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Sample records for secondary mineral microtextures

  1. Heavy Minerals in Palaeotsunami Deposits: Assemblages, Spatial Distribution and Microtextural Imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, P. J.; Andrade, C.; Cascalho, J.; Dawson, A. G.; Freitas, M. C.; Dawson, S.; Mahaney, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    more likely source areas. In addition, preliminary results of SEM analysis of microtextural features imprinted in the surface of heavy minerals indicate an increase in the number of mechanical marks in the surface of palaeotsunami grains when compared with potential source materials (beach, dune, inshore and offshore samples). This work further reveals the potential to use heavy minerals as a complementary sedimentological tool in the study of palaeotsunami deposits.

  2. Indicators of aqueous alteration in CM carbonaceous chondrites: Microtextures of a layered mineral containing Fe, S, O and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeoka, Kazushige; Buseck, Peter R.

    1985-10-01

    A petrographic and transmission electron microscopy study of the Mighei, Murchison. and Murray CM carbonaceous chondrites shows that much of the CM matrix material was probably produced by aqueous alteration of olivine, pyroxene, sulfide, and metal. The amount of CM matrix appears to be proportional to the degree of alteration, as suggested by McSween (1979), and microtextures of PCP ("poorly characterized phase") provide evidence of the progressive alteration. PCP is divided into two major types; one occurs in chondrules and aggregates and consists largely of an Fe-Ni-S-O phase (Type-I), and the other occurs in matrix and consists of the Fe-Ni-S-O phase and cronstedtite in various proportions (Type-II). Microtextures of PCP suggest that it resulted from a three-stage alteration process. (1) Type-I was produced by alteration of kamacite in chondrules and aggregates, presumably early, in the parent body regolith. (2) As the alteration advanced, olivine and pyroxene were converted to serpentine. Type-I PCP separated from chondrules and aggregates (into the matrix) during regolith gardening. Simultaneously, the Fe-Ni-S-O phase reacted with Si (released by alteration of olivine and pyroxene), producing well-formed platy cronstedtite and coherent intergrowths of the Fe-Ni-S-O phase and cronstedtite. The Fe-Ni-S-O phase also recrystallized into platy and pod-like crystals. Fe. S. Ni, Cr. and P were leached out of Type-I PCP and were deposited as small grains of Fe-Ni Sulfides, magnetite, chromite. and a mineral (unidentified) containing Fe. Ni, Cr, and P. As a result, PCP came to consist primarily of the Fe-Ni-S-O phase and cronstedtite, i.e., Type-II PCP. (3) During continued alteration, the well formed crystals of the Fe-Ni-S-O phase, cronstedtite, and their intergrowths in Type-II PCP were replaced by poorly formed fibers. In comparison to other CM chondrites, Mighei. Murchison, and Murray are relatively unaltered. Their matrices retain abundant amounts of the Fe

  3. The response of mineralizing culture systems to microtextured and polished titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S Adam; Harvey, Edward; Roughley, Peter; Tanzer, Michael; Bobyn, John

    2008-10-01

    The surface texture of titanium has a predictable effect on peri-implant tissue formation in vivo. When implanted in an osseous environment, smooth surfaces (R(a) < 0.5 mm) are generally apposed by fibrous tissue and textured surfaces (R(a) > 1.0 mm) are generally apposed by osseous tissue. Thus in vitro study assessed the mineralization and proliferation response of TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cells and canine stromal cells to tissue culture plastic (R(a) = 0.001 mm), polished (R(a) = 0.01 mm) and irregularly textured (R(a) = 3.26 mm) titanium surfaces. Amongst all culture systems, proliferation was significantly decreased on textured vs. smooth surfaces. Midway through the culture of the canine marrow cells, the cell layer detached from the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces. The TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cell systems formed a mineralized matrix on the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces which was not observed with the canine stromal cell system. Compared to the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces, matrix mineralization was significantly reduced on the textured titanium surfaces for the TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal systems, a result which was differed significantly in comparison to the canine stromal system. These results were surprising given the large number of reports concerning the in vivo response to titanium in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Further work is required to determine if the TF274, MC3T3-E1 and murine femoral stromal systems are suitable for the in vitro investigation of the effects of titanium surface texture on osteoblast activity.

  4. Metal, mineral waste processing and secondary recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, R.G.

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 40 million tons of precious metals chemical wastes are produced in the United States every year. An estimated five percent of these wastes are being reused/recycled to recover the precious and critical metals they contain. The rest of these chemical wastes are disposed of by the methods incineration, dumping at sea and dumping on land. In this paper, an attempt is made to review the research work published during 1985-1986 on metal, mineral waste processing, secondary recovery and safe disposal.

  5. Ion beam microtexturing and enhanced surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed with particular emphasis on microtexturing induced by the deliberate deposition of controllable amounts of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously sputtering the surface with an ion beam. Experimental study of the optical properties of microtextured surfaces is described. Measurements of both absorptance as a function of wavelength and emissivity are presented. A computer code is described that models the sputtering and ion reflection processes involved in microtexture formation.

  6. The Origins of Microtexture in Duplex Ti Alloys (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    To) June 2008 Journal Article Preprint 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE ORIGINS OF MICROTEXTURE IN DUPLEX Ti ALLOYS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In...house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6 . AUTHOR(S) M.G. Glavic (UES, Inc.) B.B. Bartha (United Technologies Corporation...applicable to duplex alpha/beta titanium microstructures. The crystallographic coherency of the primary and secondary alpha phase with the prior beta

  7. Microtextural analysis of quartz grains of tsunami and non-tsunami deposits - A case study from Tirúa (Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellanova, Piero; Bahlburg, Heinrich; Nentwig, Vanessa; Spiske, Michaela

    2016-08-01

    In order to estimate the tsunami hazard it is essential to reliably identify and differentiate tsunami deposits from other high-energy events like storms. Recently, the microtextural analysis of quartz grain surfaces was introduced as a method to differentiate between tsunami and other deposits. Using tsunami deposits sampled from a bank profile of the Tirúa river (central Chile), an area that was significantly affected by the 2010 and 1960 Chile tsunamis, we tested the microtextural analysis method for its capability to identify tsunami deposits. A total of 815 quartz grain surfaces of two tsunami layers, two non-tsunami marsh sediment samples, and three reference samples from nearby beach, dune and river were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We grouped the detected microtexture features into five microtextural families: angularity, fresh surfaces, percussion marks, adhering particles and dissolution features. Both the tsunami deposits and reference samples reveal high numbers of fresh surfaces and percussion marks. Thus, there are no statistically significant differences between tsunami, beach, dune and river deposits in characteristics and abundances in all microtextural families. Our study indicates that the microtextural analysis of quartz grains may not be a suitable method to identify tsunami deposits in Tirúa (Chile), due to local factors such as high numbers of inherited microtextures and the possible effects of the high amount of heavy minerals.

  8. An automated method to analyze separately the microtextures of primary {alpha}{sub p} grains and the secondary {alpha}{sub s} inherited colonies in bimodal titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, L. . E-mail: germain@letam.univ-metz.fr; Gey, N.; Humbert, M.; Hazotte, A.; Bocher, P.; Jahazi, M.

    2005-03-15

    A method was developed to automatically recognize the orientations of primary {alpha}{sub p} grains and secondary {alpha}{sub s} colonies of a bimodal titanium alloy, on the orientation map. Both populations of grains are dissociated by correlating the Electron Back Scattering Diffraction data with the corresponding Back Scattered Electron image on which a high chemical contrast is observed between the {alpha}{sub p} and ({alpha}{sub s}+{beta}{sub residual}) phases. The whole data processing is successfully applied to a large EBSD map of a bimodal IMI 834 billet. This allows to discuss the contribution of {alpha}{sub p} grains and {alpha}{sub s} colonies to the sharp texture heterogeneities observed in the billet.

  9. Bisphosphonates do not alter the rate of secondary mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs R. K.; Miller L.; Faillace M.E.; Allen M.R.; Phipps R.J. and Burr D.B.

    2011-05-18

    Bisphosphonates function to reduce bone turnover, which consequently increases the mean degree of tissue mineralization at an organ level. However, it is not clear if bisphosphonates alter the length of time required for an individual bone-modeling unit (BMU) to fully mineralize. We have recently demonstrated that it takes {approx}350 days (d) for normal, untreated cortical bone to fully mineralize. The aim of this study was to determine the rate at which newly formed trabecular BMUs become fully mineralized in rabbits treated for up to 414 d with clinical doses of either risedronate (RIS) or alendronate (ALN). Thirty-six, 4-month old virgin female New Zealand white rabbits were allocated to RIS (n = 12; 2.4 {micro}g/kg body weight), ALN (n = 12; 2.4 {micro}g/kg body weight), or volume-matched saline controls (CON; n = 12). Fluorochrome labels were administered at specific time intervals to quantify the rate and level of mineralization of trabecular bone from the femoral neck (FN) by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The organic (collagen) and inorganic (phosphate and carbonate) IR spectral characteristics of trabecular bone from undecalcified 4 micron thick tissue sections were quantified from fluorescently labels regions that had mineralized for 1, 8, 18, 35, 70, 105, 140, 210, 280, and 385 d (4 rabbits per time point and treatment group). All groups exhibited a rapid increase in mineralization over the first 18 days, the period of primary mineralization, with no significant differences between treatments. Mineralization continued to increase, at a slower rate up, to 385 days (secondary mineralization), and was not different among treatments. There were no significant differences between treatments for the rate of mineralization within an individual BMU; however, ALN and RIS both increased global tissue mineralization as demonstrated by areal bone mineral density from DXA. We conclude that increases in tissue mineralization that occur

  10. Secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff: Microscopy and microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Microcrystals of secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in the SEM. Among the samples the author discovered three new rare-earth sulfates: coskrenite-(Ce), levinsonite-(Y), and zugshunstite-(Ce). Other minerals illustrated in this report include sulfur, tschermigite, gypsum, epsomite, melanterite, halotrichite, apjohnite, jarosite, slavikite, magnesiocopiapite, and diadochite. Additional specimens whose identification is more tentative include pickeringite, aluminite, basaluminite, and botryogen. Alum Cave is a ``Dana locality`` for apjohnite and potash alum, and is the first documented North American occurrence of slavikite.

  11. Origin of secondary sulfate minerals on active andesitic stratovolcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimbelman, D.R.; Rye, R.O.; Breit, G.N.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfate minerals in altered rocks on the upper flanks and summits of active andesitic stratovolcanoes result from multiple processes. The origin of these sulfates at five active volcanoes, Citlalte??petl (Mexico), and Mount Adams, Hood, Rainier, and Shasta (Cascade Range, USA), was investigated using field observations, petrography, mineralogy, chemical modeling, and stable-isotope data. The four general groups of sulfate minerals identified are: (1) alunite group, (2) jarosite group, (3) readily soluble Fe- and Al-hydroxysulfates, and (4) simple alkaline-earth sulfates such as anhydrite, gypsum, and barite. Generalized assemblages of spatially associated secondary minerals were recognized: (1) alunite+silica??pyrite??kaolinite?? gypsum??sulfur, (2) jarosite+alunite+silica; (3) jarosite+smectite+silica??pyrite, (4) Fe- and Al-hydroxysulfates+silica, and (5) simple sulfates+silica??Al-hydroxysulfates??alunite. Isotopic data verify that all sulfate and sulfide minerals and their associated alteration assemblages result largely from the introduction of sulfur-bearing magmatic gases into meteoric water in the upper levels of the volcanoes. The sulfur and oxygen isotopic data for all minerals indicate the general mixing of aqueous sulfate derived from deep (largely disproportionation of SO2 in magmatic vapor) and shallow (oxidation of pyrite or H2S) sources. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data of alunite indicate the mixing of magmatic and meteoric fluids. Some alunite-group minerals, along with kaolinite, formed from sulfuric acid created by the disproportionation of SO2 in a condensing magmatic vapor. Such alunite, observed only in those volcanoes whose interiors are exposed by erosion or edifice collapse, may have ??34S values that reflect equilibrium (350??50 ??C) between aqueous sulfate and H2S. Alunite with ??34S values indicating disequilibrium between parent aqueous sulfate and H2S may form from aqueous sulfate created in higher level low

  12. Formation of secondary minerals in a lysimeter approach - A mineral-microbe interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffner, F.; Merten, D.; De Giudici, G.; Beyer, A.; Akob, D. M.; Ricci, P. C.; Küsel, K.; Büchel, G.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination of large areas due to uranium mining operations poses a serious long-term environmental problem. In the Ronneburg district (eastern Thuringia, Germany), leaching of low grade uranium bearing ores (uranium content < 300 g/t) occurred from 1972 to 1990 using acid mine drainage (AMD; pH 2.7-2.8) and diluted sulphuric acid (10 g/l). Secondary mineral phases like birnessite, todorokite and goethite occur within a natural attenuation process associated with enrichment of heavy metals, especially Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn due to a residual contamination even after remediation efforts. To reveal the processes of secondary mineral precipitation in the field a laboratory lysimeter approach was set up under in situ-like conditions. Homogenized soil from the field site and pure quartz sand were used as substrates. In general, in situ measurements of redox potentials in the substrates showed highly oxidizing conditions (200-750 mV). Water was supplied to the lysimeter from below via a mariottés bottle containing contaminated groundwater from the field. Evaporation processes were allowed, providing a continuous flow of water. This led to precipitation of epsomite and probably aplowite on the top layer of substrate, similar to what is observed in field investigations. After 4 weeks, the first iron and manganese bearing secondary minerals became visible. Soil water samples were used to monitor the behaviour of metals within the lysimeter. Saturation indices (SI) for different secondary minerals were calculated with PHREEQC. The SI of goethite showed oversaturation with respect to the soil solution. SEM-EDX analyses and IR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of goethite. Geochemical data revealed that goethite formation was mainly dominated by Eh/pH processes and that heavy metals, e.g. Zn and U, could be enriched in this phase. Although Eh/pH data does not support formation of manganese minerals, Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) could be isolated from field

  13. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78 BHD samples collected from 13 different SAP facilities across the U.S. were investigated. The XRD semi-quantitative analysis of BHD samples suggests the presence of metallic aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride and its oxides, spinel, elpasolite as well as diaspora. BHD also contains halite, sylvite and fluorite, which are used as fluxes in SAP activities. Total aluminum (Al) in the BHD samples averaged 18% by weight. Elevated concentrations of trace metals (>100 µgL-1 As; >1000 µgL-1 Cu, Mn, Se, Pb, Mn and Zn) were also detected in the leachate. The U.S. toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that some samples leached above the toxicity limit for Cd, Pb and Se. Exceeding the TCLP limits in all sample is independent of facilities generating the BHD. From the metal content perspective only, it appears that BHD has a higher potential to exhibit toxicity characteristics than salt cake (the largest waste stream generated by SAP facilities). The objective of this study was to investigate BHD from SAP facilities in the U.S. by determining the mineral phases and the metal (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, Se and Zn) content of the sample

  14. Bone Mineral Density and Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Silvia; Hersberger, Martin; Fischler, Manuel; Huber, Lars C; Senn, Oliver; Treder, Ursula; Speich, Rudolf; Schmid, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low bone mineral density (BMD) is common in chronic lung diseases and associated with reduced quality of life. Little is known about BMD in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Methods: Steroid-naïve patients with PH (n=34; 19 idiopathic, 15 chronic thromboembolic) had BMD measured by DXA at the time of diagnostic right heart catheterization. Exercise capacity, quality of life and various parameters related to PH severity and bone metabolism were also assessed. 24 patients with left heart failure (LHF) were similarly assessed as controls. Results: The prevalence of osteopenia was high both in PH (80%) and in controls with LHF (75%). Low BMD was associated with lean body mass, age, lower BMI, impaired exercise capacity and in PH with higher pulmonary vascular resistance. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) was elevated and considerably higher in PH than in LHF (above normal, in 55 vs 29%). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was not related to impaired renal function but possibly to low vitamin D status. Conclusions: Osteopenia is common in PH and in chronically ill patients with LHF. Osteopenia is associated with known risk factors but in PH also with disease severity. Preventive measures in an increasingly chronic ill PH population should be considered. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is highly prevalent in PH and might contribute to bone and possibly pulmonary vascular disease. Whether adequate vitamin D substitution could prevent low BMD in PH remains to be determined. PMID:19461899

  15. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  16. Nuclear Melt Glass Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation at 40 to 200C

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Viani, B; Pawloski, G; Rose, T

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are initially incorporated into melt glass and become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) only upon their release via glass dissolution (Pawloski et al., 2001). As the melt glass dissolves, secondary minerals precipitate. The types of secondary minerals that precipitate influence the water chemistry in and around the melt glass. The secondary minerals also provide a sorption sink to the released radionuclides. The changing water chemistry affects the rate of glass dissolution; it also affects the sorption behavior of the released radionuclides. This complex nature of glass dissolution and its important role in defining the HST requires a thorough understanding of glass dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation. The identity of secondary minerals formed at temperatures from 40 to 200 C are evaluated in this report to assist in that understanding.

  17. Mandrels For Microtextured Small-Vessel Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, William D.; Gabriel, Stephen B.

    1989-01-01

    Research shows artificial blood-vessel and heart-valve implants made more compatible with their biological environments by use of regularly microtextured surfaces. In new manufacturing process, ion beam etches patterned array of small pillars on mandrel used to mold tubular plastic implant. Pillars create tiny regularly spaced holes in inner surface of tube. Holes expected to provide sites for attachment of healthy lining. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) used as mandrel material because it can be etched by ion beam.

  18. Secondary Minerals in Nakhla: A 3D Reconstruction of Alteration Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzesinska, A. M.; Michalski, J. R.; Smith, C. L.; Schofield, P. F.

    2016-08-01

    Realtionship of secondary to primary minerals and fractures in Nakhla helps to gain insight into their formation and replacement history, and subsequently nature of aqueous events in the martian subsurface, and their implications for habitability.

  19. The role of secondary mineral precipitates on radionuclide sequestration at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Samson, Sherry D.; Nagy, Kathryn L.

    2004-06-27

    The effects of secondary mineral precipitates on radionuclide sequestration at the Hanford Site were investigated by reacting quartz and Hanford sediment (Warden Soil) with caustic solution of high ionic strength (2 M NaNO3), high pH (~13), high temperature (~90oC), and dissolved Al(0.01 M Al(NO3)3). Continuous Si dissolution and concomitant secondary mineral precipitation were the principal reactions observed. Nitrate-cancrinite was the dominant secondary precipitate on mineral surfaces after 3-10 days reaction time. The presence of dissolved Al in the simulated tank fluid was found to depress the net Si dissolved concentration. Based on batch equilibrium sorption results, secondary precipitates (cancrinite) at the primary mineral surfaces enhanced the sorption capacity of typical Hanford sediment for radionuclides of major concern at the Hanford Site such as 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and 90Sr.

  20. The Chronology of Asteroid Accretion, Differentiation, and Secondary Mineralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Kleine, T.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y. D.

    2008-01-01

    ) and a Pb-207/Pb-206 age of 4558.6 Ma for the LEW86010 angrite. However. the (Mn-53/Mn-55)(sub I) and Pb-207/Pb-206 ages of "intermediate" age D'Orbigny-clan angrites and Asuka 881394 are inconsistent with radioactive decay from CAI values with a Mn-55 half-life of 3.7+/-0.4 Ma. in spite of consistency between (Mn-53/Mn-55)(sub I) and (Al-26/Al-27)(sub I). Nevertheless, it appears that the Mn-Cr method with I(Mn)(sub CAI) = 9.1+/-1.7 x 10(exp -6) can be used to date primary igneous events and also secondary mineralization on asteroid parent bodies. We summarize ages thus determined for igneous events on differentiated asteroids and for carbonate and fayalite formation on carbonaceous asteroids.

  1. Oxygen Isotopes and Geothermometry of Secondary Minerals in CR Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilly, C. E.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.; Schrader, D. L.

    2014-09-01

    We report oxygen isotopes measured from secondary calcite and magnetite in QUE 99177, a weakly altered CR chondrite, and discuss implications for temperature and fluid chemistry during aqueous alteration on the CR parent body.

  2. Method of making a coating of a microtextured surface

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D [Tucson, AZ; Graff, Gordon L [West Richland, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Gross, Mark E [Pasco, WA; Burrows, Paul E [Kennewick, WA; Sapochak, Linda S [Henderson, NV

    2004-11-02

    A method for conformally coating a microtextured surface. The method includes flash evaporating a polymer precursor forming an evaporate, passing the evaporate to a glow discharge electrode creating a glow discharge polymer precursor plasma from the evaporate, cryocondensing the glow discharge polymer precursor plasma on the microtextured surface and crosslinking the glow discharge polymer precursor plasma thereon, wherein the crosslinking resulting from radicals created in the glow discharge polymer precursor plasma.

  3. Oriented microtexturing on the surface of high-speed steel cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    Microtexturing the metal cutting tool surfaces is a novel technique intended for enhancing the workability of these tools. The microtexturing is used in machining the titanium alloys for air-space applications for reducing the adhesion wear of metal cutting blades. This paper is focused on forming the microtextured dotted, banded and overlapped areas on the surfaces of high-speed steel samples. The treated areas have been examined using laser scanning microscopy for the microtexture pattern and roughness. It has been shown that the microtextured surfaces obtained on the high-speed steel samples were free of cracks. Surface pattern and roughness of all three microtextured areas have been examined and analyzed.

  4. Mineralization defect but no effect on hypercalcemia during clodronate treatment in secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ring, T; Sodemann, B; Nielsen, C; Melsen, F; Kornerup, H J

    1995-09-01

    In four patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, treatment with clodronate caused no decrease in serum calcium. In one of the patients treatment for seven months was associated with a severe mineralization defect which was not caused by aluminium. This lesion was reversible upon termination of clodronate treatment. In a single patient without hyperparathyroidism, a precipitous decrease in serum calcium was observed due to clodronate. However, long-term treatment with clodronate did not ameliorate ectopic calcification in this patient. It is concluded that in severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, clodronate does not always decrease serum calcium. Our experience suggest that clodronate like other bisphosphonates may inhibit bone mineralization.

  5. Microbial Composition in Decomposing Pine Litter Shifts in Response to Common Soil Secondary Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty-Bernard, A. T.; Heckman, K.; Vazquez, A.; Rasmussen, C.; Chorover, J.; Schwartz, E.

    2011-12-01

    A range of environmental and biotic factors have been identified that drive microbial community structure in soils - carbon substrates, redox conditions, mineral nutrients, salinity, pH, and species interactions. However, soil mineralogy has been largely ignored as a candidate in spite of recent studies that indicate that minerals have a substantial impact on soil organic matter stores and subsequent fluxes from soils. Given that secondary minerals and organic colloids govern a soil's biogeochemical activity due to surface area and electromagnetic charge, we propose that secondary minerals are a strong determinant of the communities that are responsible for process rates. To test this, we created three microcosms to study communities during decomposition using pine forest litter mixed with two common secondary minerals in soils (goethite and gibbsite) and with quartz as a control. Changes in bacterial and fungal communities were tracked over the 154-day incubation by pyrosequencing fragments of the bacterial 16S and fungal 18S rRNA genes. Ordination using nonmetric multidimensional scaling showed that bacterial communities separated on the basis of minerals. Overall, a single generalist - identified as an Acidobacteriaceae isolate - dominated all treatments over the course of the experiment, representing roughly 25% of all communities. Fungal communities discriminated between the quartz control alone and mineral treatments as a whole. Again, several generalists dominated the community. Coniochaeta ligniaria dominated communities with abundances ranging from 29 to 40%. The general stability of generalist populations may explain the similarities between treatment respiration rates. Variation between molecular fingerprints, then, were largely a function of unique minor members with abundances ranging from 0.01 to 8%. Carbon availability did not surface as a possible mechanism responsible for shifts in fingerprints due to the relatively large mass of needles in the

  6. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  7. Microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces: a thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Amirfazli, A

    2007-04-28

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with a contact angle (CA) larger than 150 degrees have recently attracted great interest in both academic research and practical applications due to their water-repellent or self-cleaning properties. However, thermodynamic mechanisms responsible for the effects of various factors such as surface geometry and chemistry, liquids, and environmental sources have not been well understood. In this study, a pillar microtexture, which has been intensively investigated in experiments, is chosen as a typical example and thermodynamically analyzed in detail. To gain a comprehensive insight into superhydrophobic behavior, the roles of pillar height, width and spacing (or roughness and solid fraction), intrinsic CA, drop size, and vibrational energy are systematically investigated. Free energy (FE) and free energy barrier (FEB) are calculated using a simple and robust model. Based on the calculations of FE and FEB, various CAs, including apparent, equilibrium (stable), advancing and receding CAs, and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) can be determined. Especially, the design of practical superhydrophobic surfaces is emphasized in connection with the transition between noncomposite and composite states; a criterion for judging such transition is proposed. The theoretical results are consistent with the Wenzel's and the Cassie's equations for equilibrium CA values and experimental observations. Furthermore, based on these results and the proposed criterion, some general principles to achieve superhydrophobic performance are suggested.

  8. Hydrothermal Alteration in the PACMANUS Hydrothermal Field: Implications From Secondary Mineral Assemblages and Mineral Chemistry, OPD Leg 193

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackschewitz, K. S.; Kummetz, M.; Kummetz, M.; Ackermand, D.; Botz, R.; Devey, C. W.; Singer, A.; Stoffers, P.

    2001-12-01

    Leg 193 of the Ocean Drilling Program investigated the subsurface nature of the active PACMANUS hydrothermal field in the Manus backarc basin near Papua New Guinea. Drilling in different areas on the felsic neovolcanic Pual Ridge, including the high-temperature black smoker complex of Roman Ruins and the low-temperature Snowcap site with diffusive discharge yielded a complex alteration history with a regional primary alteration being overprinted by a secondary mineralogy. The intense hydrothermal alteration at both sites shows significant differences in the secondary mineralogy. At Roman Ruins, the upper 25 m of hydrothermally altered rocks are characterized by a rapid change from secondary cristobalite to quartz, implying a high temperature gradient. From 10 to 120 mbsf the clay mineralogy is dominated by illite and chlorite. The chlorite formation temperature calculated from oxygen isotope data lies at 250° C in 116 mbsf which is similar to the present fluid outflow temperatures of 240-250° C (Douville et al., 1999, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 63, 627-643). Drilling in the Snowcap field recovered evidence for several stages of hydrothermal alteration. Between 50 and 150 mbsf, cristobalite and chlorite are the most abundant alteration minerals while hydrothermal pyrophyllite becomes abundant in some places At 67 mbsf, the isotopic composition of pyrophyllite gives a temperature for ist formation at 260° C whereas at 77 and 116 mbsf the pyrophyllite displays the highest temperatures of formation (>300° C). These temperatures are close to the maximum measured borehole temperatures of 313° C. The appearance of assemblages of chlorite, chlorite-vermiculite, chlorite-vermiculite-smectite and illite-smectite as well as the local development of corrensite below 150 mbsf suggests that the alteration at Snowcap may be more complex than that beneath Roman Ruins. Detailed geochemical studies of the authigenic clay mineral phases will provide further insights into the

  9. Alteration Products and Secondary Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, S. J.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    The martian meteorites contain alteration products and secondary minerals that are a critical part of understanding their near-surface histories on both Mars and Earth. In some martian meteorites, suspected martian preterrestrial alteration products can be distinguished from terrestrial weathering effects Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission SEM (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), we are studying natural fracture surfaces of ALH 84001 chips, including samples from both the interior and the exterior of the meteorite. Exterior samples include fusion crust surfaces, which are important in determining the extent of terrestrial weathering of meteorites. The focus of this study is weathering features and secondary minerals other than the distinctive carbonate globules that continue to be studied by many researchers.

  10. Dynamics of Spreading on Micro-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2015-11-01

    Ultrahydrophobic surfaces, due to their large water-repellency characteristic, have a vast variety of applications in technology and nature, such as de-icing of airplane wings, efficiency increase of power plants, and efficiency of pesticides on plants, etc. The significance of ultrahydrophobic surfaces requires enhancing the knowledge on the spreading dynamics on such surfaces. The best way to produce an ultrahydrophobic surface is by patterning of smooth hydrophobic surfaces with micron sized posts. In this research, the micro-textured surfaces have been fabricated by patterning several different sizes of micro-textured posts on Teflon plates. The experimental study has been performed using forced spreading with Tensiometer to obtain the dependencw of dynamic contact angle to the contact line velocity to describe the spreading dynamics of Newtonian liquids on the micro-textured surfaces. The effect of the geometrical descriptions of the micro-posts along with the physical properties of liquids on the spreading dynamics on micro-textured Teflon plates have been also studied.

  11. Mineral dissolution and secondary precipitation on quartz sand in simulated Hanford tank solutions affecting subsurface porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-01

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89 °C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  12. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  13. Secondary Mineralization of Ferrihydrite Affects Microbial Methanogenesis in Geobacter-Methanosarcina Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia; Ma, Jinlian; Tang, Ziyang; Yu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transformation of ferrihydrite to stable iron oxides over time has important consequences for biogeochemical cycling of many metals and nutrients. The response of methanogenic activity to the presence of iron oxides depends on the type of iron mineral, but the effects of changes in iron mineralogy on methanogenesis have not been characterized. To address these issues, we constructed methanogenic cocultures of Geobacter and Methanosarcina strains with different ferrihydrite mineralization pathways. In this system, secondary mineralization products from ferrihydrite are regulated by the presence or absence of phosphate. In cultures producing magnetite as the secondary mineralization product, the rates of methanogenesis from acetate and ethanol increased by 30.2% and 135.3%, respectively, compared with a control lacking ferrihydrite. Biogenic magnetite was proposed to promote direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosarcina in a manner similar to that of c-type cytochrome and thus facilitate methanogenesis. Vivianite biomineralization from ferrihydrite in the presence of phosphate did not significantly influence the methanogenesis processes. The correlation between magnetite occurrence and facilitated methanogenesis was supported by increased rates of methane production from acetate and ethanol with magnetite supplementation in the defined cocultures. Our data provide a new perspective on the important role of iron biomineralization in biogeochemical cycling of carbon in diverse anaerobic environments. IMPORTANCE It has been found that microbial methanogenesis is affected by the presence of iron minerals, and their influences on methanogenesis are associated with the mineralogical properties of the iron minerals. However, how changes in iron mineralogy affect microbial methanogenesis has not been characterized. To address this issue, we constructed methanogenic cocultures of Geobacter and Methanosarcina strains with different

  14. Unit-cell intergrowth of pyrochlore and hexagonal tungsten bronze structures in secondary tungsten minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Grey, Ian E. . E-mail: ian.grey@csiro.au; Birch, William D.; Bougerol, Catherine

    2006-12-15

    Structural relations between secondary tungsten minerals with general composition A{sub x}[(W,Fe)(O,OH){sub 3}]{sub .y}H{sub 2}O are described. Phyllotungstite (A=predominantly Ca) is hexagonal, a=7.31(3)A, c=19.55(1)A, space group P6{sub 3}/mmc. Pittongite, a new secondary tungsten mineral from a wolframite deposit near Pittong in Victoria, southeastern Australia (A=predominantly Na) is hexagonal, a=7.286(1)A, c=50.49(1)A, space group P-6m2. The structures of both minerals can be described as unit-cell scale intergrowths of (111){sub py} pyrochlore slabs with pairs of hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) layers. In phyllotungstite, the (111){sub py} blocks have the same thickness, 6A, whereas pittongite contains pyrochlore blocks of two different thicknesses, 6 and 12A. The structures can alternatively be described in terms of chemical twinning of the pyrochlore structure on (111){sub py} oxygen planes. At the chemical twin planes, pairs of HTB layers are corner connected as in hexagonal WO{sub 3}.

  15. Lithologic Control on Secondary Clay Mineral Formation in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caylor, E.; Rasmussen, C.; Dhakal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transformation of rock to soil is central to landscape evolution and ecosystem function. The objective of this study was to examine controls on secondary mineral formation in a forested catchment in the Catalina-Jemez CZO. We hypothesized landscape position controls the type of secondary minerals formed in that well-drained hillslopes favor Si-poor secondary phases such as kaolinite, whereas poorly drained portions of the landscape that collect solutes from surrounding areas favor formation of Si-rich secondary phases such as smectite. The study focused on a catchment in Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico where soils are derived from a mix of rhyolitic volcanic material, vegetation includes a mixed conifer forest, and climate is characterized by a mean annual precipitation of ~800 mm yr-1 and mean annual temperature of 4.5°C. Soils were collected at the soil-saprolite boundary from three landscape positions, classified as well drained hillslope, poorly drained convergent area, and poorly drained hill slope. Clay fractions were isolated and analyzed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and thermal analysis. Quantitative XRD of random powder mounts indicated the presence of both primary phases such as quartz, and alkali and plagioclase feldspars, and secondary phases that include illite, Fe-oxyhydroxides including both goethite and hematite, kaolinite, and smectite. The clay fractions were dominated by smectite ranging from 36-42%, illite ranging from 21-35%, and kaolinite ranging from 1-8%. Qualitative XRD of oriented mounts confirmed the presence of smectite in all samples, with varying degrees of interlayering and interstratification. In contrast to our hypothesis, results indicated that secondary mineral assemblage was not strongly controlled by landscape position, but rather varied with underlying variation in lithology. The catchment is underlain by a combination of porphorytic rhyolite and

  16. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  17. Genesis of secondary uranium minerals associated with jasperoid veins, El Erediya area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Naby, Hamdy H.

    2008-11-01

    Uranium mineralization in the El Erediya area, Egyptian Eastern Desert, has been affected by both high temperature and low temperature fluids. Mineralization is structurally controlled and is associated with jasperoid veins that are hosted by a granitic pluton. This granite exhibits extensive alteration, including silicification, argillization, sericitization, chloritization, carbonatization, and hematization. The primary uranium mineral is pitchblende, whereas uranpyrochlore, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral are the most abundant secondary uranium minerals. Uranpyrochlore and the unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral are interpreted as alteration products of petscheckite. The chemical formula of the uranpyrochlore based upon the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) is A {left( {{text{U}}_{{1.07}} {text{Ca}}_{{0.28}} {text{Pb}}_{{0.03}} {text{Na}}_{{0.21}} {text{Mg}}_{{0.02}} } right)}_{{Σ 1.6}} B {left( {{text{Nb}}_{{0.57}} {text{Si}}_{{0.62}} {text{Zr}}_{{0.35}} {text{P}}_{{0.20}} {text{Fe}}_{{0.17}} {text{Al}}_{{0.06}} {text{Ti}}_{{0.03}} } right)}_{{Σ 2}} . It is characterized by a relatively high Zr content (average ZrO2 = 6.6 wt%). The average composition of the unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral is ^{{text{U}}} {left( {{text{U}}_{{1.89}} {text{Ca}}_{{0.49}} {text{Pb}}_{{0.13}} {text{Na}}_{{0.06}} {text{Mg}}_{{0.02}} } right)}_{{Σ 2.59}} ^{{{text{Nb}}}} {left( {{text{Nb}}_{{1.31}} {text{Fe}}_{{0.34}} {text{Si}}_{{0.14}} {text{P}}_{{0.10}} {text{Ti}}_{{0.05}} {text{Zr}}_{{0.03}} {text{Al}}_{{0.03}} } right)}_{{Σ 2.0}} , where U and Nb represent the dominant cations in the U and Nb site, respectively. Uranophane is the dominant U6+ silicate phase in oxidized zones of the jasperoid veins. Kasolite is less abundant than uranophane and contains major U, Pb, and Si but only minor Ca, Fe, P, and Zr. A two-stage metallogenetic model is proposed for the alteration processes and uranium mineralization at

  18. Secondary sulfate mineralization and basaltic chemistry of craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho: Potential martian analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doc Richardson, C.; Hinman, Nancy W.; McHenry, Lindsay J.; Michelle Kotler, J.; Knipe, Dawn L.; Scott, Jill R.

    2012-05-01

    Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) basalts offer a reasonable analog to martian basalts, as they have elevated iron concentrations compared to traditional terrestrial analogs. Although secondary sulfate minerals on the evaporitic regions of Mars consist primarily of Mg-, Ca-, and Fe-bearing sulfate minerals, recent orbiter spectroscopic data have suggested Na-sulfate minerals may be present. Secondary minerals in the basaltic caves of COM in southern Idaho are white, efflorescent deposits in small cavities along the cave walls and ceilings and localized mounds on the cave floors. These deposits were examined using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (LD-FTICRMS). The secondary mineral assemblages were dominated by Na-sulfate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) with a small fraction of the deposits containing minor concentrations of Na-carbonate minerals. Based on thermodynamic modeling results, formation of the deposits was attributed to leaching of basalt minerals by meteoritic water followed by evaporation of solutions. Such deposits could form under similar conditions in basaltic caves on Mars, making caves an excellent target for astrobiological investigations.

  19. Control of mineral scale deposition in cooling systems using secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is a promising alternative to freshwater as power plant cooling system makeup water, especially in arid regions. A prominent challenge for the successful use of MWW for cooling is potentially severe mineral deposition (scaling) on pipe surfaces. In this study, theoretical, laboratory, and field work was conducted to evaluate the mineral deposition potential of MWW and its deposition control strategies under conditions relevant to power plant cooling systems. Polymaleic acid (PMA) was found to effectively reduce scale formation when the makeup water was concentrated four times in a recirculating cooling system. It was the most effective deposition inhibitor of those studied when applied at 10 mg/L dosing level in a synthetic MWW. However, the deposition inhibition by PMA was compromised by free chlorine added for biogrowth control. Ammonia present in the wastewater suppressed the reaction of the free chlorine with PMA through the formation of chloramines. Monochloramine, an alternative to free chlorine, was found to be less reactive with PMA than free chlorine. In pilot tests, scaling control was more challenging due to the occurrence of biofouling even with effective control of suspended bacteria. Phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors are not appropriate due to their significant loss through precipitation reactions with calcium. Chemical equilibrium modeling helped with interpretation of mineral precipitation behavior but must be used with caution for recirculating cooling systems, especially with use of MWW, where kinetic limitations and complex water chemistries often prevail.

  20. Growth of connective tissue progenitor cells on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George; Roy, Shuvo

    2002-12-15

    Growth of human connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs) was characterized on smooth and microtextured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces. Human bone-marrow-derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on smooth PDMS surfaces and on PDMS post microtextures that were 6 microm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 microm in diameter, respectively. Glass tissue-culture dishes were used as controls. The number of viable cells was determined, and an alkaline phosphatase stain was used as a marker for osteoblastic phenotype. CTPs attached, proliferated, and differentiated on all surfaces. Cells on the smooth PDMS and control surfaces spread and proliferated as colonies in proximity to other cells and migrated in random directions, with cell process lengths of up to 80 microm. In contrast, cells on the PDMS post microtextures grew as sparsely distributed networks of cells, with processes, occasionally up to 300 microm, that appeared to interact with the posts. Cell counts revealed that there were fewer (50%) CTPs on the smooth PDMS surface than were on the glass control surfaces. However, there were consistently more (>144%) CTPs on the PDMS post textures than on the controls. In particular, the 10-microm-in-diameter posts (268%) exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05) greater cell number than did the smooth PDMS.

  1. Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.

    PubMed

    Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

    2011-09-01

    Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies.

  2. Lava Cave Microbial Communities Within Mats and Secondary Mineral Deposits: Implications for Life Detection on Other Planets

    PubMed Central

    Melim, L.A.; Spilde, M.N.; Hathaway, J.J.M.; Garcia, M.G.; Moya, M.; Stone, F.D.; Boston, P.J.; Dapkevicius, M.L.N.E.; Riquelme, C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai‘i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai‘i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai‘i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. Key Words: Biosignatures—Astrobiology—Bacteria—Caves—Life detection—Microbial mats. Astrobiology 11, 601–618. PMID:21879833

  3. Secondary Sulfate Mineralization and Basaltic Chemistry of Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho: Potential Martian Analog

    SciTech Connect

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Lindsay J. McHenry; J. Michelle Kotler; Jill R. Scott

    2012-05-01

    Secondary deposits associated with the basaltic caves of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) in southern Idaho were examined using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The secondary mineral assemblages are dominated by Na-sulfate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) with a small fraction of the deposits containing minor concentrations of Na-carbonate minerals. The assemblages are found as white, efflorescent deposits in small cavities along the cave walls and ceilings and as localized mounds on the cave floors. Formation of the deposits is likely due to direct and indirect physiochemical leaching of meteoritic water through the overlying basalts. Whole rock data from the overlying basaltic flows are characterized by their extremely high iron concentrations, making them good analogs for martian basalts. Understanding the physiochemical pathways leading to secondary mineralization at COM is also important because lava tubes and basaltic caves are present on Mars. The ability of FTICR-MS to consistently and accurately identify mineral species within these heterogeneous mineral assemblages proves its validity as a valuable technique for the direct fingerprinting of mineral species by deductive reasoning or by comparison with reference spectra.

  4. Secondary Mineralization of Components in CV3 Chondrites: Nebular and Asteroidal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1995-09-01

    Our review of mineralogical variations among CV3 chondrites suggests that all components, chondrules, matrices, and CAIs, were affected by various degrees of secondary mineralization. Chondrules and CAIs are rimmed with fayalitic olivine [1, 2]; metal in all components is oxidized and sulfidized to magnetite, Ni-rich metal and sulfides [3]; silicates in all components are aqueously altered to phyllosilicates [4]; and nepheline, sodalite, wollastonite, and hedenbergite replace primary minerals in CAIs [5]. In those CV3s with altered CAIs, nepheline etc. are also present in chondrule mesostases [6] and in matrices [7]. Correlated occurrences of secondary minerals indicate that they have related origins. CV3 chondrites can be divided into three kinds according to their secondary features. Reduced CV3s (e.g., Efremovka) lack magnetite [8] and show minimal secondary features. Oxidized CV3s [8] generally show all features: those like Mokoia contain minor fayalitic rims, nepheline, etc, whereas those like Allende lack phyllosilicates but contain well developed fayalite rims and abundant nepheline, etc. Allende-like CV3 chondrites also contain abundant plate-like matrix olivine (Fa(sub)45-55). Similarities in chemistry and O isotopic composition and petrographic observations suggest that fayalitic rims and plate-like matrix olivine have related origins [1, 9]. The presence of secondary minerals in all components implies that alteration postdated component formation. The absence of secondary minerals in reduced CV3s indicates that CV3 oxidized formed from CV3 reduced-like material. Oxidized and reduced materials coexist in some breccias indicating a common parent asteroid. Nebular origins are widely accepted for most secondary features. To form fayalitic rims and matrix , Palme and colleagues [10, 11] suggest that chondritic components were briefly exposed to a hot (>1500 K), highly oxidizing nebula with H2O/H2 to about 1. Such an environment could have resulted from

  5. Minerals salt composition and secondary metabolites of Euphorbia hirta Linn., an antihyperglycemic plant

    PubMed Central

    Yvette Fofie, N’Guessan Bra; Sanogo, Rokia; Coulibaly, Kiyinlma; Kone-Bamba, Diénéba

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical study and research on acute toxicity were performed on the aerial parts (leaves and stems) of Euphorbia hirta Linn. The phytochemical screening and chromatography revealed the presence of saponin, sterol, terpene, alkaloids, polyphenols, tannins and flavonoids and especially mucilage. The evaluation of total polyphenols and total flavonoids gave 120.97 ± 7.07 gallic acid equivalents (GAE) mg/g (mg of GAE/g of extract) of dry extract and 41.4 ± 0.5 mg quercetin equivalent per gram (QE/g) (mg of QE/g of plant extract) of dry extract respectively. The physicochemical study revealed moisture content of 7.73% ± 0.00%, total ash 7.48% ± 0.03%. Sulfuric ash 9.05% ± 0.01%, hydrochloric acid insoluble ash of 0.8% ± 0.02%. The search for minerals salt revealed the presence of Cr, Zn, K, Ca and Mg having an important role in glucose metabolism. The acute toxicity study showed that the toxic dose may be above 3000 mg/kg. The results of these studies indicate that extracts from the leaves and stem of E. hirta Linn. contains trace elements and minerals salt and bioactive secondary metabolites which explain their therapeutic uses for treating diabetes mellitus. PMID:25598628

  6. Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Kathryn L.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2003-06-01

    This project, renewal of a previous EMSP project of the same title, is in its first year of funding at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The purpose is to continue investigating rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals found in the Hanford subsurface and leaked waste tank solutions. The goals are to understand processes that result in (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. A post-doctoral scientist, Dr. Sherry Samson, has been hired and two masters of science students are beginning to conduct experimental research. One research project that is underway is focused on measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms. The first set of experiments is being conduced at room temperature. Subsequent experiments will examine the role of temperature because tank solutions in many cases were near boiling when leakage is thought to have occurred and temperature gradients have been observed beneath the SX and BX tank farms. The dissolution experiments are being conducted in stirred-flow kinetic reactors using powdered labradorite feldspar from Pueblo Park, New Mexico.

  7. Evidence for an unsaturated-zone origin of secondary minerals in Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Joseph F.; Roedder, Edwin; Paces, James B.

    2001-04-29

    The unsaturated zone (UZ) in Miocene-age welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Secondary calcite and silica minerals deposited on fractures and in cavities in the UZ tuffs are texturally, isotopically, and geochemically consistent with UZ deposition from meteoric water infiltrating at the surface and percolating through the UZ along fractures. Nonetheless, two-phase fluid inclusions with small and consistent vapor to liquid (V:L) ratios that yield consistent temperatures within samples and which range from about 35 to about 80 C between samples have led some to attribute these deposits to formation from upwelling hydrothermal waters. Geochronologic studies have shown that calcite and silica minerals began forming at least 10 Ma and continued to form into the Holocene. If their deposition were really from upwelling water flooding the UZ, it would draw into question the suitability of the site as a waste repository.

  8. P-recovery by secondary nucleation and growth of calcium phosphates on magnetite mineral.

    PubMed

    Karapinar, Nuray; Hoffmann, Erhard; Hahn, Hermann H

    2006-03-01

    Precipitation of calcium phosphates from supersaturated solutions seeded with magnetite powder (magnetite mineral, Fe3O4) has been studied in lab scale in the pH range 6.9-7.7. While the initial concentration of phosphorus was 1.29 mmol/l, the initial molar ratio of Ca/P was taken one to three times of the stoichiometric calcium to phosphorus ratio of hydroxyapatite. To bring out the secondary nucleation, the precipitation system was allowed to relax and pH of the solution was maintained at the initially preset value. The period before base was added for the first time during relaxation was defined as lagtime and sodium hydroxide added during the relaxation was evaluated as the degree of growth. The lagtime was found to be dependent on the solution pH, therefore on the initial amount of precipitation. Coverage of seed surface by heterogeneous nucleation is essential. Since all precipitation by secondary nucleation took place on the seed material, precipitation during relaxation was due to growth of the solid phase on the seed surfaces. It was found that there was a pH range in which growth rate was directly proportional to pH. However, at lower residual concentrations of phosphorus, despite relatively higher pH, the growth rate was decreased.

  9. Martian surface microtexture from orbital CRISM multi-angular observations: A new perspective for the characterization of the geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, J.; Schmidt, F.; Douté, S.

    2016-09-01

    The surface of Mars has a high morphological and mineralogical diversity due to the intricacy of external, internal processes, and exchanges with the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the cryosphere. In particular, liquid water played an important role in surface evolution. However, the origin, duration and intensity of those wet events have been highly debated, especially in the clay-bearing geological units. Similarly, questions still remain about magma crystallization and volatile quantity of the dominant basaltic crust. In this work, six sites having hydrated minerals, salts and basaltic signatures (i.e., Mawrth Vallis, Holden crater, Eberswalde crater, Capri mensa, Eridania basin, Terra Sirenum) are investigated in order to better characterize the geological processes responsible for their formation and evolution (e.g., fluvial, lacustrine, in situ weathering, evaporitic, volcanic and aeolian processes). For that purpose, we use orbital multi-angular measurements from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft to analyze the manner in which light is scattered by the surface materials (photometry) in the near-infrared range (at 750 nm). The surface bidirectional reflectance depends on the composition but also on the surface microtexture such as the grain size distribution, morphology, internal structure and surface roughness, tracers of the geological processes. The Hapke semi-analytical model of radiative transfer in granular medium is used to model the surface bidirectional reflectance estimated at 750 nm from the orbital measurements after an atmospheric correction. The model depends on different radiative properties (e.g., single scattering albedo, grain phase function and regolith roughness) related to the surface composition and microtexture. In particular previous laboratory works showed that the particle phase function parameters, which describe the characteristics of the

  10. Quasi-liquid states observed on ion beam microtextured surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid-like properties have been observed on surface structures developed by means of ion beam microtexturing. The structures include cones, pyramids, or wavelike formations. The observed liquid-like effects are drips and ripples on the sides of cones, droplet formation, the apparent flow and coalescence of closely packed structures, wetting angle and other surface tension effects, and the bending of cones by additional heating. The bulk temperatures are in the range of 50-600 C. These effects are seen to some extent on Cu, Al, Au, Pb, and Ni substrates.

  11. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total

  12. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts. PMID:27243001

  13. Fibroblast extracellular matrix and adhesion on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Morgan M; Parrillo, Allegra; Thomas, Gawain M; McGimpsey, W Grant; Wen, Qi; Bellin, Robert M; Lambert, Christopher R

    2015-05-01

    The immediate physical and chemical surroundings of cells provide important biochemical cues for their behavior. Designing and tailoring biomaterials for controlled cell signaling and extracellular matrix (ECM) can be difficult due to the complexity of the cell-surface relationship. To address this issue, our research has led to the development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold with defined microtopography and chemistry for surface driven ECM assembly. When human fibroblasts were cultured on this microtextured PDMS with 2-6 µm wide vertical features, significant changes in morphology, adhesion, actin cytoskeleton, and fibronectin generation were noted when compared with cells cultured on unmodified PDMS. Investigation of cellular response and behavior was performed with atomic force microscopy in conjunction with fluorescent labeling of focal adhesion cites and fibronectin in the ECM. Changes in the surface topography induced lower adhesion, an altered actin cytoskeleton, and compacted units of fibronectin similar to that observed in vivo. Overall, these findings provide critical information of cell-surface interactions with a microtextured, polymer substrate that can be used in the field of tissue engineering for controlling cellular ECM interactions.

  14. 9 M.y. record of southern Nevada climate from Yucca Mountain secondary minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.F.; Moscati, R.J.

    1998-12-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation`s high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs within which the depth to water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present day arid to semi-arid climate, is considered a favorable attribute of the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relation between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible future transport and release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration. Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences, coupled with the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite, allow broadbrush reconstructions of climate patterns during the past 9 M.y.

  15. Volcanic stratigraphy and secondary mineralization of U. S. G. S. Pucci geothermal test well, Mount Hood, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gannett, M.W.; Bargar, K.E.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-one sample splits of drill cuttings from approximately 6.1 m intervals in the 610 m hole that was completed in 1979 were provided for this study. An additional 225 sample splits (3.05 m intervals) from 536 m to the bottom of the drill hole at 1220 m were added to the study following the deepening of the drill hole. Stratigraphic and petrologic observations of the cuttings were made. Scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer examinations were made of alteration minerals. The lithology and secondary mineralization are discussed.

  16. Proterozoic polymetamorphism in the Quanji Block, northwestern China: Evidence from microtextures, garnet compositions and monazite CHIME ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinyan; Pan, Yuanming; Chen, Nengsong; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Haihong

    2009-05-01

    The Quanji Block, situated close to the triple junction of three major Precambrian terranes in China (i.e., the North China Craton, the Yangtze Block and the Tarim Block), is composed of Precambrian metamorphic crystalline basement and an unmetamorphosed Mesozoic-Paleozoic sedimentary cover; it has been interpreted as a remnant continental fragment. Microtextural relationships, garnet trace element compositions, and monazite CHIME ages in paragneisses, schists and granitic leucosomes show two episodes of regional metamorphism in the Quanji Block basement. The first regional metamorphism and accompaning anatexis took place at ˜1.93 Ga; the second regional metamorphism occurred between ˜1.75 and ˜1.71 Ga. Mineral compositions of the first metamorphism, including those of monazite, were significantly disturbed by the second event. These two regional metamorphic episodes were most likely linked to assembly and breakup of the supercontinent Columbia, respectively.

  17. Radionuclide Incorporation in Secondary Crystalline Minerals Resulting from Chemical Weathering of Selected Waste Glasses: Progress Report for Subtask 3d

    SciTech Connect

    SV Mattigod; DI Kaplan; VL LeGore; RD Orr; HT Schaef; JS Young

    1998-10-23

    Experiments were conducted in fiscal year 1998 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate potential incorporation of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases that form from weathering vitrified nuclear waste glasses. These experiments were conducted as part of the Immobilized Low- Activity Waste-Petiormance Assessment (ILAW-PA) to generate data on radionuclide mobilization and transport in a near-field enviromnent of disposed vitrified wastes. An initial experiment was conducted to identify the types of secondary minerals that form from two glass samples of differing compositions, LD6 and SRL202. Chemical weathering of LD6 glass at 90oC in contact with an aliquot of uncontaminated Hanford Site groundwater resulted in the formation of a Crystalline zeolitic mineral, phillipsite. In contrast similar chemical weathering of SRL202 glass at 90"C resulted in the formation of a microcrystalline smectitic mineral, nontronite. A second experiment was conducted at 90"C to assess the degree to which key radionuclides would be sequestered in the structure of secondary crystalline minerals; namely, phillipsite and nontronite. Chemical weathering of LD6 in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater indicated that substantial ilactions of the total activities were retained in the phillipsite structure. Similar chemical weathering of SRL202 at 90"C, also in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater, showed that significant fractions of the total activities were retained in the nontronite structure. These results have important implications regarding the radionuclide mobilization aspects of the ILAW-PA. Additional studies are required to confkm the results and to develop an improved under- standing of mechanisms of sequestration and attenuated release of radionuclides to help refine certain aspects of their mobilization.

  18. Cement lines of secondary osteons in human bone are not mineral-deficient: new data in a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Holmes, Jennifer L; Vajda, Eric G; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2005-09-01

    Using qualitative backscattered electron (BSE) imaging and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, some investigators have concluded that cement (reversal) lines located at the periphery of secondary osteons are poorly mineralized viscous interfaces with respect to surrounding bone. This conclusion contradicts historical observations of apparent highly mineralized (or collagen-deficient) cement lines in microradiographs. Such conclusions, however, may stem from unrecognized artifacts that can occur during scanning electron microscopy. These include specimen degradation due to high-energy beams and the sampling of electron interaction volumes that extend beyond target locations during EDX analysis. This study used quantitative BSE imaging and EDX analysis, each with relatively lower-energy beams, to test the hypothesis that cement lines are poorly mineralized. Undemineralized adult human femoral diaphyses (n = 8) and radial diaphyses (n = 5) were sectioned transversely, embedded in polymethyl methacrylate, and imaged in a scanning electron microscope for BSE and EDX analyses. Unembedded samples were also evaluated. Additional thin embedded samples were stained and evaluated with light microscopy and correlated BSE imaging. BSE analyses showed the consistent presence of a bright line (higher atomic number) coincident with the classical location and description of the cement line. This may represent relative hypermineralization or, alternatively, collagen deficiency with respect to surrounding bone. EDX analyses of cement lines showed either higher Ca content or equivalent Ca content when compared to distant osteonal and interstitial bone. These data reject the hypothesis that cement lines of secondary osteons are poorly mineralized.

  19. Preliminary bounds on the water composition and secondary mineral development that may influence the near-field environment

    SciTech Connect

    Whitbeck, M.; Glassley, W.

    1998-02-01

    The evolution of the water chemistry and secondary mineral development in the vicinity of the near-field of a potential Yucca Mountain high level nuclear waste repository will be controlled by temperature, and interaction of water with rock over time. This report describes initial bounds on water composition and secondary mineral development, as a function of time, temperature, and rock type (devitrified, welded tuff and vitrophyre). The code EQ3/6 was used in the calculations, with explicit use of transition state theory models for mineral dissolution rates for the framework minerals of the tuff. Simulations were run for time durations sufficient to achieve steady state conditions. Uncertainty in the calculations, due to uncertainty in the measured dissolution rates, was considered by comparing results in simulations in which rates were varied within the range of known uncertainties for dissolution rate constants. The results demonstrate that the steady state mineralogy and water compositions are relatively insensitive to the rock unit modeled, which is consistent with the fact that the compositions of the rock units in the vicinity if the potential repository are similar, and will tend toward similar thermodynamic free energy minima, for similar rock:water ratios. Significant differences are observed, however, for large differences in rock: water ratios. The rates at which this end point condition are approached are a function of the rate parameters used, and can vary by orders of magnitude.

  20. Comparison of microstructure of superplastically deformed synthetic materials and ultramylonite: Coalescence of secondary mineral grains via grain boundary sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraga, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Tasaka, M.; Yoshida, H.

    2011-12-01

    Using very fine-grained aggregates of forsterite containing ~10vol% secondary mineral phase such as periclase and enstatite, we have been able to demonstrate their superplascity, that is, achievement of more than a few 100 % tensile strain (Hiraga et al. 2010). Superplastic deformation is commonly considered to proceed via grain boundary sliding (GBS) which results in grain switching in the samples. Hiraga et al. (2010) succeeded in detecting the operation of GBS from observing the coalescence of grains of secondary phase in superplastically deformed samples. The secondary phase pins the motion of grain boundaries of the primary phase; however, the reduction of the number of the grains of secondary phase due to their coalescence allows grain growth of the primary phase. We analyzed the relationships between grain size of the primary and secondary phases, between strain and grain size, and between strain and the number of coalesced grains in the superplastically deformed samples. The results supports participation of all the grains of the primary phase in grain switching process indicating that the grain boundary sliding accommodates almost entire strain during the deformation. Mechanical properties of these materials such as their stress and grain size exponents of 1-2 do not conflict this conclusion. We applied the relationships obtained from analyzing superplastic materials to the microstructure of the natural samples, which has been considered to have deformed via grain boundary sliding, that is, ultramylonite. The microstructure of greenschist-grade ultramylonite reported by Fliervoet et al. (1997) was analyzed. Distributions of the mineral phases (i.e., quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar and biotite) show distinct coalescence of the same mineral phases in the direction almost perpendicular to the foliation of the rock. The number of coalesced grains indicates that the strain that rock experienced is > 2. [reference] Hiraga et al. (2010) Nature 468, 1091

  1. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  2. Coupled alkali feldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in batch systems: 4. Numerical modeling of kinetic reaction paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Lu, Peng; Zheng, Zuoping; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores how dissolution and precipitation reactions are coupled in batch reactor experimental systems at elevated temperatures. This is the fourth paper in our series of "Coupled Alkali Feldspar Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation in Batch Systems". In our third paper, we demonstrated via speciation-solubility modeling that partial equilibrium between secondary minerals and aqueous solutions was not attained in feldspar hydrolysis batch reactors at 90-300 °C and that a strong coupling between dissolution and precipitation reactions follows as a consequence of the slower precipitation of secondary minerals ( Zhu and Lu, 2009). Here, we develop this concept further by using numerical reaction path models to elucidate how the dissolution and precipitation reactions are coupled. Modeling results show that a quasi-steady state was reached. At the quasi-steady state, dissolution reactions proceeded at rates that are orders of magnitude slower than the rates measured at far from equilibrium. The quasi-steady state is determined by the relative rate constants, and strongly influenced by the function of Gibbs free energy of reaction ( ΔG) in the rate laws. To explore the potential effects of fluid flow rates on the coupling of reactions, we extrapolate a batch system ( Ganor et al., 2007) to open systems and simulated one-dimensional reactive mass transport for oligoclase dissolution and kaolinite precipitation in homogeneous porous media. Different steady states were achieved at different locations along the one-dimensional domain. The time-space distribution and saturation indices (SI) at the steady states were a function of flow rates for a given kinetic model. Regardless of the differences in SI, the ratio between oligoclase dissolution rates and kaolinite precipitation rates remained 1.626, as in the batch system case ( Ganor et al., 2007). Therefore, our simulation results demonstrated coupling among dissolution, precipitation, and flow rates

  3. Minerals and rocks, what a passion! A CLIL unit in an Italian lower secondary class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Piera; Fiorineschi, Beatrice

    2015-04-01

    CLIL means Content and Language Integrated Learning. Since September 2014 the teaching of a discipline in a foreign language has been compulsory in the final year of all high schools of Italy and recommended in lower secondary schools. So I decided to take part in a training course about "CLIL in Sciences teaching " that ANISN (Associazione Nazionale Insegnanti di Scienze Naturali ) was being held in Bologna from October to December 2014. There I learned that CLIL is much more than the translation of a traditional lecture to a foreign language. It is actually a set of new methodologies, largely based on Bloom's taxonomy, and making use of many kinds of technical support often referred to as "scaffolding" . It provides a context to improve communication because "natural language is never learned divorced from meaning". But CLIL is even more effective in order to learn the content, which is more important here than in immersion methodology. In the course we had to chose a subject , develop it in a structured unit, experiment the unit in a class of ours, using just English, and finally present it to the colleagues in Bologna. I decided to do the activity with 13 year old students. We had started the science lessons with chemistry, this year and I needed a subject consistent with that. So the choice was: Minerals! Because they belong to chemistry, being chemical compounds. Subsequently, even when the course in Bologna had come to an end, we continued with: Rocks! Since the pupils were pleased to do it and I was satisfied with their results. I worked together with my colleague who teaches English in the same class. We developed the subject following the instructions I had been given at the course: we showed the students videos found on line, providing them with the script; we made the text easier for them; we made them work in couples; I organized lab activities to improve learning skills to which they could apply their knowledge . Cross - curricolar links are an

  4. Spectroscopic vibrations of austinite (CaZnAsO4ṡOH) and its mineral structure: Implications for identification of secondary arsenic-containing mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Ming, Dengshi; Cheng, Hongfei; Xu, Zhiqiang; Frost, Ray L.

    2015-01-01

    Austinite (CaZnAsO4ṡOH) is a unique secondary mineral in arsenic-contaminated mine wastes. The infrared and Raman spectroscopies were used to characterize the austenite vibrations. The IR bands at 369, 790 and 416 cm-1 are assigned to the ν2, ν3 and ν4 vibrations of AsO43- unit, respectively. The Raman bands at 814, 779 and 403 cm-1 correspond to the ν1, ν3 and ν4 vibrations of AsO43- unit respectively. The sharp bands at 3265 cm-1 for IR and 3270 cm-1 both reveals that the structural hydroxyl units exist in the austenite structure. The IR and Raman spectra both show that some SO4 units isomorphically replace AsO4 in austinite. X-ray single crystal diffraction provides the arrangement of each atom in the mineral structure, and also confirms that the conclusions made from the vibrational spectra. Micro-powder diffraction was used to confirm our mineral identification due to the small quantity of the austenite crystals.

  5. A granulometry and secondary mineral fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes and its application to blockfield origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Bradley W.

    2012-12-01

    A review of published literature was undertaken to determine if there was a fingerprint of chemical weathering in regoliths subjected to periglacial conditions during their formation. If present, this fingerprint would be applied to the question of when blockfields in periglacial landscapes were initiated. These blocky diamicts are usually considered to represent remnants of regoliths that were chemically weathered under a warm, Neogene climate and therefore indicate surfaces that have undergone only a few metres to a few 10s of metres of erosion during the Quaternary. Based on a comparison of clay and silt abundances and secondary mineral assemblages from blockfields, other regoliths in periglacial settings, and regoliths from non-periglacial settings, a fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes was identified. A mobile regolith origin under, at least seasonal, periglacial conditions is indicated where clay(%) ≤ 0.5*silt(%) + 8 across a sample batch. This contrasts with a mobile regolith origin under non-periglacial conditions, which is indicated where clay(%) ≥ 0.5*silt(%) - 6 across a sample batch with clay(%) ≥ 0.5*silt(%) + 8 in at least one sample. A range of secondary minerals, which frequently includes interstratified minerals and indicates high local variability in leaching conditions, is also commonly present in regoliths exposed to periglacial conditions during their formation. Clay/silt ratios display a threshold response to temperature, related to the freezing point of water, but there is little response to precipitation or regolith residence time. Lithology controls clay and silt abundances, which increase from felsic, through intermediate, to mafic compositions, but does not control clay/silt ratios. Use of a sedigraph or Coulter Counter to determine regolith granulometry systematically indicates lower clay abundances and intra-site variability than use of a pipette or hydrometer. In contrast to clay/silt ratios, secondary

  6. MDD Analysis of Microtexturally Characterized K-Feldspar Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. H.; Heizler, M. T.; Parsons, I.; Heizler, L.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple diffusion domain (MDD) analysis of K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra is a powerful thermochronological tool dating back 25 years, but continued validation of the basic assumptions of the model can be afforded by microanalysis of K-feldspar crystal fragments. MDD theory assumes that diffusion of Ar in K-feldspars is controlled by domains of varying size bounded by infinitely fast diffusion pathways. However, the physical character of these domain boundaries is not fully understood and this issue remains a point of criticism of the MDD model. We have evaluated the relationship between texture, age, and thermal history via step heating and modeling of texturally characterized K-feldspar crystal fragments (250-500 μm). K-feldspar phenocrysts from the Shap granite, chosen for their well-studied and relatively simple microtextures, contain large areas of homogenous regular strain-controlled film perthite with periodicities on the order of ~1 μm and abundant misfit dislocations, as well as areas of much coarser, irregular, slightly turbid, patch and vein perthite. Total gas ages (TGA) for all Shap fragments, regardless of texture, show less than 2% variation, but the shape of the age spectra varies with microtexture. Film perthites produce flat spectra whereas patch/vein perthite spectra have initial steps 5 - 25% older than the age of the emplacement with younger plateau or gently rising steps afterward. Patch/vein perthites have substantial microporosity and their spectral shapes may be a consequence of trapped 40Ar* that has diffused into micropores or other defects that have no continuity with the crystal boundaries. Correlations between spectral shape and heating schedule suggest that initial old ages are produced by the early release of trapped 40Ar* separated from the K parent rather than degassing of excess 40Ar*. The MH-42 K-feldspar from the Chain of Ponds Pluton has two primary microtextures: a coarse patch/vein perthite with lamellae 1-20 μm in

  7. Secondary Mineral Deposits and Evidence of Past Seismicity and Heating of the Proposed Repository Horizon at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, Josheph F.

    2004-01-01

    The Drift Degradation Analysis (DDA) (BSC, 2003) for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, describes model simulations of the effects of pre- and post-closure seismicity and waste-induced heating on emplacement drifts. Based on probabilistic seismic hazard analyses of the intensity and frequency of future seismic events in the region (CRWMS M&O, 1998), the DDA concludes that future seismicity will lead to substantial damage to emplacement drifts, particularly those in the lithophysal tuffs, where some simulations predict complete collapse of the drift walls. Secondary mineral studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1995 indicate that secondary calcite and silica have been deposited in some fractures and lithophysal cavities in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain during at least the past 10 million years (m.y.), and probably since the tuffs cooled to less than 100?C. Tuff fragments, likely generated by past seismic activity, have commonly been incorporated into the secondary mineral depositional sequences. Preliminary observations indicate that seismic activity has generated few, if any, tuff fragments during the last 2 to 4 m.y., which may be inconsistent with the predictions of drift-wall collapse described in the DDA. Whether or not seismicity-induced tuff fragmentation occurring at centimeter to decimeter scales in the fracture and cavity openings relates directly to failure of tuff walls in the 5.5-m-diameter waste emplacement drifts, the deposits do provide a potential record of the spatial and temporal distribution of tuff fragments in the UZ. In addition, the preservation of weakly attached coatings and (or) delicate, upright blades of calcite in the secondary mineral deposits provides an upper limit for ground motion during the late stage of deposition that might be used as input to future DDA simulations. Finally, bleaching and alteration at a few of the secondary mineral sites indicate that

  8. Coupled alkai fieldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipatation in batch systems-2: New experiments with supercritical CO2 and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Peng; Fu, Qi; Seyfried, William E. Jr.; Hedges, Sheila W.; Soong, Yee; Jones, Kyle; Zhua, Chen

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate the extent of CO{sub 2}–water–rock interactions in geological formations for C sequestration, three batch experiments were conducted on alkali feldspars–CO{sub 2}–brine interactions at 150–200 °C and 300 bars. The elevated temperatures were necessary to accelerate the reactions to facilitate attainable laboratory measurements. Temporal evolution of fluid chemistry was monitored by major element analysis of in situ fluid samples. SEM, TEM and XRD analysis of reaction products showed extensive dissolution features (etch pits, channels, kinks and steps) on feldspars and precipitation of secondary minerals (boehmite, kaolinite, muscovite and paragonite) on feldspar surfaces. Therefore, these experiments have generated both solution chemistry and secondary mineral identity. The experimental results show that partial equilibrium was not attained between secondary minerals and aqueous solutions for the feldspar hydrolysis batch systems. Evidence came from both solution chemistry (supersaturation of the secondary minerals during the entire experimental duration) and metastable co-existence of secondary minerals. The slow precipitation of secondary minerals results in a negative feedback in the dissolution–precipitation loop, reducing the overall feldspar dissolution rates by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the experimental data indicate the form of rate laws greatly influence the steady state rates under which feldspar dissolution took place. Negligence of both the mitigating effects of secondary mineral precipitation and the sigmoidal shape of rate–ΔG{sub r} relationship can overestimate the extent of feldspar dissolution during CO{sub 2} storage. Finally, the literature on feldspar dissolution in CO{sub 2}-charged systems has been reviewed. The data available are insufficient and new experiments are urgently needed to establish a database on feldspar dissolution mechanism, rates and rate laws, as well as secondary mineral

  9. Droplet motion on designed microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable wettability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guoping; Li, Wen; Wang, Xiufeng; Qiao, Guanjun

    2008-10-21

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have shown promising applications in microfluidic systems as a result of their water-repellent and low-friction properties over the past decade. Recently, designed microstructures have been experimentally applied to construct wettability gradients and direct the droplet motion. However, thermodynamic mechanisms responsible for the droplet motion on such regular rough surfaces have not been well understood such that at present specific guidelines for the design of tunable superhydrophobic surfaces are not available. In this study, we propose a simple but robust thermodynamic methodology to gain thorough insight into the physical nature for the controllable motion of droplets. On the basis of the thermodynamic calculations of free energy (FE) and the free-energy barrier (FEB), the effects of surface geometry of a pillar microtexture are systematically investigated. It is found that decreasing the pillar width and spacing simultaneously is required to lower the advancing and receding FEBs to effectively direct droplets on the roughness gradient surface. Furthermore, the external energy plays a role in the actuation of spontaneous droplet motion with the cooperation of the roughness gradient. In addition, it is suggested that the so-called "virtual wall" used to confine the liquid flow along the undesired directions could be achieved by constructing highly advancing FEB areas around the microchannels, which is promising for the design of microfluidic systems.

  10. Secondary mineral growth in fractures in the Miravalles geothermal system, Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, C.A. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Milodowski, A.E.; Savage, D. . Fluid Processes Research Group); Corella, M. )

    1989-01-01

    A mineralogical, fluid-chemical, and theoretical study of hydrothermal alteration in veins from drillcore from the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica has revealed a complex history of mineral-fluid reaction which may be used to characterize changes in temperature and fluid composition with time. Mineralogical and mineral-chemical data are consistent with hydrothermal alteration in the temperature range 200{sup 0}-270{sup 0}C, with deeper portions of the system having undergone temperatures in excess of 300{sup 0}C. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the observed alteration assemblage is not equilibrium with current well fluids, unless estimates of reservoir pH are incorrect. Fe-Al zoning of prehnite and epidote in veins is consistent with rapid, isothermal fluctuations in fluid composition at current reservoir temperatures, and may be due to changes in volatile content of the fluid due to tectonic activity.

  11. The Effects of Secondary Mineral Precipitates on 90Sr Mobility at the Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2013-06-03

    The effects of secondary precipitates on 90Sr transport at the Hanford Site were investigated using quartz column experiments with simulated caustic tank waste leachates (STWL). Significantly enhanced retardation of Sr transport was observed in the column contacted with STWL due to Sr sorption and co-precipitation with neo-formed nitratecancrinite. However, the column results also suggest that neo-formed secondary precipitates could behave like native mobile colloids that can enhance Sr transport. Initially immobilized Sr within secondary precipitates could remobilize given a change in the porewater background conditions. The mobility of the neo-formed Sr-bearing precipitates increased with increased solution flow rate. In the field, porewater contents and flow rates can be changed by snowmelt (or storm water) events or artificial infiltration. The increased porewater flow rate caused by these events could affect the mobility of 90Sr-containing secondary precipitates, which can be a potential source for facilitated Sr transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

  12. Collagen type-I leads to in vivo matrix mineralization and secondary stabilization of Mg-Zr-Ca alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Mushahary, Dolly; Wen, Cuie; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Lin, Jixing; Harishankar, Nemani; Hodgson, Peter; Pande, Gopal; Li, Yuncang

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-zirconia-calcium (Mg-Zr-Ca) alloy implants were coated with Collagen type-I (Coll-I) and assessed for their rate and efficacy of bone mineralization and implant stabilization. The phases, microstructure and mechanical properties of these alloys were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and compression test, respectively, and the corrosion behavior was established by their hydrogen production rate in simulated body fluid (SBF). Coll-I extracted from rat tail, and characterized using fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, was used for dip-coating the Mg-based alloys. The coated alloys were implanted into the femur bones of male New Zealand white rabbits. In vivo bone formation around the implants was quantified by measuring the bone mineral content/density (BMC/BMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Osseointegration of the implant and new bone mineralization was visualized by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Upon surface coating with Coll-I, these alloys demonstrated high surface energy showing enhanced performance as an implant material that is suitable for rapid and efficient new bone tissue induction with optimal mineral content and cellular properties. The results demonstrate that Coll-I coated Mg-Zr-Ca alloys have a tendency to form superior trabecular bone structure with better osteoinduction around the implants and higher implant secondary stabilization, through the phenomenon of contact osteogenesis, compared to the control and uncoated ones in shorter periods of implantation. Hence, Coll-I surface coating of Mg-Zr-Ca alloys is a promising method for expediting new bone formation in vivo and enhancing osseointegration in load bearing implant applications.

  13. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J. X.; Xu, Y. S.; Buchko, G. W.; Shaw, W. J.

    2013-10-15

    Biomineralization proteins, present during the formation of hard tissues including bones, teeth, egg shells and nacre, result in the exquisite structures and properties of the resulting materials.[1] The structure of these proteins is often implicated in the control of the mineral properties, however very little structural data is available for the bulk of these proteins due to the difficulty in determining structures of immobilized proteins. Solid-state NMR is uniquely suited to the study of the structure of proteins bound to surfaces, demonstrated with the structural and orientation insights provided for the hydroxyapatite mineralization proteins statherin and the amelogenin, LRAP.[2] While these data are some of the only structural data available for this important class of protein, the experiments are often expensive and time consuming, due to the need to prepare and measure samples with isolated spin pairs, and are limited to a size of ~60 residues. In this work, we utilized a combination of 1D and recent 2D[3] solid-state NMR techniques along with a sparsely labelled sample to characterize the structure and dynamics of potential HAP binding residues of the 180 residue enamel protein, amelogenin. Amelogenin nanospheres and mineral bound amelogenin were investigated and a shift from unstructured to β-sheet structure was observed, along with a decrease in protein flexibility. This work provides the first molecular level structure and dynamic information of full-length amelogenin on the surface of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and within nanospheres, and demonstrates the ability to evaluate structural characteristics of large biomineralization proteins bound to their physiologically relevant surface. The research was performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a facility operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, with a portion of it performed at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user

  14. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    PubMed

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2.

  15. [Secondary anticoagulant prophylaxis with low molecular heparins or oral anticoagulants and bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Przedlacki, J; Hajduk, B; Tomkowski, W; Fijałkowska, A; Ostrowski, K; Torbicki, A

    2000-11-01

    A broad spectrum of indications for low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) requires an assessment of side effects especially during prolonged administration. There are common risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and osteoporosis; heparin is "the drug of choice" for VTE treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of treatment and prophylaxis with LMWH (enoxaparine sodium) and oral anticoagulant (acenocoumarol) for bone structure. Material consists of in- and outpatients. 49 densitometries were performed in 31 patients (in 15 cases double examination). We observed a decrease of bone mineral density in comparison to the initial examination in most cases: mean change of bone mass for examined areas was 3.05%.

  16. Experimental investigation of cesium mobility in the course of secondary mineral formations in Hanford sediment columns at 50 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Mashal, Kholoud Y; Cetiner, Ziya S

    2010-10-01

    Formation of secondary minerals and Cs mobility in Hanford sediments were investigated under conditions similar to the Hanford tank leak in a dynamic flow system at 50 degrees C. The objectives were to (1) examine the nature and locations of secondary mineral phases precipitated in the sediments and (2) quantify the amount of Cs retained by the sediment matrix at 50 degrees C. To this end, Hanford sediments were packed into 10-cm long columns and leached with simulated tank waste consisting of 1.4 M NaOH, 0.125 M NaAlO(2), 3.7 M NaNO(3), and 1.3 x 10(-4) M Cs at 50 degrees C. Compositions of outflow solution were monitored with time for up to 25 days, and the columns were then segmented into four 2.5-cm long layers. The colloidal fraction in these segments was characterized in terms of mineralogy, particle morphology, Cs content, and short-range Al and Si structure. It was observed that cancrinite and sodalite precipitated at 50 degrees C. Approximately 53% Cs was retained in the column treated by the simulated tank waste at this temperature. Cesium retention in the column was lowered in the high ionic strength solution due to competition from Na for the exchange sites. This can be explained by alteration of distribution and number of sorption sites which reduces the selectivity of Cs for Na, and through the formation of cancrinite and sodalite. The formation of hydroxide complexes in highly alkaline solutions could also contribute to relatively poor retention of Cs by hindering ion exchange mechanism.

  17. A patterned microtexture to reduce friction and increase longevity of prosthetic hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Chyr, Anthony; Qiu, Mingfeng; Speltz, Jared; Jacobsen, Ronald L.; Sanders, Anthony P.; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-01-01

    More than 285,000 total hip replacement surgeries are performed in the US each year. Most prosthetic hip joints consist of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) femoral head that articulates with a polyethylene acetabular component, lubricated with synovial fluid. The statistical survivorship of these metal-on-polyethylene prosthetic hip joints declines significantly after 10 to 15 years of use, primarily as a result of polyethylene wear and wear debris incited disease. The current engineering paradigm to increase the longevity of prosthetic hip joints is to improve the mechanical properties of the polyethylene component, and to manufacture ultra-smooth articulating surfaces. In contrast, we show that adding a patterned microtexture to the ultra-smooth CoCr femoral head reduces friction when articulating with the polyethylene acetabular liner. The microtexture increases the load-carrying capacity and the thickness of the joint lubricant film, which reduces contact between the articulating surfaces. As a result, friction and wear is reduced. We have used a lubrication model to design the geometry of the patterned microtexture, and experimentally demonstrate reduced friction for the microtextured compared to conventional smooth surrogate prosthetic hip joints. PMID:25013240

  18. A patterned microtexture to reduce friction and increase longevity of prosthetic hip joints.

    PubMed

    Chyr, Anthony; Qiu, Mingfeng; Speltz, Jared; Jacobsen, Ronald L; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-07-15

    More than 285,000 total hip replacement surgeries are performed in the US each year. Most prosthetic hip joints consist of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) femoral head that articulates with a polyethylene acetabular component, lubricated with synovial fluid. The statistical survivorship of these metal-on-polyethylene prosthetic hip joints declines significantly after 10 to 15 years of use, primarily as a result of polyethylene wear and wear debris incited disease. The current engineering paradigm to increase the longevity of prosthetic hip joints is to improve the mechanical properties of the polyethylene component, and to manufacture ultra-smooth articulating surfaces. In contrast, we show that adding a patterned microtexture to the ultra-smooth CoCr femoral head reduces friction when articulating with the polyethylene acetabular liner. The microtexture increases the load-carrying capacity and the thickness of the joint lubricant film, which reduces contact between the articulating surfaces. As a result, friction and wear is reduced. We have used a lubrication model to design the geometry of the patterned microtexture, and experimentally demonstrate reduced friction for the microtextured compared to conventional smooth surrogate prosthetic hip joints.

  19. Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2013-07-09

    In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

  20. Water chemistry impacts on arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation: implications for managed aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Neil, Chelsea W; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Schupp, Don; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-04-15

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is a water reuse technique with the potential to meet growing water demands. However, MAR sites have encountered arsenic mobilization resulting from recharge operations. To combat this challenge, it is imperative to identify the mechanisms of arsenic mobilization during MAR. In this bench-scale study, arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite (FeAsS) was characterized for conditions relevant to MAR operations. Experimentally determined activation energies for arsenic mobilization from FeAsS under aerobic conditions were 36.9 ± 2.3 kJ/mol for 10 mM sodium chloride, 40.8 ± 3.5 kJ/mol for 10 mM sodium nitrate, and 43.6 ± 5.0 kJ/mol for secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant. Interestingly, the sodium chloride system showed higher arsenic mobilization under aerobic conditions. In addition, secondary mineral precipitation varied among systems and further affected arsenic mobilization. For example, the wastewater system inhibited precipitation, while in the sodium chloride system, faster phase transformation of iron(III) (hydr)oxide precipitates was observed, resulting in hematite formation after 7 days. The phase transformation to hematite will result in less available surface area for arsenic attenuation. These new observations and activation energies can be useful to develop improved reactive transport models for the fate of arsenic during MAR, and develop strategies to minimize arsenic release.

  1. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  2. Systematic variations in sinter mineralogy, microtexture and diagenesis in modern siliceous hot springs: Clues for interpreting depositional conditions in ancient deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, V. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Ruff, S. W.; Nunez, J.; Jahnke, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    The deposits of siliceous hydrothermal springs are known to capture and preserve a wide range of microbial fossil information. The recent discovery of hydrothermal silica at Home Plate, Columbia Hills, Mars has once again raised interest in the potential importance of ancient spring sinters as targets for future astrobiological mission to Mars. To create additional context information to support future in situ missions to Mars, we have documented systematic changes in the mineralogy and microtexture of modern siliceous hot spring deposits, observed along gradients in temperature, pH and flow velocity. Specific objectives are to: 1) identify chemical and physical factors that promote early diagenetic transformations of amorphous silica (opal-A), to progressively more ordered and crystalline phases (cristobalite, tridymite and quartz); 2) determine the composition and abundance of minor mineral phases, especially clays, in relationship to pH, temperature and paragenesis; and 3) to assess the usefulness of sinter mineralogy and microtexture in reconstructing the paleoenvironmental records preserved in ancient deposits. Study sites for acidic (pH 2-5) sinters included Nymph Creek, located in the Norris Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Active alkaline (pH 7-10) springs included Rabbit Creek, Steep Cone and Mound Spring located in the Lower Geyser Basin, YNP. Field measurements in active springs included pH, temperature and flow velocity, along with general microfacies assignments. To better constrain types and rates of silica diagenesis, the study also sampled older (Holocene-Pleistocene-aged) deposits. Laboratory analyses included X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal infrared spectroscopy (TIR) and thin section petrography for characterizing sinter microtextures and for placing mineral phases (identified by XRPD and TIR) into a time-ordered diagenetic framework. In analyzing the phyllosilicates present in sinters, we applied clay separation and

  3. Integrating hematite (U-Th)/He dating, microtextural analysis, and thermomechanical modeling to date seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, R.; Ault, A. K.; Evans, J. P.; Reiners, P. W.; Shuster, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Linking petrologic and geochronologic evidence for seismicity in the rock record is challenging, yet critical for understanding slip mechanics in natural faults, structural histories, and modern seismic hazards. We couple hematite (U-Th)/He (HeHe) dating with microtextural analysis and thermomechanical modeling to decipher this record from locally iridescent, hematite-coated fault surfaces in the seismogenic Wasatch fault zone (WFZ), Utah. Prior study of one fault surface linked textural evidence for elevated temperatures with a pattern of HeHe dates to hypothesize that this surface preserves evidence of multiple seismic slip events. New scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and HeHe data from a larger sample suite test this hypothesis. The SEM images reveal the presence of <500 nm polygonal hematite crystals at some iridescent regions, suggesting co- to post-seismic hematite annealing and recrystallization at temperatures >800 °C. Fault surface samples yield 3.8 ± 0.03 to 1.5 ± 0.1 Ma dates, with younger dates in iridescent regions. These results are younger than 88.5 ± 15.0 Ma and 10.8 ± 0.8 Ma dates from veins associated with initial hematite mineralization as well as new apatite (U-Th)/He dates of 4.0 ± 0.6 Ma-5.4±1.1 Ma that constrain the footwall thermal history. Reproducible but statistically different HeHe dates from samples on the same fault surface are consistent with prior observations. Collectively, these observations suggest that hematite He dates record rapid cooling from localized shear heating at asperities to temperatures hot enough to reset the hematite He system. Models incorporate rate-dependent friction and half-space cooling to constrain shear zone temperature evolution. Results reveal temperatures >800 °C are sufficient to reset hematite up to 200 μm from the fault surface and HeHe dates may represent patches of rate-strengthening friction during seismic slip. Ongoing work utilizes SEM to target aliquots with textural evidence for

  4. Field Observation of Heterogeneous Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols on Asian Mineral Dust Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the heterogeneous formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on dust surfaces by characterizing molecular compositions and size distributions of dicarboxylic acids, keto-carboxylic acids, a-dicarbonyls and inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols (9-stages) in the urban atmosphere of Xi'an, China during dust storm periods and comparing with those in non-dust storm periods. In the presence of a dust storm, all the above mentioned SOA species in Xi'an are predominantly enriched on coarse particles (>2.1 µm). Oxalic acid well correlated with NO3- (r2=0.72, p<0.01) rather than SO42-. This phenomenon differs greatly from the observed particles during a non-dust storm period, which is characterized by an enrichment of the SOA on fine particles (<2.1 µm) with a strong correlation between C2 and SO42-. We propose a three-step formation pathway to explain these observations as follows. First, nitric acid and nitrogen oxides react with dust to form a liquid film on the surface via water vapor-absorption of calcium nitrate. Second, gaseous Gly and mGly partition into the aqueous-phase. Finally, the aqueous-phase Gly and mGly oxidize into glyoxylic acid (wC2), followed by a further oxidation into C2. To the best of our knowledge, we found for the first time the enrichments of glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (mGly) on dust surfaces. Our data indicate a more critical role of nitrate than sulfate in the heterogeneous formation process of SOA on dust surfaces. Mass ratio of C2 to wC2 was found to be higher in coarse particles than in fine particles during the dust storm events, which is due to low acidity condition of large particles that is favorable for conversion of wC2 to C2.

  5. Organic carbon and reducing conditions lead to cadmium immobilization by secondary Fe mineral formation in a pH-neutral soil.

    PubMed

    Muehe, E Marie; Adaktylou, Irini J; Obst, Martin; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Behrens, Sebastian; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is of environmental relevance as it enters soils via Cd-containing phosphate fertilizers and endangers human health when taken up by crops. Cd is known to associate with Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in pH-neutral to slightly acidic soils, though it is not well understood how the interrelation of Fe and Cd changes under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Therefore, we investigated how the mobility of Cd changes when a Cd-bearing soil is faced with organic carbon input and reducing conditions. Using fatty acid profiles and quantitative PCR, we found that both fermenting and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were stimulated by organic carbon-rich conditions, leading to significant Fe(III) reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) minerals was accompanied by increasing soil pH, increasing dissolved inorganic carbon, and decreasing Cd mobility. SEM-EDX mapping of soil particles showed that a minor fraction of Cd was transferred to Ca- and S-bearing minerals, probably carbonates and sulfides. Most of the Cd, however, correlated with a secondary iron mineral phase that was formed during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction and contained mostly Fe, suggesting an iron oxide mineral such as magnetite (Fe3O4). Our data thus provide evidence that secondary Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed minerals could be a sink for Cd in soils under reducing conditions, thus decreasing the mobility of Cd in the soil.

  6. Pore-scale study of the effect of secondary carbonate precipitation on the dissolution of primary minerals using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Q.; Chen, L.; Carey, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive transport processes involving dissolution and/or precipitation are pervasive in Earth, energy, and environmental systems. One typical example is geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Among these reactive processes, it is commonly encountered that a second phase precipitates while the primary phase dissolves, and the precipitation and dissolution reactions are fully coupled with each other. In the case of mineral trapping of CO2, the primary silicate mineral dissolves due to a decrease of pH caused by the dissolution of CO2 into the solution; meanwhile the dissolved CO2 can react with cations to form a secondary precipitate of carbonate mineral. Although the effect of precipitation of secondary solid phase on the dissolution of the primary solid phase has been studied extensively, the results reported in the literature are often inconclusive and sometimes even contradict one another. The reason is that the coupled dissolution and precipitation processes are controlled by several factors whose contribution is difficult to ascertain, including the dissolution and precipitation reaction kinetics, temperature and pressure, pH and species concentration of the solution, physicochemical properties of the primary and secondary minerals, as well as the nucleation and crystal mechanisms of the precipitates, etc. In this study, a pore-scale (mesoscopic) model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to investigate the effects of secondary precipitation on the dissolution of the primary mineral. The model can predict coupled multiple physicochemical processes including fluid flow, mass transport, chemical reaction, dissolution, precipitation consisting of nucleation and crystal growth, as well as dynamical evolution of pore geometries. Effects of dissolution and precipitation reaction kinetics, molar volumes of primary and secondary minerals, initial powder size and surface roughness of the primary mineral, as well as nucleation and crystal growth

  7. Micro-textured conductive polymer/silicon heterojunction photovoltaic devices with high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting-Gang; Huang, Bo-Yu; Chen, En-Chen; Yu, Peichen; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2012-07-01

    In this work, hybrid heterojunction solar cells are demonstrated based on a conjugate polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) directly spun-cast on micro-textured n-type crystalline silicon wafers. The fabrication conditions suggest that the organic coverage on the micro-textured surface is excellent and key to achieve high efficiency, leading to an average power conversion efficiency of 9.84%. A one-dimensional drift-diffusion model is then developed based on fitting the device characteristics with experimentally determined PEDOT:PSS parameters and projects an ultimate efficiency above 20% for organic/inorganic hybrid photovoltaics. The simulation results reveal the impacts of defect densities, back surface recombination, doping concentration, and band alignment.

  8. The Role of Microtexture on Fatigue Lifetime Variability and Crack Initiation Mechanisms (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    October 2011 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE ROLE OF MICROTEXTURE OF FATIGUE LIFETIME VARIABILITY AND CRACK INITIATION MECHANISMS (PREPRINT) 5a...CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6 . AUTHOR(S) Christopher J. Szczepanski (Universal Technology...Preprint journal article to be submitted to Titanium 2011 World Conference. This document contains color. 14. ABSTRACT Commercial titanium alloys

  9. The Influence on Microstructure and Microtexture on Fatigue Crack Initiation and Growth in Alpha + Beta Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    discovered by fatigue testing, however, it would be useful to rank the resistance of a particular microstructure to its fatigue crack growth... resistance . In the present work, we present a methodology for this purpose that correlates, microstructure including microtexture as affected by...thermomechanical processing sequences were all typical of α + β worked material consisting of globular α particles in a matrix of transformed β. The

  10. Fabrication of Highly-Oleophobic and Superhydrophobic Surfaces on Microtextured al Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changsong; Zhou, Jigen; Zheng, Dongmei; Wan, Yong; Li, Zhiwen

    2011-06-01

    Theoretical calculations suggest that creating highly-oleophobic surfaces would require a surface energy lower than that of any known materials. In the present work, we demonstrate microtextured Al substrate surfaces with veins-like micro/nanostructures displaying apparent contact angles (CA) greater than 120°, even with nitromethane (surface tension γ1 = 37 mN/m). The Al substrate was microtextured by a chemical solution mixed by zinc nitrate hexahydrate, hexamethyltetramine and a little of hydrofluoric acid. A fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) agent was used to tune the surface wettability. The Al substrates were microtextured by veins-like micro/nanostructures and generating a solid-liquid-vapor composite interface. Combination with FAS modification, the Al surfaces resulted in an oleophobicity with CA for nitromethane was 126.3° (152.7° for diethylene glycol, γ1 = 45.2 mN/m). In addition, the Al surfaces demonstrated a low rolling-off angle with < 6° even for diethylene glycol. However, nitromethane droplet favored to pin on the sample surface even the sample stage is tilted to 90°. It is noted that this highly-oleophobic behavior is induced mainly by topography, which form a composite surface of air and solid with oil drop sitting partially on air. The results are expected to promote the study on self-cleaning applications, especially in the condition with oil contaminations.

  11. Assessment of toxic potential of primary and secondary particulates/aerosols from biodiesel vis-à-vis mineral diesel fuelled engine.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Avinash Kumar; Gupta, Tarun; Dixit, Neelabh; Shukla, Pravesh Chandra

    2013-05-01

    Toxicity of engine out emissions from primary and secondary aerosols has been a major cause of concern for human health and environmental impact. This study aims to evaluate comparative toxicity of nanoparticles emitted from a modern common rail direct injection engine (CRDI) fuelled with biodiesel blend (B20) vis-à-vis mineral diesel. The toxicity and potential health hazards of exhaust particles were assessed using various parameters such as nanoparticle size and number distribution, surface area distribution, elemental and organic carbon content and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto the particle surfaces, followed by toxic equivalent factor assessment. It was found that biodiesel particulate toxicity was considerably lower in comparison to mineral diesel.

  12. Effect of doxercalciferol (1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D2) on PTH, bone turnover and bone mineral density in a hemodialysis patient with persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism post parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Parisi, M S; Oliveri, B; Somoza, J; Mautalen, C

    2003-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of the vitamin D analog, doxercalciferol (1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D2, 1alphaD2) in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients has been previously reported. We report these effect of 16-week 1alphaD2 treatment on mineral metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD) in a hemodialysis patient with persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism post parathyroidectomy, resistant to previous calcitriol treatment. Levels of iPTH, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and serum type I collagen C telopeptide were above normal at baseline and were substantially decreased with 1alphaD2 treatment (-92%, -63% and -53%, respectively). BMD increased in all areas: total skeleton (+6.5%), lumbar spine (+6.9%) and total femur (+4.3%). The patient showed no hypercalcemia, and phosphorus levels remained between 3.3 and 6.2 mg/dl.

  13. Wetting effects on in vitro bioactivity and in vitro biocompatibility of laser micro-textured Ca-P coating.

    PubMed

    Paital, Sameer R; Cao, Zheng; He, Wei; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2010-06-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coating on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy enhances osteoblast adhesion and tissue formation at the bone implant interface. In light of this, in the current work a laser-based coating technique was used to synthesize two different micro-textured (100 microm and 200 microm spaced line patterns) Ca-P coatings on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy and its effect on wettability and osteoblast cell adhesion were systematically studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the coated samples indicated the presence of precursor material, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HA) and various other additional phases such as CaTiO3, Ca3(PO4)2, TiO2 (anatase) and TiO2 (rutile) owing to the reaction between the precursor (HA) and substrate (Ti-6Al-4V) during laser processing. Confocal laser scanning microscopy-based characterization of coated samples indicated that the samples processed at 100 microm line spacing demonstrated a reduced surface roughness and smaller texture parameter value as compared to the samples processed at 200 microm spacing. The surface energy and wettability of the 100 microm spaced samples measured using a static sessile drop technique demonstrated higher surface energy and increased hydrophilicity as compared to the control (untreated Ti-6Al-4V) and the samples processed at 200 microm spacing. The tendency of coated samples for mineralization through generation of an apatite-like phase during immersion in a simulated body fluid was indicative of their in vitro bioactive nature. In light of higher surface energy and increased hydrophilicity the in vitro biocompatibility of the samples with 100 microm line spacing was demonstrated through increased cell proliferation and cell adhesion of mouse MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells.

  14. Fabrication of micro-textured surfaces for a high hydrophobicity by evaporative patterning using screen mesh templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuhisa, Hideo; Tsukamoto, Shiho; Morita, Satoko; Ise, Shogo; Tomita, Mitsuru; Shirakawa, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    In this study, micro-textured surfaces for a high hydrophobicity were fabricated through evaporative patterning of a hydrophobic polymer, CYTOP using various types of screen meshes as the templates. The screen meshes were placed over a hydrophilic glass substrate followed by casting a polymer solution onto the templates to wet the surface entirely. Slow evaporation of the solution gave various types of micro-textured patterns depending on the polymer concentration, the mesh counts, the evaporation temperature, the type of the mesh, whether or not the mesh is calendared. The structures were characterized by optical and scanning electric microscopy, and contact angle (CA) measurements. The mechanism of the pattern formation is discussed. Finally, addition of graphene to the micro-textured surface gave a superhydrophobic surface (CA: 155°), which is concluded that a hierarchical micro/nano structure could be formed.

  15. In Situ Testing of Metal Micro-Textured Thermal Interface Materials in Telecommunications Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempers, R.; Kerslake, S.

    2014-07-01

    A metal micro-textured thermal interface material (MMT-TIM) has been developed to address the shortcomings of conventional TIMs for Remote Radio Heat (RRH) applications. The performance of the MMT-TIM was characterized in-situ by monitoring the temperatures of the dominant heat generating devices in an RRH Power Amplifier for a fixed input power. Measurements show that the use of the MMT-TIM results in significantly lower devices temperatures than achieved with the conventionally used graphite pads with a maximum temperature drop of 14.9 °C observed. The effect of power cycling on the long term performance trends is also examined.

  16. Study of dolomite dissolution at various temperatures - Evidence for the formation of nanocrystalline secondary phases at dolomite surface and influence on dolomite interactions with other minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debure, M.; Andreazza, P.; Grangeon, S.; Lerouge, C.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; MADE, B.; Tournassat, C.

    2015-12-01

    In most clay-rock geological formation studied for the storage of nuclear waste, pore water compositions are expected to be at equilibrium with carbonate minerals, which are always included in predictive models for pore water composition calculations [1]. Among the carbonates known to be present, dolomite may be problematic in the pore water composition calculation because its solubility spans a large range of values as a function of its crystallinity in thermodynamic databases. In addition, the composition of dolomite minerals observed in clay-rock formations such as Callovian-Oxfordian or Opalinus clay formation differs from this of a pure dolomite: the Ca/Mg stoichiometry is not ideal, and the minerals contain minor amounts of Fe and traces of many other elements [2]. To understand the influence of secondary phases precipitation during dolomite dissolution on pore water chemistry, the dissolution of monocrystals of dolomite were investigated at 25 °C and at 80 °C in a pH range 3 to 8 for various time periods (30 minutes to 21 days) in sealed PTFE reactors. Solution analyses evidenced a stoichiometric release of Ca and Mg in solution during dolomite dissolution. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses did not evidence secondary Mg-bearing minerals precipitation, but revealed the formation of Fe-bearing particles on the dolomite surface. Morphological characterizations performed with Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) evidenced that the precipitation occurs along a specific crystallographic plane of the dolomite monocrystal. Thus, the precipitated nanoparticles clustered on specific surface sites, and are made of Fe-rich phases poorly crystallized (carbonates, oxides and hydroxides). [1] Tournassat et al. 2015. Ch. 3: Chemical Conditions in Clay-Rocks. Natural and Engineered Clay Barriers, Elsevier. [2] Lerouge et al. 2011. Geochim. et Cosmoch. Acta, 2011, 75, 2633-2663.

  17. The influence of microtextured basal lamina analog topography on keratinocyte function and epidermal organization.

    PubMed

    Downing, Brett R; Cornwell, Kevin; Toner, Mehmet; Pins, George D

    2005-01-01

    The rational design of future bioengineered skin substitutes requires an understanding of the mechanisms by which the three-dimensional microarchitecture of tissue scaffolds modulates keratinocyte function. Microtextured basal lamina analogs were developed to investigate the relationship between the characteristic topography at the dermal-epidermal interface of native skin and keratinocyte function. Microfabrication techniques were used to create master patterns, negative replicates, and collagen membranes with ridges and channels of length scales (e.g., grooves of 50-200 microm in depth and width) similar to the invaginations found in basal lamina at the dermal-epidermal junction of native skin. Keratinocytes were seeded on the surfaces of basal lamina analogs, and histological analyses were performed after 7 days of tissue culture at the air-liquid interface. The keratinocytes formed a differentiated and stratified epidermis that conformed to the features of the microtextured membranes. Morphometric analyses of immunostained skin equivalents suggest that keratinocyte stratification and differentiation increases as channel depth increases and channel width decreases. This trend was most pronounced in channels with the highest depth-to-width ratios (i.e., 200 microm deep, 50 microm wide). It is anticipated that the findings from these studies will elucidate design parameters to enhance the performance of future bioengineered skin substitutes.

  18. Acid-etched microtexture for enhancement of bone growth into porous-coated implants.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Harvey, E J; Tanzer, M; Krygier, J J; Bobyn, J D

    2003-11-01

    We designed an in vivo study to determine if the superimposition of a microtexture on the surface of sintered titanium beads affected the extent of bone ingrowth. Cylindrical titanium intramedullary implants were coated with titanium beads to form a porous finish using commercial sintering techniques. A control group of implants was left in the as-sintered condition. The test group was etched in a boiling acidic solution to create an irregular surface over the entire porous coating. Six experimental dogs underwent simultaneous bilateral femoral intramedullary implantation of a control implant and an acid etched implant. At 12 weeks, the implants were harvested in situ and the femora processed for undecalcified, histological examination. Eight transverse serial sections for each implant were analysed by backscattered electron microscopy and the extent of bone ingrowth was quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The extent of bone ingrowth into the control implants was 15.8% while the extent of bone ingrowth into the etched implants was 25.3%, a difference of 60% that was statistically significant. These results are consistent with other research that documents the positive effect of microtextured surfaces on bone formation at an implant surface. The acid etching process developed for this study represents a simple method for enhancing the potential of commonly available porous coatings for biological fixation.

  19. Fibroblast attachment to smooth and microtextured PET and thin cp-Ti films.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakhi; Von Recum, Andreas F

    2004-02-01

    Improving the biological performance of engineered implants apposing interfacing tissues is a critical issue in Biomaterials Science and Engineering. Micromotion at the soft tissue-implant interface has been shown to sustain an inflammatory response. To eliminate micromotion, it is desirable to promote cellular and extracellular matrix adhesion to the implant surface. Surfaces are modified topographically or chemically to effect cellular adhesion and to influence cellular interactions and function. Previous studies have identified the specific topographical characteristics that appear to elicit cellular attachment. This in vitro study compares the independent effects of surface chemistry and topography on fibroblast-test specimen proximity. Titanium (Ti) was sputter-coated in stepwise, increasing thickness (20-350 nm) onto a series of either smooth or microtextured polyethylene terephthalate (PET), resulting in a stepwise change from a PET surface to a Ti surface. The series was evaluated in a 3-day fibroblast culture with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for cell-test specimen proximity. Fibroblast proximity to the coverslip surface increases, as the Ti thickness increases, on either smooth or textured test specimens. Furthermore, fibroblasts were firmly attached to the ridge tops on the coated textured test specimens. Therefore, fibroblast apposition is strongly enhanced by microtextured surfaces and Ti rather than smooth surfaces and PET.

  20. O-triple Isotopes of Primary and Secondary Minerals Provide Clues to the Past and Present Hydrosphere of Mars: New Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Thiemens, M. H.; Khachatryan, A.; Smirnova, V.; Jackson, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen, the most abundant element in terrestrial planets link their lithospheres, hydrospheres and atmospheres, thus providing a powerful tool to fingerprint the physical and chemical processes involved in the exchange of material between these reservoirs (1). The oxygen triple isotopic composition of SNC Martian meteorites minerals provided a record of this unique interaction. Martian silicates showed an O-isotope anomaly (Δ17O = 0.4 ‰) unlike earth's silicate (Δ17O = 0‰). Additionally, there is a signficant variation in the oxygen isotopic composition of primary and secondary minerals both in the oldest (ALH84001: Δ17OCO3 = 0.7‰, Δ17Osilicates = 0.3‰)(2) and younger martian rocks (NWA7034: Δ17OCO3 = 0.0‰, Δ17Osilicates = 0.6‰)(3) indicating substantial changes in the global aqueous chemistry of Mars and its formation. These variations in oxygen isotope anomalies are important, but puzzling due to the lack of knoweldege of the intial conditions and relevant experiments. To understand the origin and nature of heterogeneity in the oxygen triple isotopes of various minerals, laboratory experiments were conducted by simulating current Martian conditions. Ozone, a martian atmospheric constituent, was used as a tracer to identify molecular reactions occurring on the mineral surfaces. The oxygen isotopic composition of decomposed ozone and water was measured following reaction over extended time under defined conditions . The decomposed O2 defines an array with a slope δ17O = 0.87 x δ18O + 5 (r2 = 0.99). The left over ozone after 18hours showed a decrease in slope (δ17O = 0.7 x δ18O + 5 (r2 = 0.97) and significant variations in Δ17O= 20 - 31‰ depending on the mineral used in the experiment. The slope did not pass through the initial ozone and water suggesting the formation of an intermediate species and its reaction and removal that is responsible for the exchange of O-isotopes between water-ozone and mineral oxides. These results coupled with

  1. Weathering of sulfidic shale and copper mine waste: Secondary minerals and metal cycling in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R.; Meier, A.L.; Jackson, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Metal cycling via physical and chemical weathering of discrete sources (copper mines) and regional (non-point) sources (sulfide-rich shale) is evaluated by examining the mineralogy and chemistry of weathering products in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA. The elements in copper mine waste, secondary minerals, stream sediments, and waters that are most likely to have negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems are aluminum, copper, zinc, and arsenic because these elements locally exceed toxicity guidelines for surface waters or for stream sediments. Acid-mine drainage has not developed in streams draining inactive copper mines. Acid-rock drainage and chemical weathering processes that accompany debris flows or human disturbances of sulfidic rocks are comparable to processes that develop acid-mine drainage elsewhere. Despite the high rainfall in the mountain range, sheltered areas and intermittent dry spells provide local venues for development of secondary weathering products that can impact aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Geochemical, microtextural and petrological studies of the Samba prospect in the Zambian Copperbelt basement: a metamorphosed Palaeoproterozoic porphyry Cu deposit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Master, Sharad; Mirrander Ndhlovu, N.

    2015-04-01

    Ever since Wakefield (1978, IMM Trans., B87, 43-52) described a porphyry-type meta-morphosed Cu prospect, the ca 50 Mt, 0.5% Cu Samba deposit (12.717°S, 27.833°E), hosted by porphyry-associated quartz-sericite-biotite schists in northern Zambia, there has been controversy about its origin and significance. This is because it is situated in the basement to the world's largest stratabound sediment-hosted copper province, the Central African Copperbelt, which is hosted by rocks of the Neoproterozoic Katanga Supergroup. Mineralization in the pre-Katangan basement has long played a prominent role in ore genetic models, with some authors suggesting that basement Cu mineralization may have been recycled into the Katangan basin through erosion and redeposition, while others have suggested that the circulation of fluids through Cu-rich basement may have leached out the metals which are found concentrated in the Katangan orebodies. On the basis of ca 490-460 Ma Ar-Ar ages, Hitzman et al. (2012, Sillitoe Vol., SEG Spec. Publ., 16, 487-514) suggested that Samba represents late-stage impregnation of copper mineralization into the basement, and that it was one of the youngest copper deposits known in the Central African Copperbelt. If the Samba deposit really is that young, then it would have post-dated regional deformation and metamorphism (560-510 Ma), and it ought to be undeformed and unmetamorphosed. The Samba mineralization consists of chalcopyrite and bornite, occurring as disseminations, stringers and veinlets, found in a zone >1 km along strike, in steeply-dipping lenses up to 10m thick and >150m deep. Our new major and trace element XRF geochemical data (14 samples) show that the host rocks are mainly calc-alkaline metadacites. Cu is correlated with Ag (Cu/Ag ~10,000:1) with no Au or Mo. Our study focused on the microtextures and petrology of the Samba ores. We confirm that there is alteration of similar style to that accompanying classical porphyry Cu mineralization

  3. Test of the microtextural analysis of quartz grains of tsunami and non-tsunami deposits in Tirúa (Chile) - an unsuitable method for a valid tsunami identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellanova, P.; Bahlburg, H.; Nentwig, V.

    2015-12-01

    The tsunami caused by the 2010 Maule earthquake (MW 8.8) significantly affected the village of Tirúa (Central Chile). In order to estimate the hazard potential of tsunami events it is essential to reliably identify and differentiate tsunami deposits from deposits of other high-energy events like storms. Recently, the microtextural analysis of quartz grain surfaces was introduced as a method to differentiate between tsunami and other deposits. We tested the microtextural analysis method for its capability to identify tsunami deposits using paleotsunami intercalations from a bank profile of the Tirúa river. A total of 815 quartz grains of 4 river bank samples (2 tsunamigenic, 2 non-tsunamigenic) and of 3 reference samples from nearby beach, dune and river were analyzed. In order to generate a valid statistical basis even within individual grain size fractions a large number of grains was studied. Another reason was to compensate the error of the operator's subjectivity during random picking and microtexture observation. Grain surfaces were analyzed using SEM. We detected 30 individual microtextures grouped into five microtextural families according to angularity, fresh surfaces, percussion marks, adhering particles and dissolution. The grains from the tsunami deposits have high numbers of fresh surfaces and percussion marks. However, in comparison with the non-tsunamigenic deposits and all reference samples (beach, dune and river) the tsunamigenic deposits do not show statistically significant differences in characteristics and abundances in all microtextural families. The homogeneity in microtextural results of all samples indicate the absence of differences between tsunamigenic, beach dune and river deposits. A distinct tsunami signature could not be identified from our microtextural analysis. Our study indicates that the microtextural analysis of quartz grains may not be a suitable method to identify tsunami deposits.

  4. Secondary sulfate minerals associated with acid drainage in the eastern US: Recycling of metals and acidity in surficial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R.; Meier, A.L.; Kornfeld, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Weathering of metal-sulfide minerals produces suites of variably soluble efflorescent sulfate salts at a number of localities in the eastern United States. The salts, which are present on mine wastes, tailings piles, and outcrops, include minerals that incorporate heavy metals in solid solution, primarily the highly soluble members of the melanterite, rozenite, epsomite, halotrichite, and copiapite groups. The minerals were identified by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron-microprobe. Base-metal salts are rare at these localities, and Cu, Zn, and Co are commonly sequestered as solid solutions within Fe- and Fe-Al sulfate minerals. Salt dissolution affects the surface-water chemistry at abandoned mines that exploited the massive sulfide deposits in the Vermont copper belt, the Mineral district of central Virginia, the Copper Basin (Ducktown) mining district of Tennessee, and where sulfide-bearing metamorphic rocks undisturbed by mining are exposed in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Dissolution experiments on composite salt samples from three minesites and two outcrops of metamorphic rock showed that, in all cases, the pH of the leachates rapidly declined from 6.9 to 30 mg L-1), Fe (>47 mg L-1), sulfate (>1000 mg L-1), and base metals (>1000 mg L-1 for minesites, and 2 mg L-1 for other sites). Geochemical modeling of surface waters, mine-waste leachates, and salt leachates using PHREEQC software predicted saturation in the observed ochre minerals, but significant concentration by evaporation would be needed to reach saturation in most of the sulfate salts. Periodic surface-water monitoring at Vermont minesites indicated peak annual metal loads during spring runoff. At the Virginia site, where no winter-long snowpack develops, metal loads were highest during summer months when salts were dissolved periodically by rainstorms following sustained evaporation during dry

  5. Shock-thermal history of Kavarpura IVA iron: Evidences from microtextures and nickel profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Ghosh, S.; Murty, S. V. S.

    2015-11-01

    We classify Kavarpura iron (fell in August, 2006, in Rajasthan, India), an inclusion-free member of high-Ni IVA group. Widmanstätten pattern and finger-cellular plessites textures characteristic of IVA group are present in Kavarpura. Symmetric and asymmetric textural zoning within the cloudy taenite and plessite refer to long term martensitisation process with mean metallographic cooling rate of 200 °C/Ma. Imprints of variable shock pressure domains (Neumann bands and shock hatched ε kamacite) suggest alteration by up to 600 kb shock pressure. Degeneration of cellular plessites, bending of finger plessites and plastic flowage of taenites bear textural evidences corresponding to post-shock annealing which is further confirmed by Ni profiles across the cloudy taenites and plessites under high shock pressure domains. Based on microtextural evidences and Ni profiling, we suggest Kavarpura had cooled at steady state and subsequently suffered multiple impacts.

  6. Microtexture and Nanoindentation Study of Delamination Cracking in Al-Cu-Li-X Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooks, R.; Domack, M. S.; Wagner, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial Al-Li alloys have strength and weight advantages over non-Li aluminum alloys. The fracture behavior of these alloys is unusual and has limited their use. The fracture mode, described as delamination, is intergranular, along the broad grain boundaries parallel to the rolling plane of the plate. Microtexture analyses have shown that delaminations occur along boundaries with greater than 30 misorientation. However, it was observed that relatively few of the high angle boundaries exhibited this behavior. Some grains of the retained deformation texture show high internal misorientation, which is a measure of stored strain energy. Delamination tends to occur between these grains and adjacent, recrystallized grains. Nanoindentation studies indicate a higher hardness for the high internal misorientation grains. These results suggest that the delamination could be reduced by processing the alloys to minimize grain-to-grain property disparities.

  7. Oxygen Isotope and Microtextural Biosignatures of Hydroxylapatite in Karst Caves of South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Blake, R. E.; Kim, S.

    2006-05-01

    Hydroxylapatite is precipitating in restricted areas of bat habitats in three karst caves (Gosu, Sungryu, and Ssang caves) in S. Korea. It covers the surfaces of carbonate speleothem and host rock forming a 0.1 to 0.5 mm thick crust. In order to elucidate the process of formation of this hydroxylapatite crust, the O isotope composition of phosphate (δ18OP), in the crust and in bat guano, as well as the O isotope compositions of calcite carbonate (δ18OC) in speleothems, and of dripping water (δ18OW) were determined together with mineralogical and textural analyses. The δ18OP values of the crust (approx. 13 permil) are between δ18OP values of bat guano (approx. 21 permil) and δ18OW values of dripping water (approx. -9.5 permil). These δ18O values and a close relation between crust distribution and bat habitat indicate that bat excretion provides phosphate for formation of the hydroxylapatite crust. The δ18OP values of the crust are in temperature-dependent isotopic equilibrium with dripping water. This suggests that the phosphate has been metabolized and has undergone oxygen isotope exchange with dripping water by enzyme-catalyzed reactions at low temperatures (13 to 16°C). The δ18OC values of speleothem calcite below the crust are approx. 9 permil higher than the δ18OP values of the crust. This suggests that both speleothem and crust have formed in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with the dripping water as a result of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Electron microscopy shows that sulfur-bearing filamentous bacteria are distributed on and within the crust. Also, four different microtextures (colloform, sea- and-island, cellular, and reticulate textures) are observed in the crust, and are produced by the distribution patterns of bacteria. Thus, both isotopic and microtextural signatures reflect bacterially-mediated biomineralization of hydroxylapatite in karst cave ecosystems.

  8. Nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism in two cats: evaluation of bone mineral density with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulou, M; Kirpensteijn, J; Nielsen, D H; Buelund, L; Hansen, M S

    2010-01-01

    Two three-month-old, intact female Abyssinian cats were presented with a history of lameness, constipation and ataxia. The cats had been fed a diet composed almost exclusively of meat. Both showed severe osteopenia and multiple pathological fractures on radiography. Following euthanasia of the more severely affected cat, postmortem examination revealed changes consistent with nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism and fibrous osteodystrophy, such as cortical thinning, massive connective tissue invasion in the diaphysis of long bones, and hypertrophy of the chief cells in both parathyroid glands. After introducing a balanced commercial diet to the surviving cat, bone mineralisation improved from the baseline value, and at subsequent examinations at three, six and 22 weeks later, as indicated by bone mineral density measurements obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography.

  9. Effects of oxyanions, natural organic matter, and bacterial cell numbers on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and the formation of secondary mineralization products.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Edward J; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2010-06-15

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides results in the production of Fe(II) and may lead to the subsequent formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products including magnetite, siderite, vivianite, chukanovite (ferrous hydroxy carbonate (FHC)), and green rust; however, the factors controlling the formation of specific Fe(II) phases are often not well-defined. This study examined effects of (i) a range of inorganic oxyanions (arsenate, borate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, and tungstate), (ii) natural organic matter (citrate, oxalate, microbial extracellular polymeric substances [EPS], and humic substances), and (iii) the type and number of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite and formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products. The bioreduction kinetics clustered into two distinct Fe(II) production profiles. "Fast" Fe(II) production kinetics [19-24 mM Fe(II) d(-1)] were accompanied by formation of magnetite and FHC in the unamended control and in systems amended with borate, oxalate, gellan EPS, or Pony Lake fulvic acid or having "low" cell numbers. Systems amended with arsenate, citrate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, tungstate, EPS from Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, or humic substances derived from terrestrial plant material or with "high" cell numbers exhibited comparatively slow Fe(II) production kinetics [1.8-4.0 mM Fe(II) d(-1)] and the formation of green rust. The results are consistent with a conceptual model whereby competitive sorption of more strongly bound anions blocks access of bacterial cells and reduced electron-shuttling compounds to sites on the iron oxide surface, thereby limiting the rate of bioreduction.

  10. Effects of oxyanions, natural organic matter, and bacterial cell numbers on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH) and the formation of secondary mineralization products.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, E. J.; Gorski, C. A.; Scherer, M. M.; Boyanov, M. I.; Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Iowa

    2010-06-15

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides results in the production of Fe(II) and may lead to the subsequent formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products including magnetite, siderite, vivianite, chukanovite (ferrous hydroxy carbonate (FHC)), and green rust; however, the factors controlling the formation of specific Fe(II) phases are often not well-defined. This study examined effects of (i) a range of inorganic oxyanions (arsenate, borate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, and tungstate), (ii) natural organic matter (citrate, oxalate, microbial extracellular polymeric substances [EPS], and humic substances), and (iii) the type and number of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite and formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products. The bioreduction kinetics clustered into two distinct Fe(II) production profiles. 'Fast' Fe(II) production kinetics [19-24 mM Fe(II) d-1] were accompanied by formation of magnetite and FHC in the unamended control and in systems amended with borate, oxalate, gellan EPS, or Pony Lake fulvic acid or having 'low' cell numbers. Systems amended with arsenate, citrate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, tungstate, EPS from Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, or humic substances derived from terrestrial plant material or with 'high' cell numbers exhibited comparatively slow Fe(II) production kinetics [1.8-4.0 mM Fe(II) d-1] and the formation of green rust. The results are consistent with a conceptual model whereby competitive sorption of more strongly bound anions blocks access of bacterial cells and reduced electron-shuttling compounds to sites on the iron oxide surface, thereby limiting the rate of bioreduction.

  11. DOE FG02-03ER63557: Final Technical Report: Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kathryn L. Nagy

    2009-05-04

    The purpose of the project was to investigate rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals and key components of waste tank solutions that leaked into the subsurface at the Hanford Site. Results were expected to enhance understanding of processes that cause (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. Measured rates can also be used directly in reactive transport models. Project tasks included (1) measurement of the dissolution rates of biotite mica from low to high pH and over a range of temperature relevant to the Hanford subsurface, (2) measurement of dissolution rates of quartz at high pH and in the presence of dissolved alumina, (3) measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms, (4) incorporation of perrhenate in iron-oxide minerals as a function of pH, and (5) initiation of experiments to measure the formation of uranium(VI)-silicate phases under ambient conditions. Task 2 was started under a previous grant from the Environmental Management Science Program and Task 4 was partially supported by a grant to the PI from the Geosciences Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Task 5 was continued under a subsequent grant from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  12. Wetting state on hydrophilic and hydrophobic micro-textured surfaces: Thermodynamic analysis and X-ray visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dong In; Kwak, Ho Jae; Doh, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun Sun Kiyofumi, Moriyama; Kang, Hie Chan; Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2015-04-27

    In this study, the wetting state on hydrophobic and hydrophilic micro-textured surfaces was investigated. High spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray radiography was used to overcome the limitations in visualization in previous research and clearly visualize the wetting state for each droplet under quantified surface conditions. Based on thermodynamic characteristics, a theoretical model for wetting state depending on the chemical composition (intrinsic contact angle) and geometrical morphology (roughness ratio) of the surfaces was developed.

  13. Hypersonic Transition Along Curved Surfaces in the Presence of Vortices and Their Control by Using Microtextured Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-13

    it, resulting in reduced friction and allowing the drops to collect contaminants so that the interface is self-cleaning. 2. The movement of water...so that the interface is self-cleaning. 2. The movement of water droplets immersed in oil along a surface microtextured with nanometer-sized...allowing resistance to corrosion. 3. The movement of an oil phase over a hydrophobic elastomeric polymer with high air solubility was studied, and

  14. Spectral reflectance properties (0.4-2.5 μm) of secondary Fe-oxide, Fe-hydroxide, and Fe-sulphate-hydrate minerals associated with sulphide-bearing mine wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Williams, D.E.; Hammarstrom, J.M.; Piatak, N.; Chou, I.-Ming; Mars, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectra of 15 mineral species commonly associated with sulphide-bearing mine wastes show diagnostic absorption bands related to electronic processes involving ferric and/or ferrous iron, and to vibrational processes involving water and hydroxyl. Many of these absorption bands are relatively broad and overlapping; however, spectral analysis methods, including continuum removal and derivative analysis, permit most of the minerals to be distinguished. Key spectral differences between the minerals are illustrated in a series of plots showing major absorption band centres and other spectral feature positions. Because secondary iron minerals are sensitive indicators of pH, Eh, relative humidity, and other environmental conditions, spectral mapping of mineral distributions promises to have important application to mine waste remediation studies.

  15. Spectral reflectance properties (0.4-2.5 um) of secondary Fe-oxide, Fe-hydroxide, and Fe-sulfate-hydrate minerals associated with sulfide-bearing mine waste

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Williams, D.E.; Hammarstrom1, J.M.; Piatak, N.; Mars, J.C.; Chou, I-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Fifteen Fe-oxide, Fe-hydroxide, and Fe-sulphate-hydrate mineral species commonly associated with sulphide bearing mine wastes were characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscope methods. Diffuse reflectance spectra of the samples show diagnostic absorption features related to electronic processes involving ferric and/or ferrous iron, and to vibrational processes involving water and hydroxyl ions. Such spectral features enable field and remote sensing based studies of the mineral distributions. Because secondary minerals are sensitive indicators of pH, Eh, relative humidity, and other environmental conditions, spectral mapping of these minerals promises to have important applications to mine waste remediation studies. This report releases digital (ascii) spectra (spectral_data_files.zip) of the fifteen mineral samples to facilitate usage of the data with spectral libraries and spectral analysis software. The spectral data are provided in a two-column format listing wavelength (in micrometers) and reflectance, respectively.

  16. Alternate source term models for Yucca Mountain performance assessment based on natural analog data and secondary mineral solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.; Codell, R.B.

    1999-07-01

    Performance assessment calculations for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were conducted using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Total-System Performance Assessment (TPA 3.2) code to test conceptual models and parameter values for the source term based on data from the Pena Blanca, Mexico, natural analog site and based on a model for coprecipitation and solubility of secondary schoepite. In previous studies the value for the maximum constant oxidative alteration rate of uraninite at the Nopal I uranium body at Pena Blanca was estimated. Scaling this rate to the mass of uranium for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository yields an oxidative alteration rate of 22 kg/y, which was assumed to be an upper limit on the release rate from the proposed repository. A second model was developed assuming releases of radionuclides are based on the solubility of secondary schoepite as a function of temperature and solution chemistry. Releases of uranium are given by the product of uranium concentrations at equilibrium with schoepite and the flow of water through the waste packages. For both models, radionuclides other than uranium and those in the cladding and gap fraction were modeled to be released at a rate proportional to the uranium release rate, with additional elemental solubility limits applied. Performance assessment results using the Pena Blanca oxidation rate and schoepite solubility models for Yucca Mountain were compared to the TPA 3.2 base case model, in which release was based on laboratory studies of spent fuel dissolution, cladding and gap release, and solubility limits. Doses calculated using the release rate based on natural analog data and the schoepite solubility models were smaller than doses generated using the base case model. These results provide a degree of confidence in safety predictions using the base case model and an indication of how conservatism in the base case model may be reduced in future analyses.

  17. Does the Laser-Microtextured Short Implant Collar Design Reduce Marginal Bone Loss in Comparison with a Machined Collar?

    PubMed Central

    Sirali, Ali; Gultekin, Pinar; Yalcin, Serdar; Mijiritsky, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare marginal bone loss between subgingivally placed short-collar implants with machined collars and those with machined and laser-microtextured collars. Materials and Methods. The investigators used a retrospective study design and included patients who needed missing posterior teeth replaced with implants. Short-collar implants with identical geometries were divided into two groups: an M group, machined collar; and an L group, machined and laser-microtextured collar. Implants were evaluated according to marginal bone loss, implant success, and probing depth (PD) at 3 years of follow-up. Results. Sixty-two patients received 103 implants (56 in the M group and 47 in the L group). The cumulative survival rate was 100%. All implants showed clinically acceptable marginal bone loss, although bone resorption was lower in the L group (0.49 mm) than in the M group (1.38 mm) at 3 years (p < 0.01). A significantly shallower PD was found for the implants in the L group during follow-up (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Our results suggest predictable outcomes with regard to bone loss for both groups; however, bone resorption was less in the L group than in the M group before and after loading. The laser-microtextured collar implant may provide a shallower PD than the machined collar implant. PMID:27660765

  18. Nanotexturing process on microtextured surfaces of silicon solar cells by SF6/O2 reactive ion etching.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyungyong; Choi, Jaeho; Lim, Gyoungho; Parida, Bhaskar; Kim, Keunjoo; Jo, Jung Hee; Kim, Hong Seub

    2013-12-01

    We investigated a nanotexturing process on the microtextured surface of single crystalline silicon solar cell by the reactive ion etching process in SF6/O2 mixed gas ambient. P-type Si wafer samples were prepared using a chemical wet etching process to address saw damage removal and achieve microtexturing. The microtextured wafers were further processed for nanotexturing by exposure to reactive ions within a circular tray of wafer carrier containing many small holes for uniform etching. As the dry etching times were increased to 2, 4 and finally to 8 min, surface structures were observed in a transition from nanoholes to nanorods, and a variation in wafer color from dark blue to black. The surface nanostructures showed a lowered photoreflectance and enhanced quantum efficiency within the visible light region with wavelengths of less than 679 nm. The nanohole structure etched for 2 min showed enhanced conversion efficiency when compared to the bare sample; however, the nanorod structure etched for 8 min exhibited the decreased efficiency with a reduced short circuit current, indicating that the surface nanostructural damage with the enlarged nanoperimetric surface area is sensitive to surface passivation from the surface recombination process.

  19. Radioactive Bench-scale Steam Reformer Demonstration of a Monolithic Steam Reformed Mineralized Waste Form for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste - 12306

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Brent; Olson, Arlin; Mason, J. Bradley; Ryan, Kevin; Jantzen, Carol; Crawford, Charles

    2012-07-01

    Hanford currently has 212,000 m{sup 3} (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive mixed waste stored in the Hanford tank farm. This waste will be processed to produce both high-level and low-level activity fractions, both of which are to be vitrified. Supplemental treatment options have been under evaluation for treating portions of the low-activity waste, as well as the liquid secondary waste from the low-activity waste vitrification process. One technology under consideration has been the THOR{sup R} fluidized bed steam reforming process offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT). As a follow-on effort to TTT's 2008 pilot plant FBSR non-radioactive demonstration for treating low-activity waste and waste treatment plant secondary waste, TTT, in conjunction with Savannah River National Laboratory, has completed a bench scale evaluation of this same technology on a chemically adjusted radioactive surrogate of Hanford's waste treatment plant secondary waste stream. This test generated a granular product that was subsequently formed into monoliths, using a geo-polymer as the binding agent, that were subjected to compressibility testing, the Product Consistency Test and other leachability tests, and chemical composition analyses. This testing has demonstrated that the mineralized waste form, produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay using the TTT process, is as durable as low-activity waste glass. Testing has shown the resulting monolith waste form is durable, leach resistant, and chemically stable, and has the added benefit of capturing and retaining the majority of Tc-99, I-129, and other target species at high levels. (authors)

  20. Fluid-Dacite Interaction in the PACMANUS Subseafloor Hydrothermal System - Preliminary Results From Secondary Mineral Chemistry and Geochemical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeats, C. J.; Bach, W.; Vanko, D. A.; Roberts, S.; Lackschewitz, K.; Paulick, H.

    2001-12-01

    During Ocean Drilling Program Leg 193, several holes (as deep as 386 meters below sea floor) intersected variably altered and veined dacites on Pual Ridge in the eastern Manus back-arc basin. The hydothermal alteration is complex and multi-stage, and includes pervasive alteration and alteration halos along anhydrite±pyrite±quartz veins. Our preliminary interpretation is that an early pervasive "chloritic" alteration (chlorite, chlorite/smectite, quartz, +/-albite, +/-magnetite) is overprinted locally by illite-pyrophyllite-anhydrite+/-diaspore alteration followed by silica (quartz and cristobalite) flooding. Two drill holes at Snowcap, a site of diffuse venting, reveal alteration profiles of strongly illite-pyrophyllite-anhydrite altered rocks in the shallow parts grading downwards into rocks that show dominant chloritic alteration. At Roman Ruins, a site of discrete venting, K-feldspar and illite-smectite mixed layer phases are abundant and magnetite is rare. K-feldspar appears to be part of the "chloritic" alteration assemblage. Anhydrite is locally abundant but generally less common than at Snowcap. There is a strong lateral heterogeneity in basement alteration as revealed by the differences between sites in the depths of cristobalite-quartz transition and the zones of prevailing alteration styles. Geochemical modeling suggests that the rocks have been altered at temperatures of about 250 to 300° C under variable fluid-to-rock ratios. While all the mineral assemblages are consistent with quartz/cristobalite saturation of the fluids, the formation of diaspore must be related to episodic interaction of the rocks with fluids highly undersaturated in quartz. The early stage of chloritic alteration represents interaction of the dacites with fluids of a fairly high pH ({>}4). In contrast, the occurrence of pyrophyllite and local diaspore suggests lower pH fluid ({<}3) during later hydrothermal stages. A zone of abundant alunite at 350 m deep in the basement at

  1. Mineralogical and microtextural characterization of ``gel-zircon`` from the Manibay uranium mine, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Helean, K.B.; Ewing, R.C.; Burakov, B.E.; Anderson, E.B.; Strykanova, E.E.; Ushakov, S.V.

    1997-12-31

    Gel-zircon, an unusual Zr-silicate phase from the Manibay uranium mine, northern Kazakhstan, was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD results indicate that gel-zircon is mostly amorphous and occurs with numerous impurity phases. Microprobe EDS results indicate a UO{sub 2} content up to 9.14 wt.% HRTEM images revealed that the microtexture of gel-zircon consists of nanocrystallites of zircon, 2--10 nm in size, in a dominantly amorphous matrix. Despite the U-Pb age of 420 {+-} 25 my and the lack of significant crystallinity, the gel-zircon is an apparently chemically durable phase. Leaching of uranium ores which contain gel-zircon as the major U-bearing phase is impossible using existing uranium plant technologies. The alpha-decay dose, 2.64 displacements per atom (dpa), corresponding to the age of gel-zircon is much higher than that (0.5 dpa) required to cause metamictization of crystalline zircon. However, the morphology of gel-zircon which occurs as veins up to 5 mm thick and tens of mm long does not indicate initial crystallinity. Initially crystalline natural zircons often preserve their crystal morphology after metamictization. This amorphous phase is analogous to the highly damaged state characteristic of zircon proposed as a waste form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  2. Microtextured metals for stray-light suppression in the Clementine startracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Anodized blacks for suppressing stray light in optical systems can now be replaced by microscopically textured metal surfaces. An application of these black surfaces to the Clementine star-tracker navigational system, which will be launched in early 1994 to examine the Moon, en route to intercept an asteroid, is detailed. Rugged black surfaces with Lambertian BRDF less than 10(exp -2) srad(sup -1) are critical for suppressing stray light in the star-tracker optical train. Previously available materials spall under launch vibrations to contaminate mirrors and lenses. Microtextured aluminum is nearly as dark, but much less fragile. It is made by differential ion beam sputtering, which generates light-trapping pores and cones slightly smaller than the wavelength to be absorbed. This leaves a sturdy but light-absorbing surface that can survive challenging conditions without generating debris or contaminants. Both seeded ion beams and plasma immersion (from ECR plasmas) extraction can produce these microscopic textures without fragile interfaces. Process parameters control feature size, spacing, and optical effects (THR, BRDF). Both broad and narrow absorption bands can be engineered with tuning for specific wavelengths and applications. Examples are presented characterized by FTIR in reflection librators (0.95 normal emissivity), heat rejection, and enhanced nucleate boiling.

  3. Numerical modelling of microdroplet self-propelled jumping on micro-textured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attarzadeh, S. M. Reza; Dolatabadi, Ali; Chun Kim, Kyung

    2015-11-01

    Understanding various stages of single and multiple droplet impact on a super-hydrophobic surface is of interest for many industrial applications such as aerospace industry. In this study, the phenomenon of coalescence induced droplets self-propelled jumping on a micro-textured super-hydrophobic surface is numerically simulated using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. This model mimics the scenario of coalescing cloud-sized particles over the surface structure of an aircraft. The VOF coupled with a dynamic contact angle model is used to simulate the coalescence of two equal size droplets, that are initially placed very closed to each other with their interface overlapping with each other's which triggers the incipience of their coalescence. The textured surface is modeled as a series of equally spaced squared pillars, with 111° as the intrinsic contact angle all over the solid contact area. It is shown that the radial velocity of coalescing liquid bridge is reverted to upward direction due to the counter action of the surface to the basal area of droplet in contact. The presence of air beneath the droplet inside micro grooves which aimed at repelling water droplet is also captured in this model. The simulated results are found in good agreement with experimental observations. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Consortium de Recherche et d'innovation en Aerospatiale au Quebec (CRIAQ), Bombardier Aerospace, Pratt Whitney Canada.

  4. Metal nanoparticle-enhanced photocurrent in GaAs photovoltaic structures with microtextured interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dmitruk, Nicolas L; Borkovskaya, Olga Yu; Mamontova, Iryna B; Mamykin, Sergii V; Malynych, Sergii Z; Romanyuk, Volodymyr R

    2015-01-01

    The photocurrent enhancement effect caused by Au and Ag nanoparticles for GaAs-based photovoltaic structures of surface barrier or p-n junction type with microtextured interfaces has been investigated in dependence on the conditions of nanoparticles deposition and, respectively, on the shape and local dielectric environment of obtained nanoparticle arrays. Three nanoparticle deposition methods have been checked: 1) photoinduced chemical deposition of Au from aqueous AuCl3 solution forming nanowires on the ridges of quasigrating-type surface microrelief, 2) deposition of Ag nanoparticles from colloidal suspension on the GaAs substrate covered with poly(vinylpyridine), and 3) drop and dry deposition of Au/SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles from aqueous colloid solution. The comprehensive investigation of optical reflectance, photoelectric, and electrical characteristics of the fabricated barrier structures has shown the highest photovoltaic parameters for surface microrelief of quasigrating-type and electroless Au nanoparticle deposition. The analysis of characteristics obtained allowed us also to define the mechanisms of the total photocurrent enhancement.

  5. Microstructure and Microtexture Evolution of Pure Titanium during Single Direction Torsion and Alternating Cyclic Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Li, Fuguo; Liu, Jie; Li, Jinghui; Ma, Xinkai; Wan, Qiong

    2017-03-01

    Systematic experimental studies of microstructure and crystallographic texture of pure titanium during the Single Direction Torsion (SDT) and Alternating Cyclic Torsion (ACT) are carried out at room temperature. The microstructure evolution indicates that the grain size can be refined during SDT, while the grain morphology can be controlled during ACT. Also, lots of {10-12} and few {11-22} twins are observed and their area percentages increase with increasing torsion angles during SDT. The microtexture evolution states that the deformation texture first approaches to the B fiber (0, 90, 0 to 60 deg), and then stays away from B fiber (0, 90, 0 to 60 deg) with increasing plastic strain during SDT. The change of deformation texture is mainly attributed to the appearance of {10-12} twin. However, the deformation texture is always close to B fiber (0, 90, 0 to 60 deg) during ACT. Finally, the effects of different dislocation movements caused by SDT and ACT are discussed. Quantities of subgrains with high density dislocation are observed during SDT while the {10-12} and {11-22} twins intersect with each other, and high density dislocations distribute the twin during ACT.

  6. A thermoresponsive, microtextured substrate for cell sheet engineering with defined structural organization.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, Brett C; Tsuda, Yukiko; Williams, Corin; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Wong, Joyce Y

    2008-06-01

    The proper function of many tissues depends critically on the structural organization of the cells and matrix of which they are comprised. Therefore, in order to engineer functional tissue equivalents that closely mimic the unique properties of native tissues it is necessary to develop strategies for reproducing the complex, highly organized structure of these tissues. To this end, we sought to develop a simple method for generating cell sheets that have defined ECM/cell organization using microtextured, thermoresponsive polystyrene substrates to guide cell organization and tissue growth. The patterns consisted of large arrays of alternating grooves and ridges (50 microm wide, 5 microm deep). Vascular smooth muscle cells cultured on these substrates produced intact sheets consisting of cells that exhibited strong alignment in the direction of the micropattern. These sheets could be readily transferred from patterned substrates to non-patterned substrates without the loss of tissue organization. Ultimately, such sheets will be layered to form larger tissues with defined ECM/cell organization that spans multiple length scales.

  7. Transformation of heavy metals and the formation of secondary iron minerals during pig manure bioleaching by the co-inoculation acidophilic thiobacillus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Lixiang; Liu, Fenwu; Zheng, Chaocheng; Deng, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Bioleaching of heavy metals from pig manure using a mixture of harmless iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in an air-lift reactor was conducted. The transformation of heavy metals and the formation of secondary Fe minerals during bioleaching were also investigated in the present study. The removal efficiencies of Zn, Cu, and Mn from pig manure were 95.1%, 80.9%, and 87.5%, respectively. Zn mainly existed in the form of Fe-Mn oxides in fresh pig manure; most of the pig manure-borne Cu was in organic matter form; Mn existed mainly in Fe-Mn oxides, carbonates, and residual forms. The pig manure can be applied to land more safely after bioleaching because the heavy metals mainly existed in stable forms. The removal efficiencies Zn, Cu, and Mn had good relationships with pH and oxidation reduction potential during bioleaching. A mixture ofjarosite and schwertmannite was found in the bioleached pig manure, which might have an adverse effect on the solubilization efficiency of toxic metals from pig manure. The bioleaching process using a mixture of harmless iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was shown to be a very feasible technology for the removal of heavy metals from pig manure.

  8. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

  9. Micro-textures and in situ sulfur isotopic analysis of spheroidal and zonal sulfides in the giant Jinding Zn-Pb deposit, Yunnan, China: Implications for biogenic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Chunji; Chi, Guoxiang; Fayek, Mostafa

    2015-05-01

    The Jinding deposit in Yunnan, southwest China, is the largest sandstone- and conglomerate-hosted Zn-Pb deposit in the world. In this paper, we report various micro-textures of spheroidal and zonal sulfides, such as pellet-shaped and colloform aggregates of pyrite and sphalerite, from the deposit and interpret them to be possibly related to micro-colonies of sulfate reducing bacteria, probably supporting an in situ BSR hypothesis. Micro-scale sulfur isotope analysis in different parts of the spheroidal and zonal sulfide aggregates, using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), revealed δ34S (VCDT) values as low as -48.4‰ for sulfides formed in the early-main stage disseminated ores in the western part of the deposit, possibly suggesting maximum sulfur isotopic fractionation through BSR. Relatively elevated δ34S (VCDT) values (-7.7‰ to -34.8‰, mainly from -10‰ to -20‰) for the late-stage, cavity-filling ores in the eastern part of the deposit, are interpreted to be possibly related to elevated temperatures close to the hydrothermal conduit and elevated δ34S values of the remaining sulfates resulting from the preceding BSR processes. The apparent discrepancy between the low temperatures required for BSR and the high temperatures indicated by fluid inclusions (>120 °C) may be reconciled through invoking episodic influx of ore-forming hydrothermal fluids into a shallow, relatively cool environment. It is proposed that the host rocks of the Jinding deposit have not been buried to great depths (⩽1 km), which, combined with the availability of hydrocarbons in the Jinding dome (a paleo-oil and gas reservoir), provides an ideal environment for BSR. Episodic influx of metal-carrying hydrothermal fluids temporarily and locally suppressed BSR and promoted thermo-chemical sulfate reduction (TSR), resulting in deposit- and micro-scale variations of δ34S.

  10. Cryptic microtextures and geological histories of K-rich alkali feldspars revealed by charge contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Lee, Martin R.; Sherlock, Sarah C.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2012-06-01

    Charge contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope can provide new insights into the scale and composition of alkali feldspar microtextures, and such information helps considerably with the interpretation of their geological histories and results of argon isotope thermochronological analyses. The effectiveness of this technique has been illustrated using potassium-rich alkali feldspars from the Dartmoor granite (UK). These feldspars contain strain-controlled lamellar crypto- and microperthites that are cross-cut by strain-free deuteric microperthites. The constituent albite- and orthoclase-rich phases of both microperthite generations can be readily distinguished by atomic number contrast imaging. The charge contrast results additionally show that sub-micrometre-sized albite `platelets' are commonplace between coarser exsolution lamellae and occur together to make cryptoperthites. Furthermore, charge contrast imaging reveals that the orthoclase-rich feldspar is an intergrowth of two phases, one that is featureless with uniform contrast and another that occurs as cross-cutting veins and grains with the {110} adularia habit. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the featureless feldspar is tweed orthoclase, whereas the veins and euhedral grains are composed of irregular microcline that has formed from orthoclase by `unzipping' during deuteric or hydrothermal alteration. The charge contrast imaging results are especially important in demonstrating that deuteric perthites are far more abundant in alkali feldspars than would be concluded from investigations using conventional microscopy techniques. The unexpected presence of such a high volume of replacement products has significant implications for understanding the origins and geological histories of crustal rocks and the use of alkali feldspars in geo- and thermochronology. Whilst the precise properties of feldspars that generate contrast remain unclear, the similarity between charge contrast images

  11. A three dimensional scaffold with precise micro-architecture and surface micro-textures

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Alvaro; Kim, Eun Jung; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Fleischman, Aaron J.; Muschler, George F.; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) structure comprising precisely defined microarchitecture and surface micro-textures, designed to present specific physical cues to cells and tissues, may provide an efficient scaffold in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. We report a fabrication technique based on microfabrication and soft lithography that permits for the development of 3D scaffolds with both precisely engineered architecture and tailored surface topography. The scaffold fabrication technique consists of three key steps starting with microfabrication of a mold using an epoxy-based photoresist (SU-8), followed by dual-sided molding of a single layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using a mechanical jig for precise motion control; and finally, alignment, stacking, and adhesion of multiple PDMS layers to achieve a 3D structure. This technique was used to produce 3D Texture and 3D Smooth PDMS scaffolds, where the surface topography comprised 10 μm-diameter/height posts and smooth surfaces, respectively. The potential utility of the 3D microfabricated scaffolds, and the role of surface topography, were subsequently investigated in vitro with a combined heterogeneous population of adult human stem cells and their resultant progenitor cells, collectively termed connective tissue progenitors (CTPs), under conditions promoting the osteoblastic phenotype. Examination of bone-marrow derived CTPs cultured on the 3D Texture scaffold for 9 days revealed cell growth in three dimensions and increased cell numbers compared to those on the 3D Smooth scaffold. Furthermore, expression of alkaline phosphatase mRNA was higher on the 3D Texture scaffold, while osteocalcin mRNA expression was comparable for both types of scaffolds. PMID:19524292

  12. The effects of cinacalcet treatment on bone mineral metabolism, anemia parameters, left ventricular mass index and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Torun, Dilek; Yildiz, Ismail; Micozkadioglu, Hasan; Nursal, Gul Nihal; Yigit, Fatma; Ozelsancak, Ruya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cinacalcet therapy on anemia parameters, bone mineral metabolism, left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis (HD) patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Twenty-five HD patients (M/F: 11/14, mean age: 45.2±17.9 years, mean HD duration: 96.4±32.7 months) were included in this prospective pilot study. The indication to start calcimimetic therapy was persistent serum levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH)>1000 pg/mL, refractory to intravenous (i.v.) vitamin D and phosphate-binding therapy. The initial and one-year results of adjusted serum calcium (Ca+2), phosphate (P), Ca×P product, PTH, hemoglobin (Hb) and ferritin levels, transferrin saturation index (TSAT), median weekly erythropoietin (EPO) dose, LVMI, and parathyroid volume by parathyroid ultrasonography were determined. There were no differences between pre- and post-treatment levels of serum Ca+2 (P=0.853), P (P=0.447), Ca×P product (P=0.587), PTH (P=0.273), ferritin (P=0.153) and TSAT (P=0.104). After 1 year of calcimimetic therapy, the Hb levels were significantly higher than the initial levels (P=0.048). The weekly dose of EPO decreased with no statistical significance. The dose of cinacalcet was increased from 32.4±12.0 to 60.0±24.4 mg/day (P=0.01). There were no differences between the pre- and post-treatment results regarding weekly vitamin D dose, parenteral iron dose, LVMI and parathyroid volume. The results of our study suggest that cinacalcet therapy might have an additional benefit in the control anemia in HD patients.

  13. Natural radionuclide mobility and its influence on U-Th-Pb dating of secondary minerals from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, L.A.; Amelin, Y.V.

    2008-01-01

    Extreme U and Pb isotope variations produced by disequilibrium in decay chains of 238U and 232Th are found in calcite, opal/chalcedony, and Mn-oxides occurring as secondary mineral coatings in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These very slowly growing minerals (mm my-1) contain excess 206Pb and 208Pb formed from excesses of intermediate daughter isotopes and cannot be used as reliable 206Pb/238U geochronometers. The presence of excess intermediate daughter isotopes does not appreciably affect 207Pb/235U ages of U-enriched opal/chalcedony, which are interpreted as mineral formation ages. Opal and calcite from outer (younger) portions of coatings have 230Th/U ages from 94.6 ?? 3.7 to 361.3 ?? 9.8 ka and initial 234U/238U activity ratios (AR) from 4.351 ?? 0.070 to 7.02 ?? 0.12, which indicate 234U enrichment from percolating water. Present-day 234U/238U AR is ???1 in opal/chalcedony from older portions of the coatings. The 207Pb/235U ages of opal/chalcedony samples range from 0.1329 ?? 0.0080 to 9.10 ?? 0.21 Ma, increase with microstratigraphic depth, and define slow long-term average growth rates of about 1.2-2.0 mm my-1, in good agreement with previous results. Measured 234U/238U AR in Mn-oxides, which pre-date the oldest calcite and opal/chalcedony, range from 0.939 ?? 0.006 to 2.091 ?? 0.006 and are >1 in most samples. The range of 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.71156-0.71280) in Mn-oxides overlaps that in the late calcite. These data indicate that Mn-oxides exchange U and Sr with percolating water and cannot be used as a reliable dating tool. In the U-poor calcite samples, measured 206Pb/207Pb ratios have a wide range, do not correlate with Ba concentration as would be expected if excess Ra was present, and reach a value of about 1400, the highest ever reported for natural Pb. Calcite intergrown with opal contains excesses of both 206Pb and 207Pb derived from Rn diffusion and from direct ??-recoil from U-rich opal. Calcite from coatings devoid of opal

  14. Australian Mineral Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides details on the philosophy and operation of the Australian Mineral Foundation, established in 1970 to update professionals in the mining and petroleum industries. Services in continuing education courses and to secondary school teachers and students are described. (CS)

  15. Compositional and quantitative microtextural characterization of historic paintings by micro-X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pastor, Julia; Duran, Adrian; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro Basilio; Van Grieken, René; Cardell, Carolina

    2011-11-15

    This work shows the benefits of characterizing historic paintings via compositional and microtextural data from micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) combined with molecular information acquired with Raman microscopy (RM) along depth profiles in paint stratigraphies. The novel approach was applied to identify inorganic and organic components from paintings placed at the 14th century Islamic University-Madrasah Yusufiyya-in Granada (Spain), the only Islamic University still standing from the time of Al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). The use of μ-XRD to obtain quantitative microtextural information of crystalline phases provided by two-dimensional diffraction patterns to recognize pigments nature and manufacture, and decay processes in complex paint cross sections, has not been reported yet. A simple Nasrid (14th century) palette made of gypsum, vermilion, and azurite mixed with glue was identified in polychromed stuccos. Here also a Christian intervention was found via the use of smalt, barite, hematite, Brunswick green and gold; oil was the binding media employed. On mural paintings and wood ceilings, more complex palettes dated to the 19th century were found, made of gypsum, anhydrite, barite, dolomite, calcite, lead white, hematite, minium, synthetic ultramarine blue, and black carbon. The identified binders were glue, egg yolk, and oil.

  16. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.

  17. Kinetics and microtextures formation during serpentinization: role of grain scale processes and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    malvoisin, B.; Brunet, F.; Carlut, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization of mantle rocks plays a key role on the physical properties of the lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and in subduction zones. This reaction is controlled by processes occurring at scales ranging from the grain to the lithosphere but the relative importance of these processes on the kinetics and microtextures formation has not been investigated. First, hydrothermal experiments on powders of San Carlos olivine at 500 bars in the 250 - 350 °C range were monitored with a magnetic method to study the kinetics and processes of the reaction at the grain scale. For an initial grain size (IGS) > 5 μm, lizardite, brucite, magnetite and hydrogen formed at a rate one to two orders of magnitude slower than the kinetics used to model serpentinization-related processes. Moreover, the serpentinization rate decreased linearly with the square of the IGS and reaction progress vs. time curves displayed a sigmoid form. The kinetics were controlled by the dissolution of olivine increasing with its reactive surface area which was generated with two cooperating processes (etch pits and grain fracturing) during the first stages of the reaction. Then, hydrothermal experiments were conducted on sintered San Carlos olivine to investigate the role of transport on the reaction. On sintered with a grain size of 1 to 5 μm, low reaction progresses of ~ 3 % in 10 months were obtained and the rate of serpentinization was one order of magnitude slower than on powders and one order of magnitude faster than on a single grain of the size of the sintered. Kinetics were controlled by a coupling between the reaction rate at the grain scale and the rate of fluid pathways formation at grain boundaries. Lizardite precipitated where olivine dissolved whereas magnetite and brucite segregated at the surface of the sintered. These results are in agreement with the observation of magnetite formation and segregation in fractures in naturally serpentinized peridotites and could explain the sparse

  18. Micro-texture and Structure of High-pressure Quenched Graphite and Related Carbon Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohfuji, H.; Aibara, K.; Sumiya, H.; Irifune, T.

    2007-12-01

    There have been extensive studies in room-temperature compression of graphite and related carbon materials such as nanotubes and fullerene. Some reports claimed that the transformation of carbon hybridized state from sp2 to sp3 takes place under high pressure at room temperature, and the hardness of the quench products may be comparable to that of cubic diamond. Here, we investigated the micro-texture and structure involved in such high-pressure quenched carbon materials using high-resolution electron microscopy. High- pressure experiments were conducted on a variety of carbon materials including graphite (synthetic, highly- oriented sheet), single/multi-walled carbon nanotubes, amorphous carbons in a diamond anvil cell (DAC, with 250 μm culet non-beveled anvils) at room temperature. Pelletized sample was loaded into a 70 μm hall, drilled in a preindented Re gasket, without a pressure medium. The sample was compressed up to 70 ~ 90 GPa at room temperature, kept at the highest pressure at least overnight, and then decompressed. The pressure dependence of graphite E2g( G) Raman band at ~1580cm-1 was measured on compression and decompression. A1g( D) band, so called defect band at ~1350 cm-1, was also collected for the recovered products. The quenched materials were examined by high-resolution (HR) field emission (FE-) SEM and (HR)TEM. A focused ion beam (FIB) was employed to fabricate thin cross-sections of the samples. The most notable change in texture upon compression was observed in multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT); the elongated tubes were fragmented into short rods (ca. 100 - 300 nm in length and 80 - 100 nm in width, almost two times wider than that of the original MWNT). TEM observations showed that the short rod- shaped particles consist of piles of graphene shells (stacked walls of MWNT, characterized by (002) lattice fringes) which were significantly bent and fragmented. Some of those rod-shaped particles showed lattice fringes with an interlayer

  19. The role of extremophile in the redox reaction of Fe and As relating with the formation of secondary phase mineral in extreme environment, Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, T. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Park, K. R.; Jung, D. H.; Geesey, G. G.; Kim, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Redox reaction associated with microbial elemental respiration is a ubiquitous process in sediments and suspended particles at various temperatures or pH/Eh conditions. Particularly, changes in elemental redox states (structural or dissolved elemental form) induced by microbial respiration result in the unexpected biogeochemical reactions in the light of biotic/abiotic mineralization. The objective of the present study is, therefore to investigate the secondary phase mineralization through a-/biogeochemical Fe and As redox cycling in the acido-hyperhtermal Norris Geyser Basin (NGB) in Yellowstone National Park, USA, typical of the extreme condition. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge structure, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer and liquid chromatography with ICP-mass spectroscopy with filtrated supernatant were performed for the mineralogical and hydro-geochemical analysis. The clay slurry collected from the active hot-spring of the NGB area (pH=3.5 and Temperature=78 ℃) was incubated with ("enrichment") or without the growth medium ("natural"). The control was prepared in the same condition except adding the glutaraldehyde to eliminate the microbial activity. The secondary phase mineral formation of the oxidative phase of Fe and As, and K identified as 'Pharmacosiderite' only appeared in the enrichment set suggesting a role of extremophiles in the mineral formation. The considerable population of Fe-oxidizer (Metallosphera yellowstonensis MK-1) and As-oxidizer (Sulfurihydrogenibium sp.) was measured by phylogenetic analysis in the present study area. The inhibition of As-oxidation in the low pH conditions was reported in the previous study, however the As-redox reaction was observed and consequently, precipitated the Pharmacosiderite only in the enrichment set suggesting a biotic mineralization. The present study collectively suggests that the microbial

  20. High cesium concentrations in groundwater in the upper 1.2 km of fractured crystalline rock - Influence of groundwater origin and secondary minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Frédéric A.; Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Berger, Tobias; Peltola, Pasi; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.; Åström, Mats E.

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved and solid phase cesium (Cs) was studied in the upper 1.2 km of a coastal granitoid fracture network on the Baltic Shield (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory and Laxemar area, SE Sweden). There unusually high Cs concentrations (up to 5-6 μg L-1) occur in the low-temperature (<20 °C) groundwater. The material includes water collected in earlier hydrochemical monitoring programs and secondary precipitates (fracture coatings) collected on the fracture walls, as follows: (a) hydraulically pristine fracture groundwater sampled through 23 surface boreholes equipped for the retrieval of representative groundwater at controlled depths (Laxemar area), (b) fracture groundwater affected by artificial drainage collected through 80 boreholes drilled mostly along the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (underground research facility), (c) surface water collected in local streams, a lake and sea bay, and shallow groundwater collected in 8 regolith boreholes, and (d) 84 new specimens of fracture coatings sampled in cores from the Äspö HRL and Laxemar areas. The groundwater in each area is different, which affects Cs concentrations. The highest Cs concentrations occurred in deep-seated saline groundwater (median Äspö HRL: 4.1 μg L-1; median Laxemar: 3.7 μg L-1) and groundwater with marine origin (Äspö HRL: 4.2 μg L-1). Overall lower, but variable, Cs concentrations were found in other types of groundwater. The similar concentrations of Cs in the saline groundwater, which had a residence time in the order of millions of years, and in the marine groundwater, which had residence times in the order of years, shows that duration of water-rock interactions is not the single and primary control of dissolved Cs in these systems. The high Cs concentrations in the saline groundwater is ascribed to long-term weathering of minerals, primarily Cs-enriched fracture coatings dominated by illite and mixed-layer clays and possibly wall rock micaceous minerals. The high Cs concentrations in the

  1. Quantitative Comparison of Microtexture in Near-Alpha Titanium Measured by Ultrasonic Scattering and Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilchak, Adam L.; Li, Jia; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic backscattering and attenuation data were collected and processed using recently developed theoretical models to estimate the directionally dependent, volume-averaged size, and morphology of microtextured regions (MTRs) in a near-α Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V bar. The sample was also interrogated with electron backscatter diffraction from which MTR sizes were obtained by either manual segmentation and linear intercept analysis or fitting the spatial autocorrelation of similarly oriented c-axes to the geometrical autocorrelation function used in the scattering model. The results of the ultrasonic inversion were in good agreement with the EBSD measurements for the radial direction but were off by a factor of ~2.45 for the longitudinal direction. Reasons for the discrepancy were discussed and strategies to improve the agreement were made.

  2. Microtexture Analysis and Modeling of Ambient Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Damages in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Singh, A. K.; Raman, S. Ganesh Sundara; Kumar, Vikas

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, microtexture analysis using electron back-scattered diffraction technique has been performed to study fatigue- and creep-fatigue damages and associated deformation structures in Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Special emphasis has been given to low-angle grain boundary configuration and its possible application as a damage indicator. Damage is mostly present in the form of voids as investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Stored deformation energies have been evaluated for the strain-controlled fatigue-, the stress-controlled fatigue-, and the creep-fatigue-tested samples. Stored deformation energies have also been analyzed vis-à-vis total damage energies to quantify the contribution of damages to various samples. A relation between the stored deformation energy and the applied strain amplitude has been proposed in this study.

  3. Assessment of the molecular structure of natrodufrénite - NaFeFe53+()4(·2(HO), a secondary pegmatite phosphate mineral from Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Andrés; Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Ribeiro, Érika

    2013-11-01

    The mineral natrodufrénite a secondary pegmatite phosphate mineral from Minas Gerais, Brazil, has been studied by a combination of scanning electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Electron probe analysis shows the formula of the studied mineral as (Na0.88Ca0.12)∑1.00(Fe0.722+Mn0.11Mg0.08Ca0.04Zr0.01Cu0.01)∑0.97(Fe4.893+Al0.02)∑4.91(PO4)3.96(OH6.15F0.07)6.22ṡ2.05(H2O). Raman spectroscopy identifies an intense peak at 1003 cm-1 assigned to the PO43- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Raman bands are observed at 1059 and 1118 cm-1 and are attributed to the PO43- ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. A comparison is made with the spectral data of other hydrate hydroxy phosphate minerals including cyrilovite and wardite. Raman bands at 560, 582, 619 and 668 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4PO43- bending modes and Raman bands at 425, 444, 477 and 507 cm-1 are due to the ν2PO43- bending modes. Raman bands in the 2600-3800 cm-1 spectral range are attributed to water and OH stretching vibrations. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the molecular structure of natrodufrénite to be assessed.

  4. Dynamics of the Barents-Kara ice sheet as revealed by quartz sand grain microtextures of the late Pleistocene Arctic Ocean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Kari; Immonen, Ninna

    2010-12-01

    During the entire Quaternary, ice sheets advanced and retreated across the circum-Arctic margins in a series of climate related glacial-interglacial cycles. It is critical to obtain evaluation of the nature of initiated glaciers at the Arctic margins after the pronounced interglacial periods. In this study this will be done by inferring from glacially generated quartz sand grain surface microtextures and related sedimentology extracted from the central Arctic Ocean sediments. These microtextures can be correlated with the generation and fluctuations in the extent of the late Pleistocene Eurasian Ice Sheet i.e. Barents-Kara Ice Sheet. The central Arctic Ocean sediments in the Lomonosov Ridge, having been deposited after the late Pleistocene interglaciations and having had no internal hiatuses, provide an excellent time window for usage of quartz sand grain surface textures for evaluating possible evolving glaciers and continental ice sheets. This is based on the fact that iceberg and sea-ice transported quartz sand grains and their mechanically formed surface textures, created under high cryostatic stress, are diagnostic for glacier thickness and dynamics having been existed in sediment source areas. Sand-sized quartz grains in deep marine sediments favour iceberg or sea-ice transportation with characteristic content of microtextures formed prior this transportation. The sand grain surface microtextures and their frequencies of the selected submarine Lomonosov Ridge sediments during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 to MIS 3 are analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Coring during the Arctic Ocean 96 expedition (core 96/12-1pc) provided alternating clay to silty clay sediments which are characterised by prominent silt to sand-size containing intervals. The specific glacial crushing and high cryostatic stress generated features, such as high angularity, conchoidal fractures, steps and sub-parallel linear fractures, were observed from quartz sand grain

  5. Enumeration of Thiobacilli within pH-Neutral and Acidic Mine Tailings and Their Role in the Development of Secondary Mineral Soil

    PubMed Central

    Southam, G.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Lemoine tailings of Chibougamau, Quebec, Canada, were deposited as a pH-neutral mineral conglomerate consisting of aluminum-silicates, iron-aluminum-silicates, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite. These tailings are colonized by an active population of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which is localized to an acid zone occupying 40% of the tailings' surface. This population peaked at 7 × 108 most probable number per gram of tailings during July and August 1990 and extended to a depth of 40 cm from the surface. Examination of samples over this depth profile by transmission electron microscopy and electron dispersive spectroscopy revealed a microbially mediated mineral transition from sulfides (below 40 cm) to chlorides and phosphates (at the surface). Silicate minerals were unaltered by microbial action. Transmission electron microscopy showed a tight association between Thiobacillus species and the sulfide minerals, which helps account for their prominence in tailings environments. Accurate enumeration of T. ferrooxidans from tailings required the disruption of their bonding to the mineral interface. Vortexing of a 10% aqueous suspension of the tailings material prior to most-probable-number analysis best facilitated this release. Even though heavy metals were highly mobile under acidic conditions at the Lemoine tailings, it was evident by transmission electron microscopy and electron dispersive spectroscopy that they were being immobilized as bona fide fine-grain minerals containing iron, copper, chlorine, phosphorus, and oxygen on bacterial surfaces and exopolymers. This biomineralization increased with increasing bacterial numbers and was most evident in the upper 3 cm of the acidic zone. Images PMID:16348721

  6. The distribution of secondary mineral phases along an eroding hillslope and its effect on carbon stabilization mechanisms and the fate of soil carbon fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetterl, Sebastian; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Opfergelt, Sophie; Boeckx, Pascal; Bodé, Samuel; Six, Johan; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    Soil redistribution processes can change soil carbon (C) dynamics drastically by moving carbon from high decomposition and re-sequestration environments at the eroding hillslope to low decomposition and burial at the depositional footslope and valley basin. This leads to not only spatially diverse soil carbon storage throughout the landscape, but also to qualitative changes of the transported carbon and the mineral phase. The interaction between those parameters and the effect on stabilization mechanisms for soil C are still a matter of debate. Here, we present an analysis that aims to clarify the bio/geo-chemical and mineralogical components involved in stabilizing C at various depths along an eroding cropped slope and how this affects the abundance of microbial derived carbon. We use the results of an incubation experiment combined with the abundance of amino sugars in different isolated soil C fractions as a tracer for the stability of the respective fraction. We applied further (i) a sequential extraction of the reactive soil phase using pyrophosphate, oxalate and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, and (ii) a qualitative analysis of the clay mineralogy, to analyze the changes in the mineral phase for the different isolated fractions along the slope transect. Our results emphasize the importance of physical protection within microaggregates to stabilize buried, chemically labile C. Our data further indicates that the stability of these aggregates is related to the presence of organo-mineral associations and poorly crystalline minerals. However, decreasing contents of these minerals with depth indicate a temporal limitation of this stabilization mechanism. Non-expandable clay minerals experience a relative enrichment at the depositional site while expandable clay minerals experience the same at the eroding site. These changes in clay mineralogy along the slope are partly responsible for the abundance of silt and clay associated C and the effectiveness of the clay

  7. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  8. Chemical composition, plant secondary metabolites, and minerals of green and black teas and the effect of different tea-to-water ratios during their extraction on the composition of their spent leaves as potential additives for ruminants.

    PubMed

    Ramdani, Diky; Chaudhry, Abdul Shakoor; Seal, Chris J

    2013-05-22

    This study characterized the chemical composition of green and black teas as well as their spent tea leaves (STL) following boiling in water with different tea-to-water ratios. The green and black tea leaves had statistically similar (g/kg dry matter (DM), unless stated otherwise) DM (937 vs 942 g/kg sample), crude protein (240 vs 242), and ash (61.8 vs 61.4), but green tea had significantly higher (g/kg DM) total phenols (231 vs 151), total tannins (204 vs 133), condensed tannins (176 vs 101), and total saponins (276 vs 86.1) and lower neutral detergent fiber (254 vs 323) and acid detergent fiber (211 vs 309) than the black tea leaves. There was no significant difference between the green and black tea leaves for most mineral components except Mn, which was significantly higher in green tea leaves, and Na and Cu, which were significantly higher in black tea leaves. A higher tea-to-water ratio during extraction significantly reduced the loss of soluble compounds into water and hence yielded more nutrient-rich STL. On the basis of these analyses it appears that the green and black tea leaves alongside their STL have the potential for use as sources of protein, fiber, secondary metabolites, and minerals in ruminant diets. The presence of high levels of plant secondary metabolites in either tea leaves or their STL suggests that they may have potential for use as natural additives in ruminant diets.

  9. Secondary osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is –2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  10. Fe(II) sorption on pyrophyllite: Effect of structural Fe(III) (impurity) in pyrophyllite on nature of layered double hydroxide (LDH) secondary mineral formation

    SciTech Connect

    Starcher, Autumn N.; Li, Wei; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Elzinga, Evert J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2016-11-01

    Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH (layered double hydroxide) phases have been shown to form from reactions of aqueous Fe(II) with Fe-free Al-bearing minerals (phyllosilicate/clays and Al-oxides). To our knowledge, the effect of small amounts of structural Fe(III) impurities in “neutral” clays on such reactions, however, were not studied. In this study to understand the role of structural Fe(III) impurity in clays, laboratory batch studies with pyrophyllite (10 g/L), an Al-bearing phyllosilicate, containing small amounts of structural Fe(III) impurities and 0.8 mM and 3 mM Fe(II) (both natural and enriched in 57Fe) were carried out at pH 7.5 under anaerobic conditions (4% H2 – 96% N2 atmosphere). Samples were taken up to 4 weeks for analysis by Fe-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. In addition to the precipitation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH phases as observed in earlier studies with pure minerals (no Fe(III) impurities in the minerals), the analyses indicated formation of small amounts of Fe(III) containing solid(s), most probably hybrid a Fe(II)-Al(III)/Fe(III)-LDH phase. The mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation was not apparent but most likely was due to interfacial electron transfer from the sorbed Fe(II) to the structural Fe(III) and/or surface-sorption-induced electron-transfer from the sorbed Fe(II) to the clay lattice. Increase in the Fe(II)/Al ratio of the LDH with reaction time further indicated the complex nature of the samples. This research provides evidence for the formation of both Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH and Fe(II)-Fe(III)/Al(III)-LDH-like phases during reactions of Fe(II) in systems that mimic the natural environments. Better understanding Fe phase formation in complex laboratory studies will improve models of natural redox systems.

  11. A petrographic, geochemical and isotopic (O, H, C and Sr) investigation of secondary minerals in volcaniclastic rocks at Minna Bluff, Antarctica: Petrogenesis of alteration and implications for paleoenvironmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antibus, J. V.; Panter, K. S.; Wilch, T. I.; Dunbar, N. W.; McIntosh, W. C.; Blusztajn, J.; Tripati, A. K.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2012-12-01

    The alteration of volcanic deposits is a function of eruptive style, environment of deposition and post-depositional processes. In this study we use petrographic and geochemical data on secondary minerals in volcaniclastic deposits at Minna Bluff, a 45-km-long volcanic peninsula in the southern Ross Sea active between 12 and 4 Ma, to unravel their history and study the environmental conditions responsible for their alteration. Glassy volcaniclastic deposits, including lapilli tuff, hyaloclastite breccia and volcanic sediments, have been altered to contain secondary minerals zeolite, carbonate and rare chalcedony and clay (dickite). Carbonates include calcite, Mg-calcite (MgCO3> 4 to <48 mol%), dolomite, magnesite, siderite and rhodochrosite. Zeolites include phillipsite and chabazite and have high and variable alkali contents (Na+K/Ca up to 154) relative to fresh lavas (<15). During the alteration of these deposits, phillipsite formed first followed by chabazite and/or carbonate although carbonates are still thought to be a very early diagenetic precipitate. Compositional zoning in zeolites is poorly developed while carbonates are commonly complex showing changes in Fe, Mn and Sr and Mg/Ca ratios across layers. Carbonate δ18O and δ13C values show wide variations ranging from -0.50 to 21.53‰ and -1.04 to 8.98‰, respectively. Chalcedony δ18O, measured on multiple aliquots from individual vugs and within each vug from one sample, range from 0.68 to 10.37‰ and δD values are light (-187.8 to -220.6‰), matching Antarctic meteoric water. A mean 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.70327 ±0.0009 (1σ, n = 12) for carbonates is comparable to values from lavas in this region (Erebus Volcanic Province), indicating that seawater even at low elevations (<40 m asl) was not involved in the alteration of these deposits. Field relationships and laboratory results indicate that alteration and associated mineral precipitation was a result of isolated, ephemeral events involving the

  12. Pyrophanite pseudomorphs after perovskite in Perkupa serpentinites (Hungary): a microtextural study and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajzon, N.; Váczi, T.; Fehér, B.; Takács, Á.; Szakáll, S.; Weiszburg, T. G.

    2013-09-01

    Pyrophanite in serpentinite at Perkupa (Hungary) is described in detail for the first time as a replacement product of perovskite. It occurs as a 20- to 30-μm-wide rim, mantling a remnant core composed of perovskite or its alteration products. The pyrophanite rim consists of an inner zone, representing a pseudomorph after perovskite, and an outer overgrowth zone. Raman mapping and electron backscatter diffraction data show that the pyrophanite rims typically represent single crystals rather than being composed of multiple domains in different crystallographic orientations. Perovskite occurs exclusively in the core of pyrophanite and was identified as the orthorhombic CaTiO3 phase, based on Raman spectra. Heterogeneous, polyphase mineral cores, consisting of calcite, anatase and/or brookite, kassite, and Mn-bearing kassite, in some cases in association with relict perovskite, are typical in the larger pyrophanite-rimmed grains. The crystallographically coherent pyrophanite rims could have formed through a process where the precursor perovskite crystal acted as a structural template for the newly forming phase, that is, by interface-coupled dissolution reprecipitation during serpentinization of the precursor rock. This alteration of perovskite to pyrophanite was not complete, resulting in the presence of perovskite fragments enclosed in pyrophanite. During the metamorphic evolution of the rock, some of the remnant perovskite cores further altered to TiO2 polymorphs (anatase and brookite) and calcite, via transitional alteration products.

  13. Relationship Between Changes in Serum Urate and Bone Mineral Density During Treatment with Thiazide Diuretics: Secondary Analysis from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Gamble, Gregory D; Horne, Anne; Reid, Ian R

    2016-05-01

    In observational studies, serum urate concentrations associate with bone mineral density (BMD) and reduced risk of fractures. Thiazide diuretics slow the bone loss in healthy older adults, are associated with reduced incidence of fracture and also increase serum urate. We hypothesized that changes in serum urate are associated with changes in BMD during treatment with thiazide diuretics. We analysed data from a double-blind randomized controlled trial of hydrochlorothiazide (50 mg per day) and placebo in normal post-menopausal women. The relationship between change in serum urate and change in BMD after 2 years of treatment was examined using Spearman correlation and multiple linear regression models. Total body BMD increased in the hydrochlorothiazide group by 0.52 % and reduced in the placebo group by 0.29 % over 2 years (between group difference P = 0.0034). Serum urate increased in the hydrochlorothiazide group by 0.038 mmol/L and reduced in the placebo group by 0.004 mmol/L (between group difference P < 0.0001). At Year 2, there was a positive relationship between the change in serum urate and change in total body BMD for entire study population (r = 0.32, P = 0.0002) and for the hydrochlorothiazide group (r = 0.29, P = 0.023). The association between change in serum urate and change in total body BMD persisted after adjusting for treatment allocation, and change in weight, serum calcium, urinary calcium and serum creatinine (P change in serum urate = 0.043). These data raise the possibility that the effects of hydrochlorothiazide on BMD may be mediated, in part, by changes in serum urate concentrations.

  14. Mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furby, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of lubricants made from mineral oils are discussed. Types and compositions of base stocks are reviewed and the product demands and compositions of typical products are outlined. Processes for commercial production of mineral oils are examined. Tables of data are included to show examples of product types and requirements. A chemical analysis of three types of mineral oils is reported.

  15. Comparisons of the four Miller Range nakhlites, MIL 03346, 090030, 090032 and 090136: Textural and compositional observations of primary and secondary mineral assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, Lydia J.; Taylor, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Petrological and geochemical analyses of Miller Range (MIL) 03346 indicate that this meteorite originated from the same augitic cumulate layer(s) as the nakhlite Martian meteorites, but underwent rapid cooling prior to complete crystallization. As with the other nakhlites, MIL 03346 contains a secondary alteration assemblage, in this case consisting of iddingsite-like alteration veins in olivine phenocrysts, Fe-oxide alteration veins associated with the mesostasis, and Ca- and K,Fe-sulfate veins. We compared the textural and mineralogical compositions of MIL 090030, 090032, and 090136 with MIL 03346, focusing on the composition and Raman spectra of the alteration assemblages. These observations indicate that the meteorites are paired, and that the preterrestrial olivine-bound alteration assemblages were produced by weakly acidic brine. Although these alteration assemblages resemble similar assemblages in Nakhla, the absence of siderite and halite in the Miller Range nakhlites indicates that the parental alteration brine was comparatively HCO3- depleted, and less concentrated, than that which altered Nakhla. This indicates that the Miller Range nakhlite alteration brine experienced a separate evolutionary pathway to that which altered Nakhla, and therefore represents a separate branch of the Lafayette-Nakhla evaporation sequence. Thin-sections cut from the internal portions of these meteorites (away from any fusion crust or terrestrially exposed edge), contain little Ca-sulfate (identified as gypsum), and no jarosite, whereas thin-sections with terrestrially exposed edges have much higher sulfate abundances. These observations suggest that at least the majority of sulfate within the Miller Range nakhlites is terrestrially derived.

  16. Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also ...

  17. Secondary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Secondary hypertension Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Secondary hypertension (secondary high blood pressure) is high blood pressure that's caused by another medical condition. Secondary hypertension can be caused by conditions that affect your ...

  18. Identifying Minerals from Their Infra-red Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a British secondary school's use of a spectrometer to identify minerals. Discusses the origins of mineral spectra, the preparation of the specimen, the actual spectroscopic scanning, and the interpretation of the spectra. (TW)

  19. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  20. Mineral resource of the month: Vermiculite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Arnold O.

    2014-01-01

    Vermiculite comprises a group of hydrated, laminar magnesium-aluminum-iron silicate minerals resembling mica. They are secondary minerals, typically altered biotite, iron-rich phlogopite or other micas or clay-like minerals that are themselves sometimes alteration products of amphibole, chlorite, olivine and pyroxene. Vermiculite deposits are associated with volcanic ultramafic rocks rich in magnesium silicate minerals, and flakes of the mineral range in color from black to shades of brown and yellow. The crystal structure of vermiculite contains water molecules, a property that is critical to its processing for common uses.

  1. Secondary amenorrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... of periods - secondary Images Secondary amenorrhea Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) Absence of menstruation (amenorrhea) References Bulun SE. Physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  2. Industrial Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, James C.

    1978-01-01

    The past year is seen as not particularly good for industrial minerals and for industry in general. Environmental concerns continued to trouble the industry with unacceptable asbestos concentrations and chlorofluorocarbon effects on ozone. A halting U.S. economy also affected industrial progress. (MA)

  3. Mineral bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    In the last 25 years, the introduction of biotechnological methods in hydrometallurgy has created new opportunities and challenges for the mineral processing industry. This was especially true for the production of metal values from mining wastes and low-and-complex-grade mineral resources, which were considered economically not amenable for processing by conventional extraction methods. Using bio-assisted heap, dump and in-situ leaching technologies, copper and uranium extractions gained their first industrial applications. The precious metal industries were the next to adopt the bio-preoxidation technique in the extraction of gold from refractory sulfide-bearing ores and concentrates. A variety of other bioleaching opportunities exist for nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc sulfide leaching. Recently developed bioremediation methods and biosorption technologies have shown a good potential for industrial applications to remove trace heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations from contaminated soils, and mining and processing effluents.

  4. Influence of cross-rolling on the micro-texture and biodegradation of pure iron as biodegradable material for medical implants.

    PubMed

    Obayi, Camillus Sunday; Tolouei, Ranna; Paternoster, Carlo; Turgeon, Stephane; Okorie, Boniface Adeleh; Obikwelu, Daniel Oray; Cassar, Glenn; Buhagiar, Joseph; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Iron-based biodegradable metals have been shown to present high potential in cardiac, vascular, orthopaedic and dental in adults, as well as paediatric, applications. These require suitable mechanical properties, adequate biocompatibility while guaranteeing a low toxicity of degradation products. For example, in cardiac applications, stents need to be made by homogeneous and isotropic materials in order to prevent sudden failures which would impair the deployment site. Besides, the presence of precipitates and pores, chemical inhomogeneity or other anisotropic microstructural defects may trigger stress concentration phenomena responsible for the early collapse of the device. Metal manufacturing processes play a fundamental role towards the final microstructure and mechanical properties of the materials. The present work assesses the effect of mode of rolling on the micro-texture evolution, mechanical properties and biodegradation behaviour of polycrystalline pure iron. Results indicated that cross-rolled samples recrystallized with lower rates than the straight-rolled ones due to a reduction in dislocation density content and an increase in intensity of {100} crystallographic plane which stores less energy of deformation responsible for primary recrystallization. The degradation resulted to be more uniform for cross-rolled samples, while the corrosion rates of cross-rolled and straight-rolled samples did not show relevant differences in simulated body solution. Finally, this work shows that an adequate compromise between biodegradation rate, strength and ductility could be achieved by modulating the deformation mode during cold rolling.

  5. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  6. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and polishes Some ...

  7. [Secondary rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Duron, J-B; Nguyen, P S; Bardot, J; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Secondary rhinoplasty is very usual. Some patients are not satisfied by the previous surgery because the result is poor with obvious defaults but, sometimes, the result is good but the patient expects perfection. These two different situations will not lead to the same answer from the surgeon. Techniques of secondary rhinoplasty are the same than primary, but are often more difficult to perform because of scar tissue, retraction and loss of lining. The authors analyse the more frequent deformities in secondary rhinoplasty and the way they fix them.

  8. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Minerals? What Do Vitamins and Minerals Do? Fuel for Growth Common Concerns en español Vitaminas y minerales Breakfast cereals advertise that they're packed with vitamins and minerals. Sports drinks claim they can rev up your flagging energy with a jolt of vitamins or minerals (sorry, ...

  9. Minerals in our environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weathers, Judy; Galloway, John; Frank, Dave

    2000-01-01

    Minerals are found everywhere in our daily lives. This poster depicts numerous items found throughout a home, and the mineral(s) or mineral resources used in the ingredients of, or construction/manufacturing of those items. Designed for K-8 Teachers this poster can be scaled and is printable at 36" x 60" and legible at 11" x 17" in size.

  10. Development of Secondary Recrystallization in high permeability grain oriented Silicon steel produced by Thin Slab Casting and Rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. F.; Liu, S. M.; Guo, F.; He, J. Z.; Lu, B.; Dong, R. F.

    2017-02-01

    Texture evolution during high temperature annealing process in high permeability grain oriented(Hi-B)silicon steel, produced by Thin Slab Casting and Rolling(TSCR) process, was investigated using macro-/microtexture analysis. Goss texture appears in ODF at 800°C, the intensity of Goss texture is very weak until 950°CGoss grains grow abnormally during 980°C∼1000°C, grain size reached centimeter level at 1000°C instead of Primary Grains, Goss grains were obtained fully at 1020°C, Secondary recrystallization completed at 1040°C The deviation angle of Goss grain orientation decreases gradually with increasing temperature, and it reached the minimum at 1040°C.

  11. Vesicle microtexture analysis and eruption dynamics of selected high fountaining episodes at Pu`u `Ō`ō, Kīlauea volcano, Hawai`i between 1985-1986.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, S. J.; Carey, R.; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, T. R.; McPhie, J.

    2015-12-01

    The early phases of the ongoing eruption of Pu`u `Ō`ō in the East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kīlauea on Hawai`i provide a unique opportunity to study the vesicle microtexture of tephra from five high (≥200m) Hawaiian fountaining events, from a single vent, over a prolonged period of time. The high Hawaiian fountains erupted at Pu`u `Ō`ō varied in height from 200 m up to a maximum of 467 m, during which the shallow conduit at Pu`u `Ō`ō remained stable. We conducted microtextural analysis of pyroclasts from five high (264 to 391 m) Hawaiian fountaining episodes at Kīlauea, Episodes 32, 37, 40, 44 and 45, erupted from the Pu`u `Ō`ō vent between 1985 and 1986 in order to constrain the parameters that lead to large variations in fountain height of Hawaiian fountains at Pu`u `Ō`ō. Our results show that pyroclasts from a single episode can vary greatly in texture (from bubbly to foamy) and have vesicle volume densities (Nmv) that vary by an order of magnitude. This range in vesicle texture and population is due to extensive growth and coalescence of vesicles within the eruption jet post-fragmentation, resulting in the observed vesicle texture not being wholly indicative of the syn-fragmentation vesicle population. Only four pyroclasts were found to have textures that are interpreted to be indicative of the vesicle population at the moment of fragmentation, all of which have bubbly texture, high density, high Nmv, and low vesicle-to-melt ratio (VG/VL). Due to the paucity of pyroclasts representative of syn-eruption vesiculation processes, comparison of shallow conduit dynamics across episodes can only be qualitative observations, which suggest the ascending melt is thermally and mechanically heterogeneous on a small scale during Hawaiian-style fountaining. This highlights the importance for detailed micro-scale qualitative textural observations on pyroclasts with end-member densities, as well as modal densities, when carrying out vesicle microtexture analysis. This

  12. Mineral Commodity Profiles: Selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Brown, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Selenium, which is one of the chalcogen elements in group 16 (or 6A) of the periodic table, is a semiconductor that is chemically similar to sulfur for which it substitutes in many minerals and synthetic compounds. It is a byproduct of copper refining and, to a much lesser extent, lead refining. It is used in many applications, the major ones being a decolorizer for glass, a metallurgical additive to free-machining varieties of ferrous and nonferrous alloys, a constituent in cadmium sulfoselenide pigments, a photoreceptor in xerographic copiers, and a semiconductor in electrical rectifiers and photocells. Refined selenium amounting to more than 1,800 metric tons (t) was produced by 14 countries in 2000. Japan, Canada, the United States, and Belgium, which were the four largest producers, accounted for nearly 85 percent of world production. An estimated 250 t of the world total is secondary selenium, which is recovered from scrapped xerographic copier drums and selenium rectifiers; the selenium in nearly all other uses is dissipated (not recoverable as waste or scrap). The present selenium reserve bases for the United States and the world (including the United States), which are associated with copper deposits, are expected to be able to satisfy demand for selenium for several decades without difficulty.

  13. Remnants of Melt Pools and Melt Films Associated with Dewatering of Nominally Anhydrous Minerals in Lower Crustal Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, S. J.; Williams, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Water locked in structural sites and in fluid inclusions in nominally anhydrous minerals in lower crustal granitoids may act as a flux for partial melting of these source rocks. Microtextural study of the 2.6 Ga Stevenson granite of the Athabasca Granulite Terrane of northern Saskatchewan shows that increasing intensity of deformation of the granite correlates with migration of water from within crystals to grain boundaries. Dark, ultrafine-grained, water-richer matrix material consisting of quartz, plagioclase, alkali feldspar and fine iron oxides are interpreted to be former melt films that resulted, at least in part, from fluxing by NAM-derived water. Melt films on the grain boundaries of plagioclase, potassium feldspar and quartz are approximately 20 microns wide. Melt pools are up to 100+ microns in diameter. Water in nominally anhydrous minerals has the potential to lower the solidus significantly enough to initiate partial melting in lower crustal granitoids at high ambient temperatures. 3000 ppm water in minerals that make up large volumes of crustal rocks (alkali feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, quartz) would lower the dry solidus of granite by 273oC at 1 GPa, for initiation of partial melting. Generation of small volumes of partial melt on grain boundaries may lead to further rock weakening and localization of further deformation.

  14. Mineral chemical study of U-bearing minerals from the Dominion Reefs, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantzsch, Ulrike; Gauert, Christoph D. K.; van der Westhuizen, Willem A.; Duhamel, Isabelle; Cuney, Michel; Beukes, Gerhard J.

    2011-02-01

    The Neo-Archean Dominion Reefs (~3.06 Ga) are thin meta-conglomerate layers with concentrations of U- and Th-bearing heavy minerals higher than in the overlying Witwatersrand Reefs. Ore samples from Uranium One Africa's Rietkuil and Dominion exploration areas near Klerksdorp, South Africa, were investigated for their mineral paragenesis, texture and mineral chemical composition. The ore and heavy mineral assemblages consist of uraninite, other uraniferous minerals, Fe sulphides, Ni-Co sulfarsenides, garnet, pyrite, pyrrhotite, monazite, zircon, chromite, magnetite and minor gold. Sub-rounded uraninite grains occur associated with the primary detrital heavy mineral paragenesis. U-Ti, U-Th minerals, pitchblende (colloform uraninite) and coffinite are of secondary, re-mobilised origin as evidenced by crystal shape and texture. Most of the uranium mineralisation is represented by detrital uraninite with up to 70.2 wt.% UO2 and up to 9.3 wt.% ThO2. Re-crystallised phases such as secondary pitchblende (without Th), coffinite, U-Ti and U-Th phases are related to hydrothermal overprint during low-grade metamorphism and are of minor abundance.

  15. Bartering for Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Kathie

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students are assigned occupations that rely on specific minerals. To obtain the needed minerals, students learn how to trade services and commodities. Includes details on preparation, modeling behaviors, and printed materials. (DDR)

  16. Mineral Spirits Purification Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the mineral spirits to decompose 1,2- propanediol dinitrate and remove hydrogen cyandide and other gaseous decomposition produces, and then distill the mineral spirits from the remaining contaminants.

  17. Mathematical Model for the Mineralization of Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the transport and precipitation of mineral in refilling osteons. One goal of this model was to explain calcification 'halos,' in which the bone near the haversian canal is more highly mineralized than the more peripheral lamellae, which have been mineralizing longer. It was assumed that the precipitation rate of mineral is proportional to the difference between the local concentration of calcium ions and an equilibrium concentration and that the transport of ions is by either diffusion or some other concentration gradient-dependent process. Transport of ions was assumed to be slowed by the accumulation of mineral in the matrix along the transport path. ne model also mimics bone apposition, slowing of apposition during refilling, and mineralization lag time. It was found that simple diffusion cannot account for the transport of calcium ions into mineralizing bone, because the diffusion coefficient is two orders of magnitude too low. If a more rapid concentration gradient-driven means of transport exists, the model demonstrates that osteonal geometry and variable rate of refilling work together to produce calcification halos, as well as the primary and secondary calcification effect reported in the literature.

  18. Mathematical Model for the Mineralization of Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the transport and precipitation of mineral in refilling osteons. One goal of this model was to explain calcification 'halos,' in which the bone near the haversian canal is more highly mineralized than the more peripheral lamellae, which have been mineralizing longer. It was assumed that the precipitation rate of mineral is proportional to the difference between the local concentration of calcium ions and an equilibrium concentration and that the transport of ions is by either diffusion or some other concentration gradient-dependent process. Transport of ions was assumed to be slowed by the accumulation of mineral in the matrix along the transport path. The model also mimics bone apposition, slowing of apposition during refilling, and mineralization lag time. It was found that simple diffusion cannot account for the transport of calcium ions into mineralizing bone, because the diffusion coefficient is two orders of magnitude too low. If a more rapid concentration gradient-driven means of transport exists, the model demonstrates that osteonal geometry and variable rate of refilling work together to produce calcification halos, as well as the primary and secondary calcification effect reported in the literature.

  19. Radioactive demonstration of final mineralized waste forms for Hanford waste treatment plant secondary waste (WTP-SW) by fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) using the bench scale reformer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137Cs, 129I, 99Tc, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW.

  20. Origin, Behavior and Texture of Clay Minerals in Mongolian Active Fault of Bogd and Comparison with SAFOD Fault Gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, H.; Buatier, M.; Chauvet, A.; Kanitpanyacharoen, W.

    2010-12-01

    Fault gouges are generally considered as the highly deformed zone corresponding to the localization of shear during seismic events. Clays are ubiquitous minerals in fault gouges but the origin is unclear. They can form as a result of break up of inherited phyllosilicates during faulting, or during co- or post- deformation events or even during interseismic creeping. In this study, we aim to characterize the origin and nature of the clay minerals, to observe the microtexture and preferred orientation of clay at various scales in order to understand the behavior of clay mineral in seismic faults. The investigation relied on x-ray powder patterns, SEM, TEM and high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The major clay components are smectite, illite-smectite, illite-mica and kaolinite. Our observations suggest that the protolith and the fault rock of the Bogd and paleo-Bogd faults in Mongolia were highly altered by fluids. The fluid-rock interactions allows clay minerals to form and to precipitate kaolinite and smectite. Thus, newly formed clay minerals are heterogeneously distributed in the fault zone. The decrease of smectite component of the highly deformed samples suggests a dehydration process during deformation, leading to illite precipitation. From synchrotron diffraction images, volume fractions and preferred orientation were analyzed. Our analysis shows that texture strength of constituent clays is very weak ranging from 1.05 to 2.59 m.r.d., which is consistent with similar data from SAFOD fault gouge. The clays minerals of the Bogd fault favors the slip weakening behavior of the fault.

  1. Ion beam microtexturing of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Some recent work in surface microtecturing by ion beam sputtering is described. The texturing is accomplished by deposition of an impurity onto a substrate while simultaneously bombarding it with an ion beam. A summary of the theory regarding surface diffusion of impurities and the initiation of cone formation is provided. A detailed experimental study of the time-development of individual sputter cones is described. A quasi-liquid coating was observed that apparently reduces the sputter rate of the body of a cone compared to the bulk material. Experimental measurements of surface diffusion activation energies are presented for a variety of substrate-seed combinations and range from about 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. Observations of apparent crystal structure in sputter cones are discussed. Measurements of the critical temperature for cone formation are also given along with a correlation of critical temperature with substrate sputter rate.

  2. Bouncing transitions on microtextured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, M.; Pépin, A.; Marty, F.; Chen, Y.; Quéré, D.

    2006-04-01

    A drop of water thrown on a super-hydrophobic solid will often bounce off. Here we discuss the conditions to be fulfilled on the surface design (which provides super-hydrophobicity) to observe such a behavior. This allows us to precise how a material can be made water-repellent. We show in particular how the reduction of the scale of the microstructure provides a robust water repellency, and describe some peculiarities of violent shocks on such surfaces.

  3. Possible uranium mineralization, Mineral Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W. Roger; McHugh, John B.; Ficklin, Walter H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mineral Mountains block in west-central Utah is a horst whose core stands structurally high relative to all nearby basin-and-range fault blocks. Rocks of the Mineral Mountains range from Precambrian to Quaternary in age, but mostly consist of Tertiary granitic rocks. The range lies with the Wah Wah-Tusher mineral belt. Lead, silver, gold, and tungsten have been mined commercially. During a geochemical survey conducted in the summer of 1978, 30 water samples and 29 stream-sediment samples were collected from the Mineral Mountains area. The interpretation of simple plots of uranium concentrations and the results of a Q-mode factor analysis indicate that potential exists for uranium mineral deposits within the Mineral Mountains. The most favorable areas are in the granitic pluton near its contacts with sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The most likely source of the uranium anomalies is uraninite-bearing epigenic veins along faults and fractures within the pluton. Three hypothetical models are proposed to account for the uranium mineralization.

  4. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Stillion, Jenefer R; Ritt, Michelle G

    2009-06-01

    The parathyroid glands secrete parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is important for maintaining calcium homeostasis. Parathyroid gland hyperplasia and subsequent hyperparathyroidism can occur secondary to chronic renal failure in dogs, resulting in significant alterations in calcium metabolism. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is a complex, multifactorial syndrome that involves changes in circulating levels of calcium, PTH, phosphorus, and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol). An increased PTH level can have deleterious effects, including soft tissue mineralization, fibrous osteodystrophy, bone marrow suppression, urolithiasis, and neuropathy. Dietary phosphorus restriction, intestinal phosphate binders, and calcitriol supplementation may slow the progression of renal disease and decrease PTH concentrations in animals with secondary hyperparathyroidism; however, the prognosis for these animals is guarded to poor.

  5. Minerals leasing for landowners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report delineates the provisions of the legal codes of the 13 Southeastern states relating to minerals leasing. The introduction explains land ownership and land leasing in terms of mineral rights, and describes the basic elements which a lease conveyance must contain to be valid. A checklist gives the terms which must be included in all mineral leases.

  6. Fungal degradation of calcium-, lead- and silicon-bearing minerals.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Ademola O; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine nutritional influence on the ability of selected filamentous fungi to mediate biogenic weathering of the minerals, apatite, galena and obsidian in order to provide further understanding of the roles of fungi as biogeochemical agents, particularly in relation to the cycling of metals and associated elements found in minerals. The impact of three organic acid producing fungi (Aspergillus niger, Serpula himantioides and Trametes versicolor) on apatite, galena and obsidian was examined in the absence and presence of a carbon and energy source (glucose). Manifestation of fungal weathering included corrosion of mineral surfaces, modification of the mineral substrate through transformation into secondary minerals (i.e. crystal formation) and hyphal penetration of the mineral substrate. Physicochemical interactions of fungal metabolites, e.g. H+ and organic acids, with the minerals are thought to be the primary driving forces responsible. All experimental fungi were capable of mineral surface colonization in the absence and presence of glucose but corrosion of the mineral surface and secondary mineral formation were affected by glucose availability. Only S. himantioides and T. versicolor were able to corrode apatite in the absence of glucose but none of the fungi were capable of doing so with the other minerals. In addition, crystal formation with galena was entirely dependent on the availability of glucose. Penetration of the mineral substrates by fungal hyphae occurred but this did not follow any particular pattern. Although the presence of glucose in the media appeared to influence positively the mineral penetrating abilities of the fungi, the results obtained also showed that some geochemical change(s) might occur under nutrient-limited conditions. It was, however, unclear whether the hyphae actively penetrated the minerals or were growing into pre-existing pores or cracks.

  7. Mineral particles, mineral fibers, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Churg, A.; Wiggs, B.

    1985-08-01

    The total fibrous and nonfibrous mineral content of the lung has been analyzed in a series of 14 men with lung cancer but no history of occupational dust exposure, and in a series of 14 control men matched for age, smoking history, and general occupational class. The lung cancer patients had an average of 525 +/- 369 X 10(6) exogenous mineral particles and 17.4 +/- 19.6 X 10(6) exogenous mineral fibers/g dry lung, while the controls had averages of 261 +/- 175 mineral particles and 4.7 +/- 3.2 X 10(6) mineral fibers/g dry lung. These differences are statistically significant for both particles and fibers. Kaolinite, talc, mica, feldspars, and crystalline silica comprised the majority of particles of both groups. Approximately 90% of the particles were smaller than 2 micron in diameter and approximately 60% smaller than 1 micron. In both groups, patients who had smoked more than 35 pack years had greater numbers of particles than patients who had smoked less than 35 pack years. It is concluded that, in this study, lungs from patients with lung cancer had statistically greater numbers of mineral particles and fibers than lungs from controls, and that smoking influences total long-term retention of particles from all sources.

  8. Heavy-mineral analysis and provenance of Yellow River sediments around the China Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Baotian; Pang, Hongli; Gao, Hongshan; Garzanti, Eduardo; Zou, Yu; Liu, Xiaopeng; Li, Fuqiang; Jia, Yunxia

    2016-09-01

    In its upper-middle reaches the Yellow River has high sand contents after traversing through large areas of desert and the China Loess Plateau. Understanding riverbed sediment composition in the channel is critical for the interpretation of the potential provenance, aeolian sand transport and the linkage between the Loess Plateau and the Yellow River. To address these issues, we collected 52 samples from the modern riverbed, proximal deserts, and major tributaries and used analyses of grain size, grain morphology, and heavy-mineral compositions, to establish the spatial distribution and characteristics of source regions and riverbed sediments. The heavy-mineral assemblages demonstrate significant variations for the different sections of the Yellow River. The riverbed samples from the upper reach are dominated by opaque minerals (limonite and magnetite), amphibole and epidote, with minor zircon, tourmaline and rutile. Riverbed sediments from the middle reach are garnet-rich, reflecting the widespread distribution of Mesozoic sandstones. This variability closely reflects the source regions. Our data show that seasonal tributaries (the "Ten Great Gullies") carrying detritus from the Ordos Plateau may account for the localized high garnet concentrations in the Inner Mongolia section of the upper reach. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of quartz grains show that the river sediments are characterized by composite microtextures acquired in both fluvial and eolian environments of the Hedong, Ulan Buh and Kubuq Deserts. The mineralogical composition in the upper reach (Lanzhou-Yinchuan) is similar to that of sediments in the Loess Plateau and Northeast Tibet Plateau (Western Lanzhou). However, the composition differs markedly from that in the Inner Mongolia section of the upper and middle reaches. This variation indicates that in the upper reach the Northeast Tibet Plateau contributes significant volumes of sediment to the Yellow River and Loess Plateau, but

  9. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  10. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  11. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  12. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  13. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  14. Reagan issues mineral policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  15. Mineral Processing Sector

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the nonmetallic mineral processing sector (NAICS 327), including NESHAPs for asbestos and hazardous waste, and wastewater permit information.

  16. Rocks, minerals, and a dusty world

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, C.

    1993-12-31

    The Earth`s troposphere and hydrosphere contain abundant naturally generated dust. The ultimate source materials from which the terrestrially produced dust is generated are the various rock types exposed at the Earth`s surface. Natural dust is a composite of (1) lithic, primary mineral grains; (2) mineral grains formed by secondary chemical reactions; (3) volcanic ash and dust; (4) salts from sea sprays; (5) extra-terrestrial dust; and (6) biologic materials. In this paper the various pathways to the natural generation of dust (via the hydrologic cycle) will be discussed, and two geologically well-known natural dust sources will be described, paying particular attention to quantitative measurements of the dusts from these areas. General dust studies that provide data on possibly global background levels will be presented as well.. A few general aspects of the mineralogical characterization of dust particles and a discussion of some of the mineralogy of several mineral groups are first presented. 89 refs., 39 figs.

  17. Uranium mineralization in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Dreschhoff, G.A.M.; Zeller, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    For the past 10 antarctic field seasons, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey has been conducted over widely separated parts of the continent. Localized accumulations of both primary and secondary uranium minerals have been discovered at several localities scattered along the Transantarctic Mountains from the Scott Glacier to northern Victoria Land. A number of highly significant radiation anomalies have been discovered in the area between the Koettlitz Glacier and the Pyramid Trough. The occurrences consist of pegmatite vein complexes which contain an association of primary uranium and thorium minerals. Of still greater significance is the fact that abundant secondary uranium minerals were found in association with the primary deposits, and they indicate clearly that uranium is geochemically mobile under the conditions imposed by the arid polar climate that now exists in southern Victoria Land. Preliminary results of a uranium analysis performed by neutron activation indicate a concentration of 0.12% uranium in a composite sample from the two veins. Even higher levels of thorium are present. The nature of the primary uranium mineralization is currently under investigation. Preliminary results are discussed.

  18. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  19. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  20. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  1. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  2. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  3. SECONDARY OSTEOPOROSIS: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Faryal; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by decreased bone mineral density and compromised bone strength predisposing to an increased risk of fractures. Although idiopathic osteoporosis is the most common form of osteoporosis, secondary factors may contribute to the bone loss and increased fracture risk in patients presenting with fragility fractures or osteoporosis. Several medical conditions and medications significantly increase the risk for bone loss and skeletal fragility. This review focuses on some of the common causes of osteoporosis, addressing the underlying mechanisms, diagnostic approach and treatment of low bone mass in the presence of these conditions. PMID:25971649

  4. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  5. Digging into Minnesota Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul.

    This publication presents students with facts about geology and several learning activities. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, volcanoes and earthquakes, fossils, exploration geology, mining in Minnesota, environmental issues related to mining, mineral uses, mining history, and the geology of Minnesota's state parks. A geologic timetable…

  6. Mineral physics abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert

    During the 1983-1984 academic year, I spent a sabbatical leave in France, during which I had the opportunity to visit several mineral physics laboratories in Europe and meet many of our colleagues there. The purpose of this item is to report briefly on developments of interest to the U.S. mineral physics community.

  7. Mineral commodity summaries 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2015 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials

  8. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  9. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  10. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2002-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  11. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  12. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  13. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  14. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  15. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  16. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials

  17. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  18. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2003-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  19. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  20. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  1. Mineral commodity summaries 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2017-01-31

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2016 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials.

  2. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2011 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2010 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011 contains new chapters on iron oxide pigments, wollastonite, and zeolites. The chapters on mica (natural), scrap and flake and mica (natural), sheet have been combined into a single chapter - mica (natural). Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. "Appendix C - Reserves and Resources" has been divided into "Part A - Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals" and "Part B - Sources of Reserves Data," including some information that was previously in this introduction. A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2011 are welcomed.

  3. Underground mineral extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  4. Biological impact on mineral dissolution: Application of the lichen model to understanding mineral weathering in the rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Jillian F.; Barker, William W.; Welch, Susan A.; Taunton, Anne

    1999-01-01

    Microorganisms modify rates and mechanisms of chemical and physical weathering and clay growth, thus playing fundamental roles in soil and sediment formation. Because processes in soils are inherently complex and difficult to study, we employ a model based on the lichen–mineral system to identify the fundamental interactions. Fixed carbon released by the photosynthetic symbiont stimulates growth of fungi and other microorganisms. These microorganisms directly or indirectly induce mineral disaggregation, hydration, dissolution, and secondary mineral formation. Model polysaccharides were used to investigate direct mediation of mineral surface reactions by extracellular polymers. Polysaccharides can suppress or enhance rates of chemical weathering by up to three orders of magnitude, depending on the pH, mineral surface structure and composition, and organic functional groups. Mg, Mn, Fe, Al, and Si are redistributed into clays that strongly adsorb ions. Microbes contribute to dissolution of insoluble secondary phosphates, possibly via release of organic acids. These reactions significantly impact soil fertility. Below fungi–mineral interfaces, mineral surfaces are exposed to dissolved metabolic byproducts. Through this indirect process, microorganisms can accelerate mineral dissolution, leading to enhanced porosity and permeability and colonization by microbial communities. PMID:10097050

  5. MINER{nu}A Test Beam Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, A.; Castorena, J.; Urrutia, Z.; Felix, J.; Zavala, G.

    2009-12-17

    MINER{nu}A Main INjector ExpeRiment {nu}-A is a high-statistic neutrino scattering experiment that will ran in the NuMI Beam Hall at Fermilab. To calibrate the energy response of the MINER{nu}A detector, a beamline is being designed for the MINER{nu}A Test Beam Detector (TBD). The TBD is a replica of the full MINER{nu}A detector at small scale for calibration studies of the main detector. The beamline design consists of the following parts: a copper target, used to generate tertiaries from an incoming secondary beam; a steel collimator for tertiaries, which also serves as a dump for the incoming beam; a time of fight system (scintillator planes); four wire chambers, for angle measurements and tracking; and two dipole magnets, used as an spectrometer. During last October, the first commissioning run of the MINER{nu}A Test Beam took place in the Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab. We commissioned the target and collimator of the new tertiary beamline.

  6. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin David C.; O'Connor William K.; Penner Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    Concerns about global warming caused by the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere have resulted in the need for research to reduce or eliminate emissions of these gases. Carbonation of magnesium and calcium silicate minerals is one possible method to achieve this reduction. It is possible to carry out these reactions either in situ (storage underground and subsequent reaction with the host rock to trap CO2 as carbonate minerals) or ex situ (above ground in a more traditional chemical processing plant). Research at the Department of Energy’s Albany Research Center has explored both of these routes. This paper will explore parameters that affect the direct carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4) and olivine (Mg2SiO4) to produce magnesite (MgCO3), as well as the calcium silicate mineral, wollastonite (CaSiO3), to form calcite (CaCO3). The Columbia River Basalt Group is a multi-layered basaltic lava plateau that has favorable mineralogy and structure for storage of CO2. Up to 25% combined concentration of Ca, Fe2+, and Mg cations could react to form carbonates and thus sequester large quantities of CO2. Core samples from the Columbia River Basalt Group were reacted in an autoclave for up to 2000 hours at temperatures and pressures to simulate in situ conditions. Changes in core porosity, secondary minerals, and solution chemistry were measured.

  7. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapters on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  8. Minerals Yearbook, centennial edition 1981. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook Marks the centennial of the first annual publication of comprehensive mineral industry statistics by the Federal Government. This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 71 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  9. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  10. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  11. Paricalcitol for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Trillini, Matias; Cortinovis, Monica; Ruggenenti, Piero; Reyes Loaeza, Jorge; Courville, Karen; Ferrer-Siles, Claudia; Prandini, Silvia; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Villa, Alessandro; Perna, Annalisa; Gotti, Eliana; Caruso, Maria Rosa; Martinetti, Davide; Perico, Norberto

    2015-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism contributes to post-transplant CKD mineral and bone disorder. Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, decreased serum parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. This single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, open-label study compared the effect of 6-month treatment with paricalcitol (1 μg/d for 3 months and then uptitrated to 2 µg/d if tolerated) or nonparicalcitol therapy on serum parathyroid hormone levels (primary outcome), mineral metabolism, and proteinuria in 43 consenting recipients of renal transplants with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Participants were randomized 1:1 according to a computer-generated sequence. Compared with baseline, median (interquartile range) serum parathyroid hormone levels significantly declined on paricalcitol from 115.6 (94.8–152.0) to 63.3 (52.0–79.7) pg/ml (P<0.001) but not on nonparicalcitol therapy. At 6 months, levels significantly differed between treatments (P<0.001 by analysis of covariance). Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin decreased on paricalcitol therapy only and significantly differed between treatments at 6 months (P<0.001 for all comparisons). At 6 months, urinary deoxypyridinoline-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria level decreased only on paricalcitol (P<0.05). L3 and L4 vertebral mineral bone density, assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorption, significantly improved with paricalcitol at 6 months (P<0.05 for both densities). Paricalcitol was well tolerated. Overall, 6-month paricalcitol supplementation reduced parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria, attenuated bone remodeling and mineral loss, and reduced eGFR in renal transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Long-term studies are needed to monitor directly measured GFR, ensure that the bone remodeling and mineral effects are sustained, and determine if the reduction in proteinuria improves renal and

  12. Paralysis: Secondary Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5pm ET. 1-800-539-7309 ☰ Living with Paralysis Get Support Get Involved Research Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Health > Secondary conditions Secondary conditions Secondary conditions refer ...

  13. Minerals Management Service: Strategic plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-30

    This plan addresses the management of the mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf in an environmentally sound and safe manner and the timely collection, verification, and distribution of mineral revenues from Federal and Indian lands. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) manages the Nation`s natural gas, oil and other mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and collects, accounts for, and disburses revenues from offshore federal mineral leases and from onshore mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands.

  14. Identification of Mineral Phases on Basalt Surfaces by Imaging SIMS.

    PubMed

    Ingram, J C; Groenewold, G S; Olson, J E; Gianotto, A K; McCurry, M O

    1999-05-01

    A method for the identification of mineral phases on basalt surfaces utilizing secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with imaging capability is described. The goal of this work is to establish the use of imaging SIMS for characterization of the surface of basalt. The basalt surfaces were examined by interrogating the intact basalt (heterogeneous mix of mineral phases) as well as mineral phases that have been separated from the basalt samples. Mineral separates from the basalt were used to establish reference spectra for the specific mineral phases. Electron microprobe and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used as supplemental techniques for providing additional characterization of the basalt. Mineral phases that make up the composition of the basalt were identified from single-ion images which were statistically grouped. The statistical grouping is performed by utilizing a program that employs a generalized learning vector quantization technique. Identification of the mineral phases on the basalt surface is achieved by comparing the mass spectra from the statistically grouped regions of the basalt to the mass spectral results from the mineral separates. The results of this work illustrate the potential for using imaging SIMS to study adsorption chemistry at the top surface of heterogeneous mineral samples.

  15. Biological effects of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    In general, clay materials exhibit a range of biological activities, from apparently inactive or slightly active, such as hematite, to highly fibrogenic and carcinogenic, such as fibrous brucite (nemalite). The zeolites also exhibit such as range, with some mordenite being slightly active and erionite being highly active; however, erionite is the only zeolite that has been studied extensively. The diversity of mineral species holds great potential for probing these mechanisms, especially when mineralogical data are integrated with biological data. Unfortunately, many of the studies reporting data on the biological effects of clays and zeolites fail to report detailed mineralogical information; hence, it is difficult at present to interpret the biological activities of minerals in terms of their physical and chemical properties. Important mineralogical data that are only rarely considered in biological research include exact mineralogy of the specimen (i.e., identification and abundance of contaminants), physical and chemical properties of minerals, and surface properties of minerals. 141 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  16. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  17. [Synthetic mineral fibers].

    PubMed

    Boillat, M A

    1999-03-27

    The group of man-made mineral fibres includes slagwool, glasswool, rockwool, glass filaments and microfibres, as well as refractory ceramic fibres. The toxicity of mineral fibres is determined by several factors such as the diameter (< or = 3-3.5 microns) and the length of the fibres (< 100 microns), their biopersistence, which is much shorter for man-made mineral fibres than for asbestos fibres, their physicochemical structure and surface properties, and the exposure level. The chemical composition of the various types of man-made mineral fibres depends directly on the raw material used to manufacture them. While naturally occurring fibres are crystalline in structure, most man-made mineral fibres are amorphous silicates combined with various metal oxides and additives. Observations using intracavitary administration have provided evidence that some types of man-made mineral fibres are bioactive in cellular and animal experiments and may induce lung tumours and mesothelioma. It is difficult to extrapolate these results to humans since they bypass inhalation, deposition, clearance and translocation mechanisms. Inhalation studies show more realistic results but differences are observed between animal species regarding their sensibility to tumours. There is no firm evidence that exposure to various wools is associated with lung fibrosis, pleural lesions or nonspecific respiratory disease in humans. A possible exception may be mentioned for refractory ceramic fibres. A slightly elevated standard mortality ratio for lung cancer has been documented in large cohorts of workers (USA, Europe and Canada) exposed to man-made mineral fibres, especially in the early technological phase. It is not possible to determine from these data whether the risk of lung cancer is due to the man-made mineral fibres themselves, in particular due to the lack of data on smoking habits. No increased risk of mesothelioma has been demonstrated in these cohorts. Epidemiological data are

  18. Biomineralization of magnetic minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Bruce M.

    1995-07-01

    New developments and discoveries in biomineralization have occurred almost continuously in the intervening decade since the previous IUGG quadrennial report on biomineralization and biomagnetism was published [Kirschvink, 1983]. Biomineralization is widespread in the biosphere and over 60 different inorganic minerals are produced by a variety of organisms from bacteria to humans [Lowenstam and Weiner, 1989]. The literature on biomineralization is interdisplinary, combining research in microbiology, biotechnology, physics, geology, and paleomagnetism. For paleomagnetism and rock magnetism, iron biomineralization of magnetic minerals is of prime importance. From a paleomagnetism perspective, biogenic magnetic minerals can be deposited in sediments and acquire a natural remanent magnetization that preserves a record of the ancient geomagnetic field. From a rock magnetism perspective, biogenic magnetic minerals provide novel sources of magnetic material for experimental studies in fine particle magnetism. Both perspectives are interrelated through a common goal of developing magnetic techniques to detect biogenic magnetic minerals in sediments and soils. For example, the extent to which iron biominerals contribute to the fine-grained magnetic mineral assemblages in freshwater and marine sediments is important for identifying and interpreting the magnetic record of environmental change [Oldfield, 1992; Reynolds and King, this issue].

  19. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  20. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  1. Minerals: the resource gap

    SciTech Connect

    Velocci, T.

    1980-10-01

    US imports of important non-fuel minerals may have contributed to a false sense of security that could have serious economic and defense consequences. Imports account for over 90 percent of the chromite, manganese ore, and cobalt, and 90 percent of the platinum group metals. The primary sources for many of these minerals are the Soviet Union and Africa, a price and supply vulnerability which rivals Middle East oil and of which the American public is unaware. The Soviet shift to a net minerals importer will intensify competition for minerals and could lead to confrontation. The decline in US mineral production is blamed on escalating costs, largely from regulations, that prevent plant and equipment modernization and land withdrawal policies. A strategic stockpile planned for over 90 materials was established in 1939 for defense purposes, but eratic goals and planning as well as economic changes have kept the plan from being implemented. The first steps of an appropriate policy would promote domestic minerals production and open up Federal lands for exploration and development. (DCK)

  2. Evaluation of Water-Mineral Interaction Using Microfluidic Tests with Thin Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Y. S.; Ryu, J. H.; Koh, Y. K.; Jo, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    For the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, geological settings and groundwater conditions are significantly important because of their effects on a radionuclide migration. One of the preferred host rocks for the radioactive waste disposal is crystalline rock. Fractures in crystalline rocks are main fluid pathways. Groundwater reacts with fracture filling minerals in fracture zones, resulting in physicochemical changes in the minerals and groundwater. In this study, fracture filling mineral-groundwater interactions were investigated by conducting microfluidic tests using thin sections at various conditions (i.e., fluid chemistry and flow rate). Groundwater and rock core samples collected from the KAERI Underground Research Tunnel (KURT) located in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) were used in this study. Dominant bedrock is two-mica granite, which contains both biotite and muscovite. Secondary minerals (e.g., chlorite, calcite and clay minerals) occur in fracture and alteration zones. In nature, water-mineral interactions generally take long time. Microfluidic tests were conducted to simulate water-mineral interactions in shorter time with smaller scale. Thin sections of fracture filling minerals, minerals from alteration zones, and natural and synthetic groundwater samples were used for the microfluidic tests. Results showed that water-mineral interactions at various conditions caused changes in groundwater chemistry, dissolution of minerals, precipitation of secondary minerals, and formation of colloids, which can affect radionuclide migration. In addition, the fluid chemistry and flow rate affected characteristics of water-rock interactions.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1982. volume 1. metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  4. Minerals yearbook, 1983. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  5. Minerals Yearbook, 1989. Volume i. Metals and Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral industry during 1989 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on advanced materials also has been added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  6. Estimation of palaeohydrochemical conditions using carbonate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamiya, H.; Mizuno, T.; Iwatsuki, T.; Yuguchi, T.; Murakami, H.; Saito-Kokubu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term evolution of geochemical environment in deep underground is indispensable research subject for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, because the evolution of geochemical environment would impact migration behavior of radionuclides in deep underground. Many researchers have made efforts previously to elucidate the geochemical environment within the groundwater residence time based on the analysis of the actual groundwater. However, it is impossible to estimate the geochemical environment for the longer time scale than the groundwater residence time in this method. In this case, analysis of the chemical properties of secondary minerals are one of useful method to estimate the paleohydrochemical conditions (temperature, salinity, pH and redox potential). In particular, carbonate minerals would be available to infer the long-term evolution of hydrochemical for the following reasons; -it easily reaches chemical equilibrium with groundwater and precipitates in open space of water flowing path -it reflects the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater at the time of crystallization We reviewed the previous studies on carbonate minerals and geochemical conditions in deep underground and estimated the hydrochemical characteristics of past groundwater by using carbonate minerals. As a result, it was found that temperature and salinity of the groundwater during crystallization of carbonate minerals were evaluated quantitatively. On the other hand, pH and redox potential can only be understood qualitatively. However, it is suggested that the content of heavy metal elements such as manganese, iron and uranium, and rare earth elements in the carbonate minerals are useful indicators for estimating redox potential. This study was carried out under a contract with METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) as part of its R&D supporting program for developing geological disposal technology.

  7. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. It contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  8. Minerals yearbook, 1994. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1994 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. The volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. The volume also contains chapters on Survey Methods, a Statistical Summary of Nonfuel Minerals, and Trends in Mining and Quarrying.

  9. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  10. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  11. Animal...Vegetable...or Mineral?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Eugene

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the problems facing the United States with mineral reserves being depleted, and the consumption of minerals outstripping production. Expresses concern about the deteriorating mineral position, and the ignorance and confusion of the public with respect to mineral production and supply, energy requirements, and environmental consequences.…

  12. American Strategic Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, John H., Jr.; Chidester, Alfred H.

    American Strategic Minerals is a collection of six papers that were presented in December 1982 at a conference organized by the Center for the Study of Marine Policy at the University of Delaware. According to editor Gerard J. Mangone, director of the center, the papers were commissioned “to investigate not only the objective resource situation, but also past United States policy on strategic minerals and future options open to Washington.” The authors and their chapter titles are John C. Kraft, University of Delaware: “Strategic minerals and world stability” V. Anthony Cammarota, Jr., U.S. Bureau of Mines: “America's dependence on strategic minerals” John D. Morgan, U.S. Bureau of Mines: “Future demands of the United States for strategic minerals” J. Robert Moore, University of Texas: “Alternative sources of strategic minerals from the seabed” Allan I. Mendelowitz and John E. Watson, U.S. General Accounting Office: “U.S. mining investments in developing countries” and James W. Curlin, Nautilus Press: “The political dimensions of strategic minerals.”

  13. Thorium in mineral products.

    PubMed

    Collier, D E; Brown, S A; Blagojevic, N; Soldenhoff, K H; Ring, R J

    2001-01-01

    Many ores contain low levels of thorium. When these ores are processed, the associated radioactivity can be found in mineral concentrates, intermediates and final products. There is an incentive for industries to remove radioactivity from mineral products to allow the movement and sale of these materials, both nationally and internationally, without the need for licensing. Control of thorium in various products involves the development and optimisation of process steps to be able to meet product specifications. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has undertaken a range of R & D programmes targeting the treatment of thorium-bearing minerals. This paper discusses the application of a microprobe technique for siting radioactivity in zircon and ilmenite and the problems experienced in measuring the concentrations in solid rare earth products.

  14. Mineral mining installations

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, G.; Wisniewski, P.

    1983-12-15

    A mineral mining installation serves to win mineral by explosive blasting. The installation employs a shuttle conveyor arranged alongside a mineral face. Roof supports stand side-by-side at the side of the conveyor remote from the conveyor. The roof supports are connected to the conveyor through shifting rams and have roof-engageable caps or the like supported on hydraulic props. The pans of the conveyor have upstanding walls at the rear side nearest the roof supports which carry rails at their upper ends. The roof caps have wall components pivoted thereto and hydraulic piston and cylinder units serve to swing the wall components up and down. When explosive blasting takes place the wall components are swung down to engage on the walls of the conveyor pans to form a screen between the winning region and the access region of the working.

  15. Mineral find highlights cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Heavy minerals with potential commercial value were discovered last month by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in seafloor deposits off the coasts of Virginia and Georgia. The USGS sent the research vessel J. W. Powell on a 25-day cruise along the East Coast to assess the concentrations of commercially important minerals in that segment of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).Assistant Secretary of the Interior Robert Broadbent called the findings of the Powell “promising” and said they served as a “reminder of just how little we do know about the seafloor resources just a few miles offshore.”

  16. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  17. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  18. Linking Home Plate and Algonquin Class Rocks through Microtextural Analysis: Evidence for Hydrovolcanism in the Inner Basin of Columbia Hills, Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Yingst, R. Aileen; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Herkenhoff, Ken E.

    2007-01-01

    Examining the his-tory of a rock as the summed history of its constituent grains is a proven and powerful strategy that has been used on Earth to maximize the information that can be gleaned from limited samples. Grain size, sorting, roundness, and texture can be observed at the handlens scale, and may reveal clues to transport regime (e.g. fluvial, glacial, eolian) and transport distance. Diagenetic minerals may be of a form and textural context to allow identification, and to point to dominant diagenetic processes (e.g. evaporitic concentration, intermittent dissolution, early vs. late diagenetic emplacement). Handlens scale features of volcaniclastic particles may be diagnostic of primary vs recycled (by surface processes) grains and may provide information about eruptive patterns and processes. When the study site is truly remote, such as Mars, and when there are severe limitations on sample return or sample analysis with other methods, examination at the hand lens scale becomes critical both for extracting a maximum of information, and for best utilizing finite analytical capabilities.

  19. Identification of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Diane

    2005-01-01

    The lab described in this article was developed to satisfy two major goals. First, the activity is designed to show students the proper techniques used to identify the seven characteristics of all minerals. Second, the lab gives students a glimpse into the life of a professional field geologist. The author has students complete this lab at the end…

  20. New mineral physics panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Committee on Mineral Physics has formed itself into six panels. The committee chairman is Orson L. Anderson of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles; foreign secretary is Robert Liebermann, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook. The six panels are as follows.

  1. Mercury from mineral deposits and potential environmental impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    Mercury deposits are globally distributed in 26 mercury mineral belts. Three types of mercury deposits occur in these belts: silica-carbonate, hot-spring, and Almaden. Mercury is also produced as a by-product from several types of gold-silver and massive sulfide deposits, which account for 5% of the world's production. Other types of mineral deposits can be enriched in mercury and mercury phases present are dependent on deposit type. During processing of mercury ores, secondary mercury phases form and accumulate in mine wastes. These phases are more soluble than cinnabar, the primary ore mineral, and cause mercury deposits to impact the environment more so than other types of ore deposits enriched in mercury. Release and transport of mercury from mine wastes occur primarily as mercury-enriched particles and colloids. Production from mercury deposits has decreased because of environmental concerns, but by-product production from other mercury-enriched mineral deposits remains important.

  2. Minerals yearbook 1977. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report contains chapters on virtually all metallic and nonmetallic mineral commodities important to the domestic economy. In addition, it includes a general review chapter on the mineral industries, a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, and a statistical summary.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1985. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the 1985 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  4. Minerals yearbook, 1984. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  5. Minerals Yearbook, 1988. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Volume I of the 1988 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 79 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains chapters on mining and quarrying trends and on the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines and a statistical summary.

  6. Adsorption of RNA on mineral surfaces and mineral precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kawai, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The prebiotic significance of laboratory experiments that study the interactions between oligomeric RNA and mineral species is difficult to know. Natural exemplars of specific minerals can differ widely depending on their provenance. While laboratory-generated samples of synthetic minerals can have controlled compositions, they are often viewed as "unnatural". Here, we show how trends in the interaction of RNA with natural mineral specimens, synthetic mineral specimens, and co-precipitated pairs of synthetic minerals, can make a persuasive case that the observed interactions reflect the composition of the minerals themselves, rather than their being simply examples of large molecules associating nonspecifically with large surfaces. Using this approach, we have discovered Periodic Table trends in the binding of oligomeric RNA to alkaline earth carbonate minerals and alkaline earth sulfate minerals, where those trends are the same when measured in natural and synthetic minerals. They are also validated by comparison of co-precipitated synthetic minerals. We also show differential binding of RNA to polymorphic forms of calcium carbonate, and the stabilization of bound RNA on aragonite. These have relevance to the prebiotic stabilization of RNA, where such carbonate minerals are expected to have been abundant, as they appear to be today on Mars. PMID:28382177

  7. Oxygen Extraction from Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen, whether used as part of rocket bipropellant or for astronaut life support, is a key consumable for space exploration and commercialization. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) has been proposed many times as a method for making space exploration more cost effective and sustainable. On planetary and asteroid surfaces the presence of minerals in the regolith that contain oxygen is very common, making them a potential oxygen resource. The majority of research and development for oxygen extraction from minerals has been for lunar regolith although this work would generally be applicable to regolith at other locations in space. This presentation will briefly survey the major methods investigated for oxygen extraction from regolith with a focus on the current status of those methods and possible future development pathways. The major oxygen production methods are (1) extraction from lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide, (2) carbothermal reduction of iron oxides and silicates with methane, and (3) molten regolith electrolysis (MRE) of silicates. Methods (1) and (2) have also been investigated in a two-step process using CO reduction and carbon deposition followed by carbothermal reduction. All three processes have byproducts that could also be used as resources. Hydrogen or carbon monoxide reduction produce iron metal in small amounts that could potentially be used as construction material. Carbothermal reduction also makes iron metal along with silicon metal and a glass with possible applications. MRE produces iron, silicon, aluminum, titanium, and glass, with higher silicon yields than carbothermal reduction. On Mars and possibly on some moons and asteroids, water is present in the form of mineral hydrates, hydroxyl (-OH) groups on minerals, andor water adsorbed on mineral surfaces. Heating of the minerals can liberate the water which can be electrolyzed to provide a source of oxygen as well. The chemistry of these processes, some key

  8. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  9. Ice nucleation properties of the most abundant mineral dust phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Frank; Weinbruch, Stephan; Schütz, Lothar; Hofmann, Heiko; Ebert, Martin; Kandler, Konrad; Worringen, Annette

    2008-12-01

    The ice nucleation properties of the nine most abundant minerals occurring in desert aerosols (quartz, albite, microcline, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, calcite, gypsum, and hematite) were investigated by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). In this instrument, the pure minerals are exposed to water vapor at variable pressures and temperatures. The crystallization of ice on the mineral particles is observed by secondary electron imaging, and the supersaturation for an activated particle fraction of 1-3% is determined as function of temperature. In all experiments, condensation of water prior to ice formation was not observed within detectable limits, even at water supersaturation. The highest temperatures for 1-3% activation vary between -10°C and -16°C for the nine minerals investigated, and the corresponding onset relative humidities relative to ice RHi between 107 and 117%. Supersaturation temperature curves for initial ice formation (1-3% activation) in the temperature range typical for mixed-phase clouds were measured for all nine minerals. The temperature dependence of the onset relative humidity is strongly dependent on mineralogy. Kaolinite, montmorillonite, and hematite show a strong increase in RHi with decreasing temperature, whereas RHi is almost constant for illite, albite, quartz, and calcite. The highly variable ice nucleation properties of the various mineral dust components should be considered for parameterization schemes. Illite and kaolinite are the most important minerals to consider, as they have high ice nucleation efficiency and are common components of desert aerosols.

  10. Who's on First? Part II: Bacterial and fungal colonization of fresh soil minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, T.; Neurath, R.; Zhang, P.; Yuan, T.; Weber, P. K.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Firestone, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization by soil minerals is an important mechanism influencing soil C cycling. Microbes make up only a few percent of total SOM, but have a disproportionate impact on SOM cycling. Their direct interactions with soil minerals, however, are not well characterized. We studied colonization of fresh minerals by soil microbes in an Avena barbata (wild oat) California grassland soil microcosm. Examining quartz, ferrihydrite, kaolinite, and the heavy fraction of the native soil, we asked: (1) Do different minerals select for different communities, or do random processes drive the colonization of fresh minerals? (2) What factors influence which taxa colonize fresh minerals? After incubating mesh bags (<18 μm) of minerals buried next to actively growing plant roots for 2 months, we used high-throughput sequencing of 16S and ITS2 genes to characterize the microbial communities colonizing the minerals. We found significant differences between the microbial community composition of different minerals and soil for both bacteria and fungi. We found a higher relative abundance of arbuscular mycorrhial fungi with ferrihydrite and quartz, and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging of these minerals suggests that some fungal hyphae are moving C directly from roots to mineral surfaces. The enriched presence of both nematode-associated fungi (Pochonia sp.) and bacteria (Candidatus Xiphinematobacter) in the minerals suggests that these minerals may be a habitat for nematodes. Bacteria of the family Chitinophagaceae and genus Janthinobacterium were significantly enriched on both ferrihydrite and quartz minerals, both of which may interact with colonizing fungi. These findings suggest that: (1) Microbial colonization of fresh minerals is not a fully passive or neutral process. (2) Mineral exploration by plant-associated fungi and soil fauna transport may be factors in determining the initial colonization of minerals and subsequent C

  11. Mineral bridges in nacre.

    PubMed

    Checa, Antonio G; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2011-12-01

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (>100nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (<60nm), earlier reported to be mineral bridges, found to be such.

  12. Mixtures and Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.

    The monograph Mixtures and Mineral Reactions contains a large amount of information of value to mineralogists, petrologists, and geochemists. The first four chapters are a succinct account of the thermodynamic description of crystalline solutions. In these early chapters a comparison is made between different mathematical treatments of activitycomposition models, there is a discussion of the unmixing by exsolution of a single solution into two phases, and methods of computing phase equilibria in assemblages of different minerals are given. If the reader is perplexed by the discussion of standard states (cf. Figure 1.3), not to worry. That is a normal condition for anyone forced to choose between equivalent reference frames yet knowing, somewhere down the line, that the choice will ultimately make one's computational life more or less difficult.

  13. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  14. Engineering of Secondary Metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Secondary (specialized) metabolites, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants, and other organisms, exhibit enormous structural variation, and consequently display a wide range of biological activities. Secondary metabolism improves and modulates the phenotype of the host producer. Furthermore, these biological activities have resulted in the use of secondary metabolites in a variety of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Metabolic engineering presents a powerful strategy to improve access to these valuable molecules. A critical overview of engineering approaches in secondary metabolism is presented, both in heterologous and native hosts. The recognition of the increasing role of compartmentalization in metabolic engineering is highlighted. Engineering approaches to modify the structure of key secondary metabolite classes are also critically evaluated.

  15. The Indian Mineral Development Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Antoinette

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of the Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) and the possible effects it may have on Indian mineral development. Explains how the provisions of IMDA work to provide Indian tribes with greater flexibility for the development and sale of their mineral resources. (ML)

  16. 76 FR 6110 - Conflict Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    .... 34-63793; File No. S7-40-10] RIN 3235-AK84 Conflict Minerals AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... 1934 (the ``Exchange Act'') and would require any such issuer for which conflict minerals are necessary... that issuer to disclose in the body of its annual report whether its conflict minerals originated...

  17. Major issues in miner health.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, S

    1998-01-01

    As recently as the last few decades, thousands of miners died in explosions, roof collapses, fires, and floods each year, and lung disease caused by inhaling mineral dusts was ubiquitous. Miners worked virtually unprotected, and were often treated as expendable bodies fulfilling critical roles in this important industry, which in the United States comprises about 5% of the gross domestic product. PMID:9799195

  18. Culture systems: mineral oil overlay.

    PubMed

    Morbeck, Dean E; Leonard, Phoebe H

    2012-01-01

    Mineral oil overlay microdrop is commonly used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. Though mineral oil appears homogeneous, it is an undefined product that can vary in quality. Here, we describe the history, chemistry, processing, and optimal use of mineral oil for IVF and embryo culture.

  19. Reducing miner absenteeism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.H.; Clingan, M.R.; Randolph, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The U. S. Bureau of Mines has prepared this report on strategies for maintaining high job attendance among underground coal miners because high absenteeism is a threat to miners' safety and seriously hampers productivity. A substantial number of research studies on the effectiveness of various strategies for reducing absenteeism among the employees of nonmining industries have been reported in the literature. These strategies have aimed at improving job attendance through one or more of the following: (1) improving employment procedures, (2) overcoming problems that adversely affect one's ability to attend work, and (3) increasing miners' motivation to attend work. Many of these strategies appear applicable to the mining industry, and are reviewed in the first half of this report. The second half of this report describes how one could develop and implement a program for maintaining high attendance at underground coal mines. The steps include measuring and evaluating attendance levels, formulating attendance goals and an absenteeism policy, developing and implementing an attendance promotion program and periodically going through the preceding steps (known as recycling).

  20. Minerals yearbook, 1992. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral and materials industry during 1992 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Yearbook volumes follows: Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials, nonrenewable organic materials, and nonferrous metals recycling also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989, 1990, and 1991 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on materials recycling has been initiated in this 1992 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  1. Minerals yearbook, 1991. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1991 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Mineral, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials and nonrenewable organic materials also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 and 1990 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on nonferrous metals recycling has been initiated in this 1991 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  2. Coal Miner's Daughter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Applied academics is the watchword in several West Virginia secondary schools. Instead of sitting in classrooms, junior high students are measuring floor tiles, estimating stadium seating capacity, or launching models to study acceleration; high school students are creating a complicated model-railroad layout and a computer-controlled system to…

  3. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for In Situ Identification of Minerals and Organics on Diverse Planetary Surfaces: from Mars to Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Alerstam, E.; Maruyama, Y.; Cochrane, C.; Rossman, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present recent developments in time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in situ planetary surface exploration, aimed at identification of both minerals and organics. Raman is a non-destructive surface technique that requires no sample preparation. Raman spectra are highly material specific and can be used for identification of a wide range of unknown samples. In combination with micro-scale imaging and point mapping, Raman spectroscopy can be used to directly interrogate rocks and regolith materials, while placing compositional analyses within a microtextural context, essential for understanding surface evolutionary pathways. Due to these unique capabilities, Raman spectroscopy is of great interest for the exploration of all rocky and icy bodies, for example Mars, Venus, the Moon, Mars' moons, asteroids, comets, Europa, and Titan. In this work, we focus on overcoming one of the most difficult challenges faced in Raman spectroscopy: interference from background fluorescence of the very minerals and organics that we wish to characterize. To tackle this problem we use time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, which separates the Raman from background processes in the time domain. This same technique also enables operation in daylight without the need for light shielding. Two key components are essential for the success of this technique: a fast solid-state detector and a short-pulse laser. Our detector is a custom developed Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array, capable of sub-ns time-gating. Our pulsed lasers are solid-state miniature pulsed microchip lasers. We discuss optimization of laser and detector parameters for our application. We then present Raman spectra of particularly challenging planetary analog samples to demonstrate the unique capabilities of this time-resolved Raman instrument, for example, Mars-analog clays and Titan-analog organics. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a

  4. Platinum mineralization in the Kapalagulu Intrusion, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmij, Harry R.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    . Impersistent, stratiform PGE mineralized horizons occur within the MCSS harzburgite from which drill core samples were taken for platinum-group mineral (PGM) characterization from two drill holes. Where the PGE reefs reach the surface there is residual PGE mineralization within the laterite regolith from which drill core samples were taken from various laterite lithological units for PGM characterization. As the harzburgite PGE reefs contain significant concentrations of both sulfide and chromite (including chromitite seams) they resemble the PGE-rich chromitite seams of the Bushveld Complex rather than the PGE-bearing Main Sulfide Zone of the Great Dyke and Main Sulfide Layer of the Munni Munni Complex. The dominant Pd PGM in three PGE reef samples varies, ranging ( n = 164, relative wt%) from bismuthides (63 %), bismuthtellurides (19 %), and tellurides (6 %), to tellurides (39 %), bismuthtellurides (24 %), stannides (14 %), and alloys (13 %), and to antimon-arsenides (33 %), stannides (21 %), bismuthides (17 %), tellurides (13 %), and alloys (10 %). From 13.5 % to 21.0 % of the total Pd occurs as a solid solution in pentlandite. The three samples have similar Pt PGM modal distributions ( n = 172, relative wt%); the dominant Pt mineral is sperrylite (79, 58, and 47 %) followed by tellurides (15, 17, 21 %), alloys (2, 1, 1 %), and sulfides (2, 1, 0 %). Comparison of Pd/Pt ratios from assays to those calculated from minerals show that the data for the Pt and Pd PGM are very robust, confirming the concentration methodology and characterization. Study of samples from a shallow drill hole penetrating the laterite regolith shows that the primary Pd mineralization has not survived oxidation, is mainly dispersed, but some was reconstituted to form secondary minerals: cabriite, unnamed tellurides, a selenide, a Pd-Te-Hg mineral, alloys and Pd-bearing secondary sulfides (millerite and heazlewoodite). The primary Pt minerals are more resistant to oxidation and dissolution, especially

  5. Enzymatic mineralization of silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Declercq, Heidi A; Gheysens, Tom; Dendooven, Jolien; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Cornelissen, Ria; Dubruel, Peter; Kaplan, David L

    2014-07-01

    The present study focuses on the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mediated formation of apatitic minerals on porous silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds. Porous SFP scaffolds impregnated with different concentrations of ALP are homogeneously mineralized under physiological conditions. The mineral structure is apatite while the structures differ as a function of the ALP concentration. Cellular adhesion, proliferation, and colonization of osteogenic MC3T3 cells improve on the mineralized SFP scaffolds. These findings suggest a simple process to generate mineralized scaffolds that can be used to enhanced bone tissue engineering-related utility.

  6. Water, mineral waters and health.

    PubMed

    Petraccia, Luisa; Liberati, Giovanna; Masciullo, Stefano Giuseppe; Grassi, Marcello; Fraioli, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    The authors focus on water resources and the use of mineral waters in human nutrition, especially in the different stages of life, in physical activity and in the presence of some morbid conditions. Mineral water is characterized by its purity at source, its content in minerals, trace elements and other constituents, its conservation and its healing properties recognized by the Ministry of Health after clinical and pharmacological trials. Based on total salt content in grams after evaporation of 1l mineral water dried at 180 degrees C (dry residues), mineral waters can be classified as: waters with a very low mineral content, waters low in mineral content, waters with a medium mineral content, and strongly mineralized waters. Based on ion composition mineral waters can be classified as: bicarbonate waters, sulfate waters, sodium chloride or saltwater, sulfuric waters. Based on biological activity mineral waters can be classified as: diuretic waters, cathartic waters, waters with antiphlogistic properties. Instructions for use, doses, and current regulations are included.

  7. Systems genetics of mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fleet, James C; Replogle, Rebecca; Salt, David E

    2011-03-01

    Minerals are essential and toxic elements that have an impact on human health. Although we have learned a tremendous amount about the metabolism, biological roles, and health effects of minerals with the tools of biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular genetics, there are gaps in our knowledge of mineral biology that will benefit from new approaches. Forward genetics, whereby variations in phenotypes are mapped to natural genetic variation in the genome, has been successfully used to increase our understanding of many biologically important traits but has not yet been used extensively for mineral metabolism. In addition, the well-appreciated existence of interactions between minerals justifies a broader, systems approach to the study of mineral metabolism, i.e., ionomics. This short review will explain the value of forward genetics and ionomics as tools for exploring mammalian mineral metabolism.

  8. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  9. Review of cinacalcet hydrochloride in the management of secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Farhanah; Charytan, Chaim

    2014-02-01

    Cinacalcet is the first Food and Drug Administration-approved calcimimetic for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in dialysis patients. It is effective in improving control of parathyroid hormone, serum calcium, phosphorus, and calcium-phosphorus product. The calcium-lowering effect of cinacalcet overcomes the limitations of standard therapy associated hypercalcemia. There is evidence to suggest that cinacalcet has important clinical implications, which extend beyond its relevance in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the role of cinacalcet in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism, disrupted bone mineral metabolism, cardiovascular disease, and mortality. In addition, the cost implications of cinacalcet are briefly explored.

  10. Hydrothermal and Diagenetic Mineralization on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, B. L.; Quinn, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Predicted by geophysical modeling, the mineraolgic record of early Mars groundwater has only recently been discovered. First, rover exploration in sedimentary basins reveals diagenesis. At Meridiani, sandstone porosity is occluded by precipitation of secondary sulfates, hematite, and silica. Multiple alteration episodes are indicated by crystal vugs, disruption of preexisting textures by hematite concretions, and grain coatings (e.g. McLennan et al., 2005). At Gale crater, raised ridges in mudstones, interpreted to be early diagenetic features, are crossed by later-emplaced hydrated calcium sulfate veins (e.g. Grotzinger et al., 2014). Waters in Gale were likely circumneutral while jarosite mineralogy at Meridiani implies acidic waters. Second, systems of raised ridges at 100-m scale are observed from orbit in multiple Martian sedimentary rock units. An outstanding example is sulfate-bearing sediments exhumed at the northern margin of the Syrtis Major lavas (e.g. Quinn & Ehlmann, 2015). Polygonal and with no clearly preferred orientation, the ridges rise 5-30 m above the surrounding terrain. Parallel light-toned grooves with dark interiors (indicative of isopachous fills) and jarosite in ridge mineralogy point to mineralization by acidic waters. Third, some mineral assemblages observed from orbit represent the products of subsurface aqueous alteration at elevated temperatures (Ehlmann et al., 2011). These are globally distributed, exposed in scarps and by impact cratering. Mineral assemblages variously include (a) serpentine and carbonate; (b) prehnite and chlorite, and (c) zeolites. Collectively, these datasets indicate that groundwaters were spatially widespread on ancient Mars, contributing to the sustenance of lakes and to the alteration of bedrock to >1 km depths. While the Martian surface may have always been relatively inhospitable, a warmer, wetter subsurface provided a long-term potentially habitable environment. Key outstanding questions remaining include

  11. Hearing protection for miners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.

    2008-10-15

    A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  12. Mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Plevak, L.; Weirich, W.

    1982-04-20

    A longwall mineral mining installation has a longwall conveyor and a plurality of roof support units positioned side-by-side at the goaf side of the conveyor. The hydraulic appliances of the roof support units, such as their hydraulic props, hydraulic advance rams and hydraulic control valves, are supplied with pressurized hydraulic fluid from hydraulic supply lines which run along the goaf side of the conveyor. A plurality of flat, platelike intermediate members are provided at the goaf side of the conveyor. These intermediate members are formed with internal ducts for feeding the hydraulic fluid from the supply lines to the hydraulic appliances of the roof support units.

  13. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  15. Mineral Time Capsules on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Like dinosaur-age insects trapped in amber, biomolecules sequestered in million-year-old sulfate minerals could provide a glimpse into the past, say researchers who've recently analyzed such minerals from N orth America. The same minerals have recently been discovered on Mars , so they may be a good place to look for traces of past life on the red planet, the researchers say.

  16. Microelectrophoresis of selected mineral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, B. J.; Tipps, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Particle mobilities of ilmenite, labradorite plagioclase, enstatite pyroxene, and olivine were measured with a Rank microelectrophoresis system to evaluate indicated mineral separability. Sodium bicarbonate buffer suspension media with and without additives (0.0001 M DTAB and 5 percent v/v ethylene glycol) were used to determine differential adsorption by mineral particles and modification of relative mobilities. Good separability between some minerals was indicated; additives did not enhance separability.

  17. Humanizing the Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Norman K., Ed.; Saylor, J. Galen, Ed.

    These papers, presented during ASCD-sponsored conference, confront educators with issues in and alternatives for making secondary schools a more humanizing experience for students. The contributors and their articles are: Norman K. Hamilton, "Alternatives in Secondary Education"; Thornton B. Monez and Norman L. Bussiere, "The High School in Human…

  18. Secondary School Dropouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    This report on secondary school dropouts consists of an analysis of the scope and nature of the dropout problem, a discussion of successful programs and activities for dropouts, a description of a pilot study involving Minnesota public secondary schools and Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) agencies, and presentation of…

  19. Mechanisms of primary mineral weathering inferred from B isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinot, A.; Turpault, M.-P.; Chabaux, F.; Lemarchand, D.

    2012-04-01

    concentration) but share a common isotopic composition with kaolinite revealing an equilibrium with the solution. Plagioclases dissolve very early in the deepest horizon with a high degree of in-situ kaolinite reprecipitation in their mineral habitus. Here again, the isotopic composition reflect exchange with the soil solution. Muscovite shows no particular weathering mechanism other than dissolution, but isotope shift toward the soil solution value tends to indicate that the reacting boron is mainly located in easy accessible mineral interlayer sites. K-feldspar samples remained unchanged either mineralogically or isotopically. These results suggest an apparent duality between phyllosilicates which are mainly involved in transformation reactions with rapid isotopic equilibration with the surrounding soil solution, whilst tectosilicates show mainly dissolution reactions without evidence of isotopic exchange with the fluid. Depending on their nature, the secondary phases that replace the weathered primary minerals will also play a major role in the boron cycle in soils.

  20. Clay minerals for advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.H. )

    1989-11-01

    The author describes new and improved beneficiation techniques available to allow the production of clay minerals of exceptionally high purity. This is particularly true for kaolins and smectites. Wet processing techniques include particle size separation, high intensity magnetic separation, chemical leaching, flotation, and selective flocculation. The blending of clay minerals with other minerals provides opportunities to make special ceramic materials such as cordierite and other minerals that have very special ceramic properties including low heat expansion, high fired strength, low absorption, and other desired qualities.

  1. New AGU mineral physics committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A new Committee on Mineral Physics consisting of Orson Anderson (chairman), Peter Bell, Raymond Jeanloz, Robert Lieberman, Murli Manghnani, Alexandra Navrotsky, Tom Shankland, Joseph E. Smith, and Donald Weidner has been approved by the AGU Executive Committee.The increasing number of research groups in an area that combines the study of mineral properties and solid state sciences (materials research) created the impetus for this new committee. At AGU meetings, mineral physics studies have been included in recent years in sessions of Volcanology, Petrology, and Geochemistry and sessions of Tectonophysics. A portion of the charter for the new committee includes arranging special sessions for mineral physics that would bridge the two sections.

  2. Minerals Bill introduced in House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A bill that aims to strengthen a national minerals policy and to establish a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of this policy was introduced in the House of Representatives on April 30 by James D. Santini (D-Nev.). Entitled the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), the legislation, if passed, also would amend tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic minerals; it would provide the means for the Secretary of the Interior to make withdrawn public lands available for mineral development; and it would create a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals.Santini estimates that 4 billion tons of minerals are needed annually to sustain the nation's economy. Much of the minerals are supplied by other nations, however; Santini wants to see an end to the United States' dependence on foreign countries, especially those that seem relatively unstable politically. ‘The U.S. has placed its national security in the hands of a few foreign nations,’ Santini said in a recent press conference. ‘We are heavily dependent on the region of southern Africa for 76% of our cobalt, 93% of our platinum, 48% of our chromium, and a host of other strategic and critical minerals. Without these minerals, we cannot build jet aircraft, weapons, or other military hardware vitally important to our national security.’

  3. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M.; Cai, Weidong; Garan, Daniel W.; Harris, Arthur J.

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  4. Mineralization by nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and in commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. Previous models for stone formation have lead to a hypothesis that an elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity are important lithogenic factors. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4 at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Due to their specific macromolecules, nanobacteria can produce apatite very efficiency in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and rapidly mineralizing most of available calcium and phosphate. This can be also monitored by (superscript 85)Sr incorporation and provides a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. Recently, bacteria have been implicated in the formation of carbonate (hydroxy)fluorapatite in marine sediments. Apatite grains are found so commonly in sedimentary rocks that apatite is omitted in naming the stone. To prove that apatite and other minerals are formed by bacteria would implicate that the bacteria could be observed and their actions followed in stones. We have started to approach this in two ways. Firstly, by the use of sensitive methods for detecting specific bacterial components, like antigens, muramic acid and nucleic acids, that allow for detecting the presence of bacteria and, secondly, by follow-up of volatile bacterial metabolites observed by continuous monitoring with ion mobility spectrometry, IMCELL, working like an artificial, educatable smelling nose. The latter method might allow for remote real time detection of bacterial metabolism, a signature of life, in rocks via fractures of drillholes with or without

  5. Thermodynamic properties of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.

    1962-01-01

    In the ten years since the publication of the national Bureau of Standards comprehensive tables of thermochemical properties, by Rossini and other (1952), a very large body of modern calorimetric and equilibrium data has become available. Because of the complex interrelations among many thermochemical data and the necessity for internal consistency among these values, a complete revision of this standard reference is required. This is also true of the summaries of thermochemical data for the sulfides (Richardson and Jeffes 1952) and for the oxides (Coughlin 1954). The following tables present critically selected values for the heat and free energy of formation, the logarithm of the equilibrium constant of formation Log Kf, the entropy and the molar volume, at 298.15°K (25.0°C) and one atmosphere for minerals.

  6. The minerals of milk.

    PubMed

    Gaucheron, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    The salt of milk constitutes a small part of milk (8-9 g.L(-1)); this fraction contains calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium for the main cations and inorganic phosphate, citrate and chloride for the main anions. In milk, these ions are more or less associated between themselves and with proteins. Depending on the type of ion, they are diffusible (cases of sodium, potassium and chloride) or partially associated with casein molecules (cases of calcium, magnesium, phosphate and citrate), to form large colloidal particles called casein micelles. Today, our knowledge and understanding concerning this fraction is relatively complete. In this review, the different models explaining (i) the nature and distribution of these minerals (especially calcium phosphate) in both fractions of milk and (ii) their behaviour in different physico-chemical conditions, are discussed.

  7. The Mineral Physics Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineral Physics Committee members for the period July 1, 1986, to J ne 30, 1988, have been announced. They are Murli H. Manghnani (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu), and Orson L. Anderson (University of California, Los Angeles), Thomas J. Ahrens (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.), Subir K. Banerjee (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), William A. Bassett (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.), Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Michael Brown (University of Washington, Seattle), Robert M. Hazen (Geophysical Laboratory, Washington, D.C.), Raymond F. Jeanloz (University of California, Berkeley), Robert C. Liebermann (State University of New York (SUNY),(Stony Brook), Alexandra Navrotsky (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), Robert N. Schock (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif.), and Donald J. Weidner (SUNY Stony Brook).

  8. The Brazilian mineral resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurlen, Hartmut; Cassedanne, Jacques Pierre

    1981-04-01

    The activity of the first generation of Brazilian geologists began in the early sixties. Systematic exploration work since then has evidenced some important new mineral reserves in Brazil. The most important examples are the 18 × 10 9 tons of high-grade iron ore (Carajás District), formed by supergene enrichment on iron formations older than 1800 m.y., the 2.5 × 10 9 tons of bauxite and similar reserves of kaolinite as residual enrichment in Cenozoic sediments in the Amazonas Basin (Oriximina, Capim); the potash and magnesium-rich evaporites near Aracajú(Sergipe); the large residual concentrations of phosphate, anatase, pyrochlore and rare earths related to Cretaceous alkaline complexes with carbonatites; and some garnierite and asbestos deposits related to ultramafic rocks in the states of Goiás and Piauí.

  9. Minerals yearbook, 1988: Thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Mine production of monazite, the principal source of thorium, decreased slightly in 1988. Associated Minerals (USA) Inc. was the only domestic monazite producer. Monazite produced in the United States was exported, and the thorium products used domestically were derived from imported materials, existing company stocks, and thorium nitrate released from the National Defense Stockpile. Major nonenergy uses were in refractory applications, ceramics, and mantles for incandescent lanterns. The only energy use of thorium in the United States was in the high-temperature gas-cooled (HTGC) nuclear reactor at Fort St. Vrain, CO. Topics discussed in the report include domestic data coverage, legislation and government programs, domestic production, consumption and uses, stocks, prices, foreign trade, world capacity, and world review--(Australia, Brazil, Madagascar, Mozambique).

  10. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  11. Mineral dust as ice nuclei in the upper troposphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K.; Cziczo, D. J.; Murphy, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Composition, size, and phase are key properties that define the ability of an aerosol particle to initiate ice in cirrus clouds. Properties of cirrus ice nuclei (IN) have not been well constrained due to a lack of systematic measurements in the upper troposphere. In a recent study of several northern hemisphere regions we report the size and composition of sublimated cirrus particles sampled from a high altitude research aircraft using both in situ and offline techniques. Mineral dust was consistently the most abundant particle type in cirrus residuals, suggesting that heterogeneous nucleation was a dominant cirrus formation mechanism in these study regions. Other proposed heterogeneous IN, including biomass burning particles, elemental carbon, and biological material, were not abundant in cirrus residuals. Clear sky measurements show that mineral dust was ubiquitous in the background upper troposphere at levels from ~1 to 100's per liter and typically accounted for 5-40% of the particulate mass. Principal sources of upper tropospheric mineral dust include strong biomass burning events and deep convection, although some evidence suggests that dust aerosol is preferentially scavenged in convective systems. During transport mineral dust accumulates secondary sulfate, nitrate, and organic material that can reduce IN efficiency. Most upper tropospheric dust particles contain secondary material, and coating type and thickness depend on coemissions and the vertical transport mechanism.

  12. Mineral Detector for Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, S. T.; Hart, S. D.; Gulick, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a Raman spectral analysis tool that uses machine learning algorithms to classify pure minerals in igneous rocks. Experiments show greater than 90% accuracy classifying a test set of pure minerals against a database of similar reference minerals using an artificial neural network. Efforts are currently underway to improve this tool for use as a mineral detector in rock samples, an important milestone toward autonomously classifying rocks based on spectral, and previous imaging work. Although pure mineral classification has been widely successful, applying the same methods to rocks is difficult because the spectra may represent a combination of multiple, and often competing, mineral signatures. In such cases some minerals may appear with more intensity than others resulting in masking of weaker minerals. Furthermore, with our particular spectrometer (852 nm excitation, ~50 micron spot size), minerals such as potassium feldspar fluoresce, both obscuring its characteristic Raman features and suppressing those of weaker minerals. For example, plagioclase and quartz, two key minerals for determining the composition of igneous rocks, are often hidden by minerals such as potassium feldspar and pyroxene, and are consequently underrepresented in the spectral analysis. These technicalities tend to skew the perceived composition of a rock from its actual composition. Despite these obstacles, an experiment involving a training set of 26 minerals (plagioclase, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz) and a test set of 57 igneous rocks (basalt, gabbro, andesite, diorite, dacite, granodiorite, rhyolite, granite) shows that generalizations derived from their spectral data are consistent with expected trends: as rock composition goes from felsic to mafic there is a marked increase in the detection of minerals such as plagioclase and pyroxene along with a decrease in the detection of minerals such as quartz and potassium feldspar. The results suggest that phaneritic

  13. Biologically enhanced mineral weathering: what does it look like, can we model it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, M. S.; Lawrence, C. R.; Harden, J. W.; White, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    The interaction between plants and minerals in soils is hugely important and poorly understood as it relates to the fate of soil carbon. Plant roots, fungi and bacteria inhabit the mineral soil and work symbiotically to extract nutrients, generally through low molecular weight exudates (organic acids, extracelluar polysachrides (EPS), siderophores, etc.). Up to 60% of photosynthetic carbon is allocated below ground as roots and exudates, both being important carbon sources in soils. Some exudates accelerate mineral weathering. To test whether plant exudates are incorporated into poorly crystalline secondary mineral phases during precipitation, we are investigating the biologic-mineral interface. We sampled 5 marine terraces along a soil chronosequence (60 to 225 ka), near Santa Cruz, CA. The effects of the biologic interactions with mineral surfaces were characterized through the use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Morphologically, mycorrhizal fungi were observed fully surrounding minerals, fungal hyphae were shown to tunnel into primary silicate minerals and we have observed direct hyphal attachment to mineral surfaces. Fungal tunneling was seen in all 5 soils by SEM. Additionally, specific surface area (using a nitrogen BET method) of primary minerals was measured to determine if the effects of mineral tunneling are quantifiable in older soils. Results suggest that fungal tunneling is more extensive in the primary minerals of older soils. We have also examined the influence of organic acids on primary mineral weathering during soil development using a geochemical reactive transport model (CrunchFlow). Addition of organic acids in our models of soil development at Santa Cruz result in decreased activity of Fe and Al in soil pore water, which subsequently alters the spatial extent of primary mineral weathering and kaolinite precipitation. Overall, our preliminary modeling results suggest biological processes may be an important but underrepresented aspect of

  14. From Mountain Men to Miners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert L.; Fogel, Jared A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines three of the changes wrought by coal mining: (1) the miner's working conditions; (2) the establishment of company towns; and (3) the violence that ensued when miners from Harlan County, Kentucky, referred to as "Bloody Harlan," tried to better their lives by joining labor unions. (CMK)

  15. Minerals From the Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, Michael J.

    The current interest in minerals centering on, among other things, potential shortages, long-term needs, and deep seabed nodules, accentuates the usefulness and timeliness of this little book authored by a former chairman of the British National Environmental Research Council.In less than 100 pages, the author puts into perspective the potential for producing minerals from offshore areas of the world. After introducing the reader to the ocean environment and the extraordinary variety of the nature of the seabed, the author describes in some detail the variety of minerals found there. This is done in seven separate chapters entitled ‘Bulk and Non-Metallic Minerals From the Seas’ ‘Metals From the Shallow Seas’ ‘Metals From the Deep Oceans’ ‘Minerals From Solution’ ‘Oil and Gas from the Shallow Seas’ ‘Oil and Gas From Deep Waters’ and ‘Coal Beneath the Sea.’ The remaining chapters give a brief regional review of marine minerals distribution for eight areas of significant socioeconomic structure, and a short recapitulation of special problems of mineral recovery in the marine environment including such matters as the effect of water motion on mineral processing and of international law on investments. Glossaries of geological periods and technical terms, a short list of references, and an index complete the work.

  16. Investigating Minerals: Promoting Integrated Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rudi; Carmack, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    "Mineral Detectives!" is one of eighteen lessons in the "Private Whys?" integrated science unit, which uses a guided inquiry investigation to teach students in grades three through five about the role of minerals in our lives. The University of North Texas developed "Private Whys?" with funding from the Copper…

  17. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  18. Plant macro- and micronutrient minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All plants must obtain a number of inorganic mineral elements from their environment to ensure successful growth and development of both vegetative and reproductive tissues. A total of fourteen mineral nutrients are considered to be essential. Several other elements have been shown to have beneficia...

  19. Mineral Resources and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings and recommendations of panels created by the Committee on Mineral Resources and the Environment (COMRATE) to study four topic areas of mineral resources and the environment. The topic areas studied by the panels were: technology, supply, the environment, and demand. Section I, the report of the technology panel,…

  20. Ex situ aqueous mineral carbonation.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, Stephen J; O'Connor, William K; Dahlin, David C; Penner, Larry R; Rush, Hank

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, OR (formerly the Albany Research Center) has studied ex situ mineral carbonation as a potential option for carbon dioxide sequestration. Studies focused on the reaction of Ca-, Fe-, and Mg-silicate minerals with gaseous CO2 to form geologically stable, naturally occurring solid carbonate minerals. The research included resource evaluation, kinetic studies, process development, and economic evaluation. An initial cost estimate of approximately $69/ton of CO2 sequestered was improved with process improvements to $54/ton. The scale of ex situ mineral carbonation operations, requiring 55 000 tons of mineral to carbonate, the daily CO2 emissions from a 1-GW, coal-fired power plant, may make such operations impractical.

  1. Carbonate-mineral/water interactions in sulfide-rich mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al, Tom A.; Martin, Chris J.; Blowes, David W.

    2000-12-01

    The chemical composition and mineralogy of coatings on carbonate minerals from mine tailings have been studied using aqueous geochemical methods, Time-of-Flight Laser-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TOF-LIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The goal is to study major and trace element partitioning between the aqueous and solid phase, and to infer mechanisms that control the concentrations of elements in the pore water of sulfide-rich mine tailings. Pore-water samples and carbonate-mineral grains were collected from four geochemically distinct zones within the tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals near the surface results in a large range in pore-water pH (3.85 to 6.98) and aqueous concentrations of metals and sulfate. With increasing depth in the tailings, mineral-water interactions lead to increasing pH, and decreasing concentrations of metals and sulfate. Calculated mineral saturation indices, trends in the abundance of Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn in TOF-LIMS profiles through the secondary coatings, and electron diffraction patterns obtained from the coatings, suggest that precipitation/dissolution of jarosite-group minerals, gypsum, goethite, akaganéite, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxides and siderite control the aqueous Ca, Fe, Na, K and SO 4 concentrations. The occurrence of secondary coatings on primary minerals is widespread, and reactions with the secondary minerals, rather than the primary mineral substrate, probably represent the principal controls on trace-element distributions in the pore water. The data indicate that adsorption, surface-complexation and co-precipitation reactions are important controls on the concentrations of trace elements in the pore water. The occurrence of siderite coatings on the surface of ankerite grains suggests that Fe-bearing dolomite-structure carbonate minerals dissolve incongruently. This corroborates inferences made by previous workers that solubility differences between calcite and siderite lead to calcite dissolution and

  2. Microtextured Surfaces for Turbine Blade Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can exceed the blade and disk material limits by 600 F or more, necessitating both internal and film cooling schemes in addition to the use of thermal barrier coatings. Internal convective cooling is inadequate in many blade locations, and both internal and film cooling approaches can lead to significant performance penalties in the engine. Micro Cooling Concepts, Inc., has developed a turbine blade cooling concept that provides enhanced internal impingement cooling effectiveness via the use of microstructured impingement surfaces. These surfaces significantly increase the cooling capability of the impinging flow, as compared to a conventional untextured surface. This approach can be combined with microchannel cooling and external film cooling to tailor the cooling capability per the external heating profile. The cooling system then can be optimized to minimize impact on engine performance.

  3. Microtexture of Strain in electroplated copper interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Spolenak, R.; Barr, D.L.; Gross, M.E.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Brown, W.L.; Tamura, N.; MacDowell, A.A.; Celestre, R.S.; Padmore, H.A.; Valek, B.C.; Bravman, J.C.; Flinn, P.; Marieb, T.; Keller, R.R.; Batterman, B.W.; Patel, J.R.

    2001-04-01

    The microstructure of narrow metal conductors in the electrical interconnections on IC chips has often been identified as of major importance in the reliability of these devices. The stresses and stress gradients that develop in the conductors as a result of thermal expansion differences in the materials and of electromigration at high current densities are believed to be strongly dependent on the details of the grain structure. The present work discusses new techniques based on microbeam x-ray diffraction (MBXRD) that have enabled measurement not only of the microstructure of totally encapsulated conductors but also of the local stresses in them on a micron and submicron scale. White x-rays from the Advanced Light Source were focused to a micron spot size by Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The sample was stepped under the micro-beam and Laue images obtained at each sample location using a CCD area detector. Microstructure and local strain were deduced from these images. Cu lines with widths ranging from 0.8 mm to 5 mm and thickness of 1 mm were investigated. Comparisons are made between the capabilities of MBXRD and the well established techniques of broad beam XRD, electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and focused ion beam imagining (FIB).

  4. Secondary extinctions of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Jedediah F; Aslan, Clare E; Rogers, Haldre S; Redford, Kent H; Maron, John L; Bronstein, Judith L; Groves, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    Extinctions beget further extinctions when species lose obligate mutualists, predators, prey, or hosts. Here, we develop a conceptual model of species and community attributes affecting secondary extinction likelihood, incorporating mechanisms that buffer organisms against partner loss. Specialized interactors, including 'cryptic specialists' with diverse but nonredundant partner assemblages, incur elevated risk. Risk is also higher for species that cannot either evolve new traits following partner loss or obtain novel partners in communities reorganizing under changing environmental conditions. Partner loss occurs alongside other anthropogenic impacts; multiple stressors can circumvent ecological buffers, enhancing secondary extinction risk. Stressors can also offset each other, reducing secondary extinction risk, a hitherto unappreciated phenomenon. This synthesis suggests improved conservation planning tactics and critical directions for research on secondary extinctions.

  5. [Secondary chondrosarcoma: radiopathological correlation].

    PubMed

    Lozano Martínez, G A; Llauger Rosselló, J

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors originating in cartilage. Chondrosarcoma is the third most common malignant bone tumor after multiple myeloma and osteosarcoma. About 75% of chondrosarcomas are primary lesions. The remaining 25% belong to special categories such as histologic variants and secondary forms. A secondary chondrosarcoma is one that appears in a pre-existing benign chondral lesion; the different types of secondary chondrosarcomas include solitary osteochondroma, multiple osteochondromatosis, enchondroma, the different types of enchondromatosis, and primary synovial chondromatosis. The incidence of this malignant transformation varies widely in function of the type of lesion. In this article, we discuss and illustrate the different types of secondary chondrosarcomas, placing special emphasis on the imaging findings that should alert to these lesions and give radiologists a key role in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of these patients.

  6. Secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Evers, S.; Engelien, A.; Karsch, V.; Hund, M.

    1998-01-01

    Besides the hereditary hyperkalaemic paralysis, a secondary form exists which often mimicks Guillain-Barre syndrome. A 62year old patient is reported on who developed severe hyperkalaemic paralysis on the basis of mild renal failure and additive spironolactone intake. Neurophysiological examinations disclosed normal muscle fibre activity but delayed nerve conduction velocities indicating that the mechanism underlying secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is different from channelopathies. Haemodialysis led to complete recovery. Review of the medical literature showed that spironolactone intake is the most common cause of secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis. Typical symptoms are flaccid tetraplegia sparing the cranial nerves with only mild or lacking sensory impairment. Symptoms promptly resolve after haemodialysis or after glucose and insulin infusion. Only three out of 18 patients reviewed died, because of cardiopulmonary complications. Thus the prognosis of secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is good.

 PMID:9489541

  7. Secondary amenorrhea (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Secondary amenorrhea is the cessation of menstrual flow for a period of 6 months or more in the absence of pregnancy, breastfeeding or menopause. Extreme weight gain or loss, certain medications, as well as anxiety can be the root ...

  8. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  9. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  10. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  11. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  12. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  13. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  14. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  15. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  16. 30 CFR 57.5070 - Miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miner training. 57.5070 Section 57.5070 Mineral... Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Only § 57.5070 Miner training. (a) Mine operators must provide annual training to all miners at a mine covered by this part who...

  17. Moon's Pink Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.; Taylor, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 2010 remote-sensing discovery of lunar regolith rich in Mg-Al spinel on the rims and central peaks of impact craters and inner rings of basins on the Moon, researchers have been designing experiments to better understand the origin and formation history of spinel-rich rocks and what they mean for the construction of the lunar crust. The newly detected rock type is referred to as pink spinel anorthosite, or PSA, due to high plagioclase and low abundance (<5%) of mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. Two recent studies tested specific hypotheses of PSA production on the Moon. Juliane Gross (American Museum of Natural History and the Lunar and Planetary Institute, LPI) and colleagues at the LPI, University of Hawaii, and NASA Johnson Space Center conducted experiments to model the crystallization of spinel in impact melts from impact events. Tabb Prissel (Brown University) and colleagues from Brown conducted experiments to model a plutonic formation of spinel from magma-wallrock interactions. In each study, comparisons of the remote sensing data with Apollo lunar samples or lunar meteorites were crucial for testing the PSA formation hypotheses with the experimental results. Definitive answers aren't in yet. PSA could form from impact melting of the right target rocks. Equally likely is PSA formation by reaction of basaltic magma and crust. One big unknown is the effect space weathering has in determining the amount of spinel in the PSA..

  18. Universal ripper miner

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  19. Longwall mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.; Beyer, H.

    1982-09-14

    A longwall mineral mining installation comprises a scraper-chain conveyor having a scraper assembly, a first straight conveyor portion extending along the longwall working, a second straight conveyor portion extending along a roadway positioned at one end of the longwall working, and a curved conveyor section connecting the two straight conveyor portions. A guide assembly is provided for guiding the scraper assembly around the curved conveyor section. A guide is fixed to the face side of the first straight conveyor portion, and a winning machine is reciprocable along the guide. A drive station is mounted on the goaf side of the first straight conveyor portion in the region of the curved conveyor section. A drive sprocket is rotatably mounted on the face side of the first straight conveyor portion in said region. The drive sprocket drives the winning machine via a drive chain. A drive shaft drivably connects the drive station and the drive sprocket. The drive station includes a drive motor whose axis of rotation is substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the first straight conveyor portion, and the guide is angled away from the first straight conveyor portion in said region.

  20. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  1. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE PAGES

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; ...

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more » in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  2. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, J C; Schwenzer, S P; Leveille, R; Westall, F; Wiens, R C; Mangold, N; Bristow, T; Edwards, P; Berger, G

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ∽7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component. PMID:26213668

  3. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars.

    PubMed

    Bridges, J C; Schwenzer, S P; Leveille, R; Westall, F; Wiens, R C; Mangold, N; Bristow, T; Edwards, P; Berger, G

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10-50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100-1000, pH of ∽7.5-12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  4. Bone mineral density: testing for osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary osteoporosis is related to bone loss from ageing. Secondary osteoporosis results from specific conditions that may be reversible. A thoracolumbar X-ray is useful in identifying vertebral fractures, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry is the preferred method of calculating bone mineral density. The density of the total hip is the best predictor for a hip fracture, while the lumbar spine is the best site for monitoring the effect of treatment. The T-score is a comparison of the patient’s bone density with healthy, young individuals of the same sex. A negative T-score of –2.5 or less at the femoral neck defines osteoporosis. The Z-score is a comparison with the bone density of people of the same age and sex as the patient. A negative Z-score of –2.5 or less should raise suspicion of a secondary cause of osteoporosis. Clinical risk calculators can be used to predict the 10-year probability of a hip or major osteoporotic fracture. A probability of more than 5% for the hip or more than 20% for any fracture is abnormal and treatment may be warranted. PMID:27340320

  5. Microbial mineral colonization across a subsurface redox transition zone

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, Brandon J.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-08-28

    Here our study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would preferentially colonize the Fe(II)-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ) at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II) in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013). Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ for 5 months within a multilevel sampling (MLS) apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite vs. sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonadaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ) as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH4+, H2, Fe(II), and HS- oxidizing) taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant

  6. Microbial mineral colonization across a subsurface redox transition zone

    DOE PAGES

    Converse, Brandon J.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; ...

    2015-08-28

    Here our study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would preferentially colonize the Fe(II)-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ) at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II) in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013). Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ formore » 5 months within a multilevel sampling (MLS) apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite vs. sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonadaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ) as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH4+, H2, Fe(II), and HS- oxidizing) taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant behavior in the vicinity of the RTZ.« less

  7. Microbial mineral colonization across a subsurface redox transition zone

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Brandon J.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    This study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would preferentially colonize the Fe(II)-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ) at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II) in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013). Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ for 5 months within a multilevel sampling (MLS) apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite vs. sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonadaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ) as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH4+, H2, Fe(II), and HS- oxidizing) taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant behavior in the vicinity of the RTZ. PMID

  8. Use of fracture filling mineral assemblages for characterizing water-rock interactions during exhumation of an accretionary complex: An example from the Shimanto Belt, southern Kyushu Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takuya; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Metcalfe, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Various fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals in fracture walls were formed by fluid-rock interaction during the exhumation of the Palaeogene Shimanto Belt of Kyushu, Japan, which is located in an accretionary complex. Each mineral formed under favourable geological conditions and can be used to estimate the conditions of accretion and formation of the related rock sequences. Petrographic observations, mineralogical and geochemical analyses were made on fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals from boreholes of ca. 140 m depth, drilled in the Shimanto Belt. Results reveal that the secondary minerals were formed in three major stages distinguished by the sequential textural relationships of the minerals and the interpreted environment of mineral formation. Filling mineral assemblages show that the studied rock formation has been subducted to a depth of several km and the temperature reached was ca. 200-300 °C. After the subduction, the rock formation was uplifted and surface acidic water penetrated up to 80 m beneath the present ground surface. The acid water dissolved calcite fracture filling minerals to form the present groundwater flow-paths, which allowed recent wall rock alteration to occur. The results shown here imply that filling mineral assemblages can be an effective tool to evaluate the environmental changes during exhumation of an accretionary complex.

  9. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  10. Mineral sources and transport pathways for arsenic release in a coastal watershed, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Metasedimentary bedrock of coastal Maine contains a diverse suite of As-bearing minerals that act as significant sources of elements found in ground and surface waters in the region. Arsenic sources in the Penobscot Formation include, in order of decreasing As content by weight: löllingite and realgar (c.70%), arsenopyrite, cobaltite, glaucodot, and gersdorffite (in the range of 34–45%), arsenian pyrite (<4%), and pyrrhotite (<0.15%). In the Penobscot Formation, the relative stability of primary As-bearing minerals follows a pattern where the most commonly observed highly altered minerals are pyrrhotite, realgar, niccolite, löllingite > glaucodot, arsenopyrite-cobaltian > arsenopyrite, cobaltite, gersdorffite, fine-grained pyrite, Ni-pyrite > coarse-grained pyrite. Reactions illustrate that oxidation of Fe-As disulphide group and As-sulphide minerals is the primary release process for As. Liberation of As by carbonation of realgar and orpiment in contact with high-pH groundwaters may contribute locally to elevated contents of As in groundwater, especially where As is decoupled from Fe. Released metals are sequestered in secondary minerals by sorption or by incorporation in crystal structures. Secondary minerals acting as intermediate As reservoirs include claudetite (c.75%), orpiment (61%), scorodite (c. 45%), secondary arsenopyrite (c. 46%), goethite (<4490 ppm), natrojarosite (<42 ppm), rosenite, melanterite, ferrihydrite, and Mn-hydroxide coatings. Some soils also contain Fe-Co-Ni-arsenate, Ca-arsenate, and carbonate minerals. Reductive dissolution of Fe-oxide minerals may govern the ultimate release of iron and arsenic – especially As(V) – to groundwater; however, dissolution of claudetite (arsenic trioxide) may directly contribute As(III). Processes thought to explain the release of As from minerals in bedrock include oxidation of arsenian pyrite or arsenopyrite, or carbonation of As-sulphides, and most models based on these generally rely on

  11. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  12. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  13. Assessment of the geoavailability of trace elements from selected zinc minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Hageman, Phillip L.; Benzel, William M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Morman, Suzette; Choate, LaDonna M.; Lowers, Heather

    2014-01-01

    This assessment focused on five zinc-bearing minerals. The minerals were subjected to a number of analyses including quantitative X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, leaching tests, and bioaccessibility and toxicity studies. Like a previous comprehensive assessment of five copper-bearing minerals, the purpose of this assessment was to obtain structural and chemical information and to characterize the reactivity of each mineral to various simulated environmental and biological conditions. As in the copper minerals study, analyses were conducted consistent with widely accepted methods. Unless otherwise noted, analytical methods used for this study were identical to those described in the investigation of copper-bearing minerals. Two sphalerite specimens were included in the zinc-minerals set. One sphalerite was recovered from a mine in Balmat, New York; the second came from a mine in Creede, Colorado. The location and conditions of origin are significant because, as analyses confirmed, the two sphalerite specimens are quite different. For example, data acquired from a simulated gastric fluid (SGF) study indicate that the hydrothermally formed Creede sphalerite contains orders of magnitude higher arsenic, cadmium, manganese, and lead than the much older metamorphic Balmat sphalerite. The SGF and other experimental results contained in this report suggest that crystallizing conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluidization, or alteration processes significantly affect mineral properties—properties that, in turn, influence reactivity, solubility, and toxicity. The three remaining minerals analyzed for this report—smithsonite, hemimorphite, and hydrozincite—are all secondary minerals or alteration products of zinc-ore deposits. In addition, all share physical characteristics such as tenacity, density, streak, and cleavage. Similarities end there. The chemical composition, unit-cell parameters, acid-neutralizing potential, and other observable and

  14. Mineral Commodity Profiles -- Rubidium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Reese, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- Rubidium is a soft, ductile, silvery-white metal that melts at 39.3 ?C. One of the alkali metals, it is positioned in group 1 (or IA) of the periodic table between potassium and cesium. Naturally occurring rubidium is slightly radioactive. Rubidium is an extremely reactive metal--it ignites spontaneously in the presence of air and decomposes water explosively, igniting the liberated hydrogen. Because of its reactivity, the metal and several of its compounds are hazardous materials, and must be stored and transported in isolation from possible reactants. Although rubidium is more abundant in the earth?s crust than copper, lead, or zinc, it forms no minerals of its own, and is, or has been, produced in small quantities as a byproduct of the processing of cesium and lithium ores taken from a few small deposits in Canada, Namibia, and Zambia. In the United States, the metal and its compounds are produced from imported raw materials by at least one company, the Cabot Corporation (Cabot, 2003). Rubidium is used interchangeably or together with cesium in many uses. Its principal application is in specialty glasses used in fiber optic telecommunication systems. Rubidium?s photoemissive properties have led to its use in night-vision devices, photoelectric cells, and photomultiplier tubes. It has several uses in medical science, such as in positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging, the treatment of epilepsy, and the ultracentrifugal separation of nucleic acids and viruses. A dozen or more other uses are known, which include use as a cocatalyst for several organic reactions and in frequency reference oscillators for telecommunications network synchronization. The market for rubidium is extremely small, amounting to 1 to 2 metric tons per year (t/yr) in the United States. World resources are vast compared with demand.

  15. Mineral Losses During Extreme Environmental Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advisory groups that make recommendations for mineral intakes continue to identify accurate determinations of sweat mineral losses during physical activity as a critical void in their deliberations. Although estimates of sweat mineral concentrations are available, they are highly variable. Practica...

  16. Bio/organic compound detection using sodium sulfate minerals: Implications in the search for life on Mars and Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Charles Doc

    With the discovery of Na-sulfate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) on Mars and Europa, recent studies using these minerals have focused on their ability to assist in the detection of biosignatures. On Earth, biotic and biotic processes can assist in the formation and deposition of these minerals. A primary objective of these studies is the detection of bio/organic compounds that may be associated with the mineral. These biosignatures would imply biological involvement during mineral formation. The following research presents a series of natural and synthetic investigations to determine if biological activity is associated with Na-sulfate mineralization, and if these minerals can assist in detecting bio/organic compounds. Biological activity associated with the formation of Na-sulfate deposits in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho was examined by laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LD-FTMS), infrared spectroscopy and sulfur isotopic fractionation. These experiments conclude that bio/organic compounds are associated with the secondary Na-sulfate minerals, giving evidence of biological involvement in the mineralization of these deposits. LD-FTMS results of the synthetic bio/organic-mineral combinations show the potential of Na-sulfate minerals to assist in the detection and identification of bio/organic compounds. These results prove the importance of Na-sulfate minerals for future exploration missions that are likely to use LDMS to search for signs of life in the solar system.

  17. Effect of the advent and diversification of vascular land plants on mineral weathering through geologic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Martin A.; Calvin James, W.

    1987-12-01

    The origin of vascular land plants in the Silurian and their subsequent diversification have had a major effect on mineral weathering through geologic tune. The presence of vascular plants reduces the stability of soil minerals through a net export of ions from soil waters and through the release of complexing organic acids by root mycorrhizae. Additional factors that dictate the nature of plant-induced mineral weathering are (1) the differences in nutrient dynamics between evergreen and deciduous species; (2) the role of specific nutrient sinks (biomass storage and secondary soil mineralization) and outputs (runoff, etc.) in plant ecosystems; and (3) the effect of long- and short-term ecosystem disturbances. First-order increases in overall mineral weathering probably took place in the middle Paleozoic and early Tertiary, following the initial colonization and diversification of land plants and the radiation of deciduous angiospenns. Second-order fluctuations would typify time intervals where paleoecosystem disturbances were maximized, such as periods of climatic instability.

  18. Subarctic weathering of mineral wastes provides a sink for atmospheric CO(2).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Siobhan A; Dipple, Gregory M; Power, Ian M; Barker, Shaun L L; Fallon, Stewart J; Southam, Gordon

    2011-09-15

    The mineral waste from some mines has the capacity to trap and store CO(2) within secondary carbonate minerals via the process of silicate weathering. Nesquehonite [MgCO(3)·3H(2)O] forms by weathering of Mg-silicate minerals in kimberlitic mine tailings at the Diavik Diamond Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Less abundant Na- and Ca-carbonate minerals precipitate from sewage treatment effluent deposited in the tailings storage facility. Radiocarbon and stable carbon and oxygen isotopes are used to assess the ability of mine tailings to trap and store modern CO(2) within these minerals in the arid, subarctic climate at Diavik. Stable isotopic data cannot always uniquely identify the source of carbon stored within minerals in this setting; however, radiocarbon isotopic data provide a reliable quantitative estimate for sequestration of modern carbon. At least 89% of the carbon trapped within secondary carbonate minerals at Diavik is derived from a modern source, either by direct uptake of atmospheric CO(2) or indirect uptake though the biosphere. Silicate weathering at Diavik is trapping 102-114 g C/m(2)/y within nesquehonite, which corresponds to a 2 orders of magnitude increase over the background rate of CO(2) uptake predicted from arctic and subarctic river catchment data.

  19. Definitions of Health Terms: Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zinc is found in a wide variety of foods, and is found in most multivitamin/mineral supplements. Source : ... 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated ...

  20. GHGRP Minerals Sector Industrial Profile

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Minerals industry.

  1. Designing Clothing for Coal Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Susan M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes procedures taken by apparel design students, working in an industrial setting, in designing functional clothing for coal miners as part of the Armco Steel Corporation's Student Design Program. (TA)

  2. Mineral and water nutrition.

    PubMed

    Beede, D K

    1991-07-01

    In providing minerals to dairy cattle it is important to distinguish between dietary requirements and feeding recommendations. The requirement is the absolute amount of an element needed to meet the animal's metabolic needs for maintenance, growth, pregnancy, and lactation divided by the coefficient of absorption; this is estimated by the factorial method. Actual estimates of requirements for lactating dairy cattle have been determined for Ca and P. The major difficulties in relying on the requirement estimate are that dry matter intake varies and the true absorption coefficient of the mixture of feeds in the ration generally is unknown. Therefore, feeding recommendations, based on feeding graded concentrations of an element, often offer more applicable information. With the exception of Ca and P, the current feeding recommendations for the other macrominerals, Mg, Na, K, Cl and S, have resulted from feeding trials. With certain environmental and physiologic situations the feeding recommendations may vary. For example, during heat stress the dietary K recommendation for the lactating cow should be higher than in cool weather because of increased sweating and decreased feed intake. Another example may be that the source of supplemental Mg may affect what dietary inclusion rate will yield optimal performance and should be recommended. An important consideration in dairy ration formulation in the future will address the interrelationships of the various macrominerals. There is accumulating evidence that shows that different concentrations of Na, Cl, and K may interrelate and affect lactational performance. Many times the naturally occurring concentrations of one or more of these elements may have to be associated with varying concentrations of the others in order to optimize animal performance and health. Much experimentation likely will examine these interrelationships in the future. Supplementation of trace elements in diets of dairy cattle is common practice. This

  3. 77 FR 56273 - Conflict Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ...We are adopting a new form and rule pursuant to Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act relating to the use of conflict minerals. Section 1502 added Section 13(p) to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which requires the Commission to promulgate rules requiring issuers with conflict minerals that are necessary to the functionality or production of a......

  4. The Zapot pegmatite mineral county

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Soregaroli, A.E.; Gordon, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Zapot pegmatite is currently being mined for mineral specimens (chiefly amazonite, topaz and smoky quartz in miarolitic cavities), for gemstones (topaz and smoky quartz) and for decorative rock (amazonite). The deposit is owned and operated by Harvey Gordon Minerals of Reno, Nevada, and is the only amazonite-topaz mining operation in the state. Thousands of specimens from this operation have reached the collector market.

  5. Intermediate-depth earthquake generation: what hydrous minerals can tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deseta, N.; Ashwal, L.; Andersen, T. B.

    2012-04-01

    Subduction zone seismicity has commonly been causally related to the dehydration of minerals within the subducting slab(Hacker et al. 2004, Jung et al. (2004), Dobson et al. 2002, Rondenay et al. 2008). Other models for release of intermediate- and deep earthquakes include spontaneous reaction(s) affecting large rock-bodies along overstepped phase boundaries ( e.g. Green and Houston, 1995) and various shear heating-localization models (e.g. Kelemen and Hirth 2007, John et al. 2009). These concepts are principally reliant on seismic and thermo-petrological modeling; both of which are indirect methods of analysis. Recent discoveries of pseudotachylytes (PST) formed under high pressure conditions (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italy, Western Gneiss Region, Norway and Corsica) provide the first tangible opportunity to evaluate these models (Austrheim and Andersen, 2004, Lund and Austrheim, 2003, Obata and Karato, 1995, Jin et al., 1998). This case study focuses on observations based on ultramafic and mafic PST within the Ligurian Ophiolite of the high pressure-low temperature metamorphic (HP-LT) 'Shistes Lustres' complex in Cima di Gratera, Corsica (Andersen et al. 2008). These PST have been preserved in pristine lenses of peridotite and gabbro surrounded by schistose serpentinites. The PST range in thickness from 1mm to 25 cm (Andersen and Austrheim, 2006). Petrography and geochemistry on PST from the peridotite and gabbro samples indicates that total/near-total fusion of the local host rock mineral assemblage occurred; bringing up the temperature of shear zone from 350° C to 1400 - 1700° C; depending on the host rock (Andersen and Austrheim, 2006). The composition of the PST is highly variable, even at the thin section scale and this has been attributed to the coarse-grained nature of the host rock, its small scale inhomogeneity and poor mixing of the fusion melt. Almost all the bulk analyses of the PST are hydrous; the peridotitic PST is always hydrous (H2O content from 3

  6. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-02-01

    Survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attacks are at risk of a recurrent stroke, which is often more severe and disabling than the index event. Optimum secondary prevention of recurrent stroke needs rapid diagnosis and treatment and prompt identification of the underlying cardiovascular cause. Effective treatments include organised acute assessment and intervention with antithrombotic therapy, carotid revascularisation, and control of causal risk factors, as appropriate. However, effective treatments are not implemented optimally in clinical practice. Recurrent strokes continue to account for 25-30% of all strokes and represent unsuccessful secondary prevention. Immediate and sustained implementation of effective and appropriate secondary prevention strategies in patients with first-ever stroke or transient ischaemic attack has the potential to reduce the burden of stroke by up to a quarter.

  7. Fate of organo-mineral particles in streams: Microbial degradation by streamwater & biofilm assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, W. R.; Raich, M.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance. They receive carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C/ y of which, 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One aspect of this is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. their use as carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources within aquatic systems. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We experimentally tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and water sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria). Each incubation experienced a 16:8 light:dark regime, with metabolism monitored via changes in oxygen concentrations between photoperiods. The relative fate of the organo-mineral particles was quantified by tracing the mineralization of the 13C and 15N labels and their incorporation into microbial biomass. Here we present the initial results of 13C-label mineralization, incorporation and retention within dissolved organic carbon pool. The results indicate that 514 (× 219) μmol/ mmol of the 13:15N labeled free amino acids were mineralized over the 7-day incubations. By contrast, 186 (× 97) μmol/ mmol of the mineral-sorbed amino acids were mineralized over a similar period. Thus, organo-mineral complexation reduced amino acid mineralization by ~ 60 %, with no differences observed

  8. Capture probabilities for secondary resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, Renu

    1990-01-01

    A perturbed pendulum model is used to analyze secondary resonances, and it is shown that a self-similarity between secondary and primary resonances exists. Henrard's (1982) theory is used to obtain formulas for the capture probability into secondary resonances. The tidal evolution of Miranda and Umbriel is considered as an example, and significant probabilities of capture into secondary resonances are found.

  9. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  10. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  11. Influence of abiotic stress signals on secondary metabolites in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Ravishankar, Gokare Aswathanarayana

    2011-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are unique sources for pharmaceuticals, food additives, flavors, and industrially important biochemicals. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Secondary metabolites play a major role in the adaptation of plants to the environment and in overcoming stress conditions. Environmental factors viz. temperature, humidity, light intensity, the supply of water, minerals, and CO2 influence the growth of a plant and secondary metabolite production. Drought, high salinity, and freezing temperatures are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth of plants and the productivity of crops. Plant cell culture technologies have been effective tools for both studying and producing plant secondary metabolites under in vitro conditions and for plant improvement. This brief review summarizes the influence of different abiotic factors include salt, drought, light, heavy metals, frost etc. on secondary metabolites in plants. The focus of the present review is the influence of abiotic factors on secondary metabolite production and some of important plant pharmaceuticals. Also, we describe the results of in vitro cultures and production of some important secondary metabolites obtained in our laboratory. PMID:22041989

  12. Cosmetology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local secondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  13. Suicide among Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coder, Tamara L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated incidence of adolescent suicide in Kansas and assessed prevention guidelines and services dealing with adolescent suicide, and perceived needs of Kansas secondary school counselors in the area of teenage suicide. Findings from 484 school counselors indicated increase in suicide rates with age and need for suicide prevention programing…

  14. Secondary Services in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marianne; Terry, Edward

    The basic characteristics of sixty-nine secondary services in physics were analyzed in terms of sponsorship and distribution by: (1) country of origin, (2) language, (3) age, (4) frequency of publication, (5) subject and geographical coverage and (6) size. The eight major services, in terms of size, are identified. The use of the services by the…

  15. Secondary Syphilitic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, Robert E.; Musher, Daniel M.

    2005-01-01

    An important theme that emerges from all early historical accounts is that in addition to the decreased virulence of Treponema pallidum, the incidence of secondary syphilis has decreased drastically over the past three centuries. Even in the early 20th century, most syphilologists were of the opinion that the disease had undergone changes in its manifestations and that they were dealing with an attenuated form of the spirochete. Such opinions were based primarily on the observations that violent cutaneous reactions and fatalities associated with the secondary stage had become extremely rare. The rate of primary and secondary syphilis in the United States increased in 2002 for the second consecutive year. After a decade-long decline that led to an all-time low in 2000, the recent trend is attributable, to a large extent, by a increase in reported syphilis cases among men, particularly homosexual and bisexual men having sex with men. The present review addresses the clinical and diagnostic criteria for the recognition of secondary syphilis, the clinical course and manifestations of the disease if allowed to proceed past the primary stage of disease in untreated individuals, and the treatment for this stage of the disease. PMID:15653827

  16. Secondary Education in Austria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aigner, Helmut

    This booklet provides a brief description of secondary education in Austria. The publication is part of a series that seeks to make the public aware of the education systems and traditions in all signatory states to the European Cultural Convention and to outline the essential problems these systems presently are facing. This short booklet…

  17. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  18. Secondary Retention Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy R.; Hopkins, Patricia

    Two alternatives to retention in grade for secondary school students were evaluated in Austin (Texas). Both were designed to allow students who are potential retainees (PRs) to receive remediation in one semester. The Transitional Academic Program (TAP) allows PRs to enroll in ninth-grade courses while repeating eighth-grade courses they had…

  19. From Primary to Secondary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    This author discusses her decision to move to secondary school to teach mathematics, after having taught and been a mathematics manager in primary schools for six years. She states that this was a valuable experience and sparked her interest in the transition experiences of students, particularly in mathematics. Research (Evangelou et al, 2008,…

  20. [Pathophysiology of secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kawarazaki, Hiroo

    2017-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism(SHPT)is the result of a compensatory response of the calcium phosphate homeostatic mechanism. Vitamin D deficiency and chronic kidney disease, both representative pathophysiological causes of SHPT, have been related not only to skeletal disorders but also cardiovascular diseases, ADL and QOL. This relates the importance of SHPT as a pathological cause or marker of such states.

  1. Secondary School Languages: Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This curriculum guide outlines three programs for secondary school Spanish instruction, each program covering grades 9, 10, and 11 in British Columbian schools. Each outline specifies basic texts, supplementary readings, and teaching aids. In addition, a very basic outline of a beginner's Spanish 11 is offered, and a Spanish 12 literature course…

  2. Modernising Portugal's Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitor, Teresa V.

    2008-01-01

    Portugal has a total of 477 public secondary schools. Some date from the end of the 19th century but the majority were built after 1970, reflecting the period of expansion in the school network and the extension of compulsory schooling. The schools are heterogeneous in terms of building types, architectural features and quality. An assessment of…

  3. Mineral-resource data bases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Data bases are essential for modern scientific research. The new and exciting work being done in the Mineral Resource Program in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) usually begins with the question, "Where are the known deposits?" A mineral-resource data base containing this type of information and more can be useful not just to USGS scientists, but to anyone who needs such data. Users of the data bases from outside the USGS include mining and exploration companies, environmental groups, academia, other Federal Agencies, and the general public. At present, the USGS has two large mineral-resource data bases, MRDS (Mineral Resource Data System) and MAS (Minerals Availability System). MRDS was built and is mamtained by the USGS, and MAS was built and maintained by the Bureau of Mines. In 1996, after the Bureau was abolished, MAS was transferred to the USGS. The two data bases were compiled for different purposes and contain very different mformation. For instance, MAS contains information on costs, details of mining methods, and feasibility studies. MRDS has mineralogical and geologic data that are not contained in MAS. Because they are both mineral-resource data bases, however, they contain some information in common, such as location, name(s) of sites, and commodities present. Both data bases are international in scope, and both are quite large. MRDS contains over 110,000 records, while MAS has over 220,000. One reason that MAS has more records is that it contains information on smelters, mill sites, and fossil fuel sites, as well as mineral- resource sites. The USGS is working to combine the information in both data bases. This is a large undertaking that will require some years to complete. In the interim, information from both data bases will still be available

  4. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  5. Secondary impact hazard assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A series of light gas gun shots (4 to 7 km/sec) were performed with 5 mg nylon and aluminum projectiles to determine the size, mass, velocity, and spatial distribution of spall and ejecta from a number of graphite/epoxy targets. Similar determinations were also performed on a few aluminum targets. Target thickness and material were chosen to be representative of proposed Space Station structure. The data from these shots and other information were used to predict the hazard to Space Station elements from secondary particles resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids and orbital debris on the Space Station. This hazard was quantified as an additional flux over and above the primary micrometeoroid and orbital debris flux that must be considered in the design process. In order to simplify the calculations, eject and spall mass were assumed to scale directly with the energy of the projectile. Other scaling systems may be closer to reality. The secondary particles considered are only those particles that may impact other structure immediately after the primary impact. The addition to the orbital debris problem from these primary impacts was not addressed. Data from this study should be fed into the orbital debris model to see if Space Station secondaries make a significant contribution to orbital debris. The hazard to a Space Station element from secondary particles above and beyond the micrometeoroid and orbital debris hazard is categorized in terms of two factors: (1) the 'view factor' of the element to other Space Station structure or the geometry of placement of the element, and (2) the sensitivity to damage, stated in terms of energy. Several example cases were chosen, the Space Station module windows, windows of a Shuttle docked to the Space Station, the habitat module walls, and the photovoltaic solar cell arrays. For the examples chosen the secondary flux contributed no more than 10 percent to the total flux (primary and secondary) above a given calculated

  6. Understanding mineral dusts from the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, J. P.; McDonald, E.; Gillies, J. A.; Jayanty, J.; Casuccio, G.; Gertler, A.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of airborne mineral dust collected during a period of approximately one year, largely in 2006, at Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (Northern, Central, Coastal, and Southern regions). To fully understand mineral dusts, their chemical and physical properties as well as mineralogical interrelationships were accurately established. Three collocated low volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended (TSP), less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), and less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) particulate matter were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a "1 in 6 day" sampling schedule. A total of 3,136 filter samples were collected on a 1-in-6 day schedule, along with one-time bulk soil samples, at each of the 15 sites. Sample media included Teflon® membrane and quartz fiber filters for chemical analysis (71 species), and Nuclepore® filters for individual particle analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The provisional study of the data revealed three broad air pollution sources: geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and until now unidentified lead-zinc smelters and battery-processing facilities. SEM results and secondary electron imagery show that quartz and other silicate minerals and, to a lesser extent, dolomite and calcite particles are coated by a thin Si-Al-Mg layer, probably the clay minerals palygorskite and/or montmorillonite/illite. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on aerosol samples collected at six military sites in Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, and Al Asad). PMF results reflect chemical differences amongst sources impacting at individual sites, further complicated by the regional geomorphology and meteorology. Sampling sites are seldom impacted by one source at

  7. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  8. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  9. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  10. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  11. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  12. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  13. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  14. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  15. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  16. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  17. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  18. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  19. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  20. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  1. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  2. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  3. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  4. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  5. 1996 annual report on Alaska's mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Jill L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the fifteenth annual report that has been prepared in response to the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. Current Alaskan mineral projects and events that occurred during 1995 are summarized. For the purpose of this document, the term 'minerals' encompasses both energy resources (oil and gas, coal and peat, uranium, and geothermal) and nonfuel-mineral resources (metallic and industrial minerals).

  6. Portable Radiometer Identifies Minerals in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Machida, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Hand-held optical instrument aids in identifying minerals in field. Can be used in exploration for minerals on foot or by aircraft. The radiometer is especially suitable for identifying clay and carbonate minerals. Radiometer measures reflectances of mineral at two wavelengths, computes ratio of reflectances, and displays ratio to user.

  7. CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY OF HYDROUS MINERALS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. ZHAO; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Hydrogen has long been appreciated for its role in geological processes of the Earth's crust. However, its role in Earth's deep interior has been neglected in most geophysical thinking. Yet it is now believed that most of our planet's hydrogen may be locked up in high pressure phases of hydrous silicate minerals within the Earth's mantle. This rocky interior (approximately 7/8 of Earth's volume) is conjectured to contain 1-2 orders of magnitude more water than the more obvious oceans (the ''hydrosphere'') and atmosphere. This project is aimed at using the capability of neutron scattering from hydrogen to study the crystal chemistry and stability of hydrogen-bearing minerals at high pressures and temperatures. At the most basic level this is a study of the atomic position and hydrogen bond itself. We have conducted experimental runs on hydrous minerals under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The crystallographic structure of hydrous minerals at extreme conditions and its structural stability, and hydrogen bond at high P-T conditions are the fundamental questions to be addressed. The behavior of the hydrous minerals in the deep interior of the Earth has been discussed.

  8. Traditional Methods for Mineral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Robert E.; Carpenter, Charles E.

    This chapter describes traditional methods for analysis of minerals involving titrimetric and colorimetric procedures, and the use of ion selective electrodes. Other traditional methods of mineral analysis include gravimetric titration (i.e., insoluble forms of minerals are precipitated, rinse, dried, and weighed) and redox reactions (i.e., mineral is part of an oxidation-reduction reaction, and product is quantitated). However, these latter two methods will not be covered because they currently are used little in the food industry. The traditional methods that will be described have maintained widespread usage in the food industry despite the development of more modern instrumentation such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (Chap. 24). Traditional methods generally require chemicals and equipment that are routinely available in an analytical laboratory and are within the experience of most laboratory technicians. Additionally, traditional methods often form the basis for rapid analysis kits (e.g., Quantab®; for salt determination) that are increasingly in demand. Procedures for analysis of minerals of major nutritional or food processing concern are used for illustrative purposes. For additional examples of traditional methods refer to references (1-6). Slight modifications of these traditional methods are often needed for specific foodstuffs to minimize interferences or to be in the range of analytical performance. For analytical requirements for specific foods see the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International (5) and related official methods (6).

  9. Hyperspectral analysis of clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki Rama Suresh, G.; Sreenivas, K.; Sivasamy, R.

    2014-11-01

    A study was carried out by collecting soil samples from parts of Gwalior and Shivpuri district, Madhya Pradesh in order to assess the dominant clay mineral of these soils using hyperspectral data, as 0.4 to 2.5 μm spectral range provides abundant and unique information about many important earth-surface minerals. Understanding the spectral response along with the soil chemical properties can provide important clues for retrieval of mineralogical soil properties. The soil samples were collected based on stratified random sampling approach and dominant clay minerals were identified through XRD analysis. The absorption feature parameters like depth, width, area and asymmetry of the absorption peaks were derived from spectral profile of soil samples through DISPEC tool. The derived absorption feature parameters were used as inputs for modelling the dominant soil clay mineral present in the unknown samples using Random forest approach which resulted in kappa accuracy of 0.795. Besides, an attempt was made to classify the Hyperion data using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm with an overall accuracy of 68.43 %. Results showed that kaolinite was the dominant mineral present in the soils followed by montmorillonite in the study area.

  10. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-06-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) play an important role in regulating the aqueous geochemistry of iron and other metals in anaerobic, non-sulfidogenic groundwater environments; however, little work has directly assessed the cell surface electrochemistry of DIRB, or the nature of the interfacial environment around individual cells. The electrochemical properties of particulate solids are often inferred from titrations in which net surface charge is determined, assuming electroneutrality, as the difference between known added amounts of acid and base and measured proton concentration. The resultant titration curve can then be fit to a speciation model for the system to determine pKa values and site densities of reactive surface sites. Moreover, with the development of non-contact electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), it is now possible to directly inspect and quantify charge development on surfaces. A combination of acid-base titrations and EFM are being used to assess the electrochemical surface properties of the groundwater DIRB, Shewanella putrefaciens. The pKa spectra and EFM data show together that a high degree of electrochemical heterogeneity exists within the cell wall and at the cell surface of S. putrefaciens. Recognition of variations in the nature and spatial distribution of reactive sites that contribute to charge development on these bacteria implies further that the cell surface of these Fe(III)-reducing bacteria functions as a highly differentiated interfacial system capable of supporting multiple intermolecular interactions with both solutes and solids. These include surface complexation reactions involving dissolved metals, as well as adherence to mineral substrates such as hydrous ferric oxide through longer-range electrostatic interactions, and surface precipitation of secondary reduced-iron minerals.

  11. Mineral recovery from inland reverse osmosis concentrate using isothermal evaporation.

    PubMed

    Mohammadesmaeili, Farah; Badr, Mostafa Kabiri; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Fox, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Mineral recovery from reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate after concentration by a secondary sea water-type RO system with lime-soda pretreatment was the focus of this study. Lime-soda pretreatment removed Ca, Mg and Si allowing for the application of sea water-type RO resulting in a concentrate composed of sodium, potassium, sulfate and chloride. The overall objective was reduction in concentrate volume that will require disposal by evaporation while producing by-products with potential resale value. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium calculations using Pitzer's correlations for 25 °C, accurately predicted the solubility and evaporation path of the sodium sulfate minerals as potential by-products. Bench-scale evaporation experiments verified the model predictions and indicated that 81-88% of the sodium sulfate by-products were Na(2)SO(4).

  12. The pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol: Beyond bone-mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Egido, Jesús; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Bover, Jordi; Praga, Manuel; Torregrosa, José Vicente; Fernández-Giráldez, Elvira; Solozábal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is characterised by elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and a series of bone-mineral metabolism anomalies. In patients with SHPT, treatment with paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, has been shown to reduce PTH levels with minimal serum calcium and phosphorus variations. The classic effect of paricalcitol is that of a mediator in mineral and bone homeostasis. However, recent studies have suggested that the benefits of treatment with paricalcitol go beyond PTH reduction and, for instance, it has a positive effect on cardiovascular disease and survival. The objective of this study is to review the most significant studies on the so-called pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol treatment in patients with CKD.

  13. Rock Magnetic Mineral Assemblage in Mineral Separates from Xenoliths of Continental Lithospheric Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakhalova, E.; Feinberg, J. M.; Ionov, D. A.; Ferre, E. C.; Friedman, S. A.; Hernandez, F. M.; Neal, C. R.; Conder, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Studies of aeromagnetic anomalies suggest that the lithospheric mantle may contribute to long wavelength features. Examination of unaltered mantle xenoliths may reveal the mineralogical sources of these aeromagnetic anomalies. Prior work has reported microscopic inclusions of magnetic minerals in mantle silicates. Here we explore the magnetism of pure olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and spinel separated from peridotite xenoliths from the Dariganga and Tariat localities in Mongolia that sample the lithospheric mantle. All separates were leached with HF and HCl to remove secondary minerals adhering to the surface of the grains or in cracks. Separates were then mounted in cement to create monomineralic specimens for investigation using hysteresis loops, first order reversal curves (FORC), alternating field and thermal demagnetization of a 1T IRM, and low-temperature magnetometry. All specimens showed trace concentrations of ferromagnetic inclusions with Ms values of ~10-3 Am2kg-1. Thermal demagnetization showed a range of unblocking temperatures with median destructive temperatures of 300-400°C. Two specimens showed a dramatic demagnetization at 585°C, consistent with pure magnetite (Mt). The presence of Mt was confirmed by observations of the Verwey transition at 100-120K and by backfield remanence acquisition curves that plateau at ~300 mT. The median destructive alternating field was ~20 mT and 40-80 mT for specimens from Dariganga and Tariat, respectively. FORC diagrams show single-domain-like behavior with a median Hc of ~20 mT. The demagnetization experiments suggest that Mt inclusions in the lattice of olivine, opx, cpx and spinel carry magnetic remanence. Thus, the lithospheric mantle may exhibit in-situ ferromagnetism carried by Mt below 585°C. The magnetization of separates varies between xenolith localities but is consistent amongst minerals of the same locality. Future work will address whether the Mt formed before or during xenolith ascent.

  14. Accelerated growth plate mineralization and foreshortened proximal limb bones in fetuin-A knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Seto, Jong; Busse, Björn; Gupta, Himadri S; Schäfer, Cora; Krauss, Stefanie; Dunlop, John W C; Masic, Admir; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Zaslansky, Paul; Boesecke, Peter; Catalá-Lehnen, Philip; Schinke, Thorsten; Fratzl, Peter; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2012-01-01

    The plasma protein fetuin-A/alpha2-HS-glycoprotein (genetic symbol Ahsg) is a systemic inhibitor of extraskeletal mineralization, which is best underscored by the excessive mineral deposition found in various tissues of fetuin-A deficient mice on the calcification-prone genetic background DBA/2. Fetuin-A is known to accumulate in the bone matrix thus an effect of fetuin-A on skeletal mineralization is expected. We examined the bones of fetuin-A deficient mice maintained on a C57BL/6 genetic background to avoid bone disease secondary to renal calcification. Here, we show that fetuin-A deficient mice display normal trabecular bone mass in the spine, but increased cortical thickness in the femur. Bone material properties, as well as mineral and collagen characteristics of cortical bone were unaffected by the absence of fetuin-A. In contrast, the long bones especially proximal limb bones were severely stunted in fetuin-A deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates, resulting in increased biomechanical stability of fetuin-A deficient femora in three-point-bending tests. Elevated backscattered electron signal intensities reflected an increased mineral content in the growth plates of fetuin-A deficient long bones, corroborating its physiological role as an inhibitor of excessive mineralization in the growth plate cartilage matrix--a site of vigorous physiological mineralization. We show that in the case of fetuin-A deficiency, active mineralization inhibition is a necessity for proper long bone growth.

  15. Accelerated Growth Plate Mineralization and Foreshortened Proximal Limb Bones in Fetuin-A Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Himadri S.; Schäfer, Cora; Krauss, Stefanie; Dunlop, John W. C.; Masic, Admir; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Zaslansky, Paul; Boesecke, Peter; Catalá-Lehnen, Philip; Schinke, Thorsten; Fratzl, Peter; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2012-01-01

    The plasma protein fetuin-A/alpha2-HS-glycoprotein (genetic symbol Ahsg) is a systemic inhibitor of extraskeletal mineralization, which is best underscored by the excessive mineral deposition found in various tissues of fetuin-A deficient mice on the calcification-prone genetic background DBA/2. Fetuin-A is known to accumulate in the bone matrix thus an effect of fetuin-A on skeletal mineralization is expected. We examined the bones of fetuin-A deficient mice maintained on a C57BL/6 genetic background to avoid bone disease secondary to renal calcification. Here, we show that fetuin-A deficient mice display normal trabecular bone mass in the spine, but increased cortical thickness in the femur. Bone material properties, as well as mineral and collagen characteristics of cortical bone were unaffected by the absence of fetuin-A. In contrast, the long bones especially proximal limb bones were severely stunted in fetuin-A deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates, resulting in increased biomechanical stability of fetuin-A deficient femora in three-point-bending tests. Elevated backscattered electron signal intensities reflected an increased mineral content in the growth plates of fetuin-A deficient long bones, corroborating its physiological role as an inhibitor of excessive mineralization in the growth plate cartilage matrix - a site of vigorous physiological mineralization. We show that in the case of fetuin-A deficiency, active mineralization inhibition is a necessity for proper long bone growth. PMID:23091616

  16. Respiratory disability in coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.K.C.; Lapp, N.L.; Seaton, D.

    1980-06-20

    It has been suggested that the assessment of ventilatory capacity alone is inadequate for the determination of disabling occupational respiratory impairment in coal miners. The Department of Labor has accepted this view and now routinely requests blood gas analyses in those claimants not meeting the ventilatory criteria. We tested the validity of this contention by selecting two groups of coal miners claiming total disability. The first consisted of 150 claimants who were referred for spirometry, while the second consisted of 50 claimants who had been referred for blood gas studies. Of those in group 1, eight met the extant criteria for disability, while only two of those in group 2 satisfied the criteria, and, in both, cardiac disease was responsible. We conclude that blood gas analyses are unnecessary in the determination of pulmonary disability in coal miners.

  17. Mineral Supertrumps: A new card game to assist learning of mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandler, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineralogy is considered one of the cornerstone subjects of geoscience curriculum. It provides the basic information from which we can understand the composition and behaviour of Earth and planetary materials, yet many students struggle to obtain adequate comprehension and knowledge of mineralogy during tertiary degree programs. Here, I introduce a new card game called "Mineral Supertrumps" that can be used to assist teaching of mineralogy at secondary and tertiary level. The card game is easy to learn and play, and is designed to promote active learning in a group environment. The game involves 3 to 6 people, and is similar to the "Top Trumps™" card games. The pack consists of 54 mineral cards, and 6 supertrump cards. Each mineral card includes information about the mineral such as the generic chemical formula, the classification, crystal system, the geological environment where the mineral is commonly found or formed, as well as information in the five playing categories (or trumps) of Hardness, Specific Gravity, Cleavage, Crustal Abundance, and Economic Value. The first three playing categories relate to distinct physical properties of the mineral, while last two categories rate the importance of the mineral in terms of abundance in the Earth's crust and value to modern societies. Results of a formal evaluation of the game by students in the second year of a tertiary geology program indicate that the game has clear benefits for learning about mineralogy. The majority of students enjoyed playing the game and considered it to be effective for enhancing learning about mineral properties and their application to other Earth Science disciplines. Therefore, inclusion of "Mineral Supertrumps" into Earth Science curriculum at secondary or tertiary level has the potential to redress the difficulties students face in learning of mineralogy, while requiring little to no adjustment to existing teaching programs.

  18. Is the geological concept of clay minerals appropriate for soil science? A literature-based and philosophical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchman, G. Jock

    . Phyllosilicates from non-soil or geological sources are poor models for the representation of secondary clay-size minerals in soils. In philosophical terms, the reduction of soil mineralogy to mineralogy as it is practiced within geology is misleading because of the differences between the minerals formed in soil and geological environments. In other words, clay minerals as they are defined as mineralogical entities for geology are of a different ‘kind’ to clay minerals in soils and cannot serve as ‘types’ or ‘stereotypes’ to enable explanation of the contribution of secondary clay-size minerals to soil properties or behavior. It is more useful to view clay minerals in soils as secondary inorganic compounds of clay-size than to follow their definition for non-soil purposes as plastic phyllosilicate minerals.

  19. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  20. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  1. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  2. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  3. Geochemical processes at mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Hayes, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume includes 32 papers which were presented at a symposium on geochemical processes at mineral-water interfaces in 1985 and which bring to bear on this area a very wide range of expertise. The discontinuities in properties which occur at the mineral-water interface have profound effects on the movement of naturally occurring ions. Weathering and precipitation processes control the concentrations and speciation of ions in natural waters and the movements of these within the hydrosphere; both classes of processes take place at mineral-water interfaces. After an introductory overview, the book is divided into seven major sections, each dealing with one of the aspects of the processes occurring at the mineral-water interface. Five papers deal with the physical properties of the mineral-water interface; these represent a well-balanced mix of experimental and theoretical (mathematical modeling) work. Adsorption phenomena are dealt with in another five papers; these are largely experimental in character. Ion-exchange processes are discussed in four papers, one of which addresses the use of relaxation methods to study ion exchange kinetics at the microscopic level. Spectroscopic techniques (including electron-spin resonance and Moessbauer spectroscopy) are utilized in four papers. Chemical reactions, mainly redox processes, at mineral-water interfaces are treated in four papers, one of which deals with non-biological organic reactions. Solid-solution formation and equilibria are the subjects of another set of four articles, and the last group of papers deals with the processes involved in precipitation and dissolution, including weathering.

  4. Potassium Secondary Batteries.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Ali; Jian, Zelang; Ji, Xiulei

    2017-02-08

    Potassium may exhibit advantages over lithium or sodium as a charge carrier in rechargeable batteries. Analogues of Prussian blue can provide millions of cyclic voltammetric cycles in aqueous electrolyte. Potassium intercalation chemistry has recently been demonstrated compatible with both graphite and nongraphitic carbons. In addition to potassium-ion batteries, potassium-O2 (or -air) and potassium-sulfur batteries are emerging. Additionally, aqueous potassium-ion batteries also exhibit high reversibility and long cycling life. Because of potentially low cost, availability of basic materials, and intriguing electrochemical behaviors, this new class of secondary batteries is attracting much attention. This mini-review summarizes the current status, opportunities, and future challenges of potassium secondary batteries.

  5. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  6. Wollastonite : a versatile industrial mineral

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    Wollastonite is a chemically simple mineral named in honor of English mineralogist and chemist Sir W.H. Wollaston (1766–1828). It is composed of calcium (Ca) and silicon and oxygen (SiO2, silica) with the chemical formula CaSiO3. Although much wollastonite is relatively pure CaSiO3, it can contain some iron, magnesium, manganese, aluminum, potassium, sodium, or strontium substituting for calcium in the mineral structure. Pure wollastonite is bright white; the type and amount of impurities can produce gray, cream, brown, palegreen, or red colors.

  7. SECONDARY ELECTRON MULTIPLIERS

    DOEpatents

    Morton, G.A.; Green, M.W.

    1959-01-01

    A secondary emission multiplier having exceptionally high output signal current is described. In previous multiplier tubes the output signal current was limited by the space charge surrounding the electrodes. The present multiplier tubes provides a source of ions within the tube adjacent the anode to neutralize the space charge effect, and the dynode voltage is switched on intermittently for periods of time so brief that the ions do not move towards the cathode.

  8. Coatings for secondary containment

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisor, M.W.

    1995-12-31

    Federal environmental legislation has established minimum requirements for secondary containment of both hazardous wastes and petroleum products for aboveground storage tanks. Of the systems listed, the most commonly used containment is the concrete vault. Regulations require that the vault must be protected with an impermeable lining that is also compatible with the stored waste. This paper explores the selection criteria for such linings and the various types of linings on the market today.

  9. Enhanced radionuclide immobilization and flow path modifications by dissolution and secondary precipitates.

    PubMed

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R Jeffrey; Yabusaki, Steven B; Owen, Antoinette T

    2005-01-01

    Caustic radioactive wastes that have leaked at Hanford Site (Richland, WA) induce mineral dissolution and subsequent secondary precipitation that influence the fate and transport of contaminants present in the waste solutions. The effects of secondary mineral precipitates, formed after contacting solids with simulated caustic wastes, on the flow path changes and radionuclide immobilization were investigated by reacting quartz, a mixture of quartz and biotite, and a Hanford sediment (Warden soil: coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic Xeric Haplocambids) with simulated caustic tank waste solution. Continuous Si dissolution and concomitant secondary mineral precipitation were the principal reactions observed in both batch and flow-through tests. Nitrate-cancrinite was the dominant secondary precipitate on mineral surfaces after 3- to 10-d reaction times in batch experiments. X-ray microtomography images of a reacted quartz column revealed that secondary precipitates cemented quartz grains together and modified pore geometry in the center of the column. Along the circumference of the packed column, however, quartz dissolution continuously occurred, suggesting that wastes that leaked from buried tanks in the past likely did not migrate vertically as modeled in risk assessments but rather the pathways likely changed to be dominantly horizontal on precipitation of secondary precipitate phases in the Hanford vadose zone. Based on batch equilibrium sorption results on the reacted sediments, the dominant secondary precipitates (cancrinites) on the mineral surfaces enhanced the sorption capacity of typical Hanford sediment for radionuclides 129I(-I), 79Se(VI), 99Tc(VII), and 90Sr(II), all of which are of major concern at the Hanford Site.

  10. Enhanced radionuclide immobilization and flow path modifications by dissolution and secondary precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Owen, Antionette T.

    2005-07-05

    Caustic radioactive wastes that have leaked at Hanford Site (Richland, WA) induce mineral dissolution and subsequent secondary precipitation that influence the fate and transport of contaminants present in the waste solutions. The effects of secondary mineral precipitates, formed after contacting solids with simulated caustic wastes, on the flow path changes and radionuclide immobilization were investigated by reacting quartz, a mixture of quartz and biotite, and a Hanford sediment (Warden soil) with simulated caustic tank waste solution. Continuous Si dissolution and concomitant secondary mineral precipitation were the principal reactions observed in both batch and flow-through tests. Nitrate-cancrinite was the dominant secondary precipitate on mineral surfaces after 3 to 10 d reaction times in batch experiments. X-ray microtomography images of a reacted quartz column revealed that secondary precipitates cemented quartz grains together and modified pore geometry in the center of the column. Along the circumference of the packed column, however, quartz dissolution continuously occurred, suggesting that wastes that leaked from buried tanks in the past likely did not migrate vertically as modeled in risk assessments but rather the pathways likely changed to be dominantly horizontal upon precipitation of secondary precipitate phases in the Hanford vadose zone. Based on batch equilibrium sorption results on the reacted sediments, the dominant secondary precipitates (cancrinites) on the mineral surfaces enhanced the sorption capacity of typical Hanford sediment for radionuclides 129I(-I), 79Se(VI), 99Tc(VII), and 90Sr(II), all of which are of major concern at the Hanford Site.

  11. Pyroelectricity and Asymmetric Thermal Vibrations of Atoms in Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihara, Kuniaki; Okudera, Hiroki

    A structural approach was attempted to estimate rigid ion contributions to pyroelectric coefficients, employing atomic position vectors determined in the least-squares refinement of a polar mineral, cancrinite. The two sets of positions, obtained from the centers of gravity (centroids) and modes of asymmetric probability density functions (pdf) of atoms, were applied to calculate electric polarizations, whose temperature derivatives may correspond to the rigid ion contributions to the pyroelectric coefficient, γ(σ), normally measured under the condition of constant stresses and to the secondary pyroelectric coefficients, γ(2), respectively. The primary pyroelectric coefficient γ(ε) was given as the difference γ(σ)-γ(2).

  12. Fe-Ni metal and sulfide minerals in CM chondrites: An indicator for thermal history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimura, M.; Grossman, J.N.; Weisberg, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    CM chondrites were subjected to aqueous alteration and, in some cases, to secondary metamorphic heating. The effects of these processes vary widely, and have mainly been documented in silicate phases. Herein, we report the characteristic features of Fe-Ni metal and sulfide phases in 13 CM and 2 CM-related chondrites to explore the thermal history of these chondrites. The texture and compositional distribution of the metal in CM are different from those in unequilibrated ordinary and CO chondrites, but most have similarities to those in highly primitive chondrites, such as CH, CR, and Acfer 094. We classified the CM samples into three categories based on metal composition and sulfide texture. Fe-Ni metal in category A is kamacite to martensite. Category B is characterized by pyrrhotite grains always containing blebs or lamellae of pentlandite. Opaque mineral assemblages of category C are typically kamacite, Ni-Co-rich metal, and pyrrhotite. These categories are closely related to the degree of secondary heating and are not related to degree of the aqueous alteration. The characteristic features of the opaque minerals can be explained by secondary heating processes after aqueous alteration. Category A CM chondrites are unheated, whereas those in category B experienced small degrees of secondary heating. CMs in category C were subjected to the most severe secondary heating process. Thus, opaque minerals can provide constraints on the thermal history for CM chondrites. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2011.

  13. Body composition and bone mineral density of collegiate American football players

    PubMed Central

    Turnagöl, Hüseyin Hüsrev

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare whole and segmental body composition and bone mineral density of collegiate American football players by playing positions. Forty collegiate American football players voluntarily participated in this study. Participants were categorized by playing positions into one of five categories i.e., defensive linemen, offensive linemen, defensive secondary players, offensive secondary players and receivers. Whole body composition and bone mineral density were measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Offensive and defensive linemen had higher body mass, a body mass index, lean mass and a fat mass index compared to the remaining three positions and a higher lean mass index compared to offensive secondary players and receivers. Offensive linemen had a higher body fat percentage and lower values of upper to lower lean mass than offensive and defensive secondary players and receivers, and higher total mass to the lean mass ratio and fat mass to the lean mass ratio compared to the other players. Offensive linemen had a higher fat mass index and fat mass to the lean mass ratio than defensive linemen. However, in all other measures they were similar. Offensive and defensive secondary players and receivers were similar with respect to the measured variables. Bone mineral density of the players was within the normal range and no difference in lean mass was observed between the legs. In conclusion, findings of this study showed that the total and segmental body composition profile of collegiate American football players reflected the demands of particular playing positions. PMID:28149373

  14. Mysterious Lava Mineral on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph or spectrum captured by the Moessbauer spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the presence of three different iron-bearing minerals in the soil at the rover's landing site. One of these minerals has been identified as olivine, a shiny green rock commonly found in lava on Earth. The other two have yet to be pinned down. Scientists were puzzled by the discovery of olivine because it implies the soil consists at least partially of ground up rocks that have not been weathered or chemically altered. The black line in this graph represents the original data; the three colored regions denote individual minerals and add up to equal the black line.

    The Moessbauer spectrometer uses two pieces of radioactive cobalt-57, each about the size of pencil erasers, to determine with a high degree of accuracy the composition and abundance of iron-bearing minerals in martian rocks and soil. It is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.'

  15. Mineral of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2004-01-01

    Indium was discovered in Germany in 1863. Although it is a lustrous silver-white color, the finders named the new material for the “indigo” spectral lines the mineral created on the spectrograph. Indium ranks 61st in abundance in Earth’s crust and is about three times more abundant than silver or mercury.

  16. Mineral of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    From paint to airplanes, titanium is important in a number of applications. Commercial production comes from titanium-bearing ilmenite, rutile and leucoxene (altered ilmenite). These minerals are used to produce titanium dioxide pigment, as well as an assortment of metal and chemical products.

  17. Mineral of the month: rhenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magyar, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Rhenium, an exotic, heat-resistant metal, has grown in importance since its discovery nearly 80 years ago. First isolated by a team of German chemists studying a platinum ore, the mineral was named for the Rhine River. From then until the 1960s, only 2 metric tons of rhenium were produced worldwide. In 2004, worldwide production was 40 metric tons.

  18. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  19. Mineral of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyday, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

  20. Mineral evolution and Earth history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight C.

    2015-01-01

    The field of mineral evolution—a merger of mineralogy and Earth history—coalesced in 2008 with the first of several global syntheses by Robert Hazen and coworkers in the American Mineralogist. They showed that the cumulative abundance of mineral species has a stepwise trend with first appearances tied to various transitions in Earth history such as the end of planetary accretion at ca. 4.55 Ga and the onset of bio-mediated mineralogy at ca. >2.5 Ga. A global age distribution is best established for zircon. Observed abundance of zircon fluctuates through more than an order of magnitude during successive supercontinent cycles. The pulse of the Earth is also recorded, albeit imperfectly, by the 87Sr/86Sr composition of marine biogenic calcite; the Sr-isotopic ratio of this mineral reflects the balance of inputs of primitive strontium at mid-ocean ridges and evolved strontium that drains off the continents. A global mineral evolution database, currently in the works, will greatly facilitate the compilation and analysis of extant data and the expansion of research in mineralogy outside its traditional bounds and into more interdisciplinary realms.

  1. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  2. Lunar secondary craters, part K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overbeck, V. R.; Morrison, R. H.; Wedekind, J.

    1972-01-01

    Formation of V-shaped structures surrounding the fresh Copernicus Crater and its secondary craters are reviewed, and preliminary observations of the more extensively eroded secondary crater field of Theophilus are presented. Results of laboratory simulation of secondary lunar craters to examine their effects on V-shaped ridges are also described.

  3. Plants and microorganisms as drivers of mineral weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsova, K.; Chorover, J.; Maier, R.; Hunt, E.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    Plants and microorganisms play important role in mineral weathering and soil formation modifying their environment to make it more hospitable for life. This presentation summarizes several collaborative studies that focused on understanding how interactions between plants and microorganisms, where plants provide the energy through photosynthesis, drive mineral weathering and result in soil formation. Plants influence weathering through multiple mechanisms that have been previously established, such as increase in CO2 concentration in the soil through root respiration and degradation of plant residues and exudates by heterotrophic microorganisms, release of organic acids that promote mineral dissolution, removal of weathering products from soil solution through uptake, and water redistribution. Weathering processes result in nutrient release that satisfies immediate needs of the plants and microorganisms, as well as precipitation of secondary phases, that provide surfaces for retention of nutrients and organic carbon accumulation. What makes understanding contribution of plants and microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, to mineral weathering challenging is the fact that they closely interact, enhancing and amplifying each other's contribution. In order to address multiple processes that contribute to and result from biological weathering a combination of chemical, biological, mineralogical, and computational techniques and methodologies is needed. This complex array of methodologies includes bulk techniques, such as determination of total dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen, ion chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography to characterize amount and composition of exuded organic acids, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of lithogenic elements in solution, X-ray diffraction to characterize changes in mineral composition of the material, DNA extraction to characterize community structure, as well

  4. Mineral arsenicals in traditional medicines: Orpiment, realgar, and arsenolite

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuanfu; Wu, Qin; Goyer, Robert A; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Mineral arsenicals have long been used in traditional medicines for various diseases, yet arsenic can be highly toxic and carcinogenic. Arsenic in traditional medicines typically comes from deliberate addition for therapeutic purposes, mainly in the form of mineral arsenicals including orpiment (As2S3), realgar (As4S4), and arsenolite (contains arsenic trioxide, As2O3). Inorganic arsenic is now accepted in Western medicine as a first line chemotherapeutic agent against certain hematopoietic cancers. This minireview analyzes the pharmacology and toxicology of these arsenicals used in traditional medicines. Orpiment and realgar are less soluble and poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, while the bioavailability of arsenic trioxide is similar to inorganic arsenic salts like sodium arsenite. Pharmacological studies show that arsenic trioxide and realgar are effective against certain malignancies. Orpiment and realgar are used externally for various skin diseases. Realgar is frequently included as an ingredient in oral traditional remedies for its antipyretic, antiinflammatory, antiulcer, anticonvulsive and anti-schistosmiasis actions, but the pharmacological basis for this inclusion still remains to be fully justified. Toxicological studies show that cardiovascular toxicity is the major concern for arsenic trioxide, and the gastrointestinal and dermal adverse effects may occur after prolonged use of mineral arsenicals. Little is known about possible secondary cancers resulting from the long-term use of any of these arsenicals. Similar to the safety evaluation of seafood arsenicals, total arsenic content alone appears to be insufficient for mineral arsenical safety evaluation. Arsenic speciation, bioavailability, and toxicity/benefit should be considered in evaluation of mineral arsenical-containing traditional medicines. PMID:18463319

  5. U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program—Mineral resource science supporting informed decisionmaking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, Aleeza M.; Doebrich, Jeff L.

    2016-09-19

    The USGS Mineral Resources Program (MRP) delivers unbiased science and information to increase understanding of mineral resource potential, production, and consumption, and how mineral resources interact with the environment. The MRP is the Federal Government’s sole source for this mineral resource science and information. Program goals are to (1) increase understanding of mineral resource formation, (2) provide mineral resource inventories and assessments, (3) broaden knowledge of the effects of mineral resources on the environment and society, and (4) provide analysis on the availability and reliability of mineral supplies.

  6. Quantifying elemental compositions of primary minerals from granitic rocks and saprolite within the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Rasmussen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Granitic terrain comprises a significant area of the earth's land surface (>15%). Quantifying weathering processes involved in the transformation of granitic rock to saprolite and soil is central to understanding landscape evolution in these systems. The quantification of primary mineral composition is important for assessing subsequent mineral transformations and soil production. This study focuses on coupling detailed analysis of primary mineral composition to soil development across an array of field sites sampled from the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone observatory (SCM-CZO) environmental gradient. The gradient spans substantial climate-driven shifts in vegetation, ranging from desert scrub to mixed conifer forests. The parent material is a combination of Precambrian and Tertiary aged granites and quartz diorite. Primary mineral type and composition are known to vary among the various aged granitic materials and this variability is hypothesized to manifest as significant variation in regolith forming processes across the SCM-CZO. To address this variability, the mineral composition and mineral formulae of rock and saprolite samples were determined by electron microprobe chemical analyses. The rocks were pre-dominantly quartz, biotite, muscovite, orthoclase and calcium/sodium-rich plagioclase feldspars. Trace minerals observed in the samples included sphene, rutile, zircon, garnet, ilmenite, and apatite. Mineral formulae from electron microprobe analyses were combined with quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data to quantify both primary and secondary mineralogical components in soil profiles from each of the field sites. Further, electron microprobe analyses of <2mm mixed conifer saprolite revealed weathered plagioclase grains coated with clay-sized particles enriched in silica and aluminum (~25% and 15%, respectively), suggesting kaolin as the secondary phase. The coatings were interspersed within each plagioclase grain, a

  7. Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Wanek, Wolfgang; Prommer, Judith; Mooshammer, Maria; Battin, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance receiving carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C y-1. Of this 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One important aspect is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. microbial utilization as organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and streamwater sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria), tracing assimilation and mineralization of 13C and 15N labels from mineral-sorbed and dissolved amino acids. Here we present data on the effects of organo-mineral sorption upon amino acid mineralization and its C:N stoichiometry. Organo-mineral sorption had a significant effect upon microbial activity, restricting C and N mineralization by both the biofilm and streamwater treatments. Distinct differences in community response were observed, with both dissolved and mineral-stabilized amino acids playing an enhanced role in the metabolism of the streamwater microbial community. Mineral-sorption of amino acids differentially affected C & N mineralization and reduced the C:N ratio of the dissolved amino acid pool. The present study demonstrates that organo-mineral complexes restrict microbial degradation

  8. The scaling of secondary craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1991-01-01

    Secondary craters are common features around fresh planetary-scale primary impact craters throughout most of the Solar System. They derive from the ejection phase of crater formation, thus secondary scaling relations provide constraints on parameters affecting ejection processes. Secondary crater fields typically begin at the edge of the continuous ejecta blankets (CEB) and extend out several crater radii. Secondaries tend to have rounded rims and bilateral symmetry about an axis through the primary crater's center. Prominent secondary chains can extend inward across the CEB close to the rim. A simple method for comparing secondary crater fields was employed: averaging the diameters and ranges from the center of the primary crater of the five largest craters in a secondary crater field. While not as much information is obtained about individual crater fields by this method as in more complete secondary field mapping, it facilitates rapid comparison of many secondary fields. Also, by quantifying a few specific aspects of the secondary crater field, this method can be used to construct scaling relations for secondary craters.

  9. Mineral Resources, Geological Structure and Landform Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    Significant results are presented of ERTS-1 investigations of landform surveys, mineral resources, and geological structures. The report covers four areas: (1) mapping investigations; (2) dynamic surface processes and landforms; (3) structural elements; and (4) mineral deposits.

  10. Mineral Resources, Economic Growth, and World Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, David B.; Andrews, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    World mineral supply and demand is discussed. The economics of future mineral availability in terms of effects on pollution, land use, energy consumption, human settlements, and the international distribution of income are emphasized. (DT)

  11. A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions in Unsaturated Media.

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Saripalli, Prasad; Bacon, Diana H.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2004-11-15

    A new modeling approach based on the biofilm models of Taylor et al. (1990, Water Resources Research, 26, 2153-2159) has been developed for modeling changes in porosity and permeability in saturated porous media and implemented in an inorganic reactive transport code. Application of the film depositional models to mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions requires that calculations of mineral films be dynamically changing as a function of time dependent reaction processes. Since calculations of film thicknesses do not consider mineral density, results show that the film porosity model does not adequately describe volumetric changes in the porous medium. These effects can be included in permeability calculations by coupling the film permeability models (Mualem and Childs and Collis-George) to a volumetric model that incorporates both mineral density and reactive surface area. Model simulations demonstrate that an important difference between the biofilm and mineral film models is in the translation of changes in mineral radii to changes in pore space. Including the effect of tortuosity on pore radii changes improves the performance of the Mualem permeability model for both precipitation and dissolution. Results from simulation of simultaneous dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation provides reasonable estimates of porosity and permeability. Moreover, a comparison of experimental and simulated data show that the model yields qualitatively reasonable results for permeability changes due to solid-aqueous phase reactions.

  12. Strategic Minerals in the New World Order

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-30

    mineral scarcity does not exist; for an Neconomic price any product will be available in the world market. The domestic mining industry and those...shipping, and domestic mining industry efforts to establish subsidies for U.S. mineral production, using foreign flag hulls to import the minerals and...seeking to prevent further mining Industry damage; and those who saw the strategic minerals debate as but another politically incorrect effort to

  13. Mine and mineral occurrences of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, G.J.; Bliss, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This inventory of more than 1000 mines and mineral occurrences in Afghanistan was compiled from published literature and the files of project members of the National Industrial Minerals project of the U.S. Geological Survey. The compiled data have been edited for consistency and most duplicates have been deleted. The data cover metals, industrial minerals, coal, and peat. Listings in the table represent several levels of information, including mines, mineral showings, deposits, and pegmatite fields.

  14. Minerals yearbook, 1991: Massachusetts. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.K.; Sinnott, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The value of nonfuel mineral production in 1991 was $111.6 million, a decrease of $16 million compared with the 1990 value. The decrease in 1991 was largely attributable to lower sales of construction sand and gravel and crushed stone, the State's two leading mineral commodities. Other mineral commodities produced included common clay, industrial sand, dimension stone, lime, and peat. Nationally, the State ranked 41st in the production of nonfuel minerals. It ranked fifth of 34 States that produced dimension stone.

  15. Nanoindentation hardness of mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Oyen, Michelle L

    2006-01-01

    A series elastic and plastic deformation model [Sakai, M., 1999. The Meyer hardness: a measure for plasticity? Journal of Materials Research 14(9), 3630-3639] is used to deconvolute the resistance to plastic deformation from the plane strain modulus and contact hardness parameters obtained in a nanoindentation test. Different functional dependencies of contact hardness on the plane strain modulus are examined. Plastic deformation resistance values are computed from the modulus and contact hardness for engineering materials and mineralized tissues. Elastic modulus and plastic deformation resistance parameters are used to calculate elastic and plastic deformation components, and to examine the partitioning of indentation deformation between elastic and plastic. Both the numerical values of plastic deformation resistance and the direct computation of deformation partitioning reveal the intermediate mechanical responses of mineralized composites when compared with homogeneous engineering materials.

  16. Evaporites, petroleum and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This book illustrates the expanding knowledge of evaporites as important reservoir seals, fluid aquitards, ore-hosting sediments, and economically viable sediments in their own right. Researchers, oil and gas professionals, minerals resource professionals, environmental specialists and others within geology and the other earth sciences shall utilize the information within this book in their understanding of the many recent discoveries and concepts involved in the field of evaporite sedimentology.

  17. Mineral of the month: garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Garnet is the general name given to a group of complex silicate minerals, all with isometric crystal structure, similar properties and chemical compositions. Garnet occurs in every color of the spectrum except blue, but it is most commonly red, purple, brown and green. Garnet necklaces dating from the Bronze Age have been found in graves and also among the ornaments adorning the oldest Egyptian mummies.

  18. Legionella pneumophila in coal miners.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D H; Hill, E C; Howells, C H; Ribeiro, C D

    1985-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease was diagnosed in three mineworkers at a colliery. Investigation of water samples from various sites at the colliery did not discover a source of the infection. Results of serological surveys undertaken on the workmates of the patients and other miners showed only one additional positive Legionella indirect fluorescent antibody test. There was, therefore, no justification for any alteration in the water supply or the ventilation at the colliery. Images PMID:3890934

  19. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  20. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  1. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  2. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  3. Raising Environmental Awareness among Miners in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozaffari, Ezatollah

    2013-01-01

    Generation of waste is inevitable but controllable in minerals industry. The aim of this research is to find ways for raising environmental awareness among miners. Miners' attitude towards environmental mining has been investigated. A survey has been done collecting mine managers' point of view coupled with current trend on mine waste management…

  4. Is Struvite a Prebiotic Mineral?

    PubMed Central

    Gull, Maheen; Pasek, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The prebiotic relevance of mineral struvite, MgNH4PO4·6H2O, was studied experimentally as a phosphorylating reagent and, theoretically, to understand the geochemical requirements for its formation. The effectiveness of phosphorylation by the phosphate mineral, monetite, CaHPO4, was also studied to compare to the efficiency of struvite. The experiments focused on the phosphorylation reactions of the minerals with organic compounds, such as nucleosides, glycerol and choline chloride, and heat at 75 °C for about 7–8 days and showed up to 28% phosphorylation of glycerol. In contrast, the compositional requirements for the precipitation of struvite are high ammonium and phosphate concentrations, as well as a little Ca2+ dissolved in the water. Combined, these requirements suggest that it is not likely that struvite was present in excess on the early Earth to carry out phosphorylation reactions. The present study focuses on the thermodynamic aspects of struvite formation, complementing the results given by Orgel and Handschuh (1973), which were based on the kinetic effects. PMID:25369744

  5. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... meat, such as beef tuna and salmon eggs beans baked potato with skins dried fruits, like raisins ... low-fat milk and yogurt legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils Zinc Zinc helps your ...

  6. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... whole and enriched grains, like wheat or oats Potassium Potassium (say: puh-TAH-see-um) keeps your muscles ... system working properly. Which foods are rich in potassium? bananas tomatoes potatoes and sweet potatoes, with skins ...

  7. Minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past two decades, the aquaculture industry has expanded rapidly throughout the world and is expected to continue to grow in the years to come due to the high cost of harvesting fish from the oceans, the un-sustainability of ocean fishing methods, and the increased demand for fish as a resul...

  8. Two-stage mineralization of phenanthrene by estuarine enrichment cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Jones, G.E.

    1988-04-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene was mineralized in two stages by soil, estuarine water, and sediment microbial populations. At high concentrations, phenanthrene was degraded, with the concomitant production of biomass and accumulation of Folin-Ciocalteau-reactive aromatic intermediates. Subsequent consumption of these intermediates resulted in a secondary increase in biomass. Analysis of intermediates by high-performance liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and UV absorption spectrometry showed 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1H2NA) to be the predominant product. A less pronounced two-stage mineralization pattern was also observed by monitoring /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from low concentrations (0.5 mg liter/sup -1/) of radiolabeled phenanthrene. Here, mineralization of /sup 14/C-labeled 1H2NA could explain the incremental /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ produced during the later part of the incubations. Accumulation of 1H2NA by isolates obtained from enrichments was dependent on the initial phenanthrene concentration. The production of metabolites during polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation is discussed with regard to its possible adaptive significance and its methodological implications.

  9. Mineral transformations associated with goethite reduction by Methanosarcina barkeri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, D.; Wang, Hongfang; Dong, H.; Qiu, X.; Dong, X.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the interaction between methanogens and iron-containing minerals in anoxic environments, we conducted batch culture experiments with Methanosarcina barkeri in a phosphate-buffered basal medium (PBBM) to bioreduce structural Fe(III) in goethite with hydrogen as the sole substrate. Fe(II) and methane concentrations were monitored over the course of the bioreduction experiments with wet chemistry and gas chromatography, respectively. Subsequent mineralogical changes were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), 30% Fe(III) in goethite (weight basis) was reduced to Fe(II). In contrast, only 2% Fe(III) (weight basis) was bioreduced in the absence of AQDS. Most of the bioproduced Fe(II) was incorporated into secondary minerals including dufr??nite and vivianite. Our data implied a dufr??nite-vivianite transformation mechanism where a metastable dufr??nite transformed to a more stable vivianite over extended time in anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis was greatly inhibited by bioreduction of goethite Fe(III). These results have important implications for the methane flux associated with Fe(III) bioreduction and ferrous iron mineral precipitation in anaerobic soils and sediments. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Constraints on the Mineral Evolution of Terrestrial Planets Using Statistical Correlations Among the Mineral-Forming Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummer, D. R.; Hazen, R. M.; Golden, J.; Downs, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    The mineralogy of terrestrial planets is governed not only by size, bulk chemical composition, planetary differentiation processes, and secondary geochemical processes, but also by the fundamental way in which a planet's constituent elements parse themselves into mineral species. To gain insight into which elements tend to associate with each other to form minerals, we have used the IMA mineralogical database (rruff.info/ima) to conduct a statistical analysis of the number of known mineral species containing each of the 72 mineral-forming elements, as well as how many species contain both X and Y for every possible X-Y pair of elements. The frequency with which elements X and Y occur together in the nominal chemical formulae of minerals was compared with the expected rate of co-occurrence (assuming that elements are distributed among mineral species randomly). The results reveal that among the most strongly correlated element pairs are H-O, Na-Si, Al-Si, S-Ag, O-Si, Si-Ca, and O-Ca. Examples of strongly anti-correlated pairs are O-S, O-Ag, Si-S, O-Sb, O-Se, H-Ag, and Si-As. The strength of these correlations and anti-correlations varied by many orders of magnitude (as measured by their p-value in a chi-squared test for variable dependence), ranging from near 1 to an astounding 10-304. Out of 2520 unique element pairs, 1688 were statistically significant (p-value <0.05). These pair correlations can be attributed to an array of geochemical factors, including but not limited to 1) the mutual exclusivity of sulfide vs. silicate anionic groups, 2) crystal chemical considerations of size and charge similarities among cations, especially within silicate structures, 3) group relationships on the periodic table, and 4) soft vs. hard ion relationships. These principles, along with the specific correlations they produce, can serve as a valuable guide in explaining the mineral evolution of Earth's crust, and predicting the mineralogy of terrestrial planets even when the bulk

  11. Rapid Ascent of Aphyric Mantle Melts through the Overriding Crust in Subduction Zones: Evidence from Variable Uranium-Series Disequilibria, Amorphous Hydrous Alteration Microtextures in Crystal Rims, and Two-Pyroxene Pseudo-Decompression Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, G. F.; Freymuth, H.; Hsieh, H. H.; Hwang, S. L.; Iizuka, Y.; Miller, C. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Sakamoto, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic hazard mitigation at subduction zones critically depends on knowledge of magma generation and ascent processes and timescales. Two diametrically opposite scenarios are presently debated: One paradigm is the generation of low-silica (basaltic) melts in the mantle wedge, followed by protracted sub-liquidus magma ascent and evolution through crystal growth and fractionation in crustal reservoirs, which are tapped during volcanic eruptions. In contrast, a diametrically opposite model favours the generation of higher silica melts in the mantle or in a lower crustal hot zone, followed by rapid decompression to the surface under super-liquidus conditions. In the latter case, crystals are picked up during magma ascent, and are in the process of dissolving. We present multiple lines of evidence that point to crystal uptake as the principal processes by which arc melts acquire their crystal cargo: (i) variable 234U-238U disequilibria in mineral separates; (ii) hydrous mineral rims with amorphous alteration textures; and (iii) two-pyroxene pseudo-decompression paths; cf. Zellmer et al. (2014a,b,c), doi: 10.1144/SP385.3 and 10.1144/SP385.9 and 10.1144/SP410.1. These observations point to a scarcity of true phenocrysts in many arc magmas, and thus to decompression of aphyric melts that take up their crystal cargo during ascent. The data imply that many hydrous wedge melts are more silica-rich than basalts and achieve super-liquidus conditions during rapid ascent from great depth.

  12. Secondary Globular Cluster populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze-v. Alvensleben, U.

    2004-02-01

    This study is motivated by two facts: 1. The formation of populous star cluster systems is widely observed to accompany violent star formation episodes in gas-rich galaxies as e.g. those triggered by strong interactions or merging. 2. The Globular Cluster (GC) systems of most but not all early-type galaxies show bimodal optical color distributions with fairly universal blue peaks and somewhat variable red peak colors, yet their Luminosity Functions (LFs) look like simple Gaussians with apparently universal turn-over magnitudes that are used for distance measurements and the determination of Ho. Based on a new set of evolutionary synthesis models for Simple (= single burst) Stellar Populations (SSPs) of various metallicities using the latest Padova isochrones I study the color and luminosity evolution of GC populations over the wavelength range from U through K, providing an extensive grid of models for comparison with observations. I assume the intrinsic widths of the color distributions and LFs to be constant in time at the values observed today for the Milky Way or M 31 halo GC populations. Taking the color distributions and LFs of the Milky Way or M 31 halo GC population as a reference for old metal-poor GC populations in general, I study for which combinations of age and metallicity a secondary GC population formed in some violent star formation event in the history of its parent galaxy may or may not be detected in the observed GC color distributions. I also investigate the effect of these secondary GCs on the LFs of the total GC system. Significant differences are found among the diagnostic efficiencies in various wavelength regions. In particular, we predict the NIR to be able to reveal the presence of GC subpopulations with different age - metallicity combinations that may perfectly hide within one inconspicuous optical color peak. If the entire manifold of possible age - metallicity combinations is admitted for a secondary GC population, we find several

  13. Determinants of ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties: effects of architecture, mineralization, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Les, C M; Spence, C A; Vance, J L; Christopherson, G T; Patel, B; Turner, A S; Divine, G W; Fyhrie, D P

    2004-09-01

    Significant decreases in ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties (specifically, stress-rate sensitivity, and damping efficiency) are associated with three years of ovariectomy and are particularly evident at higher frequencies [Proc. Orthop. Res. Soc. 27 (2002) 89]. It is unclear what materials or architectural features of bone are responsible for either the viscoelastic properties themselves, or for the changes in those properties that were observed with estrogen depletion. In this study, we examined the relationship between these viscoelastic mechanical properties and features involving bone architecture (BV/TV), materials parameters (ash density, %mineralization), and histologic evidence of remodeling (%remodeled, cement line interface). The extent of mineralization was inversely proportional to the material's efficiency in damping stress oscillations. The damping characteristics of bone material from ovariectomized animals were significantly more sensitive to variation in mineralization than was bone from control animals. At low frequencies (6 Hz or less), increased histologic evidence of remodeling was positively correlated with increased damping efficiency. However, the dramatic decreases in stress-rate sensitivity that accompanied 3-year ovariectomy were seen throughout the bone structure and occurred even in areas with little or no secondary Haversian remodeling as well as in areas of complete remodeling. Taken together, these data suggest that, while the mineral component may modify the viscoelastic behavior of bone, the basic mechanism underlying bone viscoelastic behavior, and of the changes in that behavior with estrogen depletion, reside in a non-mineral component of the bone that can be significantly altered in the absence of secondary remodeling.

  14. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215.25 Section 215.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying...

  15. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215.25 Section 215.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying...

  16. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215.25 Section 215.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying...

  17. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215.25 Section 215.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying...

  18. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215.25 Section 215.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying...

  19. Drivers of Phosphorus Uptake by Barley Following Secondary Resource Application

    PubMed Central

    Brod, Eva; Øgaard, Anne Falk; Krogstad, Tore; Haraldsen, Trond Knapp; Frossard, Emmanuel; Oberson, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Minable rock phosphate is a finite resource. Replacing mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizer with P-rich secondary resources is one way to manage P more efficiently, but the importance of physicochemical and microbial soil processes induced by secondary resources for plant P uptake is still poorly understood. Using radioactive-labeling techniques, the fertilization effects of dairy manure, fish sludge, meat bone meal, and wood ash were studied as P uptake by barley after 44 days and compared with those of water-soluble mineral P (MinP) and an unfertilized control (NoP) in a pot experiment with an agricultural soil containing little available P at two soil pH levels, approximately pH 5.3 (unlimed soil) and pH 6.2 (limed soil). In a parallel incubation experiment, the effects of the secondary resources on physicochemical and microbial soil processes were studied. The results showed that the relative agronomic efficiency compared with MinP decreased in the order: manure ≥fish sludge ≥wood ash ≥meat bone meal. The solubility of inorganic P in secondary resources was the main driver for P uptake by barley (Hordeum vulgare). The effects of secondary resources on physicochemical and microbial soil processes were of little overall importance. Application of organic carbon with manure resulted in microbial P immobilization and decreased uptake by barley of P derived from the soil. On both soils, P uptake by barley was best explained by a positive linear relationship with the H2O + NaHCO3-soluble inorganic P fraction in fertilizers or by a linear negative relationship with the HCl-soluble inorganic P fraction in fertilizers. PMID:27243015

  20. Drivers of Phosphorus Uptake by Barley Following Secondary Resource Application.

    PubMed

    Brod, Eva; Øgaard, Anne Falk; Krogstad, Tore; Haraldsen, Trond Knapp; Frossard, Emmanuel; Oberson, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Minable rock phosphate is a finite resource. Replacing mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizer with P-rich secondary resources is one way to manage P more efficiently, but the importance of physicochemical and microbial soil processes induced by secondary resources for plant P uptake is still poorly understood. Using radioactive-labeling techniques, the fertilization effects of dairy manure, fish sludge, meat bone meal, and wood ash were studied as P uptake by barley after 44 days and compared with those of water-soluble mineral P (MinP) and an unfertilized control (NoP) in a pot experiment with an agricultural soil containing little available P at two soil pH levels, approximately pH 5.3 (unlimed soil) and pH 6.2 (limed soil). In a parallel incubation experiment, the effects of the secondary resources on physicochemical and microbial soil processes were studied. The results showed that the relative agronomic efficiency compared with MinP decreased in the order: manure ≥fish sludge ≥wood ash ≥meat bone meal. The solubility of inorganic P in secondary resources was the main driver for P uptake by barley (Hordeum vulgare). The effects of secondary resources on physicochemical and microbial soil processes were of little overall importance. Application of organic carbon with manure resulted in microbial P immobilization and decreased uptake by barley of P derived from the soil. On both soils, P uptake by barley was best explained by a positive linear relationship with the H2O + NaHCO3-soluble inorganic P fraction in fertilizers or by a linear negative relationship with the HCl-soluble inorganic P fraction in fertilizers.

  1. Assessing the addition of mineral processing waste to green waste-derived compost: an agronomic, environmental and economic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L; Chesworth, S; Khalid, M; Iqbal, Z

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of mixing two large volume wastes, namely mineral processing waste and source-segregated green waste compost, on the growth performance of plants targeted towards high (horticulture/agriculture) and low (amenity/restoration) value markets. The secondary aims were to evaluate the influence of mineral waste type on plant growth performance and to undertake a simple economic analysis of the use of mineral-compost mixtures in land restoration. Our results showed that in comparison to organic wastes, mineral wastes contained a low available nutrient content which reduces compost quality. This is supported by growth trials with tomato, wheat and grass which showed that, irrespective of mineral source, plants performed poorly in compost blended with mineral waste in comparison to those grown in green waste or peat-based compost alone. In terms of consumer confidence, unlike other wastes (e.g. biosolids and construction/demolition waste) the mineral quarry wastes can be expected to be free of potentially toxic elements, however, the production costs of compost-mineral waste mixtures and subsequent transport costs may limit its widespread use. In addition, handling of the material can be difficult under wet conditions and effective blending may require the purchase of specialist equipment. From our results, we conclude that mineral fines may prove useful for low quality, low value landscaping activities close to the source of production but are unsuited to high value markets.

  2. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Gehring, A. U.

    1992-01-01

    Iron-enriched smectites have been suggested as important mineral compounds of the Martian soil. They were shown to comply with the chemical analysis of the Martian soil, to simulate many of the findings of the Viking Labeled Release Experiments on Mars, to have spectral reflectance in the VIS-NIR strongly resembling the bright regions on Mars. The analogy with Mars soil is based, in a number of aspects, on the nature and behavior of the iron oxides and oxyhydroxides deposited on the surface of the clay particles. A summary of the properties of these iron phases and some recent findings are presented. Their potential relevance to Mars surface processes is discussed.

  3. Secondary use potentials of geomaterials used in construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Annual extraction of geomaterials for construction from inorganic resources contribute to more than 70 % of total mineral resources production around the world. Any possibility to reduce input of materials from primary resources thus can be envisaged as acceptable contribution on how to cope with our reliance on primary mineral industries. This paper discusses possible scenarios of secondary uses of geomaterials used in construction specifically from the point of view of preservation of their key functional properties. Although having several different forms, the secondary use of materials is often identified as recycling, but in the case of geomaterials used in construction it possesses following meanings: (1) re-use of the material (i.e., finding new use to dismantled structural elements without necessity of its reprocessing); (2) recycling of the material (material from demolished structure is used as a raw material for production of a new construction material having similar functional properties as the original), (3) downcycling (secondary use of the material from demolished structure with lower functional value than was for the original).

  4. Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation due to Carbon Dioxide-Water-Rock Interactions: The Significance of Accessory Minerals in Carbonate Reservoirs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Marcon, V.; Chopping, C.

    2013-12-01

    Accessory minerals in carbonate reservoirs, and in the caprocks that seal these reservoirs, can provide insight into multiphase fluid (CO2 + H2O)-rock interactions and the behavior of CO2 that resides in these water-rock systems. Our program integrates field data, hydrothermal experiments, and geochemical modeling to evaluate CO2-water-rock reactions and processes in a variety of carbonate reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region of the US. These studies provide insights into a wide range of geologic environments, including natural CO2 reservoirs, geologic carbon sequestration, engineered geothermal systems, enhanced oil and gas recovery, and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. One suite of experiments evaluates the Madison Limestone on the Moxa Arch, Southwest Wyoming, a sulfur-rich natural CO2 reservoir. Mineral textures and geochemical features developed in the experiments suggest that carbonate minerals which constitute the natural reservoir will initially dissolve in response to emplacement of CO2. Euhedral, bladed anhydrite concomitantly precipitates in response to injected CO2. Analogous anhydrite is observed in drill core, suggesting that secondary anhydrite in the natural reservoir may be related to emplacement of CO2 into the Madison Limestone. Carbonate minerals ultimately re-precipitate, and anhydrite dissolves, as the rock buffers the acidity and reasserts geochemical control. Another suite of experiments emulates injection of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery in the Desert Creek Limestone (Paradox Formation), Paradox Basin, Southeast Utah. Euhedral iron oxyhydroxides (hematite) precipitate at pH 4.5 to 5 and low Eh (approximately -0.1 V) as a consequence of water-rock reaction. Injection of CO2 decreases pH to approximately 3.5 and increases Eh by approximately 0.1 V, yielding secondary mineralization of euhedral pyrite instead of iron oxyhydroxides. Carbonate minerals also dissolve and ultimately re-precipitate, as determined by experiments in the

  5. Structure-mechanics relationships in mineralized tendons.

    PubMed

    Spiesz, Ewa M; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we review the hierarchical structure and the resulting elastic properties of mineralized tendons as obtained by various multiscale experimental and computational methods spanning from nano- to macroscale. The mechanical properties of mineralized collagen fibres are important to understand the mechanics of hard tissues constituted by complex arrangements of these fibres, like in human lamellar bone. The uniaxial mineralized collagen fibre array naturally occurring in avian tendons is a well studied model tissue for investigating various stages of tissue mineralization and the corresponding elastic properties. Some avian tendons mineralize with maturation, which results in a graded structure containing two zones of distinct morphology, circumferential and interstitial. These zones exhibit different amounts of mineral, collagen, pores and a different mineral distribution between collagen fibrillar and extrafibrillar space that lead to distinct elastic properties. Mineralized tendon cells have two phenotypes: elongated tenocytes placed between fibres in the circumferential zone and cuboidal cells with lower aspect ratios in the interstitial zone. Interestingly some regions of avian tendons seem to be predestined to mineralization, which is exhibited as specific collagen cross-linking patterns as well as distribution of minor tendon constituents (like proteoglycans) and loss of collagen crimp. Results of investigations in naturally mineralizing avian tendons may be useful in understanding the pathological mineralization occurring in some human tendons.

  6. Decorin modulates matrix mineralization in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Duarte, Wagner R.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Paschalis, Eleftherios P.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    Decorin (DCN), a member of small leucine-rich proteoglycans, is known to modulate collagen fibrillogenesis. In order to investigate the potential roles of DCN in collagen matrix mineralization, several stable osteoblastic cell clones expressing higher (sense-DCN, S-DCN) and lower (antisense-DCN, As-DCN) levels of DCN were generated and the mineralized nodules formed by these clones were characterized. In comparison with control cells, the onset of mineralization by S-DCN clones was significantly delayed; whereas it was markedly accelerated and the number of mineralized nodules was significantly increased in As-DCN clones. The timing of mineralization was inversely correlated with the level of DCN synthesis. In these clones, the patterns of cell proliferation and differentiation appeared unaffected. These results suggest that DCN may act as an inhibitor of collagen matrix mineralization, thus modulating the timing of matrix mineralization.

  7. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O'Connor, W

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  8. Biofortifying crops with essential mineral elements.

    PubMed

    White, Philip J; Broadley, Martin R

    2005-12-01

    Humans require more than 22 mineral elements, which can all be supplied by an appropriate diet. However, the diets of populations subsisting on cereals, or inhabiting regions where soil mineral imbalances occur, often lack Fe, Zn, Ca, Mg, Cu, I or Se. Traditional strategies to deliver these minerals to susceptible populations have relied on supplementation or food fortification programs. Unfortunately, these interventions have not always been successful. An alternative solution is to increase mineral concentrations in edible crops. This is termed 'biofortification'. It can be achieved by mineral fertilization or plant breeding. There is considerable genetic variation in crop species that can be harnessed for sustainable biofortification strategies. Varieties with increased mineral concentrations in their edible portions are already available, and new genotypes with higher mineral densities are being developed.

  9. Multifaceted role of clay minerals in pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Inderpreet Singh; Kaur, Satvinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The desirable physical and physiochemical properties of clay minerals have led them to play a substantial role in pharmaceutical formulations. Clay minerals like kaolin, smectite and palygorskite-sepiolite are among the world's most valuable industrial minerals and of considerable importance. The elemental features of clay minerals which caused them to be used in pharmaceutical formulations are high specific area, sorption capacity, favorable rheological properties, chemical inertness, swelling capacity, reactivity to acids and inconsiderable toxicity. Of course, these are highly cost effectual. This special report on clay minerals provides a bird's eye view of the chemical composition and structure of these minerals and their influence on the release properties of active medicinal agents. Endeavor has been made to rope in myriad applications depicting the wide acceptability of these clay minerals. PMID:28031881

  10. Secondary Education in Cyprus. Guide to Secondary Education in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcou, Costas

    This report examines the state of secondary education in Cyprus. It opens with the historical and political background of Cyprus and the system of administration and management under which the country operates. The financing and expenditure involved with education is discussed, as are the aims and content of secondary education. The educational…

  11. The Minerals of Aureum Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation of 3-dimensional model with 5x vertical exaggeration

    This image of chaotic terrain in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0858UTC (3:58 a.m. EST) on January 24, 2008, near 3.66 degrees south latitude, 26.5 degrees west longitude. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. The image is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    Aureum Chaos is a 368 kilometer (229 mile) wide area of chaotic terrain in the eastern part of Valles Marineris. The chaotic terrain is thought to have formed by collapse of the surrounding Margaritifer Terra highland region. Aureum Chaos contains heavily eroded, randomly oriented mesas, plateaus, and knobs many revealing distinct layered deposits along their slopes. These deposits may be formed from remnants of the collapsed highlands, sand carried by Martian winds, dust or volcanic ash that settled out of the atmosphere, or sediments laid down on the floor of an ancient lake.

    The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data cover a narrow plateau near the edge of the chaotic terrain, that stretches across from the southwest to the northeast.

    The lower left image, an infrared false color image, reveals the plateau and several eroded knobs of varying sizes. The plateau's layer-cake structure is similar to that of other layered outcrops in Valles Marineris.

    The lower right image reveals the strengths of mineral spectral features overlain on a black-and-white version of the infrared image. Areas shaded in red hold more of the mineral pyroxene, a primary component of basaltic rocks that are prevalent in the highlands. Spots of green

  12. Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals from Nakhlites and Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the amount of water in the interior of terrestrial planets has tremendous implications on our understanding of solar nebula evolution, planet formation and geological history, and extraterrestrial volcanism. Mars has been a recent focus of such enquiry with complementary datasets from spacecrafts, rovers and martian meteorite studies. In planetary interiors, water can be dissolved in fluids or melts and hydrous phases, but can also be locked as protons attached to structural oxygen in lattice defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) such as olivine, pyroxene, or feldspar [1-3]. Measuring water in Martian meteorite NAM is challenging because the minerals are fragile and riddled with fractures from impact processes that makes them break apart during sample processing. Moreover, curing the sample in epoxy causes problems for the two main water analysis techniques, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS). Measurements to date have resulted in a heated debate on how much water the mantle of Mars contains. SIMS studies of NAM [4], amphiboles [5], and apatites [6-8] from Martian meteorites report finding enough water in these phases to infer that the martian mantle is as hydrous as that of the Earth. On the other hand, a SIMS study of glass in olivine melt inclusions from shergottites concludes that the Martian mantle is much drier [9]. The latter interpretation is also supported by the fact that most martian hydrous minerals generally have the relevant sites filled with Cl and F instead of H [10,11]. As for experimental results, martian basalt compositions can be reproduced using water as well as Cl in the parent melts [12,13]. Here FTIR is used to measure water in martian meteorite minerals in order to constrain the origin of the distribution of water in martian meteorite phases.

  13. Analysis of some elements in primary enamel during postnatal mineralization.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Nina; Klinberg, Gunilla; Nietzsche, Sandor; Robertson, Agneta; Odelius, Hans; Norén, Jörgen G

    2009-01-01

    The primary teeth start to mineralize in utero and continue development and maturation during the first year of life.The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of some elements, C, F, Na, Mg, Cl, K and Sr, by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in human primary incisors at different stages of mineralization.The teeth derived from an autopsy material from children who had died in sudden infant death.The buccal enamel of specimens from the ages 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 19 months, respectively, was analyzed. It was evident that posteruptive effects play an important role in composition of the outermost parts of the enamel. Before the tooth erupts, the concentrations of the elements vary with the maturation grade of the mineralization in the enamel. Sodium was the element with the highest concentration of the measured elements and chlorine was the element of lowest concentration.The 19 month old specimen, considered as the only mature and erupted tooth, showed to differ from the other specimens.The concentration of fluorine, in the 19 month old specimen's outermost surface, is readily seen higher compared with the other specimens at this depth zone. In the 19 month old specimen the concentration of carbon is lower. Potassium, sodium and chlorine have higher concentrations, in general, in the 19 month old specimen compared with the immature specimens. The thickness of the enamel during mineralization was calculated from data from SIMS.The thickness of the buccal enamel of primary incisors seemed to be fully developed between 3-4 months after birth, reaching a thickness of 350-400 microm.

  14. Phosphorus removal from wastewater by mineral apatite.

    PubMed

    Bellier, Nathalie; Chazarenc, Florent; Comeau, Yves

    2006-08-01

    Natural apatite has emerged as potentially effective for phosphorus (P) removal from wastewater. The retention capacity of apatite is attributed to a lower activation energy barrier required to form hydroxyapatite (HAP) by crystallization. The aim of our study was to test the P removal potential of four apatites found in North America. Minerals were collected from two geologically different formations: sedimentary apatites from Florida and igneous apatites from Quebec. A granular size ranging from 2.5 to 10mm to prevent clogging in wastewater applications was used. Isotherms (24 and 96 h) were drawn after batch tests using the Langmuir model which indicated that sedimentary apatites presented a higher P-affinity (K(L)=0.009 L/g) than igneous apatites (K(L) approximately 0.004 L/g). The higher density of igneous material probably explained this difference. P-retention capacities were determined to be around 0.3mg P/g apatite (24 h). A 30 mg P/L synthetic effluent was fed during 39 days to four lab-scale columns. A mixture of sedimentary material (apatite and limestone 50-50%, w/w) showed a complete P-retention during 15 days which then declined to 65% until the end of the 39 days lab scale test period. A limitation in calcium may have limited nucleation processes. The same mixture used in a field scale test showed 60% P-retention from a secondary effluent (30 mg COD/L, 10 mg Pt/L) during 65 days without clogging.

  15. Evaluating biodiversity of mineral lands

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, G.L.; Tritton, L.M.

    1997-12-31

    Increasingly, lands intended for mining, or lands that have been mined and reclaimed, are being evaluated in terms of biological diversity (biodiversity). The concept of biodiversity includes die variety and number of living organisms, their organizations, and the environments that support them. This paper presents a framework for discussing and evaluating biodiversity and for constructing checklists for evaluating biodiversity before and after mining. This framework identifies some of the different types of biodiversity applicable to mineral lands, die ranges of scale at which they are applicable, and the social stakes and stakeholders relevant across scale and diversity types.

  16. Radium Adsorption to Iron Bearing Minerals in Variable Salinity Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Radium is a common, naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are a product of natural uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal flux leads to accumulation within porewaters. Radium has been used as a natural tracer to estimate submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], where the ratios of various radium isotopes are used to estimate total groundwater flux to and from the ocean [2]. Further, it represents a substantial hazard in waste water produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a primary pathway of radium retention within subsurface environments. For SGD studies, it is important to understand adsorption processes to correctly estimate GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids will mediate the activities of radium within produced water. While some studies of radium adsorption to various minerals have been performed [4], there is a limited understanding of the surface chemistry of radium adsorption, particularly to iron-bearing minerals such as pyrite, goethite and ferrihydrite. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption experiments of radium to a suite of iron-bearing minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through the use of artificial groundwater, seawater, and shale formation brine. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the retention of radium. This work lays the groundwork for further study of radium use as a tracer for SGD, as well as understanding mechanisms of radium retention and release from deep aquifer materials following hydraulic fracturing

  17. Primary and secondary hypertriglyceridaemia.

    PubMed

    Kolovou, Genovefa D; Anagnostopoulou, Katherine K; Kostakou, Peggy M; Bilianou, Helen; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2009-04-01

    Familial hypertriglyceridaemia is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. The responsible genetic abnormality is unknown but recently, a novel gene encoding apolipoprotein AV has been linked to familial hypertriglyceridaemia. All patients develop the same phenotype with elevated levels of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in plasma. The main disorder of this dyslipidaemia is decreased intestinal absorption of biliary acids, leading to a compensatory increase of VLDL production. In familial hypertriglyceridaemia, a marked increase in plasma triglyceride (TG) levels can cause acute pancreatitis. Moreover, patients with other genetic factors, like familial chylomicronaemia, familial combined hyperlipidaemia, familial dysbetalipoproteinaemia and other rare disorders (e.g. Tangier disease and fish eye disease) may present increase of TG levels or cholesterol levels or both. Secondary hypertriglyceridaemias include hypothyroidism, kidney abnormalities (e.g. nephrotic syndrome or chronic kidney failure), diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol consumption and obesity. In men and postmenopausal women, it seems that estrogen deficiency is responsible for higher TG levels compared with premenopausal women postprandially. In every state -fasting or postprandial-, women demonstrate lower plasma TG levels compared with men. This fact is due not only to increased muscular TG uptake and storage but also to higher TG clearance. Many studies demonstrated an age impact on plasma TG increase and larger variation of fasting TG levels caused by age. Also, hypertriglyceridaemia (TG >150 mg/dl; 1.7 mmol/l) is one of the diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome. Finally, several drugs may increase TG levels (e.g. chlorthalidone or beta-blockers).

  18. Micro-Raman spectroscopic identification of natural mineral phases and their weathering products inside an abandoned zinc/lead mine.

    PubMed

    Goienaga, N; Arrieta, N; Carrero, J A; Olivares, M; Sarmiento, A; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Fernández, L A; Madariaga, J M

    2011-10-01

    Mining activities provide a good source of minerals of different nature. On the one hand, the primary minerals for whose formation a geological time-scale is required. On the other hand, secondary minerals, formed from removed products after the earlier weathering and alteration states. These are characteristic of the local geology and the environment context that commonly appears due to the low chemical stability of their original primary minerals. This work shows how quickly the reactions promoting secondary minerals may have taken place, due to the fact that these were found in newly formed solid materials called efflorescences. To achieve this purpose, the sampling is crucial. It was carried out in such a way that tried to guarantee that the samples collected consisted in the very top soil matter (first 2 cm depth). Thus, unlike the deeper soil, the material analysed may have been newly formed due to the interactions that they had with the place weathering agents (i.e. air oxygen, humidity, and microbial activities). Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a good and fast non-destructive technique that provides molecular information of the local mineralogy without the need of any pre-treatment of the samples. At the same time, the work looked for information on the variety of non-stable lead and-or zinc containing minerals due to the possible health and environmental risks they convey. Among the different minerals identified, 16 were of primary nature while 23 may be classified as secondary minerals, probably formed in the last decades as the result of the extractive activities.

  19. 30 CFR 281.8 - Rights to minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rights to minerals. 281.8 Section 281.8 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General § 281.8 Rights to minerals. (a)...

  20. Technical Subjects in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine technical education in various types of secondary schools, and suggests three levels of technical courses to be taught in secondary schools. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses the differences between technical schools and colleges, and vocational technical courses taught in "academic"…