuals. There was no significant difference in asymmetry for either males or females of A. fumipennis, or males of Pa. longipennis (females were not sampled). We also evaluated differences in melanotic encapsulation between A. fumipennis, which readily encapsulates mites in nature, and Pa. longipennis. We inserted a 2.0-mm piece of sterile monofilament line into the thorax of captured individuals for 24 h and compared mean gray value scores of inserted and emergent ends using Image-J software. There was no difference in melanotic encapsulation between species. PMID:27067302

  3. Resistance to Arrenurus spp. Parasitism in Odonates: Patterns Across Species and Comparisons Between a Resistant and Susceptible Host.

    PubMed

    Worthen, Wade B; Hart, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Some adult odonates resist parasitism by larval water mites (Arrenurus spp.) with melanotic encapsulation, in which the mite's stylestome is clogged and the mite starves. In summer 2014, we counted the engorged and resisted mites on 2,729 adult odonates sampled by aerial net at 11 water bodies in Greenville Co. and Pickens Co., SC, and tested the hypothesis that the frequency and intensity of resistance correlates with parasite prevalence (the percentage of parasitized hosts). Resistance prevalence (the percentage of parasitized hosts that resisted at least one mite) varied significantly among host species, exceeding 60% for Argia fumipennis(Burmeister) and Celithemis fasciata Kirby but less than 20% for other species. However, neither resistance prevalence nor mean resistance intensity (mean percentage of resisted mites on resisting hosts) correlated with parasite prevalence. We described potential effects of parasitism on host development ofA. fumipennis and Pachydiplax longipennis(Burmeister) by comparing the percent asymmetry of forewing lengths between parasitized and unparasitized individuals. There was no significant difference in asymmetry for either males or females of A. fumipennis, or males of Pa. longipennis(females were not sampled). We also evaluated differences in melanotic encapsulation between A. fumipennis, which readily encapsulates mites in nature, and Pa. longipennis We inserted a 2.0-mm piece of sterile monofilament line into the thorax of captured individuals for 24 h and compared mean gray value scores of inserted and emergent ends using Image-J software. There was no difference in melanotic encapsulation between species.

  4. Role of Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and its secondary hosts in plum pox virus propagation.

    PubMed

    Manachini, B; Casati, P; Cinanni, L; Bianco, P

    2007-08-01

    Plum pox virus (family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, PPV) is one of the most important viral pathogens of plants in the genus Prunus, particularly Prunus persica L. The role of the Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) as a vector of PPV-M, and its role in spreading PPV-M, was investigated. PPV-M-infected peach trees were used as inoculum sources, and transmission to 15 herbaceous species commonly present in and around peach orchards was evaluated. The presence of PPV-M in secondary hosts after aphid transmission was verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests. The results indicate that Saponaria ocymoides L., Pisum sativum L., Trifolium repens L., Trifolium pratense L., Lepidium sativum L., Matricaria chamomilla L., Centaurea cyanus L., Bellis perennis L., Papaver rhoeas L., and Zinnia elegans L. became infected. Although Lupinus polyphyllus Lindley, Taraxacum officinale L., Achillea millefolium L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., and Linum rubrum L. did not become infected, they are hosts of M. persicae. Among the 10 positive species that were infected, the species most common in peach orchards, T. pratense, T. repens, B. perennis, and M. chamomilla, were used as source plants for the transmission studies to the peach tree. Our study reveals the ability of M. persicae to transmit PPV-M from herbaceous hosts to peach trees, describes PPV-M symptoms in herbaceous species, and discusses the role of M. persicae and its hosts as a source of PPV-M in peach orchards.

  5. Evolution of a polydnavirus gene in relation to parasitoid-host species immune resistance.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Stéphane; Gitau, Catherine Wanjiru; Branca, Antoine; Le Rü, Bruno Pierre; Silvain, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    CrV1, a polydisperse DNA virus (polydnavirus or PDV) gene contributes to the suppression of host immunity in Cotesia genus parasitoids. Its molecular evolution was analyzed in relation to levels of resistance in the sympatric host species. Natural selection for nonsynonymous substitutions (positive Darwinian selection) was observed at specific amino acid sites among CrV1 variants; particularly, between parasitoid strains immune suppressive and nonimmune suppressive to the main resistant stem borer host, Busseola fusca. In Cotesia sesamiae, geographic distribution of CrV1 alleles in Kenya was correlated to the relative abundance of B. fusca. These results suggest that PDV genes evolve through natural selection and are genetically linked to factors of suppression of local host resistance. We discuss the forces driving the evolution of CrV1 and its use as a marker to understand parasitoid adaptation to host resistance in biological control.

  6. Host-dependent Induction of Transient Antibiotic Resistance: A Prelude to Treatment Failure.

    PubMed

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z; Heithoff, Douglas M; Ersoy, Selvi C; Shimp, William R; House, John K; Marth, Jamey D; Smith, Jeffrey W; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Current antibiotic testing does not include the potential influence of host cell environment on microbial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance, hindering appropriate therapeutic intervention. We devised a strategy to identify the presence of host-pathogen interactions that alter antibiotic efficacy in vivo. Our findings revealed a bacterial mechanism that promotes antibiotic resistance in vivo at concentrations of drug that far exceed dosages determined by standardized antimicrobial testing. This mechanism has escaped prior detection because it is reversible and operates within a subset of host tissues and cells. Bacterial pathogens are thereby protected while their survival promotes the emergence of permanent drug resistance. This host-dependent mechanism of transient antibiotic resistance is applicable to multiple pathogens and has implications for the development of more effective antimicrobial therapies.

  7. Predicting the host range of Nystalea ebalea: secondary plant chemistry and host selection by a surrogate biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The safety of weed biological control depends upon the selection and utilization of the target weed by the agent while causing minimal harm to non-target species. Selection of weed species by biological control agents is determined by the presence of behavioral cues, generally host secondary plant c...

  8. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes.

  9. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  10. A unified inter-host and in-host model of antibiotic resistance and infection spread in a hospital ward.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Lester; Lawson, Barry

    2017-03-30

    As the battle continues against hospital-acquired infections and the concurrent rise in antibiotic resistance among many of the major causative pathogens, there is a dire need to conduct controlled experiments, in order to compare proposed control strategies. However, cost, time, and ethical considerations make this evaluation strategy either impractical or impossible to implement with living patients. This paper presents a multi-scale model that offers promise as the basis for a tool to simulate these (and other) controlled experiments. This is a "unified" model in two important ways: (i) It combines inter-host and in-host dynamics into a single model, and (ii) it links two very different modeling approaches - agent-based modeling and differential equations - into a single model. The potential of this model as an instrument to combat antibiotic resistance in hospitals is demonstrated with numerical examples.

  11. Stagonospora nodorum: from pathology to genomics and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Richard P; Friesen, Timothy L; Faris, Justin D; Solomon, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    Stagonospora nodorum is a major necrotrophic pathogen of wheat that causes the diseases S. nodorum leaf and glume blotch. A series of tools and resources, including functional genomics, a genome sequence, proteomics and metabolomics, host-mapping populations, and a worldwide collection of isolates, have enabled the dissection of pathogenicity mechanisms. Metabolic and signaling genes required for pathogenicity have been defined. Interaction with the host is dominated by interplay of fungal effectors that induce necrosis on wheat lines carrying specific sensitivity loci. As such, the pathogen has emerged as a model for the Pleosporales group of pathogens.

  12. Clinical Use of Colistin Induces Cross-Resistance to Host Antimicrobials in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Brooke A.; Burd, Eileen M.; Satola, Sarah W.; Cagle, Stephanie M.; Ray, Susan M.; McGann, Patrick; Pohl, Jan; Lesho, Emil P.; Weiss, David S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alarming rise in antibiotic resistance has led to an increase in patient mortality and health care costs. This problem is compounded by the absence of new antibiotics close to regulatory approval. Acinetobacter baumannii is a human pathogen that causes infections primarily in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and is highly antibiotic resistant. Colistin is one of the last-line antibiotics for treating A. baumannii infections; however, colistin-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. This cationic antibiotic attacks negatively charged bacterial membranes in a manner similar to that seen with cationic antimicrobials of the innate immune system. We therefore set out to determine if the increasing use of colistin, and emergence of colistin-resistant strains, is concomitant with the generation of cross-resistance to host cationic antimicrobials. We found that there is indeed a positive correlation between resistance to colistin and resistance to the host antimicrobials LL-37 and lysozyme among clinical isolates. Importantly, isolates obtained before and after treatment of individual patients demonstrated that colistin use correlated with increased resistance to cationic host antimicrobials. These data reveal the overlooked risk of inducing cross-resistance to host antimicrobials when treating patients with colistin as a last-line antibiotic. PMID:23695834

  13. Host resistance and tolerance of parasitic gut worms depend on resource availability.

    PubMed

    Knutie, Sarah A; Wilkinson, Christina L; Wu, Qiu Chang; Ortega, C Nicole; Rohr, Jason R

    2017-04-01

    Resource availability can significantly alter host-parasite dynamics. Abundant food can provide more resources for hosts to resist infections, but also increase host tolerance of infections by reducing competition between hosts and parasites for food. Whether abundant food favors host resistance or tolerance (or both) might depend on the type of resource that the parasite exploits (e.g., host tissue vs. food), which can vary based on the stage of infection. In our study, we evaluated how low and high resource diets affect Cuban tree frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) resistance and tolerance of a skin-penetrating, gut nematode Aplectana sp. at each stage of the infection. Compared to a low resource diet, a high resource diet enhanced frog resistance to worm penetration and tolerance while worms traveled to the gut. In contrast, a low resource diet increased resistance to establishment of the infection. After the infection established and worms could access food resources in the gut, a high resource diet enhanced host tolerance of parasites. On a high resource diet, parasitized frogs consumed significantly more food than non-parasitized frogs; when food was then restricted, mass of non-parasitized frogs did not change, whereas mass of parasitized frogs decreased significantly. Thus, a high resource diet increased frog tolerance of established worms because frogs could fully compensate for energy lost to the parasites. Our study shows that host-parasite dynamics are influenced by the effect of resource availability on host resistance and tolerance, which depends on when parasites have access to food and the stage of infection.

  14. Leaf rust of wheat: Pathogen biology, variation and host resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rusts are important pathogens of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Rust fungi are among the most important pathogens of cereals. Cereal rusts are heteroecious and macrocyclic requiring two taxonomically unrelated hosts to complete a five spore stage life cycle. Cereal rust fungi are highly variable for v...

  15. [Repellent and antifeedant effect of secondary metabolites of non-host plants on Plutella xylostella].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hui; Hou, Youming; Yang, Guang; You, Minsheng

    2004-03-01

    Based on the theory of co-evolution between plants and phytophagous insects, the repellent and antifeedant effect of secondary metabolites of non-host plants on diamondback moth(DBM) Plutella xylostella was studied, aimed at finding out the oviposition repellents and antifeedants of insect pests. When the ethanol extracts(Etho Exts) of Bauhinia variegata, Eucalyptus tereticornis, Euphorbia hirta, Duranta repens, Zanthoxylum bungeanum, Magnolia grandiflora, and Nicotiana tabacum were applied respectively, the oviposition repellent rates were all over 80.00%; while after forty-eight hours treatment with the Etho Exts of Euphorbia pulcherrima, Broussonetia papyrifera, Artemisia argyi, Camellia oleifera, Salix babylonica, Euphorbia hirta, Bauhinia variegata, and Setaria viridisa, the antifeedant rates of DBM larvae were all more than 80.00%.

  16. Salmonella pathogenicity islands in host specificity, host pathogen-interactions and antibiotics resistance of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Roman G; Hensel, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a pathogen highly successful in causing a variety of gastrointestinal and systemic diseases in animals and humans. While some serovars of S. enterica are able to infect a broad range of host organisms, other serovars are highly restricted to specific host species. The colonization of hosts by S. enterica depends on the function of a large number of virulence determinants. The molecular analyses of virulence genes demonstrated that most of these loci are clustered within Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPI). SPI1 and SPI2 each encode type III secretion systems (T355) that confer main virulence traits of S. enterica, i.e. invasion, enteropathogenesis and intracellular survival and proliferation. Further SPI encode factors that contribute to intracellular survival, different types of adhesins, or effector proteins of the SPI1-T3SS or SPI2-T3SS. The availability of genome sequences of several serovars of S. enterica also revealed serovar-specific SPI. In this review, the main characteristics of the currently known SPI are summarized with focus on their roles in various animal hosts and putative functions in human infections.

  17. Update on Host Plant Resistance Studies of Banded Sunflower Moth and Sunflower Moth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding pest-resistance crop cultivars to insects and diseases is one of the primary goals of integrated pest management programs worldwide. Host plant resistance is a tactic that uses the plant's own defenses to reduce injury from pest attack. Among the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) insect pest...

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Requires Phosphate-Responsive Gene Regulation To Resist Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Leistikow, Rachel L.; Kirksey, Meghan A.; Voskuil, Martin I.; McKinney, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists in the tissues of mammalian hosts despite inducing a robust immune response dominated by the macrophage-activating cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ). We identified the M. tuberculosis phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system component PstA1 as a factor required to resist IFN-γ-dependent immunity. A ΔpstA1 mutant was fully virulent in IFN-γ−/− mice but attenuated in wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking specific IFN-γ-inducible immune mechanisms: nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), phagosome-associated p47 GTPase (Irgm1), or phagocyte oxidase (phox). These phenotypes suggest that ΔpstA1 bacteria are sensitized to an IFN-γ-dependent immune mechanism(s) other than NOS2, Irgm1, or phox. In other species, the Pst system has a secondary role as a negative regulator of phosphate starvation-responsive gene expression through an interaction with a two-component signal transduction system. In M. tuberculosis, we found that ΔpstA1 bacteria exhibited dysregulated gene expression during growth in phosphate-rich medium that was mediated by the two-component sensor kinase/response regulator system SenX3-RegX3. Remarkably, deletion of the regX3 gene suppressed the replication and virulence defects of ΔpstA1 bacteria in NOS2−/− mice, suggesting that M. tuberculosis requires the Pst system to negatively regulate activity of RegX3 in response to available phosphate in vivo. We therefore speculate that inorganic phosphate is readily available during replication in the lung and is an important signal controlling M. tuberculosis gene expression via the Pst-SenX3-RegX3 signal transduction system. Inability to sense this environmental signal, due to Pst deficiency, results in dysregulation of gene expression and sensitization of the bacteria to the host immune response. PMID:23132496

  19. Host-dependent Induction of Transient Antibiotic Resistance: A Prelude to Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Ersoy, Selvi C.; Shimp, William R.; House, John K.; Marth, Jamey D.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Mahan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Current antibiotic testing does not include the potential influence of host cell environment on microbial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance, hindering appropriate therapeutic intervention. We devised a strategy to identify the presence of host–pathogen interactions that alter antibiotic efficacy in vivo. Our findings revealed a bacterial mechanism that promotes antibiotic resistance in vivo at concentrations of drug that far exceed dosages determined by standardized antimicrobial testing. This mechanism has escaped prior detection because it is reversible and operates within a subset of host tissues and cells. Bacterial pathogens are thereby protected while their survival promotes the emergence of permanent drug resistance. This host-dependent mechanism of transient antibiotic resistance is applicable to multiple pathogens and has implications for the development of more effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:26501114

  20. The potential impact of antifungal drug resistance mechanisms on the host immune response to Candida

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Russell E.; Viale, Pierluigi; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    A large number of studies have been published over the last two decades examining molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance in Candida species. However, few of these studies have explored how such mechanisms influence the host immune response to this opportunistic pathogen. With recent advances in our understanding of host immunity to Candida, a body of emerging literature has begun to explore how intrinsic and adaptive resistance mechanisms in Candida alter host immune system evasion and detection, which could have important implications for understanding (1) why certain resistance mechanisms and Candida species predominate in certain patient populations, (2) the biological context for understanding why high in vitro levels of resistance in may not necessarily correlate with risk of drug failure in vivo and (3) insight into effective immunotherapeutic strategies for combatting Candida resistance. Although this area of research is still in its infancy, two themes are emerging: First, the immunoevasion and intracellular persistence of C. glabrata may be a key factor in the capability of this species to persist in the course of multiple antifungal treatments and develop multidrug resistance. Second, changes in the cell wall associated with antifungal resistance often favor evasion for the host immune response. PMID:22722245

  1. Effectors of biotrophic fungi and oomycetes: pathogenicity factors and triggers of host resistance.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Peter N; Rafiqi, Maryam; Gan, Pamela H P; Hardham, Adrienne R; Jones, David A; Ellis, Jeffrey G

    2009-01-01

    Many biotrophic fungal and oomycete pathogens share a common infection process involving the formation of haustoria, which penetrate host cell walls and form a close association with plant membranes. Recent studies have identified a class of pathogenicity effector proteins from these pathogens that is transferred into host cells from haustoria during infection. This insight stemmed from the identification of avirulence (Avr) proteins from these pathogens that are recognized by intracellular host resistance (R) proteins. Oomycete effectors contain a conserved translocation motif that directs their uptake into host cells independently of the pathogen, and is shared with the human malaria pathogen. Genome sequence information indicates that oomycetes may express several hundred such host-translocated effectors. Elucidating the transport mechanism of fungal and oomycete effectors and their roles in disease offers new opportunities to understand how these pathogens are able to manipulate host cells to establish a parasitic relationship and to develop new disease-control measures.

  2. Infection success of Echinoparyphium aconiatum (Trematoda) in its snail host under high temperature: role of host resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extreme weather events such as summer heat waves become more frequent owing to global climate change and are predicted to alter disease dynamics. This is because high temperatures can reduce host immune function. Predicting the impact of climate change on host-parasite interactions is, however, difficult as temperature may also affect parasite infective stages and other host characteristics determining the outcome of interaction. Methods Two experiments were conducted to investigate these phenomena in a Lymnaea stagnalis–Echinoparyphium aconiatum (Trematoda) interaction. In the first experiment, the effects of exposure of snails to experimental heat waves [maintenance at 25°C vs. 15°C (control)] with different durations (3 days, 7 days) on the infection success of parasite cercariae was examined. In the second experiment, the infection success was examined under similar conditions, while controlling for the possible temperature effects on cercariae and at least partly also for host physiological changes that take place rapidly compared to alterations in immune function (exposure to cercariae at intermediate 20°C). Results In the first experiment, increased infection success at 25°C was found independently of the duration of the heat wave. In the second experiment, increased infection success was found only in snails maintained at 25°C for 7 days, a treatment in which snail immune defence is known to be impaired. Conclusions These results suggest that the effects of host resistance in determining overall parasite infection success can be overridden by effects of temperature on parasite transmission stages and/or alterations in other host traits than immune defence. PMID:24754889

  3. Host Genes and Resistance/Sensitivity to Military Priority Pathogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Vargas , A. Velds, T. R. Brummelkamp, A. M. Dirac, T. K. Sixma, and R. Bernards. 2005. A genomic and functional inventory of deubiquitinating enzymes. Cell...JW, Kayagaki N, Broz P, Henry T, Newton K, O’Rourke K, Chan S, Dong J, Qu Y, Roose-Girma M, et al: Absent in melanoma 2 is required for innate immune...increased proinflammatory responses from host cells. Infect Immun 2010, 78(3):1022-1031. 62. Weiss DS, Henry T, Monack DM: Francisella tularensis

  4. Host genetic diversity enables Ebola hemorrhagic fever pathogenesis and resistance.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Angela L; Okumura, Atsushi; Ferris, Martin T; Green, Richard; Feldmann, Friederike; Kelly, Sara M; Scott, Dana P; Safronetz, David; Haddock, Elaine; LaCasse, Rachel; Thomas, Matthew J; Sova, Pavel; Carter, Victoria S; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Miller, Darla R; Shaw, Ginger D; Korth, Marcus J; Heise, Mark T; Baric, Ralph S; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2014-11-21

    Existing mouse models of lethal Ebola virus infection do not reproduce hallmark symptoms of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, neither delayed blood coagulation and disseminated intravascular coagulation nor death from shock, thus restricting pathogenesis studies to nonhuman primates. Here we show that mice from the Collaborative Cross panel of recombinant inbred mice exhibit distinct disease phenotypes after mouse-adapted Ebola virus infection. Phenotypes range from complete resistance to lethal disease to severe hemorrhagic fever characterized by prolonged coagulation times and 100% mortality. Inflammatory signaling was associated with vascular permeability and endothelial activation, and resistance to lethal infection arose by induction of lymphocyte differentiation and cellular adhesion, probably mediated by the susceptibility allele Tek. These data indicate that genetic background determines susceptibility to Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

  5. NUTRITION OF THE HOST AND NATURAL RESISTANCE TO INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Howard A.; Webster, Leslie T.

    1945-01-01

    1. A diet of whole wheat and whole dried milk has been shown to promote a higher survival rate, among W-Swiss mice subjected to S. enteritidis infection, than that promoted by a "synthetic" diet. 2. The demonstration of this ability of diet to condition natural resistance has been found to depend upon the genetic constitution of the mice employed. The demonstration has been possible in W-Swiss mice, a strain only moderately inbred and retaining a degree of genetic variability. The demonstration has not been possible in three highly inbred strains of mice selected so that they differed predictably from one another in natural resistance. 3. The nutritional factors involved are present in whole wheat and are absent or negligible in dried whole milk. Their nature has not yet been determined. PMID:19871463

  6. Host mating system and the spread of a disease-resistant allele in a population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Koslow, Jennifer M.; Jiang, J.; Ruan, S.

    2008-01-01

    The model presented here modifies a susceptible-infected (SI) host-pathogen model to determine the influence of mating system on the outcome of a host-pathogen interaction. Both deterministic and stochastic (individual-based) versions of the model were used. This model considers the potential consequences of varying mating systems on the rate of spread of both the pathogen and resistance alleles within the population. We assumed that a single allele for disease resistance was sufficient to confer complete resistance in an individual, and that both homozygote and heterozygote resistant individuals had the same mean birth and death rates. When disease invaded a population with only an initial small fraction of resistant genes, inbreeding (selfing) tended to increase the probability that the disease would soon be eliminated from a small population rather than become endemic, while outcrossing greatly increased the probability that the population would become extinct due to the disease.

  7. Iron Regulatory Proteins Mediate Host Resistance to Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Casarrubea, Daniela; Sonnweber, Thomas; Viatte, Lydie; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Fang, Ferric C; Hentze, Matthias W; Weiss, Guenter; Galy, Bruno

    2015-08-12

    Macrophages are essential for systemic iron recycling, and also control iron availability to pathogens. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells is orchestrated posttranscriptionally by iron-regulatory proteins (IRP)-1 and -2. Here, we generated mice with selective and combined ablation of both IRPs in macrophages to investigate the role of IRPs in controlling iron availability. These animals are hyperferritinemic but otherwise display normal clinical iron parameters. However, mutant mice rapidly succumb to systemic infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogenic bacterium that multiplies within macrophages, with increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen. Ex vivo infection experiments indicate that IRP function restricts bacterial access to iron via the EntC and Feo bacterial iron-acquisition systems. Further, IRPs contain Salmonella by promoting the induction of lipocalin 2, a host antimicrobial factor that inhibits bacterial uptake of iron-laden siderophores, and by suppressing the ferritin iron pool. This work reveals the importance of the IRPs in innate immunity.

  8. Antioxidant Secondary Metabolites in Cereals: Potential Involvement in Resistance to Fusarium and Mycotoxin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Barreau, Christian; Richard-Forget, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Gibberella and Fusarium Ear Rot and Fusarium Head Blight are major diseases affecting European cereals. These diseases are mainly caused by fungi of the Fusarium genus, primarily Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides. These Fusarium species pose a serious threat to food safety because of their ability to produce a wide range of mycotoxins, including type B trichothecenes and fumonisins. Many factors such as environmental, agronomic or genetic ones may contribute to high levels of accumulation of mycotoxins in the grain and there is an urgent need to implement efficient and sustainable management strategies to reduce mycotoxin contamination. Actually, fungicides are not fully efficient to control the mycotoxin risk. In addition, because of harmful effects on human health and environment, their use should be seriously restricted in the near future. To durably solve the problem of mycotoxin accumulation, the breeding of tolerant genotypes is one of the most promising strategies for cereals. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant resistance to both Fusarium and mycotoxin contamination will shed light on plant-pathogen interactions and provide relevant information for improving breeding programs. Resistance to Fusarium depends on the plant ability in preventing initial infection and containing the development of the toxigenic fungi while resistance to mycotoxin contamination is also related to the capacity of plant tissues in reducing mycotoxin accumulation. This capacity can result from two mechanisms: metabolic transformation of the toxin into less toxic compounds and inhibition of toxin biosynthesis. This last mechanism involves host metabolites able to interfere with mycotoxin biosynthesis. This review aims at gathering the latest scientific advances that support the contribution of grain antioxidant secondary metabolites to the mechanisms of plant resistance to Fusarium and mycotoxin accumulation. PMID:27148243

  9. Heterogeneous Mechanisms of Secondary Resistance and Clonal Selection in Sarcoma during Treatment with Nutlin.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Audrey; Tran-Cong, Kevin; Chaire, Vanessa; Lagarde, Pauline; Hostein, Isabelle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Chibon, Frederic; Neuville, Agnes; Lesluyes, Tom; Lucchesi, Carlo; Italiano, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Nutlin inhibits TP53-MDM2 interaction and is under investigation in soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) and other malignancies. Molecular mechanisms of secondary resistance to nutlin in STS are unknown. We performed whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) on three pretreatment and secondary resistant STS cell lines selected based on their high primary sensitivity to nutlin. Our data identified a subset of cancer gene mutations and ploidy variations that were positively selected following treatment, including TP53 mutations in 2 out of 3 resistant cell lines. Further, secondary resistance to nutlin was associated with deregulation of apoptosis-related genes and marked productive autophagy, the inhibition of which resulted in significant restoration of nutlin-induced cell death. Collectively, our findings argue that secondary resistance to nutlin in STS involved heterogeneous mechanisms resulting from clonal evolution and several biological pathways. Alternative dosing regimens and combination with other targeted agents are needed to achieve successful development of nutlin in the clinical setting.

  10. Genetic engineering alveolar macrophages for host resistance to PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Prather, Randall S; Whitworth, Kristin M; Schommer, Susan K; Wells, Kevin D

    2017-02-10

    Standard strategies for control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have not been effective, as vaccines have not reduced the prevalence of disease and many producers depopulate after an outbreak. Another method of control would be to prevent the virus from infecting the pig. The virus was thought to infect alveolar macrophages by interaction with a variety of cell surface molecules. One popular model had PRRSV first interacting with heparin sulfate followed by binding to sialoadhesin and then being internalized into an endosome. Within the endosome, PRRSV was thought to interact with CD163 to uncoat the virus so the viral genome could be released into the cytosol and infect the cell. Other candidate receptors have included vimentin, CD151 and CD209. By using genetic engineering, it is possible to test the importance of individual entry mediators by knocking them out. Pigs engineered by knockout of sialoadhesin were still susceptible to infection, while CD163 knockout resulted in pigs that were resistant to infection. Genetic engineering is not only a valuable tool to determine the role of specific proteins in infection by PRRSV (in this case), but also provides a means to create animals resistant to disease. Genetic engineering of alveolar macrophages can also illuminate the role of other proteins in response to infection. We suggest that strategies to prevent infection be pursued to reduce the reservoir of virus.

  11. Induced Bacterial Cross-Resistance toward Host Antimicrobial Peptides: A Worrying Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Fleitas, Osmel; Franco, Octávio L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, threatening to return to the pre-antibiotic era. Therefore, the search for new antimicrobial compounds that overcome the resistance phenomenon has become a priority. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as one of the most promising antibiotic medicines. However, in recent years several AMP-resistance mechanisms have been described. Moreover, the AMP-resistance phenomenon has become more complex due to its association with cross-resistance toward AMP effectors of the host innate immune system. In this context, the use of AMPs as a therapeutic option could be potentially hazardous, since bacteria could develop resistance toward our innate immune system. Here, we review the findings of major studies that deal with the AMP cross-resistance phenomenon. PMID:27047486

  12. Induced Bacterial Cross-Resistance toward Host Antimicrobial Peptides: A Worrying Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Fleitas, Osmel; Franco, Octávio L

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, threatening to return to the pre-antibiotic era. Therefore, the search for new antimicrobial compounds that overcome the resistance phenomenon has become a priority. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as one of the most promising antibiotic medicines. However, in recent years several AMP-resistance mechanisms have been described. Moreover, the AMP-resistance phenomenon has become more complex due to its association with cross-resistance toward AMP effectors of the host innate immune system. In this context, the use of AMPs as a therapeutic option could be potentially hazardous, since bacteria could develop resistance toward our innate immune system. Here, we review the findings of major studies that deal with the AMP cross-resistance phenomenon.

  13. Unravelling the networks dictating host resistance versus tolerance during pulmonary infections.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Isabelle; Kaufmann, Eva; Downey, Jeffrey; Divangahi, Maziar

    2017-03-01

    The appearance of single cell microorganisms on earth dates back to more than 3.5 billion years ago, ultimately leading to the development of multicellular organisms approximately 3 billion years later. The evolutionary burst of species diversity and the "struggle for existence", as proposed by Darwin, generated a complex host defense system. Host survival during infection in vital organs, such as the lung, requires a delicate balance between host defense, which is essential for the detection and elimination of pathogens and host tolerance, which is critical for minimizing collateral tissue damage. Whereas the cellular and molecular mechanisms of host defense against many invading pathogens have been extensively studied, our understanding of host tolerance as a key mechanism in maintaining host fitness is extremely limited. This may also explain why current therapeutic and preventive approaches targeting only host defense mechanisms have failed to provide full protection against severe infectious diseases, including pulmonary influenza virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. In this review, we aim to outline various host strategies of resistance and tolerance for effective protection against acute or chronic pulmonary infections.

  14. Within-host competition and drug resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Mary; Morton, Lindsay; Duah, Nancy; Quashie, Neils; Abuaku, Benjamin; Koram, Kwadwo A; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Plucinski, Mateusz; Gutman, Julie; Lyaruu, Peter; Kachur, S Patrick; de Roode, Jacobus C; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-03-16

    Infections with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum typically comprise multiple strains, especially in high-transmission areas where infectious mosquito bites occur frequently. However, little is known about the dynamics of mixed-strain infections, particularly whether strains sharing a host compete or grow independently. Competition between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains, if it occurs, could be a crucial determinant of the spread of resistance. We analysed 1341 P. falciparum infections in children from Angola, Ghana and Tanzania and found compelling evidence for competition in mixed-strain infections: overall parasite density did not increase with additional strains, and densities of individual chloroquine-sensitive (CQS) and chloroquine-resistant (CQR) strains were reduced in the presence of competitors. We also found that CQR strains exhibited low densities compared with CQS strains (in the absence of chloroquine), which may underlie observed declines of chloroquine resistance in many countries following retirement of chloroquine as a first-line therapy. Our observations support a key role for within-host competition in the evolution of drug-resistant malaria. Malaria control and resistance-management efforts in high-transmission regions may be significantly aided or hindered by the effects of competition in mixed-strain infections. Consideration of within-host dynamics may spur development of novel strategies to minimize resistance while maximizing the benefits of control measures.

  15. Strong host resistance targeted against a viral suppressor of the plant gene silencing defence mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H W; Lucy, A P; Guo, H S; Li, W X; Ji, L H; Wong, S M; Ding, S W

    1999-01-01

    The 2b protein encoded by cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (Cmv2b) acts as an important virulence determinant by suppressing post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a natural plant defence mechanism against viruses. We report here that the tomato aspermy cucumovirus 2b protein (Tav2b), when expressed from the unrelated tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (TMV) RNA genome, activates strong host resistance responses to TMV in tobacco which are typical of the gene-for-gene disease resistance mechanism. Domain swapping between Cmv2b, which does not elicit these responses, and Tav2b, revealed functional domains in Tav2b critical for triggering virus resistance and hypersensitive cell death. Furthermore, substitution of two amino acids from Tav2b by those found at the same positions in Cmv2b, Lys21-->Val and Arg28-->Ser, abolished the ability to induce hypersensitive cell death and virus resistance. However, in Nicotiana benthamiana, a species related to tobacco, Tav2b functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses PTGS. Thus, a viral suppressor of the host gene silencing defence mechanism is the target of another independent host resistance mechanism. Our results provide new insights into the complex molecular strategies employed by viruses and their hosts for defence, counter-defence and counter counter-defence. PMID:10329615

  16. Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis Jill K. Terra1, Bryan France1...of America Abstract Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by...Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis. PLoS Pathog 7(12): e1002469. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002469 Editor: Theresa M. Koehler, The

  17. Heritable variation in host tolerance and resistance inferred from a wild host–parasite system

    PubMed Central

    Mazé-Guilmo, Elise; Loot, Géraldine; Páez, David J.; Lefèvre, Thierry; Blanchet, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Hosts have evolved two distinct defence strategies against parasites: resistance (which prevents infection or limit parasite growth) and tolerance (which alleviates the fitness consequences of infection). However, heritable variation in resistance and tolerance and the genetic correlation between these two traits have rarely been characterized in wild host populations. Here, we estimate these parameters for both traits in Leuciscus burdigalensis, a freshwater fish parasitized by Tracheliastes polycolpus. We used a genetic database to construct a full-sib pedigree in a wild L. burdigalensis population. We then used univariate animal models to estimate inclusive heritability (i.e. all forms of genetic and non-genetic inheritance) in resistance and tolerance. Finally, we assessed the genetic correlation between these two traits using a bivariate animal model. We found significant heritability for resistance (H = 17.6%; 95% CI: 7.2–32.2%) and tolerance (H = 18.8%; 95% CI: 4.4–36.1%), whereas we found no evidence for the existence of a genetic correlation between these traits. Furthermore, we confirm that resistance and tolerance are strongly affected by environmental effects. Our results demonstrate that (i) heritable variation exists for parasite resistance and tolerance in wild host populations, and (ii) these traits can evolve independently in populations. PMID:24478295

  18. Chemotherapy, within-host ecology and the fitness of drug-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Huijben, Silvie; Nelson, William A; Wargo, Andrew R; Sim, Derek G; Drew, Damien R; Read, Andrew F

    2010-10-01

    A major determinant of the rate at which drug-resistant malaria parasites spread through a population is the ecology of resistant and sensitive parasites sharing the same host. Drug treatment can significantly alter this ecology by removing the drug-sensitive parasites, leading to competitive release of resistant parasites. Here, we test the hypothesis that the spread of resistance can be slowed by reducing drug treatment and hence restricting competitive release. Using the rodent malaria model Plasmodium chabaudi, we found that low-dose chemotherapy did reduce competitive release. A higher drug dose regimen exerted stronger positive selection on resistant parasites for no detectable clinical gain. We estimated instantaneous selection coefficients throughout the course of replicate infections to analyze the temporal pattern of the strength and direction of within-host selection. The strength of selection on resistance varied through the course of infections, even in untreated infections, but increased immediately following drug treatment, particularly in the high-dose groups. Resistance remained under positive selection for much longer than expected from the half life of the drug. Although there are many differences between mice and people, our data do raise the question whether the aggressive treatment regimens aimed at complete parasite clearance are the best resistance-management strategies for humans.

  19. Host life history and host–parasite syntopy predict behavioural resistance and tolerance of parasites

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Brittany F.; Snyder, Paul W.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is growing interest in the role that life-history traits of hosts, such as their ‘pace-of-life’, play in the evolution of resistance and tolerance to parasites.Theory suggests that, relative to host species that have high syntopy (local spatial and temporal overlap) with parasites, host species with low syntopy should have lower selection pressures for more constitutive (always present) and costly defences, such as tolerance, and greater reliance on more inducible and cheaper defences, such as behaviour. Consequently, we postulated that the degree of host–parasite syntopy, which is negatively correlated with host pace-of-life (an axis reflecting the developmental rate of tadpoles and the inverse of their size at metamorphosis) in our tadpole–parasitic cercarial (trematode) system, would be a negative and positive predictor of behavioural resistance and tolerance, respectively.To test these hypotheses, we exposed seven tadpole species to a range of parasite (cercarial) doses crossed with anaesthesia treatments that controlled for anti-parasite behaviour. We quantified host behaviour, successful and unsuccessful infections, and each species’ reaction norm for behavioural resistance and tolerance, defined as the slope between cercarial exposure (or attempted infections) and anti-cercarial behaviours and mass change, respectively. Hence, tolerance is capturing any cost of parasite exposure.As hypothesized, tadpole pace-of-life was a significant positive predictor of behavioural resistance and negative predictor of tolerance, a result that is consistent with a trade-off between behavioural resistance and tolerance across species that warrants further investigation. Moreover, these results were robust to considerations of phylogeny, all possible re-orderings of the three fastest or slowest paced species, and various measurements of tolerance.These results suggest that host pace-of-life and host–parasite syntopy are powerful drivers of both the

  20. Host plant resistance in melon (Cucumis melo L.) to sweetpotato whitefly in California and Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato whitefly (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) feeding severely impacts fall season melon yield and quality in the lower deserts of California and Arizona. Melon accessions PI 313970 and TGR 1551 (PI 482420) have been reported to exhibit host plant resistance (HPR) to SPWF. Pot...

  1. Evaluations of melon germplasm reported to exhibit host plant resistance to sweetpotato whitefly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato whitefly (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) displaced B. tabaci biotype A in 1991 in the lower desert area of southern California and the adjoining areas of Arizona and western Mexico. The search for high-level host plant resistance to this devastating insect has been ongoin...

  2. Engineering of a genome-reduced host: practical application of synthetic biology in the overproduction of desired secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Zhuo, Ying; Ashforth, Elizabeth; Zhang, Lixin

    2010-07-01

    Synthetic biology aims to design and build new biological systems with desirable properties, providing the foundation for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. The most prominent representation of synthetic biology has been used in microbial engineering by recombinant DNA technology. However, there are advantages of using a deleted host, and therefore an increasing number of biotechnology studies follow similar strategies to dissect cellular networks and construct genome-reduced microbes. This review will give an overview of the strategies used for constructing and engineering reduced-genome factories by synthetic biology to improve production of secondary metabolites.

  3. Bacterial Communities Differ among Drosophila melanogaster Populations and Affect Host Resistance against Parasitoids

    PubMed Central

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Falcao Salles, Joana

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, diet is considered a prominent factor shaping the associated bacterial community. However, the host population background (e.g. genotype, geographical origin and founder effects) is a factor that may also exert a significant influence and is often overlooked. To test for population background effects, we characterized the bacterial communities in larvae of six genetically differentiated and geographically distant D. melanogaster lines collected from natural populations across Europe. The diet for these six lines had been identical for ca. 50 generations, thus any differences in the composition of the microbiome originates from the host populations. We also investigated whether induced shifts in the microbiome—in this case by controlled antibiotic administration—alters the hosts’ resistance to parasitism. Our data revealed a clear signature of population background on the diversity and composition of D. melanogaster microbiome that differed across lines, even after hosts had been maintained at the same diet and laboratory conditions for over 4 years. In particular, the number of bacterial OTUs per line ranged from 8 to 39 OTUs. Each line harboured 2 to 28 unique OTUs, and OTUs that were highly abundant in some lines were entirely missing in others. Moreover, we found that the response to antibiotic treatment differed among the lines and significantly altered the host resistance to the parasitoid Asobara tabida in one of the six lines. Wolbachia, a widespread intracellular endosymbiont associated with parasitoid resistance, was lacking in this line, suggesting that other components of the Drosophila microbiome caused a change in host resistance. Collectively, our results revealed that lines that originate from different population backgrounds show significant differences in the established Drosophila microbiome, outpacing the long-term effect of diet. Perturbations on these naturally assembled microbiomes to some degree influenced the hosts

  4. Health trajectories reveal the dynamic contributions of host genetic resistance and tolerance to infection outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lough, Graham; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Bergmann, Silke; Lengeling, Andreas; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea B.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance and tolerance are two alternative strategies hosts can adopt to survive infections. Both strategies may be genetically controlled. To date, the relative contribution of resistance and tolerance to infection outcome is poorly understood. Here, we use a bioluminescent Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) infection challenge model to study the genetic determination and dynamic contributions of host resistance and tolerance to listeriosis in four genetically diverse mouse strains. Using conventional statistical analyses, we detect significant genetic variation in both resistance and tolerance, but cannot capture the time-dependent relative importance of either host strategy. We overcome these limitations through the development of novel statistical tools to analyse individual infection trajectories portraying simultaneous changes in infection severity and health. Based on these tools, early expression of resistance followed by expression of tolerance emerge as important hallmarks for surviving Lm infections. Our trajectory analysis further reveals that survivors and non-survivors follow distinct infection paths (which are also genetically determined) and provides new survival thresholds as objective endpoints in infection experiments. Future studies may use trajectories as novel traits for mapping and identifying genes that control infection dynamics and outcome. A Matlab script for user-friendly trajectory analysis is provided. PMID:26582028

  5. Use of a secondary host by non-outbreak populations of the gypsy moth. [Pinus rigida; Quercus spp; Lymantria dispar

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, M.

    1987-08-01

    Oaks are the favored host of gypsy moths in the northeastern US, although the herbivore expands its host range dramatically during an outbreak. Pitch pine, a secondary host because of its unacceptability for early development, was found to be frequently used for oviposition in oak-pitch pine forests with non-outbreak populations. This observation led to the study of ecological and behavioral factors that can contribute to the use of a secondary host under low-density conditions by an irruptive herbivore species. A series of manipulative field and laboratory experiments plus a study of natural history provided data on the pattern of pitch pine use during the life cycle of the gypsy moth, the effect of pitch pine on larval growth, and the differential impact of natural enemies depending on host use. It was found that: 1) egg masses occurred far more frequently on pitch pine than was expected based on the frequency of pitch pine in forests with low-density gypsy moth populations; 2) in the laboratory, early-instar larvae could not survive on pitch pine while late-instar larvae grew well; 3) in the field, larvae began to use pitch pine to feed and rest after the onset of the fourth instar. Compared to oak, 4) egg masses on pitch pine experienced less parasitism; 5) the microhabitat of pitch pine held less nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV), a major mortality agent of the gypsy moth; 6) individuals hatching from eggs laid on pitch pine were less infected with NPV; and 7) larvae dosed with a known amount of NPV survived longer when feeding on pitch pine foliage. The use of pitch pine by individuals in low-density gypsy moth populations appeared to be beneficial and may have an important effect on population dynamics. The mobility associated with host switching by late-instar larvae and with dispersal by first-instar larvae oviposited on unacceptable food may represent an important mechanism for host-range extension.

  6. Exploring the host transcriptome for mechanisms underlying protective immunity and resistance to nematode infections in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Choudhary, Ratan K; Capuco, Anthony V; Urban, Joseph F

    2012-11-23

    Nematode infections in ruminants are a major impediment to the profitable production of meat and dairy products, especially for small farms. Gastrointestinal parasitism not only negatively impacts weight gain and milk yield, but is also a major cause of mortality in small ruminants. The current parasite control strategy involves heavy use of anthelmintics that has resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant parasite strains. This, in addition to increasing consumer demand for animal products that are free of drug residues has stimulated development of alternative strategies, including selective breeding of parasite resistant ruminants. The development of protective immunity and manifestations of resistance to nematode infections relies upon the precise expression of the host genome that is often confounded by mechanisms simultaneously required to control multiple nematode species as well as ecto- and protozoan parasites, and microbial and viral pathogens. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes represents a key step toward development of effective new parasite control strategies. Recent progress in characterizing the transcriptome of both hosts and parasites, utilizing high-throughput microarrays and RNA-seq technology, has led to the recognition of unique interactions and the identification of genes and biological pathways involved in the response to parasitism. Innovative use of the knowledge gained by these technologies should provide a basis for enhancing innate immunity while limiting the polarization of acquired immunity can negatively affect optimal responses to co-infection. Strategies for parasite control that use diet and vaccine/adjuvant combination could be evaluated by monitoring the host transcriptome for induction of appropriate mechanisms for imparting parasite resistance. Knowledge of different mechanisms of host immunity and the critical regulation of parasite development, physiology, and virulence can also selectively

  7. A novel Capsicum gene inhibits host-specific disease resistance to Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gregory; Monroy-Barbosa, Ariadna; Bosland, Paul W

    2013-05-01

    A novel disease resistance inhibitor gene (inhibitor of P. capsici resistance [Ipcr]), found in the chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) variety 'New Mexico Capsicum Accession 10399' (NMCA10399), inhibits resistance to Phytophthora capsici but not to other species of Phytophthora. When a highly P. capsici-resistant variety was hybridized with NMCA10399, the resultant F1 populations, when screened, were completely susceptible to P. capsici for root rot and foliar blight disease syndromes, despite the dominance inheritance of P. capsici resistance in chile pepper. The F2 population displayed a 3:13 resistant-to-susceptible (R:S) ratio. The testcross population displayed a 1:1 R:S ratio, and a backcross population to NMCA10399 displayed complete susceptibility. These results demonstrate the presence of a single dominant inhibitor gene affecting P. capsici resistance in chile pepper. Moreover, when lines carrying the Ipcr gene were challenged against six Phytophthora spp., the nonhost resistance was not overcome. Therefore, the Ipcr gene is interfering with host-specific resistance but not the pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular pattern nonhost responses.

  8. Parasite diversity drives rapid host dynamics and evolution of resistance in a bacteria‐phage system

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Alex; Gifford, Danna R.; MacLean, R. Craig; King, Kayla C.

    2016-01-01

    Host–parasite evolutionary interactions are typically considered in a pairwise species framework. However, natural infections frequently involve multiple parasites. Altering parasite diversity alters ecological and evolutionary dynamics as parasites compete and hosts resist multiple infection. We investigated the effects of parasite diversity on host–parasite population dynamics and evolution using the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and five lytic bacteriophage parasites. To manipulate parasite diversity, bacterial populations were exposed for 24 hours to either phage monocultures or diverse communities containing up to five phages. Phage communities suppressed host populations more rapidly but also showed reduced phage density, likely due to interphage competition. The evolution of resistance allowed rapid bacterial recovery that was greater in magnitude with increases in phage diversity. We observed no difference in the extent of resistance with increased parasite diversity, but there was a profound impact on the specificity of resistance; specialized resistance evolved to monocultures through mutations in a diverse set of genes. In summary, we demonstrate that parasite diversity has rapid effects on host–parasite population dynamics and evolution by selecting for different resistance mutations and affecting the magnitude of bacterial suppression and recovery. Finally, we discuss the implications of phage diversity for their use as biological control agents. PMID:27005577

  9. Life-history trade-offs and the evolution of pathogen resistance: competition between host strains.

    PubMed

    Bowers, R G; Boots, M; Begon, M

    1994-09-22

    The dynamics of a 'resistant' and a 'susceptible' strain of a self-regulated host species, in the presence of a directly transmitted pathogen, is investigated. The two strains trade off differences in pathogen transmissibility (as an aspect of pathogen resistance) against differences in birth rate and/or resistance to crowding. Depending on parameter values, either strain may be eliminated, or the two may coexist (along with the pathogen). Coexistence (polymorphism), unsurprisingly, requires an appropriate balance between the different advantages possessed by the two strains. The probability of coexistence through such a balance, however, varies nonlinearly with the degree of difference between the strains: coexistence is least likely between two very similar strains. Resistance is most likely to evolve in hosts with the characteristics of many insect pests. Moreover, with highly pathogenic pathogens, a 'susceptible' strain may exclude a 'resistant' strain because its higher growth rate is more effective against the pathogen than reduced transmissibility. 'Resistance' can reside in parameters other than those directly associated with the pathogen. Although no cycles arise and no chaotic behaviour is found, an oscillatory approach to equilibrium is commonly observed, signalling the possibility of observable oscillations in strain frequency in the (more variable) real world.

  10. A Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance mechanism that subdues host defences and promotes virulence.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Mills, Grant; Sá-Pessoa, Joana; Dumigan, Amy; Frank, Christian G; Insua, José L; Ingram, Rebecca; Hobley, Laura; Bengoechea, José A

    2017-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of multidrug-resistant infections worldwide. Recent studies highlight the emergence of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae strains which show resistance to colistin, a last-line antibiotic, arising from mutational inactivation of the mgrB regulatory gene. However, the precise molecular resistance mechanisms of mgrB-associated colistin resistance and its impact on virulence remain unclear. Here, we constructed an mgrB gene K. pneumoniae mutant and performed characterisation of its lipid A structure, polymyxin and antimicrobial peptide resistance, virulence and inflammatory responses upon infection. Our data reveal that mgrB mutation induces PhoPQ-governed lipid A remodelling which confers not only resistance to polymyxins, but also enhances K. pneumoniae virulence by decreasing antimicrobial peptide susceptibility and attenuating early host defence response activation. Overall, our findings have important implications for patient management and antimicrobial stewardship, while also stressing antibiotic resistance development is not inexorably linked with subdued bacterial fitness and virulence.

  11. The cost of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis varies with the host plant of Trichoplusia ni

    PubMed Central

    Janmaat, Alida F; Myers, Judith H

    2005-01-01

    Selection for resistance to insecticides, diseases and parasitoids is assumed to be costly and often requires tradeoffs with reproductive fitness. The costs of resistance, however, are often difficult to measure. Cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, a generalist Lepidopteran herbivore, has become highly resistant following the extensive use of the microbial insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki (Bt) in vegetable greenhouses. We compared the growth rate, pupal size and survival of resistant, susceptible and hybrid T. ni larvae fed on tomato, bell pepper and cucumber. Performance was best on cucumber and worst on pepper, and the magnitude of fitness costs associated with Bt resistance increased with declining host plant suitability. This supports the hypothesis that in this system, resistance costs are condition dependent and are greatest in the most stressful environment. Management strategies that rely on the presence of fitness costs to reduce the frequency of resistance genes must consider this variation and should be more successful on crops that are less suitable food plants. In general, condition dependence should be considered in studies designed to measure the costs of resistance. PMID:16024361

  12. Tn5-mediated bleomycin resistance in Escherichia coli requires the expression of host genes.

    PubMed

    Blot, M; Heitman, J; Arber, W

    1993-06-01

    The transposon Tn5 expresses a gene, ble, whose product increases the viability of Escherichia coli and also confers resistance to the DNA-cleaving antibiotic bleomycin and the DNA-alkylating agent ethylmethanesulphonate. We find that the Ble protein induces expression of an alkylation inducible gene, aidC, and that both the AidC gene product and DNA polymerase I are required for Ble to confer bleomycin resistance. These findings support models in which Ble enhances DNA repair and suggest that Tn5 confers a fitness advantage to the host bacterium by increasing the repair of spontaneous DNA lesions. Such co-operation between a transposon and its host suggests that Tn5 is a symbiotic rather than a selfish DNA element.

  13. Making the best of a bad situation: host partial resistance and bypass of behavioral manipulation by parasites?

    PubMed

    Daoust, Simon P; King, Kayla C; Brodeur, Jacques; Roitberg, Bernard D; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    With few exceptions, parasitic manipulation dramatically reduces host fitness. That said, evidence of host resistance to behavior-manipulating parasites is scarce. Here, we suggest that the evolution of partial resistance, as well as bypass, to manipulation (PRM and BPM, respectively) represents new, seldom-explored options for parasitized hosts. Natural selection could favor hosts that partially resist certain manipulative dimensions to postpone their death and perform additional reproductive episodes (PRM). Alternatively, manipulated hosts may express novel traits that do not alter the manipulation per se but that alleviate its detrimental fitness consequences (BPM). If effective, PRM and BPM have many implications for the ecology and evolution of hosts and their parasites, especially the evolution of multidimensional manipulations.

  14. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Terra, Jill K; France, Bryan; Cote, Christopher K; Jenkins, Amy; Bozue, Joel A; Welkos, Susan L; Bhargava, Ragini; Ho, Chi-Lee; Mehrabian, Margarete; Pan, Calvin; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; LeVine, Steven M; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2011-12-01

    Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT), as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  15. Parasite evolution in response to sex-based host heterogeneity in resistance and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, S V; Alizon, S

    2014-12-01

    Heterogenity between sexes in terms of both the level and the type of immune response to infection is documented in many species, but its role on parasite evolution is only beginning to be explored. We adopt an evolutionary epidemiology approach to study how the ability of a host to respond to infection through active immunity (resistance) or through minimizing deleterious effects of a given parasite load (tolerance) affects the evolution of parasite virulence. Consistently with earlier models, we find that increases in host resistance and tolerance both favour more virulent parasite strains. However, we show that qualitatively different results can be obtained if dimorphism between the sexes occurs through resistance or through tolerance depending on the contact pattern between the sexes. Finally, we find that variations in host sex ratio can amplify the consequences of heterogeneity for parasite evolution. These results are analysed in the light of several examples from the literature to illustrate the prevalence of sexually dimorphic immune responses and the potential for further study of the role of sexual dimorphism on parasite evolution. Such studies are likely to be highly relevant for improving treatment of chronic infections and control of infectious diseases, and understanding the role of sex in immune function.

  16. A link between host plant adaptation and pesticide resistance in the polyphagous spider mite Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Dermauw, Wannes; Wybouw, Nicky; Rombauts, Stephane; Menten, Björn; Vontas, John; Grbic, Miodrag; Clark, Richard M; Feyereisen, René; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2013-01-08

    Plants produce a wide range of allelochemicals to defend against herbivore attack, and generalist herbivores have evolved mechanisms to avoid, sequester, or detoxify a broad spectrum of natural defense compounds. Successful arthropod pests have also developed resistance to diverse classes of pesticides and this adaptation is of critical importance to agriculture. To test whether mechanisms to overcome plant defenses predispose the development of pesticide resistance, we examined adaptation of the generalist two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, to host plant transfer and pesticides. T. urticae is an extreme polyphagous pest with more than 1,100 documented hosts and has an extraordinary ability to develop pesticide resistance. When mites from a pesticide-susceptible strain propagated on bean were adapted to a challenging host (tomato), transcriptional responses increased over time with ~7.5% of genes differentially expressed after five generations. Whereas many genes with altered expression belonged to known detoxification families (like P450 monooxygenases), new gene families not previously associated with detoxification in other herbivores showed a striking response, including ring-splitting dioxygenase genes acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Strikingly, transcriptional profiles of tomato-adapted mites resembled those of multipesticide-resistant strains, and adaptation to tomato decreased the susceptibility to unrelated pesticide classes. Our findings suggest key roles for both an expanded environmental response gene repertoire and transcriptional regulation in the life history of generalist herbivores. They also support a model whereby selection for the ability to mount a broad response to the diverse defense chemistry of plants predisposes the evolution of pesticide resistance in generalists.

  17. Reversing the resistance phenotype of the Biomphalaria glabrata snail host Schistosoma mansoni infection by temperature modulation.

    PubMed

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Knight, Matty

    2012-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata snails that display either resistant or susceptible phenotypes to the parasitic trematode, Schistosoma mansoni provide an invaluable resource towards elucidating the molecular basis of the snail-host/schistosome relationship. Previously, we showed that induction of stress genes either after heat-shock or parasite infection was a major feature distinguishing juvenile susceptible snails from their resistant counterparts. In order to examine this apparent association between heat stress and snail susceptibility, we investigated the effect of temperature modulation in the resistant snail stock, BS-90. Here, we show that, incubated for up to 4 hrs at 32°C prior to infection, these resistant snails became susceptible to infection, i.e. shedding cercariae at 5 weeks post exposure (PE) while unstressed resistant snails, as expected, remained resistant. This suggests that susceptibility to infection by this resistant snail phenotype is temperature-sensitive (ts). Additionally, resistant snails treated with the Hsp 90 specific inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA) after heat stress, were no longer susceptible to infection, retaining their resistant phenotype. Consistently, susceptible snail phenotypes treated with 100 mM GA before parasite exposure also remained uninfected. These results provide direct evidence for the induction of stress genes (heat shock proteins; Hsp 70, Hsp 90 and the reverse transcriptase [RT] domain of the nimbus non-LTR retrotransposon) in B. glabrata susceptibility to S. mansoni infection and characterize the resistant BS-90 snails as a temperature-sensitive phenotype. This study of reversing snail susceptibility phenotypes to S. mansoni provides an opportunity to directly track molecular pathway(s) that underlie the B. glabrata snail's ability to either sustain or destroy the S. mansoni parasite.

  18. New tricks for old dogs: countering antibiotic resistance in tuberculosis with host-directed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hawn, Thomas R; Shah, Javeed A; Kalman, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Despite the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) drugs for over 50 years, tuberculosis (TB) remains at pandemic levels. New drugs are urgently needed for resistant strains, shortening duration of treatment, and targeting different stages of the disease, especially for treatment during human immunodeficiency virus co-infection. One solution to the conundrum that antibiotics kill the bacillus yet select for resistance is to target the host rather than the pathogen. Here, we discuss recent progress in so-called 'host-directed therapeutics' (HDTs), focusing on two general mechanistic strategies: (i) HDTs that disrupt Mtb pathogenesis in macrophages and (ii) immunomodulatory HDTs that facilitate protective immune responses that kill Mtb or reduce deleterious responses that exacerbate disease. HDTs hold significant promise as adjunctive therapies in that they are less likely to engender resistance, will likely have efficacy against antibiotic-resistant strains, and may have activity against non-replicating Mtb. However, TB is a complex and variegated disease, and human populations exhibit significant diversity in their immune responses to it, which presents a complicated landscape for HDTs to navigate. Nevertheless, we suggest that a detailed mechanistic understanding of drug action, together with careful selection of disease stage targets and dosing strategies may overcome such limitations and allow the development of HDTs as effective adjunctive treatment options for TB.

  19. Extracellular matrix-associated proteome changes during non-host resistance in citrus-Xanthomonas interactions.

    PubMed

    Swaroopa Rani, Tirupaati; Podile, Appa Rao

    2014-04-01

    Non-host resistance (NHR) is a most durable broad-spectrum resistance employed by the plants to restrict majority of pathogens. Plant extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical defense barrier. Understanding ECM responses during interaction with non-host pathogen will provide insights into molecular events of NHR. In this study, the ECM-associated proteome was compared during interaction of citrus with pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) and non-host pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) at 8, 16, 24 and 48 h post inoculation. Comprehensive analysis of ECM-associated proteins was performed by extracting wall-bound and soluble ECM components using both destructive and non-destructive procedures. A total of 53 proteins was differentially expressed in citrus-Xanthomonas host and non-host interaction, out of which 44 were identified by mass spectrometry. The differentially expressed proteins were related to (1) defense-response (5 pathogenesis-related proteins, 3 miraculin-like proteins (MIR, MIR1 and MIR2) and 2 proteases); (2) enzymes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism [Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), Fe-SOD, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cysteine-peroxiredoxin]; (3) signaling (lectin, curculin-like lectin and concanavalin A-like lectin kinase); and (4) cell-wall modification (α-xylosidase, glucan 1, 3 β-glucosidase, xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase). The decrease in ascorbate peroxidase and cysteine-peroxiredoxin could be involved in maintenance of ROS levels. Increase in defense, cell-wall remodeling and signaling proteins in citrus-Xoo interaction suggests an active involvement of ECM in execution of NHR. Partially compromised NHR in citrus against Xoo, upon Brefeldin A pre-treatment supported the role of non-classical secretory proteins in this phenomenon.

  20. Heterogeneous Mechanisms of Secondary Resistance and Clonal Selection in Sarcoma during Treatment with Nutlin

    PubMed Central

    Laroche, Audrey; Tran-Cong, Kevin; Chaire, Vanessa; Lagarde, Pauline; Hostein, Isabelle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Chibon, Frederic; Neuville, Agnes; Lesluyes, Tom; Lucchesi, Carlo; Italiano, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Nutlin inhibits TP53-MDM2 interaction and is under investigation in soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) and other malignancies. Molecular mechanisms of secondary resistance to nutlin in STS are unknown. We performed whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) on three pretreatment and secondary resistant STS cell lines selected based on their high primary sensitivity to nutlin. Our data identified a subset of cancer gene mutations and ploidy variations that were positively selected following treatment, including TP53 mutations in 2 out of 3 resistant cell lines. Further, secondary resistance to nutlin was associated with deregulation of apoptosis-related genes and marked productive autophagy, the inhibition of which resulted in significant restoration of nutlin-induced cell death. Collectively, our findings argue that secondary resistance to nutlin in STS involved heterogeneous mechanisms resulting from clonal evolution and several biological pathways. Alternative dosing regimens and combination with other targeted agents are needed to achieve successful development of nutlin in the clinical setting. PMID:26427052

  1. Resistance of Candida albicans Biofilms to Drugs and the Host Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Sandai, Doblin; Tabana, Yasser M; Ouweini, Ahmad El; Ayodeji, Ishola Oluwaseun

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a commensal fungus that resides on mucosal surfaces and in the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts in humans. However, it can cause an infection when the immune system of the host is impaired or if a niche becomes available. Many C. albicans infections are due to the organism’s ability to form a biofilm on implanted medical devices. A biofilm represents an optimal medium for the growth of C. albicans as it allows cells to be enclosed by a self-produced extracellular matrix (ECM). Objectives The present work investigated certain aspects of the resistance of C. albicans biofilms to drugs and the host immune system. Results An ECM was found to provide the infrastructure for biofilm formation, prevent disaggregation, and shield encapsulated C. albicans cells from antifungal drugs and the host’s immune system. By influencing FKS1 and upregulating multiple glucan modification genes, β-1, 3-glucan, an important component of ECM, was shown to be responsible for many of the biofilm’s drug-resistant properties. On being engulfed by ECM, the fungal cell was found to switch from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis. Resembling the cellular response to starvation, this was followed by the activation of the glyoxylate cycle that allowed the use of simple molecules as energy sources. Conclusion Mature biofilms were found to be much more resistant to antifungal agents and the host immune system than free cells. The factors responsible for high resistance included the complex architecture of biofilms, ECM, increased expression of drug efflux pumps, and metabolic plasticity. PMID:28138373

  2. Host plant resistance among tomato accessions to the spider mite Tetranychus evansi in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Onyambus, G K; Maranga, R O; Gitonga, L M; Knapp, M

    2011-08-01

    The spider mite Tetranychus evansi has a broad range of host plants. Control of T. evansi has been a big challenge to tomato farmers due to its fast rate of reproduction, development of resistance to chemical pesticides and its ability to use weeds as alternative hosts when the tomato plants are not available. The aim of the current study was to determine the host plant acceptance and the relative contributions of trichomes in the control of the red spider mite by comparing the survival, development and oviposition rates of the red spider mite on eight tomato accessions. Leaflets from eight tomato varieties were assayed with the spider mites to determine the egg laying capacity and developmental time of the spider mites on the tomato accessions as well as the trichome densities. Densities of trichome types I, IV, V and VI varied among the tomato accessions. Variation in types I, IV and VI accounted for most of the variation in mite responses. The varieties with high densities of types IV and VI had the highest fecundity and mite development did not go beyond the larval stage. The developmental time varied significantly among the tomato accessions. The results indicated that the higher the density of trichome type I the lower the adult survival. The findings indicated possible resistance of some of the tested tomato accessions against T. evansi which is partially associated with trichomes types and density.

  3. Dominant mechanisms of primary resistance differ from dominant mechanisms of secondary resistance to targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Asić, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of targeted therapies is currently limited, as almost all patients eventually acquire resistance within year/year and a half from therapy initiation and a small subset of a patients fail to respond at all, demonstrating intrinsic resistance. The aim of this review was to determine the potential common features and differences between the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to targeted therapies by analyzing established resistance-generating alterations for ten FDA-approved targeted drugs. The frequency of alterations underlying intrinsic and acquired resistance shows distinctive pattern, where dominant mechanisms of intrinsic resistance include aberrations of signals downstream or upstream of the targeted protein and dominant mechanisms of acquired resistance refer to lesions in the target itself or alterations of signals at target-level that can mimic or compensate for target function. It appears that during the evolution of acquired resistance, the tumor cell is inclined to preserve the same oncogene addiction on a targeted protein it had prior to drug administration. On the other hand, intrinsic resistance develops early in tumorogenesis and is based on randomly selected mutated signals between targeted and non-targeted signaling pathways, leading to the acquisition of cancer hallmarks. In general, there is an overlap between the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance, but the occurrence frequency and distribution of alterations underlying intrinsic and acquired resistance to targeted therapies are significantly different. Focus should be placed on different group of genes in pursuing predictive markers for intrinsic and acquired resistance to targeted therapies.

  4. Accomplishments of a 10-year initiative to develop host plant resistance to root-knot and reniform nematodes in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2003 Cotton Incorporated initiated a Beltwide research program to develop host plant resistance against root-knot (Meloidogyne incognita) and reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis) nematodes. Objectives formulated at a coordinating meeting in 2003 that included participants from public institutions...

  5. Genetic variation and host-parasite specificity of Striga resistance and tolerance in rice: the need for predictive breeding.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Jonne; Cissoko, Mamadou; Kayongo, Nicholas; Dieng, Ibnou; Bisikwa, Jenipher; Irakiza, Runyambo; Masoka, Isaac; Midega, Charles A O; Scholes, Julie D

    2017-02-13

    The parasitic weeds Striga asiatica and Striga hermonthica cause devastating yield losses to upland rice in Africa. Little is known about genetic variation in host resistance and tolerance across rice genotypes, in relation to virulence differences across Striga species and ecotypes. Diverse rice genotypes were phenotyped for the above traits in S. asiatica- (Tanzania) and S. hermonthica-infested fields (Kenya and Uganda) and under controlled conditions. New rice genotypes with either ecotype-specific or broad-spectrum resistance were identified. Resistance identified in the field was confirmed under controlled conditions, providing evidence that resistance was largely genetically determined. Striga-resistant genotypes contributed to yield security under Striga-infested conditions, although grain yield was also determined by the genotype-specific yield potential and tolerance. Tolerance, the physiological mechanism mitigating Striga effects on host growth and physiology, was unrelated to resistance, implying that any combination of high, medium or low levels of these traits can be found across rice genotypes. Striga virulence varies across species and ecotypes. The extent of Striga-induced host damage results from the interaction between parasite virulence and genetically determined levels of host-plant resistance and tolerance. These novel findings support the need for predictive breeding strategies based on knowledge of host resistance and parasite virulence.

  6. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response

    PubMed Central

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  7. Acquired immunity and stochasticity in epidemic intervals impede the evolution of host disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Harding, Karin C; Hansen, B Johan L; Goodman, Simon J

    2005-12-01

    Disease can generate intense selection pressure on host populations, but here we show that acquired immunity in a population subject to repeated disease outbreaks can impede the evolution of genetic disease resistance by maintaining susceptible genotypes in the population. Interference between the life-history schedule of a species and periodicity of the disease has unintuitive effects on selection intensity, and stochasticity in outbreak period further reduces the rate of spread of disease-resistance alleles. A general age-structured population genetic model was developed and parameterized using empirical data for phocine distemper virus (PDV) epizootics in harbor seals. Scenarios with acquired immunity had lower levels of epizootic mortality compared with scenarios without acquired immunity for the first PDV outbreaks, but this pattern was reversed after about five disease cycles. Without acquired immunity, evolution of disease resistance was more rapid, and long-term population size variation is efficiently dampened. Acquired immunity has the potential to significantly influence rapid evolutionary dynamics of a host population in response to age-structured disease selection and to alter predicted selection intensities compared with epidemiological models that do not consider such feedback. This may have important implications for evolutionary population dynamics in a range of human, agricultural, and wildlife disease settings.

  8. Resistance and host-response of selected plants to Meloidogyne megadora.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, A M S F; de A Santos, M S N

    2002-06-01

    Fourteen plant species, including 30 genotypes, were assessed for host suitability to Meloidogyne megadora in a growth room at 20 to 28 degrees C. Host suitability was based on the gall index (GI) and the reproduction factor (Rf):final population density (Pf)/initial population density (Pi). The presence of distinct galling was observed on roots of six plant species, and reproduction occurred on five of the 14 species tested. Three cultivars of cantaloupe (cvs. Branco do Ribatejo, Concerto, and Galia), three of cucumber (cvs. LM 809, Half Long Palmetto, and Market More), six of banana (cvs. Maçá, Ouro Branco, Ouro Roxo, Prata, Páo, and Valery), and one of broad bean (cv. Algarve) were considered susceptible (Pf/Pi > 1). Resistant cultivars (Pf/Pi = 0) included beet (cv, Crosby), pepper (cv. LM 204), watermelon (cvs. Black Magic and Crimson Sweet), tomato (cvs. Moneymaker and Rossol), radish (cv. Cherry Belle), and corn (cv. Dunia); sunn hemp and black velvetbean genotypes were also resistant. All Brassica cultivars were galled, although no egg masses were observed (Pf/Pi = 0), and classified as resistant/hypersensitive.

  9. Current status of the availability, development, and use of host plant resistance to nematodes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, P A

    1992-06-01

    Host plant resistance (HPR) to nematodes has been identified in many major crops and related wild germplasm. Most HPR is to the more specialized, sedentary endoparasitic genera and species, e.g., Globodera, Heterodera, Meloidogyne, Nacobbus, Rotylenchulus, and Tylenchulus. Some HPR has been developed or identified also to certain migratory endoparasites (Aphelenchoides, Ditylenchus, Pratylenchus, Radopholus) in a few hosts. Commercial use of HPR remains limited, despite its benefits to crop production when deployed appropriately. Restricted use and availability of HPR result from problems associated with transfer of resistance into acceptable cultivars. Difficulties occur in gene transfer to acceptable cultivars because of incompatibility barriers to hybridization or linkage to undesirable traits, for example in cucurbitaceous and solanaceous crops and sugarbeet. Specificity of HPR to only one species, or one or few pathotypes, as it relates to resistance durability and nematode virulence, and HPR response to abiotic factors such as high soil temperature, also limit availability and utility. A scheme for HPR development is presented to emphasize nematology research and information requirements for expanding HPR use in nematode control programs, for example in common bean, sugarbeet, and tomato. Nonbiological factors that influence HPR usage are discussed, including heavy reliance on nematicide programs, low priority of nematode HPR in many breeding programs, and insufficient breeder-nematologist collaboration.

  10. Host cell reactivation studies with epidermal cells of mice sensitive and resistant to carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.E.; Strickland, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Primary epidermal cells from AKR, BALB/c, CD-1, and SENCAR mice, listed in order of least to most sensitive to epidermal carcinogenesis by initiation and promotion protocols, were found to be equally competent to ''reactivate'' herpes simplex virus type 1 irradiated by germicidal ultraviolet radiation. Nontumorigenic BALB/c epidermal cell lines selected in vitro for resistance to terminal differentiation after in vivo or in vitro treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens showed virus survival curves similar to those of primary cells. Similarly, primary cultures which were allowed to grow to confluency following a single treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (100 ng/ml) retained normal host cell reactivation. Host cell reactivation studies with mouse dermal fibroblasts could not be done because of the failure of the herpes simplex virus to infect these cells and produce plaques. These results demonstrate that survival of ultraviolet light-damaged virus in primary epidermal cells in culture is unrelated to whether the cells are derived from mice sensitive or resistant to epidermal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, virus survival is not changed by tumor promoter treatment or by treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens which results in differentiation-resistant cells.

  11. The 12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: host plant resistance and disease management, current status and future outlook

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium was held on 6 August 2012 during the Annual meeting of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) in Providence, RI. The theme for this symposium was “Host Plant Resistance and Disease Management: Current Status and Future Outlook”. The APS Host R...

  12. Overcoming Resistance to Achievement-based Unit Grading in Secondary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Randall

    2008-01-01

    Achievement-based unit grading in secondary physical education is not commonly practiced due to resistance to grading students based on learning, performance, or achievement. Traditional grading practices based on managerial factors, such as attendance and good behavior, and on "pseudo-accountability" do little to make students accountable for…

  13. The Secondary School Pipeline: Longitudinal Indicators of Resilience and Resistance in Urban Schools Under Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samel, Arthur N.; Sondergeld, Toni A.; Fischer, John M.; Patterson, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    Students in the secondary education pipeline, the 6-year period between 7th and 12th grades, deal with external and internal conditions that facilitate or hinder progress to graduation and beyond--these conditions offer resilience or resistance and influence student movement through public schools. This study follows an urban middle school cohort…

  14. A Piece of Resistance: Exploring Behaviour Assessment and Political Subjectification in a Swedish Upper Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, students at a Swedish Upper Secondary School engaged in a series of protests and demonstrations against the implementation of a written assessment of student conduct. This article explores the motivations and manifestations of this resistance, mainly by analysing debate articles and web material from the student union that organized the…

  15. Host Double Strand Break Repair Generates HIV-1 Strains Resistant to CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Kristine E; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2016-07-12

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been proposed as a therapeutic treatment for HIV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 induced double strand breaks (DSBs) targeted to the integrated viral genome have been shown to decrease production of progeny virus. Unfortunately HIV-1 evolves rapidly and may readily produce CRISPR/Cas9 resistant strains. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize HIV-1 strains that developed resistance to six different CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNAs (gRNAs). Reverse transcriptase (RT) derived base substitution mutations were commonly found at sites encoding unpaired bases of RNA stem-loop structures. In addition to RT mutations, insertion and/or deletion (indel) mutations were common. Indels localized to the CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage site were major contributors to CRISPR gRNA resistance. While most indels at non-coding regions were a single base pair, 3 base pair indels were observed when a coding region of HIV-1 was targeted. The DSB repair event may preserve the HIV-1 reading frame, while destroying CRISPR gRNA homology. HIV-1 may be successfully edited by CRISPR/Cas9, but the virus remains competent for replication and resistant to further CRISPR/Cas9 targeting at that site. These observations strongly suggest that host DSB repair at CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage sites is a novel and important pathway that may contribute to HIV-1 therapeutic resistance.

  16. Host Double Strand Break Repair Generates HIV-1 Strains Resistant to CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been proposed as a therapeutic treatment for HIV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 induced double strand breaks (DSBs) targeted to the integrated viral genome have been shown to decrease production of progeny virus. Unfortunately HIV-1 evolves rapidly and may readily produce CRISPR/Cas9 resistant strains. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize HIV-1 strains that developed resistance to six different CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNAs (gRNAs). Reverse transcriptase (RT) derived base substitution mutations were commonly found at sites encoding unpaired bases of RNA stem-loop structures. In addition to RT mutations, insertion and/or deletion (indel) mutations were common. Indels localized to the CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage site were major contributors to CRISPR gRNA resistance. While most indels at non-coding regions were a single base pair, 3 base pair indels were observed when a coding region of HIV-1 was targeted. The DSB repair event may preserve the HIV-1 reading frame, while destroying CRISPR gRNA homology. HIV-1 may be successfully edited by CRISPR/Cas9, but the virus remains competent for replication and resistant to further CRISPR/Cas9 targeting at that site. These observations strongly suggest that host DSB repair at CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage sites is a novel and important pathway that may contribute to HIV-1 therapeutic resistance. PMID:27404981

  17. Host-Mediated Bioactivation of Pyrazinamide: Implications for Efficacy, Resistance, and Therapeutic Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Via, Laura E.; Savic, Rada; Weiner, Danielle M.; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Prideaux, Brendan; Irwin, Scott M.; Lyon, Eddie; O’Brien, Paul; Gopal, Pooja; Eum, Seokyong; Lee, Myungsun; Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Dutta, Noton K.; Shim, TaeSun; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Wooshik; Karakousis, Petros C.; Lenaerts, Anne; Nuermberger, Eric; Barry, Clifton E.; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide has played a critical role in shortening therapy against drug-sensitive, drug-resistant, active, and latent tuberculosis (TB). Despite widespread recognition of its therapeutic importance, the sterilizing properties of this 60-year-old drug remain an enigma given its rather poor activity in vitro. Here we revisit longstanding paradigms and offer pharmacokinetic explanations for the apparent disconnect between in vitro activity and clinical impact. We show substantial host-mediated conversion of prodrug pyrazinamide (PZA) to the active form, pyrazinoic acid (POA), in TB patients and in animal models. We demonstrate favorable penetration of this pool of circulating POA from plasma into lung tissue and granulomas, where the pathogen resides. In standardized growth inhibition experiments, we show that POA exhibits superior in vitro potency compared to PZA, indicating that the vascular supply of host-derived POA may contribute to the in vivo efficacy of PZA, thereby reducing the apparent discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo activity. However, the results also raise the possibility that subinhibitory concentrations of POA generated by the host could fuel the emergence of resistance to both PZA and POA. In contrast to widespread expectations, we demonstrate good oral bioavailability and exposure in preclinical species in pharmacokinetic studies of oral POA. Baseline exposure of oral POA can be further increased by the xanthine oxidase inhibitor and approved gout drug allopurinol. These promising results pave the way for clinical investigations of oral POA as a therapeutic alternative or an add-on to overcome PZA resistance and salvage this essential TB drug. PMID:26086040

  18. Warriors at the gate that never sleep: non-host resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Uma, Battepati; Rani, T Swaroopa; Podile, Appa Rao

    2011-12-15

    The native resistance of most plant species against a wide variety of pathogens is known as non-host resistance (NHR), which confers durable protection to plant species. Only a few pathogens or parasites can successfully cause diseases. NHR is polygenic and appears to be linked with basal plant resistance, a form of elicited protection. Sensing of pathogens by plants is brought about through the recognition of invariant pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that trigger downstream defense signaling pathways. Race-specific resistance, (R)-gene mediated resistance, has been extensively studied and reviewed, while our knowledge of NHR has advanced only recently due to the improved access to excellent model systems. The continuum of the cell wall (CW) and the CW-plasma membrane (PM)-cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in perceiving external cues and activating defense signaling cascades during NHR. Based on the type of hypersensitive reaction (HR) triggered, NHR was classified into two types, namely type-I and type-II. Genetic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants has revealed important roles for a number of specific molecules in NHR, including the role of SNARE-complex mediated exocytosis, lipid rafts and vesicle trafficking. As might be expected, R-gene mediated resistance is found to overlap with NHR, but the extent to which the genes/pathways are common between these two forms of disease resistance is unknown. The present review focuses on the various components involved in the known mechanisms of NHR in plants with special reference to the role of CW-PM components.

  19. Host response. Inflammation-induced disruption of SCS macrophages impairs B cell responses to secondary infection.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Mauro; Castello, Angelo; Montaner, Beatriz; Rogers, Neil; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Batista, Facundo D

    2015-02-06

    The layer of macrophages at the subcapsular sinus (SCS) captures pathogens entering the lymph node, preventing their global dissemination and triggering an immune response. However, how infection affects SCS macrophages remains largely unexplored. Here we show that infection and inflammation disrupt the organization of SCS macrophages in a manner that involves the migration of mature dendritic cells to the lymph node. This disrupted organization reduces the capacity of SCS macrophages to retain and present antigen in a subsequent secondary infection, resulting in diminished B cell responses. Thus, the SCS macrophage layer may act as a sensor or valve during infection to temporarily shut down the lymph node to further antigenic challenge. This shutdown may increase an organism's susceptibility to secondary infections.

  20. Nitrogen fertilization of the host plant influences production and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea secondary inoculum.

    PubMed

    Abro, Manzoor Ali; Lecompte, François; Bryone, Florian; Nicot, Philippe C

    2013-03-01

    The influence of nitrogen (N) nutrition on a plant's susceptibility to Botrytis spp. and other pathogens is well documented. However, little is known of possible effects on sporulation of the pathogen on diseased tissue and on the pathogenicity of resulting secondary inoculum. To address this question, sporulation by two strains of Botrytis cinerea was quantified on tomato plants produced under different N irrigation regimes with inputs of NO(3)- at 0.5 to 45 mmol liter(-1) (mM). Sporulation decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing N fertilization up to NO(3)- at 15 to 30 mM. The secondary inoculum was collected and used to inoculate pruning wounds on tomato plants produced under a standard fertilization regime. Pathogenicity of the spores was significantly influenced by the nutritional status of their production substrate. Disease severity was highest with spores produced on plants with very low or very high N fertilization (NO(3)- at 0.5 or 30 mM). It was lowest for inoculum from plants with moderate levels of N fertilization. These results suggest that it may be possible to find an optimum level of N fertilization to reduce the production of secondary inoculum and its pathogenicity to tomato.

  1. Temporal and anatomical host resistance to chronic Salmonella infection is quantitatively dictated by Nramp1 and influenced by host genetic background.

    PubMed

    Loomis, Wendy P; Johnson, Matthew L; Brasfield, Alicia; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Yi, Jaehun; Miller, Samuel I; Cookson, Brad T; Hajjar, Adeline M

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal membrane transporter, Nramp1, plays a key role in innate immunity and resistance to infection with intracellular pathogens such as non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS). NTS-susceptible C57BL/6 (B6) mice, which express the mutant Nramp1D169 allele, are unable to control acute infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium following intraperitoneal or oral inoculation. Introducing functional Nramp1G169 into the B6 host background, either by constructing a congenic strain carrying Nramp1G169 from resistant A/J mice (Nramp-Cg) or overexpressing Nramp1G169 from a transgene (Nramp-Tg), conferred equivalent protection against acute Salmonella infection. In contrast, the contributions of Nramp1 for controlling chronic infection are more complex, involving temporal and anatomical differences in Nramp1-dependent host responses. Nramp-Cg, Nramp-Tg and NTS-resistant 129×1/SvJ mice survived oral Salmonella infection equally well for the first 2-3 weeks, providing evidence that Nramp1 contributes to the initial control of NTS bacteremia preceding establishment of chronic Salmonella infection. By day 30, increased host Nramp1 expression (Tg>Cg) provided greater protection as indicated by decreased splenic bacterial colonization (Tghost resistance is conferred by Nramp1 expression in NTS-susceptible mice, 2) restriction of systemic bacterial growth in the spleens of NTS-susceptible mice is enhanced by Nramp1 expression and dose-dependent, and 3) host genes other than Nramp1 also contribute to the ability of NTS-resistant 129×1/SvJ mice to control bacterial replication during chronic infection.

  2. Inoculation of Transgenic Resistant Potato by Phytophthora infestans Affects Host Plant Choice of a Generalist Moth.

    PubMed

    Abreha, Kibrom B; Alexandersson, Erik; Vossen, Jack H; Anderson, Peter; Andreasson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen attack and the plant's response to this attack affect herbivore oviposition preference and larval performance. Introduction of major resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans (Rpi-genes), the cause of the devastating late blight disease, from wild Solanum species into potato changes the plant-pathogen interaction dynamics completely, but little is known about the effects on non-target organisms. Thus, we examined the effect of P. infestans itself and introduction of an Rpi-gene into the crop on host plant preference of the generalist insect herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). In two choice bioassays, S. littoralis preferred to oviposit on P. infestans-inoculated plants of both the susceptible potato (cv. Desiree) and an isogenic resistant clone (A01-22: cv. Desiree transformed with Rpi-blb1), when compared to uninoculated plants of the same genotype. Both cv. Desiree and clone A01-22 were equally preferred for oviposition by S. littoralis when uninoculated plants were used, while cv. Desiree received more eggs compared to the resistant clone when both were inoculated with the pathogen. No significant difference in larval and pupal weight was found between S. littoralis larvae reared on leaves of the susceptible potato plants inoculated or uninoculated with P. infestans. Thus, the herbivore's host plant preference in this system was not directly associated with larval performance. The results indicate that the Rpi-blb1 based resistance in itself does not influence insect behavior, but that herbivore oviposition preference is affected by a change in the plant-microbe interaction.

  3. Ruling Out Possible Secondary Stars to Exoplanet Host Stars Using the CHARA Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-17

    north. – 19 – Table 4. Exoplanet Host Star and Planet Observed Parameters Observed Stellar Parameters Planetary System Parameters Spectral θLD σLD K π...Because it is more likely that the companion is a planetary -mass object in a moderate- to high-inclination orbit than a low-mass stellar object in a...likely that the companion is a planetary -mass object in a moderate- to high-inclination orbit than a low-mass stellar object in a nearly face-on orbit

  4. Splice variants and regulatory networks associated with host resistance to the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of host resistance, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of Angus cattle selected for parasite resistance for over 20 years in response to infection caused by the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora. The transcript abundance of 56 genes, such as that of muc...

  5. Exposure to Corticosterone Affects Host Resistance, but Not Tolerance, to an Emerging Fungal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Murone, Julie; DeMarchi, Joseph A.; Venesky, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses to pathogens include defenses that reduce infection burden (i.e., resistance) and traits that reduce the fitness consequences of an infection (i.e., tolerance). Resistance and tolerance are affected by an organism's physiological status. Corticosterone (“CORT”) is a hormone that is associated with the regulation of many physiological processes, including metabolism and reproduction. Because of its role in the stress response, CORT is also considered the primary vertebrate stress hormone. When secreted at high levels, CORT is generally thought to be immunosuppressive. Despite the known association between stress and disease resistance in domesticated organisms, it is unclear whether these associations are ecologically and evolutionary relevant in wildlife species. We conducted a 3x3 fully crossed experiment in which we exposed American toads (Anaxyrus [Bufo] americanus) to one of three levels of exogenous CORT (no CORT, low CORT, or high CORT) and then to either low or high doses of the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (“Bd”) or a sham exposure treatment. We assessed Bd infection levels and tested how CORT and Bd affected toad resistance, tolerance, and mortality. Exposure to the high CORT treatment significantly elevated CORT release in toads; however, there was no difference between toads given no CORT or low CORT. Exposure to CORT and Bd each increased toad mortality, but they did not interact to affect mortality. Toads that were exposed to CORT had higher Bd resistance than toads exposed to ethanol controls/low CORT, a pattern opposite that of most studies on domesticated animals. Exposure to CORT did not affect toad tolerance to Bd. Collectively, these results show that physiological stressors can alter a host’s response to a pathogen, but that the outcome might not be straightforward. Future studies that inhibit CORT secretion are needed to better our understanding of the relationship between stress physiology

  6. The inflammasomes: molecular effectors of host resistance against bacterial, viral, parasitic, and fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, Alexander; Saleh, Maya

    2011-01-01

    The inflammasomes are large multi-protein complexes scaffolded by cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that form an important part of the innate immune system. They are activated following the recognition of microbial-associated molecular patterns or host-derived danger signals (danger-associated molecular patterns) by PRRs. This recognition results in the recruitment and activation of the pro-inflammatory protease caspase-1, which cleaves its preferred substrates pro-interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 into their mature biologically active cytokine forms. Through processing of a number of other cellular substrates, caspase-1 is also required for the release of "alarmins" and the induction and execution of an inflammatory form of cell death termed pyroptosis. A growing spectrum of inflammasomes have been identified in the host defense against a variety of pathogens. Reciprocally, pathogens have evolved effector strategies to antagonize the inflammasome pathway. In this review we discuss recent developments in the understanding of inflammasome-mediated recognition of bacterial, viral, parasitic, and fungal infections and the beneficial or detrimental effects of inflammasome signaling in host resistance.

  7. IL-21 signaling is essential for optimal host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Booty, Matthew G.; Barreira-Silva, Palmira; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Jacques, Miye K.; Stowell, Britni L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa; Beamer, Gillian; Behar, Samuel M.

    2016-01-01

    IL-21 is produced predominantly by activated CD4+ T cells and has pleiotropic effects on immunity via the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R), a member of the common gamma chain (γc) cytokine receptor family. We show that IL-21 signaling plays a crucial role in T cell responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by augmenting CD8+ T cell priming, promoting T cell accumulation in the lungs, and enhancing T cell cytokine production. In the absence of IL-21 signaling, more CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in chronically infected mice express the T cell inhibitory molecules PD-1 and TIM-3. We correlate these immune alterations with increased susceptibility of IL-21R−/− mice, which have increased lung bacterial burden and earlier mortality compared to WT mice. Finally, to causally link the immune defects with host susceptibility, we use an adoptive transfer model to show that IL-21R−/− T cells transfer less protection than WT T cells. These results prove that IL-21 signaling has an intrinsic role in promoting the protective capacity of T cells. Thus, the net effect of IL-21 signaling is to enhance host resistance to M. tuberculosis. These data position IL-21 as a candidate biomarker of resistance to tuberculosis. PMID:27819295

  8. IL-37 impairs host resistance to Listeria infection by suppressing macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengmeng; Hu, Yongguang; Shou, Juanjuan; Su, Shao Bo; Yang, Jianhua; Yang, Tianshu

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium that was transmitted through contaminated food and causes sepsis and even death. IL-37 has been described as an important anti-inflammatory factor, but little is known about the function of IL-37 in host defense against Liseria monocytogenes (Lm) infection. In mice model of systemic infection, we found that mice treated with IL-37 were more sensitive to Lm infection compared with PBS-treated mice. This reduced resistance to Lm in IL-37-treated mice is accompanied with increased bacterial burden and liver damage. Serum levels of colony-stimulating factors were decreased in IL-37-treated mice. IL-37 treatment reduced bactericidal ability of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro, which contribute to the inability of IL-37-treated mice to combat Lm infection. Furthermore, increased apoptosis was observed in Lm-infected macrophages treated with IL-37. Increased macrophage apoptosis reduced percentage in liver macrophages was observed in IL-37-treated mice following Lm infection. These results indicate the negative regulatory effect of IL-37 on host resistance during immune defense against Lm.

  9. Bug on the back: vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella typhi in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Pragya; Mohan, Sachin; Roy, Satyajeet

    2015-11-27

    Although Salmonella osteomyelitis is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients, it may occasionally affect an immunocompetent host. Symptoms are usually non-specific, such as fever, abdominal or back pain; hence it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of travel to endemic regions. Fluoroquinolone resistance is rising and non-responsive patients should be treated with ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ceftriaxone. We present a case of acute T8-T11 osteomyelitis with cord compression caused by a fluoroquinolone resistant strain of Salmonella typhi.

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii Coordinates Urea Metabolism with Metal Import To Resist Host-Mediated Metal Limitation.

    PubMed

    Juttukonda, Lillian J; Chazin, Walter J; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-09-27

    During infection, bacterial pathogens must adapt to a nutrient metal-limited environment that is imposed by the host. The innate immune protein calprotectin inhibits bacterial growth in vitro by chelating the divalent metal ions zinc (Zn(2+), Zn) and manganese (Mn(2+), Mn), but pathogenic bacteria are able to cause disease in the presence of this antimicrobial protein in vivo. One such pathogen is Acinetobacter baumannii, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes pneumonia and bloodstream infections that can be complicated by resistance to multiple antibiotics. A. baumannii inhibition by calprotectin is dependent on calprotectin Mn binding, but the mechanisms employed by A. baumannii to overcome Mn limitation have not been identified. This work demonstrates that A. baumannii coordinates transcription of an NRAMP family Mn transporter and a urea carboxylase to resist the antimicrobial activities of calprotectin. This NRAMP family transporter facilitates Mn accumulation and growth of A. baumannii in the presence of calprotectin. A. baumannii is found to utilize urea as a sole nitrogen source, and urea utilization requires the urea carboxylase encoded in an operon with the NRAMP family transporter. Moreover, urea carboxylase activity is essential for calprotectin resistance in A. baumannii Finally, evidence is provided that this system combats calprotectin in vivo, as deletion of the transporter impairs A. baumannii fitness in a mouse model of pneumonia, and this fitness defect is modulated by the presence of calprotectin. These findings reveal that A. baumannii has evolved mechanisms to subvert host-mediated metal sequestration and they uncover a connection between metal starvation and metabolic stress.

  11. Acinetobacter baumannii Coordinates Urea Metabolism with Metal Import To Resist Host-Mediated Metal Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Juttukonda, Lillian J.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During infection, bacterial pathogens must adapt to a nutrient metal-limited environment that is imposed by the host. The innate immune protein calprotectin inhibits bacterial growth in vitro by chelating the divalent metal ions zinc (Zn2+, Zn) and manganese (Mn2+, Mn), but pathogenic bacteria are able to cause disease in the presence of this antimicrobial protein in vivo. One such pathogen is Acinetobacter baumannii, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes pneumonia and bloodstream infections that can be complicated by resistance to multiple antibiotics. A. baumannii inhibition by calprotectin is dependent on calprotectin Mn binding, but the mechanisms employed by A. baumannii to overcome Mn limitation have not been identified. This work demonstrates that A. baumannii coordinates transcription of an NRAMP family Mn transporter and a urea carboxylase to resist the antimicrobial activities of calprotectin. This NRAMP family transporter facilitates Mn accumulation and growth of A. baumannii in the presence of calprotectin. A. baumannii is found to utilize urea as a sole nitrogen source, and urea utilization requires the urea carboxylase encoded in an operon with the NRAMP family transporter. Moreover, urea carboxylase activity is essential for calprotectin resistance in A. baumannii. Finally, evidence is provided that this system combats calprotectin in vivo, as deletion of the transporter impairs A. baumannii fitness in a mouse model of pneumonia, and this fitness defect is modulated by the presence of calprotectin. These findings reveal that A. baumannii has evolved mechanisms to subvert host-mediated metal sequestration and they uncover a connection between metal starvation and metabolic stress. PMID:27677795

  12. Bacterial endosymbiosis in a chordate host: long-term co-evolution and conservation of secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Jason C; Schmidt, Eric W

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular symbiosis is known to be widespread in insects, but there are few described examples in other types of host. These symbionts carry out useful activities such as synthesizing nutrients and conferring resistance against adverse events such as parasitism. Such symbionts persist through host speciation events, being passed down through vertical transmission. Due to various evolutionary forces, symbionts go through a process of genome reduction, eventually resulting in tiny genomes where only those genes essential to immediate survival and those beneficial to the host remain. In the marine environment, invertebrates such as tunicates are known to harbor complex microbiomes implicated in the production of natural products that are toxic and probably serve a defensive function. Here, we show that the intracellular symbiont Candidatus Endolissoclinum faulkneri is a long-standing symbiont of the tunicate Lissoclinum patella, that has persisted through cryptic speciation of the host. In contrast to the known examples of insect symbionts, which tend to be either relatively recent or ancient relationships, the genome of Ca. E. faulkneri has a very low coding density but very few recognizable pseudogenes. The almost complete degradation of intergenic regions and stable gene inventory of extant strains of Ca. E. faulkneri show that further degradation and deletion is happening very slowly. This is a novel stage of genome reduction and provides insight into how tiny genomes are formed. The ptz pathway, which produces the defensive patellazoles, is shown to date to before the divergence of Ca. E. faulkneri strains, reinforcing its importance in this symbiotic relationship. Lastly, as in insects we show that stable symbionts can be lost, as we describe an L. patella animal where Ca. E. faulkneri is displaced by a likely intracellular pathogen. Our results suggest that intracellular symbionts may be an important source of ecologically significant natural products in

  13. Bacterial Endosymbiosis in a Chordate Host: Long-Term Co-Evolution and Conservation of Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular symbiosis is known to be widespread in insects, but there are few described examples in other types of host. These symbionts carry out useful activities such as synthesizing nutrients and conferring resistance against adverse events such as parasitism. Such symbionts persist through host speciation events, being passed down through vertical transmission. Due to various evolutionary forces, symbionts go through a process of genome reduction, eventually resulting in tiny genomes where only those genes essential to immediate survival and those beneficial to the host remain. In the marine environment, invertebrates such as tunicates are known to harbor complex microbiomes implicated in the production of natural products that are toxic and probably serve a defensive function. Here, we show that the intracellular symbiont Candidatus Endolissoclinum faulkneri is a long-standing symbiont of the tunicate Lissoclinum patella, that has persisted through cryptic speciation of the host. In contrast to the known examples of insect symbionts, which tend to be either relatively recent or ancient relationships, the genome of Ca. E. faulkneri has a very low coding density but very few recognizable pseudogenes. The almost complete degradation of intergenic regions and stable gene inventory of extant strains of Ca. E. faulkneri show that further degradation and deletion is happening very slowly. This is a novel stage of genome reduction and provides insight into how tiny genomes are formed. The ptz pathway, which produces the defensive patellazoles, is shown to date to before the divergence of Ca. E. faulkneri strains, reinforcing its importance in this symbiotic relationship. Lastly, as in insects we show that stable symbionts can be lost, as we describe an L. patella animal where Ca. E. faulkneri is displaced by a likely intracellular pathogen. Our results suggest that intracellular symbionts may be an important source of ecologically significant natural products in

  14. Host immunity to Plasmodium falciparum and the assessment of emerging artemisinin resistance in a multinational cohort.

    PubMed

    Ataide, Ricardo; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Powell, Rosanna; Chan, Jo-Anne; Malloy, Michael J; O'Flaherty, Katherine; Takashima, Eizo; Langer, Christine; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Dondorp, Arjen M; Day, Nicholas P; Dhorda, Mehul; Fairhurst, Rick M; Lim, Pharath; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Hien, Tran Tinh; Htut, Ye; Mayxay, Mayfong; Faiz, M Abul; Beeson, James G; Nosten, Francois; Simpson, Julie A; White, Nicholas J; Fowkes, Freya J I

    2017-03-28

    Artemisinin-resistant falciparum malaria, defined by a slow-clearance phenotype and the presence of kelch13 mutants, has emerged in the Greater Mekong Subregion. Naturally acquired immunity to malaria clears parasites independent of antimalarial drugs. We hypothesized that between- and within-population variations in host immunity influence parasite clearance after artemisinin treatment and the interpretation of emerging artemisinin resistance. Antibodies specific to 12 Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite and blood-stage antigens were determined in 959 patients (from 11 sites in Southeast Asia) participating in a multinational cohort study assessing parasite clearance half-life (PCt1/2) after artesunate treatment and kelch13 mutations. Linear mixed-effects modeling of pooled individual patient data assessed the association between antibody responses and PCt1/2.P. falciparum antibodies were lowest in areas where the prevalence of kelch13 mutations and slow PCt1/2 were highest [Spearman ρ = -0.90 (95% confidence interval, -0.97, -0.65), and Spearman ρ = -0.94 (95% confidence interval, -0.98, -0.77), respectively]. P. falciparum antibodies were associated with faster PCt1/2 (mean difference in PCt1/2 according to seropositivity, -0.16 to -0.65 h, depending on antigen); antibodies have a greater effect on the clearance of kelch13 mutant compared with wild-type parasites (mean difference in PCt1/2 according to seropositivity, -0.22 to -0.61 h faster in kelch13 mutants compared with wild-type parasites). Naturally acquired immunity accelerates the clearance of artemisinin-resistant parasites in patients with falciparum malaria and may confound the current working definition of artemisinin resistance. Immunity may also play an important role in the emergence and transmission potential of artemisinin-resistant parasites.

  15. Apparent Acquired Resistance by a Weevil to Its Parasitoid Is Influenced by Host Plant

    PubMed Central

    Goldson, Stephen L.; Tomasetto, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Field parasitism rates of the Argentine stem weevil Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Microctonus hyperodae Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are known to vary according to different host Lolium species that also differ in ploidy. To further investigate this, a laboratory study was conducted to examine parasitism rates on tetraploid Italian Lolium multiflorum, diploid Lolium perenne and diploid hybrid L. perenne ×L. multiflorum; none of which were infected by Epichloë endophyte. At the same time, the opportunity was taken to compare the results of this study with observations made during extensive laboratory-based research and parasitoid-rearing in the 1990s using the same host plant species. This made it possible to determine whether there has been any change in weevil susceptibility to the parasitoid over a 20 year period when in the presence of the tetraploid Italian, diploid perennial and hybrid host grasses that were commonly in use in the 1990’s. The incidence of parasitism in cages, in the presence of these three grasses mirrored what has recently been observed in the field. When caged, weevil parasitism rates in the presence of a tetraploid Italian ryegrass host were significantly higher (75%) than rates that occurred in the presence of either the diploid perennial (46%) or the diploid hybrid (52%) grass, which were not significantly different from each other. This is very different to laboratory parasitism rates in the 1990s when in the presence of both of the latter grasses high rates of parasitism (c. 75%) were recorded. These high rates are typical of those still found in weevils in the presence of both field and caged tetraploid Italian grasses. In contrast, the abrupt decline in weevil parasitism rates points to the possibility of evolved resistance by the weevil to the parasitoid in the diploid and hybrid grasses, but not so in the tetraploid. The orientation of plants in the laboratory cages had no significant effect

  16. Sr isotope variations in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from continetal basalts: evaluating primary vs secondary signatures of melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, F. C.; Wolff, J. A.; Reid, M. R.

    2003-04-01

    Melt inclusions have become the focus of intense study in constraining the sources involved in magma production in MORB and OIB. Such inclusions retain a wide variety of major and trace element signatures that have been typically attributed to various mantle sources without significant inputs from secondary magmatic processes such as crustal contamination. Sr isotopes of melt inclusions from continental basalts affected by crustal contamination suggest that highly variable major and trace element signatures in melt inclusions result from crustal contamination, not heterogeneous mantle sources. This may result from the inherent ability of melt inclusions to capture melt from regions in which rapid cooling and rapid olivine growth can occur. More specifically, rapid olivine growth, and subsequent melt capture, may be more likely to occur along wallrock/magma interfaces where a wide variety of crustally modified liquids may be present. Accordingly, melt inclusions captured in olivine phenocrysts from crustally contaminated basalts which retain elevated MgO contents (6 to 8 weight percent) reflect the widest range of Sr isotope signatures found in all phenocrysts and groundmass samples. In effect, the largest overall range of Sr isotopes is observed in olivine-hosted melt inclusions suggesting that melt inclusions are more likely to record the effects of secondary processes, rather than primary magmatic signatures. As such, caution should be exercised when using melt inclusions to identify mantle signatures, and Sr isotopes offer an excellent opportunity in which to evaluate the modifying effects of open-system processes affecting basalts.

  17. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer enhances host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection through MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongwei; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chunxia; Chen, Jianshe; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hu, Yue; Niu, Xiaobin; Pei, Dongxu; He, Zhiqiang; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the role of extra-cellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the drug resistance of the pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The BALB/c mice were transfected with PA, then the mice were infected with the siRNA of EMMPRIN to silence the EMMPRIN gene. The EMMPRIN mRNA and protein were detected by using RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. In order to examine the function of EMMPRIN in drug resistance of PA, the BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with EMMPRIN siRNA. The cytokines, EMMPRIN and MMP9 were examined by the RP-PCR and ELISA, respectively, undergoing the silence of EMMPRIN siRNA. Moreover, the western blot assay was also used to test the phosphorylated MAPK in the murine macrophages after silenced by the EMMPRIN siRNA. The EMMPRIN was activated, with lipopolysaccharide stimulation and treated with the MAPK inhibitor, to evaluate whether the MAPK participates in the EMMPRIN-triggered drug resistance. The results indicated that the EMMPRIN expression was elevated in the infected BALB/c at 3 or 5 days post-infection. Silence of EMMPRIN Enhanced the Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PA keratitis. Silence of EMMPRIN significantly up-regulated Th1-type cytokines IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-18, but down-regulated Th2-type cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. MMP9 was increased in the cells with rEMMPRIN treatment. EMMPRIN inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production via a MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, EMMPRIN promotes host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection via MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:28078032

  18. Heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 confers host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2013-07-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (M) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1(-/-)) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1(+/+)) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1(-/-) mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1(-/-) versus Hmox1(+/+) SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected M, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type M in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in M, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

  19. The effect of spring pads in the secondary suspension of railway vehicles on bogie yaw resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michálek, Tomáš; Zelenka, Jaromír

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with properties of bogie yaw resistance of an electric locomotive with secondary suspension consisting of flexi-coil springs supplemented with tilting spring pads. Transversal stiffness of a sample of a spring/pad assembly was measured on a dynamic test stand of the University of Pardubice (Czech Republic) and the results were applied into a multi-body model of the locomotive created in the simulation tool 'SJKV'. On the basis of the simulation results, a detailed analysis of the bogie yaw resistance was performed in order to explain the effect in dynamic behaviour of the locomotive when the moment against bogie rotation (and therefore the distribution of guiding forces on individual wheels, as well) is influenced with the vehicle speed in a certain curve. Results of this analysis show that the application of suspension elements with strongly directionally dependent transversal stiffness into the secondary suspension can just lead to a dependency of the bogie yaw resistance on cant deficiency, i.e. on the vehicle speed in curve. This fact has wide consequences on the vehicle dynamics (especially on the guiding behaviour of the vehicle in curves) and it also points out that the current method of evaluation of the bogie yaw resistance according to relevant standards, which is related with assessment of the quasistatic safety of a railway vehicle against derailment, is not objective enough.

  20. Splice variants and regulatory networks associated with host resistance to the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora in cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Wu, Sitao; Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Weizhong; Schroeder, Steven G

    2015-07-30

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of host resistance, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of Angus cattle selected for parasite resistance for over 20 years in response to infection caused by the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora. The transcript abundance of 56 genes, such as that of mucin 12 (MUC12) and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI), was significantly higher in resistant cattle. Novel splicing variants, exon skipping events, and gene fusion events, were also detected. An algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) was used to infer de novo regulatory molecular networks in the interactome between the parasite and host. Under a combined cutoff of an error tolerance (ϵ = 0.10) and a stringent P-value threshold of mutual information (1.0 × 10(-5)), a total of 229,100 direct interactions controlled by 20,288 hub genes were identified. Among these hub genes, 7651 genes had ≥ 100 direct neighbors while the top 9778 hub genes controlled more than 50% of total direct interactions. Three lysozyme genes (LYZ1, LYZ2, and LYZ3), which are co-located in bovine chromosome 5 in tandem and are strongly upregulated in resistant cattle, shared a common regulatory network of 55 genes. These ancient antimicrobials were likely involved in regulating host-parasite interactions by affecting host gut microbiome. Notably, ALPI, known as a gut mucosal defense factor, controlled a molecular network consisting 410 genes, including 14 transcription factors (TF) and 10 genes that were significantly regulated in resistant cattle. Several large regulatory networks were controlled by TF, such as STAT6, SREBF1, and ELF4. Gene ontology (GO) processes significantly enriched in the regulatory network controlled by STAT6 included lipid metabolism. Our findings provide insights into the immune regulation of host-parasite interactions and the molecular mechanisms of host resistance in cattle.

  1. Impaired host resistance to endotoxin and malaria in polychlorinated biphenyl- and hexachlorobenzene-treated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Loose, L D; Silkworth, J B; Pittman, K A; Benitz, K F; Mueller, W

    1978-01-01

    The in vivo effect of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on murine endotoxin sensitivity and resistance to malaria (Plasmodium berghei NYU-2) infection was studied. The dietary administration of 167 ppm (167 microgram/g) of PCB 1242 or HCB for 3 weeks resulted in an enhanced sensitivity to gram-negative endotoxin (Salmonella typhosa), which was further increased in animals maintained on the diets for 6 weeks. By 6 weeks, a 5.2- or 32-fold increase in endotoxin sensitivity was seen in mice fed PCB or HCB, respectively. A 20% decrease in mean survival time of mice fed PCB 1242 for 3 or 6 weeks and inoculated with malaria was demonstrated. Infected mice that received HCB for 3 or 6 weeks manifested a reduction in mean survival time of 24 or 31%, respectively. Histopathological examination revealed a normal thymus, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and lungs. Centrilobular and pericentral hepatocyte hypertrophy, common to organochlorine exposure, was observed. Electron capture gas chromatographic analysis for PCB 1242 or HCB in the tissues examined histologically revealed a significant deposit of the xenobiotics. HCB concentration was approximately 16 to 25 times greater than that of PCB. The data indicate that environmental chemicals impair host resistance and that the alteration may be related to the presence of the chemicals in the lymphoreticular organs. PMID:97225

  2. Identification of Mycobacterium avium genes associated with resistance to host antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Nima; Danelishvili, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate immune defence. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (M. avium) is an organism that establishes contact with the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa as a necessary step for infection. M. avium is resistant to high concentrations of polymyxin B, a surrogate for antimicrobial peptides. To determine gene-encoding proteins that are associated with this resistance, we screened a transposon library of M. avium strain 104 for susceptibility to polymyxin B. Ten susceptible mutants were identified and the inactivated genes sequenced. The great majority of the genes were related to cell wall synthesis and permeability. The mutants were then examined for their ability to enter macrophages and to survive macrophage killing. Three clones among the mutants had impaired uptake by macrophages compared with the WT strain, and all ten clones were attenuated in macrophages. The mutants were also shown to be susceptible to cathelicidin (LL-37), in contrast to the WT bacterium. All but one of the mutants were significantly attenuated in mice. In conclusion, this study indicated that the M. avium envelope is the primary defence against host antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24836414

  3. Assessment of safety of lactobacillus strains based on resistance to host innate defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Asahara, Takashi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Nomoto, Koji; Takayama, Hiroo; Onoue, Masaharu; Morotomi, Masami; Tanaka, Ryuichiro; Yokokura, Teruo; Yamashita, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    Seven Lactobacillus strains belonging to four species were evaluated for pathogenicity as well as for in vitro sensitivity to the bactericidal mechanisms of macrophages in a rabbit infective endocarditis (IE) model. Two bacteremia-associated strains, L. rhamnosus PHLS A103/70 and L. casei PHLS A357/84, as well as the L. rhamnosus type strain and the probiotic L. rhamnosus strain ATCC 53103, showed moderate infectivity, and the virulence of the probiotic L. casei strain Shirota and type strains such as L. acidophilus ATCC 4356(T) and L. gasseri DSM 20243(T) in the model was negligible. The strains that showed pathogenic potential in the rabbit IE model (PHLS A357/84, PHLS A103/70, and ATCC 53103) were more resistant than strain Shirota to intracellular killing activity by mouse macrophages in vitro and also to bactericidal nitrogen intermediates, such as nitric oxide and NO(2)(-) ions. These results suggest that resistance to host innate defense systems, which would function at inflammatory lesions, should be considered in the safety assessment of Lactobacillus strains.

  4. Microevolutionary Events Involving Narrow Host Plasmids Influences Local Fixation of Vancomycin-Resistance in Enterococcus Populations

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana R.; Novais, Carla; Tedim, Ana P.; Francia, María Victoria; Baquero, Fernando; Peixe, Luísa; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistance in enterococci (VRE) is associated with isolates within ST18, ST17, ST78 Enterococcus faecium (Efm) and ST6 Enterococcus faecalis (Efs) human adapted lineages. Despite of its global spread, vancomycin resistance rates in enterococcal populations greatly vary temporally and geographically. Portugal is one of the European countries where Tn1546 (vanA) is consistently found in a variety of environments. A comprehensive multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE isolates (75 Efm and 29 Efs) from Portuguese hospitals and aquatic surroundings (1996–2008) was performed to clarify the local dynamics of VRE. Clonal relatedness was established by PFGE and MLST while plasmid characterization comprised the analysis of known relaxases, rep initiator proteins and toxin-antitoxin systems (TA) by PCR-based typing schemes, RFLP comparison, hybridization and sequencing. Tn1546 variants were characterized by PCR overlapping/sequencing. Intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of Efm ST18, ST132 and ST280 and Efs ST6 clones, carrying rolling-circle (pEFNP1/pRI1) and theta-replicating (pCIZ2-like, Inc18, pHTβ-like, two pRUM-variants, pLG1-like, and pheromone-responsive) plasmids was documented. Tn1546 variants, mostly containing ISEf1 or IS1216, were located on plasmids (30–150 kb) with a high degree of mosaicism and heterogeneous RFLP patterns that seem to have resulted from the interplay between broad host Inc18 plasmids (pIP501, pRE25, pEF1), and narrow host RepA_N plasmids (pRUM, pAD1-like). TAs of Inc18 (ω-ε-ζ) and pRUM (Axe-Txe) plasmids were infrequently detected. Some plasmid chimeras were persistently recovered over years from different clonal lineages. This work represents the first multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE, revealing a frequent recombinatorial diversification of a limited number of interacting clonal backgrounds, plasmids and transposons at local scale. These interactions provide a continuous process of parapatric clonalization driving a full

  5. Molecular mapping of a non-host resistance gene YrpstY1 in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) for resistance to wheat stripe rust.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xinxia; He, Zhonghu; Lu, Yaming; Wang, Zhenlin; Xia, Xianchun

    2010-10-01

    Cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is considered as a non-host or inappropriate host species for wheat stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. Most barley cultivars show a broad-spectrum resistance to wheat stripe rust. To determine the genes for resistance to wheat stripe rust in barley, a cross was made between a resistant barley line Y12 and a susceptible line Y16. The two parents, F(1) and 147 BC(1) plants were tested at seedling stage with Chinese prevalent race CYR32 of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici by artificial inoculation in greenhouse. The results indicated that Y12 possessed one dominant resistance gene to wheat stripe rust, designated YrpstY1 provisionally. A total of 388 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to map the resistance gene in Y12 using bulked segregant analysis. A linkage map, including nine SSR loci on chromosome 7H and YrpstY1, was constructed using the BC(1) population, indicating that the resistance gene YrpstY1 is located on chromosome 7H. It is potential to transfer the resistance gene into common wheat for stripe rust resistance.

  6. The role of the secondary cell wall in plant resistance to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Miedes, Eva; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Molina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens relies on a complex network of constitutive and inducible defensive barriers. The plant cell wall is one of the barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. The traditional view of the plant cell wall as a passive barrier has evolved to a concept that considers the wall as a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defense mechanisms, and as a source of signaling molecules that trigger immune responses. The secondary cell walls of plants also represent a carbon-neutral feedstock (lignocellulosic biomass) for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Therefore, engineering plants with improved secondary cell wall characteristics is an interesting strategy to ease the processing of lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery. However, modification of the integrity of the cell wall by impairment of proteins required for its biosynthesis or remodeling may impact the plants resistance to pathogens. This review summarizes our understanding of the role of the plant cell wall in pathogen resistance with a focus on the contribution of lignin to this biological process. PMID:25161657

  7. The role of the secondary cell wall in plant resistance to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Miedes, Eva; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Molina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens relies on a complex network of constitutive and inducible defensive barriers. The plant cell wall is one of the barriers that pathogens need to overcome to successfully colonize plant tissues. The traditional view of the plant cell wall as a passive barrier has evolved to a concept that considers the wall as a dynamic structure that regulates both constitutive and inducible defense mechanisms, and as a source of signaling molecules that trigger immune responses. The secondary cell walls of plants also represent a carbon-neutral feedstock (lignocellulosic biomass) for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Therefore, engineering plants with improved secondary cell wall characteristics is an interesting strategy to ease the processing of lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery. However, modification of the integrity of the cell wall by impairment of proteins required for its biosynthesis or remodeling may impact the plants resistance to pathogens. This review summarizes our understanding of the role of the plant cell wall in pathogen resistance with a focus on the contribution of lignin to this biological process.

  8. Plant resistance to aphid feeding: behavioral, physiological, genetic and molecular cues regulate aphid host selection and feeding.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Michael; Chuang, Wen-Po

    2014-04-01

    Aphids damage major world food and fiber crops through direct feeding and transmission of plant viruses. Fortunately, the development of many aphid-resistant crop plants has provided both ecological and economic benefits to food production. Plant characters governing aphid host selection often dictate eventual plant resistance or susceptibility to aphid herbivory, and these phenotypic characters have been successfully used to map aphid resistance genes. Aphid resistance is often inherited as a dominant trait, but is also polygenic and inherited as recessive or incompletely dominant traits. Most aphid-resistant cultivars exhibit constitutively expressed defenses, but some cultivars exhibit dramatic aphid-induced responses, resulting in the overexpression of large ensembles of putative aphid resistance genes. Two aphid resistance genes have been cloned. Mi-1.2, an NBS-LRR gene from wild tomato, confers resistance to potato aphid and three Meloidogyne root-knot nematode species, and Vat, an NBS-LRR gene from melon, controls resistance to the cotton/melon aphid and to some viruses. Virulence to aphid resistance genes of plants occurs in 17 aphid species--more than half of all arthropod biotypes demonstrating virulence. The continual appearance of aphid virulence underscores the need to identify new sources of resistance of diverse sequence and function in order to delay or prevent biotype development.

  9. Host plant resistance to megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) in diverse soybean germplasm maturity groups V through VIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initially discovered in Georgia in 2009, the exotic invasive plataspid, Megacopta cribraria Fabricius has become a serious pest of soybean. Managing M. cribraria in soybean typically involves the application of broad-spectrum insecticides. Soybean host plant resistance is an attractive alternative...

  10. Identification of maize genes associated with host plant resistance and susceptibility to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination of maize pose negative impacts in agriculture and health. Commercial maize hybrids are generally susceptible to this fungus. Significant levels of host plant resistance have been observed in certain maize inbred lines. This study was conducted...

  11. Does acquired resistance of rodent hosts affect metabolic rate of fleas?

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Irina S; Ghazaryan, Lusine; Krasnov, Boris R; Degen, A Allan

    2009-07-01

    We studied whether (a) previous infestation of a rodent host with fleas and (b) the reproductive effort of fleas affect the rate of CO(2) emission in two flea species, host-specific Parapulex chephrenis and host-opportunistic Xenopsylla ramesis when feeding on their typical and atypical rodent hosts. We measured the rate of CO(2) emission in preovipositing and ovipositing female fleas fed on either pristine or previously infested Acomys cahirinus (typical host of P. chephrenis) and Dipodillus dasyurus (typical host of X. ramesis). When P. chephrenis fed on a typical host, its mass-specific rate of CO(2) emission was not affected by previous infestation of a host, whereas when this flea fed on the atypical host, its rate of CO(2) emission was higher when a host was previously infested. This was manifested, however, mainly during the oviposition period. The rate of CO(2) emission by X. ramesis feeding on pristine hosts was significantly lower than in conspecifics feeding on previously infested hosts, independent of host species. Both flea species feeding on their typical hosts emitted CO(2) at similar mass-specific rates during preoviposition and oviposition, except for P. chephrenis feeding on D. dasyurus, which increased its rate during oviposition. There was no effect of the number of eggs produced per female on the rate of CO(2) emission during oviposition.

  12. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, Neil C.; Warner, Barry T.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  13. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1982-07-07

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  14. Understanding Host-Pathogen Interactions with Expression Profiling of NILs Carrying Rice-Blast Resistance Pi9 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Priyanka; Singh, Pankaj K.; Kapoor, Ritu; Khanna, Apurva; Solanke, Amolkumar U.; Krishnan, S. Gopala; Singh, Ashok K.; Sharma, Vinay; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2017-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae infection causes rice blast, a destructive disease that is responsible for considerable decrease in rice yield. Development of resistant varieties via introgressing resistance genes with marker-assisted breeding can eliminate pesticide use and minimize crop losses. Here, resistant near-isogenic line (NIL) of Pusa Basmati-1(PB1) carrying broad spectrum rice blast resistance gene Pi9 was used to investigate Pi9-mediated resistance response. Infected and uninfected resistant NIL and susceptible control line were subjected to RNA-Seq. With the exception of one gene (Pi9), transcriptional signatures between the two lines were alike, reflecting basal similarities in their profiles. Resistant and susceptible lines possessed 1043 (727 up-regulated and 316 down-regulated) and 568 (341 up-regulated and 227 down-regulated) unique and significant differentially expressed loci (SDEL), respectively. Pathway analysis revealed higher transcriptional activation of kinases, WRKY, MYB, and ERF transcription factors, JA-ET hormones, chitinases, glycosyl hydrolases, lipid biosynthesis, pathogenesis and secondary metabolism related genes in resistant NIL than susceptible line. Singular enrichment analysis demonstrated that blast resistant NIL is significantly enriched with genes for primary and secondary metabolism, response to biotic stimulus and transcriptional regulation. The co-expression network showed proteins of genes in response to biotic stimulus interacted in a manner unique to resistant NIL upon M. oryzae infection. These data suggest that Pi9 modulates genome-wide transcriptional regulation in resistant NIL but not in susceptible PB1. We successfully used transcriptome profiling to understand the molecular basis of Pi9-mediated resistance mechanisms, identified potential candidate genes involved in early pathogen response and revealed the sophisticated transcriptional reprogramming during rice-M. oryzae interactions. PMID:28280498

  15. Understanding Host-Pathogen Interactions with Expression Profiling of NILs Carrying Rice-Blast Resistance Pi9 Gene.

    PubMed

    Jain, Priyanka; Singh, Pankaj K; Kapoor, Ritu; Khanna, Apurva; Solanke, Amolkumar U; Krishnan, S Gopala; Singh, Ashok K; Sharma, Vinay; Sharma, Tilak R

    2017-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae infection causes rice blast, a destructive disease that is responsible for considerable decrease in rice yield. Development of resistant varieties via introgressing resistance genes with marker-assisted breeding can eliminate pesticide use and minimize crop losses. Here, resistant near-isogenic line (NIL) of Pusa Basmati-1(PB1) carrying broad spectrum rice blast resistance gene Pi9 was used to investigate Pi9-mediated resistance response. Infected and uninfected resistant NIL and susceptible control line were subjected to RNA-Seq. With the exception of one gene (Pi9), transcriptional signatures between the two lines were alike, reflecting basal similarities in their profiles. Resistant and susceptible lines possessed 1043 (727 up-regulated and 316 down-regulated) and 568 (341 up-regulated and 227 down-regulated) unique and significant differentially expressed loci (SDEL), respectively. Pathway analysis revealed higher transcriptional activation of kinases, WRKY, MYB, and ERF transcription factors, JA-ET hormones, chitinases, glycosyl hydrolases, lipid biosynthesis, pathogenesis and secondary metabolism related genes in resistant NIL than susceptible line. Singular enrichment analysis demonstrated that blast resistant NIL is significantly enriched with genes for primary and secondary metabolism, response to biotic stimulus and transcriptional regulation. The co-expression network showed proteins of genes in response to biotic stimulus interacted in a manner unique to resistant NIL upon M. oryzae infection. These data suggest that Pi9 modulates genome-wide transcriptional regulation in resistant NIL but not in susceptible PB1. We successfully used transcriptome profiling to understand the molecular basis of Pi9-mediated resistance mechanisms, identified potential candidate genes involved in early pathogen response and revealed the sophisticated transcriptional reprogramming during rice-M. oryzae interactions.

  16. Enhancement of host resistance against Listeria infection by Lactobacillus casei: Role of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.

    1984-05-01

    Among the 10 species of the genus Lactobacillus, L. casei showed the strongest protective action against Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice. The activity of L. casei differed with regard to the dose of administration. The anti-L. monocytogenes resistance in mice intravenously administered 5.5 X 10(7), 2.8 X 10(8), or 1.1 X 10(9) L. casei cells was most manifest at ca. 2, 2 and 13, and 3 to 21 days after its administration, respectively. The growth of L. monocytogenes in the liver of mice injected with L. casei (10(7), 10(8), or 10(9) cells) 48 h after infection was suppressed, particularly when 10(8) or 10(9) L. casei cells were given 2 or 13 days before the induced infection, respectively. This suppression of L. monocytogenes growth was overcome by carrageenan treatment or X-ray irradiation. (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into the liver DNA increased 13 days after administration of L. casei, and augmentation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation during 6 to 48 h after infection was dependent on the dose of L. casei. Peritoneal macrophage accumulation observed 1 to 5 days after intraperitoneal injection of UV-killed L. monocytogenes was markedly enhanced when the mice were treated with L. casei cells 13 days before macrophage elicitation. Therefore, the enhanced host resistance by L. casei to L. monocytogenes infection may be mediated by macrophages migrating from the blood stream to the reticuloendothelial system in response to L. casei injection before or after L. monocytogenes infection.

  17. Effect of a secondary metallurgy technology on the types of forming nonmetallic inclusions and the corrosion resistance of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dub, V. S.; Safronov, A. A.; Movchan, M. A.; Ioffe, A. V.; Tazetdinov, V. I.; Zhivykh, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a secondary metallurgy technology on the metal quality during the production of lowcarbon corrosion-resistant steels is estimated. The content of a modifier introduced is found to principally influence the types of inclusions and, via them, the corrosion resistance of parts from the metal subjected to deep refining from sulfur and nonmetallic inclusions.

  18. Experimental infection dynamics: using immunosuppression and in vivo parasite tracking to understand host resistance in an amphibian-trematode system.

    PubMed

    LaFonte, Bryan E; Johnson, Pieter T J

    2013-10-01

    Although naturally occurring hosts often exhibit pronounced differences in infection and pathology, the relative importance of factors associated with host life history and immunity in explaining such patterns often remains speculative. Research in eco-immunology highlights the trade-offs between host physiology and immunity, for which natural variations in disease susceptibility offer a valuable platform to test predictions within this framework. Here, we combined use of a novel, in vivo assay for tracking parasite fate and an experimental manipulation of host immune function (via chronic corticosterone exposure) to assess the role of host immunity in regulating susceptibility of amphibian hosts to three larval trematodes: Ribeiroia ondatrae, Echinostoma trivolvis and Alaria sp. 2. Results from the in vivo parasite-tracking assay revealed marked differences in initial parasite penetration and subsequent host clearance. Relative to infections in a highly susceptible species (Pseudacris regilla), the virulent trematode R. ondatrae was -25% less successful at penetrating larvae of three hylid frog species and was cleared > 45(×) faster, such that all parasites were rapidly cleared from hylid hosts over 72 h following a Weibull distribution. Immune suppression of Hyla versicolor sharply reduced this resistance and increased infection of all three trematodes by 67 to 190%, with particularly strong increases for R. ondatrae. Diminished resistance correlated with a 62% decrease in circulating eosinophils. Correspondingly, 10 days after corticosterone exposures ended, infections declined dramatically while eosinophil levels returned to normal. In light of ongoing declines and deformities in amphibian populations, these findings have application potential for mitigating disease-driven effects.

  19. Antimicrobial drug resistance affects broad changes in metabolomic phenotype in addition to secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Derewacz, Dagmara K.; Goodwin, Cody R.; McNees, C. Ruth; McLean, John A.; Bachmann, Brian O.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria develop resistance to many classes of antibiotics vertically, by engendering mutations in genes encoding transcriptional and translational apparatus. These severe adaptations affect global transcription, translation, and the correspondingly affected metabolism. Here, we characterize metabolome scale changes in transcriptional and translational mutants in a genomically characterized Nocardiopsis, a soil-derived actinomycete, in stationary phase. Analysis of ultra-performance liquid chromatography–ion mobility–mass spectrometry metabolomic features from a cohort of streptomycin- and rifampicin-resistant mutants grown in the absence of antibiotics exhibits clear metabolomic speciation, and loadings analysis catalogs a marked change in metabolic phenotype. Consistent with derepression, up to 311 features are observed in antibiotic-resistant mutants that are not detected in their progenitors. Mutants demonstrate changes in primary metabolism, such as modulation of fatty acid composition and the increased production of the osmoprotectant ectoine, in addition to the presence of abundant emergent potential secondary metabolites. Isolation of three of these metabolites followed by structure elucidation demonstrates them to be an unusual polyketide family with a previously uncharacterized xanthene framework resulting from sequential oxidative carbon skeletal rearrangements. Designated as “mutaxanthenes,” this family can be correlated to a type II polyketide gene cluster in the producing organism. Taken together, these data suggest that biosynthetic pathway derepression is a general consequence of some antibiotic resistance mutations. PMID:23341601

  20. Metagenomic Assembly Reveals Hosts of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and the Shared Resistome in Pig, Chicken, and Human Feces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Xia, Yu; Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Li, Li-Guan; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-05

    The risk associated with antibiotic resistance disseminating from animal and human feces is an urgent public issue. In the present study, we sought to establish a pipeline for annotating antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) based on metagenomic assembly to investigate ARGs and their co-occurrence with associated genetic elements. Genetic elements found on the assembled genomic fragments include mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and metal resistance genes (MRGs). We then explored the hosts of these resistance genes and the shared resistome of pig, chicken and human fecal samples. High levels of tetracycline, multidrug, erythromycin, and aminoglycoside resistance genes were discovered in these fecal samples. In particular, significantly high level of ARGs (7762 ×/Gb) was detected in adult chicken feces, indicating higher ARG contamination level than other fecal samples. Many ARGs arrangements (e.g., macA-macB and tetA-tetR) were discovered shared by chicken, pig and human feces. In addition, MGEs such as the aadA5-dfrA17-carrying class 1 integron were identified on an assembled scaffold of chicken feces, and are carried by human pathogens. Differential coverage binning analysis revealed significant ARG enrichment in adult chicken feces. A draft genome, annotated as multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, was retrieved from chicken feces metagenomes and was determined to carry diverse ARGs (multidrug, acriflavine, and macrolide). The present study demonstrates the determination of ARG hosts and the shared resistome from metagenomic data sets and successfully establishes the relationship between ARGs, hosts, and environments. This ARG annotation pipeline based on metagenomic assembly will help to bridge the knowledge gaps regarding ARG-associated genes and ARG hosts with metagenomic data sets. Moreover, this pipeline will facilitate the evaluation of environmental risks in the genetic context of ARGs.

  1. How religion influences morbidity and health: reflections on natural history, salutogenesis and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Levin, J S

    1996-09-01

    This paper surveys the field that has come to be known as the epidemiology of religion. Epidemiologic study of the impact of religious involvement, broadly defined, has become increasingly popular in recent years, although the existence, meaning and implications of an apparently salutary religious effect on health have not yet been interpreted in an epidemiologic context. This paper attempts to remedy this situation by putting the "epidemiology" into the epidemiology of religion through discussion of existing empirical findings in terms of several substantive epidemiologic concepts. After first providing an overview of key research findings and prior reviews of this field, the summary finding of a protective religious effect on morbidity is examined in terms of three important epidemiologic concepts: the natural history of disease, salutogenesis and host resistance. In addition to describing a theoretical basis for interpreting a religion-health association, this paper provides an enumeration of common misinterpretations of epidemiologic findings for religious involvement, as well as an outline of hypothesized pathways, mediating factors, and salutogenic mechanisms for respective religious dimensions. It is hoped that these reflections will serve both to elevate the status of religion as a construct worthy of social-epidemiologic research and to reinvigorate the field of social epidemiology.

  2. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  3. Improved secondary caries resistance via augmented pressure displacement of antibacterial adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-na; Huang, Li; Fang, Ming; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-juan; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2016-01-01

    The present in vitro study evaluated the secondary caries resistance potential of acid-etched human coronal dentin bonded using augmented pressure adhesive displacement in conjunction with an experimental antibacterial adhesive. One hundred and twenty class I cavities were restored with a commercial non-antibacterial etch-and-rinse adhesive (N) or an experimental antibacterial adhesive (A) which was displaced by gentle air-blow (G) or augmented pressure air-blow (H). After bonding and restoration with resin composite, the resulted 4 groups (N-G, N-H, A-G and A-H) were exposed to Streptococcus mutans biofilm for 4, 8, 15, 20 or 25 days. The development of secondary caries in the bonding interface was then examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data acquired from 15, 20 and 25 days of artificial caries induction were analyzed with three-way ANOVA at α = 0.05. The depth of the artificial carious lesions was significantly affected by “adhesive type” (Single Bond 2 vs experimental antibacterial adhesive p = 0.003), “intensity of adhesive displacement” (gentle vs augmented-pressure adhesive displacement; p < 0.001), as well as “artificial caries induction time” (p < 0.001). The combined use of augmented pressure adhesive displacement and experimental antibacterial adhesive reduces the progression of secondary caries. PMID:26928742

  4. Graft-versus-host resistance induced by class II major histocompatibility complex-specific T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of graft-vs.-host (GVH) resistance have been studied using a panel of seven class II major histocompatibility complex-specific T cell clones for elicitation and challenge. One clone recognized I-Ak,d,f, and expressed V beta 8.3 together with J beta 1.5. The remaining six clones were I-Ek specific and expressed V beta 15 rearranged to J beta 1.1 or J beta 1.3. The I-Ek-specific clones were also homologous to each other and different from the I-A-reactive one in the D and N regions. Four of the seven clones exhibited I-Ek- specific cytolytic activity. Each clone, when injected in sublethal numbers into appropriate recipients, could induce resistance to a subsequent lethal dose of any other clone in the panel. The resistance did not require sharing of either T cell receptor beta chains or antigen specificity, or MHC molecules by the eliciting and challenging clone. Cytolytic and noncytolytic clones were equally efficient in inducing GVH resistance. A prerequisite of resistance induction was the activation of eliciting clone subsequent to recognition of class II molecules in the host. Clones preactivated with high concentrations of recombinant interleukin 2, in vitro, could induce GVH resistance also in syngeneic hosts, suggesting that resistance induction was associated with the activated state of clone, rather than antigen recognition per se. In all instances of resistance, the challenging clones failed to induce vascular leakage, which was the cause of death in susceptible recipients (Lehmann, P. V., G. Schumm, D. Moon, U. Hurtenbach, F. Falcioni, S. Muller, and Z. A. Nagy. 1990. J. Exp. Med. 171:1485). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced resistance to vascular leakage did not provide crossresistance to GVH and vice versa, suggesting that interleukin 1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha implicated in LPS resistance are not involved in GVH resistance. Although the mechanism remains unclear, the most likely explanation for GVH resistance in this

  5. Non-host Plant Resistance against Phytophthora capsici Is Mediated in Part by Members of the I2 R Gene Family in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Shimada-Beltrán, Harumi; Sevillano-Serrano, Jacobo; Moffett, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The identification of host genes associated with resistance to Phytophthora capsici is crucial to developing strategies of control against this oomycete pathogen. Since there are few sources of resistance to P. capsici in crop plants, non-host plants represent a promising source of resistance genes as well as excellent models to study P. capsici - plant interactions. We have previously shown that non-host resistance to P. capsici in Nicotiana spp. is mediated by the recognition of a specific P. capsici effector protein, PcAvr3a1 in a manner that suggests the involvement of a cognate disease resistance (R) genes. Here, we have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA in Nicotiana spp. to identify candidate R genes that mediate non-host resistance to P. capsici. Silencing of members of the I2 multigene family in the partially resistant plant N. edwardsonii and in the resistant N. tabacum resulted in compromised resistance to P. capsici. VIGS of two other components required for R gene-mediated resistance, EDS1 and SGT1, also enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici in N. edwardsonii, as well as in the susceptible plants N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii. The silencing of I2 family members in N. tabacum also compromised the recognition of PcAvr3a1. These results indicate that in this case, non-host resistance is mediated by the same components normally associated with race-specific resistance.

  6. Non-host Plant Resistance against Phytophthora capsici Is Mediated in Part by Members of the I2 R Gene Family in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C.; Shimada-Beltrán, Harumi; Sevillano-Serrano, Jacobo; Moffett, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The identification of host genes associated with resistance to Phytophthora capsici is crucial to developing strategies of control against this oomycete pathogen. Since there are few sources of resistance to P. capsici in crop plants, non-host plants represent a promising source of resistance genes as well as excellent models to study P. capsici – plant interactions. We have previously shown that non-host resistance to P. capsici in Nicotiana spp. is mediated by the recognition of a specific P. capsici effector protein, PcAvr3a1 in a manner that suggests the involvement of a cognate disease resistance (R) genes. Here, we have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA in Nicotiana spp. to identify candidate R genes that mediate non-host resistance to P. capsici. Silencing of members of the I2 multigene family in the partially resistant plant N. edwardsonii and in the resistant N. tabacum resulted in compromised resistance to P. capsici. VIGS of two other components required for R gene-mediated resistance, EDS1 and SGT1, also enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici in N. edwardsonii, as well as in the susceptible plants N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii. The silencing of I2 family members in N. tabacum also compromised the recognition of PcAvr3a1. These results indicate that in this case, non-host resistance is mediated by the same components normally associated with race-specific resistance. PMID:28261255

  7. Evaluation of tetraploid switchgrass (Poales: Poaceae) populations for host suitability and differential resistance to four cereal aphids.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kyle G; Fithian, Rachael; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M; Bradshaw, Jeff D; Sarath, Gautam; Spilker, Courtney

    2014-02-01

    Switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L., is being developed as a bioenergy feedstock. The potential for large-scale production has encouraged its evaluation as a host for important grass pests. Eight no-choice studies were performed for two developmental stages of two switchgrass cultivars ('Kanlow' and'Summer') and two experimental strains, K x S, and S x K produced by reciprocal mating of these cultivars followed by selection for high yield. Plants were evaluated for host suitability and damage differences to herbivory by four important cereal aphids, Sipha flava (Forbes), Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) (biotype I), Rhopalosiphum padi (L.), and Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko). All switchgrasses were found to be unsuitable feeding and reproductive hosts to R. padi and D. noxia, which were unable to establish on the plants. However, both S. flava and S. graminum were able to establish on all switchgrasses tested. Differential levels of resistance to S. flava and S. graminum were detected among the switchgrasses by both cumulative aphid days (CAD) and plant damage ratings. Kanlow was consistently rated as highly resistant based on CAD and damage ratings for both aphid species, while Summer was consistently among the most susceptible to both aphids at both developmental stages, with relatively high damage ratings. The resistance of the K x S and S x K populations in relationship to their Summer and Kanlow parents indicted that they inherited some resistance to S. graminum and S. flava from their Kanlow parent. These studies provide valuable baseline information concerning the host suitability of switchgrass to four cereal aphids and the plant-insect interactions within a system that has been largely overlooked and indicate that there are genetic differences among switchgrass populations for resistance to some insects.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita)-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) roots reveals complex gene expression profiles and metabolic networks of both host and nematode during susceptible and resistance responses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Neha; Yadav, Rachita; Kaur, Pritam; Rasmussen, Simon; Goel, Shailendra; Agarwal, Manu; Jagannath, Arun; Gupta, Ramneek; Kumar, Amar

    2017-02-21

    Root knot nematodes (RKNs, Meloidogyne incognita) are economically important endoparasites having a wide-host range. We have taken a comprehensive transcriptomic approach to investigate the expression of both tomato and RKN genes in tomato roots at five infection time intervals from susceptible plants and two infection time intervals from resistant plants, grown under soil conditions. Differentially expressed genes during susceptible (1827-tomato, 462-RKN) and resistance (25-tomato, 160-RKN) interactions were identified. In susceptible responses, tomato genes involved in cell wall structure, development, primary and secondary metabolites and defense signalling pathways along with RKN genes involved in host parasitism, development and defense are discussed. In resistance responses, tomato genes involved in secondary metabolite and hormone-mediated defense responses along with RKN genes involved in starvation stress-induced apoptosis are discussed. Also, forty novel differentially expressed RKN genes encoding secretory proteins were identified. Our findings, for the first time, provide novel insights into temporal regulation of genes involved in various biological processes from tomato and RKN simultaneously during susceptible and resistance responses, and reveals involvement of a complex network of biosynthetic pathways during disease development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Abrogation of hybrid resistance to bone marrow engraftment by graft versus host induced immune deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, F.T.; Shearer, G.M.

    1986-03-01

    Lethally irradiated F/sub 1/ mice, heterozygous at the hematopoietic histocompatibility (Hh) locus at H-2D/sup b/, reject bone marrow grafts from homozygous H-2/sup b/ parents. This hybrid resistance (HR) is reduced by prior injection of H-2/sup b/ parental spleen cells. Since injection of parental spleen cells produces a profound suppression of F/sub 1/ immune functions, the authors investigated whether parental-induced abrogation of HR was due to graft-vs-host induced immune deficiency (GVHID). HR was assessed by quantifying engraftment in irradiated mice using /sup 125/I-IUdR spleen uptake; GVHID by measuring generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from unirradiated mice. They observed correlation in time course, spleen dose dependence and T cell dependence between GVHID and loss of HR. The injection of B10 recombinant congenic spleens into (B10 x B10.A) F/sub 1/ mice, prior to grafting with B10 marrow, demonstrated that only those disparities in major histocompatibility antigens which generated GVHID would result in loss of HR. Spleens from (B10 x B10.A(2R))F/sub 1/ mice (Class I disparity only) did not induce GVHID or affect HR, while (B10 x B10.A(5R)F/sub 1/ spleens (Class I and II disparity) abrogated CTL generation and HR completely. GVHID produced by a Class II only disparity, as in (B10 x B10.A(5R))F/sub 1/ spleens injected into (B6/sup bm12 x B10.A(5R))F/sub 1/ mice, was also sufficient to markedly reduce HR to B10 bone marrow. Modulation of hematopoietic graft rejection by GVHID may affect marrow engraftment in man.

  10. Enhancing host resistance to pressure ulcers: a new approach to prevention.

    PubMed

    Mawson, A R; Siddiqui, F H; Biundo, J J

    1993-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are notoriously common in spinal-cord-injured patients, in patients with other neurological deficits, in malnourished and severely debilitated patients, and in the frail elderly. Prolonged localized external pressure, coupled with insensitivity to ischemia resulting from neurologic injury, has long been considered the major causal factor. Preventive efforts have focused on the relief of pressure via frequent repositioning and the use of pressure-relieving devices. However, consensus is growing that host factors also play a role in the development of pressure ulcers, the most important in spinal-cord-injured patients being the injury-induced loss of vasomotor control below the level of the lesion, resulting in hypoxemia. Accordingly, pressure ulcers may be prevented not only by reducing external pressure but also by increasing the patient's resistance to pressure, that is, by directly influencing tissue oxygenation. Review of the literature suggests that electrical stimulation increases cutaneous blood flow and promotes the healing of pressure ulcers. Moreover, high-voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation (75 V, 10 Hz) applied to the back at spinal level T6 in spinal-cord-injured persons lying supine on egg-crate mattresses can raise sacral transcutaneous oxygen tension levels into the normal ranges (A. R. Mawson, F. H. Siddiqui, B. J. Connolly, C. J. Sharp, W. R. Summer, and J. J. Biundo, Jr., Paraplegia in press). Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the efficacy of high-voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation for preventing pressure ulcers in spinal-cord-injured persons and other groups at high risk.

  11. EDTA a novel inducer of pisatin, a phytoalexin indicator of the non-host resistance in peas.

    PubMed

    Hadwiger, Lee A; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2014-12-23

    Pea pod endocarp suppresses the growth of an inappropriate fungus or non-pathogen by generating a "non-host resistance response" that completely suppresses growth of the challenging fungus within 6 h. Most of the components of this resistance response including pisatin production can be elicited by an extensive number of both biotic and abiotic inducers. Thus this phytoalexin serves as an indicator to be used in evaluating the chemical properties of inducers that can initiate the resistance response. Many of the pisatin inducers are reported to interact with DNA and potentially cause DNA damage. Here we propose that EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) is an elicitor to evoke non-host resistance in plants. EDTA is manufactured as a chelating agent, however at low concentration it is a strong elicitor, inducing the phytoalexin pisatin, cellular DNA damage and defense-responsive genes. It is capable of activating complete resistance in peas against a pea pathogen. Since there is also an accompanying fragmentation of pea DNA and alteration in the size of pea nuclei, the potential biochemical insult as a metal chelator may not be its primary action. The potential effects of EDTA on the structure of DNA within pea chromatin may assist the transcription of plant defense genes.

  12. Scaling up from greenhouse resistance to fitness in the field for a host of an emerging forest disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Katherine J; Garbelotto, Matteo; Dodd, Richard; Wright, Jessica W

    2013-01-01

    Forest systems are increasingly threatened by emergent, exotic diseases, yet management strategies for forest trees may be hindered by long generation times and scant background knowledge. We tested whether nursery disease resistance and growth traits have predictive value for the conservation of Notholithocarpus densiflorus, the host most susceptible to sudden oak death. We established three experimental populations to assess nursery growth and resistance to Phytophthora ramorum, and correlations between nursery-derived breeding values with seedling survival in a field disease trial. Estimates of nursery traits’ heritability were low to moderate, with lowest estimates for resistance traits. Within the field trial, survival likelihood was increased in larger seedlings and decreased with the development of disease symptoms. The seed-parent family wide likelihood of survival was likewise correlated with family predictors for size and resistance to disease in 2nd year laboratory assays, though not resistance in 1st year leaf assays. We identified traits and seedling families with increased survivorship in planted tanoaks, and a framework to further identify seed parents favored for restoration. The additive genetic variation and seedling disease dynamics we describe hold promise to refine current disease models and expand the understanding of evolutionary dynamics of emergent infectious diseases in highly susceptible hosts. PMID:24062805

  13. Scaling up from greenhouse resistance to fitness in the field for a host of an emerging forest disease.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Katherine J; Garbelotto, Matteo; Dodd, Richard; Wright, Jessica W

    2013-09-01

    Forest systems are increasingly threatened by emergent, exotic diseases, yet management strategies for forest trees may be hindered by long generation times and scant background knowledge. We tested whether nursery disease resistance and growth traits have predictive value for the conservation of Notholithocarpus densiflorus, the host most susceptible to sudden oak death. We established three experimental populations to assess nursery growth and resistance to Phytophthora ramorum, and correlations between nursery-derived breeding values with seedling survival in a field disease trial. Estimates of nursery traits' heritability were low to moderate, with lowest estimates for resistance traits. Within the field trial, survival likelihood was increased in larger seedlings and decreased with the development of disease symptoms. The seed-parent family wide likelihood of survival was likewise correlated with family predictors for size and resistance to disease in 2nd year laboratory assays, though not resistance in 1st year leaf assays. We identified traits and seedling families with increased survivorship in planted tanoaks, and a framework to further identify seed parents favored for restoration. The additive genetic variation and seedling disease dynamics we describe hold promise to refine current disease models and expand the understanding of evolutionary dynamics of emergent infectious diseases in highly susceptible hosts.

  14. Pharmacological Targeting of the Host-Pathogen Interaction: Alternatives to Classical Antibiotics to Combat Drug-Resistant Superbugs.

    PubMed

    Munguia, Jason; Nizet, Victor

    2017-03-07

    The rise of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the dearth of new antibiotic development place an existential strain on successful infectious disease therapy. Breakthrough strategies that go beyond classical antibiotic mechanisms are needed to combat this looming public health catastrophe. Reconceptualizing antibiotic therapy in the richer context of the host-pathogen interaction is required for innovative solutions. By defining specific virulence factors, the essence of a pathogen, and pharmacologically neutralizing their activities, one can block disease progression and sensitize microbes to immune clearance. Likewise, host-directed strategies to boost phagocyte bactericidal activity, enhance leukocyte recruitment, or reverse pathogen-induced immunosuppression seek to replicate the success of cancer immunotherapy in the field of infectious diseases. The answer to the threat of multidrug-resistant pathogens lies 'outside the box' of current antibiotic paradigms.

  15. Microbial selectivity of UV treatment on antibiotic-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in secondary effluents of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2013-10-15

    Little is known about the microbial selectivity of UV treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria, and the results of limited studies are conflicting. To understand the effect of UV disinfection on antibiotic resistant bacteria, both total heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistant bacteria (including cephalexin-, ciprofloxacin-, erythromycin-, gentamicin-, vancomycin-, sulfadiazine-, rifampicin-, tetracycline- and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria) were examined in secondary effluent samples from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Bacteria resistant to both erythromycin and tetracycline were chosen as the representative of multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their characteristics after UV treatment were also investigated. UV disinfection results in effective inactivation for total heterotrophic bacteria, as well as all antibiotic resistant bacteria. After UV treatment at a fluence of 5 mJ/cm(2), the log reductions of nine types of antibiotic resistant bacteria varied from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 2.4 ± 0.1. Bacteria resistant to both erythromycin and tetracycline had a similar fluence response as did total heterotrophic bacteria. The findings suggest that UV disinfection could eliminate antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment effluents and thus ensure public health security. Our experimental results indicated that UV disinfection led to enrichment of bacteria with resistance to sulfadiazine, vancomycin, rifampicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol, while the proportions of cephalexin-, erythromycin-, gentamicin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria in the wastewater decreased. This reveals the microbial selectivity of UV disinfection for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

  16. Insect Resistance Management in Bt Maize: Wild Host Plants of Stem Borers Do Not Serve as Refuges in Africa.

    PubMed

    Van den Berg, J

    2017-02-01

    Resistance evolution by target pests threatens the sustainability of Bt maize in Africa where insect resistance management (IRM) strategies are faced by unique challenges. The assumptions, on which current IRM strategies for stem borers are based, are not all valid for African maize stem borer species. The high dose-refuge strategy which is used to delay resistance evolution relies heavily on the presence of appropriate refuges (non-Bt plants) where pests are not under selection pressure and where sufficient numbers of Bt-susceptible individuals are produced to mate with possible survivors on the Bt maize crop. Misidentification of stem borer species and inaccurate reporting on wild host plant diversity over the past six decades created the perception that grasses will contribute to IRM strategies for these pests in Africa. Desired characteristics of refuge plants are that they should be good pest hosts, implying that larval survival is high and that it produces sufficient numbers of high-quality moths. Refuge plants should also have large cover abundance in areas where Bt maize is planted. While wild host plants may suffice in IRM strategies for polyphagous pests, this is not the case with stenophagous pests. This review discusses data of ecological studies and stem borer surveys conducted over the past decade and shows that wild host plants are unsuitable for development and survival of sufficient numbers of stem borer individuals. These grasses rather act as dead-end-trap plants and do not comply with refuge requirements of producing 500 susceptible individuals for every one resistant individual that survives on Bt maize.

  17. Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment Diminishes Fungal Viability and Up-Regulates Resistance Genes in a Plant Host

    PubMed Central

    Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance. PMID:24911947

  18. Interplay between Parasitism and Host Ontogenic Resistance in the Epidemiology of the Soil-Borne Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Delarue, Patrick; Morlière, Stéphanie; Montfort, Françoise; Hervé, Maxime R.; Poggi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i) its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii) after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed. PMID:25127238

  19. Interplay between parasitism and host ontogenic resistance in the epidemiology of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas E; Le Cointe, Ronan; Delarue, Patrick; Morlière, Stéphanie; Montfort, Françoise; Hervé, Maxime R; Poggi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i) its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii) after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed.

  20. Increased plant growth and copper uptake of host and non-host plants by metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Leni; Wang, Xiaohan; Li, Ya

    2016-01-01

    The effects of inoculation with two metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria (Burkholderia sp. GL12 and Bacillus megaterium JL35) were evaluated on the plant growth and Cu uptake in their host Elsholtzia splendens and non-host Brassica napus plants grown in natural Cu-contaminated soil. The two strains showed a high level of ACC deaminase activities. In pot experiments, inoculation with strain GL12 significantly increased root and above-ground tissue dry weights of both plants, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of E. splendens and Brassica napus by 132% and 48.2% respectively. Inoculation with strain JL35 was found to significantly increase not only the biomass of B. napus, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of B. napus by 31.3%, but Cu concentration of E. splendens for above-ground tissues by 318% and roots by 69.7%, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of E. splendens by 223%. The two strains could colonize the rhizosphere soils and root interiors of both plants. Notably, strain JL35 could colonize the shoot tissues and significantly increase the translocation factors and bioaccumulation factors of E. splendens. These results suggested that Burkholderia sp. GL12 and B. megaterium JL35 were valuable bacterial resource which had the potential in improving the efficiency of Cu phytoextraction by E. splendens and B. napus in a natural Cu-contaminated soil.

  1. Severe insulin resistance secondary to insulin antibodies: successful treatment with the immunosuppressant MMF.

    PubMed

    Segal, T; Webb, Ea; Viner, R; Pusey, C; Wild, G; Allgrove, J

    2008-06-01

    We have evaluated the use of the immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the treatment of severe insulin resistance caused by neutralising anti-insulin antibodies in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A 12-yr-old boy with a 5-month history of T1DM developed severe immunological insulin resistance secondary to human insulin antibodies. Various different treatment modalities, including lispro insulin, intravenous insulin, prednisolone and immunoabsorption, were tried, all without a sustained response to treatment. Although the introduction of the immunosuppressant MMF only resulted in a small reduction in haemoglobin A1c (from 10.9 to 9.8%), it did result in a significant reduction in insulin requirements from 6000 to 250 U/d (75 to 3.1 U/kg/d), disappearance of the severe nocturnal hypoglycaemia associated with high titres of insulin antibodies and a reduction in the level of these antibodies from 34.6 to 2.7 mg/dL. MMF may be considered as a means of immunosuppression in patients with markedly raised insulin antibodies whose diabetes cannot be controlled with insulin alone.

  2. Heritable variation in the foliar secondary metabolite sideroxylonal in Eucalyptus confers cross-resistance to herbivores.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rose L; Wallis, Ian R; Harwood, Chris E; Henson, Michael; Foley, William J

    2007-10-01

    Plants encounter a broad range of natural enemies and defend themselves in diverse ways. The cost of defense can be reduced if a plant secondary metabolite confers resistance to multiple herbivores. However, there are few examples of positively correlated defenses in plants against herbivores of different types. We present evidence that a genetically variable chemical trait that acts as a strong antifeedant to mammalian herbivores of Eucalyptus also deters insect herbivores, suggesting a possible mechanism for cross-resistance. We provide field confirmation that sideroxylonal, an important antifeedant for mammalian herbivores, also determines patterns of damage by Christmas beetles, a specialist insect herbivore of Eucalyptus. In a genetic progeny trial of Eucalyptus tricarpa, we found significant heritabilities of sideroxylonal concentration (0.60), overall insect damage (0.34), and growth traits (0.30-0.53). Population of origin also had a strong effect on each trait. Negative phenotypic correlations were observed between sideroxylonal and damage, and between damage and growth. No relationship was observed between sideroxylonal concentration and any growth trait. Our results suggest that potential for evolution by natural selection of sideroxylonal concentrations is not strongly constrained by growth costs and that both growth and defense traits can be successfully incorporated into breeding programs for plantation trees.

  3. Interplay between seven secondary metal uptake systems is required for full metal resistance of Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, M; Bauer, L; Kirsten, A; Nies, D H

    2016-03-01

    The beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans is able to grow in metal-contaminated environments due to having sophisticated metal efflux systems. Here, the contribution of all seven known secondary metal uptake systems (ZupT, PitA, CorA1, CorA2, CorA3, ZntB, HoxN) to metal resistance is characterized. In a strategic deletion approach, all ten double deletion mutants, a variety of triple and quadruple mutants, and from the Δ4 mutant (ΔzupT ΔcorA1 ΔcorA2 ΔcorA3) the mutants Δ5 (=Δ4 ΔpitA), Δ6 (=Δ4 ΔpitA ΔzntB), and finally Δ7 (ΔzupT ΔcorA1 ΔcorA2 ΔcorA3 ΔpitA ΔzntB ΔhoxN) were constructed. Metal resistance, metal content, and regulation of expression of these genes were characterized in these mutants. The ΔzupT single deletion strain exhibited an extended lag phase in Tris-buffered liquid mineral salts medium (TMM) compared to its parent strain AE104, indicating a decreased fitness level. Further deletions up to Δ6 did not influence growth in TMM without added metals but fitness of the Δ7 strain dropped to a lower level compared to Δ6, Δ5 and ΔzupT. The cells of the Δ7 multiple deletion strain still contained all essential metals, demonstrating that additional metal import systems must exist in C. metallidurans. PitA was an important contributor of metal:phosphate complexes to C. metallidurans. Up to Δ5 no evidence was found for increased expression of the transporter genes to recruit substitutes for the deleted importers. Only the hoxN-lacZ reporter gene fusion displayed a changed expression pattern in the Δ6 strain, indicating recruitment of HoxN. Metal resistance of the deletion strains decreased along the deletion series although all strains still contained metal efflux systems: up to the Δ6 mutant the overall fitness was kept at the ΔzupT mutant strain level at the cost of a diminished competence to handle μM concentrations of transition metals. Together, these data demonstrated an important contribution of the seven

  4. Impacts of thiamethoxam seed treatment and host plant resistance on the soybean aphid fungal pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis.

    PubMed

    Koch, Karrie A; Ragsdale, David W

    2011-12-01

    Since the introduction of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, from Asia, insecticide use in soybean has increased substantially in the north central United States. Insecticide seed treatments and aphid resistant soybean varieties are management tactics that may reduce reliance on foliar applications of broad-spectrum insecticides. Exploring potential nontarget impacts of these technologies will be an important step in incorporating them into aphid management programs. We investigated impacts of thiamethoxam seed treatment and Rag1 aphid resistant soybean on a fungal pathogen of soybean aphid, Pandora neoaphidis (Remaudière & Hennebert) Humber, via open plot and cage studies. We found that although thiamethoxam seed treatment did significantly lower aphid pressure in open plots compared with an untreated control, this reduction in aphid density translated into nonsignificant decreases in fungal disease prevalence in aphids. Furthermore, when aphid densities were approximately equal in seed treated and untreated soybean, no impact on aphid fungal disease was observed. In open plots, Rag1 resistant soybean experienced lower aphid pressure and aphid disease prevalence compared with a nonresistant isoline. However, in cages when aphid densities were equivalent in both resistant and susceptible soybean, resistance had no impact on aphid disease prevalence. The addition of thiamethoxam seed treatment to resistant soybean yielded aphid densities and aphid disease prevalence similar to untreated, resistant soybean. These studies provide evidence that thiamethoxam seed treatments and Rag1 resistance can impact P. neoaphidis via decreased aphid densities; however, this impact is minimal, implying use of seed treatments and host plant resistance are compatible with P. neoaphidis.

  5. Within-host whole genome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain sub-type in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Bryan A.; Ramsay, Kay A.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Whiley, David M.; Beatson, Scott A.; Bell, Scott C.

    2017-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AUST-02 strain sub-type (M3L7) has been identified in Australia, infects the lungs of some people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with antibiotic resistance. Multiple clonal lineages may emerge during treatment with mutations in chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes commonly observed. Here we describe the within-host diversity and antibiotic resistance of M3L7 during and after antibiotic treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation using whole genome sequencing and show both variation and shared mutations in important genes. Eleven isolates from an M3L7 population (n = 134) isolated over 3 months from an individual with cystic fibrosis underwent whole genome sequencing. A phylogeny based on core genome SNPs identified three distinct phylogenetic groups comprising two groups with higher rates of mutation (hypermutators) and one non-hypermutator group. Genomes were screened for acquired antibiotic resistance genes with the result suggesting that M3L7 resistance is principally driven by chromosomal mutations as no acquired mechanisms were detected. Small genetic variations, shared by all 11 isolates, were found in 49 genes associated with antibiotic resistance including frame-shift mutations (mexA, mexT), premature stop codons (oprD, mexB) and mutations in quinolone-resistance determining regions (gyrA, parE). However, whole genome sequencing also revealed mutations in 21 genes that were acquired following divergence of groups, which may also impact the activity of antibiotics and multi-drug efflux pumps. Comparison of mutations with minimum inhibitory concentrations of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics could not easily explain all resistance profiles observed. These data further demonstrate the complexity of chronic and antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa infection where a multitude of co-existing genotypically diverse sub-lineages might co-exist during and after intravenous antibiotic treatment. PMID:28273168

  6. Within-host whole genome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain sub-type in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Laura J; Tai, Anna S; Wee, Bryan A; Ramsay, Kay A; Kidd, Timothy J; Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Whiley, David M; Beatson, Scott A; Bell, Scott C

    2017-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AUST-02 strain sub-type (M3L7) has been identified in Australia, infects the lungs of some people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with antibiotic resistance. Multiple clonal lineages may emerge during treatment with mutations in chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes commonly observed. Here we describe the within-host diversity and antibiotic resistance of M3L7 during and after antibiotic treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation using whole genome sequencing and show both variation and shared mutations in important genes. Eleven isolates from an M3L7 population (n = 134) isolated over 3 months from an individual with cystic fibrosis underwent whole genome sequencing. A phylogeny based on core genome SNPs identified three distinct phylogenetic groups comprising two groups with higher rates of mutation (hypermutators) and one non-hypermutator group. Genomes were screened for acquired antibiotic resistance genes with the result suggesting that M3L7 resistance is principally driven by chromosomal mutations as no acquired mechanisms were detected. Small genetic variations, shared by all 11 isolates, were found in 49 genes associated with antibiotic resistance including frame-shift mutations (mexA, mexT), premature stop codons (oprD, mexB) and mutations in quinolone-resistance determining regions (gyrA, parE). However, whole genome sequencing also revealed mutations in 21 genes that were acquired following divergence of groups, which may also impact the activity of antibiotics and multi-drug efflux pumps. Comparison of mutations with minimum inhibitory concentrations of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics could not easily explain all resistance profiles observed. These data further demonstrate the complexity of chronic and antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa infection where a multitude of co-existing genotypically diverse sub-lineages might co-exist during and after intravenous antibiotic treatment.

  7. Cell Wall Biomolecular Composition Plays a Potential Role in the Host Type II Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Lahlali, Rachid; Kumar, Saroj; Wang, Lipu; Forseille, Li; Sylvain, Nicole; Korbas, Malgorzata; Muir, David; Swerhone, George; Lawrence, John R.; Fobert, Pierre R.; Peng, Gary; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease of wheat worldwide. Cultivar resistance to FHB depends on biochemical factors that confine the pathogen spread in spikes. Breeding for cultivar resistance is considered the most practical way to manage this disease. In this study, different spectroscopy and microscopy techniques were applied to discriminate resistance in wheat genotypes against FHB. Synchrotron-based spectroscopy and imaging techniques, including focal plane array infrared and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy were used to understand changes in biochemical and nutrients in rachis following FHB infection. Sumai3 and Muchmore were used to represent resistant and susceptible cultivars to FHB, respectively, in this study. The histological comparison of rachis showed substantial differences in the cell wall thickness between the cultivars after infection. Synchrotron-based infrared imaging emphasized substantial difference in biochemical composition of rachis samples between the two cultivars prior to visible symptoms; in the resistant Sumai3, infrared bands representing lignin and hemicellulose were stronger and more persistent compared to the susceptible cultivar. These bands may be the candidates of biochemical markers for FHB resistance. Focal plane array infrared imaging (FPA) spectra from the rachis epidermis and vascular bundles revealed a new band (1710 cm−1) related to the oxidative stress on the susceptible cultivar only. XRF spectroscopy data revealed differences in nutrients composition between cultivars, and between controls and inoculated samples, with substantial increases observed for Ca, K, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si in the resistant cultivar. These nutrients are related to cell wall stability, metabolic process, and plant defense mechanisms such as lignification pathway and callose deposition. The combination of cell wall composition and lignification plays a role in the mechanism of type II host resistance to FHB. Biochemical profiling

  8. Selective chemical inhibition of agr quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus promotes host defense with minimal impact on resistance.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O; Alexander, Susan M; Femling, Jon K; Gray, Brian M; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Horswill, Alexander R; Hall, Pamela R; Gresham, Hattie D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  9. Selective Chemical Inhibition of agr Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Host Defense with Minimal Impact on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O.; Alexander, Susan M.; Femling, Jon K.; Gray, Brian M.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Hall, Pamela R.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  10. The necrotroph Botrytis cinerea induces a non-host type II resistance mechanism in Pinus pinaster suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Herlânder; Lino-Neto, Teresa; Tavares, Rui Manuel

    2008-03-01

    Models of non-host resistance have failed to account for the pathogenicity of necrotrophic agents. During the interaction of Pinus pinaster (maritime pine) with the non-host necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the induction of the hypersensitive response (HR) were analyzed. Elicitation of maritime pine suspended cells with B. cinerea spores resulted in the biphasic induction of ROS. The phase I oxidative burst was dependent on calcium influx, while the phase II oxidative burst also depended on NADPH oxidase, protein kinase activity, and de novo transcription and protein synthesis. A decline was observed in catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, together with the down-regulation of Fe-Sod1, chlCu, Zn-Sod1 and csApx1, suggesting a coordinated response towards a decrease in the ROS-scavenging capacity of maritime pine cells during challenge. Following the second oxidative burst, programmed cell death events characteristic of the HR were observed. The results suggest the ROS-mediated and cell-breach-independent activation of Type II non-host resistance during the P. pinaster-B. cinerea interaction.

  11. Effects of Alcohol Intoxication and Victimization History on Women's Sexual Assault Resistance Intentions: The Role of Secondary Cognitive Appraisals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Susan A.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.; Davis, Kelly Cue; Masters, N. Tatiana; Hessler, Danielle M.

    2007-01-01

    This study used an experimental paradigm to investigate the role of secondary cognitive appraisals in women's sexual assault resistance and whether these appraisals mediated influences of alcohol and prior victimization. After consuming a beverage (control, placebo, moderate, or high dose), 351 women projected themselves into a simulated…

  12. Role of volatile and non-volatile plant secondary metabolites in host tree selection by Christmas beetles.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Mamoru; Foley, William J; Floyd, Robert B

    2011-03-01

    Individual Eucalyptus trees in south-eastern Australia vary considerably in susceptibility to herbivores. On the one hand, studies with insect herbivores have suggested that variation in the concentrations of foliar monoterpenes is related to variation in susceptibility. On the other, studies with marsupial folivores have suggested that variation in the concentrations of sideroxylonals (a group of formylated phloroglucinol compounds) is responsible for variation in susceptibility. We examined relative importance of sideroxylonals and 1,8-cineole (a dominant monoterpene) in host tree selection by Christmas beetles (Anoplognathus species: Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) by using no-choice experiments, choice/no-choice experiments, and manipulative experiments in which concentrations of sideroxylonals or 1,8-cineole were altered. We used two species of host Eucalyptus, one species of non-host Eucalyptus, and three species of non-host non-Eucalyptus trees. Leaf consumption by Christmas beetles was negatively correlated with the concentrations of sideroxylonals and 1,8-cineole. Artificial increases in the concentration of sideroxylonals or 1,8-cineole reduced leaf consumption by Christmas beetles. An artificial reduction in foliar monoterpenes had no effect on leaf consumption by the beetles when leaves contained high or very low concentrations of sideroxylonals. However, when the concentration of sideroxylonals was moderate, a reduction in the foliar monoterpenes increased leaf consumption by the beetles. Therefore, monoterpenes such as 1,8-cineole may be used as a negative cue by Christmas beetles. The pattern of food consumption on non-host Eucalyptus species and non-host non-Eucalyptus species suggest that both positive and negative cues may be used by Christmas beetles to select host trees.

  13. Potential of host-plant resistance as an alternative control measure for sugarbeet root maggot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) Germplasm lines with sugarbeet root maggot (Tetanops myopaeformis von Röder) (SBRM) resistance have been available since 1996. Two resistant germplasm lines, F1015 and F1016, and a susceptible germplasm line, F1010, crossed with three susceptible CMS lines (L53cms, FC50...

  14. Clinical Determinants of HIV-1B Between-Host Evolution and their Association with Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patricia; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that modulate the evolution of virus populations is essential to design efficient control strategies. Mathematical models predict that factors affecting viral within-host evolution may also determine that at the between-host level. Although HIV-1 within-host evolution has been associated with clinical factors used to monitor AIDS progression, such as patient age, CD4 cells count, viral load, and antiretroviral experience, little is known about the role of these clinical factors in determining between-host HIV-1 evolution. Moreover, whether the relative importance of such factors in HIV-1 evolution vary in adult and children patients, in which the course of infection is different, has seldom been analysed. To address these questions, HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) pol sequences of 163 infected children and 450 adults of Madrid, Spain, were used to estimate genetic diversity, rates of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, selection pressures and frequency of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). The role and relative importance of patient age, %CD4, CD4/mm3, viral load, and antiretroviral experience in HIV-1B evolution was analysed. In the pediatric HIV-1B population, three clinical factors were primary predictors of virus evolution: Higher HIV-1B genetic diversity was observed with increasing children age, decreasing CD4/mm3 and upon antiretroviral experience. This was mostly due to higher rates of non-synonymous mutations, which were associated with higher frequency of DRMs. Using this data, we have also constructed a simple multivariate model explaining between 55% and 66% of the variance in HIV-1B evolutionary parameters in pediatric populations. On the other hand, the analysed clinical factors had little effect in adult-infecting HIV-1B evolution. These findings highlight the different evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1B in children and adults, and contribute to understand the factors shaping HIV-1B evolution and the appearance of drug-resistance

  15. Host plant resistance in melon to sweetpotato whitefly in California and Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato whitefly biotype B (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) feeding severely impacts fall season melon (Cucumis melo L.) yield and quality in the lower deserts of California and Arizona. Melon accessions PI 313970 and TGR 1551 (PI 482420) have been reported to exhibit host plant r...

  16. Understanding mechanisms of host resistance against greenbug in cereal crops - an interdisciplinary, collaborative approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At Texas AgriLife Research - Amarillo, we have an ongoing research program focusing on elucidating the mechanisms of interactions between the phloem-feeding aphid pests and cereal crop hosts using the wheat-greenbug as a model system. During this workshop, recent results from our research on the fo...

  17. Butyrate enhances disease resistance of chickens by inducing antimicrobial host defense peptide gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute a large group of natural broad-spectrum antimicrobials and an important first line of immunity in virtually all forms of life. Specific augmentation of synthesis of endogenous HDPs may represent a promising antibiotic-alternative approach to disease control. I...

  18. Genetically engineered resistance to Plum pox virus infection in herbaceous and stone fruit hosts.

    PubMed

    Ilardi, Vincenza; Nicola-Negri, Elisa Di

    2011-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV), a Potyvirus, is the causal agent of sharka, the most detrimental viral disease affecting stone fruit trees. This review focuses on research carried out to obtain PPV- resistant transgenic plants and on how biotechnological strategies evolved in light of the scientific advances made during the last several years. Successful RNA silencing strategies that confer high level of resistance to strains of PPV have been developed and tested under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Moreover, field tests showed that transgene-mediated RNA silencing was effective in protecting plum plants against aphid-mediated PPV infection. The new emerging biotechnological approaches for conferring PPV resistance are discussed.

  19. Water relations of host trees and resistance to the phloem-boring beetle Phoracantha semipunctata F. (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Hanks, Lawrence M; Paine, Timothy D; Millar, Jocelyn G; Campbell, Christopher D; Schuch, Ursula K

    1999-05-01

    Environmental stresses, particularly water deficit, predispose eucalypt trees to attack by the eucalyptus longhorned borer, Phoracantha semipunctata F. (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Our experiments with potted eucalypts revealed that reduced tree water potential was associated with lower resistance to colonization by neonate P. semipunctata, but the linear relationship between water potential and colonization success was reversed at higher larval densities. There was no indication that the bark exudate "kino" served to defend trees from borer attack. Larvae were not able to colonize the cambium of eucalypt logs with high bark moisture, and survival was low under high moisture conditions in artificial hosts composed of pure cellulose. In trees and cut logs with moist bark, larvae failed to reach the cambium, feeding instead in poorer-quality tissues just beneath the bark surface. Our findings suggest that variation in resistance of eucalypts to attack by the borer is associated with moisture content of the bark.

  20. UV light tolerance and reactivation potential of tetracycline-resistant bacteria from secondary effluents of a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Xi, Jinying; Hu, Hong-Ying; Li, Yi; Lu, Sun-Qin; Tang, Fang; Pang, Yu-Chen

    2016-03-01

    Tetracycline-resistant bacteria (TRB) are of concern as emerging microbial contaminants in reclaimed water. To understand the effects of UV disinfection on TRB, both inactivation and reactivation profiles of TRB, as well as 16 tetracycline-resistant isolates from secondary effluent, were characterized in this study. The inactivation ratio of TRB was significantly lower (3.0-log) than that of heterotrophic bacteria (>4.0-log) in the secondary effluent. Additionally, the proportion of TRB significantly increased from 1.65% to 15.51% under 20mJ/cm(2) ultraviolet (UV) exposure. The inactivation rates of tetracycline-resistant isolates ranged from 0.57/s to 1.04/s, of which tetracycline-resistant Enterobacter-1 was the most tolerant to UV light. The reactivation of TRB, tetracycline-resistant isolated strains, as well as heterotrophic bacteria commonly occurred in the secondary effluent even after 20mJ/cm(2) UV exposure. The colony forming ability of TRB and heterotrophic bacteria reached 3.2-log and 3.0-log under 20mJ/cm(2) UV exposure after 22hr incubation. The final inactivation ratio of tetracycline-resistant Enterobacter-1 was 1.18-log under 20mJ/cm(2) UV exposure after 22hr incubation, which is similar to those of TRB (1.18-log) and heterotrophic bacteria (1.19-log). The increased proportion of TRB and the reactivation of tetracycline-resistant enterobacteria in reclaimed water could induce a microbial health risk during wastewater reuse.

  1. 22 CFR Appendix F to Part 62 - Information To Be Collected on Secondary School Student Host Family Applications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Contact information (telephone; e-mail address) of host parents e. Employment—employer name, job title... functioning business? (e.g., daycare, farm) g. Description of each household member (e.g., level of education... school) b. Name, address, e-mail and telephone number of school official c. Approximate size of...

  2. Comparison of gene expression changes in susceptible, tolerant, and resistant hosts in response to infection with citrus tristeza virus and huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogens Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) and Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) are both phloem limited and have significant economic impact on citrus production wherever they are found. Studies of host resistance have indicated that Poncirus trifoliata has tolerance or resistance to both path...

  3. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. )

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  4. Pursuing Post-Secondary Education in the Host Country and the Occupational Attainment of Highly Educated Immigrants to Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the occupational attainment of highly educated adult immigrants by employing a secondary analysis of three waves of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada that provide data on immigrant arrivals in 2000-2001. Occupational attainment is described in terms of matching immigrants' pre-migration occupation with the main…

  5. Introgression of an imidazolinone-resistance gene from winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) into jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host).

    PubMed

    Perez-Jones, Alejandro; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Hansen, Jennifer L; Zemetra, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    Imidazolinone-resistant winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is being commercialized in the USA. This technology allows wheat growers to selectively control jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host), a weed that is especially problematic because of its close genetic relationship with wheat. However, the potential movement of the imidazolinone-resistance gene from winter wheat to jointed goatgrass is a concern. Winter wheat and jointed goatgrass have the D genome in common and can hybridize and backcross under natural field conditions. Since the imidazolinone-resistance gene (Imi1) is located on the D genome, it is possible for resistance to be transferred to jointed goatgrass via hybridization and backcrossing. To study the potential for gene movement, BC(2)S(2) plants were produced artificially using imidazolinone-resistant winter wheat (cv. FS-4) as the female parent and a native jointed goatgrass collection as the male recurrent parent. FS-4, the jointed goatgrass collection, and 18 randomly selected BC(2)S(2) populations were treated with imazamox. The percentage of survival was 100% for the FS-4, 0% for the jointed goatgrass collection and 6 BC(2)S(2) populations, 40% or less for 2 BC(2)S(2) populations, and 50% or greater for the remaining 10 BC(2)S(2) populations. Chromosome counts in BC(2)S(3) plants showed a restoration of the chromosome number of jointed goatgrass, with four out of four plants examined having 28 chromosomes. Sequencing of AHASL1D in BC(2)S(3) plants derived from BC(2)S(2)-6 revealed the sexual transmission of Imi1 from FS-4 to jointed goatgrass. Imi1 conferred resistance to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox, as shown by the in vitro assay for acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) activity.

  6. The Vibrio cholerae Mrp system: cation/proton antiport properties and enhancement of bile salt resistance in a heterologous host.

    PubMed

    Dzioba-Winogrodzki, Judith; Winogrodzki, Olga; Krulwich, Terry A; Boin, Markus A; Häse, Claudia C; Dibrov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The mrp operon from Vibrio cholerae encoding a putative multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter was cloned and functionally expressed in the antiporter-deficient strain of Escherichia coli EP432. Cells of EP432 expressing Vc-Mrp exhibited resistance to Na(+) and Li(+) as well as to natural bile salts such as sodium cholate and taurocholate. When assayed in everted membrane vesicles of the E. coli EP432 host, Vc-Mrp had sufficiently high antiport activity to facilitate the first extensive analysis of Mrp system from a Gram-negative bacterium encoded by a group 2 mrp operon. Vc-Mrp was found to exchange protons for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) ions in pH-dependent manner with maximal activity at pH 9.0-9.5. Exchange was electrogenic (more than one H(+) translocated per cation moved in opposite direction). The apparent K(m) at pH 9.0 was 1.08, 1.30, and 68.5 mM for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), respectively. Kinetic analyses suggested that Vc-Mrp operates in a binding exchange mode with all cations and protons competing for binding to the antiporter. The robust ion antiport activity of Vc-Mrp in sub-bacterial vesicles and its effect on bile resistance of the heterologous host make Vc-Mrp an attractive experimental model for the further studies of biochemistry and physiology of Mrp systems.

  7. Host resistance elicited by methyl jasmonate reduces emission of aggregation pheromones by the spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Erbilgin, Nadir; Krokene, Paal

    2011-11-01

    We treated Norway spruce (Picea abies) stems with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) to determine possible quantitative and qualitative effects of induced tree defenses on pheromone emission by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. We measured the amounts of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and (S)-cis-verbenol, the two main components of the beetle's aggregation pheromone, released from beetle entrance holes, along with phloem terpene content and beetle performance in MeJA-treated and untreated Norway spruce logs. As expected, phloem terpene levels were higher and beetle tunnel length was shorter (an indication of poor performance) in MeJA-treated logs relative to untreated logs. Parallel to the higher phloem terpene content and poorer beetle performance, beetles in MeJA-treated logs released significantly less 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and (S)-cis-verbenol, and the ratio between the two pheromone components was significantly altered. These results suggest that host resistance elicited by MeJA application reduces pheromone emission by I. typographus and alters the critical ratio between the two main pheromone components needed to elicit aggregation. The results also provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced performance and attractivity observed in earlier studies when bark beetles colonize trees with elicited host defenses, and extend our understanding of the ecological functions of conifer resistance against bark beetles.

  8. Temporal Effects of a Begomovirus Infection and Host Plant Resistance on the Preference and Development of an Insect Vector, Bemisia tabaci, and Implications for Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Legarrea, Saioa; Barman, Apurba; Marchant, Wendy; Diffie, Stan; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent plant viruses, by altering phenotypic and physiological traits of their hosts, could modulate the host preference and fitness of hemipteran vectors. A majority of such modulations increase vector preference for virus-infected plants and improve vector fitness, ultimately favouring virus spread. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how these virus-induced modulations on vectors vary temporally, and whether host resistance to the pathogen influences such effects. This study addressed the two questions using a Begomovirus-whitefly-tomato model pathosystem. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) -susceptible and TYLCV-resistant tomato genotypes were evaluated by whitefly-mediated transmission assays. Quantitative PCR revealed that virus accumulation decreased after an initial spike in all genotypes. TYLCV accumulation was less in resistant than in susceptible genotypes at 3, 6, and 12 weeks post inoculation (WPI). TYLCV acquisition by whiteflies over time from resistant and susceptible genotypes was also consistent with virus accumulation in the host plant. Furthermore, preference assays indicated that non-viruliferous whiteflies preferred virus-infected plants, whereas viruliferous whiteflies preferred non-infected plants. However, this effect was prominent only with the susceptible genotype at 6 WPI. The development of whiteflies on non-infected susceptible and resistant genotypes was not significantly different. However, developmental time was reduced when a susceptible genotype was infected with TYLCV. Together, these results suggest that vector preference and development could be affected by the timing of infection and by host resistance. These effects could play a crucial role in TYLCV epidemics. PMID:26529402

  9. Resistance and Susceptibility to Malarial Infection: A Host Defense Strategy against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    BAKIR, Hanaa; YONES, Doaa; GALAL, Lamia; HUSEEIN, Enas

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an effort to understand what limits the virulence of malaria parasites in relation to the host genetic and immunogenic background, we investigated the possibility that the parasite and host genotype crossover interactions constrain virulence. Methods: Two groups of mice from different genotypes were used (C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 mice). The mice were infected with a virulent parasite line Plasmodium yoelii 17XL (P. yoelii 17XL). Parasitemia, hematocrit value and lymphocytes yielded by livers and spleens were evaluated. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) analysis illustrated phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes. Results: Infection with P. yoelii 17XL did not result in the death of DBA/2 mice. In contrast, B6 mice developed significantly high parasitemia and succumbed to death. Using (FACS) analysis, DBA/2 mice were found to experience a marked expansion of interleukin (IL)-2Rβ+ CD3int cells and γδ T cells in the liver, especially in the recovery phase. The expansion of unconventional T cells (i.e. B220+ T cells) was also marked in DBA/2 mice. Conclusion: The outcome of murine malaria infections depends on the dynamic interplay between the immune-mediator and the genotype of the host. PMID:26811732

  10. Experimental elimination of parasites in nature leads to the evolution of increased resistance in hosts

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, Felipe; Scott, Marilyn E.; Hendry, Andrew P.; Fussmann, Gregor F.

    2013-01-01

    A reduction in the strength of selection is expected to cause the evolution of reduced trait expression. Elimination of a parasite should thus cause the evolution of reduced resistance to that parasite. To test this prediction in nature, we studied the fourth- and eighth-generation descendants of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) introduced into four natural streams following experimental elimination of a common and deleterious parasite (Gyrodactylus spp.). After two generations of laboratory rearing to control for plasticity and maternal effects, we infected individual fish to assess their resistance to the parasite. Contrary to theoretical expectations, the introduced guppy populations had rapidly and repeatably evolved increased resistance to the now-absent parasite. This evolution was not owing to a resistance-tolerance trade-off, nor to differences in productivity among the sites. Instead, a leading candidate hypothesis is that the rapid life-history evolution typical in such introductions pleiotropically increases parasite resistance. Our study adds a new dimension to the growing evidence for contemporary evolution in the wild, and also points to the need for a re-consideration of simple expectations from host–parasite theory. In particular, our results highlight the need for increased consideration of multiple sources of selection and pleiotropy when studying evolution in natural contexts. PMID:24197417

  11. Rapid death of duck cells infected with influenza: a potential mechanism for host resistance to H5N1.

    PubMed

    Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Dunham, Stephen P; Nelli, Rahul; White, Gavin A; Coward, Vivien J; Slomka, Marek J; Brown, Ian H; Chang, Kin Chow

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic birds are the natural reservoir for most subtypes of influenza A, and a source of novel viruses with the potential to cause human pandemics, fatal zoonotic disease or devastating epizootics in poultry. It is well recognised that waterfowl typically show few clinical signs following influenza A infection, in contrast, terrestrial poultry such as chickens may develop severe disease with rapid death following infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza. This study examined the cellular response to influenza infection in primary cells derived from resistant (duck) and susceptible (chicken) avian hosts. Paradoxically, we observed that duck cells underwent rapid cell death following infection with low pathogenic avian H2N3, classical swine H1N1 and 'classical' highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Dying cells showed morphological features of apoptosis, increased DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase 3/7. Following infection of chicken cells, cell death occurred less rapidly, accompanied by reduced DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. Duck cells produced similar levels of viral RNA but less infectious virus, in comparison with chicken cells. Such rapid cell death was not observed in duck cells infected with a contemporary Eurasian lineage H5N1 fatal to ducks. The induction of rapid death in duck cells may be part of a mechanism of host resistance to influenza A, with the loss of this response leading to increased susceptibility to emergent strains of H5N1. These studies provide novel insights that should help resolve the long-standing enigma of host-pathogen relationships for highly pathogenic and zoonotic avian influenza.

  12. Conversion of M serotype 24 of Streptococcus pyogenes to M serotypes 5 and 18: effect on resistance to phagocytosis and adhesion to host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, H S; Liu, S; Dale, J B; Hasty, D L

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we utilized recombinant strains expressing the M5 and M18 proteins and M- mutants of group A streptococci to compare the abilities of these M proteins to confer resistance to phagocytosis and to mediate adhesion to host cells. The data indicate that the M5 and M18 proteins can confer resistance to phagocytosis, that fibrinogen is required for this resistance, and that these M proteins can mediate adhesion to HEp-2 cells. PMID:9169794

  13. Endogenous growth factor stimulation of hemocyte proliferation induces resistance to Schistosoma mansoni challenge in the snail host.

    PubMed

    Pila, Emmanuel A; Gordy, Michelle A; Phillips, Valerie K; Kabore, Alethe L; Rudko, Sydney P; Hanington, Patrick C

    2016-05-10

    Digenean trematodes are a large, complex group of parasitic flatworms that infect an incredible diversity of organisms, including humans. Larval development of most digeneans takes place within a snail (Gastropoda). Compatibility between snails and digeneans is often very specific, such that suitable snail hosts define the geographical ranges of diseases caused by these worms. The immune cells (hemocytes) of a snail are sentinels that act as a crucial barrier to infection by larval digeneans. Hemocytes coordinate a robust and specific immunological response, participating directly in parasite killing by encapsulating and clearing the infection. Hemocyte proliferation and differentiation are influenced by unknown digenean-specific exogenous factors. However, we know nothing about the endogenous control of hemocyte development in any gastropod model. Here, we identify and functionally characterize a progranulin [Biomphalaria glabrata granulin (BgGRN)] from the snail B. glabrata, a natural host for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni Granulins are growth factors that drive proliferation of immune cells in organisms, spanning the animal kingdom. We demonstrate that BgGRN induces proliferation of B. glabrata hemocytes, and specifically drives the production of an adherent hemocyte subset that participates centrally in the anti-digenean defense response. Additionally, we demonstrate that susceptible B. glabrata snails can be made resistant to infection with S. mansoni by first inducing hemocyte proliferation with BgGRN. This marks the functional characterization of an endogenous growth factor of a gastropod mollusc, and provides direct evidence of gain of resistance in a snail-digenean infection model using a defined factor to induce snail resistance to infection.

  14. Host-derived probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus improves resistance against Streptococcus iniae infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) via immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Safari, Reza; Adel, Milad; Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Dadar, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    The present study evaluated the benefits of dietary administration of host-derived candidate probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus in juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Experimental diets were prepared by incorporating the microorganisms in the basal feed at 3 inclusion levels (i.e. 10(7) CFU g(-1) of feed [T1], 10(8) CFU g(-1) of feed [T2], 10(9) CFU g(-1) of feed [T3]). The probiotic feeds were administered for 8 weeks, with a group fed with the basal diet serving as control. The effects on growth performance, gut health, innate immunity and disease resistance were evaluated. Results showed that growth performance parameters were significantly improved in T2 and T3 groups. Activities of digestive enzymes such as trypsin and lipase were significantly higher in these two groups as well. Gut micro-ecology was influenced by probiotic feeding as shown by the significant increase in intestinal lactic acid bacteria and total viable aerobic counts in T2 and T3. Humoral immunity was impacted by dietary probiotics as total serum protein and albumin were significantly elevated in T3. The levels of serum IgM significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups at week 8; with the T3 group registering the highest increment. Respiratory burst activity of blood leukocytes were significantly improved in T2 and T3. Hematological profiling further revealed that neutrophil counts significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups. Challenge test showed that probiotic feeding significantly improved host resistance to Streptococcus iniae infection, specifically in T2 and T3 where a considerable modulation of immune responses was observed. Taken together, this study demonstrated E. casseliflavus as a potential probiotics for rainbow trout with the capability of improving growth performance and enhancing disease resistance by immunomodulation.

  15. Endogenous growth factor stimulation of hemocyte proliferation induces resistance to Schistosoma mansoni challenge in the snail host

    PubMed Central

    Pila, Emmanuel A.; Gordy, Michelle A.; Phillips, Valerie K.; Kabore, Alethe L.; Rudko, Sydney P.; Hanington, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Digenean trematodes are a large, complex group of parasitic flatworms that infect an incredible diversity of organisms, including humans. Larval development of most digeneans takes place within a snail (Gastropoda). Compatibility between snails and digeneans is often very specific, such that suitable snail hosts define the geographical ranges of diseases caused by these worms. The immune cells (hemocytes) of a snail are sentinels that act as a crucial barrier to infection by larval digeneans. Hemocytes coordinate a robust and specific immunological response, participating directly in parasite killing by encapsulating and clearing the infection. Hemocyte proliferation and differentiation are influenced by unknown digenean-specific exogenous factors. However, we know nothing about the endogenous control of hemocyte development in any gastropod model. Here, we identify and functionally characterize a progranulin [Biomphalaria glabrata granulin (BgGRN)] from the snail B. glabrata, a natural host for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. Granulins are growth factors that drive proliferation of immune cells in organisms, spanning the animal kingdom. We demonstrate that BgGRN induces proliferation of B. glabrata hemocytes, and specifically drives the production of an adherent hemocyte subset that participates centrally in the anti-digenean defense response. Additionally, we demonstrate that susceptible B. glabrata snails can be made resistant to infection with S. mansoni by first inducing hemocyte proliferation with BgGRN. This marks the functional characterization of an endogenous growth factor of a gastropod mollusc, and provides direct evidence of gain of resistance in a snail-digenean infection model using a defined factor to induce snail resistance to infection. PMID:27114544

  16. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    PubMed Central

    Haaber, Jakob; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Cohn, Marianne T.; Catalan-Moreno, Arancha; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Westh, Henrik; Penadés, José R.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S. aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction', allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence model (wax moth larvae) and enables it to proliferate under strong antibiotic selection pressure. Our results may help to explain the rapid exchange of antibiotic resistance genes observed in S. aureus. PMID:27819286

  17. Suppression of bacterial blight on mustard greens with host plant resistance and Acibenzolar-S-Methyl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, attacks the leaves of most brassica vegetables, including mustard greens (Brassica juncea). ‘Carolina Broadleaf,’ a new mustard cultivar, is resistant to bacterial blight. Acibenzolar-S-methyl (trade name Actigard) has been used to m...

  18. Potential of host plant resistance to the sugarbeet root maggot in an integrated pest management system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of a hybrid with a sugarbeet root maggot (Tetanops myopaeformis von Röder) resistant pollinator was compared to the performance of an adapted susceptible hybrid at a location with root maggots present (St. Thomas, ND) and a location with no root maggots (Fargo, ND) in 2015 and 2016. ...

  19. Intestinal Decontamination of Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae After Recurrent Infections in an Immunocompromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Kronman, Matthew P.; Zerr, Danielle M.; Qin, Xuan; Englund, Janet; Cornell, Cathy; Sanders, Jean E.; Myers, Jeffrey; Rayar, Jaipreet; Berry, Jessica E.; Adler, Amanda L.; Weissman, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae infections are associated with increased morbidity. We describe a 20-year-old hematopoietic cell transplantation recipient with recurrent MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, prolonged intestinal colonization, and subsequent intestinal decontamination. Further study should evaluate stool surveillance, molecular typing, and fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with intestinal MDR Enterobacteriaceae carriage. PMID:25041704

  20. Role of macrophages in early host resistance to respiratory Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hongyu; KuoLee, Rhonda; Harris, Greg; Van Rooijen, Nico; Patel, Girishchandra B; Chen, Wangxue

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen that causes nosocomial pneumonia and other infections. Although it is recognized as an increasing threat to immunocompromised patients, the mechanism of host defense against A. baumannii infection remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the potential role of macrophages in host defense against A. baumannii infection using in vitro macrophage culture and the mouse model of intranasal (i.n.) infection. Large numbers of A. baumannii were taken up by alveolar macrophages in vivo as early as 4 h after i.n. inoculation. By 24 h, the infection induced significant recruitment and activation (enhanced expression of CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) of macrophages into bronchoalveolar spaces. In vitro cell culture studies showed that A. baumannii were phagocytosed by J774A.1 (J774) macrophage-like cells within 10 minutes of co-incubation, and this uptake was microfilament- and microtubule-dependent. Moreover, the viability of phagocytosed bacteria dropped significantly between 24 and 48 h after co-incubation. Infection of J774 cells by A. baumannii resulted in the production of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and moderate amounts of nitric oxide (NO). Prior treatment of J774 cells with NO inhibitors significantly suppressed their bactericidal efficacy (P<0.05). Most importantly, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages significantly enhanced the susceptibility of mice to i.n. A. baumannii challenge (P<0.01). These results indicate that macrophages may play an important role in early host defense against A. baumannii infection through the efficient phagocytosis and killing of A. baumannii to limit initial pathogen replication and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines for the rapid recruitment of other innate immune cells such as neutrophils.

  1. Development of host resistance to Fasciola hepatica after the elimination of primary infection with diamphenethide.

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Spaldonová, R

    1975-01-01

    We studied the specificity of the individual developmental stages of Fasciola hepatica for evoking immune response of the host to reinfection with this parasite, whereby the primary infection was eliminated by a dose of 150 mg/kg diamphenethide administered in various intervals. In rats we observed a state of hypersensitivity demonstrated by retarded migration and growth of the flukes and the reduction in the number of sexually developed parasites. The changes were most marked, if the elimination of the immunizing infection followed 8-10 weeks after primary infection.

  2. Partial dysfunction of STAT1 profoundly reduces host resistance to flaviviral infection.

    PubMed

    Larena, Maximilian; Lobigs, Mario

    2017-03-07

    The genetic basis for a dramatically increased virus susceptibility phenotype of MHC-II knockout mice acquired during routine maintenance of the mouse strain was determined. Segregation of the susceptibility allele from the defective MHC-II locus combined with sequence capture and sequencing showed that a Y37L substitution in STAT1 accounted for high flavivirus susceptibility of a newly derived mouse strain, designated Tuara. Interestingly, the mutation in STAT1 gene gave only partial inactivation of the type I interferon antiviral pathway. Accordingly, merely a relatively small impairment of interferon α/β signalling is sufficient to overcome the ability of the host to control the infection.

  3. Geography and genealogy of the human host harbouring a distinctive drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Paul; Henry, Kevin A; Schwartzman, Kevin; Jomphe, Michèle; Olson, Sherry H

    2008-05-01

    For a strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mono-resistant to pyrazinamide (PZA), we report the geographic distribution within Quebec of the 77 cases diagnosed during 1990-2000. Known as the Quebec mutation (or the pncA deletion), the strain is rare in urban areas and showed an unexpected concentration in Mauricie, one of the 16 health districts of the province, with a cluster of 10 cases situated in a rural area of 35-km radius. The cases occurred among people >50 (98%), of French Canadian origins (90%), and are understood to have arisen by reactivation. The rarity in Montreal and smaller cities is explained by the youthfulness of massive postwar migrations. To reach back into the history of settlement, we examined genealogies: 92,429 ancestral marriages for 32 of the 77 PZA-resistant isolates and 226,535 for a set of 85 controls with isolates of more diverse mycobacterial strains. Genealogical analysis showed no salient common ancestor for the cases, and kinship among them was no greater than observed in control samples from the same regions. But it identified an unsuspected geographical region as the site of ancestral concentrations prior to 1840, for both resistant strains and controls. The following scenario is proposed for the resistant strain: endemic in a specific geographical region by 1800, it dispersed with families moving into regions opened to settlement in the 1840s and 1850s, among them Mauricie, where dispersion was intensified by seasonal mobility of labour in logging, milling and marketing timber. In high-incidence areas, it is difficult to distinguish cases of reactivation from recent infections, but the low-incidence context allows us to observe a 200-year trajectory of a distinctive drug-resistant strain of M. tuberculosis.

  4. Down-regulation of Fusarium oxysporum endogenous genes by Host-Delivered RNA interference enhances disease resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zongli; Parekh, Urvi; Maruta, Natsumi; Trusov, Yuri; Botella, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a devastating pathogen causing extensive yield losses in a variety of crops and development of sustainable, environmentally friendly methods to improve crop resistance is crucial. We have used Host-Derived RNA interference (HD-RNAi) technology to partially silence three different genes (FOW2, FRP1 and OPR) in the hemi-biotrophic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans. Expression of double stranded RNA molecules targeting fungal pathogen genes was achieved in a number of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. F. oxysporum infecting the transgenic lines displayed substantially reduced mRNA levels on all three targeted genes, with an average of 75%, 83% and 72% reduction for FOW2, FRP1 and OPR respectively. The silencing of pathogen genes had a clear positive effect on the ability of the transgenic lines to fight infection. All transgenic lines displayed enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum with delayed disease symptom development, especially FRP1 and OPR lines. Survival rates after fungal infection were higher in the transgenic lines compared to control wild type plants which consistently showed survival rates of 10%, with FOW2 lines showing 25% survival; FRP1 lines 30-50% survival and FOW2 between 45-70% survival. The down-regulation effect was specific for the targeted genes without unintended effects in related genes. In addition to producing resistant crops, HD-RNAi can provide a useful tool to rapidly screen candidate fungal pathogenicity genes without the need to produce fungal knockout mutants.

  5. New hypotheses derived from the structure of a flaviviral Xrn1-resistant RNA: Conservation, folding, and host adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Jeffrey S; Rabe, Jennifer L; Chapman, Erich G

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne flaviviruses (FVs) are a growing world-wide health threat whose incidence and range are increasing. The pathogenicity and cytopathicity of these single-stranded RNA viruses are influenced by viral subgenomic non-protein-coding RNAs (sfRNAs) that the viruses produce to high levels during infection. To generate sfRNAs the virus co-opts the action of the abundant cellular exonuclease Xrn1, which is part of the cell's normal RNA turnover machinery. This exploitation of the cellular machinery is enabled by discrete, highly structured, Xrn1-resistant RNA elements (xrRNAs) in the 3′UTR that interact with Xrn1 to halt processive 5′ to 3′ decay of the viral genomic RNA. We recently solved the crystal structure of a functional xrRNA, revealing a novel fold that provides a mechanistic model for Xrn1 resistance. Continued analysis and interpretation of the structure reveals that the tertiary contacts that knit the xrRNA fold together are shared by a wide variety of arthropod-borne FVs, conferring robust Xrn1 resistance in all tested. However, there is some variability in the structures that correlates with unexplained patterns in the viral 3′ UTRs. Finally, examination of these structures and their behavior in the context of viral infection leads to a new hypothesis linking RNA tertiary structure, overall 3′ UTR architecture, sfRNA production, and host adaptation. PMID:26399159

  6. Down-regulation of Fusarium oxysporum endogenous genes by Host-Delivered RNA interference enhances disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zongli; Parekh, Urvi; Maruta, Natsumi; Trusov, Yuri; Botella, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a devastating pathogen causing extensive yield losses in a variety of crops and development of sustainable, environmentally friendly methods to improve crop resistance is crucial. We have used Host-Delivered RNA interference (HD-RNAi) technology to partially silence three different genes (FOW2, FRP1, and OPR) in the hemi-biotrophic fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans. Expression of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules targeting fungal pathogen genes was achieved in a number of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. F. oxysporum infecting the transgenic lines displayed substantially reduced mRNA levels on all three targeted genes, with an average of 75, 83, and 72% reduction for FOW2, FRP1, and OPR, respectively. The silencing of pathogen genes had a clear positive effect on the ability of the transgenic lines to fight infection. All transgenic lines displayed enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum with delayed disease symptom development, especially FRP1 and OPR lines. Survival rates after fungal infection were higher in the transgenic lines compared to control wild type plants which consistently showed survival rates of 10%, with FOW2 lines showing 25% survival; FRP1 lines 30–50% survival and OPR between 45 and 70% survival. The down-regulation effect was specific for the targeted genes without unintended effects in related genes. In addition to producing resistant crops, HD-RNAi can provide a useful tool to rapidly screen candidate fungal pathogenicity genes without the need to produce fungal knockout mutants. PMID:25654075

  7. Deciphering host resistance and pathogen virulence: the Arabidopsis/Pseudomonas interaction as a model.

    PubMed

    Quirino, Betania F; Bent, Andrew F

    2003-11-01

    SUMMARY The last decade has witnessed steady progress in deciphering the molecular basis of plant disease resistance and pathogen virulence. Although contributions have been made using many different plant and pathogen species, studies of the interactions between Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas syringae have yielded a particularly significant body of information. The present review focuses on recent findings regarding R gene products and the guard hypothesis, RAR1/SGT1 and other examples where protein processing activity is implicated in disease resistance or susceptibility, the use of microarray expression profiling to generate information and experimental leads, and important molecular- and genome-level discoveries regarding P. syringae effectors that mediate bacterial virulence. The development of the Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas model system is also reviewed briefly, and we close with a discussion of characteristics to consider when selecting other pathosystems as experimentally tractable models for future research.

  8. Steroidal Surfactants: Detection of Premicellar Aggregation, Secondary Aggregation Changes in Micelles, and Hosting of a Highly Charged Negative Substance.

    PubMed

    Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Cladera, Josep

    2015-08-25

    CHAPSO and CHAPS are zwitterionic surfactants derived from bile salts which are usually employed in protein purification and for the preparation of liposomes and bicelles. Despite their spread use, there are significant discrepancies on the critical concentrations that determine their aggregation behavior. In this work, we study the interaction between these surfactants with the negative fluorescent dye pyranine (HPTS) by absorbance, fluorescence, and infrared spectrometry to establish their concentration-dependent aggregation. For the studied surfactants, we detect three critical concentrations showing their concentration-dependent presence as a monomeric form, premicellar aggregates, micelles, and a second type of micelle in aqueous medium. The nature of the interaction of HPTS with the surfactants was studied using analogues of their tails and the negative bile salt taurocholate (TC) as reference for the sterol ring. The results indicate that the chemical groups involved are the hydroxyl groups of the polar face of the sterol ring and the sulfonate groups of the dye. This interaction causes not only the incorporation of the negative dye in CHAPSO and CHAPS micelles but also its association with their premicellar aggregates. Surprisingly, this hosting behavior for a negative charged molecule was also detected for the negative bile salt TC, bypassing, in this way, the electrostatic repulsion between the guest and the host.

  9. Patterns of host-parasite adaptation in three populations of monarch butterflies infected with a naturally occurring protozoan disease: virulence, resistance, and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Li, Hui; Wang, Rebecca; Gowler, Camden; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have used host-parasite systems to study local adaptation, but few of these studies have found unequivocal evidence for adaptation. One potential reason is that most studies have focused on limited measures of host and parasite fitness that are generally assumed to be under negative frequency-dependent selection. We have used reciprocal cross-infection experiments to test for local adaptation in Hawaiian, south Floridian, and eastern North American populations of monarch butterflies and their protozoan parasites. Sympatric host-parasite combinations did not result in greater host or parasite fitness, as would be expected under coevolutionary dynamics driven by negative frequency-dependent selection. Instead, we found that Hawaiian hosts were more resistant and carried more infective and virulent parasites, which is consistent with theoretical predictions for virulence evolution and coevolutionary arms race dynamics. We also found that Hawaiian hosts were more tolerant, particularly of Hawaiian parasites, indicating that increased resistance does not preclude increased tolerance within a population and that hosts may be more tolerant of local parasites. We did not find a similar pattern in the south Floridian or eastern populations, possibly because host-parasite adaptation occurs within the context of a greater ecological community.

  10. Resistance to niclosamide in Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum: should we be worried?

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-Rong; Li, You-Zi; Wang, Wei; Xing, Yun-Tian; Qu, Guo-Li; Liang, You-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    As the currently only available molluscicide, niclosamide has been widely used for snail control for over 2 decades in China. There is therefore a concern about the emergence of niclosamide-resistant snail populations following repeated, extensive use of the chemical. The purpose of this study was to investigate the likelihood of niclosamide resistance in Oncomelania hupensis in China. Active adult O. hupensis snails derived from 20 counties of 10 schistosomiasis-endemic provinces of China, of 10 snails in each drug concentration, were immersed in solutions of 1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, 0.063, 0.032, 0.016 and 0.008 mg L-1 of a 50% wettable powder of niclosamide ethanolamine salt (WPN) for 24 and 48 h at 25 °C, and the median lethal concentration (LC50) was estimated. Then, the 24- and 48-h WPN LC50 values were compared with those determined in the same sampling sites in 2002. The results indicated that the 24- and 48-h WPN LC50 values for O. hupensis were not significantly different from those determined in 2002 (P = 0.202 and 0.796, respectively). It is concluded that the current sensitivity of O. hupensis to niclosamide has not changed after more than 2 decades of repeated, extensive application in the main endemic foci of China, and there is no evidence of resistance to niclosamide detected in O. hupensis.

  11. Effects of Host Resistance and Temperature on Development of Globodera tabacum solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Johnson, C. S.; Eisenback, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Penetration and development of juveniles of tobacco cyst nematode (Globodera tabacum solanacearum) on a resistant (NC567) and a susceptible (K326) cultivar of flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were determined in root zone chamber experiments. More vermiform juveniles developed into a swollen shape at 22, 27, and 31 °C than at 17 °C. Development of flask-shaped nematodes appeared to be similar across tested temperatures (17, 22, 27, and 31 °C). General patterns of penetration and development of juveniles in both resistant and susceptible cultivars were similar under all temperatures tested. More vermiform, swollen, and flask-shaped nematodes were found in roots of K326 than in those of NC567. Development from swollen to flaskshaped nematodes appeared to be similar between the two cultivars, although more vermiform juveniles developed into swollen nematodes on K326 than on NC567. Differences in resistance between the two cultivars remained stable across tested temperatures. PMID:19266009

  12. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci species isolated from computer keyboards located in secondary and postsecondary schools.

    PubMed

    Boa, Tyler T; Rahube, Teddie O; Fremaux, Bastien; Levett, Paul N; Yost, Christopher K

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public health threat within the general community, thereby warranting identification of MRSA reservoirs within the community. Computer terminals in schools were sampled for S. aureus and methicillin-resistant staphylococci. The overall prevalence of MRSA on computer keyboards was low: 0.68% for a postsecondary institution and 2% and 0% for two secondary institutes. The MRSA isolate from the postsecondary institution did not correspond to the Canadian epidemic clusters, but is related to the USA 700 cluster, which contains strains implicated in outbreaks within the U.S. The isolate from the secondary institute's keyboard was typed as CMRSA7 (USA 400), a strain that has been implicated in both Canadian and U.S. epidemics. Methicillin-resistant S. haemolyticus and S. epidermidis were also isolated from keyboards, indicating that a mixed community of methicillin-resistant staphylococci can be present on keyboards. Although the prevalence was low, the presence of MRSA combined with the high volume of traffic on these student computer terminals demonstrates the potential for public-access computer terminals and computer rooms at educational institutes to act as reservoirs.

  13. Host resistance of CD18 knockout mice against systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common beta2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P < 0.01). Quantitative organ culture showed that numbers of Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1beta and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense.

  14. Cheating as Subversive and Strategic Resistance: Vocational Students' Resistance and Conformity towards Academic Subjects in a Swedish Upper Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogberg, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a field study in two boy-dominated classes in a vocational programme in a Swedish upper secondary school. The focus of the article is the boys' perspective on their cheating activities during lessons and tests within academic subjects. Since the boys often regarded these subjects as boring and useless in relation to their…

  15. Diversity in Betasatellites Associated with Cotton Leaf Curl Disease During Source-To-Sink Movement Through a Resistant Host.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftikhar Ali; Akhtar, Khalid Pervaiz; Akbar, Fazal; Hassan, Ishtiaq; Amin, Imran; Saeed, Muhammad; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-02-01

    Cotton leaf curl is devastating disease of cotton characterized by leaf curling, vein darkening and enations. The disease symptoms are induced by DNA satellite known as Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB), dominant betasatellite in cotton but another betasatellite known as Chili leaf curl betasatellite (ChLCB) is also found associated with the disease. Grafting experiment was performed to determine if host plant resistance is determinant of dominant population of betasatellite in cotton (several distinct strains of CLCuMuB are associated with the disease). Infected scion of Gossypium hirsutum collected from field (the source) was grafted on G. arboreum, a diploid cotton species, resistant to the disease. A healthy scion of G. hirsutum (sink) was grafted at the top of G. arboreum to determine the movement of virus/betasatellite to upper susceptible scion of G. hirsutum. Symptoms of disease appeared in the upper scion and presence of virus/betasatellite in the upper scion was confirmed via molecular techniques, showing that virus/betasatellite was able to move to upper scion through resistant G. arboreum. However, no symptoms appeared on G. arboreum. Betasatelites were cloned and sequenced from lower scion, upper scion and G. arboreum which show that the lower scion contained both CLCuMuB and ChLCB, however only ChLCB was found in G. arboreum. The upper scion contained CLCuMuB with a deletion of 78 nucleotides (nt) in the non-coding region between A-rich sequence and βC1 gene and insertion of 27 nt in the middle of βC1 ORF. This study may help in investigating molecular basis of resistance in G. arboreum.

  16. Diversity in Betasatellites Associated with Cotton Leaf Curl Disease During Source-To-Sink Movement Through a Resistant Host

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Iftikhar Ali; Akhtar, Khalid Pervaiz; Akbar, Fazal; Hassan, Ishtiaq; Amin, Imran; Saeed, Muhammad; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl is devastating disease of cotton characterized by leaf curling, vein darkening and enations. The disease symptoms are induced by DNA satellite known as Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB), dominant betasatellite in cotton but another betasatellite known as Chili leaf curl betasatellite (ChLCB) is also found associated with the disease. Grafting experiment was performed to determine if host plant resistance is determinant of dominant population of betasatellite in cotton (several distinct strains of CLCuMuB are associated with the disease). Infected scion of Gossypium hirsutum collected from field (the source) was grafted on G. arboreum, a diploid cotton species, resistant to the disease. A healthy scion of G. hirsutum (sink) was grafted at the top of G. arboreum to determine the movement of virus/betasatellite to upper susceptible scion of G. hirsutum. Symptoms of disease appeared in the upper scion and presence of virus/betasatellite in the upper scion was confirmed via molecular techniques, showing that virus/betasatellite was able to move to upper scion through resistant G. arboreum. However, no symptoms appeared on G. arboreum. Betasatelites were cloned and sequenced from lower scion, upper scion and G. arboreum which show that the lower scion contained both CLCuMuB and ChLCB, however only ChLCB was found in G. arboreum. The upper scion contained CLCuMuB with a deletion of 78 nucleotides (nt) in the non-coding region between A-rich sequence and βC1 gene and insertion of 27 nt in the middle of βC1 ORF. This study may help in investigating molecular basis of resistance in G. arboreum. PMID:26889114

  17. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  18. Staphylococcus aureus CC398: Host Adaptation and Emergence of Methicillin Resistance in Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik; Aziz, Maliha; Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Pearson, Talima; Waters, Andrew E.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James; Gillece, John; Driebe, Elizabeth; Liu, Cindy M.; Springer, Burkhard; Zdovc, Irena; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Żmudzki, Jacek; Schwarz, Stefan; Butaye, Patrick; Jouy, Eric; Pomba, Constanca; Porrero, M. Concepción; Ruimy, Raymond; Smith, Tara C.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Weese, J. Scott; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Yu, Fangyou; Laurent, Frederic; Keim, Paul; Skov, Robert; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collection of CC398 isolates (n = 89), including MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from animals and humans spanning 19 countries and four continents. We identified 4,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the 89 core genomes. Minimal homoplasy (consistency index = 0.9591) was detected among parsimony-informative SNPs, allowing for the generation of a highly accurate phylogenetic reconstruction of the CC398 clonal lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MSSA from humans formed the most ancestral clades. The most derived lineages were composed predominantly of livestock-associated MRSA possessing three different staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) types (IV, V, and VII-like) including nine subtypes. The human-associated isolates from the basal clades carried phages encoding human innate immune modulators that were largely missing among the livestock-associated isolates. Our results strongly suggest that livestock-associated MRSA CC398 originated in humans as MSSA. The lineage appears to have undergone a rapid radiation in conjunction with the jump from humans to livestock, where it subsequently acquired tetracycline and methicillin resistance. Further analyses are required to estimate the number of independent genetic events leading to the methicillin-resistant sublineages, but the diversity of SCCmec subtypes is suggestive of strong and diverse antimicrobial selection associated with food animal production. PMID:22354957

  19. Diversification of broad host range plasmids correlates with the presence of antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobin; Wang, Yafei; Brown, Celeste J.; Yao, Fei; Jiang, Yong; Top, Eva M.; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The IncP-1ε subgroup is a recently identified phylogenetic clade within IncP-1 plasmids, which plays an important role in the spread of antibiotic resistance and degradation of xenobiotic pollutants. Here, four IncP-1ε plasmids were exogenously captured from a petroleum-contaminated habitat in China and compared phylogenetically and genomically with previously reported IncP-1ε and other IncP-1 plasmids. The IncP-1ε plasmids can be clearly subdivided into two subclades, designated as ε-I and ε-II, based on phylogenetic analysis of backbone proteins TraI and TrfA. This was further supported by comparison of concatenated backbone genes. Moreover, the two subclades differed in the transposon types, phenotypes and insertion locations of the accessory elements. The accessory genes on ε-I plasmids were inserted between parA and traC, and harbored ISPa17 and Tn402-like transposon modules, typically carrying antibiotic resistance genes. In contrast, the accessory elements on ε-II plasmids were typically located between trfA and oriV, and contained IS1071, which was commonly inserted within the Tn501-like transposon, typically harboring a cluster of genes encoding mercury resistance and/or catabolic pathways. Our study is one of the first to compare IncP-1 plasmid genomes from China, expands the available collection of IncP-1ε plasmids and enhances our understanding of their diversity, biogeography and evolutionary history. PMID:26635412

  20. Antibiotic Resistance and Regulation of the Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Barrier by Host Innate Immune Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-negative outer membrane is an important barrier that provides protection against toxic compounds, which include antibiotics and host innate immune molecules such as cationic antimicrobial peptides. Recently, significant research progress has been made in understanding the biogenesis, regulation, and functioning of the outer membrane, including a recent paper from the laboratory of Dr. Brett Finlay at the University of British Columbia (J. van der Heijden et al., mBio 7:e01238-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01541-16). These investigators demonstrate that toxic oxygen radicals, such as those found in host tissues, regulate outer membrane permeability by altering the outer membrane porin protein channels to regulate the influx of oxygen radicals as well as β-lactam antibiotics. This commentary provides context about this interesting paper and discusses the prospects of utilizing increased knowledge of outer membrane biology to develop new antibiotics for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27677793

  1. Host-Directed Therapies for Tackling Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis: Learning From the Pasteur-Bechamp Debates.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global emergency causing an estimated 1.5 million deaths annually. For several decades the major focus of tuberculosis treatment has been on antibiotic development targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The lengthy tuberculosis treatment duration and poor treatment outcomes associated with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are of major concern. The sparse new tuberculosis drug pipeline and widespread emergence of MDR-TB signal an urgent need for more innovative interventions to improve treatment outcomes. Building on the historical Pasteur-Bechamp debates on the role of the "microbe" vs the "host internal milieu" in disease causation, we make the case for parallel investments into host-directed therapies (HDTs). A range of potential HDTs are now available which require evaluation in randomized controlled clinical trials as adjunct therapies for shortening the duration of tuberculosis therapy and improving treatment outcomes for drug-susceptible tuberculosis and MDR-TB. Funder initiatives that may enable further research into HDTs are described.

  2. An alternative host model of a mixed fungal infection by azole susceptible and resistant Aspergillus spp strains

    PubMed Central

    Alcazar-Fuoli, L; Buitrago, Mj; Gomez-Lopez, A; Mellado, E

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common mold involved in human infections. However, the number of non-fumigatus species able to cause disease is continuously increasing. Among them, Aspergillus lentulus is reported in hematological and cystic fibrosis patients and in those treated with corticosteroids. A. lentulus differs from A. fumigatus in some clinically relevant aspects such as virulence and antifungal susceptibility, showing high MICs to most antifungals. Previous studies proved that A. lentulus was pathogenic in immunocompromised mice, although the course of the infection was delayed compared to A. fumigatus. These differences could explain why A. lentulus is mostly found in mixed infections with A. fumigatus challenging the diagnosis and treatment. We used the alternative model host Galleria mellonella to compare virulence, host interaction, fungal burden and antifungal response when larvae were infected with A. fumigatus or A. lentulus alone, and with a mixture of both species. A. lentulus was pathogenic in G. mellonella but infected larvae did not respond to therapeutic doses of voriconazole. We were able to simultaneously detect A. fumigatus and A. lentulus by a multiplex Nested Real Time PCR (MN-PCR). Comparative analysis of larvae histological sections showed melanization of both species but presented a different pattern of immune response by haemocytes. Analysis of fungal burden and histology showed that A. lentulus survived in the G. mellonella despite the antifungal treatment in single and mixed infections. We conclude that the simultaneous presence of antifungal susceptible and resistant Aspergillus species would likely complicate the management of these infections. PMID:26065322

  3. Targeting chitinase gene of Helicoverpa armigera by host-induced RNA interference confers insect resistance in tobacco and tomato.

    PubMed

    Mamta; Reddy, K R K; Rajam, M V

    2016-02-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a devastating agricultural insect pest with broad spectrum of host range, causing million dollars crop loss annually. Limitations in the present conventional and transgenic approaches have made it crucial to develop sustainable and environmental friendly methods for crop improvement. In the present study, host-induced RNA interference (HI-RNAi) approach was used to develop H. armigera resistant tobacco and tomato plants. Chitinase (HaCHI) gene, critically required for insect molting and metamorphosis was selected as a potential target. Hair-pin RNAi construct was prepared from the conserved off-target free partial HaCHI gene sequence and was used to generate several HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato plants. Northern hybridization confirmed the production of HaCHI gene-specific siRNAs in HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato lines. Continuous feeding on leaves of RNAi lines drastically reduced the target gene transcripts and consequently, affected the overall growth and survival of H. armigera. Various developmental deformities were also manifested in H. armigera larvae after feeding on the leaves of RNAi lines. These results demonstrated the role of chitinase in insect development and potential of HI-RNAi for effective management of H. armigera.

  4. Galleria mellonella as a host model to study Aspergillus terreus virulence and amphotericin B resistance.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Elisabeth; Browne, Niall; Surlis, Carla; Jukic, Emina; Moser, Patrizia; Kavanagh, Kevin; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Binder, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the alternative in vivo model Galleria mellonella can be used (i) to determine differences in pathogenicity of amphotericin B (AMB) resistant and susceptible A. terreus isolates, (ii) to evaluate AMB efficacy in vivo (iii) and to correlate outcome to in vitro susceptibility data. Larvae were infected with 2 A. terreus AMB resistant (ATR) and 3 AMB susceptible (ATS) isolates and survival rates were correlated to physiological attributes and killing ability of larval haemocytes. Additionally, infected larvae were treated with different concentrations of L-AMB. Haemocyte density were ascertained to evaluate the influence of L-AMB on the larval immune cells. Larvae were sensitive to A. terreus infection in an inoculum-size and temperature dependent manner. In vitro susceptibility to L-AMB correlated with in vivo outcome of antifungal treatment, defining an AMB susceptible strain cluster of A. terreus. Susceptibility to L-AMB increased virulence potential in the larval model, but this increase was also in accordance with faster growth and less damage caused by larval haemocytes. L-AMB treatment primed the larval immune response by increasing haemocyte density. G. mellonella provides a convenient model for the in vivo screening of A. terreus virulence and treatment options, contributing to the generation of a hypothesis that can be further tested in refined experiments in mammalian models.

  5. The genetic basis of resistance and matching-allele interactions of a host-parasite system: The Daphnia magna-Pasteuria ramosa model.

    PubMed

    Bento, Gilberto; Routtu, Jarkko; Fields, Peter D; Bourgeois, Yann; Du Pasquier, Louis; Ebert, Dieter

    2017-02-21

    Negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) is an evolutionary mechanism suggested to govern host-parasite coevolution and the maintenance of genetic diversity at host resistance loci, such as the vertebrate MHC and R-genes in plants. Matching-allele interactions of hosts and parasites that prevent the emergence of host and parasite genotypes that are universally resistant and infective are a genetic mechanism predicted to underpin NFDS. The underlying genetics of matching-allele interactions are unknown even in host-parasite systems with empirical support for coevolution by NFDS, as is the case for the planktonic crustacean Daphnia magna and the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. We fine-map one locus associated with D. magna resistance to P. ramosa and genetically characterize two haplotypes of the Pasteuria resistance (PR-) locus using de novo genome and transcriptome sequencing. Sequence comparison of PR-locus haplotypes finds dramatic structural polymorphisms between PR-locus haplotypes including a large portion of each haplotype being composed of non-homologous sequences resulting in haplotypes differing in size by 66 kb. The high divergence of PR-locus haplotypes suggest a history of multiple, diverse and repeated instances of structural mutation events and restricted recombination. Annotation of the haplotypes reveals striking differences in gene content. In particular, a group of glycosyltransferase genes that is present in the susceptible but absent in the resistant haplotype. Moreover, in natural populations, we find that the PR-locus polymorphism is associated with variation in resistance to different P. ramosa genotypes, pointing to the PR-locus polymorphism as being responsible for the matching-allele interactions that have been previously described for this system. Our results conclusively identify a genetic basis for the matching-allele interaction observed in a coevolving host-parasite system and provide a first insight into its molecular basis.

  6. The genetic basis of resistance and matching-allele interactions of a host-parasite system: The Daphnia magna-Pasteuria ramosa model

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Peter D.; Bourgeois, Yann; Du Pasquier, Louis; Ebert, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) is an evolutionary mechanism suggested to govern host-parasite coevolution and the maintenance of genetic diversity at host resistance loci, such as the vertebrate MHC and R-genes in plants. Matching-allele interactions of hosts and parasites that prevent the emergence of host and parasite genotypes that are universally resistant and infective are a genetic mechanism predicted to underpin NFDS. The underlying genetics of matching-allele interactions are unknown even in host-parasite systems with empirical support for coevolution by NFDS, as is the case for the planktonic crustacean Daphnia magna and the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. We fine-map one locus associated with D. magna resistance to P. ramosa and genetically characterize two haplotypes of the Pasteuria resistance (PR-) locus using de novo genome and transcriptome sequencing. Sequence comparison of PR-locus haplotypes finds dramatic structural polymorphisms between PR-locus haplotypes including a large portion of each haplotype being composed of non-homologous sequences resulting in haplotypes differing in size by 66 kb. The high divergence of PR-locus haplotypes suggest a history of multiple, diverse and repeated instances of structural mutation events and restricted recombination. Annotation of the haplotypes reveals striking differences in gene content. In particular, a group of glycosyltransferase genes that is present in the susceptible but absent in the resistant haplotype. Moreover, in natural populations, we find that the PR-locus polymorphism is associated with variation in resistance to different P. ramosa genotypes, pointing to the PR-locus polymorphism as being responsible for the matching-allele interactions that have been previously described for this system. Our results conclusively identify a genetic basis for the matching-allele interaction observed in a coevolving host-parasite system and provide a first insight into its molecular basis

  7. Alteration of pathogenicity-linked life-history traits by resistance of its host Solanum tuberosum impacts sexual reproduction of the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Clément, J A J; Magalon, H; Pellé, R; Marquer, B; Andrivon, D

    2010-12-01

    Although sexual reproduction implies a cost, it represents an evolutionary advantage for the adaptation and survival of facultative sexual pathogens. Understanding the maintenance of sex in pathogens requires to analyse how host resistance will impact their sexual reproduction through the alteration of their life-history traits. We explored this experimentally using potato (Solanum tuberosum) and one of its pathogens, the heterothallic oomycete Phytophthora infestans. Sexual reproduction was highest on hosts favouring asexual multiplication of the pathogen, suggesting similar nutritional requirements for both sexual and asexual sporulation. Sexual reproduction was also highest on hosts decreasing the latent period, probably because of a trade-off between growth and reproduction. Distinguishing host effects on each pathogenic trait remains however uneasy, as most life-history traits linked to pathogenicity were not independent of each other. We argue that sexual reproduction of P. infestans is an adaptation to survive when the host is susceptible and rapidly destroyed.

  8. Host-plant-mediated competition via induced resistance: interactions between pest herbivores on potatoes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Margaret E; Kaplan, Ian; Dively, Galen P; Denno, Robert F

    2006-06-01

    Plant-mediated competition among insect herbivores occurs when one species induces changes in plant chemistry, nutrition, or morphology that render plants resistant to attack by others. We explored plant-mediated interspecific interactions between the potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae) and the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), two important pests on potatoes. Leafhoppers colonize fields in advance of beetles, and thus the possibility exists that previous feeding by leafhoppers induces changes in potato plants that have adverse consequences for beetles. The consequences of leafhopper-induced resistance for beetle performance were studied in the greenhouse, field cages, and in large open-field plots. Potato plants were exposed to four densities of leafhoppers (none, low, moderate, and high), and visible feeding symptoms were measured as percentage leaf curling, chlorosis, and necrosis. The oviposition preference, performance, and survivorship of Colorado potato beetles were then measured on the four categories of induced plants in field-cage and greenhouse settings. In open field plots, survival on the four categories of induced plants was determined by placing cohorts of beetle adults onto plants and measuring the densities of resulting eggs, larvae, and emerging Fl adults. Leafhopper-induced symptoms on potato plants were density dependent, with the percentage of curled, chlorotic, and necrotic leaves increasing with leafhopper density. Previous feeding by leafhoppers adversely affected oviposition and larval performance of beetles. Fewer egg masses were deposited on plants that incurred high levels of leafhopper feeding. Similarly, larval development was delayed and emerging adult beetles weighed less when fed induced foliage from the high leafhopper-density treatment. Beetles survived less well in the field on plants experiencing moderate and high levels of leafhopper feeding as evidenced by lower densities of eggs, larvae, and emerging F1

  9. Integrated management of fusarium wilt of chickpea with sowing date, host resistance, and biological control.

    PubMed

    Landa, Blanca B; Navas-Cortés, Juan A; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M

    2004-09-01

    ABSTRACT A 3-year experiment was conducted in field microplots infested with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris race 5 at Córdoba, Spain, in order to assess efficacy of an integrated management strategy for Fusarium wilt of chickpea that combined the choice of sowing date, use of partially resistant chickpea genotypes, and seed and soil treatments with biocontrol agents Bacillus megaterium RGAF 51, B. subtilis GB03, nonpathogenic F. oxysporum Fo 90105, and Pseudomonas fluorescens RG 26. Advancing the sowing date from early spring to winter significantly delayed disease onset, reduced the final disease intensity (amount of disease in a microplot that combines disease incidence and severity, expressed as a percentage of the maximum possible amount of disease in that microplot), and increased chickpea seed yield. A significant linear relationship was found between disease development over time and weather variables at the experimental site, with epidemics developing earlier and faster as mean temperature increased and accumulated rainfall decreased. Under conditions highly conducive for Fusarium wilt development, the degree of disease control depended primarily on choice of sowing date, and to a lesser extent on level of resistance of chickpea genotypes to F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris race 5, and the biocontrol treatments. The main effects of sowing date, partially resistant genotypes, and biocontrol agents were a reduction in the rate of epidemic development over time, a reduction of disease intensity, and an increase in chickpea seedling emergence, respectively. Chickpea seed yield was influenced by all three factors in the study. The increase in chickpea seed yield was the most consistent effect of the biocontrol agents. However, that effect was primarily influenced by sowing date, which also determined disease development. Effectiveness of biocontrol treatments in disease management was lowest in January sowings, which were least favorable for Fusarium wilt. Sowing

  10. Tobamovirus-resistant tobacco generated by RNA interference directed against host genes.

    PubMed

    Asano, Momoko; Satoh, Rena; Mochizuki, Atsuko; Tsuda, Shinya; Yamanaka, Takuya; Nishiguchi, Masamichi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Meshi, Tetsuo; Naito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2005-08-15

    Two homologous Nicotiana tabacum genes NtTOM1 and NtTOM3 have been identified. These genes encode polypeptides with amino acid sequence similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana TOM1 and TOM3, which function in parallel to support tobamovirus multiplication. Simultaneous RNA interference against NtTOM1 and NtTOM3 in N. tabacum resulted in nearly complete inhibition of the multiplication of Tomato mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses, but did not affect plant growth or the ability of Cucumber mosaic virus to multiply. As TOM1 and TOM3 homologues are present in a variety of plant species, their inhibition via RNA interference should constitute a useful method for generating tobamovirus-resistant plants.

  11. Comparative infectivity of Fasciola hepatica metacercariae from isolates of the main and secondary reservoir animal host species in the Bolivian Altiplano high human endemic region.

    PubMed

    Valero, M A; Mas-Coma, S

    2000-01-01

    Fascioliasis due to Fasciola hepatica (Linnaeus, 1758) is an endemic disease on the Northern Bolivian Altiplano, where human prevalences and intensities are the highest known, sheep and cattle are the main reservoir hosts, and pigs and donkeys the secondary ones. Investigations were carried out to study the viability of metacercariae experimentally obtained from eggs shed by naturally infected Altiplanic sheep, cattle, pigs and donkeys. A total of 157 Wistar rats were infected with doses of 5, 10, 20 and 150 metacercariae. Metacercariae aged for different number of weeks were used to analyse the influence of age on their viability. The number of worms successfully developed in each rat was established by dissection. Results obtained show that metacercarial infectivity is dependent upon storage time, being lower when metacercariae are older. The maximum longevity is 31 weeks using doses of 20 metacercariae per rat and 48 weeks with 150 metacercariae per rat, although in the latter case only a very low percentage of worms is recovered. Age-related infectivity of metacercariae from Altiplanic F. hepatica does not significantly differ from that of the liver fluke in lowlands of other countries. Concerning the influence of the isolate according to host species, results indicate that metacercarial viabilities of pig and donkey isolates are similar to the viabilities of metacercariae of sheep and cattle isolates. Thus, pig and donkey have a high transmission potential capacity concerning this aspect. This fact is of great importance for the control of human and animal fascioliasis in this highly endemic zone.

  12. Non-host disease resistance response in pea (Pisum sativum) pods: Biochemical function of DRR206 and phytoalexin pathway localization.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Herana Kamal; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Yang, Hong; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2015-05-01

    Continually exposed to potential pathogens, vascular plants have evolved intricate defense mechanisms to recognize encroaching threats and defend themselves. They do so by inducing a set of defense responses that can help defeat and/or limit effects of invading pathogens, of which the non-host disease resistance response is the most common. In this regard, pea (Pisum sativum) pod tissue, when exposed to Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli spores, undergoes an inducible transcriptional activation of pathogenesis-related genes, and also produces (+)-pisatin, its major phytoalexin. One of the inducible pathogenesis-related genes is Disease Resistance Response-206 (DRR206), whose role in vivo was unknown. DRR206 is, however, related to the dirigent protein (DP) family. In this study, its biochemical function was investigated in planta, with the metabolite associated with its gene induction being pinoresinol monoglucoside. Interestingly, both pinoresinol monoglucoside and (+)-pisatin were co-localized in pea pod endocarp epidermal cells, as demonstrated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging. In addition, endocarp epidermal cells are also the site for both chalcone synthase and DRR206 gene expression. Taken together, these data indicate that both (+)-pisatin and pinoresinol monoglucoside function in the overall phytoalexin responses.

  13. Host-Derived Artificial MicroRNA as an Alternative Method to Improve Soybean Resistance to Soybean Cyst Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Li, Jiarui; Oakley, Thomas R.; Todd, Timothy C.; Trick, Harold N.

    2016-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is one of the most important pests limiting soybean production worldwide. Novel approaches to managing this pest have focused on gene silencing of target nematode sequences using RNA interference (RNAi). With the discovery of endogenous microRNAs as a mode of gene regulation in plants, artificial microRNA (amiRNA) methods have become an alternative method for gene silencing, with the advantage that they can lead to more specific silencing of target genes than traditional RNAi vectors. To explore the application of amiRNAs for improving soybean resistance to SCN, three nematode genes (designated as J15, J20, and J23) were targeted using amiRNA vectors. The transgenic soybean hairy roots, transformed independently with these three amiRNA vectors, showed significant reductions in SCN population densities in bioassays. Expression of the targeted genes within SCN eggs were downregulated in populations feeding on transgenic hairy roots. Our results provide evidence that host-derived amiRNA methods have great potential to improve soybean resistance to SCN. This approach should also limit undesirable phenotypes associated with off-target effects, which is an important consideration for commercialization of transgenic crops. PMID:27941644

  14. The Mouthparts Enriched Odorant Binding Protein 11 of the Alfalfa Plant Bug Adelphocoris lineolatus Displays a Preferential Binding Behavior to Host Plant Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang; Wei, Yu; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Yang, Xian-Ming; Xiao, Qiang; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are proposed to be directly required for odorant discrimination and represent potential interesting targets for pest control. In the notoriously agricultural pest Adelphocoris lineolatus, our previous functional investigation of highly expressed antennal OBPs clearly supported this viewpoint, whereas the findings of the current study by characterizing of AlinOBP11 rather indicated that OBP in hemipterous plant bugs might fulfill a different and tantalizing physiological role. The phylogenetic analysis uncovered that AlinOBP11 together with several homologous bug OBP proteins are potential orthologs, implying they could exhibit a conserved function. Next, the results of expression profiles solidly showed that AlinOBP11 was predominantly expressed at adult mouthparts, the most important gustatory organ of Hemiptera mirid bug. Finally, a rigorously selective binding profile was observed in the fluorescence competitive binding assay, in which recombinant AlinOBP11 displayed much stronger binding abilities to non-volatile secondary metabolite compounds than the volatile odorants. These results reflect that AlinOBP11, even its orthologous proteins across bug species, could be associated with a distinctively conserved physiological role such as a crucial carrier for non-volatiles host secondary metabolites in gustatory system. PMID:27313540

  15. In vitro reduction of antibacterial activity of tigecycline against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with host stress hormone norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Masato; Matsuda, Naoyuki; Banno, Hirotsugu; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kimura, Kouji; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2016-12-01

    The host stress hormone norepinephrine (NE), also called noradrenaline, is reported to augment bacterial growth and pathogenicity, but few studies have focused on the effect of NE on the activity of antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to clarify whether NE affects antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB). Time-kill studies of tigecycline (TIG) and colistin (COL) against MDR-AB as well as assays for factors contributing to antibiotic resistance were performed using MDR-AB clinical strains both in the presence and absence of 10 µM NE. In addition, expression of three efflux pump genes (adeB, adeJ and adeG) in the presence and absence of NE was analysed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Viable bacterial cell counts in TIG-supplemented medium containing NE were significantly increased compared with those in medium without NE. In contrast, NE had little influence on viable bacterial cell counts in the presence of COL. NE-supplemented medium resulted in an ca. 2 log increase in growth and in bacterial cell numbers adhering on polyurethane, silicone and polyvinylchloride surfaces. Amounts of biofilm in the presence of NE were ca. 3-fold higher than without NE. Expression of the adeG gene was upregulated 4-6-fold in the presence of NE. In conclusion, NE augmented factors contributing to antibiotic resistance and markedly reduced the in vitro antibacterial activity of TIG against MDR-AB. These findings suggest that NE treatment may contribute to the failure of TIG therapy in patients with MDR-AB infections.

  16. Innate immune responses to systemic Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice: neutrophils, but not interleukin-17, mediate host resistance.

    PubMed

    Breslow, Jessica M; Meissler, Joseph J; Hartzell, Rebecca R; Spence, Phillip B; Truant, Allan; Gaughan, John; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2011-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen with a high prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant strains, causing pneumonia and sepsis. The current studies further develop a systemic mouse model of this infection and characterize selected innate immune responses to the organism. Five clinical isolates, with various degrees of antibiotic resistance, were assessed for virulence in two mouse strains, and between male and female mice, using intraperitoneal infection. A nearly 1,000-fold difference in virulence was found between bacterial strains, but no significant differences between sexes or mouse strains were observed. It was found that microbes disseminated rapidly from the peritoneal cavity to the lung and spleen, where they replicated. A persistent septic state was observed. The infection progressed rapidly, with mortality between 36 and 48 h. Depletion of neutrophils with antibody to Ly-6G decreased mean time to death and increased mortality. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) promotes the response of neutrophils by inducing production of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (KC/CXCL1), the mouse homolog of human IL-8. Acinetobacter infection resulted in biphasic increases in both IL-17 and KC/CXCL1. Depletion of neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1, using specific antibodies, resulted in a difference in bacterial burdens in organs of infected mice at 10 h postinfection. Comparison of bacterial burdens between IL-17a(-/-) and wild-type mice confirmed that the absence of this cytokine did not sensitize mice to Acinetobacter infection. These studies definitely demonstrate the importance of neutrophils in resistance to systemic Acinetobacter infection. However, neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1 alone is required for effective host defense to systemic infection with this organism.

  17. High-resolution linkage map in the proximity of the host resistance locus Cmv1

    SciTech Connect

    Depatie, C.; Muise, E.; Gros, P.

    1997-01-15

    The mouse chromosome 6 locus Cmv1 controls replication of mouse Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in the spleen of the infected host. In our effort to clone Cmv1, we have constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map in the proximity of the gene. For this, a total of 45 DNA markers corresponding to either cloned genes or microsatellites were mapped within a 7.9-cM interval overlapping the Cmv1 region. We have followed the cosegregation of these markers with respect to Cmv1 in a total of 2248 backcross mice from a preexisting interspecific backcross panel of 281 (Mus spretus X C57BL/6J)F1 X C57BL/6J and 2 novel panels of 989 (A/J X C57BL6)F1 X A/J and 978 (BALB/c X C57BL/6J)F1 X BALB/c segregating Cmv1. Combined pedigree analysis allowed us to determine the following gene order and intergene distances (in cM) on the distal region of mouse chromosome 6: D6Mit216-(1.9)-D6Mit336-(2.2)-D6Mit218-(1.0)-D6Mit52-(0.5)-D6Mit194-(0.2)-Nkrp1/D6Mit61/135/257/289/338-(0.4)-Cmv1/Ly49A/D6Mit370-(0.3)-Prp/Kap/D6Mit13/111/219-(0.3)-Tel/D6Mit374/290/220/196/195/110-(1.1)-D6Mit25. Therefore, the minimal genetic interval for Cmv1 of 0.7 cM is defined by 13 tightly linked markers including 2 markers, Ly49A and D6Mit370, that did not show recombination with Cmv1 in 1967 meioses analyzed; the proximal limit of the Cmv1 domain was defined by 8 crossovers between Nkrp1/D6Mit61/135/257/289/338 and Cmv1/Ly49A/D6Mit370, and the distal limit was defined by 5 crossovers between Cmv1/Ly49A/D6Mit370 and Prp/Kap/D6Mit13/111/219. This work demonstrates tight linkage between Cmv1 and genes from the natural killer complex (NKC), such as Nkrp1 and Ly49A suggesting that Cmv1 may represent an NK cell recognition structure encoded in the NKC region. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  19. Mutations That Determine Resistance Breaking in a Plant RNA Virus Have Pleiotropic Effects on Its Fitness That Depend on the Host Environment and on the Type, Single or Mixed, of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Pérez, Manuel G.; García-Luque, Isabel; Fraile, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overcoming host resistance in gene-for-gene host-virus interactions is an important instance of host range expansion, which can be hindered by across-host fitness trade-offs. Trade-offs are generated by negative effects of host range mutations on the virus fitness in the original host, i.e., by antagonistic pleiotropy. It has been reported that different mutations in Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) coat protein result in overcoming L-gene resistance in pepper. To analyze if resistance-breaking mutations in PMMoV result in antagonistic pleiotropy, all reported mutations determining the overcoming of L3 and L4 alleles were introduced in biologically active cDNA clones. Then, the parental and mutant virus genotypes were assayed in susceptible pepper genotypes with an L+, L1, or L2 allele, in single and in mixed infections. Resistance-breaking mutations had pleiotropic effects on the virus fitness that, according to the specific mutation, the host genotype, and the type of infection, single or mixed with other virus genotypes, were antagonistic or positive. Thus, resistance-breaking mutations can generate fitness trade-offs both across hosts and across types of infection, and the frequency of host range mutants will depend on the genetic structure of the host population and on the frequency of mixed infections by different virus genotypes. Also, resistance-breaking mutations variously affected virulence, which may further influence the evolution of host range expansion. IMPORTANCE A major cause of virus emergence is host range expansion, which may be hindered by across-host fitness trade-offs caused by negative pleiotropy of host range mutations. An important instance of host range expansion is overcoming host resistance in gene-for-gene plant-virus interactions. We analyze here if mutations in the coat protein of Pepper mild mottle virus determining L-gene resistance-breaking in pepper have associated fitness penalties in susceptible host genotypes. Results

  20. Activation and products of the cryptic secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters by rifampin resistance (rpoB) mutations in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Kasahara, Ken; Hirose, Yutaka; Murakami, Kiriko; Kugimiya, Rie; Ochi, Kozo

    2013-07-01

    A subset of rifampin resistance (rpoB) mutations result in the overproduction of antibiotics in various actinomycetes, including Streptomyces, Saccharopolyspora, and Amycolatopsis, with H437Y and H437R rpoB mutations effective most frequently. Moreover, the rpoB mutations markedly activate (up to 70-fold at the transcriptional level) the cryptic/silent secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters of these actinomycetes, which are not activated under general stressful conditions, with the exception of treatment with rare earth elements. Analysis of the metabolite profile demonstrated that the rpoB mutants produced many metabolites, which were not detected in the wild-type strains. This approach utilizing rifampin resistance mutations is characterized by its feasibility and potential scalability to high-throughput studies and would be useful to activate and to enhance the yields of metabolites for discovery and biochemical characterization.

  1. The draft genome of whitefly Bemisia tabaci MEAM1, a global crop pest, provides novel insights into virus transmission, host adaptation, and insecticide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whiteflies are among the most important agricultural pests. They have a broad range of host plants and exceptional ability to transmit a large number of plant viruses, and can rapidly evolve insecticide resistance. Here we present a high-quality draft genome of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. Comparat...

  2. Managing the evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis resistance in natural populations of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis: host plant, host race and pherotype of adult males at aggregation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps, Arnaud; Bourguet, Denis; Pélozuelo, Laurent; Bethenod, Marie-Thérèse; Ponsard, Sergine

    2004-01-01

    The European corn borer (ECB) consists of at least two, genetically differentiated host races: one feeding on maize, the other feeding on mugwort and hop. It is unclear to what extent individuals feeding on these, or other host plants, contribute to natural ECB populations. The mechanisms underlying the genetic differentiation between both races are not well understood; they may include sexual attraction via different pheromone blends (E or Z) and differences in the location of mating sites. We caught adult males with traps baited with the E or the Z blend at hop, maize, and 'mixed' sites. We determined their probable host race by allozyme-based genetic assignment, and the photosynthetic type of their host plant by stable carbon isotope analysis. Most individuals caught in Z traps had emerged from a C(4)-type plant and belonged to the maize race, whereas most individuals caught in E traps had emerged from C(3)-type plants and were but weakly differentiated from the hop-mugwort race, suggesting a strong, though not absolute, correspondence between host plant, host race and pherotype. We also found that although spatial segregation may contribute to genetic isolation between host races, moths of both host races may be present at a given location. Regarding the management of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize, our results indicate that, at least at the present study sites, it is unlikely that any wild or cultivated C(3)-type plant species could be a source of susceptible individuals that would mate randomly with Bt-resistant Z-C(4) moths emerging from Bt-maize fields. PMID:15475339

  3. Rph22: mapping of a novel leaf rust resistance gene introgressed from the non-host Hordeum bulbosum L. into cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul A; Niks, Rients E; Meiyalaghan, Vijitha; Blanchet, Elise; Pickering, Richard

    2013-06-01

    A resistance gene (Rph22) to barley leaf rust caused by Puccinia hordei was introgressed from the non-host species Hordeum bulbosum into cultivated barley. The H. bulbosum introgression in line '182Q20' was located to chromosome 2HL using genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH). Using molecular markers it was shown to cover approximately 20 % of the genetic length of the chromosome. The introgression confers a very high level of resistance to P. hordei at the seedling stage that is not based on a hypersensitive reaction. The presence of the resistance gene increased the latency period of the leaf rust fungus and strongly reduced the infection frequency relative to the genetic background cultivar 'Golden Promise'. An F2 population of 550 individuals was developed and used to create a genetic map of the introgressed region and to determine the map position of the underlying resistance gene(s). The resistance locus, designated Rph22, was located to the distal portion of the introgression, co-segregating with markers H35_26334 and H35_45139. Flanking markers will be used to reduce the linkage drag, including gene(s) responsible for a yield penalty, around the resistance locus and to transfer the gene into elite barley germplasm. This genetic location is also known to harbour a QTL (Rphq2) for non-hypersensitive leaf rust resistance in the barley cultivar 'Vada'. Comparison of the 'Vada' and H. bulbosum resistances at this locus may lead to a better understanding of the possible association between host and non-host resistance mechanisms.

  4. The GraS Sensor in Staphylococcus aureus Mediates Resistance to Host Defense Peptides Differing in Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Chaili, Siyang; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Waring, Alan J.; Memmi, Guido; Donegan, Niles; Yang, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the two-component regulatory system GraRS to sense and respond to host defense peptides (HDPs). However, the mechanistic impact of GraS or its extracellular sensing loop (EL) on HDP resistance is essentially unexplored. Strains with null mutations in the GraS holoprotein (ΔgraS) or its EL (ΔEL) were compared for mechanisms of resistance to HDPs of relevant immune sources: neutrophil α-defensin (human neutrophil peptide 1 [hNP-1]), cutaneous β-defensin (human β-defensin 2 [hBD-2]), or the platelet kinocidin congener RP-1. Actions studied by flow cytometry included energetics (ENR); membrane permeabilization (PRM); annexin V binding (ANX), and cell death protease activation (CDP). Assay conditions simulated bloodstream (pH 7.5) or phagolysosomal (pH 5.5) pH contexts. S. aureus strains were more susceptible to HDPs at pH 7.5 than at pH 5.5, and each HDP exerted a distinct effect signature. The impacts of ΔgraS and ΔΕL on HDP resistance were peptide and pH dependent. Both mutants exhibited defects in ANX response to hNP-1 or hBD-2 at pH 7.5, but only hNP-1 did so at pH 5.5. Both mutants exhibited hyper-PRM, -ANX, and -CDP responses to RP-1 at both pHs and hypo-ENR at pH 5.5. The actions correlated with ΔgraS or ΔΕL hypersusceptibility to hNP-1 or RP-1 (but not hBD-2) at pH 7.5 and to all study HDPs at pH 5.5. An exogenous EL mimic protected mutant strains from hNP-1 and hBD-2 but not RP-1, indicating that GraS and its EL play nonredundant roles in S. aureus survival responses to specific HDPs. These findings suggest that GraS mediates specific resistance countermeasures to HDPs in immune contexts that are highly relevant to S. aureus pathogenesis in humans. PMID:26597988

  5. Do-or-die life cycles and diverse post-infection resistance mechanisms limit the evolution of parasite host ranges.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    In light of the dynamic nature of parasite host ranges and documented potential for rapid host shifts, the observed high host specificity of most parasites remains an ecological paradox. Different variants of host-use trade-offs have become a mainstay of theoretical explanations of the prevalence of host specialism, but empirical evidence for such trade-offs is rare. We propose an alternative theory based on basic features of the parasite life cycle: host selection and subsequent intrahost replication. We introduce a new concept of effective burst size that accounts for the fact that successful host selection does not guarantee intrahost replication. Our theory makes a general prediction that a parasite will expand its host range if its effective burst size is positive. An in silico model of bacteria-phage coevolution verifies our predictions and demonstrates that the tendency for relatively narrow host ranges in parasites can be explained even in the absence of trade-offs.

  6. Genetic parameters for indicators of host resistance to parasites from weaning to hogget age in Merino sheep.

    PubMed

    Pollott, G E; Karlsson, L J E; Eady, S; Greeff, J C

    2004-10-01

    Fecal egg count (FEC) has been widely used as an indicator of host resistance to gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and has been shown to be a heritable trait. Two other possible indicators of parasites, dag score (DS; accumulated fecal material) and fecal consistency score (FCS), were investigated in this study, along with BW. All four traits were studied to see how heritability and genetic correlations varied with age from weaning (4 mo) to hogget age (approximately 400 d). More than 1,100 lambs, the offspring of 37 rams, were recorded eight times between weaning (3 to 5 mo of age) and hogget age (13 to 18 mo of age) on two farms. Sire models were fitted to the data from each trait at each recording and in a repeatability model involving the whole data set. Overall, the heritabilities were 0.28+/-0.072 (FEC), 0.11+/-0.036 (DS), 0.12+/-0.036 (FCS), and 0.23+/-0.070 (BW). By fitting random regression models to the time-series data, it was possible to see how these heritability values varied as the lambs aged, from weaning to hogget age. The heritability of FEC rose from 0.2 at weaning to 0.65 at 400 d. Dag score had a higher heritability (0.25) in the middle of the age range and a low value at weaning (<0.1) and hogget age (0.16). The heritability of FCS was low, with a value of 0.2 at weaning reducing to 0.05 as the animals aged. Body weight had zero heritability at weaning, which rose to greater than 0.6 at hogget age. Most traits had low genetic correlations between them, the only exception being that between FCS and DS (0.63). Most genetic correlations varied little over the age range with the exception of FEC and BW, which fell from 0 at weaning to -0.63 at hogget age. Whereas FCS and DS may be good indicators of scouring, they are very different from FEC as an indicator of host resistance to gastrointestinal parasites.

  7. Polyclonal Secondary FGFR2 Mutations Drive Acquired Resistance to FGFR Inhibition in Patients with FGFR2 Fusion-Positive Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Lipika; Saha, Supriya K; Liu, Leah Y; Siravegna, Giulia; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Ahronian, Leanne G; Lennerz, Jochen K; Vu, Phuong; Deshpande, Vikram; Kambadakone, Avinash; Mussolin, Benedetta; Reyes, Stephanie; Henderson, Laura; Sun, Jiaoyuan Elisabeth; Van Seventer, Emily E; Gurski, Joseph M; Baltschukat, Sabrina; Schacher-Engstler, Barbara; Barys, Louise; Stamm, Christelle; Furet, Pascal; Ryan, David P; Stone, James R; Iafrate, A John; Getz, Gad; Porta, Diana Graus; Tiedt, Ralph; Bardelli, Alberto; Juric, Dejan; Corcoran, Ryan B; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Zhu, Andrew X

    2017-03-01

    Genetic alterations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway are promising therapeutic targets in many cancers, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). The FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 displayed encouraging efficacy in patients with FGFR2 fusion-positive ICC in a phase II trial, but the durability of response was limited in some patients. Here, we report the molecular basis for acquired resistance to BGJ398 in three patients via integrative genomic characterization of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (cfDNA), primary tumors, and metastases. Serial analysis of cfDNA demonstrated multiple recurrent point mutations in the FGFR2 kinase domain at progression. Accordingly, biopsy of post-progression lesions and rapid autopsy revealed marked inter- and intralesional heterogeneity, with different FGFR2 mutations in individual resistant clones. Molecular modeling and in vitro studies indicated that each mutation led to BGJ398 resistance and was surmountable by structurally distinct FGFR inhibitors. Thus, polyclonal secondary FGFR2 mutations represent an important clinical resistance mechanism that may guide the development of future therapeutic strategies.Significance: We report the first genetic mechanisms of clinical acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in patients with FGFR2 fusion-positive ICC. Our findings can inform future strategies for detecting resistance mechanisms and inducing more durable remissions in ICC and in the wide variety of cancers where the FGFR pathway is being explored as a therapeutic target. Cancer Discov; 7(3); 252-63. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Smyth et al., p. 248This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 235.

  8. Differential ability to resist to complement lysis and invade host cells mediated by MBL in R4 and 860 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Evans-Osses, Ingrid; Mojoli, Andres; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; da Costa, Denise Endo; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; de Messias-Reason, Iara; Ramirez, Marcel Ivan

    2014-03-18

    To produce an infection Trypanosoma cruzi must evade lysis by the complement system. During early stages of infection, the lectin pathway plays an important role in host defense and can be activated by binding of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) to carbohydrates on the surface of pathogens. We hypothesized that MBL has a dual role during parasite-host cell interaction as lectin complement pathway activator and as binding molecule to invade the host cell. We used two polarized strains of T. cruzi, R4 (susceptible) and 860 (resistant) strains, to investigate the role of MBL in complement-mediated lysis. Interestingly R4, but not 860 metacyclic strain, markedly increases the invasion of host cells, suggesting that MBL drives the invasion process while the parasite deactivates the Lectin complement pathway.

  9. Chlamydia trachomatis Is Resistant to Inclusion Ubiquitination and Associated Host Defense in Gamma Interferon-Primed Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Arun K.; Piro, Anthony S.; Finethy, Ryan; Espenschied, Scott T.; Brown, Hannah E.; Giebel, Amanda M.; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Nelson, David E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induces cell-autonomous immunity to combat infections with intracellular pathogens, such as the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. The present study demonstrates that IFN-γ-primed human cells ubiquitinate and eliminate intracellular Chlamydia-containing vacuoles, so-called inclusions. We previously described how IFN-γ-inducible immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) employ ubiquitin systems to mark inclusions for destruction in mouse cells and, furthermore, showed that the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum blocks ubiquitination of its inclusions by interfering with mouse IRG function. Here, we report that ubiquitination of inclusions in human cells is independent of IRG and thus distinct from the murine pathway. We show that C. muridarum is susceptible to inclusion ubiquitination in human cells, while the closely related human pathogen C. trachomatis is resistant. C. muridarum, but not C. trachomatis, inclusions attract several markers of cell-autonomous immunity, including the ubiquitin-binding protein p62, the ubiquitin-like protein LC3, and guanylate-binding protein 1. Consequently, we find that IFN-γ priming of human epithelial cells triggers the elimination of C. muridarum, but not C. trachomatis, inclusions. This newly described defense pathway is independent of indole-2,3-dioxygenase, a known IFN-γ-inducible anti-Chlamydia resistance factor. Collectively, our observations indicate that C. trachomatis evolved mechanisms to avoid a human-specific, ubiquitin-mediated response as part of its unique adaptation to its human host. PMID:27965446

  10. High-resolution linkage map of mouse chromosome 13 in the vicinity of the host resistance locus Lgn1

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, M.C.; Ernst, E.; Diez, E.

    1997-02-01

    Natural resistance of inbred mouse strains to infection with Legionella pneumophila is controlled by the expression of a single dominant gene on chromosome 13, designated Lgn1. The genetic difference at Lgn1 is phenotypically expressed as the presence or absence of intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in host macrophages. In our effort to identify the Lgn1 gene by positional cloning, we have generated a high-resolution linkage map of the Lgn1 chromosomal region. For this, we have carried out extensive segregation analysis in a total of 1270 (A/J x C57BL/6J) X A/J informative backcross mice segregating the resistance allele of C57BL/6J and the susceptibility allele of A/J. Additional segregation analyses were carried out in three preexisting panels of C57BL/6J X Mus spretus interspecific backcross mice. A total of 39 DNA markers were mapped within an interval of approximately 30 cM overlapping the Lgn1 region. Combined pedigree analyses for the 5.4-cM segment overlapping Lgn1 indicated the locus order and the interlocus distances (in cM): D13Mit128-(1.4)-D13Mit194-(0.1)-D13Mit147-(0.9)-Dl3Mit36-(0.9)-D13Mit146-(0.2)-Lgn1/D 13Mit37-(1.0)-D13Mit70. Additional genetic linkage studies of markers not informative in the A/J X C57BL/6J cross positioned D13Mit30, -72, -195, and -203, D13Gor4, D13Hun35, and Mtap5 in the immediate vicinity of the Lgn1 locus. The marker density and resolution of this genetic linkage map should allow the construction of a physical map of the region and the isolation of YAC clones overlapping the gene. 60 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The influence of the autochthonous wastewater microbiota and gene host on the fate of invasive antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Narciso-da-Rocha, Carlos; Manaia, Célia M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the fate of invasive antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) discharged in wastewater. With this objective, antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) known to harbor specific ARG were inoculated in wastewater (hospital effluent, or municipal raw and treated wastewater) and in ultra-pure sterile water microcosms. Two sets of wastewater ARB isolates were used - set 1, Enterococcus faecalis, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and set 2, Enterococcus faecium, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Escherichia coli. Non-inoculated controls were run in parallel. Samples were collected at the beginning and at the end (15days) of the incubation period and the abundance of the genes 16S rRNA, intI1, blaTEM and vanA and the bacterial community composition were analyzed. In general, the genes blaTEM and vanA had lower persistence in wastewater and in ultra-pure water than the genes 16S rRNA or the class 1 integron integrase intI1. This effect was more pronounced in wastewater than in ultra-pure water, evidencing the importance of the autochthonous microbiota on the elimination of invasive ARG. Wastewater autochthonous bacterial groups most correlated with variations of the genes intI1, blaTEM and vanA were members of the classes Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli or Bacteroidia. For blaTEM, but not for vanA, the species of the ARB host was important to determine its fate. These are novel findings on the ecology of ARB in wastewater environments.

  12. Chlamydia trachomatis Is Resistant to Inclusion Ubiquitination and Associated Host Defense in Gamma Interferon-Primed Human Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Arun K; Piro, Anthony S; Finethy, Ryan; Espenschied, Scott T; Brown, Hannah E; Giebel, Amanda M; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Nelson, David E; Coers, Jörn

    2016-12-13

    The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induces cell-autonomous immunity to combat infections with intracellular pathogens, such as the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis The present study demonstrates that IFN-γ-primed human cells ubiquitinate and eliminate intracellular Chlamydia-containing vacuoles, so-called inclusions. We previously described how IFN-γ-inducible immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) employ ubiquitin systems to mark inclusions for destruction in mouse cells and, furthermore, showed that the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum blocks ubiquitination of its inclusions by interfering with mouse IRG function. Here, we report that ubiquitination of inclusions in human cells is independent of IRG and thus distinct from the murine pathway. We show that C. muridarum is susceptible to inclusion ubiquitination in human cells, while the closely related human pathogen C. trachomatis is resistant. C. muridarum, but not C. trachomatis, inclusions attract several markers of cell-autonomous immunity, including the ubiquitin-binding protein p62, the ubiquitin-like protein LC3, and guanylate-binding protein 1. Consequently, we find that IFN-γ priming of human epithelial cells triggers the elimination of C. muridarum, but not C. trachomatis, inclusions. This newly described defense pathway is independent of indole-2,3-dioxygenase, a known IFN-γ-inducible anti-Chlamydia resistance factor. Collectively, our observations indicate that C. trachomatis evolved mechanisms to avoid a human-specific, ubiquitin-mediated response as part of its unique adaptation to its human host.

  13. Extremotolerance and Resistance of Lichens: Comparative Studies on Five Species Used in Astrobiological Research II. Secondary Lichen Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeßen, J.; Sánchez, F. J.; Sadowsky, A.; de la Torre, R.; Ott, S.; de Vera, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    Lichens, which are symbioses of a fungus and one or two photoautotrophs, frequently tolerate extreme environmental conditions. This makes them valuable model systems in astrobiological research to fathom the limits and limitations of eukaryotic symbioses. Various studies demonstrated the high resistance of selected extremotolerant lichens towards extreme, non-terrestrial abiotic factors including space exposure, hypervelocity impact simulations as well as space and Martian parameter simulations. This study focusses on the diverse set of secondary lichen compounds (SLCs) that act as photo- and UVR-protective substances. Five lichen species used in present-day astrobiological research were compared: Buellia frigida, Circinaria gyrosa, Rhizocarpon geographicum, Xanthoria elegans, and Pleopsidium chlorophanum. Detailed investigation of secondary substances including photosynthetic pigments was performed for whole lichen thalli but also for axenically cultivated mycobionts and photobionts by methods of UV/VIS-spectrophotometry and two types of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, a set of chemical tests is presented to confirm the formation of melanic compounds in lichen and mycobiont samples. All investigated lichens reveal various sets of SLCs, except C. gyrosa where only melanin was putatively identified. Such studies will help to assess the contribution of SLCs on lichen extremotolerance, to understand the adaptation of lichens to prevalent abiotic stressors of the respective habitat, and to form a basis for interpreting recent and future astrobiological experiments. As most of the identified SLCs demonstrated a high capacity in absorbing UVR, they may also explain the high resistance of lichens towards non-terrestrial UVR.

  14. Extremotolerance and resistance of lichens: comparative studies on five species used in astrobiological research II. Secondary lichen compounds.

    PubMed

    Meessen, J; Sánchez, F J; Sadowsky, A; de la Torre, R; Ott, S; de Vera, J-P

    2013-12-01

    Lichens, which are symbioses of a fungus and one or two photoautotrophs, frequently tolerate extreme environmental conditions. This makes them valuable model systems in astrobiological research to fathom the limits and limitations of eukaryotic symbioses. Various studies demonstrated the high resistance of selected extremotolerant lichens towards extreme, non-terrestrial abiotic factors including space exposure, hypervelocity impact simulations as well as space and Martian parameter simulations. This study focusses on the diverse set of secondary lichen compounds (SLCs) that act as photo- and UVR-protective substances. Five lichen species used in present-day astrobiological research were compared: Buellia frigida, Circinaria gyrosa, Rhizocarpon geographicum, Xanthoria elegans, and Pleopsidium chlorophanum. Detailed investigation of secondary substances including photosynthetic pigments was performed for whole lichen thalli but also for axenically cultivated mycobionts and photobionts by methods of UV/VIS-spectrophotometry and two types of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, a set of chemical tests is presented to confirm the formation of melanic compounds in lichen and mycobiont samples. All investigated lichens reveal various sets of SLCs, except C. gyrosa where only melanin was putatively identified. Such studies will help to assess the contribution of SLCs on lichen extremotolerance, to understand the adaptation of lichens to prevalent abiotic stressors of the respective habitat, and to form a basis for interpreting recent and future astrobiological experiments. As most of the identified SLCs demonstrated a high capacity in absorbing UVR, they may also explain the high resistance of lichens towards non-terrestrial UVR.

  15. BcGs1, a glycoprotein from Botrytis cinerea, elicits defence response and improves disease resistance in host plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yunhua; Qiu, Dewen; Zeng, Hongmei; Guo, Lihua; Yang, Xiufen

    2015-02-20

    In this study, a necrosis-inducing protein was purified from the culture filtrate of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea BC-98 strain. Secreted proteins were collected and fractionated by liquid chromatography. The fraction with the highest necrosis-inducing activity was further purified. A glycoprotein named BcGs1 was identified by 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The BcGs1 protein consisted of 672 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 70.487 kDa. Functional domain analysis indicated that BcGs1 was a glucan 1,4-alpha-glucosidase, a cell wall-degrading enzyme, with a Glyco_hydro_15 domain and a CBM20_glucoamylase domain. The BcGs1 protein caused necrotic lesions that mimicked a typical hypersensitive response and H2O2 production in tomato and tobacco leaves. BcGs1-treated plants exhibited resistance to B. cinerea, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and tobacco mosaic virus in systemic leaves. In addition, BcGs1 triggered elevation of the transcript levels of the defence-related genes PR-1a, TPK1b and Prosystemin. This is the first report of a Botrytis glucan 1,4-alpha-glucosidase triggering host plant immunity as an elicitor. These results lay a foundation for further study of the comprehensive interaction between plants and necrotrophic fungi.

  16. Fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease of the gut

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Yuki; Suda, Wataru; Najima, Yuho; Kuwata, Go; Sasajima, Satoshi; Mimura, Iyo; Morita, Hidetoshi; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Hattori, Masahira; Hino, Yutaro; Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Yamamoto, Keita; Toya, Takashi; Doki, Noriko; Koizumi, Koichi; Honda, Kenya; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the gut microbiota is closely associated with acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) in stem cell transplantation (SCT). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) could represent an alternative treatment option for aGVHD. However, FMT for SCT patients carries a potential risk of infection by infused microbiota because of the severely immunosuppressed status. We therefore conducted a pilot study to evaluate the safety of FMT in SCT. A total of 4 patients with steroid-resistant (n = 3) or steroid-dependent gut aGVHD (n = 1) received FMT. No severe adverse events attributed to FMT were observed. All patients responded to FMT, with 3 complete responses and 1 partial response. Temporal dynamics of microbiota seemed to be linked to the gut condition of patients and peripheral effector regulatory T cells also increased during response to FMT. FMT was safely performed in our patients and might offer a novel therapeutic option for aGVHD. This trial was registered at the University Hospital Medical Information Network (https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/icdr_e/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000017575) as #UMIN000015115. PMID:27461930

  17. Activation of dormant secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin resistance into the deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-07-29

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(D-Pro-D-Phe) (1), cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-L-prolinate (3), cyclo(L-Ile-L-Pro) (4), cyclo(L-Leu-L-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1-6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent fungal

  18. Activation of Dormant Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin Resistance into the Deep-Sea Fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-01-01

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(d-Pro-d-Phe) (1), cyclo(d-Tyr-d-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-l-prolinate (3), cyclo(l-Ile-l-Pro) (4), cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1–6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent

  19. Influence of leaf color in a dry bean mapping population on Empoasca sp. populations and host plant resistance.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visual cues may be the first line of host plant recognition and an important determining factor when selecting host plants for feeding and oviposition, especially for highly polyphagous insects, such as leafhoppers, which have a broad range of potential host plants. Temperate Empoasca fabae and trop...

  20. Drug Resistance and Substance Use Among Male and Female Adolescents in Alternative Secondary Schools in Guanajuato, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Kulis, Stephen; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Ayers, Stephanie L.; Booth, Jaime; Nuño-Gutiérrez, Bertha L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Research is limited on the strategies that Mexican adolescents use to resist use of alcohol, cigarettes, and other drugs. Cultural norms and gender socialization patterns concerning the acceptability of use of various substances by women and men influence Mexican youths in their responses to offers of substances. This study explored the drug-resistance strategies used by youth in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato, how their use predicted patterns of substance use, and how these associations differed by gender. Method: The analysis used cross-sectional survey data from 702 (60% male) students enrolled in eight alternative secondary education school sites in 2007. Participants reported the drug-resistance behaviors they used to deal with offers of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana. Past-12-month use of the four drug-resistance strategies employed most often by U.S. youth—refuse, explain, avoid, and leave (R.E.A.L.)—and any other strategies were measured. Composite measures of lifetime and recent use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana were predicted in multivariate ordinary least squares regression analyses. Models were tested with and without controls for the frequency that respondents were offered substances and introduced gender interaction effects. Results: Controlling for substance use offers, more frequent use of a wide repertoire of R.E.A.L. strategies predicted less consumption of alcohol and cigarettes, and using non-R.E.A.L. strategies predicted less marijuana consumption. All of these relationships were either stronger for males than for females or significant for males only. Conclusions: Gender differences exist in the impact of R.E.A.L. strategies on substance use among youth in Mexico. Despite a narrowing gender gap in substance use in Mexico, large exposure to and susceptibility of substance use remains. Developing effective prevention programs in Mexico based on teaching appropriate drug-resistance strategies and enhancing

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese secondary care facility.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yumiko; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Matsuda, Junichi; Yamaryo, Takeshi; Kawakami, Kenji; Matsuo, Hidenori; Kosai, Kosuke; Uno, Naoki; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is prevalent in Japan, and the Staphylococcus cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type II is common among hospital-acquired MRSA isolates. Information pertaining to MRSA characteristics is limited, including SCCmec types, in primary or secondary care facilities. A total of 128 MRSA isolates (90 skin and soft tissue isolates and 38 blood isolates) were collected at a secondary care facility, Kawatana Medical Center, from 2005 to 2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for anti-MRSA antibiotics and molecular testing for SCCmec and virulence genes (tst, sec, etb, lukS/F-PV) were performed. Strains positive for lukS/F-PV were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing and phage open-reading frame typing. SCCmec typing in skin and soft tissue isolates revealed that 65.6% had type IV, 22.2% had type II, 8.9% had type I, and 3.3% had type III. In blood isolates, 50.0% had type IV, 47.4% had type II, and 2.6% had type III. Minimum inhibitory concentrations, MIC(50)/MIC(90), against vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, and arbekacin increased slightly in SCCmec II isolates from skin and soft tissue. MICs against daptomycin were similar between sites of isolation. SCCmec type II isolates possess tst and sec genes at a greater frequently than SCCmec type IV isolates. Four lukS/F-PV-positive isolates were divided into two clonal patterns and USA300 was not included. In conclusion, SCCmec type IV was dominant in blood, skin, and soft tissue isolates in a secondary care facility in Japan. Because antimicrobial susceptibility varies with the SCCmec type, SCCmec typing of clinical isolates should be monitored in primary or secondary care facilities.

  2. Chytridiomycosis of Marine Diatoms—The Role of Stress Physiology and Resistance in Parasite-Host Recognition and Accumulation of Defense Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Bettina; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Vyverman, Wim; Ólafsson, Halldór G.; Karsten, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chemotaxis in the location and attachment of chytrid zoospores to potential diatom hosts. Hypothesizing that environmental stress parameters affect parasite-host recognition, four chytrid-diatom tandem cultures (Chytridium sp./Navicula sp., Rhizophydium type I/Nitzschia sp., Rhizophydium type IIa/Rhizosolenia sp., Rhizophydium type IIb/Chaetoceros sp.) were used to test the chemotaxis of chytrid zoospores and the presence of potential defense molecules in a non-contact-co-culturing approach. As potential triggers in the chemotaxis experiments, standards of eight carbohydrates, six amino acids, five fatty acids, and three compounds known as compatible solutes were used in individual and mixed solutions, respectively. In all tested cases, the whole-cell extracts of the light-stressed (continuous light exposure combined with 6 h UV radiation) hosts attracted the highest numbers of zoospores (86%), followed by the combined carbohydrate standard solution (76%), while all other compounds acted as weak triggers only. The results of the phytochemical screening, using biomass and supernatant extracts of susceptible and resistant host-diatom cultures, indicated in most of the tested extracts the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, phenols, and aldehydes, whereas the bioactivity screenings showed that the zoospores of the chytrid parasites were only significantly affected by the ethanolic supernatant extract of the resistant hosts. PMID:28125065

  3. Chytridiomycosis of Marine Diatoms-The Role of Stress Physiology and Resistance in Parasite-Host Recognition and Accumulation of Defense Molecules.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Bettina; Küpper, Frithjof C; Vyverman, Wim; Ólafsson, Halldór G; Karsten, Ulf

    2017-01-25

    Little is known about the role of chemotaxis in the location and attachment of chytrid zoospores to potential diatom hosts. Hypothesizing that environmental stress parameters affect parasite-host recognition, four chytrid-diatom tandem cultures (Chytridium sp./Navicula sp., Rhizophydium type I/Nitzschia sp., Rhizophydium type IIa/Rhizosolenia sp., Rhizophydium type IIb/Chaetoceros sp.) were used to test the chemotaxis of chytrid zoospores and the presence of potential defense molecules in a non-contact-co-culturing approach. As potential triggers in the chemotaxis experiments, standards of eight carbohydrates, six amino acids, five fatty acids, and three compounds known as compatible solutes were used in individual and mixed solutions, respectively. In all tested cases, the whole-cell extracts of the light-stressed (continuous light exposure combined with 6 h UV radiation) hosts attracted the highest numbers of zoospores (86%), followed by the combined carbohydrate standard solution (76%), while all other compounds acted as weak triggers only. The results of the phytochemical screening, using biomass and supernatant extracts of susceptible and resistant host-diatom cultures, indicated in most of the tested extracts the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, phenols, and aldehydes, whereas the bioactivity screenings showed that the zoospores of the chytrid parasites were only significantly affected by the ethanolic supernatant extract of the resistant hosts.

  4. Integrated palmer amaranth management in glufosinate-resistant cotton: II. primary, secondary, and conservation tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate the role of inversion tillage, cover crops and spring tillage methods for Palmer amaranth between-row (BR) and within-row (WR) management in glufosinate-resistant cotton. Main plots were two inversion tillage systems: fall inversion tillage (IT...

  5. Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry 16 Kinase Promotes Host Resistance to Oral Infection and Intestinal Inflammation Only in the Context of the Dense Granule Protein GRA15

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kirk D. C.; Hu, Kenneth; Whitmarsh, Ryan J.; Hassan, Musa A.; Julien, Lindsay; Lu, Diana; Chen, Lieping; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii transmission between intermediate hosts is dependent on the ingestion of walled cysts formed during the chronic phase of infection. Immediately following consumption, the parasite must ensure survival of the host by preventing adverse inflammatory responses and/or by limiting its own replication. Since the Toxoplasma secreted effectors rhoptry 16 kinase (ROP16) and dense granule 15 (GRA15) activate the JAK-STAT3/6 and NF-κB signaling pathways, respectively, we explored whether a particular combination of these effectors impacted intestinal inflammation and parasite survival in vivo. Here we report that expression of the STAT-activating version of ROP16 in the type II strain (strain II+ROP16I) promotes host resistance to oral infection only in the context of endogenous GRA15 expression. Protection was characterized by a lower intestinal parasite burden and dampened inflammation. Host resistance to the II+ROP16I strain occurred independently of STAT6 and the T cell coinhibitory receptors B7-DC and B7-H1, two receptors that are upregulated by ROP16. In addition, coexpression of ROP16 and GRA15 enhanced parasite susceptibility within tumor necrosis factor alpha/gamma interferon-stimulated macrophages in a STAT3/6-independent manner. Transcriptional profiling of infected STAT3- and STAT6-deficient macrophages and parasitized Peyer's patches from mice orally challenged with strain II+ROP16I suggested that ROP16 activated STAT5 to modulate host gene expression. Consistent with this supposition, the ROP16 kinase induced the sustained phosphorylation and nuclear localization of STAT5 in Toxoplasma-infected cells. In summary, only the combined expression of both GRA15 and ROP16 promoted host resistance to acute oral infection, and Toxoplasma may possibly target the STAT5 signaling pathway to generate protective immunity in the gut. PMID:23545295

  6. The leucine-rich repeat domain can determine effective interaction between RPS2 and other host factors in arabidopsis RPS2-mediated disease resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, D; Zhang, X; Bent, A F

    2001-01-01

    Like many other plant disease resistance genes, Arabidopsis thaliana RPS2 encodes a product with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. This study explored the hypothesized interaction of RPS2 with other host factors that may be required for perception of Pseudomonas syringae pathogens that express avrRpt2 and/or for the subsequent induction of plant defense responses. Crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes Col-0 (resistant) and Po-1 (susceptible) revealed segregation of more than one gene that controls resistance to P. syringae that express avrRpt2. Many F(2) and F(3) progeny exhibited intermediate resistance phenotypes. In addition to RPS2, at least one additional genetic interval associated with this defense response was identified and mapped using quantitative genetic methods. Further genetic and molecular genetic complementation experiments with cloned RPS2 alleles revealed that the Po-1 allele of RPS2 can function in a Col-0 genetic background, but not in a Po-1 background. The other resistance-determining genes of Po-1 can function, however, as they successfully conferred resistance in combination with the Col-0 allele of RPS2. Domain-swap experiments revealed that in RPS2, a polymorphism at six amino acids in the LRR region is responsible for this allele-specific ability to function with other host factors. PMID:11333251

  7. Minimising losses caused by Zucchini yellow mosaic virus in vegetable cucurbit crops in tropical, sub-tropical and Mediterranean environments through cultural methods and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Coutts, B A; Kehoe, M A; Jones, R A C

    2011-08-01

    Between 2006 and 2009, 10 field experiments were done at Kununurra, Carnarvon or Medina in Western Australia (WA) which have tropical, sub-tropical and Mediterranean climates, respectively. These experiments investigated the effectiveness of cultural control measures in limiting ZYMV spread in pumpkin, and single-gene resistance in commercial cultivars of pumpkin, zucchini and cucumber. Melon aphids (Aphis gossypii) colonised field experiments at Kununurra; migrant green peach aphids (Myzus persicae) visited but did not colonise at Carnarvon and Medina. Cultural control measures that diminished ZYMV spread in pumpkin included manipulation of planting date to avoid exposing young plants to peak aphid vector populations, deploying tall non-host barriers (millet, Pennisetum glaucum) to protect against incoming aphid vectors and planting upwind of infection sources. Clustering of ZYMV-infected pumpkin plants was greater without a 25m wide non-host barrier between the infection source and the pumpkin plants than when one was present, and downwind compared with upwind of an infection source. Host resistance gene zym was effective against ZYMV isolate Knx-1 from Kununurra in five cultivars of cucumber. In zucchini, host resistance gene Zym delayed spread of infection (partial resistance) in 2 of 14 cultivars but otherwise did not diminish final ZYMV incidence. Zucchini cultivars carrying Zym often developed severe fruit symptoms (8/14), and only the two cultivars in which spread was delayed and one that was tolerant produced sufficiently high marketable yields to be recommended when ZYMV epidemics are anticipated. In three pumpkin cultivars with Zym, this gene was effective against isolate Cvn-1 from Carnarvon under low inoculum pressure, but not against isolate Knx-1 under high inoculum pressure, although symptoms were milder and marketable yields greater in them than in cultivars without Zym. These findings allowed additional cultural control recommendations to be added

  8. Fulminant hepatic failure secondary to acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Lokesh

    2016-10-17

    Liver failure is a frequent and serious complication that causes morbidity and mortality in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. Liver dysfunction in these patients can be related to infectious causes, most common viral hepatitis. We report a case of disseminated acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection following HCT that led to acute liver failure and death. Although rare, HSV hepatitis leads to high morbidity and mortality and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of HCT recipients with marked elevation of hepatic transaminase. Acyclovir is a first-line therapy for HSV infection; however, acyclovir-resistant viral strains should be considered and alternative HSV therapies given in HCT recipients whose HSV infection does not improve on acyclovir therapy.

  9. Probable secondary transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli between people living with and without pets

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, Yeon Soo; PARK, Young Kyung; PARK, Yong Ho; PARK, Kun Taek

    2017-01-01

    Companion animals are considered as one of the reservoirs of antimicrobial-resistant (AR) bacteria that can be cross-transmitted to humans. However, limited information is available on the possibility of AR bacteria originating from companion animals being transmitted secondarily from owners to non-owners sharing the same space. To address this issue, the present study investigated clonal relatedness among AR E. coli isolated from dog owners and non-owners in the same college classroom or household. Anal samples (n=48) were obtained from 14 owners and 34 non-owners; 31 E. coli isolates were collected (nine from owners and 22 from non-owners). Of 31 E. coli, 20 isolates (64.5%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, and 16 isolates (51.6%) were determined as multi-drug resistant E. coli. Six isolates (19.4%) harbored integrase genes (five harbored class I integrase gene and one harbored class 2 integrase gene, respectively). Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic analysis identified three different E. coli clonal sets among isolates, indicating that cross-transmission of AR E. coli can easily occur between owners and non-owners. The findings emphasize a potential risk of spread of AR bacteria originating from pets within human communities, once they are transferred to humans. Further studies are needed to evaluate the exact risk and identify the risk factors of secondarily transmission by investigating larger numbers of isolates from pets, their owners and non-owners in a community. PMID:28190823

  10. Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 Is a Dominant, Antimicrobial-Resistant Clonal Group Associated with Healthcare and Elderly Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ritu; Johnston, Brian; Lohse, Christine; Porter, Stephen B.; Clabots, Connie; Johnson, James R.

    2014-01-01

    globally predominant ST131 pulsotypes accounted for 45% of ST131 isolates. CONCLUSIONS ST131 is a dominant, antimicrobial-resistant clonal group associated with healthcare settings, elderly hosts, and persistent or recurrent symptoms. PMID:23466908

  11. A new mouse model reveals a critical role for host innate immunity in resistance to Rift Valley fever.

    PubMed

    do Valle, Tânia Zaverucha; Billecocq, Agnès; Guillemot, Laurent; Alberts, Rudi; Gommet, Céline; Geffers, Robert; Calabrese, Kátia; Schughart, Klaus; Bouloy, Michèle; Montagutelli, Xavier; Panthier, Jean-Jacques

    2010-11-15

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease repeatedly reported in many African countries and, more recently, in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. RVF virus (RVFV) primarily infects domesticated ruminants, resulting in miscarriage in pregnant females and death for newborns and young animals. It also has the ability to infect humans, causing a feverish syndrome, meningoencephalitis, or hemorrhagic fever. The various outcomes of RVFV infection in animals and humans argue for the existence of host genetic determinants controlling the disease. We investigated the susceptibility of inbred mouse strains to infection with the virulent RVFV ZH548 strain. Compared with classical BALB/cByJ mice, wild-derived Mus m. musculus MBT/Pas mice exhibited earlier and greater viremia and died sooner, a result in sharp contrast with their resistance to infection with West Nile virus and influenza A. Infection of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from MBT/Pas mice with RVFV also resulted in higher viral production. Microarray and quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that BALB/cByJ MEFs displayed a significant activation of the type I IFN pathway. In contrast, MBT/Pas MEFs elicited a delayed and partial type I IFN response to RVFV infection. RNA interference-mediated inhibition of genes that were not induced by RVFV in MBT/Pas MEFs increased viral production in BALB/cByJ MEFs, thus demonstrating their functional importance in limiting viral replication. We conclude that the failure of MBT/Pas murine strain to induce, in due course, a complete innate immune response is instrumental in the selective susceptibility to RVF.

  12. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum.

    PubMed

    Untalan, Pia M; Pruett, John H; Steelman, C Dayton

    2007-04-10

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manifestation of this phenotype remain elusive. In an effort to analyze the role that genes within the BoLA complex may play in host resistance to ticks, we have evaluated components of this system within a herd of cattle established at our laboratory that has been phenotyped for ectoparasite susceptibility. Of three microsatellite loci within the BoLA complex analyzed, alleles of two microsatellite loci within the BoLA class IIa cluster (DRB1-118 and DRB3-174) associated with the tick-resistant phenotype, prompting further investigation of gene sequences within the DRB3 region. DRB3 is a class IIa gene, the second exon of which is highly polymorphic since it encodes the antigen recognition site of the DR class II molecule. Analysis of the second exon of the DRB3 gene from the phenotyped calves in our herd revealed a significant association between the DRB3*4401 allele and the tick-resistant phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a putative association between a class IIa DRB3 sequence and host resistance to the Lone Star tick. Elucidation of the mechanism involved in tick resistance will contribute to improving breeding schemes for parasite resistance, which will be beneficial to the cattle industry.

  13. Activation of the silent secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin-resistance in a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Yi, Le; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wang, Nan; Han, Xiao

    2015-04-22

    Introduction of neomycin-resistance into a marine-derived, wild-type Penicillium purpurogenum G59 resulted in activation of silent biosynthetic pathways for the secondary metabolite production. Upon treatment of G59 spores with neomycin and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a total of 56 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of mutants to neomycin was testified by the resistance test. In contrast to the G59 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 28 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that the 28 mutants have acquired the capability to produce bioactive metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses further indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the bioactive mutant extracts. Followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that five bioactive secondary metabolites, curvularin (1), citrinin (2), penicitrinone A (3), erythro-23-O-methylneocyclocitrinol (4) and 22E-7α-methoxy-5α, 6α-epoxyergosta-8(14),22-dien-3β-ol (5), were newly produced by a mutant, 4-30, compared to the G59 strain. All 1-5 were also not yet found in the secondary metabolites of other wild type P. purpurogenum strains. Compounds 1-5 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60, HeLa and BGC-823 cells to varying extents. Both present bioassays and chemical investigations demonstrated that the introduction of neomycin-resistance into the marine-derived fungal G59 strain could activate silent secondary metabolite production. The present work not only extended the previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi both in DMSO concentrations and antibiotics, but also additionally exemplified effectiveness of this method for activating silent fungal secondary metabolites. This method could be applied to other fungal isolates to elicit their metabolic potentials to investigate secondary metabolites from silent biosynthetic pathways.

  14. Cell Wall Changes in Amphotericin B-Resistant Strains from Candida tropicalis and Relationship with the Immune Responses Elicited by the Host.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Arango, Ana C; Rueda, Cristina; Román, Elvira; Quintin, Jessica; Terrón, María C; Luque, Daniel; Netea, Mihai G; Pla, Jesus; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    We have morphologically characterizedCandida tropicalisisolates resistant to amphotericin B (AmB). These isolates present an enlarged cell wall compared to isolates of regular susceptibility. This correlated with higher levels of β-1,3-glucan in the cell wall but not with detectable changes in chitin content. In line with this, AmB-resistant strains showed reduced susceptibility to Congo red. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in cell integrity were already activated during regular growth in these strains. Finally, we investigated the response elicited by human blood cells and found that AmB-resistant strains induced a stronger proinflammatory response than susceptible strains. In agreement, AmB-resistant strains also induced stronger melanization ofGalleria mellonellalarvae, indicating that the effect of alterations of the cell wall on the immune response is conserved in different types of hosts. Our results suggest that resistance to AmB is associated with pleiotropic mechanisms that might have important consequences, not only for the efficacy of the treatment but also for the immune response elicited by the host.

  15. Cell Wall Changes in Amphotericin B-Resistant Strains from Candida tropicalis and Relationship with the Immune Responses Elicited by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Arango, Ana C.; Rueda, Cristina; Román, Elvira; Quintin, Jessica; Terrón, María C.; Luque, Daniel; Netea, Mihai G.; Pla, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    We have morphologically characterized Candida tropicalis isolates resistant to amphotericin B (AmB). These isolates present an enlarged cell wall compared to isolates of regular susceptibility. This correlated with higher levels of β-1,3-glucan in the cell wall but not with detectable changes in chitin content. In line with this, AmB-resistant strains showed reduced susceptibility to Congo red. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in cell integrity were already activated during regular growth in these strains. Finally, we investigated the response elicited by human blood cells and found that AmB-resistant strains induced a stronger proinflammatory response than susceptible strains. In agreement, AmB-resistant strains also induced stronger melanization of Galleria mellonella larvae, indicating that the effect of alterations of the cell wall on the immune response is conserved in different types of hosts. Our results suggest that resistance to AmB is associated with pleiotropic mechanisms that might have important consequences, not only for the efficacy of the treatment but also for the immune response elicited by the host. PMID:26833156

  16. Redundant species, cryptic host-associated divergence, and secondary shift in Sennertia mites (Acari: Chaetodactylidae) associated with four large carpenter bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Xylocopa) in the Japanese island arc.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Kazuhide; Kawakita, Atsushi; Kameda, Yuichi; Kato, Makoto

    2008-11-01

    Sennertia mites live as inquilines in the nests of carpenter bees and disperse as deutonymphs on newly emerged adult bees. Because their life cycle is tightly linked to that of the host bees, Sennertia may diverge in response to speciation in the hosts. However, the majority of Sennertia species are associated with several closely related carpenter bees, suggesting that host speciation may not be reflected in mite genetic structure. Here we investigate the extent of host-associated genetic differentiation in two Sennertia mites (S. alfkeni and S. japonica) that share four closely related, strictly allopatric large carpenter bees (Xylocopa). Analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in Sennertia unexpectedly indicates that the two species represent morphological variants of a single species, and they collectively group into four distinct, allopatric clades that are uniquely associated with a single Xylocopa host. An exception is the mites associated with X. amamensis of the northernmost populations, which have genotypes typical of those associated with neighboring X. appendiculatacircumvolans. Additional analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) further corroborates the presence of four mite clades but contrary to the COI data, suggests that the mites of the southernmost population of X. appendiculatacircumvolans have genetic profiles typical of those associated with X. amamensis. These results indicate that some mites have undergone secondary host switch after the formation of the four mite lineages and further experienced mitochondrial introgression during period of lineage coexistence. Overall, our results strongly urge reappraisal of deutonymph-based mite taxonomy and illuminate the importance of host-associated divergence during incipient stage of speciation in chaetodactylid mites. Furthermore, the occurrence of host switch and introgression between genetically differentiated mites entails that two host species

  17. Leptin resistance is a secondary consequence of the obesity in ciliopathy mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Berbari, Nicolas F; Pasek, Raymond C; Malarkey, Erik B; Yazdi, S M Zaki; McNair, Andrew D; Lewis, Wesley R; Nagy, Tim R; Kesterson, Robert A; Yoder, Bradley K

    2013-05-07

    Although primary cilia are well established as important sensory and signaling structures, their function in most tissues remains unknown. Obesity is a feature associated with some syndromes of cilia dysfunction, such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Alström syndrome, as well as in several cilia mutant mouse models. Recent data indicate that obesity in BBS mutant mice is due to defects in leptin receptor trafficking and leptin resistance. Furthermore, induction of cilia loss in leptin-responsive proopiomelanocortin neurons results in obesity, implicating cilia on hypothalamic neurons in regulating feeding behavior. Here, we directly test the importance of the cilium as a mediator of the leptin response. In contrast to the current dogma, a longitudinal study of conditional Ift88 cilia mutant mice under different states of adiposity indicates that leptin resistance is present only when mutants are obese. Our studies show that caloric restriction leads to an altered anticipatory feeding behavior that temporarily abrogates the anorectic actions of leptin despite normalized circulating leptin levels. Interestingly, preobese Bbs4 mutant mice responded to the anorectic effects of leptin and did not display other phenotypes associated with defective leptin signaling. Furthermore, thermoregulation and activity measurements in cilia mutant mice are inconsistent with phenotypes previously observed in leptin deficient ob/ob mice. Collectively, these data indicate that cilia are not directly involved in leptin responses and that a defect in the leptin signaling axis is not the initiating event leading to hyperphagia and obesity associated with cilia dysfunction.

  18. Secondary (gamma-Proteobacteria) endosymbionts infect the primary (beta-Proteobacteria) endosymbionts of mealybugs multiple times and coevolve with their hosts.

    PubMed

    Thao, MyLo Ly; Gullan, Penny J; Baumann, Paul

    2002-07-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera, Coccoidea, Pseudococcidae) are plant sap-sucking insects that have within their body cavities specialized cells containing prokaryotic primary endosymbionts (P-endosymbionts). The P-endosymbionts have the unusual property of containing within their cytoplasm prokaryotic secondary endosymbionts (S-endosymbionts) [C. D. von Dohlen, S. Kohler, S. T. Alsop, and W. R. McManus, Nature (London) 412:433-436, 2001]. Four-kilobase fragments containing 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were obtained from the P-endosymbionts of 22 mealybug species and the S-endosymbionts of 12 representative species. Phylogenetic analyses of the P-endosymbionts indicated that they have a monophyletic origin and are members of the beta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria; these organisms were subdivided into five different clusters. The S-endosymbionts were members of the gamma-subdivision of the Proteobacteria and were grouped into clusters similar to those observed with the P-endosymbionts. The S-endosymbiont clusters were distinct from each other and from other insect-associated bacteria. The similarity of the clusters formed by the P- and S-endosymbionts suggests that the P-endosymbionts of mealybugs were infected multiple times with different precursors of the S-endosymbionts and once the association was established, the P- and S-endosymbionts were transmitted together. The lineage consisting of the P-endosymbionts of mealybugs was given the designation "Candidatus Tremblaya" gen. nov., with a single species, "Candidatus Tremblaya princeps" sp. nov. The results of phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA fragments encoding cytochrome oxidase subunits I and II from four representative mealybug species were in agreement with the results of 16S-23S rDNA analyses, suggesting that relationships among strains of "Candidatus T. princeps" are useful in inferring the phylogeny of their mealybug hosts.

  19. Effect of Bt broccoli and resistant genotype of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on development and host acceptance of the parasitoid Diadegma insulare (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Mao; Onstad, David; Roush, Rick; Shelton, Anthony M

    2011-08-01

    The ecological implications on biological control of insecticidal transgenic plants, which produce crystal (Cry) proteins from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), remain a contentious issue and affect risk assessment decisions. In this study, we used a unique system of resistant insects, Bt plants and a parasitoid to critically evaluate this issue. The effects of broccoli type (normal or expressing Cry1Ac protein) and insect genotype (susceptible or Cry1Ac-resistant) of Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) were examined for their effects on the development and host foraging behavior of the parasitoid, Diadegma insulare (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) over two generations. Parasitism rate and development of D. insulare were not significantly different when different genotypes (Bt-resistant or susceptible) of insect host larvae fed on non-Bt broccoli plants. D. insulare could not discriminate between resistant and susceptible genotypes of P. xylostella, nor between Bt and normal broccoli plants with different genotypes of P. xylostella feeding on them. No D. insulare could emerge from Bt broccoli-fed susceptible and heterozygous P. xylostella larvae because these larvae were unable to survive on Bt broccoli. The parasitism rate, developmental period, pupal and adult weights of D. insulare that had developed on Bt broccoli-fed Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella larvae were not significantly different from those that developed on non-Bt broccoli-fed larvae. Female D. insulare emerged from Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella that fed on Bt plants could successfully parasitize P. xylostella larvae. The life parameters of the subsequent generation of D. insulare from P. xylostella reared on Bt broccoli were not significantly different from those from non-Bt broccoli. The Cry1Ac protein was detected in P. xylostella and in D. insulare when hosts fed on Bt broccoli. These results are the first to indicate that Cry1Ac did not harm the development or

  20. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  1. Prevalence of male secondary hypogonadism in moderate to severe obesity and its relationship with insulin resistance and excess body weight.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Berniza; Gómez-Martín, Jesús M; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Galindo, Julio; Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2016-01-01

    To study the prevalence of male obesity-secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) in patients with moderate to severe obesity, we performed a prospective prevalence study including 100 male patients with moderate to severe obesity at a university tertiary hospital. Total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations among others were assayed in all patients. Serum-free testosterone (FT) concentration was calculated from TT and SHBG levels. Semen analysis was conducted in 31 patients. We found a prevalence of 45% (95% CI: 35-55%) when considering decreased TT and/or FT concentrations. Serum concentrations of TT were correlated negatively with glucose (r = -0.328, p < 0.001) and insulin resistance (r = -0.261, p = 0.011). The same occurred with FT and glucose (r = -0.340, p < 0.001) and insulin resistance (r = -0.246, p = 0.016). Sixty-two percent (95% CI: 39-85%) of the patients with seminogram also presented abnormal results in semen analysis. The frequencies of low TT or low FT values were similar in patients with abnormal or normal semen analysis (p = 0.646 and p = 0.346, respectively). Ejaculate volume inversely correlated with BMI (ρ = -0.400, p = 0.029) and with excess body weight (ρ = -0.464, p = 0.010). Our data show the prevalence of MOSH in patients with moderate to severe obesity is high. Low circulating testosterone is associated with insulin resistance and low ejaculate volume with higher BMI and excess body weight. Semen analysis must be performed in these patients when considering fertility whether or not presenting low circulating testosterone.

  2. Emergence of Daptomycin Resistance in Daptomycin-Naïve Rabbits with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prosthetic Joint Infection Is Associated with Resistance to Host Defense Cationic Peptides and mprF Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nagendra N.; Yang, Soo-Jin; Chen, Liang; Muller, Claudette; Saleh-Mghir, Azzam; Kuhn, Sebastian; Peschel, Andreas; Yeaman, Michael R.; Nast, Cynthia C.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Crémieux, Anne-Claude; Bayer, Arnold S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies of both clinically-derived and in vitro passage-derived daptomycin–resistant (DAP-R) Staphylococcus aureus strains demonstrated the coincident emergence of increased DAP MICs and resistance to host defense cationic peptides (HDP-R). Methods In the present investigation, we studied a parental DAP-susceptible (DAP-S) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain and three isogenic variants with increased DAP MICs which were isolated from both DAP-treated and DAP-untreated rabbits with prosthetic joint infections. These strains were compared for: in vitro susceptibility to distinct HDPs differing in size, structure, and origin; i.e.; thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal proteins [tPMPs] and human neutrophil peptide-1 [hNP-1]; cell membrane (CM) phospholipid and fatty acid content; CM order; envelope surface charge; cell wall thickness; and mprF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and expression profiles. Results In comparison with the parental strain, both DAP-exposed and DAP-naive strains exhibited: (i) significantly reduced susceptibility to each HDP (P<0.05); (ii) thicker cell walls (P<0.05); (iii) increased synthesis of CM lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (L-PG); (iv) reduced content of CM phosphatidylglycerol (PG); and (v) SNPs within the mprF locus No significant differences were observed between parental or variant strains in outer CM content of L-PG, CM fluidity, CM fatty acid contents, surface charge, mprF expression profiles or MprF protein content. An isolate which underwent identical in vivo passage, but without evolving increased DAP MICs, retained parental phenotypes and genotype. Conclusions These results suggest: i) DAP MIC increases may occur in the absence of DAP exposures in vivo and may be triggered by organism exposure to endogenous HDPs: and ii) gain-in-function SNPs in mprF may contribute to such HDP-DAP cross-resistance phenotypes, although the mechanism of this relationship remains to be defined. PMID

  3. Genetics of resistance in lettuce to races 1 and 2 of Verticillium dahliae from different host species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Race 1 resistance against Verticillium dahliae in lettuce was originally shown in the cultivar La Brillante to be conditioned by a single dominant gene (Verticillium resistance 1, Vr1). Multiple, morphologically diverse sources of germplasm have been identified as resistant to race 1. In this study...

  4. Host-mediated gene silencing of a single effector gene from the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans imparts partial resistance to late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Sanju, Suman; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Thakur, Aditi; Shukla, Pradeep K; Srivastava, Nidhi; Pattanayak, Debasis; Sharma, Sanjeev; Singh, B P

    2015-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has proved a powerful genetic tool for silencing genes in plants. Host-induced gene silencing of pathogen genes has provided a gene knockout strategy for a wide range of biotechnological applications. The RXLR effector Avr3a gene is largely responsible for virulence of oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In this study, we attempted to silence the Avr3a gene of P. infestans through RNAi technology. The P. infestans inoculation resulted in lower disease progression and a reduction in pathogen load, as demonstrated by disease scoring and quantification of pathogen biomass in terms of Pi08 repetitive elements, respectively. Transgenic plants induced moderate silencing of Avr3a, and the presence and/or expression of small interfering RNAs, as determined through Northern hybridization, indicated siRNA targeted against Avr3a conferred moderate resistance to P. infestans. The single effector gene did not provide complete resistance against P. infestans. Although the Avr3a effector gene could confer moderate resistance, for complete resistance, the cumulative effect of effector genes in addition to Avr3a needs to be considered. In this study, we demonstrated that host-induced RNAi is an effective strategy for functional genomics in oomycetes.

  5. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  6. Evaluating the non-rice host plant species of Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) as natural refuges: resistance management of Bt rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuorong; Gao, Yulin; Luo, Ju; Lai, Fengxiang; Li, Yunhe; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yufa

    2011-06-01

    Although rice (Oryza sativa L.) lines that express Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have shown great potential for managing the major Lepidoptera pests of rice in southern China, including Sesamia inferens, their long-term use is dependent on managing resistance development to Bt toxins in pest populations. The maintenance of "natural" refuges, non-Bt expressing plants that are hosts for a target pest, has been proposed as a means to minimize the evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in transgenic plants. In the current study, field surveys and greenhouse experiments were conducted to identify host plants of S. inferens that could serve as "natural" refuges in rice growing areas of southern China. A field survey showed that 34 plant species in four families can be alternative host plants of S. inferens. Based on injury level under field conditions, rice (Oryza sativa L.); water oat (Zizania latifolia Griseb.); corn (Zea mays L.); tidalmarsh flatsedge (Cyperus serotinus Rottb.); and narrow-leaved cat-tail (Typha angustifolia Linn.) were identified as the primary host plant species of S. inferens. Greenhouse experiments further demonstrated that water oat, corn, and narrow-leaved cat-tail could support the survival and development of S. inferens. Interestingly, greenhouse experiments showed that S. inferens preferred to lay eggs on tidalmarsh flatsedge compared with the other three nonrice host species, although no pupae were found in the plants examined in field surveys. Few larvae were found to survive on tidalmarsh flatsedge in greenhouse bioassays, suggesting that tidalmarsh flatsedge could serve as a "dead-end" trap crop for S. inferens, but is not a candidate to serve as natural refuge to maintain susceptible S. inferens. Overall, these results suggest that water-oat, corn, and narrow-leaved cat-tail might serve as "natural refuge" for S. inferens in rice planting area of southern China when Bt rice varieties are planted.

  7. Role of Antimicrobial Selective Pressure and Secondary Factors on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevalence in Escherichia coli from Food-Producing Animals in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kazuki; Asai, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in the veterinary field affects the emergence, prevalence, and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from food-producing animals. To control the emergence, prevalence, and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance, it is necessary to implement appropriate actions based on scientific evidence. In Japan, the Japanese Veterinary Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (JVARM) was established in 1999 to monitor the antimicrobial susceptibility of foodborne and commensal bacteria from food-producing animals. The JVARM showed that the emergence and prevalence of resistant Escherichia coli were likely linked to the therapeutic antimicrobial use in food-producing animals through not only direct selection of the corresponding resistance but also indirect selections via cross-resistance and coresistance. In addition, relevant factors such as host animals and bacterial properties might affect the occurrence and prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli under the selective pressure from antimicrobial usage. This paper reviews the trends in antimicrobial resistance in E. coli and consumption of antimicrobials agents in Japan and introduces the relationship between antimicrobial usage and prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, from food-producing animals under the JVARM program. In this paper, we will provide the underlying information about the significant factors that can help control antimicrobial resistance in bacteria in veterinary medicine. PMID:20589071

  8. Overcoming Resistance to Change: A Case Study of Revision and Renewal in a U.S. Secondary Education Teacher Preparation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akmal, Tariq; Miller, Darcy

    2003-01-01

    Examined internal and external factors contributing to the change process, bureaucratic and personal responses, and resistance to change in a secondary teacher preparation program. Data from interviews, observations, document review, and review of personal journals highlighted four recurring phenomena serving as catalysts for and obstacles to…

  9. Cladosporium fulvum CfHNNI1 induces hypersensitive necrosis, defence gene expression and disease resistance in both host and nonhost plants.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xin-Zhong; Zhou, Xin; Xu, You-Ping; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2007-05-01

    Nonhost resistance as a durable and broad-spectrum defence strategy is of great potential for agricultural applications. We have previously isolated a cDNA showing homology with genes encoding bZIP transcription factors from tomato leaf mould pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. Upon expression, the cDNA results in necrosis in C. fulvum host tomato and nonhost tobacco plants and is thus named CfHNNI1 (for C . f ulvum host and nonhost plant necrosis inducer 1). In the present study we report the induction of necrosis in a variety of nonhost plant species belonging to three families by the transient in planta expression of CfHNNI1 using virus-based vectors. Additionally, transient expression of CfHNNI1 also induced expression of the HR marker gene LeHSR203 and greatly reduced the accumulation of recombinant Potato virus X. Stable CfHNNI1 transgenic tobacco plants were generated in which the expression of CfHNNI1 is under the control of the pathogen-inducible hsr203J promoter. When infected with the oomycetes pathogen Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae, these transgenic plants manifested enhanced expression of CfHNNI1 and subsequent accumulation of CfHNNI1 protein, resulting in high expression of the HSR203J and PR genes, and strong resistance to the pathogen. The CfHNNI1 transgenic plants also exhibited induced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci and Tobacco mosaic virus. Furthermore, CfHNNI1 was highly expressed and the protein was translocated into plant cells during the incompatible interactions between C. fulvum and host and nonhost plants. Our results demonstrate that CfHNNI1 is a potential general elicitor of hypersensitive response and nonhost resistance.

  10. Host resistance, population structure and the long-term persistence of bubonic plague: contributions of a modelling approach in the Malagasy focus.

    PubMed

    Gascuel, Fanny; Choisy, Marc; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Débarre, Florence; Brouat, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Although bubonic plague is an endemic zoonosis in many countries around the world, the factors responsible for the persistence of this highly virulent disease remain poorly known. Classically, the endemic persistence of plague is suspected to be due to the coexistence of plague resistant and plague susceptible rodents in natural foci, and/or to a metapopulation structure of reservoirs. Here, we test separately the effect of each of these factors on the long-term persistence of plague. We analyse the dynamics and equilibria of a model of plague propagation, consistent with plague ecology in Madagascar, a major focus where this disease is endemic since the 1920s in central highlands. By combining deterministic and stochastic analyses of this model, and including sensitivity analyses, we show that (i) endemicity is favoured by intermediate host population sizes, (ii) in large host populations, the presence of resistant rats is sufficient to explain long-term persistence of plague, and (iii) the metapopulation structure of susceptible host populations alone can also account for plague endemicity, thanks to both subdivision and the subsequent reduction in the size of subpopulations, and extinction-recolonization dynamics of the disease. In the light of these results, we suggest scenarios to explain the localized presence of plague in Madagascar.

  11. Parasites of QX-resistant and wild-type Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) in Moreton Bay, SE Queensland, Australia: diversity and host response.

    PubMed

    Dang, Cécile; Cribb, Thomas H; Cutmore, Scott C; Chan, Janlin; Hénault, Olivier; Barnes, Andrew C

    2013-03-01

    Wild caught (WC) and QX resistant (QXR) Sydney rock oysters were introduced at North Stradbroke Island and Pimpama River, SE Queensland, Australia, and sampled monthly during 1 year. Three groups of parasites/diseases were identified by observation of histological sections: (1) Marteilia sydneyi (Queensland unknown (QX) disease) and Steinhausia sp. (Microsporidia) characterized by a high prevalence and deleterious impact on the host; (2) disseminated neoplasia and the trematode Proctoeces sp. characterized by low prevalence but deleterious effects on the host; (3) parasites or symbionts with no detectable effect on the host: trematodes, ciliates, turbellarians and metacestodes. Mortality rates were similar between both oyster lines but higher at Pimpama River (reaching around 90%) than Stradbroke Island, mostly because of QX disease and, to a lesser extent, to the unfavourable environmental conditions of the summer 2010-2011. Lower prevalences of QX disease at Stradbroke Island probably related to the relative lack of intermediate hosts of the parasite and to lower freshwater input. Surprisingly, no difference in prevalence of QX disease was observed between the two oyster lines.

  12. Na+/K+-ATPase resistance and cardenolide sequestration: basal adaptations to host plant toxins in the milkweed bugs (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae: Lygaeinae).

    PubMed

    Bramer, Christiane; Dobler, Susanne; Deckert, Jürgen; Stemmer, Michael; Petschenka, Georg

    2015-04-22

    Despite sequestration of toxins being a common coevolutionary response to plant defence in phytophagous insects, the macroevolution of the traits involved is largely unaddressed. Using a phylogenetic approach comprising species from four continents, we analysed the ability to sequester toxic cardenolides in the hemipteran subfamily Lygaeinae, which is widely associated with cardenolide-producing Apocynaceae. In addition, we analysed cardenolide resistance of their Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases, the molecular target of cardenolides. Our data indicate that cardenolide sequestration and cardenolide-resistant Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are basal adaptations in the Lygaeinae. In two species that shifted to non-apocynaceous hosts, the ability to sequester was secondarily reduced, yet Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase resistance was maintained. We suggest that both traits evolved together and represent major coevolutionary adaptations responsible for the evolutionary success of lygaeine bugs. Moreover, specialization on cardenolides was not an evolutionary dead end, but enabled this insect lineage to host shift to cardenolide-producing plants from distantly related families.

  13. Na+/K+-ATPase resistance and cardenolide sequestration: basal adaptations to host plant toxins in the milkweed bugs (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae: Lygaeinae)

    PubMed Central

    Bramer, Christiane; Dobler, Susanne; Deckert, Jürgen; Stemmer, Michael; Petschenka, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Despite sequestration of toxins being a common coevolutionary response to plant defence in phytophagous insects, the macroevolution of the traits involved is largely unaddressed. Using a phylogenetic approach comprising species from four continents, we analysed the ability to sequester toxic cardenolides in the hemipteran subfamily Lygaeinae, which is widely associated with cardenolide-producing Apocynaceae. In addition, we analysed cardenolide resistance of their Na+/K+-ATPases, the molecular target of cardenolides. Our data indicate that cardenolide sequestration and cardenolide-resistant Na+/K+-ATPase are basal adaptations in the Lygaeinae. In two species that shifted to non-apocynaceous hosts, the ability to sequester was secondarily reduced, yet Na+/K+-ATPase resistance was maintained. We suggest that both traits evolved together and represent major coevolutionary adaptations responsible for the evolutionary success of lygaeine bugs. Moreover, specialization on cardenolides was not an evolutionary dead end, but enabled this insect lineage to host shift to cardenolide-producing plants from distantly related families. PMID:25808891

  14. Frequency and Distribution of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms within mprF in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates and Their Role in Cross-Resistance to Daptomycin and Host Defense Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Arnold S; Mishra, Nagendra N; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Rubio, Aileen; Yang, Soo-Jin

    2015-08-01

    MprF is responsible for the lysinylation of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to synthesize the positively charged phospholipid (PL) species, lysyl-PG (L-PG). It has been proposed that the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the mprF open reading frame (ORF) are associated with a gain-in-function phenotype in terms of daptomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. (Note that although the official term is daptomycin nonsusceptibility, we use the term daptomycin resistance in this paper for ease of presentation.) Using 22 daptomycin-susceptible (DAP(s))/daptomycin-resistant (DAP(r)) clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain pairs, we assessed (i) the frequencies and distribution of putative mprF gain-in-function SNPs, (ii) the relationships of the SNPs to both daptomycin resistance and cross-resistance to the prototypical endovascular host defense peptide (HDP) thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein (tPMP), and (iii) the impact of mprF SNPs on positive surface charge phenotype and modifications of membrane PL profiles. Most of the mprF SNPs identified in our DAP(r) strains were clustered within the two MprF loci, (i) the central bifunctional domain and (ii) the C-terminal synthase domain. Moreover, we were able to correlate the presence and location of mprF SNPs in DAP(r) strains with HDP cross-resistance, positive surface charge, and L-PG profiles. Although DAP(r) strains with mprF SNPs in the bifunctional domain showed higher resistance to tPMPs than DAP(r) strains with SNPs in the synthase domain, this relationship was not observed in positive surface charge assays. These results demonstrated that both charge-mediated and -unrelated mechanisms are involved in DAP resistance and HDP cross-resistance in S. aureus.

  15. Frequency and Distribution of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms within mprF in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates and Their Role in Cross-Resistance to Daptomycin and Host Defense Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Arnold S.; Mishra, Nagendra N.; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Rubio, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    MprF is responsible for the lysinylation of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to synthesize the positively charged phospholipid (PL) species, lysyl-PG (L-PG). It has been proposed that the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the mprF open reading frame (ORF) are associated with a gain-in-function phenotype in terms of daptomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. (Note that although the official term is daptomycin nonsusceptibility, we use the term daptomycin resistance in this paper for ease of presentation.) Using 22 daptomycin-susceptible (DAPs)/daptomycin-resistant (DAPr) clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain pairs, we assessed (i) the frequencies and distribution of putative mprF gain-in-function SNPs, (ii) the relationships of the SNPs to both daptomycin resistance and cross-resistance to the prototypical endovascular host defense peptide (HDP) thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein (tPMP), and (iii) the impact of mprF SNPs on positive surface charge phenotype and modifications of membrane PL profiles. Most of the mprF SNPs identified in our DAPr strains were clustered within the two MprF loci, (i) the central bifunctional domain and (ii) the C-terminal synthase domain. Moreover, we were able to correlate the presence and location of mprF SNPs in DAPr strains with HDP cross-resistance, positive surface charge, and L-PG profiles. Although DAPr strains with mprF SNPs in the bifunctional domain showed higher resistance to tPMPs than DAPr strains with SNPs in the synthase domain, this relationship was not observed in positive surface charge assays. These results demonstrated that both charge-mediated and -unrelated mechanisms are involved in DAP resistance and HDP cross-resistance in S. aureus. PMID:26055370

  16. Systemic induction of phloem secondary metabolism and its relationship to resistance to a canker pathogen in Austrian pine.

    PubMed

    Wallis, C; Eyles, A; Chorbadjian, R; McSpadden Gardener, B; Hansen, R; Cipollini, D; Herms, D A; Bonello, P

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms and conditions affecting expression of systemic induced resistance (SIR) in pine are not clearly understood. Two hypotheses were tested here: that SIR against a pathogen induced by either a pathogen or an insect involves coordinated shifts in phloem secondary metabolism; and that fertility affects the production of these compounds. To test these hypotheses, a tripartite system was used comprising Austrian pine (Pinus nigra) grown under three different fertility regimes, the fungal pathogen Diplodia pinea, and the defoliator Neodiprion sertifer. Fungal induction led to systemic accumulation of lignin, phenolic glycosides and stilbenes, whereas insect defoliation led to an increase in germacrene D concentration in branch phloem. Fertility affected the concentrations of only the phenolic glycosides. Multivariate analyses showed coregulation of compounds within at least three consistent groupings: phenolic glycosides, stilbenes and monoterpenes. As groups and as individual compounds, accumulation of phenolic glycosides and stilbenes was negatively correlated with disease susceptibility. The experimental manipulation of the phenolics and terpenoids metabolic networks achieved in this study by biotic induction and changes in nutrient availability suggests that lignin, phenolic glycosides and stilbenes are important biochemical factors in the expression of SIR against the pathogen in this system.

  17. Characterization and Genetic Analysis of Rice Mutant crr1 Exhibiting Compromised Non-host Resistance to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Yuheng; Yang, Donghe; Cheng, Yulin; Jiao, Min; Zhan, Gangming; Zhang, Hongchang; Wang, Junyi; Zhou, Kai; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat in China. Rapid change to virulence following release of resistant cultivars necessitates ongoing discovery and exploitation of new resistance resources. Considerable effort has been directed at non-host resistance (NHR) which is believed to be durable. In the present study we identified rice mutant crr1 (compromised resistance to rust 1) that exhibited compromised NHR to Pst. Compared with wild type rice variety Nipponbare, crr1 mutant displayed a threefold increase in penetration rate by Pst, and enhanced hyphal growth. The pathogen also developed haustoria in crr1 mesophyll cells, but failed to sporulate. The response to the adapted rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae was unchanged in crr1 relative to the wild type. Several defense-related genes involved in the SA- and JA-mediated defense pathways response and in phytoalexin synthesis (such as OsPR1a, OsLOX1, and OsCPS4) were more rapidly and strongly induced in infected crr1 leaves than in the wild type, suggesting that other layers of defense are still in effect. Genetic analysis and mapping located the mutant loci at a region between markers ID14 and RM25792, which cover about 290 kb genome sequence on chromosome 10. Further fine mapping and cloning of the locus should provide further insights into NHR to rust fungi in rice, and may reveal new strategies for improving rust resistance in wheat. PMID:27965705

  18. Comparison of tests to detect oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus schleiferi, and Staphylococcus aureus isolates from canine hosts.

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Jones, Rebekah D; Hiatt, Lauren E; Ofori, Edward D; Rohrbach, Barton W; Frank, Linda A; Kania, Stephen A

    2006-09-01

    Multiple tests were compared to the reference standard PBP2a latex agglutination test for detection of mecA-mediated oxacillin resistance in canine staphylococci. Cefoxitin disk diffusion, using breakpoints for human isolates of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., had low sensitivity for detection of oxacillin resistance in members of the Staphylococcus intermedius group.

  19. Insecticide resistance may enhance the response to a host-plant volatile kairomone for the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauphanor, Benoît; Franck, Pierre; Lasnier, Thérèse; Toubon, Jean-François; Beslay, Dominique; Boivin, Thomas; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Renou, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The behavioral and electroantennographic responses of Cydia pomonella (L.) to the ripe pear volatile ethyl (2 E,4 Z)-2,4-decadienoate (Et- E, Z-DD), were compared in insecticide-susceptible and -resistant populations originating from southern France. A dose-response relationship to this kairomonal attractant was established for antennal activity and did not reveal differences between susceptible and resistant strains. Conversely, males of the laboratory strains expressing metabolic [cytochrome P450-dependent mixed-function oxidases (mfo)] or physiological (kdr-type mutation of the sodium-channel gene) resistance mechanisms exhibited a significantly higher response to Et- E, Z-DD than those of the susceptible strain in a wind tunnel experiment. No response of the females to this kairomone could be obtained in our wind-tunnel conditions. In apple orchards, mfo-resistant male moths were captured at significantly higher rates in kairomone-baited traps than in traps baited with the sex pheromone of C. pomonella. Such a differential phenomenon was not verified for the kdr-resistant insects, which exhibited a similar response to both the sex pheromone and the kairomonal attractant in apple orchards. Considering the widespread distribution of metabolic resistance in European populations of C. pomonella and the enhanced behavioral response to Et- E, Z-DD in resistant moths, the development of control measures based on this kairomonal compound would be of great interest for the management of insecticide resistance in this species.

  20. An Important Role of Prostanoid Receptor EP2 in Host Resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Vandana; Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Singh, Yogesh; Van Kaer, Luc; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, resides and replicates within susceptible hosts by inhibiting host antimicrobial mechanisms. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), produced by M. tuberculosis–infected macrophages, exerts a variety of immunomodulatory functions via 4 receptors (EP1–EP4), each mediating distinct PGE2 functions. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis infection selectively upregulates EP2 messenger RNA expression in CD4+ T cells. We found that EP2 deficiency in mice increases susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection, which correlated with reduced antigen-specific T-cell responses and increased levels of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells. These findings have revealed an important role for EP2 in host immune defense against tuberculosis. As a G protein-coupled receptor, EP2 could serve as a target for immunotherapy of tuberculosis. PMID:23033144

  1. An important role of prostanoid receptor EP2 in host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Vandana; Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Singh, Yogesh; Van Kaer, Luc; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2012-12-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, resides and replicates within susceptible hosts by inhibiting host antimicrobial mechanisms. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), produced by M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages, exerts a variety of immunomodulatory functions via 4 receptors (EP1-EP4), each mediating distinct PGE(2) functions. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis infection selectively upregulates EP2 messenger RNA expression in CD4(+) T cells. We found that EP2 deficiency in mice increases susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection, which correlated with reduced antigen-specific T-cell responses and increased levels of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells. These findings have revealed an important role for EP2 in host immune defense against tuberculosis. As a G protein-coupled receptor, EP2 could serve as a target for immunotherapy of tuberculosis.

  2. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic evidence for a secondary yet early magnetization in large sandstone pipes and host Late Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Summerville Formation and Bluff Sandstone near Mesita, west central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, John W.; Harlan, Stephen S.

    2004-07-01

    Processes responsible for the acquisition of ancient yet secondary magnetizations are important facets of the geologic history of rocks and, when the age of such magnetizations can be estimated with confidence, provide useful information on the ancient geomagnetic field. In west central New Mexico near Mesita, on the Colorado Plateau, hematitic sandstone and siltstone beds of the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Summerville Formation and overlying Bluff Sandstone are host to numerous large (up to 100 m2 in map area) pipe-like sandstone bodies. The pipes are as strongly cemented by hematite (colors range from 10R 6/6 to 10R 3/4) as the host strata; paleomagnetic data from them and their host strata are interpreted to indicate that these rocks have been remagnetized, probably in association with sandstone pipe formation. Reverse polarity magnetizations isolated in both alternating field and thermal demagnetization from pipes are well grouped and are similar to, and not statistically distinct from, those in adjacent host strata. The grand-mean direction for 16 sites (7 sites in sandstone pipes and 9 in host strata), corrected for slight (5°) west-northwest tilt of the strata, is D = 163.0°, I = -44.3° (α95 = 2.7°, k = 169). This direction yields a pole position of 72.8°N, 135.7°E (dp = 2.1°, dm = 3.4°). Assuming a modest (i.e., ˜5°) clockwise rotation of the Colorado Plateau, the pole lies at 68.7°N, 143.8°E. Median destructive fields for the remanence in pipes and host strata are typically 40-50 mT; over 90% of the remanence is "unblocked" or removed during changes in the magnetic mineralogy by temperatures of ˜400-450°C. Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition data, and thermal demagnetization of "saturation" IRM, however, demonstrate that the dominant magnetic phase is of high coercivity and relatively high (above 600°C) laboratory unblocking temperatures in both sandstone pipes and host strata, yet it does not appear to contribute

  3. A Highly Conserved Toxo1 Haplotype Directs Resistance to Toxoplasmosis and Its Associated Caspase-1 Dependent Killing of Parasite and Host Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Bisanz, Cordelia; Lagrange, Dominique; Pilloux, Ludovic; Massera, Céline; Cristinelli, Sara; Jublot, Delphine; Bastien, Olivier; Loeuillet, Corinne; Aldebert, Delphine; Touquet, Bastien; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie France

    2014-01-01

    Natural immunity or resistance to pathogens most often relies on the genetic make-up of the host. In a LEW rat model of refractoriness to toxoplasmosis, we previously identified on chromosome 10 the Toxo1 locus that directs toxoplasmosis outcome and controls parasite spreading by a macrophage-dependent mechanism. Now, we narrowed down Toxo1 to a 891 kb interval containing 29 genes syntenic to human 17p13 region. Strikingly, Toxo1 is included in a haplotype block strictly conserved among all refractory rat strains. The sequencing of Toxo1 in nine rat strains (5 refractory and 4 susceptible) revealed resistant-restricted conserved polymorphisms displaying a distribution gradient that peaks at the bottom border of Toxo1, and highlighting the NOD-like receptor, Nlrp1a, as a major candidate. The Nlrp1 inflammasome is known to trigger, upon pathogen intracellular sensing, pyroptosis programmed-cell death involving caspase-1 activation and cleavage of IL-1β. Functional studies demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent refractoriness in vivo correlated with both the ability of macrophages to restrict T. gondii growth and a T. gondii-induced death of intracellular parasites and its host macrophages. The parasite-induced cell death of infected macrophages bearing the LEW-Toxo1 alleles was found to exhibit pyroptosis-like features with ROS production, the activation of caspase-1 and IL1-β secretion. The pharmacological inactivation of caspase-1 using YVAD and Z-VAD inhibitors prevented the death of both intravacuolar parasites and host non-permissive macrophages but failed to restore parasite proliferation. These findings demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent response of rat macrophages to T. gondii infection may trigger two pathways leading to the control of parasite proliferation and the death of parasites and host macrophages. The NOD-like receptor NLRP1a/Caspase-1 pathway is the best candidate to mediate the parasite-induced cell death. These data represent new insights

  4. A highly conserved Toxo1 haplotype directs resistance to toxoplasmosis and its associated caspase-1 dependent killing of parasite and host macrophage.

    PubMed

    Cavailles, Pierre; Flori, Pierre; Papapietro, Olivier; Bisanz, Cordelia; Lagrange, Dominique; Pilloux, Ludovic; Massera, Céline; Cristinelli, Sara; Jublot, Delphine; Bastien, Olivier; Loeuillet, Corinne; Aldebert, Delphine; Touquet, Bastien; Fournié, Gilbert J; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie France

    2014-04-01

    Natural immunity or resistance to pathogens most often relies on the genetic make-up of the host. In a LEW rat model of refractoriness to toxoplasmosis, we previously identified on chromosome 10 the Toxo1 locus that directs toxoplasmosis outcome and controls parasite spreading by a macrophage-dependent mechanism. Now, we narrowed down Toxo1 to a 891 kb interval containing 29 genes syntenic to human 17p13 region. Strikingly, Toxo1 is included in a haplotype block strictly conserved among all refractory rat strains. The sequencing of Toxo1 in nine rat strains (5 refractory and 4 susceptible) revealed resistant-restricted conserved polymorphisms displaying a distribution gradient that peaks at the bottom border of Toxo1, and highlighting the NOD-like receptor, Nlrp1a, as a major candidate. The Nlrp1 inflammasome is known to trigger, upon pathogen intracellular sensing, pyroptosis programmed-cell death involving caspase-1 activation and cleavage of IL-1β. Functional studies demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent refractoriness in vivo correlated with both the ability of macrophages to restrict T. gondii growth and a T. gondii-induced death of intracellular parasites and its host macrophages. The parasite-induced cell death of infected macrophages bearing the LEW-Toxo1 alleles was found to exhibit pyroptosis-like features with ROS production, the activation of caspase-1 and IL1-β secretion. The pharmacological inactivation of caspase-1 using YVAD and Z-VAD inhibitors prevented the death of both intravacuolar parasites and host non-permissive macrophages but failed to restore parasite proliferation. These findings demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent response of rat macrophages to T. gondii infection may trigger two pathways leading to the control of parasite proliferation and the death of parasites and host macrophages. The NOD-like receptor NLRP1a/Caspase-1 pathway is the best candidate to mediate the parasite-induced cell death. These data represent new insights

  5. High-level tolerance to triclosan may play a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance in immunocompromised hosts: evidence from outbreak investigation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious threat to immunocompromised patients. We recently reported a fatal epidemic of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in an onchoematology unit, linked to massive contamination of a triclosan-based disinfectant. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of triclosan and chlorhexidine digluconate against the epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, to confirm the hypothesis that the soap dispenser acted as a continuous source of the infection during the outbreak, and to explore the potential role of triclosan in increasing the level of resistance to selected antibiotics. Susceptibility tests and time-kill assays for disinfectans were performed using two commercial formulations containing triclosan and chlorhexidine digluconate, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the broth microdilution method. Findings The P. aeruginosa epidemic strain exhibited an extremely high level of triclosan resistance (apparent MIC = 2,125 mg/L), while it was markedly susceptible to chlorhexidine digluconate (apparent MIC = 12.5 mg/L). Upon gradual adaptation to triclosan, the epidemic strain survived for a long period (> 120 h) in the presence of 3,400 mg/L (equivalent to 1.6 × MIC) of triclosan, concomitantly increasing the resistance to six antibiotics that are typical substrates of drug efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division family. This effect was reversed by efflux pump inhibitors. Conclusions The epidemic P. aeruginosa strain was resistant to triclosan and its previous exposure to triclosan increases antibiotic resistance, likely through active efflux mechanisms. Since P. aeruginosa can become tolerant to elevated triclosan concentrations, the use of triclosan-based disinfectants should be avoided in those healthcare settings hosting patients at high risk for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:22260715

  6. Host genetic resistance to root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp., in Solanaceae: from genes to the field.

    PubMed

    Barbary, Arnaud; Djian-Caporalino, Caroline; Palloix, Alain; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) heavily damage most solanaceous crops worldwide. Fortunately, major resistance genes are available in a number of plant species, and their use provides a safe and economically relevant strategy for RKN control. From a structural point of view, these genes often harbour NBS-LRR motifs (i.e. a nucleotide binding site and a leucine rich repeat region near the carboxy terminus) and are organised in syntenic clusters in solanaceous genomes. Their introgression from wild to cultivated plants remains a challenge for breeders, although facilitated by marker-assisted selection. As shown with other pathosystems, the genetic background into which the resistance genes are introgressed is of prime importance to both the expression of the resistance and its durability, as exemplified by the recent discovery of quantitative trait loci conferring quantitative resistance to RKNs in pepper. The deployment of resistance genes at a large scale may result in the emergence and spread of virulent nematode populations able to overcome them, as already reported in tomato and pepper. Therefore, careful management of the resistance genes available in solanaceous crops is crucial to avoid significant reduction in the duration of RKN genetic control in the field. From that perspective, only rational management combining breeding and cultivation practices will allow the design and implementation of innovative, sustainable crop production systems that protect the resistance genes and maintain their durability.

  7. Identification and analysis of host plant resistance in leading maize genotypes against spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Arabjafari, K H; Jalali, S K

    2007-06-01

    Twenty six popular varieties of maize in Karnataka state (India) were screened for resistance to Chilo partellus (Swinhoe). In field trial, varieties CM132, CM137 and PMZ103 showed the highest level of resistance, respectively. While the varieties GK3014, HY4642 and DK984 had the lowest level of resistance, respectively. In glasshouse trial, the varieties CM137 and HY4642 had the highest and lowest level of resistance. A positive correlation equal to +0.111 (in field) and +0.521 (in glasshouse) was found between the Leaf Injury Score (LIS) and Stem Diameter (SD). Meanwhile, negative correlation equal to -0.432 (in field) and -0.896 (in glasshouse) was found between Leaf Injury Score (LIS) and Internodal Distance (InD). Results of the studies on major nutritional elements on resistant variety CM137 and susceptible variety HY4642 indicated higher percentage of P, K, Fe and Si in stem tissues of the variety CM137, while the variety HY4642 had higher percentage of N and Sugar, highlighting the role of these elements in conferring resistance and susceptibility to C. partellus. Studies on the impact of resistance factors on biological events of C. partellus revealed significant differences between percentage survival of larvae, percentage of pupation, pupal weight and pupal period (females only) on two varieties CM137 and HY4642. But there was no significant difference in the percentage of moth emergence on two varieties.

  8. Investigating the Role of the Host Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein Transporter Family in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Pathogenicity Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Pietro; Visone, Marco; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato; Ballestriero, Francesco; Santos, Radleigh; Pinilla, Clemencia; Di Schiavi, Elia; Tegos, George; de Pascale, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between host efflux system of the non-vertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) strain virulence. This is the first comprehensive effort to profile host-transporters within the context of Bcc infection. With this aim, two different toxicity tests were performed: a slow killing assay that monitors mortality of the host by intestinal colonization and a fast killing assay that assesses production of toxins. A Virulence Ranking scheme was defined, that expressed the toxicity of the Bcc panel members, based on the percentage of surviving worms. According to this ranking the 18 Bcc strains were divided in 4 distinct groups. Only the Cystic Fibrosis isolated strains possessed profound nematode killing ability to accumulate in worms’ intestines. For the transporter analysis a complete set of isogenic nematode single Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) efflux mutants and a number of efflux inhibitors were interrogated in the host toxicity assays. The Bcc pathogenicity profile of the 7 isogenic C. elegans MRP knock-out strains functionality was classified in two distinct groups. Disabling host transporters enhanced nematode mortality more than 50% in 5 out of 7 mutants when compared to wild type. In particular mrp-2 was the most susceptible phenotype with increased mortality for 13 out 18 Bcc strains, whereas mrp-3 and mrp-4 knock-outs had lower mortality rates, suggesting a different role in toxin-substrate recognition. The use of MRP efflux inhibitors in the assays resulted in substantially increased (>40% on average) mortality of wild-type worms. PMID:26587842

  9. Investigating the Role of the Host Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein Transporter Family in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Pathogenicity Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Pietro; Visone, Marco; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato; Ballestriero, Francesco; Santos, Radleigh; Pinilla, Clemencia; Di Schiavi, Elia; Tegos, George; de Pascale, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between host efflux system of the non-vertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) strain virulence. This is the first comprehensive effort to profile host-transporters within the context of Bcc infection. With this aim, two different toxicity tests were performed: a slow killing assay that monitors mortality of the host by intestinal colonization and a fast killing assay that assesses production of toxins. A Virulence Ranking scheme was defined, that expressed the toxicity of the Bcc panel members, based on the percentage of surviving worms. According to this ranking the 18 Bcc strains were divided in 4 distinct groups. Only the Cystic Fibrosis isolated strains possessed profound nematode killing ability to accumulate in worms' intestines. For the transporter analysis a complete set of isogenic nematode single Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) efflux mutants and a number of efflux inhibitors were interrogated in the host toxicity assays. The Bcc pathogenicity profile of the 7 isogenic C. elegans MRP knock-out strains functionality was classified in two distinct groups. Disabling host transporters enhanced nematode mortality more than 50% in 5 out of 7 mutants when compared to wild type. In particular mrp-2 was the most susceptible phenotype with increased mortality for 13 out 18 Bcc strains, whereas mrp-3 and mrp-4 knock-outs had lower mortality rates, suggesting a different role in toxin-substrate recognition. The use of MRP efflux inhibitors in the assays resulted in substantially increased (>40% on average) mortality of wild-type worms.

  10. Engineering of Secondary Metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Secondary (specialized) metabolites, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants, and other organisms, exhibit enormous structural variation, and consequently display a wide range of biological activities. Secondary metabolism improves and modulates the phenotype of the host producer. Furthermore, these biological activities have resulted in the use of secondary metabolites in a variety of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Metabolic engineering presents a powerful strategy to improve access to these valuable molecules. A critical overview of engineering approaches in secondary metabolism is presented, both in heterologous and native hosts. The recognition of the increasing role of compartmentalization in metabolic engineering is highlighted. Engineering approaches to modify the structure of key secondary metabolite classes are also critically evaluated.

  11. Development of resistance with host age to adhesion of K99+ Escherichia coli to isolated intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Runnels, P L; Moon, H W; Schneider, R A

    1980-01-01

    When isolated intestinal epithelial cells from neonatal and older pigs, calves, and mice were tested for adhesion by K99+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, cells from older animals were resistant to adhesion. PMID:6103878

  12. Non-host Resistance Induced by the Xanthomonas Effector XopQ Is Widespread within the Genus Nicotiana and Functionally Depends on EDS1

    PubMed Central

    Adlung, Norman; Prochaska, Heike; Thieme, Sabine; Banik, Anne; Blüher, Doreen; John, Peter; Nagel, Oliver; Schulze, Sebastian; Gantner, Johannes; Delker, Carolin; Stuttmann, Johannes; Bonas, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Most Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria translocate effector proteins (T3Es) directly into plant cells via a conserved type III secretion system, which is essential for pathogenicity in susceptible plants. In resistant plants, recognition of some T3Es is mediated by corresponding resistance (R) genes or R proteins and induces effector triggered immunity (ETI) that often results in programmed cell death reactions. The identification of R genes and understanding their evolution/distribution bears great potential for the generation of resistant crop plants. We focus on T3Es from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv), the causal agent of bacterial spot disease on pepper and tomato plants. Here, 86 Solanaceae lines mainly of the genus Nicotiana were screened for phenotypical reactions after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of 21 different Xcv effectors to (i) identify new plant lines for T3E characterization, (ii) analyze conservation/evolution of putative R genes and (iii) identify promising plant lines as repertoire for R gene isolation. The effectors provoked different reactions on closely related plant lines indicative of a high variability and evolution rate of potential R genes. In some cases, putative R genes were conserved within a plant species but not within superordinate phylogenetical units. Interestingly, the effector XopQ was recognized by several Nicotiana spp. lines, and Xcv infection assays revealed that XopQ is a host range determinant in many Nicotiana species. Non-host resistance against Xcv and XopQ recognition in N. benthamiana required EDS1, strongly suggesting the presence of a TIR domain-containing XopQ-specific R protein in these plant lines. XopQ is a conserved effector among most xanthomonads, pointing out the XopQ-recognizing RxopQ as candidate for targeted crop improvement. PMID:27965697

  13. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes.

    PubMed

    Alves, Marta S; Pereira, Anabela; Araújo, Susana M; Castro, Bruno B; Correia, António C M; Henriques, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR) dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of fecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of fecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull feces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and feces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull feces (29 and 32%) were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%). Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull feces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes bla TEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A), and tet(B), were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (bla CTX-M-1 and bla SHV-12) and seagull feces (bla CMY-2). Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull feces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived fecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health.

  14. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marta S.; Pereira, Anabela; Araújo, Susana M.; Castro, Bruno B.; Correia, António C. M.; Henriques, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR) dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of fecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of fecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull feces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and feces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull feces (29 and 32%) were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%). Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull feces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes blaTEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A), and tet(B), were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (blaCTX-M-1 and blaSHV-12) and seagull feces (blaCMY-2). Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull feces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived fecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health. PMID:25191308

  15. Host-induced gene silencing of an essential chitin synthase gene confers durable resistance to Fusarium head blight and seedling blight in wheat.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Song, Xiu-Shi; Li, He-Ping; Cao, Le-Hui; Sun, Ke; Qiu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Yu-Bin; Yang, Peng; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-12-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) and Fusarium seedling blight (FSB) of wheat, caused by Fusarium pathogens, are devastating diseases worldwide. We report the expression of RNA interference (RNAi) sequences derived from an essential Fusarium graminearum (Fg) virulence gene, chitin synthase (Chs) 3b, as a method to enhance resistance of wheat plants to fungal pathogens. Deletion of Chs3b was lethal to Fg; disruption of the other Chs gene family members generated knockout mutants with diverse impacts on Fg. Comparative expression analyses revealed that among the Chs gene family members, Chs3b had the highest expression levels during Fg colonization of wheat. Three hairpin RNAi constructs corresponding to the different regions of Chs3b were found to silence Chs3b in transgenic Fg strains. Co-expression of these three RNAi constructs in two independent elite wheat cultivar transgenic lines conferred high levels of stable, consistent resistance (combined type I and II resistance) to both FHB and FSB throughout the T3 to T5 generations. Confocal microscopy revealed profoundly restricted mycelia in Fg-infected transgenic wheat plants. Presence of the three specific short interfering RNAs in transgenic wheat plants was confirmed by Northern blotting, and these RNAs efficiently down-regulated Chs3b in the colonizing Fusarium pathogens on wheat seedlings and spikes. Our results demonstrate that host-induced gene silencing of an essential fungal chitin synthase gene is an effective strategy for enhancing resistance in crop plants under field test conditions.

  16. Variation in tomato host response to Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in relation to acyl sugar content and presence of the nematode and potato aphid resistance gene Mi.

    PubMed

    Nombela, G; Beitia, F; Muñiz, M

    2000-04-01

    Two commercial cultivars of tomato, Alta and Peto 95, the accession line number LA716 of Lycopersicon pennellii and lines 94GH-006 and 94GH-033 (backcrosses between Peto 95 and LA716), with different leaf acyl sugar contents were screened for resistance to Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring (corresponding to the Spanish B-biotype of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius)), in greenhouse- and field-no-choice experiments. There was no oviposition on LA716 (with the highest acyl sugar content) while the greatest fecundity and fertility values were observed on the cultivar Alta (no acyl sugar content). However, no clear relationship was found between the low acyl sugar content in the other tomato cultivars tested and whitefly reproduction. Thus, resistance to B. tabaci did not appear to correlate with acyl sugar content below a threshold level of 37.8 microg cm-2 leaf. In a greenhouse choice-assay, B. tabaci exhibited reduced host preference and reproduction on the commercial tomato cultivars Motelle, VFN8 and Ronita all of which carry the Mi gene resistance to Meloidogyne nematodes and the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), than on the Mi-lacking cultivars Moneymaker, Rio Fuego and Roma. When data of Mi-bearing plants were pooled, the mean values for daily infestation and pupal production of B. tabaci were significantly lower than those of Mi-lacking plants. This reflected a level of antixenosis- and antibiosis-based resistance in commercial tomato and indicated that Mi, or another closely linked gene, might be implicated in a partial resistance which was not associated either with the presence of glandular trichomes or their exudates. These findings support the general hypothesis for the existence of similarities among the resistance mechanisms to whiteflies, aphids and nematodes in commercial tomato plants.

  17. Resistance evaluation of Chinese wild Vitis genotypes against Botrytis cinerea and different responses of resistant and susceptible hosts to the infection

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Ran; Hou, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianhang; Qu, Jingwu; Singer, Stacy D.; Wang, Yuejin; Wang, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is a major threat to grapevine cultivation worldwide. A screen of 41 Vitis genotypes for leaf resistance to B. cinerea suggested species independent variation and revealed 18 resistant Chinese wild Vitis genotypes, while most investigated V. vinifera, or its hybrids, were susceptible. A particularly resistant Chinese wild Vitis, “Pingli-5” (V. sp. [Qinling grape]) and a very susceptible V. vinifera cultivar, “Red Globe” were selected for further study. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that B. cinerea growth was limited during early infection on “Pingli-5” before 24 h post-inoculation (hpi) but not on Red Globe. It was found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidative system were associated with fungal growth. O2- accumulated similarly in B. cinerea 4 hpi on both Vitis genotypes. Lower levels of O2- (not H2O2) were detected 4 hpi and ROS (H2O2 and O2-) accumulation from 8 hpi onwards was also lower in “Pingli-5” leaves than in “Red Globe” leaves. B. cinerea triggered sustained ROS production in “Red Globe” but not in “Pingli-5” with subsequent infection progresses. Red Globe displayed little change in antioxidative activities in response to B. cinerea infection, instead, antioxidative activities were highly and timely elevated in resistant “Pingli-5” which correlated with its minimal ROS increases and its high resistance. These findings not only enhance our understanding of the resistance of Chinese wild Vitis species to B. cinerea, but also lay the foundation for breeding B. cinerea resistant grapes in the future. PMID:26579134

  18. Resistance evaluation of Chinese wild Vitis genotypes against Botrytis cinerea and different responses of resistant and susceptible hosts to the infection.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ran; Hou, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianhang; Qu, Jingwu; Singer, Stacy D; Wang, Yuejin; Wang, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is a major threat to grapevine cultivation worldwide. A screen of 41 Vitis genotypes for leaf resistance to B. cinerea suggested species independent variation and revealed 18 resistant Chinese wild Vitis genotypes, while most investigated V. vinifera, or its hybrids, were susceptible. A particularly resistant Chinese wild Vitis, "Pingli-5" (V. sp. [Qinling grape]) and a very susceptible V. vinifera cultivar, "Red Globe" were selected for further study. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that B. cinerea growth was limited during early infection on "Pingli-5" before 24 h post-inoculation (hpi) but not on Red Globe. It was found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidative system were associated with fungal growth. O[Formula: see text] accumulated similarly in B. cinerea 4 hpi on both Vitis genotypes. Lower levels of O[Formula: see text] (not H2O2) were detected 4 hpi and ROS (H2O2 and O[Formula: see text]) accumulation from 8 hpi onwards was also lower in "Pingli-5" leaves than in "Red Globe" leaves. B. cinerea triggered sustained ROS production in "Red Globe" but not in "Pingli-5" with subsequent infection progresses. Red Globe displayed little change in antioxidative activities in response to B. cinerea infection, instead, antioxidative activities were highly and timely elevated in resistant "Pingli-5" which correlated with its minimal ROS increases and its high resistance. These findings not only enhance our understanding of the resistance of Chinese wild Vitis species to B. cinerea, but also lay the foundation for breeding B. cinerea resistant grapes in the future.

  19. Requirement of UNC93B1 reveals a critical role for Toll-Like Receptor 7 in host resistance to primary infection with Trypanosoma cruzi1,2

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Braulia C.; Carmo, Bianca B.; Melo, Mariane B.; Cerny, Anna; dos Santos, Sara L.; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    UNC93B1 associates with Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 3, 7 and 9, mediating their translocation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the endolysosome, thus allowing proper activation by microbial nucleic acids. We found that the triple deficient ‘3d’ mice, which lack functional UNC93B1 as well as functional endossomal TLRs, are highly susceptible to infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. The enhanced parasitemia and mortality in 3d animals were associated with impaired pro-inflammatory response, including reduced levels of IL-12p40 and IFN-γ. Importantly, the phenotype of 3d mice was intermediary between MyD88−/− (highly susceptible) and TLR9−/− (less susceptible), indicating the involvement of an additional UN93B1-dependent-TLR(s) on host resistance to T. cruzi. Hence, our experiments also revealed that TLR7 is a critical innate immune receptor involved in recognition of parasite RNA, induction of IL-12p40 by dendritic cells, and consequent IFN-γ by T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we show that upon T. cruzi infection triple TLR3/7/9−/− mice had similar phenotype than 3d mice. These data imply that the nucleic acid-sensing TLRs are critical determinants of host resistance to primary infection with T. cruzi. PMID:21753151

  20. Simultaneous depth-profiling of electrical and elemental properties of ion-implanted arsenic in silicon by combining secondary-ion mass spectrometry with resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, N. S.; Wong, C. S.; McNally, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to extract the electrical data for surface doping profiles of semiconductors in unison with the chemical profile acquired by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)—a method we call SIMSAR (secondary-ion mass spectrometry and resistivity). The SIMSAR approach utilizes the inherent sputtering process of SIMS, combined with sequential four-point van der Pauw resistivity measurements, to surmise the active doping profile as a function of depth. The technique is demonstrated for the case of ion-implanted arsenic doping profiles in silicon. Complications of the method are identified, explained, and corrections for these are given. While several techniques already exist for chemical dopant profiling and numerous for electrical profiling, since there is no technique which can measure both electrical and chemical profiles in parallel, SIMSAR has significant promise as an extension of the conventional dynamic SIMS technique, particularly for applications in the semiconductor industry.

  1. Simultaneous depth-profiling of electrical and elemental properties of ion-implanted arsenic in silicon by combining secondary-ion mass spectrometry with resistivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bennett, N S; Wong, C S; McNally, P J

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to extract the electrical data for surface doping profiles of semiconductors in unison with the chemical profile acquired by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)-a method we call SIMSAR (secondary-ion mass spectrometry and resistivity). The SIMSAR approach utilizes the inherent sputtering process of SIMS, combined with sequential four-point van der Pauw resistivity measurements, to surmise the active doping profile as a function of depth. The technique is demonstrated for the case of ion-implanted arsenic doping profiles in silicon. Complications of the method are identified, explained, and corrections for these are given. While several techniques already exist for chemical dopant profiling and numerous for electrical profiling, since there is no technique which can measure both electrical and chemical profiles in parallel, SIMSAR has significant promise as an extension of the conventional dynamic SIMS technique, particularly for applications in the semiconductor industry.

  2. Compounds of the sphingomyelin-ceramide-glycosphingolipid pathways as secondary messenger molecules: new targets for novel therapies for fatty liver disease and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-06-01

    The compounds of sphingomyelin-ceramide-glycosphingolipid pathways have been studied as potential secondary messenger molecules in various systems, along with liver function and insulin resistance. Secondary messenger molecules act directly or indirectly to affect cell organelles and intercellular interactions. Their potential role in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis and diabetes has been suggested. Data samples collected from patients with Gaucher's disease, who had high levels of glucocerebroside, support a role for compounds from these pathways as a messenger molecules in the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease and diabetes. The present review summarizes some of the recent data on the role of glycosphingolipid molecules as messenger molecules in various physiological and pathological conditions, more specifically including insulin resistance and fatty liver disease.

  3. TPL-2-ERK1/2 signaling promotes host resistance against intracellular bacterial infection by negative regulation of type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    McNab, Finlay W; Ewbank, John; Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Stavropoulos, Evangelos; Martirosyan, Anna; Redford, Paul S; Wu, Xuemei; Graham, Christine M; Saraiva, Margarida; Tsichlis, Philip; Chaussabel, Damien; Ley, Steven C; O'Garra, Anne

    2013-08-15

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, causing ≈ 1.4 million deaths per year. Key immune components for host protection during tuberculosis include the cytokines IL-12, IL-1, and TNF-α, as well as IFN-γ and CD4(+) Th1 cells. However, immune factors determining whether individuals control infection or progress to active tuberculosis are incompletely understood. Excess amounts of type I IFN have been linked to exacerbated disease during tuberculosis in mouse models and to active disease in patients, suggesting tight regulation of this family of cytokines is critical to host resistance. In addition, the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 is known to inhibit the immune response to M. tuberculosis in murine models through the negative regulation of key proinflammatory cytokines and the subsequent Th1 response. We show in this study, using a combination of transcriptomic analysis, genetics, and pharmacological inhibitors, that the TPL-2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway is important in mediating host resistance to tuberculosis through negative regulation of type I IFN production. The TPL-2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulated production by macrophages of several cytokines important in the immune response to M. tuberculosis as well as regulating induction of a large number of additional genes, many in a type I IFN-dependent manner. In the absence of TPL-2 in vivo, excess type I IFN promoted IL-10 production and exacerbated disease. These findings describe an important regulatory mechanism for controlling tuberculosis and reveal mechanisms by which type I IFN may promote susceptibility to this important disease.

  4. fundTPL-2 – ERK1/2 Signaling Promotes Host Resistance against Intracellular Bacterial Infection by Negative Regulation of Type I Interferon Production3

    PubMed Central

    McNab, Finlay W.; Ewbank, John; Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Stavropoulos, Evangelos; Martirosyan, Anna; Redford, Paul S.; Wu, Xuemei; Graham, Christine M.; Saraiva, Margarida; Tsichlis, Philip; Chaussabel, Damien; Ley, Steven C.; O’Garra, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, causing approximately 1.4 million deaths per year. Key immune components for host protection during tuberculosis include the cytokines IL-12, IL-1 and TNF-α, as well as IFN-γ and CD4+ Th1 cells. However, immune factors determining whether individuals control infection or progress to active tuberculosis are incompletely understood. Excess amounts of type I interferon have been linked to exacerbated disease during tuberculosis in mouse models and to active disease in patients, suggesting tight regulation of this family of cytokines is critical to host resistance. In addition, the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 is known to inhibit the immune response to Mtb in murine models through the negative regulation of key pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent Th1 response. We show here, using a combination of transcriptomic analysis, genetics and pharmacological inhibitors that the TPL-2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway is important in mediating host resistance to tuberculosis through negative regulation of type I interferon production. The TPL-2-ERK1/2 signalling pathway regulated production by macrophages of several cytokines important in the immune response to Mtb as well as regulating induction of a large number of additional genes, many in a type I IFN dependent manner. In the absence of TPL-2 in vivo, excess type I interferon promoted IL-10 production and exacerbated disease. These findings describe an important regulatory mechanism for controlling tuberculosis and reveal mechanisms by which type I interferon may promote susceptibility to this important disease. PMID:23842752

  5. Viral-inducible Argonaute18 confers broad-spectrum virus resistance in rice by sequestering a host microRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianguo; Yang, Zhirui; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Lijia; Ye, Ruiqiang; Ji, Yinghua; Zhao, Shanshan; Ji, Shaoyi; Liu, Ruofei; Xu, Le; Zheng, Hong; Zhou, Yijun; Zhang, Xin; Cao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Lianhui; Wu, Zujian; Qi, Yijun; Li, Yi

    2015-02-17

    Viral pathogens are a major threat to rice production worldwide. Although RNA interference (RNAi) is known to mediate antiviral immunity in plant and animal models, the mechanism of antiviral RNAi in rice and other economically important crops is poorly understood. Here, we report that rice resistance to evolutionarily diverse viruses requires Argonaute18 (AGO18). Genetic studies reveal that the antiviral function of AGO18 depends on its activity to sequester microRNA168 (miR168) to alleviate repression of rice AGO1 essential for antiviral RNAi. Expression of miR168-resistant AGO1a in ago18 background rescues or increases rice antiviral activity. Notably, stable transgenic expression of AGO18 confers broad-spectrum virus resistance in rice. Our findings uncover a novel cooperative antiviral activity of two distinct AGO proteins and suggest a new strategy for the control of viral diseases in rice.

  6. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Resistant Host Responses in Arachis diogoi Challenged with Late Leaf Spot Pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dilip; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2015-01-01

    Late leaf spot is a serious disease of peanut caused by the imperfect fungus, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Wild diploid species, Arachis diogoi. is reported to be highly resistant to this disease and asymptomatic. The objective of this study is to investigate the molecular responses of the wild peanut challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen using cDNA-AFLP and 2D proteomic study. A total of 233 reliable, differentially expressed genes were identified in Arachis diogoi. About one third of the TDFs exhibit no significant similarity with the known sequences in the data bases. Expressed sequence tag data showed that the characterized genes are involved in conferring resistance in the wild peanut to the pathogen challenge. Several genes for proteins involved in cell wall strengthening, hypersensitive cell death and resistance related proteins have been identified. Genes identified for other proteins appear to function in metabolism, signal transduction and defence. Nineteen TDFs based on the homology analysis of genes associated with defence, signal transduction and metabolism were further validated by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses in resistant wild species in comparison with a susceptible peanut genotype in time course experiments. The proteins corresponding to six TDFs were differentially expressed at protein level also. Differentially expressed TDFs and proteins in wild peanut indicate its defence mechanism upon pathogen challenge and provide initial breakthrough of genes possibly involved in recognition events and early signalling responses to combat the pathogen through subsequent development of resistivity. This is the first attempt to elucidate the molecular basis of the response of the resistant genotype to the late leaf spot pathogen, and its defence mechanism. PMID:25646800

  7. Transcriptome analysis of Pinus monticola primary needles by RNA-seq provides novel insight into host resistance to Cronartium ribicola

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Five-needle pines are important forest species that have been devastated by white pine blister rust (WPBR, caused by Cronartium ribicola) across North America. Currently little transcriptomic and genomic data are available to understand molecular interactions in the WPBR pathosystem. Results We report here RNA-seq analysis results using Illumina deep sequencing of primary needles of western white pine (Pinus monticola) infected with WPBR. De novo gene assembly was used to generate the first P. monticola consensus transcriptome, which contained 39,439 unique transcripts with an average length of 1,303 bp and a total length of 51.4 Mb. About 23,000 P. monticola unigenes produced orthologous hits in the Pinus gene index (PGI) database (BLASTn with E values < e-100) and 6,300 genes were expressed actively (at RPKM ≥ 10) in the healthy tissues. Comparison of transcriptomes from WPBR-susceptible and -resistant genotypes revealed a total of 979 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with a significant fold change > 1.5 during P. monticola- C. ribicola interactions. Three hundred and ten DEGs were regulated similarly in both susceptible and resistant seedlings and 275 DEGs showed regulatory differences between susceptible and resistant seedlings post infection by C. ribicola. The DEGs up-regulated in resistant seedlings included a set of putative signal receptor genes encoding disease resistance protein homologs, calcineurin B-like (CBL)-interacting protein kinases (CIPK), F-box family proteins (FBP), and abscisic acid (ABA) receptor; transcriptional factor (TF) genes of multiple families; genes homologous to apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), flowering locus T-like protein (FT), and subtilisin-like protease. DEGs up-regulated in resistant seedlings also included a wide diversity of down-stream genes (encoding enzymes involved in different metabolic pathways, pathogenesis-related -PR proteins of multiple families, and anti-microbial proteins). A large proportion

  8. Honeydew analysis for detecting phloem transport of plant natural products : Implications for host-plant resistance to sap-sucking insects.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, R J; Campbell, B C; Dreyer, D L

    1990-06-01

    Analysis of honeydew excreted by various sap-sucking insects indicated the presence of certain plant secondary constituents in the phloem of their host plants. Honeydew excreted by mealybugs (Pseudococcus longispinus), living onCastanospermum australe, contained the indolizidine alkaloid castanospermine, a potent β-glucosidase inhibitor. Similarly, honeydew from green peach aphids (Myzus persicae), feeding onSenecio vulgaris flower buds, contained the pyrrolizidine alkaloid senecionine, itsN-oxide, and hydrolytic products including retronecine. Cardenolides were detected in the honeydew of oleander aphids (Aphis nerii) feeding on oleander (Nerium oleander), indicating that these compounds are translocated in the phloem. On the other hand, honeydew from greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum), feeding on barley, lacked gramine or related indole metabolites. Similarly MBOA, the breakdown product of DIMBOA, was not detected in the honeydew of greenbugs living on DIMBOA-containing wheat.

  9. Transcript Dynamics at Early Stages of Molecular Interactions of MYMIV with Resistant and Susceptible Genotypes of the Leguminous Host, Vigna mungo

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV- Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  10. Ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhances host resistance to viral, bacterial, and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Jeong Mee; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2002-10-01

    In many plants, including hot pepper plants, productivity is greatly affected by pathogen attack. We reported previously that tobacco stress-induced gene 1 (Tsi1) may play an important role in regulating stress responsive genes and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. In this study, we demonstrated that overexpression of Tsi1 gene in transgenic hot pepper plants induced constitutive expression of several PR genes in the absence of stress or pathogen treatment. The transgenic hot pepper plants expressing Tsi1 exhibited resistance to Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Furthermore, these transgenic plants showed increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and also an oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. These results suggested that ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhanced the resistance of the plants to various pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and oomycete. These results suggest that using transcriptional regulatory protein genes may contribute to developing broad-spectrum resistance in crop plants.

  11. Possible mechanisms of host resistance to Haemonchus contortus infection in sheep breeds native to the Canary Islands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blood feeder parasite Haemonchus contortus appears to be the most economically important helminth species for small ruminant production in many regions of the world. The two sheep breeds native to the Canary Islands display distinctly different resistant phenotypes under both natural and experim...

  12. Silencing of the host factor eIF(iso)4E gene confers plum pox virus resistance in plum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhua; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Svircev, Antonet; Wang, Aiming; Sanfaçon, Hélène; Tian, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) causes the most economically-devastating viral disease in Prunus species. Unfortunately, few natural resistance genes are available for the control of PPV. Recessive resistance to some potyviruses is associated with mutations of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) or its isoform eIF(iso)4E. In this study, we used an RNA silencing approach to manipulate the expression of eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E towards the development of PPV resistance in Prunus species. The eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E genes were cloned from plum (Prunus domestica L.). The sequence identity between plum eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E coding sequences is 60.4% at the nucleotide level and 52.1% at the amino acid level. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that these two genes have a similar expression pattern in different tissues. Transgenes allowing the production of hairpin RNAs of plum eIF4E or eIF(iso)4E were introduced into plum via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Gene expression analysis confirmed specific reduced expression of eIF4E or eIF(iso)4E in the transgenic lines and this was associated with the accumulation of siRNAs. Transgenic plants were challenged with PPV-D strain and resistance was evaluated by measuring the concentration of viral RNA. Eighty-two percent of the eIF(iso)4E silenced transgenic plants were resistant to PPV, while eIF4E silenced transgenic plants did not show PPV resistance. Physical interaction between PPV-VPg and plum eIF(iso)4E was confirmed. In contrast, no PPV-VPg/eIF4E interaction was observed. These results indicate that eIF(iso)4E is involved in PPV infection in plum, and that silencing of eIF(iso)4E expression can lead to PPV resistance in Prunus species.

  13. Increase in bacteriophage radiation resistance as a result of enhanced expression of stress systems in host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verbenko, V.N.; Kalinin, V.L.

    1995-12-01

    By means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of proteins from radiation-resistant Gam{sup r} mutants of Escherichia coli, it was shown that induction and elimination of RecA protein in these mutants are kinetically more rapid than in wild type cells, and heat-shock proteins (HSP) are hyperproduced even at a normal temperature (32{degrees}C). {gamma}- and UV-irradiated bacteriophages were used to study the results of simultaneous enhanced expression of two stress repair systems. Radiation-resistant mutants are similar to wild type cells in their ability to reactivate phages {Lambda}cI, {phi}80 vir, and T4D inactivated by {gamma}-rays and UV-light. W-reactivation of {gamma}-irradiated phages {Lambda} and {phi}80 is respectively 1.5 and 1.2 times higher in Gam{sup r} cells in which maximal W-reactivation was observed at wide range of doses (from 300 to 2000 Gy), whereas in wild type cells the peak C of W-reactivation was registered at doses of 400 to 450 Gy. The phage {Lambda}, {gamma}-irradiated upon adsorption on the cells of a radiation-resistant mutant, was two times more resistant to {gamma}-rays (DMF = 2 at LD{sub 10}) than when irradiated upon adsorption on wild type cells. Postirradiation degradation of the phage {Lambda} DNA, when irradiated within Gam{sup r} cells, was significantly lower than in wild type cells, and preirradiation of the cells decreased phage DNA degradation (12% in Gam{sup r} cells and 30% in wild-type cells). The role of an increased HSP level and expression of SOS-regulon in radiation resistance and possible interaction of stress systems in bacterial cells are discussed. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Activities of the Triazole Derivative SCH 56592 (Posaconazole) against Drug-Resistant Strains of the Protozoan Parasite Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi in Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressed Murine Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Judith; Martins-Filho, Olindo; Brener, Zigman; Romanha, Alvaro J.; Loebenberg, David; Urbina, Julio A.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo activity of the new experimental triazole derivative SCH 56592 (posaconazole) against a variety of strains of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed murine hosts. The T. cruzi strains used in the study were previously characterized as susceptible (CL), partially resistant (Y), or highly resistant (Colombiana, SC-28, and VL-10) to the drugs currently in clinical use, nifurtimox and benznidazole. Furthermore, all strains are completely resistant to conventional antifungal azoles, such as ketoconazole. In the first study, acute infections with the CL, Y, and Colombiana strains in both normal and cyclophosphamide-immunosuppressed mice were treated orally, starting 4 days postinfection (p.i.), for 20 consecutive daily doses. The results indicated that in immunocompetent animals SCH 56592 at 20 mg/kg of body weight/day provided protection (80 to 90%) against death caused by all strains, a level comparable or superior to that provided by the optimal dose of benznidazole (100 mg/kg/day). Evaluation of parasitological cure revealed that SCH 56592 was able to cure 90 to 100% of the surviving animals infected with the CL and Y strains and 50% of those which received the benznidazole- and nifurtimox-resistant Colombiana strain. Immunosuppression markedly reduced the mean survival time of untreated mice infected with any of the strains, but this was not observed for the groups which received SCH 56592 at 20 mg/kg/day or benznidazole at 100 mg/kg/day. However, the overall cure rates were higher for animals treated with SCH 56592 than among those treated with benznidazole. The results were confirmed in a second study, using the same model but a longer (43-dose) treatment period. Finally, a model for the chronic disease in which oral treatment was started 120 days p.i. and consisted of 20 daily consecutive doses was investigated. The results showed

  15. Efficacy and safety of intra-arterial steroid infusions in patients with steroid-resistant gastrointestinal acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Hirose, Asao; Nakamae, Mika; Nakane, Takahiko; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Okamura, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Takuro; Koh, Shiro; Nanno, Satoru; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Takeshita, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sakai, Yukimasa; Nishida, Norifumi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Miki, Yukio; Hino, Masayuki; Nakamae, Hirohisa

    2015-12-01

    There is no established second-line treatment for steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We prospectively assessed the safety and efficacy of intra-arterial steroid infusions (IASIs) for steroid-resistant acute gastrointestinal (GI) GVHD and compared the outcomes with those of historical controls at our institution. Nineteen consecutive, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation subjects aged 31-67 years (median 52) were enrolled between October, 2008, and November, 2012. Acute GVHD was confirmed by biopsy in all cases. The enrolled patients were treated with infusions of methylprednisolone into the mesenteric arteries and/or gastroduodenal and left gastric arteries. Fourteen consecutive patients who developed steroid-resistant acute GI GVHD between 2001 and 2008 were used as controls. For the primary endpoint at day 28, the overall and complete responses in the IASI group trended higher (79% vs. 42%, p = 0.066) and were significantly higher (63% vs. 21%, p = 0.033) than those in the control group. Although not statistically significant, owing to the small population, the crude day-180-nonrelapse mortality rate was about 20% lower and the day-180-overall-survival rate tended to be higher than the control (11% vs. 29%, p = 0.222; 79% vs. 50%, p = 0.109, respectively). There were no serious IASI-related complications. Our results suggest that IASI can safely provide excellent efficacy for refractory acute GI GVHD without increasing infection-related complications and may improve prognosis.

  16. The Role of a Host Protein (TIP) in the Resistance Response of Arabidopsis to Turnip Crinkle Virus Infection.

    SciTech Connect

    T. Jack Morris, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0118

    2008-10-20

    Our research on Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) has shown that the viral capsid protein (CP) is both a virulence factor as well as the elicitor of a hypersensitive resistance response (HR) to the virus in Arabidopsis. Initially, we identified a protein from Arabidopsis that specifically interacted with the viral CP using a yeast two-hybrid screen. This protein, designated TIP for TCV-Interacting Protein, is a member of the NAC family of plant transcription factors implicated in the regulation of development and senescence. When TCV CP was mutated to eliminate its ability to interact with TIP, the corresponding virus mutants broke the HR-mediated resistance conferred by the HRT resistance (R) gene in Arabidopsis ecotype Dijon (Di)-17. This result suggested that TIP is a component of the signal transduction pathway that leads to the genetically specified TCV resistance. We next confirmed that TIP and the viral CP interact in plant cells and that this interaction prevents nuclear localization of this transcription factor. We demonstrated that TCV CP suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a newly discovered RNA-mediated defense system in plants. Together these results suggest that the CP is a virulence factor that could well be functioning through its interaction with TIP. We have proposed a model involving the role of TIP and CP in triggering HR mediated plant defense that fits with the current thinking about how gene-for-gene resistance may function. A unique component of our system is the opportunity to link R-gene function with the newly discovered RNA silencing pathway that is not only a potent defense against viral pathogens, but also regulates early development in plants. In the current funding period we made several significant findings: First, we completed an array analysis comparing gene expression in Arabidopsis infected with TCV and a mutant virus unable to bind TIP. Second, we produced transgenic lines that over-express and inducibly under

  17. Host plant secondary metabolite profiling shows a complex, strain-dependent response of maize to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria of the genus Azospirillum.

    PubMed

    Walker, Vincent; Bertrand, Cédric; Bellvert, Floriant; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Bally, René; Comte, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Most Azospirillum plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) benefit plant growth through source effects related to free nitrogen fixation and/or phytohormone production, but little is known about their potential effects on plant physiology. These effects were assessed by comparing the early impacts of three Azospirillum inoculant strains on secondary metabolite profiles of two different maize (Zea mays) cultivars. After 10d of growth in nonsterile soil, maize methanolic extracts were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and secondary metabolites identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Seed inoculation resulted in increased shoot biomass (and also root biomass with one strain) of hybrid PR37Y15 but had no stimulatory effect on hybrid DK315. In parallel, Azospirillum inoculation led to major qualitative and quantitative modifications of the contents of secondary metabolites, especially benzoxazinoids, in the maize plants. These modifications depended on the PGPR strain×plant cultivar combination. Thus, Azospirillum inoculation resulted in early, strain-dependent modifications in the biosynthetic pathways of benzoxazine derivatives in maize in compatible interactions. This is the first study documenting a PGPR effect on plant secondary metabolite profiles, and suggests the establishment of complex interactions between Azospirillum PGPR and maize.

  18. Correlation between resistance-change effect in transition-metal oxides and secondary-electron contrast of scanning electron microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, K.; Kishida, S.; Yoda, T.

    2011-09-15

    Conductive atomic-force microscopy (C-AFM) writing is attracting attention as a technique for clarifying the switching mechanism of resistive random-access memory by providing a wide area filled with filaments, which can be regarded as one filament with large radius. The writing area on a nickel-oxide (NiO) film formed by conductive atomic-force microscopy was observed by scanning electron microscope, and a correlation between the contrast in a secondary-electron image (SEI) and the resistance written by C-AFM was revealed. In addition, the dependence of the SEI contrast on the beam accelerating voltage (V{sub accel}) suggests that the resistance-change effect occurs near the surface of the NiO film. As for the effects of electron irradiation and vacuum annealing on the C-AFM writing area, it was shown that the resistance-change effect is caused by exchange of oxygen with the atmosphere at the surface of the NiO film. This result suggests that the low-resistance and high-resistance areas are, respectively, p-type Ni{sub 1+{delta}}O ({delta} < 0) and insulating (stoichiometric) or n-type Ni{sub 1+{delta}}O ({delta}{>=} 0).

  19. A Wheat Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase TaCAD12 Contributes to Host Resistance to the Sharp Eyespot Disease.

    PubMed

    Rong, Wei; Luo, Meiying; Shan, Tianlei; Wei, Xuening; Du, Lipu; Xu, Huijun; Zhang, Zengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sharp eyespot, caused mainly by the necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis, is a destructive disease in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In Arabidopsis, certain cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs) have been implicated in monolignol biosynthesis and in defense response to bacterial pathogen infection. However, little is known about CADs in wheat defense responses to necrotrophic or soil-borne pathogens. In this study, we isolate a wheat CAD gene TaCAD12 in response to R. cerealis infection through microarray-based comparative transcriptomics, and study the enzyme activity and defense role of TaCAD12 in wheat. The transcriptional levels of TaCAD12 in sharp eyespot-resistant wheat lines were significantly higher compared with those in susceptible wheat lines. The sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that TaCAD12 belongs to IV group in CAD family. The biochemical assay proved that TaCAD12 protein is an authentic CAD enzyme and possesses catalytic efficiencies toward both coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde. Knock-down of TaCAD12 transcript significantly repressed resistance of the gene-silenced wheat plants to sharp eyespot caused by R. cerealis, whereas TaCAD12 overexpression markedly enhanced resistance of the transgenic wheat lines to sharp eyespot. Furthermore, certain defense genes (Defensin, PR10, PR17c, and Chitinase1) and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes (TaCAD1, TaCCR, and TaCOMT1) were up-regulated in the TaCAD12-overexpressing wheat plants but down-regulated in TaCAD12-silencing plants. These results suggest that TaCAD12 positively contributes to resistance against sharp eyespot through regulation of the expression of certain defense genes and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes in wheat.

  20. A Wheat Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase TaCAD12 Contributes to Host Resistance to the Sharp Eyespot Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Wei; Luo, Meiying; Shan, Tianlei; Wei, Xuening; Du, Lipu; Xu, Huijun; Zhang, Zengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sharp eyespot, caused mainly by the necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis, is a destructive disease in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In Arabidopsis, certain cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs) have been implicated in monolignol biosynthesis and in defense response to bacterial pathogen infection. However, little is known about CADs in wheat defense responses to necrotrophic or soil-borne pathogens. In this study, we isolate a wheat CAD gene TaCAD12 in response to R. cerealis infection through microarray-based comparative transcriptomics, and study the enzyme activity and defense role of TaCAD12 in wheat. The transcriptional levels of TaCAD12 in sharp eyespot-resistant wheat lines were significantly higher compared with those in susceptible wheat lines. The sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that TaCAD12 belongs to IV group in CAD family. The biochemical assay proved that TaCAD12 protein is an authentic CAD enzyme and possesses catalytic efficiencies toward both coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde. Knock-down of TaCAD12 transcript significantly repressed resistance of the gene-silenced wheat plants to sharp eyespot caused by R. cerealis, whereas TaCAD12 overexpression markedly enhanced resistance of the transgenic wheat lines to sharp eyespot. Furthermore, certain defense genes (Defensin, PR10, PR17c, and Chitinase1) and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes (TaCAD1, TaCCR, and TaCOMT1) were up-regulated in the TaCAD12-overexpressing wheat plants but down-regulated in TaCAD12-silencing plants. These results suggest that TaCAD12 positively contributes to resistance against sharp eyespot through regulation of the expression of certain defense genes and monolignol biosynthesis-related genes in wheat. PMID:27899932

  1. Viral-inducible Argonaute18 confers broad-spectrum virus resistance in rice by sequestering a host microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianguo; Yang, Zhirui; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Lijia; Ye, Ruiqiang; Ji, Yinghua; Zhao, Shanshan; Ji, Shaoyi; Liu, Ruofei; Xu, Le; Zheng, Hong; Zhou, Yijun; Zhang, Xin; Cao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Lianhui; Wu, Zujian; Qi, Yijun; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Viral pathogens are a major threat to rice production worldwide. Although RNA interference (RNAi) is known to mediate antiviral immunity in plant and animal models, the mechanism of antiviral RNAi in rice and other economically important crops is poorly understood. Here, we report that rice resistance to evolutionarily diverse viruses requires Argonaute18 (AGO18). Genetic studies reveal that the antiviral function of AGO18 depends on its activity to sequester microRNA168 (miR168) to alleviate repression of rice AGO1 essential for antiviral RNAi. Expression of miR168-resistant AGO1a in ago18 background rescues or increases rice antiviral activity. Notably, stable transgenic expression of AGO18 confers broad-spectrum virus resistance in rice. Our findings uncover a novel cooperative antiviral activity of two distinct AGO proteins and suggest a new strategy for the control of viral diseases in rice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05733.001 PMID:25688565

  2. Secondary bacterial symbiont community in aphids responds to plant diversity.

    PubMed

    Zytynska, Sharon E; Meyer, Sebastian T; Sturm, Sarah; Ullmann, Wiebke; Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-03-01

    Biodiversity is important for ecosystem functioning and biotic interactions. In experimental grasslands, increasing plant species richness is known to increase the diversity of associated herbivores and their predators. If these interactions can also involve endosymbionts that reside within a plant or animal host is currently unknown. In plant-feeding aphids, secondary bacterial symbionts can have strong fitness effects on the host, e.g. resistance to natural enemies or fungal pathogens. We examined the secondary symbiont community in three species of aphid, each feeding on a unique host plant across experimental plots that varied in plant species richness. Aphids were collected in May and June, and the symbiont community identified using species-specific PCR assays. Aphis fabae aphids were found to host six different symbiont species with individual aphids co-hosting up to four symbionts. Uroleucon jaceae and Macrosiphum rosae hosted two and three symbiont species, respectively. We found that, at the aphid population level, increasing plant species richness increased the diversity of the aphid symbiont community, whereas at the individual aphid level, the opposite was found. These effects are potentially driven by varying selective pressures across different plant communities of varying diversities, mediated by defensive protection responses and a changing cost-benefit trade-off to the aphid for hosting multiple secondary symbionts. Our work extends documented effects of plant diversity beyond visible biotic interactions to changes in endosymbiont communities, with potentially far-reaching consequences to related ecosystem processes.

  3. Enumeration and characterization of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in effluent from municipal, hospital, and secondary treatment facility sources.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Sandra; Boyle, Fiona; Hickey, Paul; Vellinga, Akke; Morris, Dearbháile; Cormican, Martin

    2010-07-01

    We describe a modification of the most probable number (MPN) method for rapid enumeration of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in aqueous environmental samples. E. coli (total and antimicrobial-resistant) bacteria were enumerated in effluent samples from a hospital (n = 17) and municipal sewers upstream (n = 5) and downstream (n = 5) from the hospital, effluent samples from throughout the treatment process (n = 4), and treated effluent samples (n = 13). Effluent downstream from the hospital contained a higher proportion of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli than that upstream from the hospital. Wastewater treatment reduced the numbers of E. coli bacteria (total and antimicrobial resistant); however, antimicrobial-resistant E. coli was not eliminated, and E. coli resistant to cefotaxime (including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase [ESBL] producers), ciprofloxacin, and cefoxitin was present in treated effluent samples.

  4. Nonredundant Roles of Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 in Murine Host Defense against Cutaneous and Hematogenous Infection Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Liana C.; Chaili, Siyang; Filler, Scott G.; Barr, Kevin; Wang, Huiyuan; Kupferwasser, Deborah; Edwards, John E.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Miller, Lloyd S.; Schmidt, Clint S.; Hennessey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) in humans. Moreover, the high frequency of recurring SSSI due to S. aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, suggests that infection induces suboptimal anamnestic defenses. The present study addresses the hypothesis that interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 play distinct roles in immunity to cutaneous and invasive MRSA infection in a mouse model of SSSI. Mice were treated with specific neutralizing antibodies against IL-17A and/or IL-22 and infected with MRSA, after which the severity of infection and host immune response were determined. Neutralization of either IL-17A or IL-22 reduced T cell and neutrophil infiltration and host defense peptide elaboration in lesions. These events corresponded with increased abscess severity, MRSA viability, and CFU density in skin. Interestingly, combined inhibition of IL-17A and IL-22 did not worsen abscesses but did increase gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expression at these sites. The inhibition of IL-22 led to a reduction in IL-17A expression, but not vice versa. These results suggest that the expression of IL-17A is at least partially dependent on IL-22 in this model. Inhibition of IL-17A but not IL-22 led to hematogenous dissemination to kidneys, which correlated with decreased T cell infiltration in renal tissue. Collectively, these findings indicate that IL-17A and IL-22 have complementary but nonredundant roles in host defense against cutaneous versus hematogenous infection. These insights may support targeted immune enhancement or other novel approaches to address the challenge of MRSA infection. PMID:26351278

  5. EST and microarray analyses of pathogen-responsive genes in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) non-host resistance against soybean pustule pathogen (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyeob; Kim, Soo-Yong; Chung, Eunjoo; Joung, Young-Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Choi, Doil

    2004-07-01

    Large-scale single-pass sequencing of cDNA libraries and microarray analysis have proven to be useful tools for discovering new genes and studying gene expression. As a first step in elucidating the defense mechanisms in hot pepper plants, a total of 8,525 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated and analyzed in silico. The cDNA microarray analysis identified 613 hot pepper genes that were transcriptionally responsive to the non-host soybean pustule pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines ( Xag). Several functional types of genes, including those involved in cell wall modification/biosynthesis, transport, signaling pathways and divergent defense reactions, were induced at the early stage of Xag infiltration. In contrast, genes encoding proteins that are involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and the synthesis of chloroplast biogenetic proteins were down-regulated at the late stage of Xag infiltration. These expression profiles share common features with the expression profiles elicited by other stresses, such as fungal challenge, wounding, cold, drought and high salinity. However, we also identified several novel transcription factors that may be specifically involved in the defense reaction of the hot pepper. We also found that the defense reaction of the hot pepper may involve the deactivation of gibberellin. Furthermore, many genes encoding proteins with unknown function were identified. Functional analysis of these genes may broaden our understanding of non-host resistance. This study is the first report of large-scale sequencing and non-host defense transcriptome analysis of the hot pepper plant species. (The sequence data in this paper have been submitted to the dbEST and GenBank database under the codes 10227604-10236595 and BM059564-BM068555, respectively. Additional information is available at http://plant.pdrc.re.kr/ks200201/pepper.html).

  6. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA--Ecstasy) decreases neutrophil activity through the glucocorticoid pathway and impairs host resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Ribeiro, A; Souza-Queiroz, J; Pinheiro, M L; Vecina, J F; Souza, D P M; Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Moreau, R L M; Queiroz, M L S; Palermo-Neto, J

    2014-12-01

    Ecstasy is the popular name of the abuse drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) that decreases immunity in animals. The mechanisms that generate such alterations are still controversial. Seven independent pharmacological approaches were performed in mice to identify the possible mechanisms underlying the decrease of neutrophil activity induced by MDMA and the possible effects of MDMA on host resistance to Listeria monocytogenes. Our data showed that MDMA (10 mg kg(-1)) administration decreases NFκB expression in circulating neutrophils. Metyrapone or RU-486 administration prior to MDMA treatment abrogated MDMA effects on neutrophil activity and NFκB expression, while 6-OHDA or ICI-118,551 administration did not. As MDMA treatment increased the plasmatic levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline, propranolol pre-treatment effects were also evaluated. Propranolol suppressed both MDMA-induced increase in corticosterone serum levels and its effects on neutrophil activity. In a L. monocytogenes experimental infection context, we showed that MDMA: induced myelosuppression by decreasing granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitors (CFU-GM) in the bone marrow but increased CFU-GM in the spleen; decreased circulating leukocytes and bone marrow cellularity and increased spleen cellularity; decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-12p70, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-6) and chemokine (MCP-1) production 24 h after the infection; increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines 72 h after infection and decreased IL-10 levels at all time points analyzed. It was proposed that MDMA immunosuppressive effects on neutrophil activity and host resistance to L monocytogenes rely on NFκB signaling, being mediated by HPA axis activity and corticosterone.

  7. Host Protein BSL1 Associates with Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector AVR2 and the Solanum demissum Immune Receptor R2 to Mediate Disease Resistance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Diane G.O.; Breen, Susan; Win, Joe; Schornack, Sebastian; Hein, Ingo; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Champouret, Nicolas; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.; Birch, Paul R.J.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to modulate plant immunity and promote host colonization. Plant nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immunoreceptors recognize specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly. Little is known about how NB-LRR proteins recognize effectors of filamentous plant pathogens, such as Phytophthora infestans. AVR2 belongs to a family of 13 sequence-divergent P. infestans RXLR effectors that are differentially recognized by members of the R2 NB-LRR family in Solanum demissum. We report that the putative plant phosphatase BSU-LIKE PROTEIN1 (BSL1) is required for R2-mediated perception of AVR2 and resistance to P. infestans. AVR2 associates with BSL1 and mediates the interaction of BSL1 with R2 in planta, possibly through the formation of a ternary complex. Strains of P. infestans that are virulent on R2 potatoes express an unrecognized form, Avr2-like (referred to as A2l). A2L can still interact with BSL1 but does not promote the association of BSL1 with R2. Our findings show that recognition of the P. infestans AVR2 effector by the NB-LRR protein R2 requires the putative phosphatase BSL1. This reveals that, similar to effectors of phytopathogenic bacteria, recognition of filamentous pathogen effectors can be mediated via a host protein that interacts with both the effector and the NB-LRR immunoreceptor. PMID:22885736

  8. Molecular cloning of a family of xenobiotic-inducible drosophilid cytochrome P450s: Evidence for involvement in host-plant allelochemical resistance

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Phillip B.; MacIntyre, Ross J.; Fogleman, James C.

    1997-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s constitute a superfamily of genes encoding mostly microsomal hemoproteins that play a dominant role in the metabolism of a wide variety of both endogenous and foreign compounds. In insects, xenobiotic metabolism (i.e., metabolism of insecticides and toxic natural plant compounds) is known to involve members of the CYP6 family of cytochrome P450s. Use of a 3′ RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) strategy with a degenerate primer based on the conserved cytochrome P450 heme-binding decapeptide loop resulted in the amplification of four cDNA sequences representing another family of cytochrome P450 genes (CYP28) from two species of isoquinoline alkaloid-resistant Drosophila and the cosmopolitan species Drosophila hydei. The CYP28 family forms a monophyletic clade with strong regional homologies to the vertebrate CYP3 family and the insect CYP6 family (both of which are involved in xenobiotic metabolism) and to the insect CYP9 family (of unknown function). Induction of mRNA levels for three of the CYP28 cytochrome P450s by toxic host-plant allelochemicals (up to 11.5-fold) and phenobarbital (up to 49-fold) corroborates previous in vitro metabolism studies and suggests a potentially important role for the CYP28 family in determining patterns of insect–host-plant relationships through xenobiotic detoxification. PMID:9380713

  9. Host protein BSL1 associates with Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector AVR2 and the Solanum demissum Immune receptor R2 to mediate disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Diane G O; Breen, Susan; Win, Joe; Schornack, Sebastian; Hein, Ingo; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Champouret, Nicolas; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; Birch, Paul R J; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-08-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to modulate plant immunity and promote host colonization. Plant nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immunoreceptors recognize specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly. Little is known about how NB-LRR proteins recognize effectors of filamentous plant pathogens, such as Phytophthora infestans. AVR2 belongs to a family of 13 sequence-divergent P. infestans RXLR effectors that are differentially recognized by members of the R2 NB-LRR family in Solanum demissum. We report that the putative plant phosphatase BSU-LIKE PROTEIN1 (BSL1) is required for R2-mediated perception of AVR2 and resistance to P. infestans. AVR2 associates with BSL1 and mediates the interaction of BSL1 with R2 in planta, possibly through the formation of a ternary complex. Strains of P. infestans that are virulent on R2 potatoes express an unrecognized form, Avr2-like (referred to as A2l). A2L can still interact with BSL1 but does not promote the association of BSL1 with R2. Our findings show that recognition of the P. infestans AVR2 effector by the NB-LRR protein R2 requires the putative phosphatase BSL1. This reveals that, similar to effectors of phytopathogenic bacteria, recognition of filamentous pathogen effectors can be mediated via a host protein that interacts with both the effector and the NB-LRR immunoreceptor.

  10. Small multidrug resistance protein EmrE reduces host pH and osmotic tolerance to metabolic quaternary cation osmoprotectants.

    PubMed

    Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J

    2012-11-01

    The small multidrug resistance (SMR) transporter protein EmrE in Escherichia coli is known to confer resistance to toxic antiseptics classified as quaternary cation compounds (QCCs). Naturally derived QCCs synthesized during metabolic activities often act as osmoprotectants, such as betaine and choline, and participate in osmotic homoestasis. The goal of this study was to determine if EmrE proteins transport biological QCC-based osmoprotectants. Plasmid-encoded copies of E. coli emrE and the inactive variant emrE-E14C (emrE with the E → C change at position 14) were expressed in various E. coli strains grown in either rich or minimal media at various pHs (5 to 9) and under hypersaline (0.5 to 1.0 M NaCl and KCl) conditions to identify changes in growth phenotypes induced by osmoprotectant transport. The results demonstrated that emrE expression reduced pH tolerance of E. coli strains at or above neutral pH and when grown in hypersaline media at or above NaCl or KCl concentrations of 0.75 M. Hypersaline growth conditions were used to screen QCC osmoprotectants betaine, choline, l-carnitine, l-lysine, l-proline, and l-arginine. The study identified that betaine and choline are natural QCC substrates of EmrE.

  11. Evaluation of Host-Plant Resistance of Selected Rice Genotypes to the Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Vyavhare, Suhas S; Gealy, David R; Way, Michael O; Tabien, Rodante E; Pearson, Rebecca A

    2016-08-30

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, is the most important insect pest of rice in the United States. Management of L. oryzophilus mainly depends upon the use of insecticides due to the lack of effective alternative management tactics. A 3-yr field study was conducted to determine if difference exists among rice genotypes and cultivars of inbred tropical japonica subspecies commercially grown in the southern United States [Cocodrie (PI 606331), CL171, and CL151 (PI 654463)] and the germplasm lines of indica subspecies adapted to tropical climates of Asia [WC 4644 (PI 312777), TNI (PI 495830), Rondo (PI 615022), 4612 (PI 615039), TeQing (PI 536047), and 4593 (PI 615031)] for resistance to L. oryzophilus Experiments were established as a split-plot design with cultivars as main plots and insecticide treatment as subplots. No significant differences were observed in number of L. oryzophilus larvae recovered across cultivars and genotypes, indicating no significant variation in their preference to L. oryzophilus oviposition. Insecticide treatment had a significant impact on L. oryzophilus larval density. However, grain yield did not vary significantly between treated and untreated plots for any of the cultivars and genotypes. The amount of yield loss in response to L. oryzophilus infestation did not vary significantly across genotypes and cultivars, indicating no variation among these genotypes for resistance to L. oryzophilus.

  12. Evaluation of Host-Plant Resistance of Selected Rice Genotypes to the Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Vyavhare, Suhas S; Gealy, David R; Way, Michael O; Tabien, Rodante E; Pearson, Rebecca A

    2016-12-01

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, is the most important insect pest of rice in the United States. Management of L. oryzophilus mainly depends upon the use of insecticides due to the lack of effective alternative management tactics. A 3-yr field study was conducted to determine if difference exists among rice genotypes and cultivars of inbred tropical japonica subspecies commercially grown in the southern United States [Cocodrie (PI 606331), CL171, and CL151 (PI 654463)] and the germplasm lines of indica subspecies adapted to tropical climates of Asia [WC 4644 (PI 312777), TNI (PI 495830), Rondo (PI 615022), 4612 (PI 615039), TeQing (PI 536047), and 4593 (PI 615031)] for resistance to L. oryzophilus Experiments were established as a split-plot design with cultivars as main plots and insecticide treatment as subplots. No significant differences were observed in number of L. oryzophilus larvae recovered across cultivars and genotypes, indicating no significant variation in their preference to L. oryzophilus oviposition. Insecticide treatment had a significant impact on L. oryzophilus larval density. However, grain yield did not vary significantly between treated and untreated plots for any of the cultivars and genotypes. The amount of yield loss in response to L. oryzophilus infestation did not vary significantly across genotypes and cultivars, indicating no variation among these genotypes for resistance to L. oryzophilus.

  13. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sunde, Marianne; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Böckerman, Inger; Norström, Madelaine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331) isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241) produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9) than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3), (p<0.01, Chi-square test). Identical cassette arrays including dfrA1-aadA1, aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, oxa-30-aadA1 (class 1 integrons) and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (class 2 integrons) were detected from both humans and meat. However, the most prevalent cassette array in human isolates, dfrA17-aadA5, did not occur in isolates from meat, suggesting a possible linkage between this class 1 integron and a subpopulation of E. coli adapted to a human host. The drfA1-aadA1 and aadA1 class 1 integrons were found frequently in both human and meat isolates. These isolates were subjected to further studies to investigate similarities with regard to transferability, plasmid and host strain characteristics. We detected incF plasmids with pMLST profile F24:A-:B1 carrying drfA1-aadA1 integrons in isolates from pork and in a more distantly related E. coli strain from a human with septicaemia. Furthermore, we showed that most of the class 1 integrons with aadA1 were located on incF plasmids with pMLST profile F51:A-:B10 in human isolates. The plasmid was present in unrelated as well as closely related host strains, demonstrating that dissemination of this

  14. Optimizing Host-Pathogen In-Flight Assays for C.Elegans and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Timothy G.; Birdsall, Holly H.; Hammond, Jeffrey S.; Allen, Patricia L.

    2013-02-01

    This study addresses controls for an assay of bacterial virulence that has been optimized for space flight studies. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms ingest microorganisms, but are also killed by virulent bacteria. Virulence is assessed by the number of bacteria surviving in co-culture with C. elegans , as measured by optical density at 620 nm. Co -cultures of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with C. elegans have a higher OD620 than MRSA grown alone, which could reflect debris from dead worms and/or enhanced growth of the MRSA in response to worm-derived factors. The use of media conditioned by pre-incubation with worms demonstrated the presence of temperature-stable factors that change MRSA growth in a strain-dependent manner. Some sources of deionized water contain an undefined antibacterial activity present in conditioned, but not fresh untreated media.

  15. Acquisition of multidrug resistance by L1210 leukemia cells decreases their tumorigenicity and enhances their susceptibility to the host immune response.

    PubMed

    Martín-Orozco, Elena; Ferragut, José Antonio; Garcia-Peñarrubia, Pilar; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2005-04-01

    The use of antineoplastic drugs for cancer treatment is frequently associated with the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype that renders tumoural cells insensitive to antineoplastics. It remains elusive whether the acquisition of the MDR phenotype alters immunological parameters that could influence the cell sensitivity to an eventual host immune response. We report that immunisation of syngeneic mice with gamma-irradiated L1210S (parental line) and L1210R (MDR phenotype) cells results in a significant rejection of subsequently implanted L1210R-based tumours, but not of the L1210S ones. Notably, L1210R tumours display a twofold reduction in vivo proliferative capacity and are less aggressive in terms of mouse survival than their sensitive counterparts. Also, analysis of surface expression of molecules involved in antigen presentation and cytokine activity revealed a slight increase in IFN-gamma receptor expression, a decrease of Fas molecule, and a fourfold up-regulation of MHC class I molecules in L1210R cells. Nonetheless, both cell lines were able to induce a cytotoxic response in syngeneic mice and were equally susceptible to cytotoxicity by splenic cells. Together, these findings indicate that acquisition of drug resistance by L1210 cells is accompanied by pleiotropic changes that result in reduced tumour proliferative capacity and tumorigenicity in syngeneic mice. Hence, immunological studies of MDR tumours may assist in the design of specific therapeutic strategies that complement current chemotherapy treatments.

  16. The Hydrobia ulvae-Maritrema subdolum association: influence of temperature, salinity, light, water-pressure and secondary host exudates on cercarial emergence and longevity.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, K N

    2002-12-01

    The effects of environmental factors and exudates from the amphipod Corophium volutator on the emergence of Maritrema subdolum cercariae (Digenea: Microphallidae) from the snail Hydrobia ulvae were investigated in the laboratory. Increasing the temperature (15 to 25 degrees C) caused an overall 11-fold increase in emergence rate under varying salinities (24 to 36 per thousand). The effect of salinity depended on the experimental temperature. Emergence increased with increasing salinity at higher temperatures, but decreased with increasing salinity at 15 degrees C. Whereas the different levels of salinity had no effect, increasing the temperature significantly reduced the life span of cercariae. In comparison with complete darkness, light caused a two-fold increase in emergence, whereas an increment of the water pressure from 1.0 to 1.3 ATM (corresponding to 0 and 3 m of depth) left the shedding rate unaffected. Unidentified exudates from the second intermediate host, C. volutator, significantly depressed the cercarial emergence rate. The main transmission window of M. subdolum seems to occur during low water in tidal pools where light levels are high and solar radiation rapidly elevates the water temperature, as well as salinity through evaporation. The consequence of such a transmission strategy is discussed in relation to the impact of M. subdolum on the population dynamics of the second intermediate host.

  17. Effect of host tree species on cellulase activity and bacterial community composition in the gut of larval Asian longhorned beetle.

    PubMed

    Geib, Scott M; Jimenez-Gasco, Maria Del Mar; Carlson, John E; Tien, Ming; Hoover, Kelli

    2009-06-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis, the Asian longhorned beetle, is a wood-boring insect that can develop in a wide range of healthy deciduous hosts and requires gut microbes to aid in wood degradation and digestion. Here we show that larval A. glabripennis harbor a diverse gut bacterial community, and this community can be extremely variable when reared in different host trees. A. glabripennis reared in a preferred host (Acer saccharum) had the highest gut bacterial diversity compared with larvae reared either in a secondary host (Quercus palustris), a resistant host (Pyrus calleryana), or on artificial diet. The gut microbial community of larval A. glabripennis collected from field populations on Brooklyn, NY, showed the highest degree of complexity among all samples in this study. Overall, when larvae fed on a preferred host, they harbored a broad diversity of gut bacteria spanning the alpha-, beta-, gamma-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Cellulase activities (beta-1,4-endoglucanase, beta-1,4-exoglucanase, and beta-1,4-glucosidase) in the guts of larvae fed in a preferred host (A. saccharum) or a secondary host (Q. palustris) were significantly higher than that of artificial diet fed larvae. Larvae that fed on wood from a resistant host (P. calleryana) showed suppressed total gut cellulase activity. Results show that the host tree can impact both gut microbial community complexity and cellulase activity in A. glabripennis.

  18. Brown Tumour in a Patient with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Resistant to Medical Therapy: Case Report on Successful Treatment after Subtotal Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Condò, Stefano; Ferrannini, Michele; Bertoli, Marta; Rovella, Valentina; Di Renzo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2009-01-01

    Brown tumour represents a serious complication of hyperparathyroidism. Differential diagnosis, based on histological examination, is only presumptive and clinical, radiological and laboratory data are necessary for definitive diagnosis. Here we describe a case of a brown tumour localised in the maxilla due to secondary hyperparathyroidism in a young women with chronic renal failure. Hemodialysis and pharmacological treatment were unsuccessful in controlling secondary hyperparathyroidism making it necessary to proceed with a subtotal parathyroidectomy. The proper timing of the parathyroidectomy and its favourable effect on regression of the brown tumor made it possible to avoid a potentially disfiguring surgical removal of the brown tumor. PMID:20011058

  19. The intestinal microbiota in aged mice is modulated by dietary resistant starch and correlated with improvements in host responses.

    PubMed

    Tachon, Sybille; Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael; Martin, Roy; Marco, Maria L

    2013-02-01

    Dietary interventions might prevent or reverse age-related declines in health through modification of the activity and composition of the intestinal microbiota. As a first step toward more comprehensive evaluations of single dietary components on healthy aging, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was applied to determine the structure of the bacterial communities in the ceca of 20-month-old healthy mice fed energy-controlled diets containing 0, 18, or 36% type 2 resistant starch (RS) from high-amylose maize (HAM-RS2). The cecal microbiota of mice fed a diet depleted in RS and containing the readily digestible carbohydrate amylopectin were dominated by bacteria in the Firmicutes phylum and contained low levels of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. In contrast, mice fed diets containing HAM-RS2 were colonized by higher levels of Bacteroidetes and Bifidobacterium, Akkermansia, and Allobaculum species in proportions that were dependent on the concentration of the dietary fiber. The proportions of Bifidobacterium and Akkermansia were positively correlated with mouse feeding responses, gut weight, and expression levels of proglucagon, the precursor of the gut anti-obesity/diabetic hormone GLP-1. This study showed that aging mice harbor a distinct microbiota, which can be modulated by RS and enriched for bacteria that are associated with improved health.

  20. Species-specific but not genotype-specific primary and secondary isotype-specific NSP4 antibody responses in gnotobiotic calves and piglets infected with homologous host bovine (NSP4[A]) or porcine (NSP4[B]) rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Honma, Shinjiro; Ishida, Shin-Ichi; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Kapikian, Albert Z; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2004-12-05

    Using recombinant baculoviruses expressing rotavirus NSP4 [A], [B], [C], and [D] genotypes of bovine, porcine, human, simian, or murine origin, we analyzed serum antibody responses to NSP4s in gnotobiotic calves and piglets infected by the oral/alimentary or intraamniotic route with bovine (NSP4[A]) (Wyatt, R.G., Mebus, C.A., Yolken, R.H., Kalica, A.R., James, H.D., Jr., Kapikian, A.Z., Chanock, R.M., 1979. Rotaviral immunity in gnotobiotic calves: heterologous resistance to human virus induced by bovine virus. Science 203(4380), 548-550) or porcine (NSP4[B]) (Hoshino, Y., Saif, L.J., Sereno, M.M., Chanock, R.M., Kapikian, A.Z., 1988. Infection immunity of piglets to either VP3 or VP7 outer capsid protein confers resistance to challenge with a virulent rotavirus bearing the corresponding antigen. J. Virol. 62(3), 744-748) rotaviruses. Following primary infection and challenge with virulent rotaviruses, the animals developed higher or significantly higher antibody titers to homologous host homotypic NSP4s than to heterologous host homotypic or heterologous host heterotypic NSP4s, indicating that antibody responses were species specific rather than genotype specific. Antibody responses to NSP4s corresponded closely with the phylogenetic relationships of NSP4s within a species-specific region of amino acids (aa) 131-141. In contrast, NSP4 genotypes determined by amino acid full-length sequence identity predicted poorly their "serotypes". In piglets, antibodies to NSP4 induced by previous oral infection failed to confer protection against challenge from a porcine rotavirus bearing serotypically different VP4 and VP7 but essentially identical NSP4 to the porcine rotavirus in primary infection. Thus, in an approach to immunization with a live oral rotavirus vaccine, the NSP4 protein does not appear to play an important role in protection against rotavirus disease and infection.

  1. Comparison of the taxonomy, serology, drug resistance transfer, and virulence of Citrobacter freundii strains from mammals and poikilothermic hosts.

    PubMed Central

    Toranzo, A E; Cutrín, J M; Roberson, B S; Núñez, S; Abell, J M; Hetrick, F M; Baya, A M

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the phenotypic, antigenic, and virulence characteristics of 32 Citrobacter freundii strains of fish, human, and veterinary origin were comparatively analyzed. In addition, the spread of drug resistance factors by conjugation was investigated. Regardless of the source of isolation, the strains exhibited variable reactions mainly for arginine dihydrolase, ornithine decarboxylase, and fermentation of sucrose, melibiose, amygdalin, and salicin. Total fatty acid methyl ester analysis by gas chromatography proved to be useful for an intratypic differentiation within the C. freundii strains studied. In fact, although all of the isolates exhibited similar fatty acid methyl ester profiles, significant differences in the major fatty acids 16:1 and 16:0 and in the 17:0 delta region were observed between the isolates from salmonids and the remaining strains. Serological studies using agglutination tests, analysis of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and the corresponding immunoblots with 13 antisera indicated a great antigenic diversity among the strains. Common LPS patterns were shared only by some isolates showing high cross-agglutination titers. In contrast, although all strains exhibited very similar surface protein patterns, only two common outer membrane proteins of 54 and 58 kDa were immunologically related. Infectivity trials performed in mice and rainbow trout indicated that all of the C. freundii strains were not pathogenic for mice (50% lethal dose of > 5 x 10(7)). Although the isolates displayed a low degree of virulence for trout, inoculated strains were always recovered from the survivors in pure culture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8031079

  2. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Invasion-Resistant Cells Identifies Laminin α2 as a Host Factor for Bacterial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Xander M.; Döhrmann, Simon; Hallström, Björn M.; Li, Shangzhong; Voldborg, Bjørn G.; Meng, Brandon X.; McKee, Karen K.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Lewis, Nathan E.; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To understand the role of glycosaminoglycans in bacterial cellular invasion, xylosyltransferase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were created using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-cas9) gene targeting. When these mutants were compared to the pgsA745 cell line, a CHO xylosyltransferase mutant generated previously using chemical mutagenesis, an unexpected result was obtained. Bacterial invasion of pgsA745 cells by group B Streptococcus (GBS), group A Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus was markedly reduced compared to the invasion of wild-type cells, but newly generated CRISPR-cas9 mutants were only resistant to GBS. Invasion of pgsA745 cells was not restored by transfection with xylosyltransferase, suggesting that an additional mutation conferring panresistance to multiple bacteria was present in pgsA745 cells. Whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) uncovered a deletion in the gene encoding the laminin subunit α2 (Lama2) that eliminated much of domain L4a. Silencing of the long Lama2 isoform in wild-type cells strongly reduced bacterial invasion, whereas transfection with human LAMA2 cDNA significantly enhanced invasion in pgsA745 cells. The addition of exogenous laminin-α2β1γ1/laminin-α2β2γ1 strongly increased bacterial invasion in CHO cells, as well as in human alveolar basal epithelial and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Thus, the L4a domain in laminin α2 is important for cellular invasion by a number of bacterial pathogens. PMID:28074024

  3. The Epos of Euclidean Geometry in Greek Secondary Education (1836-1985): Pressure for Change and Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toumasis, Charalampos

    1990-01-01

    Presented is the development of school geometry in contemporary Greece since the era in which the secondary education system was established (1836). Identified and interpreted are the reasons for the endurance of Euclid's Elements as the basic component of school geometry in Greece. (KR)

  4. The newly described mecA homologue, mecALGA251, is present in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from a diverse range of host species

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, G. K.; Larsen, A. R.; Robb, A.; Edwards, G. E.; Pennycott, T. W.; Foster, G.; Mot, D.; Hermans, K.; Baert, K.; Peacock, S. J.; Parkhill, J.; Zadoks, R. N.; Holmes, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives A previously unidentified mecA homologue, mecALGA251, has recently been described in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from humans and dairy cattle. The origin and epidemiology of this novel homologue are unclear. The objective of this study was to provide basic descriptive information of MRSA isolates harbouring mecALGA251 from a range of host animal species. Methods A number of S. aureus isolates from historical animal isolate collections were chosen for investigation based on their similarity to known mecALGA251 MRSA isolates. The presence of mecALGA251 was determined using a multiplex PCR and antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed by disc diffusion. Results MRSA harbouring mecALGA251 were found in isolates from a domestic dog, brown rats, a rabbit, a common seal, sheep and a chaffinch. All of the isolates were phenotypically MRSA, although this depended on which test was used; some isolates would be considered susceptible with certain assays. All isolates were susceptible to linezolid, rifampicin, kanamycin, norfloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, fusidic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and mupirocin. Five multilocus sequence types were represented (2273, 130, 425, 1764 and 1245) and six spa types (t208, t6293, t742, t6594, t7914 and t843). Conclusions The discovery of MRSA isolates possessing mecALGA251 from a diverse range of host species, including different taxonomic classes, has important implications for the diagnosis of MRSA in these species and our understanding of the epidemiology of this novel mecA homologue. PMID:22941897

  5. An efficient viral vector for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees and its induced resistance to Plum pox virus via silencing of a host factor gene.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2017-03-01

    RNA silencing is a powerful technology for molecular characterization of gene functions in plants. A commonly used approach to the induction of RNA silencing is through genetic transformation. A potent alternative is to use a modified viral vector for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to degrade RNA molecules sharing similar nucleotide sequence. Unfortunately, genomic studies in many allogamous woody perennials such as peach are severely hindered because they have a long juvenile period and are recalcitrant to genetic transformation. Here, we report the development of a viral vector derived from Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), a widespread fruit tree virus that is endemic in all Prunus fruit production countries and regions in the world. We show that the modified PNRSV vector, harbouring the sense-orientated target gene sequence of 100-200 bp in length in genomic RNA3, could efficiently trigger the silencing of a transgene or an endogenous gene in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. We further demonstrate that the PNRSV-based vector could be manipulated to silence endogenous genes in peach such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E isoform (eIF(iso)4E), a host factor of many potyviruses including Plum pox virus (PPV). Moreover, the eIF(iso)4E-knocked down peach plants were resistant to PPV. This work opens a potential avenue for the control of virus diseases in perennial trees via viral vector-mediated silencing of host factors, and the PNRSV vector may serve as a powerful molecular tool for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees.

  6. Diverted secondary metabolism and improved resistance to European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) in maize (Zea mays L.) transformed with wheat oxalate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingqin; Burt, Andrew J; Ramputh, Al-I; Simmonds, John; Cass, Leslie; Hubbard, Keith; Miller, Shea; Altosaar, Illimar; Arnason, John T

    2007-04-04

    An alteration in the secondary metabolism of maize (Zea mays L.) genetically modified with the wheat oxalate oxidase (OxO) gene was observed using HPLC and fluorescence microscopy. Phenolic concentrations in the OxO lines were significantly increased, but DIMBOA synthesis was reduced due to a diversion in the shikimate pathway leading to phenolic and hydroxamic acids. Ferulic acid exhibited the largest increase and accounted for 80.4% of the total soluble phenolics. Transcription of a 13-lipoxygenase gene, coding for a key enzyme involved in the regulation of secondary metabolism, was substantially higher in the OxO line than in the null line. To test whether the high levels of soluble phenolic acids, in particular ferulic acid, contributed to the insect resistance in the OxO maize, ferulic acid was administered in meridic diets to European corn borer (ECB). A significant negative correlation between ferulic acid concentration and ECB larval growth rate was found. Field testing during 2001 showed that OxO maize was more resistant to ECB, with leaf consumption and stalk-tunneling damage significantly reduced by 28-34 and 37-39%, respectively, on all of the OxO lines tested and confirming published 2000 findings.

  7. The effect of malnutrition on the susceptibility of the host to viral infection.

    PubMed

    FLANIGAN, C C; SPRUNT, D H

    1956-11-01

    The effect of progressive long term dietary protein depletion on viral susceptibility was investigated in 2 host-virus systems: (1) swine influenza in the male CF(1) mouse, and (2) Rous sarcoma virus in the New Hampshire red chicken. Data are presented demonstrating a relationship between host protein nutrition and susceptibility to virus infection. This relationship is shown to be cyclic in character, involving phases of increased and decreased viral susceptibility. The relative resistance of the host on low protein intake is a function of the duration on incomplete diet administration before virus inoculation, and consequently a function of the host's state of depletion. As illustrated in Fig. 6, the cyclic susceptibility change demonstrated by these animals on low protein diet was characterized by an initial phase of increased susceptibility, a secondary phase of increased resistance, and a final phase of increased susceptibility. It is proposed that these alterations in relative viral susceptibility result from metabolic changes occurring within the host during the process of dietary protein depletion. The resistance changes are roughly correlated to periods of depot fat utilization (increased susceptibility), reserve protein utilization (decreased susceptibility), and tissue breakdown subsequent to protein starvation (increased susceptibility). Many previously published concepts of the interplay of viral susceptibility and host nutrition maintained that host malnourishment led to increased host resistance. The cyclic change in resistance, reported herein, is given as evidence that the effect of host deficiency cannot be explained simply on the basis of an inhibition of virus growth due to retarded cellular metabolism in the host. Protein deficiency is shown not to produce an "all-or-none" effect, but a series of reproducible phases of increased and decreased resistance. From the aforementioned results it is proposed that the phases of viral susceptibility seen

  8. Disease Interactions in a Shared Host Plant: Effects of Pre-Existing Viral Infection on Cucurbit Plant Defense Responses and Resistance to Bacterial Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mauck, Kerry E.; Pulido, Hannier; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Stephenson, Andrew G.; Mescher, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana) contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila) at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA) in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant quality for (and

  9. Disease interactions in a shared host plant: effects of pre-existing viral infection on cucurbit plant defense responses and resistance to bacterial wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lori R; Salvaudon, Lucie; Mauck, Kerry E; Pulido, Hannier; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Stephenson, Andrew G; Mescher, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana) contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila) at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA) in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant quality for (and

  10. The lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a novel Phytophthora resistance component and a potential host target for a RXLR effector.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; de Sain, Mara; Weide, Rob; Gouget, Anne; Klamer, Sofieke; Canut, Herve; Govers, Francine

    2011-03-01

    In plants, an active defense against biotrophic pathogens is dependent on a functional continuum between the cell wall (CW) and the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus anticipated that proteins maintaining this continuum also function in defense. The legume-like lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a putative mediator of CW-PM adhesions in Arabidopsis and is known to bind in vitro to the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-dEER effector IPI-O via a RGD cell attachment motif present in IPI-O. Here we show that LecRK-I.9 is associated with the plasma membrane, and that two T-DNA insertions lines deficient in LecRK-I.9 (lecrk-I.9) have a 'gain-of-susceptibility' phenotype specifically towards the oomycete Phytophthora brassicae. Accordingly, overexpression of LecRK-I.9 leads to enhanced resistance to P. brassicae. A similar 'gain-of-susceptibility' phenotype was observed in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing ipiO (35S-ipiO1). This phenocopy behavior was also observed with respect to other defense-related functions; lecrk-I.9 and 35S-ipiO1 were both disturbed in pathogen- and MAMP-triggered callose deposition. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the RGD cell attachment motif in IPI-O is not only essential for disrupting the CW-PM adhesions, but also for disease suppression. These results suggest that destabilizing the CW-PM continuum is one of the tactics used by Phytophthora to promote infection. As countermeasure the host may want to strengthen CW-PM adhesions and the novel Phytophthora resistance component LecRK-I.9 seems to function in this process.

  11. The Lectin Receptor Kinase LecRK-I.9 Is a Novel Phytophthora Resistance Component and a Potential Host Target for a RXLR Effector

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; de Sain, Mara; Weide, Rob; Gouget, Anne; Klamer, Sofieke; Canut, Herve; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In plants, an active defense against biotrophic pathogens is dependent on a functional continuum between the cell wall (CW) and the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus anticipated that proteins maintaining this continuum also function in defense. The legume-like lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a putative mediator of CW-PM adhesions in Arabidopsis and is known to bind in vitro to the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-dEER effector IPI-O via a RGD cell attachment motif present in IPI-O. Here we show that LecRK-I.9 is associated with the plasma membrane, and that two T-DNA insertions lines deficient in LecRK-I.9 (lecrk-I.9) have a ‘gain-of-susceptibility’ phenotype specifically towards the oomycete Phytophthora brassicae. Accordingly, overexpression of LecRK-I.9 leads to enhanced resistance to P. brassicae. A similar ‘gain-of-susceptibility’ phenotype was observed in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing ipiO (35S-ipiO1). This phenocopy behavior was also observed with respect to other defense-related functions; lecrk-I.9 and 35S-ipiO1 were both disturbed in pathogen- and MAMP-triggered callose deposition. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the RGD cell attachment motif in IPI-O is not only essential for disrupting the CW-PM adhesions, but also for disease suppression. These results suggest that destabilizing the CW-PM continuum is one of the tactics used by Phytophthora to promote infection. As countermeasure the host may want to strengthen CW-PM adhesions and the novel Phytophthora resistance component LecRK-I.9 seems to function in this process. PMID:21483488

  12. Rapid response to alefacept given to patients with steroid resistant or steroid dependent acute graft-versus-host disease: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Shapira, M Y; Resnick, I B; Bitan, M; Ackerstein, A; Tsirigotis, P; Gesundheit, B; Zilberman, I; Miron, S; Leubovic, A; Slavin, S; Or, R

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the effect of alefacept (Amevive), a novel dimeric fusion protein, in steroid resistant/dependent acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD). Seven patients were treated in eight aGVHD episodes. GVHD grade at treatment initiation and at peak ranged 2-4 (median 2.5) and 2-4 (median 4), respectively. System involvement at GVHD peak included skin (n=7), gastrointestinal tract (n=5) and liver (n=3). All patients responded. However, one patient with skin GVHD and two with gastrointestinal GVHD featuring an early initial response (IR) exacerbated and CR was not achieved. Skin GVHD responded rapidly with a median of 1 day to IR and 7 days to CR. Intestinal response was slower with median 7.5 days to IR. Of the four patients that achieved IR, CR was achieved in only one (40 days to CR). None of the patients had significant hepatic GVHD before treatment so no hepatic effect of alefacept could be determined. No immediate alefacept-related side effects were observed. Late side effects included infections (aspergillus sinusitis, pneumonia, bacteremia, pharyngeal thrush), pancytopenia and hemorrhagic cystitis. Three patients had CMV reactivation while on alefacept. We conclude that alefacept may have a beneficial effect in controlling aGVHD. Further investigations in larger cohorts of patients and controlled studies are warranted.

  13. Discovering Host Genes Involved in the Infection by the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Complex and in the Establishment of Resistance to the Virus Using Tobacco Rattle Virus-based Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Czosnek, Henryk; Eybishtz, Assaf; Sade, Dagan; Gorovits, Rena; Sobol, Iris; Bejarano, Eduardo; Rosas-Díaz, Tábata; Lozano-Durán, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technologies allows for evaluating gene expression at the whole-genome level. Together with proteomic and metabolomic studies, these analyses have resulted in the identification of plant genes whose function or expression is altered as a consequence of pathogen attacks. Members of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) complex are among the most important pathogens impairing production of agricultural crops worldwide. To understand how these geminiviruses subjugate plant defenses, and to devise counter-measures, it is essential to identify the host genes affected by infection and to determine their role in susceptible and resistant plants. We have used a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV-VIGS) to uncover genes involved in viral infection of susceptible plants, and to identify genes underlying virus resistance. To identify host genes with a role in geminivirus infection, we have engineered a Nicotiana benthamiana line, coined 2IRGFP, which over-expresses GFP upon virus infection. With this system, we have achieved an accurate description of the dynamics of virus replication in space and time. Upon silencing selected N. benthamiana genes previously shown to be related to host response to geminivirus infection, we have identified eighteen genes involved in a wide array of cellular processes. Plant genes involved in geminivirus resistance were studied by comparing two tomato lines: one resistant (R), the other susceptible (S) to the virus. Sixty-nine genes preferentially expressed in R tomatoes were identified by screening cDNA libraries from infected and uninfected R and S genotypes. Out of the 25 genes studied so far, the silencing of five led to the total collapse of resistance, suggesting their involvement in the resistance gene network. This review of our results indicates that TRV-VIGS is an exquisite reverse genetics tool that may provide new insights into the molecular

  14. Effects of Juvenile Host Density and Food Availability on Adult Immune Response, Parasite Resistance and Virulence in a Daphnia-Parasite System

    PubMed Central

    Schoebel, Corine N.; Auld, Stuart K. J. R.; Spaak, Piet; Little, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    Host density can increase infection rates and reduce host fitness as increasing population density enhances the risk of becoming infected either through increased encounter rate or because host condition may decline. Conceivably, potential hosts could take high host density as a cue to up-regulate their defence systems. However, as host density usually covaries with food availability, it is difficult to examine the importance of host density in isolation. Thus, we performed two full-factorial experiments that varied juvenile densities of Daphnia magna (a freshwater crustacean) and food availability independently. We also included a simulated high-density treatment, where juvenile experimental animals were kept in filtered media that previously maintained Daphnia at high-density. Upon reaching adulthood, we exposed the Daphnia to their sterilizing bacterial parasite, Pasteuria ramosa, and examined how the juvenile treatments influenced the likelihood and severity of infection (Experiment I) and host immune investment (Experiment II). Neither juvenile density nor food treatments affected the likelihood of infection; however, well-fed hosts that were well-fed as juveniles produced more offspring prior to sterilization than their less well-fed counterparts. By contrast, parasite growth was independent of host juvenile resources or host density. Parasite-exposed hosts had a greater number of circulating haemocytes than controls (i.e., there was a cellular immune response), but the magnitude of immune response was not mediated by food availability or host density. These results suggest that density dependent effects on disease arise primarily through correlated changes in food availability: low food could limit parasitism and potentially curtail epidemics by reducing both the host’s and parasite’s reproduction as both depend on the same food. PMID:24736707

  15. Influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent phagocytic bacterial clearance and enhances susceptibility to secondary methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Keer; Metzger, Dennis W

    2014-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a leading contributor to mortality during recent influenza pandemics. The mechanism for this influenza-induced susceptibility to secondary S. aureus infection is poorly understood. In this study, we show that innate antibacterial immunity was significantly suppressed during the recovery stage of influenza infection, even though MRSA superinfection had no significant effect on viral burdens. Compared with mice infected with bacteria alone, postinfluenza MRSA-infected mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance, which was not due to defective phagocyte recruitment, but rather coincided with reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. NADPH oxidase is responsible for reactive oxygen species production during phagocytic bacterial killing, a process also known as oxidative burst. We found that gp91(phox)-containing NADPH oxidase activity in macrophages and neutrophils was essential for optimal bacterial clearance during respiratory MRSA infections. In contrast to wild-type animals, gp91(phox-/-) mice exhibited similar defects in MRSA clearance before and after influenza infection. Using gp91(phox+/-) mosaic mice, we further demonstrate that influenza infection inhibits a cell-intrinsic contribution of NADPH oxidase to phagocyte bactericidal activity. Taken together, our results establish that influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent bacterial clearance and leads to susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection.

  16. News Conference: Serbia hosts teachers' seminar Resources: Teachers TV website closes for business Festival: Science takes to the stage in Denmark Research: How noise affects learning in secondary schools CERN: CERN visit inspires new teaching ideas Education: PLS aims to improve perception of science for school students Conference: Scientix conference discusses challenges in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    Conference: Serbia hosts teachers' seminar Resources: Teachers TV website closes for business Festival: Science takes to the stage in Denmark Research: How noise affects learning in secondary schools CERN: CERN visit inspires new teaching ideas Education: PLS aims to improve perception of science for school students Conference: Scientix conference discusses challenges in science education

  17. Antibiotic-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli High-Risk Clones and an IncFIIk Mosaic Plasmid Hosting Tn1 (blaTEM-4) in Isolates from 1990 to 2004

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Irene; Novais, Ângela; Lira, Felipe; Valverde, Aránzazu; Curião, Tânia; Martínez, José Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    We describe the genetic background of blaTEM-4 and the complete sequence of pRYC11::blaTEM-4, a mosaic plasmid that is highly similar to pKpQIL-like variants, predominant among TEM-4 producers in a Spanish hospital (1990 to 2004), which belong to Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli high-risk clones responsible for the current spread of different antibiotic resistance genes. Predominant populations of plasmids and host adapted clonal lineages seem to have greatly contributed to the spread of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. PMID:25691645

  18. Antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli high-risk clones and an IncFII(k) mosaic plasmid hosting Tn1 (blaTEM-4) in isolates from 1990 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Irene; Novais, Ângela; Lira, Felipe; Valverde, Aránzazu; Curião, Tânia; Martínez, José Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-05-01

    We describe the genetic background of bla(TEM-4) and the complete sequence of pRYC11::bla(TEM-4), a mosaic plasmid that is highly similar to pKpQIL-like variants, predominant among TEM-4 producers in a Spanish hospital (1990 to 2004), which belong to Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli high-risk clones responsible for the current spread of different antibiotic resistance genes. Predominant populations of plasmids and host adapted clonal lineages seem to have greatly contributed to the spread of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins.

  19. Examination of immune parameters and host-resistance mechanisms in B6C3F1 mice following adult exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-'p'-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    House, R.V.; Lauer, L.D.; Murray, M.J.; Thomas, P.T.; Ehrlich, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Adult female B6C3F1 mice were given a single IP dose of 0, 0.1, 1.0, or 10.0 micrograms/kg TCDD and examined for immune function and host resistance seven to ten days later. Exposure to TCDD resulted in a significant dose-related decrease in induction of both IgM and IgG antibody-forming cells. The suppression was noted for both T-dependent and T-independent antigens. TCDD at a dosage of 10 micrograms/kg was shown to suppress production of viral hemagglutinin. In contrast, TCDD exposure had no significant effect on natural killer cell function, production of interferon, or various parameters of macrophage function. Host resistance assessment revealed a significant increase in susceptibility to fatal infection with influenza virus, but no significant alteration in susceptibility to infection with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes.

  20. Host plant resistance against tomato spotted wilt virus in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its impact on susceptibility to the virus, virus population genetics, and vector feeding behavior and survival.

    PubMed

    Sundaraj, Sivamani; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-02-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely affects peanut production in the southeastern United States. Breeding efforts over the last three decades resulted in the release of numerous peanut genotypes with field resistance to TSWV. The degree of field resistance in these genotypes has steadily increased over time, with recently released genotypes exhibiting a higher degree of field resistance than older genotypes. However, most new genotypes have never been evaluated in the greenhouse or laboratory against TSWV or thrips, and the mechanism of resistance is unknown. In this study, TSWV-resistant and -susceptible genotypes were subjected to TSWV mechanical inoculation. The incidence of TSWV infection was 71.7 to 87.2%. Estimation of TSWV nucleocapsid (N) gene copies did not reveal significant differences between resistant and susceptible genotypes. Parsimony and principal component analyses of N gene nucleotide sequences revealed inconsistent differences between virus isolates collected from resistant and susceptible genotypes and between old (collected in 1998) and new (2010) isolates. Amino acid sequence analyses indicated consistent differences between old and new isolates. In addition, we found evidence for overabundance of nonsynonymous substitutions. However, there was no evidence for positive selection. Purifying selection, population expansion, and differentiation seem to have influenced the TSWV populations temporally rather than positive selection induced by host resistance. Choice and no-choice tests indicated that resistant and susceptible genotypes differentially affected thrips feeding and survival. Thrips feeding and survival were suppressed on some resistant genotypes compared with susceptible genotypes. These findings reveal how TSWV resistance in peanut could influence evolution, epidemiology, and management of TSWV.

  1. Secondary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Secondary hypertension Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Secondary hypertension (secondary high blood pressure) is high blood pressure that's caused by another medical condition. Secondary hypertension can be caused by conditions that affect your ...

  2. Secondary Cell Wall Polymers of Enterococcus faecalis Are Critical for Resistance to Complement Activation via Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Geiss-Liebisch, Stefan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Beczala, Agnieszka; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Kruszynska, Karolina; Repp, Christian; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes; Theilacker, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is part of our first line of defense against invading pathogens. The strategies used by Enterococcus faecalis to evade recognition by human complement are incompletely understood. In this study, we identified an insertional mutant of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthesis gene tagB in E. faecalis V583 that exhibited an increased susceptibility to complement-mediated killing by neutrophils. Further analysis revealed that increased killing of the mutant was due to a higher rate of phagocytosis by neutrophils, which correlated with higher C3b deposition on the bacterial surface. Our studies indicated that complement activation via the lectin pathway was much stronger on the tagB mutant compared with wild type. In concordance, we found an increased binding of the key lectin pathway components mannose-binding lectin and mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on the mutant. To understand the mechanism of lectin pathway inhibition by E. faecalis, we purified and characterized cell wall carbohydrates of E. faecalis wild type and V583ΔtagB. NMR analysis revealed that the mutant strain lacked two WTAs with a repeating unit of →6)[α-l-Rhap-(1→3)]β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P and →6) β-d-Glcp-(1→3) [α-d-Glcp-(1→4)]-β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P→, respectively (Rbo, ribitol). In addition, compositional changes in the enterococcal rhamnopolysaccharide were noticed. Our study indicates that in E. faecalis, modification of peptidoglycan by secondary cell wall polymers is critical to evade recognition by the complement system. PMID:22908219

  3. The Brachypodium-Puccinia graminis system: Solving a puzzle to uncover the underlying mechanisms of non-host resistance and plant immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachypodium distachyon is regarded as non-host to the causal agent of stem rust in wheat and barley, P. graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), and a near-host to the pathogens of forage grasses, P. graminis f. sp. lolii (Pgl) and P. graminis f. sp. phlei-pratensis (Pgp). Given the devastating effect of ste...

  4. An Unusual Case of Resistant Hypokalaemia in a Patient with Large Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Bagul, A.; Gupta, A.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Prostate (NECP) is rare and only few cases have been reported, constituting less than 0.5% of prostatic malignancies. We report a rare case of large bowel obstruction from NECP posing a further challenge in management due to resistant hypokalaemia. A 70-year-old man presented with clinical signs of large bowel obstruction who was known to have prostatic carcinoma three years ago, treated initially with hormone therapy then chemoradiation. The blood profile showed a severe hypokalaemia and CT scan revealed liver and lung metastases apart from confirming large bowel obstruction from local invasion of NECP. Severe hypokalaemia was believed to be caused by paraneoplastic syndrome from tumor burden or by recent administration of Etoposide. Intensive potassium correction through a central venous access in maximal doses of 150 mmol/24 hours under cardiac monitoring finally raised serum potassium to 3.8 mmol/L. This safe period allowed us to perform a trephine colostomy at the left iliac fossa. The postoperative period was relatively uneventful. This first case report is presenting a rare cause of large bowel obstruction from a neuroendocrine carcinoma of prostate and highlights the importance of an early, intensive correction of electrolytes in patients with large tumor burden from NECP. PMID:28386507

  5. Implications Of Host Plant Resistance Against Whitefly-Transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus In Tomato For Virus Epidemics And Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whitefly-transmitted Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) severely impacts tomato production in southeastern USA. Growers typically spray insecticides against whiteflies and plant TYLCV-resistant genotypes. Semi-dominant genes such as TY-1 and TY-2 confer resistance to TYLCV. Resistant genotypes ar...

  6. Primary and secondary experimental infestation of rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) with Sarcoptes scabiei from a wild rabbit: factors determining resistance to reinfestation.

    PubMed

    Casais, Rosa; Dalton, Kevin P; Millán, Javier; Balseiro, Ana; Oleaga, Alvaro; Solano, Paloma; Goyache, Félix; Prieto, José Miguel; Parra, Francisco

    2014-06-16

    Studies of sarcoptic mange and immunity are hampered by lack of mite sources and natural infestation models. We have investigated the clinical and pathological signs, specific IgG response and acquired immunity in naïve New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) experimentally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei originally isolated from a clinically affected free-living European wild rabbit. Twenty rabbits were infested using two methods, direct contact for a 24 h period with a seeder rabbit simulating the natural process of infestation and application of a dressing holding approximately 1800 live mites on each hind limb (foot area) for a 24h period. Eight weeks post infestation, rabbits were treated with ivermectin and infestation cleared. Eight weeks later seventeen previously infested and four uninfested naïve controls were then re-exposed to the same S. scabiei variety using the same methods and followed for another 8 weeks. The progress of the disease was markedly more virulent in the animals infested by contact, indicating that the effective dose of mites managing to thrive and infest each rabbit by this method was higher. Nevertheless, infestation by contact resulted in partial protection to reexposure, rabbits developed high non-protective antibody titres upon reinfestation and presented severe clinical signs. However, rabbits reinfested by dressing developed lower IgG titres, and presented high levels of resistance to reinfestation, which might be due to induction of a strong local cellular response in the inoculation point that killed the mites and resulted in a lower mite effective dose, with subsequent reduced lesion development. Statistical analysis showed that sex, method of infestation and previous exposure are key factors determining the ability of rabbits to develop immunity to this disease. The rabbit-mange model developed will allow the further study of immunity and resistance to this neglected pathogen using a natural host system.

  7. During readaptation in vivo, a tissue culture-adapted strain of feline immunodeficiency virus reverts to broad neutralization resistance at different times in individual hosts but through changes at the same position of the surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bendinelli, M; Pistello, M; Del Mauro, D; Cammarota, G; Maggi, F; Leonildi, A; Giannecchini, S; Bergamini, C; Matteucci, D

    2001-05-01

    The broad resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization of lentiviruses recently isolated from infected hosts is a poorly understood feature which might contribute to the ability of these viruses to persist and to the failure of experimental vaccines to protect against virulent viruses. We studied the underlying molecular mechanisms by examining the evolution of a neutralization-sensitive, tissue culture-adapted strain of feline immunodeficiency virus upon reinoculation into specific-pathogen-free cats. Reversion to broad neutralization resistance was observed in seven of seven inoculated animals and, in individual hosts, started to develop between less than 4 and more than 15 months from infection. After comparison of the envelope sequences of the inoculum virus, of an additional 4 neutralization-sensitive in vitro variants, and of 14 ex vivo-derived variants (6 neutralization sensitive, 5 resistant, and 3 with intermediate phenotype), a Lys-->Asn or -->Glu change at position 481 in the V4 region of the surface glycoprotein appeared as a key player in the reversion. This conclusion was confirmed by mutagenesis of molecularly cloned virus. Analysis of viral quasispecies and biological clones showed that the intermediate phenotype was due to transient coexistence of neutralization-sensitive and -resistant variants. Since the amino acid position involved was the same in four of four recent revertants, it is suggested that the number of residues that control reversion to broad neutralization resistance in FIV might be very limited. Amino acid 481 was found to be changed only in one of three putative long-term revertants. These variants shared a Ser-->Asn change at position 557 in region V5, which probably collaborated with other mutations in long-term maintenance of neutralization resistance, as suggested by the study of mutagenized virus.

  8. Resection of ictal high frequency oscillations is associated with favorable surgical outcome in pediatric drug resistant epilepsy secondary to tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hisako; Leach, James L; Greiner, Hansel M; Holland-Bouley, Katherine D; Rose, Douglas F; Arthur, Todd; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-10-01

    Resective epilepsy surgery can improve seizures when the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is limited to a well-defined region. High frequency oscillations (HFO) have been recognized as having a high association with the seizure onset zone. Therefore, we retrospectively identified ictal HFOs and determined their relationship to specific intracranial features of cortical tubers in children with TSC who underwent resective surgery. We identified 14 patients with drug resistant epilepsy secondary to TSC who underwent subdural grid and strip implantation for presurgical evaluation and subsequent resection with adequate post-surgical follow-up. We aimed to determine the relationship between ictal HFOs, post-resection outcome and neuroimaging features in this population. The largest tuber was identified in all 14 patients (100%). Four patients (29%) had unusual tubers. HFOs were observed at ictal onset in all 14 patients. Seven of 10 patients with complete resection of HFOs were seizure free. The better seizure outcome (ILAE=1-3) was achieved with complete HFO resection regardless of the unique TSC structural features (p=0.0140). Our study demonstrates the presence of ripple and fast ripple range HFOs at ictal onset in children with TSC. Our study showed that complete HFO resection led to the better surgical outcome, independent of MR imaging findings.

  9. Co-localisation of host plant resistance QTLs affecting the performance and feeding behaviour of the aphid Myzus persicae in the peach tree

    PubMed Central

    Sauge, M-H; Lambert, P; Pascal, T

    2012-01-01

    The architecture and action of quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to plant resistance mechanisms against aphids, the largest group of phloem-feeding insects, are not well understood. Comparative mapping of several components of resistance to the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) was undertaken in Prunus davidiana, a wild species related to peach. An interspecific F1 population of Prunus persica var. Summergrand × P. davidiana clone P1908 was scored for resistance (aphid colony development and foliar damage) and 17 aphid feeding behaviour traits monitored by means of the electrical penetration graph technique. Seven resistance QTLs were detected, individually explaining 6.1–43.1% of the phenotypic variation. Consistency was shown over several trials. Nine QTLs affecting aphid feeding behaviour were identified. All resistance QTLs except one co-located with QTLs underlying aphid feeding behaviour. A P. davidiana resistance allele at the major QTL was associated with drastic reductions in phloem sap ingestion by aphids, suggesting a phloem-based resistance mechanism. Resistance was also positively correlated with aphid salivation into sieve elements, suggesting an insect response to restore the appropriate conditions for ingestion after phloem occlusion. No significant QTL was found for traits characterising aphid mouthpart activity in plant tissues other than phloem vessels. Two QTLs with effects on aphid feeding behaviour but without effect on resistance were identified. SSR markers linked to the main QTLs involved in resistance are of potential use in marker-assisted selection for aphid resistance. Linking our results with the recent sequencing of the peach genome may help clarify the physiological resistance mechanisms. PMID:21897441

  10. Secondary amenorrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... of periods - secondary Images Secondary amenorrhea Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) Absence of menstruation (amenorrhea) References Bulun SE. Physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  11. Bugs, hosts and ICU environment: countering pan-resistance in nosocomial microbiota and treating bacterial infections in the critical care setting.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Emilio; Mensa, José; Valía, Juan-Carlos; Gomez-Herreras, José-Ignacio; Ramasco, Fernando; Samso, Enric; Chiveli, Miguel-Angel; Pereira, Jorge; González, Rafael; Aguilar, Gerardo; Tamayo, Gonzalo; Ojeda, Nazario; Rico, Jesús; Giménez, María-José; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    ICUs are areas where resistance problems are the largest, and these constitute a major problem for the intensivist's clinical practice. Main resistance phenotypes among nosocomial microbiota are (i) vancomycin-resistance/heteroresistance and tolerance in grampositives (MRSA, enterococci) and (ii) efflux pumps/enzymatic resistance mechanisms (ESBLs, AmpC, metallo-betalactamases) in gramnegatives. These phenotypes are found at different rates in pathogens causing respiratory (nosocomial pneumonia/ventilator-associated pneumonia), bloodstream (primary bacteremia/catheter-associated bacteremia), urinary, intraabdominal and surgical wound infections and endocarditis in the ICU. New antibiotics are available to overcome non-susceptibility in grampositives; however, accumulation of resistance traits in gramnegatives has led to multidrug resistance, a worrisome problem nowadays. This article reviews microorganism/infection risk factors for multidrug resistance, suggesting adequate empirical treatments. Drugs, patient and environmental factors all play a role in the decision to prescribe/recommend antibiotic regimens in the specific ICU patient, implying that intensivists should be familiar with available drugs, environmental epidemiology and patient factors.

  12. Bugs, hosts and ICU environment: countering pan-resistance in nosocomial microbiota and treating bacterial infections in the critical care setting.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Emilio; Mensa, José; Valía, Juan-Carlos; Gomez-Herreras, Jose-Ignacio; Ramasco, Fernando; Samso, Enric; Chiveli, Miguel-Angel; Pereira, Jorge; González, Rafael; Aguilar, Gerardo; Tamayo, Gonzalo; Ojeda, Nazario; Rico, Jesús; Gimenez, María José; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2013-12-01

    ICUs are areas where resistance problems are the largest, and they constitutes a major problem for the intensivist's clinical practice. Main resistance phenotypes among nosocomial microbiota are: i) vancomycin-resistance/heteroresistance and tolerance in grampositives (MRSA, enterococci) and ii) efflux pumps/enzymatic resistance mechanisms (ESBLs, AmpC, metallobetalactamases) in gramnegatives. These phenotypes are found at different rates in pathogens causing respiratory (nosocomial pneumonia/ventilator-associated pneumonia), bloodstream (primary bacteremia/catheter-associated bacteremia), urinary, intraabdominal and surgical wound infections and endocarditis in the ICU. New antibiotics are available to overcome non-susceptibility in grampositives; however, accumulation of resistance traits in gramnegatives has lead to multidrug resistance, a worrisome problem nowadays. This article reviews by microorganism/infection risk factors for multidrug resistance, suggesting adequate empirical treatments. Drugs, patient and environmental factors all play a role in the decision to prescribe/recommend antibiotic regimens in the specific ICU patient, implying that intensivists should be familiar with available drugs, environmental epidemiology and patient factors.

  13. Cold Stress-Induced Disease Resistance(SIDR): Indirect effects of low temperatures on host-pathogen interactions and disease progress in the grapevine powdery mildew pathosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erysiphe necator is an obligate biotroph capable of infecting three genera within the Vitaceae (Vitis, Parthenocissus, and Ampelopsis). The pathogen inhabits a unique niche involving wholly external mycelial growth on the host epidermal cells. This growth habit coupled with its biotrophic reliance ...

  14. Genetic differentiation among Maruca vitrata F. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) populations on cultivated cowpea and wild host plants: implications for insect resistance management and biological control strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maruca vitrata is a polyphagous insect pest on a wide variety of leguminous plants in the tropics and subtropics. The contribution of host-associated genetic variation on population structure was investigated using analysis mitochondrial cox1 sequence and microsatellite marker data from M. vitrata c...

  15. Effectiveness of subcutaneous low-dose alemtuzumab and rituximab combination therapy for steroid-resistant chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Cesar Homero; Cantú-Rodríguez, Olga Graciela; Borjas-Almaguer, Omar David; González-Llano, Oscar; Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Solano-Genesta, Manuel; Gómez-Guijosa, Miguel; Mancias-Guerra, Consuelo; Tarin, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic graft-versus-host disease is a common late complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Corticosteroids are the standard initial treatment. Second-line treatment has not been well defined. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of low doses of alemtuzumab plus low doses of rituximab in the treatment of steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease. Design and Methods Ten men and 5 women were prospectively included in the study. All patients received one cycle of subcutaneous alemtuzumab 10 mg/day/3 days and intravenous rituximab 100 mg on Days +4, +11, +18 and +25. The therapeutic response was measured on Days +30, +90 and +365 of the protocol. Results Median age was 41 years. The main site involved was the oral mucosa (86.7%) followed by the eyes (66.7%), liver (60%), skin (53%), lungs (13.3%) and intestinal tract (6.7%). The overall response was 100% at Day +30 evaluation: 10 patients (67%) had partial remission, 5 (33%) had complete remission. At Day +90 evaluation, 7 (50%) patients had partial remission, 4 (28%) had complete remission; 3 (21%) had relapsed chronic graft-versus-host disease and one patient did not reach the evaluation time point. So far, 5 patients have reached the Day +365 follow-up evaluation; 2 (40%) had partial remission, 2 had complete remission and one experienced chronic graft-versus-host disease progression. Adverse effects were mainly infections in 67% of patients; these were all quickly solved, except for one patient who died from pneumonia. Conclusions This combination therapy appears to be an efficacious and safe treatment for steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease. Longer follow up to determine the durability of response and survival is required. PMID:22133770

  16. Secondary extinctions of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Jedediah F; Aslan, Clare E; Rogers, Haldre S; Redford, Kent H; Maron, John L; Bronstein, Judith L; Groves, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    Extinctions beget further extinctions when species lose obligate mutualists, predators, prey, or hosts. Here, we develop a conceptual model of species and community attributes affecting secondary extinction likelihood, incorporating mechanisms that buffer organisms against partner loss. Specialized interactors, including 'cryptic specialists' with diverse but nonredundant partner assemblages, incur elevated risk. Risk is also higher for species that cannot either evolve new traits following partner loss or obtain novel partners in communities reorganizing under changing environmental conditions. Partner loss occurs alongside other anthropogenic impacts; multiple stressors can circumvent ecological buffers, enhancing secondary extinction risk. Stressors can also offset each other, reducing secondary extinction risk, a hitherto unappreciated phenomenon. This synthesis suggests improved conservation planning tactics and critical directions for research on secondary extinctions.

  17. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M.; Cai, Weidong; Garan, Daniel W.; Harris, Arthur J.

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  18. Host Resistance and Survival in Carcinoma of Breast: A Study of 104 Cases of Medullary Carcinoma in a Series of 1,411 Cases of Breast Cancer Followed for 20 years*

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, H. J. G.; Richardson, W. W.; Field, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    This paper deals with a special type of mammary carcinoma, generally of high-grade malignancy, which carries a remarkably good prognosis—the so-called “medullary carcinoma of the breast with lymphoid infiltrate.” Probably the increased lymphoid tissue seen in these tumours is concerned with cell-mediated and humoral immunological reactions and reflects a strong host-defence mechanism which is responsible for the remarkably high survival rates following radical treatment. Since the evidence for host resistance to malignant disease is based largely on animal data, the opportunity to study a group of patients followed for 20 years, in whom this type of defence reaction appears to exist, is of considerable clinical interest. Among 1,411 cases of breast cancer there were 104 with medullary carcinoma (7·4%), for which the corrected 5- to 20-year survival rates have been calculated. After 20 years 74% of cases with operable medullary tumours were alive, compared with 14% of cases with similar stage non-medullary cancer. In the presence of histologically proved axillary metastases the 20-year survival rate was 61% for medullary cases, compared with only 13% for other types of breast cancer. In 30 cases of medullary cancer in which the axilla was free, the corrected 20-year survival rate was 95% following a combination of radical operation and radiotherapy. No evidence could be found that axillary dissection or postoperative irradiation is harmful to women with operable highly malignant breast cancer in whom a well-marked host resistance is thought to be present. A combination of radical mastectomy and postoperative irradiation appears to be the most effective treatment for such cases. The present grounds for rejecting a radical approach to treatment of breast cancer, based on current immunological considerations, are regarded as being quite inadequate. PMID:5448777

  19. The major outer membrane protein OmpU of Vibrio splendidus contributes to host antimicrobial peptide resistance and is required for virulence in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Duperthuy, Marylise; Binesse, Johan; Le Roux, Frédérique; Romestand, Bernard; Caro, Audrey; Got, Patrice; Givaudan, Alain; Mazel, Didier; Bachère, Evelyne; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2010-04-01

    Vibrio splendidus, strain LGP32, is an oyster pathogen associated with the summer mortalities affecting the production of Crassostrea gigas oysters worldwide. Vibrio splendidus LGP32 was shown to resist to up to 10 microM Cg-Def defensin and Cg-BPI bactericidal permeability increasing protein, two antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs) involved in C. gigas immunity. The resistance to both oyster Cg-Def and Cg-BPI and standard AMPs (polymyxin B, protegrin, human BPI) was dependent on the ompU gene. Indeed, upon ompU inactivation, minimal bactericidal concentrations decreased by up to fourfold. AMP resistance was restored upon ectopic expression of ompU. The susceptibility of bacterial membranes to AMP-induced damages was independent of the ompU-mediated AMP resistance. Besides its role in AMP resistance, ompU proved to be essential for the adherence of V. splendidus LGP32 to fibronectin. Interestingly, in vivo, ompU was identified as a major determinant of V. splendidus pathogenicity in oyster experimental infections. Indeed, the V. splendidus-induced oyster mortalities dropped from 56% to 11% upon ompU mutation (Kaplan-Meier survival curves, P < 0.01). Moreover, in co-infection assays, the ompU mutant was out competed by the wild-type strain with competitive indexes in the range of 0.1-0.2. From this study, ompU is required for virulence of V. splendidus. Contributing to AMP resistance, conferring adhesive properties to V. splendidus, and being essential for in vivo fitness, the OmpU porin appears as an essential effector of the C. gigas/V. splendidus interaction.

  20. Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also ...

  1. Variation in Host and Pathogen in the Neonectria/Malus Interaction; toward an Understanding of the Genetic Basis of Resistance to European Canker

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cortecero, Antonio; Saville, Robert J.; Scheper, Reiny W. A.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Agripino De Medeiros, Hugo; Kingsnorth, Jennifer; Xu, Xiangming; Harrison, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Apple canker caused by the phytopathogenic fungus Neonectria ditissima is an economically important disease, which has spread in recent years to almost all pome-producing regions of the world. N. ditissima is able to cross-infect a wide range of apple varieties and causes branch and trunk lesions, known as cankers. Most modern apple varieties are susceptible and in extreme cases suffer from high mortality (up to 50%) in the early phase of orchard establishment. There is no known race structure of the pathogen and the global level of genetic diversity of the pathogen population is unknown. Resistance breeding is underway in many global breeding programmes, but nevertheless, a total resistance to canker has not yet been demonstrated. Here we present preliminary data from a survey of the phylogenetic relationships between global isolates of N. ditissima which reveals only slight evidence for population structure. In addition we report the results of four rapid screening tests to assess the response to N. ditissima in different apple scion and rootstock varieties, which reveals abundant variation in resistance responses in both cultivar and rootstock material. Further seedling tests show that the segregation patterns of resistance and susceptibility vary widely between crosses. We discuss inconsistencies in test performance with field observations and discuss future research opportunities in this area. PMID:27695463

  2. RNAi silencing of the 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor protein in maize and its effect on host resistance against Aspergillus flavus infection/aflatoxin production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the major crops susceptible to Aspergillus flavus Link ex. Fries infection and subsequent aflatoxin contamination. Previous studies found the expression of an antifungal 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor (TI) was associated with maize aflatoxin resistance. To further investigate...

  3. Proteomics analysis reveals novel host molecular mechanisms that could be associated with heat-induced resistance to ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ in lemon plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable long-term measures to combat HLB via breeding or genetic engineering methods are hampered by the fact that no true genetic resistance has been found in citrus germplasm. All cultivated citrus species or citrus relatives are susceptible to the disease. However, the degree of HLB susceptib...

  4. Optimizing EPG settings to record blue-green sharpshooter X waves for future studies of grape host plant resistance to Xf inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long-term goal of the research reported in this review is to develop methodology for assessment of grapevine resistant to sharpshooter inoculation of Xylella fastidiosa(Xf)into healthy grapevines, thereby preventing Xf infection. Such a trait would be quite different from the more common mechani...

  5. International Symposium on Genetic Control of Host Resistance to Infection and Malignancy (2nd) held in Montreal, Canada, on May 12-16, 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    temperature -scinsiti~e mutant of S. typhimurium a long lasting infection could be esta- blished in susceptible (C57BL/6) and resistant (A/J) mice. In C57BL...Guyanensis, transmitted by phlebotomine sandflies . In the population amounting to 677 individuals in 1982, distributed among 39 families, 92 cases of

  6. Current Understandings of Plant Nonhost Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Hye-Young; Seo, Eunyoung; Lee, Joohyun; Kim, Saet-Byul; Oh, Soohyun; Choi, Eunbi; Choi, Eunhye; Lee, So Eui; Choi, Doil

    2017-01-01

    Nonhost resistance, a resistance of plant species against all nonadapted pathogens, is considered the most durable and efficient immune system of plants but yet remains elusive. The underlying mechanism of nonhost resistance has been investigated at multiple levels of plant defense for several decades. In this review, we have comprehensively surveyed the latest literature on nonhost resistance in terms of preinvasion, metabolic defense, pattern-triggered immunity, effector-triggered immunity, defense signaling, and possible application in crop protection. Overall, we summarize the current understanding of nonhost resistance mechanisms. Pre- and postinvasion is not much deviated from the knowledge on host resistance, except for a few specific cases. Further insights on the roles of the pattern recognition receptor gene family, multiple interactions between effectors from nonadapted pathogen and plant factors, and plant secondary metabolites in host range determination could expand our knowledge on nonhost resistance and provide efficient tools for future crop protection using combinational biotechnology approaches. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license .

  7. TLR9 is required for MAPK/NF-κB activation but does not cooperate with TLR2 or TLR6 to induce host resistance to Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Túlio; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Pereira, Guilherme de Sousa; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Splitter, Gary; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2016-05-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes a zoonosis of worldwide occurrence, leading to undulant fever in humans and abortion in domestic animals. B. abortus is recognized by several pattern-recognition receptors triggering pathways during the host innate immune response. Therefore, here, we determined the cooperative role of TLR9 with TLR2 or TLR6 receptors in sensing Brucella Furthermore, we deciphered the host innate immune response against B. abortus or its DNA, emphasizing the role of TLR9-MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. TLR9 is required for the initial host control of B. abortus, but this TLR was dispensable after 6 wk of infection. The susceptibility of TLR9(-/-)-infected animals to Brucella paralleled with lower levels of IFN-γ produced by mouse splenocytes stimulated with this pathogen compared with wild-type cells. However, no apparent cooperative interplay was observed between TLR2-TLR9 or TLR6-TLR9 receptors to control infection. Moreover, B. abortus or its DNA induced activation of MAPK/NF-κB pathways and production of IL-12 and TNF-α by macrophages partially dependent on TLR9 but completely dependent on MyD88. In addition, B. abortus-derived CpG oligonucleotides required TLR9 to promote IL-12 and TNF-α production by macrophages. By confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that TLR9 redistributed and colocalized with lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 upon Brucella infection. Thus, B. abortus induced TLR9 traffic, leading to cell signaling activation and IL-12 and TNF-α production. Although TLR9 recognized Brucella CpG motifs, our results suggest a new pathway of B. abortus DNA-activating macrophages independent of TLR9.

  8. The E2-like conjugation enzyme Atg3 promotes binding of IRG and Gbp proteins to Chlamydia- and Toxoplasma-containing vacuoles and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Arun K; Piro, Anthony S; Pilla, Danielle M; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Coers, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Cell-autonomous immunity to the bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is controlled by two families of Interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases: Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs) and Guanylate binding proteins (Gbps). Members of these two GTPase families associate with pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) and solicit antimicrobial resistance pathways specifically to the intracellular site of infection. The proper delivery of IRG and Gbp proteins to PVs requires the autophagy factor Atg5. Atg5 is part of a protein complex that facilitates the transfer of the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8 from the E2-like conjugation enzyme Atg3 to the lipid phosphatidylethanolamine. Here, we show that Atg3 expression, similar to Atg5 expression, is required for IRG and Gbp proteins to dock to PVs. We further demonstrate that expression of a dominant-active, GTP-locked IRG protein variant rescues the PV targeting defect of Atg3- and Atg5-deficient cells, suggesting a possible role for Atg proteins in the activation of IRG proteins. Lastly, we show that IFN-induced cell-autonomous resistance to C. trachomatis infections in mouse cells depends not only on Atg5 and IRG proteins, as previously demonstrated, but also requires the expression of Atg3 and Gbp proteins. These findings provide a foundation for a better understanding of IRG- and Gbp-dependent cell-autonomous resistance and its regulation by Atg proteins.

  9. Genetic enhancement of host plant-resistance of the Lalat cultivar of rice against bacterial blight employing marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Dokku, Prasad; Das, K M; Rao, G J N

    2013-08-01

    To incorporate durable resistance against bacterial blight, a major disease rice, three resistance genes, xa 5, xa13 and Xa21, from IRBB 60 were transferred through marker-assisted backcrossing using RG 556, RG 136 and pTA248 markers linked to the three genes to supplement the Xa4 gene present in Lalat, a popular rice cultivar. Effective selection enabled the transfer in three back-crosses and a generation of selfing and background selection employing morphological and grain quality traits and molecular markers, led to >90 % recovery of the recurrent parental genome. The gene pyramids exhibited high levels of resistance against the pathogen in multi-location evaluation trials conducted over several locations of bacterial blight in India. IL-2 (CRMAS2621-7-1), a gene pyramid, was identified as being promising for several endemic regions of bacterial blight and was released as Improved Lalat in one of the identified regions. The success of the study demonstrates the vast potential of marker-assisted selection for gene stacking and recovery of the parental genome with high precision.

  10. Host genetic resistance to Marek's disease sustains protective efficacy of herpesvirus of turkey in both experimental and commercial lines of chickens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuang; Xie, Qingmei; Dunn, John R; Ernst, Catherine W; Song, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Huanmin

    2014-04-01

    Marek's disease (MD) remains a continual threat to the poultry industry worldwide as the MD virus continues evolving in virulence. MD has been controlled primarily by intensive use of vaccines since 1969. Based on the antigenic and pathogenic differences of the viruses that the vaccines were derived from, commercially available MD vaccines are classified into three categories, MDV-1, -2, and -3 vaccines. This study was designed to compare the protective efficacy of MDV-1 (CVI988/Rispens) and MDV-3 (HVT) vaccines against challenge of a very virulent plus strain of Marek's disease virus (vv+MDV) in experimental and commercial egg-layer lines of chickens under controlled experimental conditions. The two experimental lines (63 and 72) of chickens carry a uniform MHC B*2 haplotype and are known to differ in resistance to MD. One of the two commercial egg-layer lines (WL and BL) segregates for three MHC haplotypes (B*2, B*15, and B*21); the other is unclear. MD incidences of the unvaccinated groups of both experimental lines and both commercial lines were 100% or close to 100% induced by the vv+MDV, 648A. Survived day patterns of the unvaccinated groups significantly differed between the two experimental lines, but did not between the two commercial lines, which suggested the two experimental lines do differ in resistance to MD but not between the two commercial lines. At manufacturers' recommended vaccine dosage, two HVTs conveyed comparable protection for the MD resistant line 63 chickens as did both CVI988/Rispens used in this study. The two HVTs also conveyed comparable protection for both commercial lines of chickens as did one of two CVI988/Rispens (CVI988/Rispens-A). At a 2000PFU uniform dose, HVT and CVI988/Rispens again conveyed comparable protection for the MD resistant experimental line of chickens. The findings suggest vaccine protective efficacy is modulated by factors including the types and the sources of vaccines and the genetic backgrounds of chickens

  11. Fasciola hepatica: comparative effects of host resistance and parasite intra-specific interactions on size and reproductive histology in flukes from rats infected with isolates differing in triclabendazole sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hanna, R E B; Gordon, A W; Moffett, D; Edgar, H W J; Oliver, L F; McConnell, S; Shaw, L; Brennan, G P; Fairweather, I

    2011-06-10

    The efficacies of putative fasciolicides and vaccines against Fasciola hepatica are frequently monitored in clinical and field trials by determination of fluke egg output in host faeces and by worm counts in the host liver at autopsy. Less often used are parameters based on fluke size and histology, yet these can provide important indications of specific effects on the development of particular germ-line or somatic tissues, especially in relation to the timing and profligacy of egg production. In this study, F. hepatica metacercariae of two distinct isolates, the triclabendazole (TCBZ)-sensitive Cullompton isolate and the TCBZ-resistant Oberon isolate, were administered to rats as single-isolate or mixed-isolate infections. At autopsy 16 weeks later individual adult flukes were counted, measured and the reproductive organs were examined histologically. The degree of development of the testis tubules in each fluke was represented by a numerical score, based on the proportion of the histological section profiles occupied by testis tissue. The level of anti-F. hepatica antibody in the serum of each rat was determined by ELISA. It was found that Cullompton flukes were significantly larger than Oberon flukes, and that significantly more Cullompton metacercariae developed to adults than Oberon metacercariae. The Cullompton flukes showed histological evidence of aspermy and spermatogenic arrest, which was reflected in quantitatively reduced testicular development, as compared with the Oberon isolate. In Cullompton flukes, parthenogenetic egg development is implied. The size of Cullompton and Oberon flukes was significantly related to the number of adult flukes recovered, to the number of metacercariae administered, and to the percentage success of infection. The testis development score in both isolates was significantly related to the number of adult flukes recovered but not to the number of metacercariae administered, or to the percentage success of infection. Fluke

  12. The Cmv1 host resistance locus is closely linked to the Ly49 multigene family within the natural killer cell gene complex on mouse chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, C.A.; Shellam, G.R.; Scalzo, A.A.

    1997-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in controlling tumor cells and against a range of infectious organisms. Recent studies of mouse NK cell surface receptors, which may be involved in the specificity of NK cells, have shown that many of these molecules are encoded by the Ly49 and Ly55 (Nkrp1) multigene families that map to distal mouse chromosome 6. Also mapping to this NK cell gene complex (NKC) is the resistance locus, Cmv1, which is involved in genetically determined resistance to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). The aim of this study was to localize Cmv1 more precisely in relation to other NKC loci by generating a high-resolution genetic map of the region. We have analyzed 1250 backcross mice comprising panels of 700 (BALB/c x C57BL/6J)F{sub 1} X BALB/c and 550 (A/J X C57BL/6J)F{sub 1} X A/J progeny. A total of 25 polymorphic genes or microsatellite markers were analyzed over a region of 10 map units from D6Mit134 to D6Mit59. The Cmv1 phenotypes of mice recombinant in this interval were tested by infection with MCMV. The results obtained indicate that the functionally important NKC region is a tightly linked cluster of loci spanning at least 0.4 map units. Furthermore, Cmv1 maps distal to, but very closely linked to, the Ly49 multigene family (< 0.2 map units), suggesting that MCMV resistance may be conferred by MHC class I-specific NK cell receptors. 49 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Stress-induced differences in primary and secondary resistance against bacterial sepsis corresponds with diverse corticotropin releasing hormone receptor expression by pulmonary CD11c+ MHC II+ and CD11c− MHC II+ APCs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Xavier F.; Desmutkh, Aniket; Pulse, Mark; Johnson, Khaisha; Jones, Harlan P.

    2009-01-01

    Stress responses have been associated with altered immunity and depending upon the type of stressor, can have diverse effects on disease outcomes. As the first line of defense against potential pathogens, alterations in cellular immune responses along the respiratory tract can have a significant impact on the manifestation of local and systemic disease. Utilizing a murine model of respiratory pneumonia, the current study investigated the effects of restraint stress on the induction of primary and secondary immunity along the respiratory tract, influencing host susceptibility. Female CD-1 mice were subjected to three hours of restraint stress over a period of four days followed by primary and secondary Streptococcus pneumoniae infection via intranasal route. Stress exposure led to increased retention of bacterial carriage in the lungs, enhanced polymorphonuclear cells and a preferential decrease in pulmonary CD11c+ MHC II+ cells resulting in delayed lethality during primary infection but significant impairment of acquired immune protection after secondary infection. We also provide evidence to support a role for lung-associated corticotrophin releasing hormone regulation through peripheral CRH and diverse CRH receptor expression by MHC II+ antigen presenting cells (APCs). We conclude that repeated restraint stress has distinct influences on immune cell populations that appear to be important in the generation of innate and adaptive immune responses along the respiratory tract with the potential to influence local and systemic protection against disease pathogenesis. PMID:18166336

  14. Abrogation of bone marrow allograft resistance in mice by increased total body irradiation correlates with eradication of host clonable T cells and alloreactive cytotoxic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, E.; Lapidot, T.; Gozes, D.; Singer, T.S.; Reisner, Y.

    1987-01-15

    Host-vs-graft activity presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, conditioned exactly like leukemia patients, it was shown that residual host clonable T cells, as well as alloreactive cytotoxic precursors, were present in peripheral blood and spleen after completion of cytoreduction. We have now extended this study in a mouse model for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. C/sub 3/H/HeJ mice were treated by 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and 24 hr later their spleen cells were cultured in the presence of T cell growth factor and phytohemagglutinin according to the limit dilution procedure. After 7 days of culture the average frequency of clonable cells was 2.5 X 10(-3) compared with 37 X 10(-3) in the spleens of normal mice. The T cell derivation of the growing cells was ascertained by complement-mediated cytotoxicity with anti-Thy-1 as well as with anti-Lyt-2 and anti-Ly-3T4. In parallel, we found that the initial engraftment rate of bone marrow allograft in mice given 9 Gy TBI was lower than that found in recipients of syngeneic marrow. The initial engraftment rate was measured by the number of colony-forming units in the spleen and by splenic uptake of /sup 125/IUdR. A slight increase in TBI from 9 Gy to 11 Gy markedly reduced the difference in the number of spleen colony-forming units or the IUdR uptake between recipients of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow. This increase in TBI also coincided with eradication of detectable clonable T cells. Moreover, in mice transplanted with T cell-depleted bone marrow after 9 Gy TBI, we also demonstrate that cytotoxicity against donor-type target cells is present in the spleen 10 to 14 days posttransplantation, whereas in mice treated by 11 Gy TBI such alloreactivity could not be detected.

  15. Eosinophils Subvert Host Resistance to an Intracellular Pathogen by Instigating Non-Protective IL-4 in CCR2−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash H.; Bueter, Chelsea L.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Deepe, George S.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils contribute to type II immune responses in helminth infections and allergic diseases, however, their influence on intracellular pathogens is less clear. We previously reported that CCR2−/− mice exposed to the intracellular fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum exhibit dampened immunity caused by an early exaggerated IL-4 response. We sought to identify the cellular source promulgating interleukin (IL)-4 in infected mutant animals. Eosinophils were the principal instigators of non-protective IL-4 and depleting this granulocyte population improved fungal clearance in CCR2−/− animals. The deleterious impact of eosinophilia on mycosis was also recapitulated in transgenic animals overexpressing eosinophils. Mechanistic examination of IL-4 induction revealed that phagocytosis of H. capsulatum via the pattern recognition receptor complement receptor (CR) 3 triggered the heightened IL-4 response in murine eosinophils. This phenomenon was conserved in human eosinophils; exposure of cells to the fungal pathogen elicited a robust IL-4 response. Thus, our findings elucidate a detrimental attribute of eosinophil biology in fungal infections that could potentially trigger a collapse in host defenses by instigating type II immunity. PMID:27049063

  16. Campylobacter jejuni serine protease HtrA plays an important role in heat tolerance, oxygen resistance, host cell adhesion, invasion, and transmigration

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Judith; Backert, Steffen; Tegtmeyer, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important pathogen of foodborne illness. Transmigration across the intestinal epithelial barrier and invasion are considered as primary reasons for tissue damage triggered by C. jejuni. Using knockout mutants, it was shown that the serine protease HtrA may be important for stress tolerance and physiology of C. jejuni. HtrA is also secreted in the extra­cellular environment, where it can cleave junctional host cell proteins such as E-cadherin. Aim of the present study was to establish a genetic complementation system in two C. jejuni strains in order to introduce the wild-type htrA gene in trans, test known htrA phenotypes, and provide the basis to perform further mutagenesis. We confirm that reexpression of the htrA wild-type gene in ΔhtrA mutants restored the following phenotypes: 1) C. jejuni growth at high temperature (44 °C), 2) growth under high oxygen stress conditions, 3) expression of proteolytically active HtrA oligomers, 4) secretion of HtrA into the supernatant, 5) cell attachment and invasion, and 6) transmigration across polarized epithelial cells. These results establish a genetic complementation system for htrA in C. jejuni, exclude polar effects in the ΔhtrA mutants, confirm important HtrA properties, and permit the discovery and dissection of new functions. PMID:25883795

  17. Inactivation and regrowth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by PAA disinfection in the secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing Jing; Xi, Jing Ying; Hu, Hong Ying; Tang, Fang; Pang, Yu Chen

    2013-10-01

    Inactivation and microbial regrowth of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cefalexin-, tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and rifampicin-resistant bacteria were studied to explore risks associated with selection and regrowth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after PAA disinfection. The results showed that after exposure to 20 mg/L PAA for 10 min, inactivation of ampicillin-resistant bacteria reached 2.3-log, which was significantly higher than that of total heterotrophic bacteria with a decrease of 2.0-log. In contrast, inactivation of tetracycline- resistant bacteria was significantly less efficient, reaching only 1.1-log. Chloramphenicol-and tetracycline-resistant bacteria, as well as total heterotrophic bacteria regrew more than 10 fold compared to those in the untreated wastewater sample with 22 h stilling culture after exposure to 2 or 5 mg/L PAA as for 10 min. Selection and potential regrowth of tetracycline-and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria are potential risks when utilizing PAA disinfection, which may induce the spread of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria in reclaimed water.

  18. Horizontal Transfer of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Infantis Resistance and Virulence Plasmid pESI to the Gut Microbiota of Warm-Blooded Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Aviv, Gili; Rahav, Galia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis is one of the prevalent salmonellae worldwide. Recently, we showed that the emergence of S. Infantis in Israel was facilitated by the acquisition of a unique megaplasmid (pESI) conferring multidrug resistance and increased virulence phenotypes. Here we elucidate the ecology, transmission properties, and regulation of pESI. We show that despite its large size (~280 kb), pESI does not impose a significant metabolic burden in vitro and that it has been recently fixed in the domestic S. Infantis population. pESI conjugation and the transcription of its pilus (pil) genes are inhibited at the ambient temperature (27°C) and by ≥1% bile but increased under temperatures of 37 to 41°C, oxidative stress, moderate osmolarity, and the microaerobic conditions characterizing the intestinal environment of warm-blooded animals. The pESI-encoded protein TraB and the oxygen homeostasis regulator Fnr were identified as transcriptional regulators of pESI conjugation. Using the mouse model, we show that following S. Infantis infection, pESI can be horizontally transferred to the gut microbiota, including to commensal Escherichia coli strains. Possible transfer, but not persistence, of pESI was also observed into Gram-positive mouse microbiota species, especially Lactobacillus reuteri. Moreover, pESI was demonstrated to further disseminate from gut microbiota to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, in the context of gastrointestinal infection. These findings exhibit the ability of a selfish clinically relevant megaplasmid to distribute to and from the microbiota and suggest an overlooked role of the microbiota as a reservoir of mobile genetic elements and intermediator in the spread of resistance and virulence genes between commensals and pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27601577

  19. Concurrent Infection with an Intestinal Helminth Parasite Impairs Host Resistance to Enteric Citrobacter rodentium and Enhances Citrobacter-Induced Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Louie, Steve; McCormick, Beth; Walker, W. Allan; Shi, Hai Ning

    2005-01-01

    Infections with intestinal helminth and bacterial pathogens, such as enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, continue to be a major global health threat for children. To test the hypothesis that intestinal helminth infection may be a risk factor for enteric bacterial infection, a murine model was established by using the intestinal helminth Heligomosomoides polygyrus. To analyze the modulatory effect of a Th2-inducing helminth on the outcome of enteric bacterium Citrobacter rodentium infection, BALB/c and STAT 6 knockout (KO) mice were infected with H. polygyrus, C. rodentium, or both. We found that only BALB/c mice coinfected with H. polygyrus and C. rodentium displayed a marked morbidity and mortality. The enhanced susceptibility to C. rodentium and intestinal injury of coinfected BALB/c mice were shown to be associated with a significant increase in helminth-driven Th2 responses, mucosally and systemically, and correlated with a significant downregulation of protective gamma interferon and with a dramatic upregulation of the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor alpha response. In addition, C. rodentium-associated colonic pathology in coinfected BALB/c mice was significantly enhanced, whereas bacterial burden was increased and clearance was delayed. In contrast, coinfection in STAT 6 KO mice failed to promote C. rodentium infection or to induce a more severe intestinal inflammation and tissue injury, demonstrating a mechanism by which helminth influences the development of host protective immunity and susceptibility to bacterial infections. We conclude that H. polygyrus coinfection can promote C. rodentium-associated disease and colitis through a STAT 6-mediated immune mechanism. PMID:16113263

  20. Critical role of ASC inflammasomes and bacterial type IV secretion system in caspase-1 activation and host innate resistance to Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Tulio R; Campos, Priscila C; Oliveira, Fernanda S; Corsetti, Patricia P; Bortoluci, Karina R; Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2013-04-01

    Pathogens are detected by innate immune receptors that, upon activation, orchestrate an appropriate immune response. Recent studies revealed the intracellular signaling cascades involved in the TLR-initiated immune response to Brucella abortus infection. However, no report has elucidated the role of inflammasome receptors in Brucella recognition. Therefore, we decided to investigate the function of NLRC4, NLRP3, and AIM2 in sensing Brucella. In this study, we showed that NLRC4 is not required to induce caspase-1 activation and further secretion of IL-1β by B. abortus in macrophages. In contrast, we determined that AIM2, which senses Brucella DNA, and NLRP3 are partially required for caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion. Additionally, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species induced by Brucella were implicated in IL-1β production. Furthermore, AIM2, NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 knockout mice were more susceptible to B. abortus infection than were wild-type animals, suggesting that multiple ASC-dependent inflammasomes contribute to host protection against infection. This protective effect is due to the inflammatory response caused by IL-1β and IL-18 rather than pyroptosis, because we observed augmented bacterial burden in IL-1R and IL-18 knockout mice. Finally, we determined that bacterial type IV secretion system VirB and live, but not heat-killed, Brucella are required for full inflammasome activation in macrophages during infection. Taken together, our results indicate that Brucella is sensed by ASC inflammasomes that collectively orchestrate a robust caspase-1 activation and proinflammatory response.

  1. Does phloem-based resistance to aphid feeding affect host-plant acceptance for reproduction? Parturition of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, on two near-isogenic lines of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nam, K Jung; Powell, G; Hardie, J

    2013-12-01

    Probing behaviour (prior to parturition) and parturition of two clones (PS01 and N116) of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum on two genotypes (near-isogenic lines (NILs)) (Q174_5.13 and Q174_9.10) of Medicago truncatula were investigated using electrical penetration graph (EPG) coupled with simultaneous visual monitoring for parturition. Line Q174_5.13 has been reported to show a phloem-based resistance to feeding in the clone PS01 but to be susceptible to the clone N116, whereas Q174_9.10 has shown to be susceptible to both aphid clones. The time taken to first parturition by clone PS01 was similar on Q174_5.13 and Q174_9.10. Prior to parturition, no aphids on Q174_5.13 contacted phloem, but 5% of the aphids on Q174_9.10 showed phloem salivation (recognized by EPG pattern E1). No phloem contact was observed with aphid clone N116 on either NILs of Medicago before first parturition occurred, and the time taken to first larviposition was similar on Q174_5.13 and Q174_9.10. The results indicate that the initiation of parturition of the clone PS01 and N116 on both NILs does not require the phloem contact and seems unchanged by a phloem-based resistance mechanism to feeding on Medicago. This finding suggests that host recognition and decisions about parturition occur before phloem contact or ingestion, and act independently on R-gene-mediated resistance.

  2. A Model of DENV-3 Infection That Recapitulates Severe Disease and Highlights the Importance of IFN-γ in Host Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Valadão, Deborah F.; Cisalpino, Daniel; Dias, Ana Carolina F.; Silveira, Kátia D.; Kangussu, Lucas M.; Ávila, Thiago V.; Bonfim, Maria Rosa Q.; Bonaventura, Daniela; Silva, Tarcília A.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; Rachid, Milene A.; Vieira, Leda Q.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; de Paula, Ana Maria; Atrasheuskaya, Alena; Ignatyev, George; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Souza, Danielle G.

    2012-01-01

    There are few animal models of dengue infection, especially in immunocompetent mice. Here, we describe alterations found in adult immunocompetent mice inoculated with an adapted Dengue virus (DENV-3) strain. Infection of mice with the adapted DENV-3 caused inoculum-dependent lethality that was preceded by several hematological and biochemical changes and increased virus dissemination, features consistent with severe disease manifestation in humans. IFN-γ expression increased after DENV-3 infection of WT mice and this was preceded by increase in expression of IL-12 and IL-18. In DENV-3-inoculated IFN-γ−/− mice, there was enhanced lethality, which was preceded by severe disease manifestation and virus replication. Lack of IFN-γ production was associated with diminished NO-synthase 2 (NOS2) expression and higher susceptibility of NOS2−/− mice to DENV-3 infection. Therefore, mechanisms of protection to DENV-3 infection rely on IFN-γ-NOS2-NO-dependent control of viral replication and of disease severity, a pathway showed to be relevant for resistance to DENV infection in other experimental and clinical settings. Thus, the model of DENV-3 infection in immunocompetent mice described here represents a significant advance in animal models of severe dengue disease and may provide an important tool to the elucidation of immunopathogenesis of disease and of protective mechanisms associated with infection. PMID:22666512

  3. The TolC Protein of Legionella pneumophila Plays a Major Role in Multi-Drug Resistance and the Early Steps of Host Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ferhat, Mourad; Atlan, Danièle; Vianney, Anne; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Doublet, Patricia; Gilbert, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Pneumonia associated with Iegionnaires's disease is initiated in humans after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In the environment, Legionella pneumophila is thought to survive and multiply as an intracellular parasite within free-living amoeba. In the genome of L. pneumophila Lens, we identified a unique gene, tolC, encoding a protein that is highly homologous to the outer membrane protein TolC of Escherichia coli. Deletion of tolC by allelic exchange in L. pneumophila caused increased sensitivity to various drugs. The complementation of the tolC mutation in trans restored drug resistance, indicating that TolC is involved in multi-drug efflux machinery. In addition, deletion of tolC caused a significant attenuation of virulence towards both amoebae and macrophages. Thus, the TolC protein appears to play a crucial role in virulence which could be mediated by its involvement in efflux pump mechanisms. These findings will be helpful in unraveling the pathogenic mechanisms of L. pneumophila as well as in developing new therapeutic agents affecting the efflux of toxic compounds. PMID:19888467

  4. Dysregulation of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Compromises Innate and Adaptive T Cell Responses and Host Resistance to an Attenuated West Nile Virus Infection in Old Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guorui; Luo, Huanle; Pang, Lan; Peng, Bi-hung; Winkelmann, Evandro; McGruder, Brenna; Hesse, Joseph; Whiteman, Melissa; Campbell, Gerald; Milligan, Gregg N.; Cong, Yingzi; Barrett, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms, mostly in the elderly population. No vaccines are available for human use. Recent work showed that an attenuated WNV, a nonstructural (NS) 4B-P38G mutant, induced no lethality but strong immune responses in young (6- to 10-week-old) mice. While studying protective efficacy, we found unexpectedly that old (21- to 22-month) mice were susceptible to WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection but were protected from subsequent lethal wild-type WNV challenge. Compared to responses in young mice, the NS4B-P38G mutant triggered higher inflammatory cytokine and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, a delayed γδ T cell expansion, and lower antibody and WNV-specific T cell responses in old mice. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is expressed on multiple types of cells. Impaired TLR7 signaling in old mice led to dendritic cell (DC) antigen-presenting function compromise and a reduced γδ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion during NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848, a TLR7 agonist, decreased host vulnerability in NS4B-P38G-infected old mice by enhancing γδ T cell and Treg expansion and the antigen-presenting capacity of DCs, thereby promoting T cell responses. In summary, our results suggest that dysregulation of TLR7 partially contributes to impaired innate and adaptive T cell responses and an enhanced vulnerability in old mice during WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848 increases the safety and efficacy during immunization of old mice with the WNV NS4B-P38G mutant. IMPORTANCE The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms more frequently in the elderly population. No vaccines are available

  5. Migration and survival of gamma-irradiated Schistosoma mansoni larvae and the duration of host-parasite contact in relation to the induction of resistance in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, B.L.; Dean, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The migration in mice of 20-, 50-, and 90-krad /sup 60/Co-irradiated Schistosoma mansoni larvae, biosynthetically radioisotope labeled with /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine, was evaluated by autoradiography of compressed tissues and compared to the migration of non-irradiated 75 Se-labeled larvae. By day 8 over 90% of both non-irradiated and 20 krad-irradiated organisms were located in the lungs. In contrast to non-irradiated organisms, however, only a small proportion of 20-krad organisms migrated to the liver. The delay in migration between skin and lungs was more pronounced with 50-krad-irradiated schistosomula. No more than an occasional 50-krad-irradiated organism was ever detected in the liver. In three experiments, over 85% of the 90-krad-irradiated organisms were retained in the skin; in a fourth experiment about half of the 90-krad-irradiated organisms migrated as far as the lungs. Only an occasional 90-krad organism was ever detected in the liver. In three experiments, over 85% of the 90 Krad.-irradiated organisms were retained in the skin, in a fourth experiment about half of the 90 Krad.-irradiated organisms migrated as far as the lungs. Only an occasional 90 Krad. organism was ever detected in the liver. Removal of the skin exposure site within the first 4 days of immunization with either 50- or 90-krad-irradiated cercariae completely blocked the induction of resistance. Removal between the 4th and the 6th days gave variable results.

  6. [Secondary rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Duron, J-B; Nguyen, P S; Bardot, J; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Secondary rhinoplasty is very usual. Some patients are not satisfied by the previous surgery because the result is poor with obvious defaults but, sometimes, the result is good but the patient expects perfection. These two different situations will not lead to the same answer from the surgeon. Techniques of secondary rhinoplasty are the same than primary, but are often more difficult to perform because of scar tissue, retraction and loss of lining. The authors analyse the more frequent deformities in secondary rhinoplasty and the way they fix them.

  7. Tritrophic interactions among Macrosiphum euphorbiae aphids, their host plants and endosymbionts: investigation by a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Francis, F; Guillonneau, F; Leprince, P; De Pauw, E; Haubruge, E; Jia, L; Goggin, F L

    2010-06-01

    The Mi-1.2 gene in tomato confers resistance against certain clones of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). This study used 2D-DIGE coupled with protein identification by MALDI-TOF-MS to compare the proteome patterns of avirulent and semivirulent potato aphids and their bacterial endosymbionts on resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2-) tomato lines. Avirulent aphids had low survival on resistant plants, whereas the semivirulent clone could colonize these plants. Eighty-two protein spots showed significant quantitative differences among the four treatment groups, and of these, 48 could be assigned putative identities. Numerous structural proteins and enzymes associated with primary metabolism were more abundant in the semivirulent than in the avirulent aphid clone. Several proteins were also up-regulated in semivirulent aphids when they were transferred from susceptible to resistant plants. Nearly 25% of the differentially regulated proteins originated from aphid endosymbionts and not the aphid itself. Six were assigned to the primary endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola, and 5 appeared to be derived from a Rickettsia-like secondary symbiont. These results indicate that symbiont expression patterns differ between aphid clones with differing levels of virulence, and are influenced by the aphids' host plant. Potentially, symbionts may contribute to differential adaptation of aphids to host plant resistance.

  8. Effect of resistance-type exercise training with or without protein supplementation on cognitive functioning in frail and pre-frail elderly: secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van de Rest, Ondine; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L; Tieland, Michael; Adam, Jos J; Hiddink, Gert Jan; van Loon, Luc J C; de Groot, Lisette C P G M

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity has been proposed as one of the most effective strategies to prevent cognitive decline. Protein supplementation may exert an additive effect. The effect of resistance-type exercise training with or without protein supplementation on cognitive functioning in frail and pre-frail elderly people was assessed in a secondary analysis. Two 24-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention studies were carried out in parallel. Subjects performed a resistance-type exercise program of two sessions per week (n=62) or no exercise program (n=65). In both studies, subjects were randomly allocated to either a protein (2×15 g daily) or a placebo drink. Cognitive functioning was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery focusing on the cognitive domains episodic memory, attention and working memory, information processing speed, and executive functioning. In frail and pre-frail elderly, resistance-type exercise training in combination with protein supplementation improved information processing speed (changes in domain score 0.08±0.51 versus -0.23±0.19 in the non-exercise group, p=0.04). Exercise training without protein supplementation was beneficial for attention and working memory (changes in domain scores 0.35±0.70 versus -0.12±0.69 in the non-exercise group, p=0.02). There were no significant differences among the intervention groups on the other cognitive tests or domain scores.

  9. Modification of primary and secondary metabolism of potato plants by nitrogen application differentially affects resistance to Phytophthora infestans and Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Mittelstrass, K; Treutter, D; Plessl, M; Heller, W; Elstner, E F; Heiser, I

    2006-09-01

    Potato plants ( SOLANUM TUBEROSUM L. cv. Indira) were grown at two levels of N supply in the greenhouse. Plants supplied with 0.8 g N per plant (high N variant) showed significantly increased biomass as compared to plants without additional N fertilisation (low N variant). C/N ratio was lower and protein content was higher in leaves of the high N variant. The concentration of chlorogenic acids and flavonols was significantly lower in leaves from the high N variant. Whereas resistance to ALTERNARIA SOLANI increased when plants were supplied with additional nitrogen, these plants were more susceptible to PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS. After infection with both pathogens, we found a strong induction of p-coumaroylnoradrenaline and p-coumaroyloctopamine, which are identified for the first time in potato leaves and are discussed as resistance factors of other solanaceous plants.

  10. Homogeneity of antimicrobial policy, yet heterogeneity of antimicrobial resistance: antimicrobial non-susceptibility among 108 717 clinical isolates from primary, secondary and tertiary care patients in London

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Luke S. P.; Freeman, Rachel; Gilchrist, Mark J.; Gharbi, Myriam; Brannigan, Eimear T.; Donaldson, Hugo; Livermore, David M.; Holmes, Alison H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examined the 4 year trend in antimicrobial susceptibilities and prescribing across levels of care at two London teaching hospitals and their multisite renal unit, and for the surrounding community. Methods Laboratory and pharmacy information management systems were interrogated, with antimicrobial use and susceptibilities analysed between hospitals, within hospitals and over time. Results A total of 108 717 isolates from 71 687 patients were identified, with significant differences (at P < 0.05) in antimicrobial susceptibility between and within hospitals. Across the 4 years, rates of ESBL-/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae ranged from 6.4% to 10.7% among community isolates, 17.8% to 26.9% at ward level and 25.2% to 52.5% in critical care. Significant variations were also demonstrated in glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (ward level 6.2%–17.4%; critical care 21.9%–56.3%), MRSA (ward level 18.5%–38.2%; critical care 12.5%–47.9%) and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas spp. (ward level 8.3%–16.9%; critical care 19.9%–53.7%). Few instances of persistently higher resistance were seen between the hospitals in equivalent cohorts, despite persistently higher antimicrobial use in Hospital 1 than Hospital 2. We found significant fluctuations in non-susceptibility year on year across the cohorts, but with few persistent trends. Conclusions The marked heterogeneity of antimicrobial susceptibilities between hospitals, within hospitals and over time demands detailed, standardized surveillance and appropriate benchmarking to identify possible drivers and effective interventions. Homogeneous antimicrobial policies are unlikely to continue to be suitable as individual hospitals join hospital networks, and policies should be tailored to local resistance rates, at least at the hospital level, and possibly with finer resolution, particularly for critical care. PMID:25118270

  11. Cytotoxic and antibacterial substances against multi-drug resistant pathogens from marine sponge symbiont: Citrinin, a secondary metabolite of Penicillium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Ramesh; Kumar, Rohitesh; Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective To Isolate, purify, characterize, and evaluate the bioactive compounds from the sponge-derived fungus Penicillium sp. FF001 and to elucidate its structure. Methods The fungal strain FF001 with an interesting bioactivity profile was isolated from a marine Fijian sponge Melophlus sp. Based on conidiophores aggregation, conidia development and mycelia morphological characteristics, the isolate FF001 was classically identified as a Penicillium sp. The bioactive compound was identified using various spectral analysis of UV, high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectra, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. Further minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) assay and brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay were also carried out to evaluate the biological properties of the purified compound. Results Bioassay guided fractionation of the EtOAc extract of a static culture of this Penicillium sp. by different chromatographic methods led the isolation of an antibacterial, anticryptococcal and cytotoxic active compound, which was identified as citrinin (1). Further, citrinin (1) is reported for its potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), rifampicin-resistant S. aureus, wild type S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium showed MICs of 3.90, 0.97, 1.95 and 7.81 µg/mL, respectively. Further citrinin (1) displayed significant activity against the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC 3.90 µg/mL), and exhibited cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae LD50 of 96 µg/mL. Conclusions Citrinin (1) is reported from sponge associated Penicillium sp. from this study and for its strong antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens including cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae, which indicated that sponge associated Penicillium spp. are promising sources of natural bioactive metabolites. PMID:23620853

  12. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  13. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; ...

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. nigermore » has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.« less

  14. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  15. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P Deepa S; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E; Frisvad, Jens C; Nielsen, Kristian F; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  16. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.J.

    2015-01-01

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. PMID:26566947

  17. Fouling mediates grazing: intertwining of resistances to multiple enemies in the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Jormalainen, Veijo; Wikström, Sofia A; Honkanen, Tuija

    2008-03-01

    Macroalgae have to cope with multiple natural enemies, such as herbivores and epibionts. As these are harmful for the host, the host is expected to show resistance to them. Evolution of resistance is complicated by the interactions among the enemies and the genetic correlations among resistances to different enemies. Here, we explored genetic variation in resistance to epibiosis and herbivory in the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus, both under conditions where the enemies coexisted and where they were isolated. F. vesiculosus showed substantial genetic variation in the resistance to both epibiosis and grazing. Grazing pressure on the alga was generally lower in the presence than in the absence of epibiota. Furthermore, epibiosis modified the susceptibility of different algal genotypes to grazing. Resistances to epibiosis and grazing were independent when measured separately for both enemies but positively correlated when both these enemies coexisted. Thus, when the enemies coexisted, the fate of genotypes with respect to these enemies was intertwined. Genotypic correlation between phlorotannins, brown-algal phenolic secondary metabolites, and the amount of epibiota was negative, indicating that these compounds contribute to resistance to epibiosis. In addition, phlorotannins correlated also with the resistance to grazing, but this correlation disappeared when grazing occurred in the absence of epibiota. This indicates that the patterns of selection for the type of the resistance as well as for the resistance traits vary with the occurrence patterns of the enemies.

  18. Identification of race-specific resistance in North American Vitis spp. limiting Erysiphe necator hyphal growth.

    PubMed

    Ramming, David W; Gabler, Franka; Smilanick, Joseph L; Margosan, Dennis A; Cadle-Davidson, Molly; Barba, Paola; Mahanil, Siraprapa; Frenkel, Omer; Milgroom, Michael G; Cadle-Davidson, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Race-specific resistance against powdery mildews is well documented in small grains but, in other crops such as grapevine, controlled analysis of host-pathogen interactions on resistant plants is uncommon. In the current study, we attempted to confirm powdery mildew resistance phenotypes through vineyard, greenhouse, and in vitro inoculations for test cross-mapping populations for two resistance sources: (i) a complex hybrid breeding line, 'Bloodworth 81-107-11', of at least Vitis rotundifolia, V. vinifera, V. berlandieri, V. rupestris, V. labrusca, and V. aestivalis background; and (ii) Vitis hybrid 'Tamiami' of V. aestivalis and V. vinifera origin. Statistical analysis of vineyard resistance data suggested the segregation of two and three race-specific resistance genes from the two sources, respectively. However, in each population, some resistant progeny were susceptible in greenhouse or in vitro screens, which suggested the presence of Erysiphe necator isolates virulent on progeny segregating for one or more resistance genes. Controlled inoculation of resistant and susceptible progeny with a diverse set of E. necator isolates clearly demonstrated the presence of fungal races differentially inte