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Sample records for sector mass spectrometry

  1. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  2. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  3. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  4. Determination of elemental impurities in leachate solutions from syringes using sector field ICP-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Hoecke, K; Catry, C; Vanhaecke, F

    2013-04-15

    Prefilled syringes are of increasing importance on the drug product market. Drug products supplied in prefilled syringes have to comply with guidelines on elemental impurity limit concentrations. Elemental impurities may be introduced through any reagents or catalysts used or any product contact surface. This work addresses the determination of elemental impurities leaching from three types of glass syringe container-closure systems supplied by two leading manufacturers. Leachate solutions of every type of syringe were analyzed for Na, Al, Si, W and the 16 elements listed in draft USP chapter 232, which were selected on grounds of toxicity. Elemental impurity concentrations were determined using sector field ICP-mass spectrometry. Significant concentrations of Na and Si were found in all leachate solutions, up to 1200 and 4500μgL(-1), respectively. In addition, also Al, As and W were leached out of syringes from one manufacturer in variable amounts, giving rise to average concentrations (std. dev., n=6) of 400 (120), 0.55 (0.08) and 230 (220)μgL(-1), respectively. So far, no exceeding of limit concentrations was observed.

  5. Hybrid instruments for mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glish, G.L.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to refine further the technique of mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry efforts are being made to combine the desirable features of sector based tandem instruments with those of triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. This has resulted in the construction of tandem mass spectrometers which incorporate both sector type analyzers and quadrupole mass filters. These so-called hybrid instruments, designed specifically for mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry applications, are appearing in a variety of geometries each with unique features. This review describes the hybrid instruments reported to data and discusses general considerations for evaluating hybrid instruments with regard to application. 100 references.

  6. Tandem mass spectrometry of peptides using hybrid and four-sector instruments: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bean, M F; Carr, S A; Thorne, G C; Reilly, M H; Gaskell, S J

    1991-07-15

    Product-ion spectra produced by high- and low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of [M + H]+ ions of a series of peptides (Mr 550-2500) have been compared on four-sector and hybrid tandem mass spectrometers, respectively. The fast atom bombardment product-ion spectra obtained for the smallest peptide analyzed (methionine-enkephalin) were remarkably similar, but substantial differences in fragmentation were observed for the heavier analytes. For peptides with Mr greater than 1000, more complete sequence information was obtained from high-energy CAD on the four-sector instrument. Nevertheless, low-energy CAD on the hybrid mass spectrometer was able to produce partial sequence information even for the largest of the peptides compared. Limits of analysis, defined as the least quantities of analyte for which product-ion spectra of essentially uncompromised quality could be obtained, were similar (ca. 15 pmol) for small peptides, but lower limits were achieved for larger peptides (Mr greater than 1000) with the four-sector instrument. High-energy CAD spectra were found to be highly reproducible, with qualitatively similar spectra obtained over a wide range of operating conditions. In contrast, it was necessary to carefully control collision gas pressures and collision energies in order to obtain good reproducible data for low-energy CAD. Experimental procedures for obtaining reproducible spectra with good sensitivity for peptides on the hybrid instrument are presented.

  7. Application of inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry for low-level environmental americium-241 analysis.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsolt

    2007-03-28

    An improved and novel sample preparation method for (241)Am analysis by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry has been developed. The procedure involves a selective CaF(2) pre-concentration followed by an extraction chromatographic separation using TRU resin. The achieved absolute detection limit of 0.86 fg (0.11 mBq) is comparable to that of alpha spectrometry (0.1 mBq) and suitable for low-level environmental measurements. Analysis of different kinds of environmental standard reference materials (IAEA-384--Fangataufa lagoon sediment, IAEA-385--Irish Sea sediment and IAEA-308--Mixed seaweed from the Mediterranean Sea) and alpha spectrometry were used to validate the procedure. The chemical recovery of sample preparation ranged between 72 and 94%. The results obtained are in good agreement with reference values and those measured by alpha spectrometry. The proposed method offers a rapid and less labor-intensive possibility for environmental (241)Am analysis than the conventionally applied radioanalytical techniques.

  8. Recent developments in inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, A.N.; Lee, Der-Chuen; Christensen, J.C.; Jones, C.E.; Hall, C.M.; Yi, Wen; Teagle, D.; Walder, A.J.; Freedman, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes advances in isotopic measurements that have been made with an inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometer and presents results of new experiments aimed at further evaluating the instrument`s capability. It is shown using standard solutions that trace element ratios such as Rb/Sr can be measured precisely without isotope dilution by comparison with reference solutions of known composition. Similarly, using a new wide flight tube, Pb isotopic compositions and U/Pb ratios can be accurately measured simultaneously without isotope dilution. The effects of deliberately inducing changes in the running conditions (RF power) are shown to be significant for measuring trace element ratios but not for mass bias and interference corrected isotopic compositions. Finally, it is demonstrated that precise and accurate isotopic compositions of elements as refractory as W can be determined relatively easily by solution nebulization and even by direct laser ablation of complex silicates. Isobaric interferences in such experiments are negligible. These experiments serve to highlight the remarkable potential that this new field offers for hitherto difficult isotopic measurements in nuclear, earth, environmental and medical sciences. Isotopic measurements can be made that are reproducible at high precision through a range of running conditions, even in the presence of isobaric interferences. The ability to correct for mass discrimination accurately using a second element of similar mass, the very high sensitivity for elements that are otherwise difficult to ionize, the demonstrated capability for laser ablation work and the ability to measure through a wide mass range simultaneously give this instrument major advantages over other more traditional techniques of isotopic measurement.

  9. Analysis of Ir in Köfelsit rocks by inductively coupled plasma-sector-field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS).

    PubMed

    Koellensperger, G; Hann, S; Prinz, G; Stingeder, G; Bujatti-Narbeshuber, M

    2001-07-01

    Three different analytical strategies have been evaluated for the quantification of Ir in geological samples. Glassy rock samples from Köfels and reference material WGB-1 were analyzed directly by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) at mass resolution 400 using membrane desolvation and at mass resolution 9500 without membrane desolvation. Matrix separation by anion-exchange pre-concentration was also investigated. The ultrasonic nebulizer USN6000AT+ (Cetac Technologies, Omaha, NE, USA) incorporating a membrane desolvation unit was used as the sample-introduction system. Sample preparation involved complete microwave-assisted acid digestion of the silicate matrix with HNO3-HCl-HF. The results obtained by the three methods of quantification were in good agreement, showing that oxide-type interferences were effectively eliminated solely by membrane desolvation. The limits of detection were 6 pg g for low resolution measurement with use of the membrane, 15 pg g(-1) at a mass resolution of 9500, and 59 pg g(-1) for the ion-exchange procedure. The ultimate precision obtained for the Köfelsit Ir data was, however, compromised by the small sample intake (0.3 g), because of the inhomogeneous distribution of Ir in geological samples.

  10. Determination of rare earth elements in environmental matrices by sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riondato, J; Vanhaecke, F; Moens, L; Dams, R

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of an international certification campaign, sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sector-field ICP-MS) was used for the accurate determination of the rare earth elements in five candidate reference materials: aquatic plant, calcareous soil, mussel tissue, river sediment, and tuna muscle. All samples were taken into solution by use of microwave-assisted or mixed microwave-assisted / open beaker acid digestion. Subsequently, the samples were appropriately diluted and subjected to ICP-MS analysis. Except for Sc, all the elements involved were determined at low mass resolution (R = 300). For Sc, application of a higher resolution setting (R = 3,000) was required to separate the analyte signal from those of several molecular ions which gave rise to spectral overlap at low mass resolution. Some of the heavier REE can also suffer from spectral overlap attributed to the occurrence of oxide ions (MO+) of the lighter REE and Ba. This spectral overlap could be successfully overcome by mathematical correction. Matrix effects were overcome by use of two carefully selected internal standards, such that external calibration could be used. On each occasion, a geological reference material was analyzed as a quality-control sample and the reliability of all results obtained was additionally checked by means of chondrite normalization. For tuna muscle the content of all REE was below the limit of detection. For calcareous soil and river sediment, low to sub microg g(-1) values were observed, whereas the REE content of aquatic plant and mussel tissue was considerably lower (low to sub ng g(-1)). Overall, the results obtained were in excellent agreement with the average values, calculated on the basis of all "accepted" values, obtained in different laboratories using different techniques.

  11. Determination of low-level plutonium in seawater by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: method validation.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Emilia; Han, Eunmi; Levy, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    Sources of plutonium isotopes to the marine environment are well defined, both spatially and temporally which makes plutonium (Pu) a potential tracer for oceanic processes. This paper presents the optimisation and validation of an analytical procedure for ultra-trace determination of Pu isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) in seawater based on the external calibration and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF ICP-MS) determination. Additionally, method for Pu isotope ratio ((240)Pu/(239)Pu) in marine samples is also discussed. A combination of two-step anion exchange (AG1-X8) and one-step extraction chromatography (TEVA) was very efficient resulting in uranium (U) decontamination factor of 5 × 10(6)-1 × 10(8). A full validation approach in line with ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, blanks, recovery (87 ± 8 %, k = 2), within-laboratory repeatability (5.6 %), limits of detection (0.12 and 0.08 fg mL(-1) for (239)Pu and (240)Pu, respectively) and expanded uncertainty (13 %, k = 2) were systematically assessed. The procedure was applied for the determination of (239)Pu and Pu in seawater sample coming from Mediterranean Sea. Obtained results were in good agreement with results obtained with alpha spectrometry, applied on the same seawater sample. Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in seawater sample from the Mediterranean Sea was also determined. The precision and accuracy of (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratio analysis were carefully examined using NBS-947 isotopic standard. (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio was found to be 0.187 ± 0.006 and is in agreement with accepted ratios for the global fallout of Pu.

  12. Trace element biomonitoring in hair of school children from a polluted area by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Drobyshev, Evgenii J; Solovyev, Nikolay D; Ivanenko, Natalya B; Kombarova, Maria Yu; Ganeev, Alexander A

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, a biomonitoring of 18 hair trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V, Zn, Ca, Na and P) in school children from Leningradskaya Oblast' is reported. A case group, residing in a proximity to the toxic waste disposal grounds (Krasniy Bor), has been assessed vs. controls from a non-urban settlement Seltso. In total, 166 hair samples were analysed using double focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted sample digestion with nitric acid. For the determination of Ca, Na and P inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was employed. For the validation, a reference material and spiked hair samples were analysed. The data obtained was processed using parametric statistics and factor analysis. Determined concentrations of trace elements were in agreement with the previously published results on chemically polluted areas. In the case group, linear correlations between Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni and V were observed. Also, these metals correlated to selenium hair content in the case group. Additionally, a correlation between hair Se and P was observed in the case subjects. Several gender differences in trace content were observed within each group. However, no age- or body index-related difference was found. The obtained results show that closely located waste disposal grounds intensifies trace element exposure in school children of Krasniy Bor. However, judging from rather high values for the controls, total environmental status of the region seems to be unstable, so additional monitoring and chemical safety measures are required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurements of gunshot residues by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry--further studies with pistols.

    PubMed

    Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Neto, Osvaldo N; Viebig, Sônia; Durrant, Steven F

    2007-10-02

    The most popular handgun in Brazil is the single round-barrel caliber 0.38 revolver. In recent years, however, owing to the modernization of police arms and their availability on the legal and illicit markets, pistols have become increasingly popular and currently represent about 20% of police seizures. In a previous paper we presented a novel collection method for gunshot residues (GSR) using a sampling procedure based on ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution as a complexing agent on moistened swabs with subsequent detection using sector field-high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SF-HR-ICP-MS). In the present paper, we discuss the capability of this methodology to identify antimony (Sb), barium (Ba) and lead (Pb) on the hands of volunteers after shot tests with 9 mm and 0.40 in. caliber pistols. Two types of munitions were tested: 9 mm Taurus and clean range. The use of a technique with high sensitivity, such as SF-HR-ICP-MS, permits the identification of low concentrations (less than 1 microg/L) of metals in firearm residue and constitutes a powerful tool in forensic science. We also discuss the importance of the sampling procedure, including collection from a different body part than the gun hand of the suspect. Comparison of the analytical data obtained allows clear discrimination between samples from the hands of shooters and non-shooters.

  14. Determination of total chlorine and bromine in solid wastes by sintering and inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Osterlund, Helene Rodushkin, Ilia; Ylinenjaervi, Karin; Baxter, Douglas C.

    2009-04-15

    A sample preparation method based on sintering, followed by analysis by inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) for the simultaneous determination of chloride and bromide in diverse and mixed solid wastes, has been evaluated. Samples and reference materials of known composition were mixed with a sintering agent containing Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and ZnO and placed in an oven at 560 deg. C for 1 h. After cooling, the residues were leached with water prior to a cation-exchange assisted clean-up. Alternatively, a simple microwave-assisted digestion using only nitric acid was applied for comparison. Thereafter the samples were prepared for quantitative analysis by ICP-SFMS. The sintering method was evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs) and by comparison with US EPA Method 5050 and ion chromatography with good agreement. Median RSDs for the sintering method were determined to 10% for both chlorine and bromine, and median recovery to 96% and 97%, respectively. Limits of detection (LODs) were 200 mg/kg for chlorine and 20 mg/kg for bromine. It was concluded that the sintering method is suitable for chlorine and bromine determination in several matrices like sewage sludge, plastics, and edible waste, as well as for waste mixtures. The sintering method was also applied for determination of other elements present in anionic forms, such as sulfur, arsenic, selenium and iodine.

  15. Determination of total chlorine and bromine in solid wastes by sintering and inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Heléne; Rodushkin, Ilia; Ylinenjärvi, Karin; Baxter, Douglas C

    2009-04-01

    A sample preparation method based on sintering, followed by analysis by inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) for the simultaneous determination of chloride and bromide in diverse and mixed solid wastes, has been evaluated. Samples and reference materials of known composition were mixed with a sintering agent containing Na(2)CO(3) and ZnO and placed in an oven at 560 degrees C for 1h. After cooling, the residues were leached with water prior to a cation-exchange assisted clean-up. Alternatively, a simple microwave-assisted digestion using only nitric acid was applied for comparison. Thereafter the samples were prepared for quantitative analysis by ICP-SFMS. The sintering method was evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs) and by comparison with US EPA Method 5050 and ion chromatography with good agreement. Median RSDs for the sintering method were determined to 10% for both chlorine and bromine, and median recovery to 96% and 97%, respectively. Limits of detection (LODs) were 200mg/kg for chlorine and 20mg/kg for bromine. It was concluded that the sintering method is suitable for chlorine and bromine determination in several matrices like sewage sludge, plastics, and edible waste, as well as for waste mixtures. The sintering method was also applied for determination of other elements present in anionic forms, such as sulfur, arsenic, selenium and iodine.

  16. Characterization of the elemental composition of newborn blood spots using sector-field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Erica K.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Gorski, Patrick; Overdier, Joel; Musselman, Jessica; Ross, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    We developed extraction and analysis protocols for element detection in neonatal blood spots (NBSs) using sector-field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). A 5% (v/v) nitric acid element extraction protocol was optimized and used to simultaneously measure 28 elements in NBS card filter paper and 150 NBSs. NBS element concentrations were corrected for filter paper background contributions estimated from measurements in samples obtained from either unspotted or spotted NBS cards. A lower 95% uncertainty limit (UL) that accounted for ICP-MS method, filter paper element concentration, and element recovery uncertainties was calculated by standard methods for each individual’s NBS element concentration. Filter paper median element levels were highly variable within and between lots for most elements. After accounting for measurement uncertainties, 11 elements (Ca, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, Rb, S, Zn) had lower 95% ULs >0 ng/spot with estimated concentrations ranging from 0.05->50,000 ng/spot in ≥50% of NBS samples in both correction methods. In a NBS sample minority, Li, Cd, Cs, Cr, Ni, Mo, and Pb had estimated concentrations ≥20-fold higher than the respective median level. Taking measurement uncertainties into account, this assay could be used for semiquantitative newborn blood element measurement and for detection of individuals exposed to supraphysiologic levels of some trace elements. Adequate control of filter paper element contributions remains the primary obstacle to fully quantitative element measurement in newborn blood using NBSs. PMID:20588324

  17. Rapid and sensitive determination of tellurium in soil and plant samples by sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we report a rapid and highly sensitive analytical method for the determination of tellurium in soil and plant samples using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). Soil and plant samples were digested using Aqua regia. After appropriate dilution, Te in soil and plant samples was directly analyzed without any separation and preconcentration. This simple sample preparation approach avoided to a maximum extent any contamination and loss of Te prior to the analysis. The developed analytical method was validated by the analysis of soil/sediment and plant reference materials. Satisfactory detection limits of 0.17 ng g(-1) for soil and 0.02 ng g(-1) for plant samples were achieved, which meant that the developed method was applicable to studying the soil-to-plant transfer factor of Te. Our work represents for the first time that data on the soil-to-plant transfer factor of Te were obtained for Japanese samples which can be used for the estimation of internal radiation dose of radioactive tellurium due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

  18. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Nier, A.O.C.

    1959-08-25

    A voltage switching apparatus is described for use with a mass spectrometer in the concentratron analysis of several components of a gas mixture. The system automatically varies the voltage on the accelerating electrode of the mass spectrometer through a program of voltages which corresponds to the particular gas components under analysis. Automatic operation may be discontinued at any time to permit the operator to manually select any desired predetermined accelerating voltage. Further, the system may be manually adjusted to vary the accelerating voltage over a wide range.

  19. Measurements of natural carbonate rare earth elements in femtogram quantities by inductive coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chuan-Chou; Wu, Chung-Che; Liu, Yi; Yu, Jimin; Chang, Ching-Chih; Lam, Doan Dinh; Chou, Chien-Ju; Lo, Li; Wei, Kuo-Yen

    2011-09-01

    A rapid and precise standard-bracketing method has been developed for measuring femtogram quantity rare earth element (REE) levels in natural carbonate samples by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry that does not require chemical separation steps. A desolvation nebulization system was used to effectively reduce polyatomic interference and enhance sensitivity. REE/Ca ratios are calculated directly from the intensities of the ion beams of (46)Ca, (139)La, (140)Ce, (141)Pr, (146)Nd, (147)Sm, (153)Eu, (160)Gd, (159)Tb, (163)Dy, (165)Ho, (166)Er, (169)Tm, (172)Yb, and (175)Lu using external matrix-matched synthetic standards to correct for instrumental ratio drifting and mass discrimination. A routine measurement time of 3 min is typical for one sample containing 20-40 ppm Ca. Replicate measurements made on natural coral and foraminiferal samples with REE/Ca ratios of 2-242 nmol/mol show that external precisions of 1.9-6.5% (2 RSD) can be achieved with only 10-1000 fg of REEs in 10-20 μg of carbonate. We show that different sources for monthly resolved coral ultratrace REE variability can be distinguished using this method. For natural slow growth-rate carbonate materials, such as sclerosponges, tufa, and speleothems, the high sample throughput, high precision, and high temporal resolution REE records that can be produced with this procedure have the potential to provide valuable time-series records to advance our understanding of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental dynamics on different time scales.

  20. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.

    1962-01-01

    method is described for operating a mass spectrometer to improve its resolution qualities and to extend its period of use substantially between cleanings. In this method, a small amount of a beta emitting gas such as hydrogen titride or carbon-14 methane is added to the sample being supplied to the spectrometer for investigation. The additive establishes leakage paths on the surface of the non-conducting film accumulating within the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer, thereby reducing the effect of an accumulated static charge on the electrostatic and magnetic fields established within the instrument. (AEC)

  1. Sensitive redox speciation of iron, neptunium, and plutonium by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Graser, Carl-Heinrich; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Bender, Kerstin Anne; Lagos, Markus; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Marsac, Rémi; Montoya, Vanessa; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-10-06

    The long-term safety assessment for nuclear waste repositories requires a detailed understanding of actinide (geo)chemistry. Advanced analytical tools are required to gain insight into actinide speciation in a given system. The geochemical conditions in the vicinity of a nuclear repository control the redox state of radionuclides, which in turn has a strong impact on their mobility. Besides the long-lived radionuclides plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np), which are key elements in high level nuclear waste, iron (Fe) represents a main component in natural systems controlling redox-related geochemical processes. Measuring the oxidation state distribution for redox sensitive radionuclides and other metal ions is challenging at trace concentrations below the detection limit of most available spectroscopic methods (≥10(-6) M). Consequently, ultrasensitive new analytical techniques are required. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a suitable separation method for metal cations. CE hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-SF-MS) was used to measure the redox speciation of Pu (III, IV, V, VI), Np (IV, V, VI), and Fe (II, III) at concentrations lower than 10(-7) M. CE coupling and separation parameters such as sample gas pressure, make up flow rate, capillary position, auxiliary gas flow, as well as the electrolyte system were optimized to obtain the maximum sensitivity. We obtain detection limits of 10(-12) M for Np and Pu. The various oxidation state species of Pu and Np in different samples were separated by application of an acetate-based electrolyte system. The separation of Fe (II) and Fe (III) was investigated using different organic complexing ligands, EDTA, and o-phenanthroline. For the Fe redox system, a limit of detection of 10(-8) M was calculated. By applying this analytical system to sorption studies, we were able to underline previously published results for the sorption behavior of Np in highly diluted concentrations, and

  2. Review: mass spectrometry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zaikin, Vladimir G; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    The present review covers the main research in the area of mass spectrometry from the 1990s which was about the same time as the Russian Federation emerged from the collapse of the Soviet Union (USSR). It consists of two main parts-application of mass spectrometry to chemistry and related fields and creation and development of mass spectrometric technique. Both traditional and comparatively new mass spectrometric methods were used to solve various problems in organic chemistry (reactivity of gas-phase ions, structure elucidation and problems of identification, quantitative and trace analysis, differentiation of stereoisomers, derivatization approaches etc.), biochemistry (proteomics and peptidomics, lipidomics), medical chemistry (mainly the search of biomarkers, pharmacology, doping control), environmental, petrochemistry, polymer chemistry, inorganic and physical chemistry, determination of natural isotope ratio etc. Although a lot of talented mass spectrometrists left Russia and moved abroad after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the vitality of the mass spectral community proved to be rather high, which allowed the continuation of new developments in the field of mass spectrometric instrumentation. They are devoted to improvements in traditional magnetic sector mass spectrometers and the development of new ion source types, to analysis and modification of quadrupole, time-of-flight (ToF) and ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) analyzers. The most important achievements are due to the creation of multi-reflecting ToF mass analyzers. Special attention was paid to the construction of compact mass spectrometers, particularly for space exploration, of combined instruments, such as ion mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer and accelerating mass spectrometers. The comparatively young Russian Mass Spectrometry Society is working hard to consolidate the mass spectrometrists from Russia and foreign countries, to train young professionals on new appliances and regularly

  3. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  4. Identification of gunshot residues in fabric targets using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique and ternary graphs.

    PubMed

    Freitas, João Carlos D; Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Negrini Neto, Osvaldo; Viebig, Sônia Bocamino

    2012-03-01

    During criminal investigations involving firearms, the detection of gunshot residues (GSRs) is one of the most important evidences. In the present study, a new method to identify trace evidences of GSRs, deposited around the bullet entrance hole, in different types of fabrics used as targets, is described. The experiments were carried out using a 0.38-inch caliber revolver, and 9-mm and 0.40-inch caliber pistols. Testimonies of 2.25 cm(2) of the fabrics were cut around the bullet entrance and digested with 10% nitric acid. Antimony, barium, and lead were analyzed in the remaining solution using a sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The concentrations of the elements were detected at levels up to few microgram per square centimeter. The use of ternary graphics allowed us to identify specific patterns of distribution for blank samples and the clear distinction between the revolver and pistols used. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  6. Trace level determination of trichloroethylene from liver, lung and kidney tissues by gas chromatography - magnetic sector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy D. Brown; S. Muralidhara; James V. Bruckner, Michael G. Bartlett

    2002-07-30

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common industrial chemical that has been heavily used as a metal degreaser and a solvent for the past 100 years. As a result of the extensive use and production of this compound, it has become prevalent in the environment, appearing at over 50% of the hazardous waste sites on the US EPA's National Priorities List (NPL). TCE exposure has been linked to neurological dysfunction as well as to several types of cancer in animals. This paper describes the development and validation of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the quantitation of trace levels of TCE in its target tissues (i.e. liver, kidney and lungs). The limit of quantitation (5 ng/ml) is substantially lower than currently published methods for the analysis of TCE in tissues. The % RSD and % Error for the assay falls within the acceptable range (<15% for middle and high QC points and <20% for low QC points), and the recovery is high from all tissues (>79%).

  7. Measurement of airborne gunshot particles in a ballistics laboratory by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ernesto; Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Viebig, Sônia; Saldiva, Paulo

    2012-01-10

    The present study aimed determines lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and barium (Ba) as the major elements present in GSR in the environmental air of the Ballistics Laboratory of the São Paulo Criminalistics Institute (I.C.-S.P.), São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Micro environmental monitors (mini samplers) were located at selected places. The PM(2.5) fraction of this airborne was collected in, previously weighted filters, and analyzed by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SF-HR-ICP-MS). The higher values of the airborne lead, antimony and barium, were found at the firing range (lead (Pb): 58.9 μg/m(3); barium (Ba): 6.9 μg/m(3); antimony (Sb): 7.3 μg/m(3)). The mean value of the airborne in this room during 6 monitored days was Pb: 23.1 μg/m(3); Ba: 2.2 μg/m(3); Sb: 1.5 μg/m(3). In the water tank room, the air did not show levels above the limits of concern. In general the airborne lead changed from day to day, but the barium and antimony remained constant. Despite of that, the obtained values suggest that the workers may be exposed to airborne lead concentration that can result in an unhealthy environment and could increase the risk of chronic intoxication. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  9. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  10. High precision 230Th/232Th and 234U/238U measurements using energyfiltered ICP magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaozhong; Rehkamper, Mark; Lee, Der-Chuen; Halliday, Alex N.

    1997-12-01

    We have developed new chemical and mass spectrometric techniques for the precise determination of 234U/238U and 230Th/232Th ratios in geological materials. The isotope ratio measurements were performed using an inductively coupled plasma double focusing magnetic sector multiple-collector mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) equipped with an additional energy filter. Following sample dissolution, U and Th are first separated from the rock matrix by a new and highly efficient column chromatographic procedure utilizing TRU-Spec resin. The strong affinity of U and Th for this material allows the use of extremely small ( < 0.5 ml resin) columns, even for the processing of silicate samples as large as ~5 g. Our new mass-spectrometric techniques permit precise corrections for mass discrimination and gain variation during analysis. As a consequence, the precision and external reproducibility of uranium and thorium isotopic analysis is improved by a factor of ~3-5 compared with previous results by conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). A sensitivity of ~0.04% is routinely achieved for Th and this is comparable to the best values achieved by TIMS for large sample sizes. Recent instrumental improvements, however, have further increased our sensitivity by about a factor of five. Our Th and U isotope data for standard reference materials and other geological samples are in excellent agreement with previously published values from other laboratories, further highlighting the reliability and analytical capabilities of our new techniques.

  11. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  12. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  13. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  14. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  15. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  16. Determination of extremely low (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios in environmental samples by sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using high-efficiency sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Heumann, Klaus G

    2006-01-01

    A method by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed which allows the measurement of (236)U at concentration ranges down to 3 x 10(-14)g g(-1) and extremely low (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios in soil samples of 10(-7). By using the high-efficiency solution introduction system APEX in connection with a sector-field ICP-MS a sensitivity of more than 5,000 counts fg(-1) uranium was achieved. The use of an aerosol desolvating unit reduced the formation rate of uranium hydride ions UH(+)/U(+) down to a level of 10(-6). An abundance sensitivity of 3 x 10(-7) was observed for (236)U/(238)U isotope ratio measurements at mass resolution 4000. The detection limit for (236)U and the lowest detectable (236)U/(238)U isotope ratio were improved by more than two orders of magnitude compared with corresponding values by alpha spectrometry. Determination of uranium in soil samples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) resulted in that the (236)U/(238)U isotope ratio is a much more sensitive and accurate marker for environmental contamination by spent uranium in comparison to the (235)U/(238)U isotope ratio. The ICP-MS technique allowed for the first time detection of irradiated uranium in soil samples even at distances more than 200 km to the north of Chernobyl NPP (Mogilev region). The concentration of (236)U in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers varied from 2 x 10(-9)g g(-1) within radioactive spots close to the Chernobyl NPP to 3 x 10(-13)g g(-1) on a sampling site located by >200 km from Chernobyl.

  17. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling of amorphous polymer multilayers using O{sub 2}{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ion bombardment with a magnetic sector instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Harton, S.E.; Stevie, F.A.; Ade, H.

    2006-03-15

    Thin planar polymer films are model systems in a number of fields, including nano- and biotechnology. In contrast to reciprocal space techniques such as reflectivity or diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can provide depth profiles of tracer labeled polymers in real space directly with sufficient depth resolution to characterize many important aspects in these systems. Yet, continued improvements in characterization methods are highly desirable in order to optimize the trade-offs between depth resolution, mass resolution, detection sensitivity, data acquisition time, and artifacts. In this context, the utility of a magnetic sector SIMS instrument for amorphous polymer film analysis was evaluated using model polymer bilayer systems of polystyrene (PS) with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), PS with poly(2-vinylpyridine), and poly(cyclohexyl methacrylate) (PCHMA) with PMMA. Deuterium-labeled polystyrene embedded in PS or PCHMA at concentrations ranging from 5% to 20%(v/v) was used as tracer polymer. Analysis conditions for a magnetic sector SIMS instrument (CAMECA IMS-6f) were varied to achieve a depth resolution of {approx}10 nm, high signal/noise ratios, and high sensitivity, while minimizing matrix effects and sample charging. Use of Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} primary ions with detection of negative and positive secondary ions, respectively, has been explored. Primary beam impact energy and primary ion species have been shown to affect matrix secondary ion yields. Sputtering rates have been determined for PS and PMMA using both primary ion species and referenced to values for intrinsic (100) silicon (Si) under identical analysis conditions.

  18. Determination of trace sulfur in biodiesel and diesel standard reference materials by isotope dilution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amais, Renata S; Long, Stephen E; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Christopher, Steven J

    2014-01-02

    A method is described for quantification of sulfur at low concentrations on the order of mgkg(-1) in biodiesel and diesel fuels using isotope dilution and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-SF-ICP-MS). Closed vessel microwave-assisted digestion was employed using a diluted nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide decomposition medium to reduce sample dilution volumes. Medium resolution mode was employed to eliminate isobaric interferences at (32)S and (34)S related to polyatomic phosphorus and oxygen species, and sulfur hydride species. The method outlined yielded respective limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.7 mg kg(-1) S and 2.5 mg kg(-1) S (in the sample). The LOD was constrained by instrument background counts at (32)S but was sufficient to facilitate value assignment of total S mass fraction in NIST SRM 2723b Sulfur in Diesel Fuel Oil at 9.06±0.13 mg kg(-1). No statistically significant difference at a 95% confidence level was observed between the measured and certified values for certified reference materials NIST SRM 2773 B100 Biodiesel (Animal-Based), CENAM DRM 272b and NIST SRM 2723a Sulfur in Diesel Fuel Oil, validating method accuracy.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of novel platinum containing anticancer agent BP-C1 studied in rabbits using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Navolotskii, Denis V; Ivanenko, Natalya B; Solovyev, Nikolay D; Fedoros, Elena I; Panchenko, Andrey V

    2015-09-01

    A method of platinum quantification in whole blood samples after microwave digestion using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. The following analytical figures of merit have been established: limit of detection 1.1 µg/L for blood samples, dynamic range 3.6-200 µg/L, intra-day precision (relative standard deviation, n = 9) did not exceed 5%. Spiked samples were analyzed for method validation. The method was used for pharmacokinetics studies of a novel anti-cancer drug BP-С1, a complex of cis-configured platinum and benzene-poly-carboxylic acids. Main pharmacokinetic parameters (area under curve, maximum concentration, clearance, half-life times for α- and β-phase) were estimated for two dosage forms of BP-C1 0.05 and 0.125 mass %. Pharmacokinetic curves were assessed for single and course administration. Studies were performed using rabbits (n = 6) as a model. BP-C1 was injected intramuscularly. The study established dose proportionality of the tested dosage forms and suggested clinical dosing schedule: 5 days of injections followed by 2 days' break. Platinum tissue distribution was studied in tissue samples collected 20 days after the last injection. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed in kidneys, liver, and muscles near injection site. 'Slow' phase of platinum excretion kinetics may be related to the muscles at the injection site.

  20. Coded Apertures in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jason J; Gehm, Michael E; Russell, Zachary E; Chen, Evan X; Di Dona, Shane T; Wolter, Scott D; Danell, Ryan M; Kibelka, Gottfried; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Brady, David J; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2017-06-12

    The use of coded apertures in mass spectrometry can break the trade-off between throughput and resolution that has historically plagued conventional instruments. Despite their very early stage of development, coded apertures have been shown to increase throughput by more than one order of magnitude, with no loss in resolution in a simple 90-degree magnetic sector. This enhanced throughput can increase the signal level with respect to the underlying noise, thereby significantly improving sensitivity to low concentrations of analyte. Simultaneous resolution can be maintained, preventing any decrease in selectivity. Both one- and two-dimensional (2D) codes have been demonstrated. A 2D code can provide increased measurement diversity and therefore improved numerical conditioning of the mass spectrum that is reconstructed from the coded signal. This review discusses the state of development, the applications where coding is expected to provide added value, and the various instrument modifications necessary to implement coded apertures in mass spectrometers.

  1. Factors determining the performance of triple quadrupole, quadrupole ion trap and sector field mass spectrometer in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 2. Suitability for de novo sequencing.

    PubMed

    Premstaller, A; Huber, C G

    2001-01-01

    The sequence coverage by fragment ions resulting from collision-induced dissociation in a triple stage quadrupole (TSQ) and a quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer of 10-20-mer oligonucleotides was investigated. While (a-B) and w ion series were the most abundant on both instruments, additional ion series of sequence relevance were preferably formed in the TSQ. Thus, a total number of 83 fragment ions were used to deduce the complete sequence of a 10-mer oligonucleotide of mixed sequence from a tandem mass spectrum recorded on the TSQ. The complete sequence was also encoded in the 28 fragments that were obtained from the QIT under comparable fragmentation conditions. Spectrum complexity increased considerably at the cost of signal-to-noise ratio upon fragmentation of a 20-mer oligonucleotide in the TSQ, whereas spectrum interpretation with longer oligonucleotides was significantly more straightforward in spectra recorded on the QIT. The extent of fragmentation had to be optimized by appropriate setting of collision energy and choice of precursor ion charge state in order to obtain full sequence coverage by fragments for de novo sequencing. Moreover, full sequence information was also dependent on base sequence because of the low tendency of backbone cleavage at thymidines. Tandem mass spectrometry on the QIT yielded redundant information that was successfully utilized to deduce the complete sequence of 20-mer oligonucleotides with high confidence. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  3. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed.

  4. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed. PMID:28337398

  5. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  6. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  7. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  8. Multi-isotopic determination of plutonium (239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 242Pu) in marine sediments using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donard, O F X; Bruneau, F; Moldovan, M; Garraud, H; Epov, V N; Boust, D

    2007-03-28

    Among the transuranic elements present in the environment, plutonium isotopes are mainly attached to particles, and therefore they present a great interest for the study and modelling of particle transport in the marine environment. Except in the close vicinity of industrial sources, plutonium concentration in marine sediments is very low (from 10(-4) ng kg(-1) for (241)Pu to 10 ng kg(-1) for (239)Pu), and therefore the measurement of (238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu in sediments at such concentration level requires the use of very sensitive techniques. Moreover, sediment matrix contains huge amounts of mineral species, uranium and organic substances that must be removed before the determination of plutonium isotopes. Hence, an efficient sample preparation step is necessary prior to analysis. Within this work, a chemical procedure for the extraction, purification and pre-concentration of plutonium from marine sediments prior to sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) analysis has been optimized. The analytical method developed yields a pre-concentrated solution of plutonium from which (238)U and (241)Am have been removed, and which is suitable for the direct and simultaneous measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu by SF-ICP-MS.

  9. Rapid speciation and determination of vanadium compounds using ion-pair reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kilibarda, Nikola; Afton, Scott E; Harrington, James M; Yan, Fei; Levine, Keith E

    2013-08-23

    Environmental vanadium contamination is a potential concern to public health, as evidenced by its place on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List as a priority contaminant. Vanadium toxicity varies significantly between different oxidation states; therefore, it is crucial to be able to monitor the speciation of vanadium in environmental samples. In this study, a novel method is described that utilizes ion-pair reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (IP-RP-UHPLC-ICP-SFMS) to separate vanadyl and vanadate ions and resolve a major polyatomic spectral interference ((35)Cl(16)O(+)) in less than a minute. Detection limits were obtained in the low ngL(-1) (part per trillion) range with linear calibrations across several orders of magnitude (50ngL(-1)-100μgL(-1)). The mechanism of chromatographic retention was elucidated through investigation of the role of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, tetrabutylammonium ion and pH on elution. The optimized method was then applied to the speciation of vanadium in local lake water samples.

  10. Quantification of trace elements by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in urine, serum, blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocca, B.; Alimonti, A.; Petrucci, F.; Violante, N.; Sancesario, G.; Forte, G.; Senofonte, O.

    2004-04-01

    To assess whether levels of trace metals and oxidative species are involved in Parkinson's disease (PD), Al, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and V were measured in urine, serum, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum peroxides and antioxidant capacity were determined in 26 patients with PD and 13 control subjects. The quantification of metals was based on the 1+4 water dilution of CSF, serum and urine, the acid-assisted microwave digestion under atmospheric pressure of blood and final determination by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). Results indicated a significant increase of Pb and V concentrations in blood and urine ( P≤0.03, in both cases) related to the disease. Parkinson disease also seemed to be closely associated ( P≤0.003) with a reduction in levels of Al, Cd, Hg and Pb in serum and of Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Pb in CSF. As regards Mn, a lower mean concentration was found in the CSF and whole blood of PD patients than in control group, although this trend was not statistically significant. Levels of peroxides were also increased ( P≤0.001), while antioxidant capacity was lower ( P≤0.002) in PD patients than in controls.

  11. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  12. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of novel platinum containing anticancer agent BP‐C1 studied in rabbits using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Navolotskii, Denis V.; Ivanenko, Natalya B.; Fedoros, Elena I.; Panchenko, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    A method of platinum quantification in whole blood samples after microwave digestion using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. The following analytical figures of merit have been established: limit of detection 1.1 µg/L for blood samples, dynamic range 3.6–200 µg/L, intra‐day precision (relative standard deviation, n = 9) did not exceed 5%. Spiked samples were analyzed for method validation. The method was used for pharmacokinetics studies of a novel anti‐cancer drug BP‐С1, a complex of cis‐configured platinum and benzene‐poly‐carboxylic acids. Main pharmacokinetic parameters (area under curve, maximum concentration, clearance, half‐life times for α‐ and β‐phase) were estimated for two dosage forms of BP‐C1 0.05 and 0.125 mass %. Pharmacokinetic curves were assessed for single and course administration. Studies were performed using rabbits (n = 6) as a model. BP‐C1 was injected intramuscularly. The study established dose proportionality of the tested dosage forms and suggested clinical dosing schedule: 5 days of injections followed by 2 days’ break. Platinum tissue distribution was studied in tissue samples collected 20 days after the last injection. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed in kidneys, liver, and muscles near injection site. ‘Slow’ phase of platinum excretion kinetics may be related to the muscles at the injection site. © 2015 The Authors. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26061351

  14. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    high-purity materials and environmental samples) is used in order to improve the detection limits of trace elements. Furthermore, the determination of chemical elements in the trace and ultratrace concentration range is often difficult and can be disturbed through mass interferences of analyte ions by molecular ions at the same nominal mass. By applying double-focusing sector field mass spectrometry at the required mass resolution—by the mass spectrometric separation of molecular ions from the analyte ions—it is often possible to overcome these interference problems. Commercial instrumental equipment, the capability (detection limits, accuracy, precision) and the analytical application fields of mass spectrometric methods for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements and for surface analysis are discussed.

  15. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  16. Method validation for high resolution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry determination of the emerging contaminants in the open ocean: Rare earth elements as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, Irena; Vassileva, Emilia

    2017-02-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of fourteen rare earth elements (REEs) in the seawater samples has been developed and validated. The elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) at ultra-trace level were measured by high resolution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-SFMS) after off-line analytes pre-concentration and matrix separation. The sample pre-treatment was carried out by commercially available automated system seaFAST-pico™, which is a low-pressure ion chromatography technique, based on solid phase extraction principles. Efficient elimination of seawater matrix and up to 50-fold pre-concentration of REEs enabled their accurate and precise quantification at ng L- 1 level. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines were followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range, linearity, recovery (from 92% to 102%), repeatability (1%-4%), intermediate precision (2%-6%), limits of detection (0.001-0.08 ng L- 1) were systematically assessed. The total uncertainty associated to each result was estimated and the main sources of uncertainty sorted out. All major contributions to the combined uncertainty of the obtained results were identified and propagated together, following the ISO/GUM guidelines. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at range from 10.4% to 11.6% (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results was also presented. Due to the low limits of detection, this method enables the determination of ultra-low levels of REEs in the open seawater as well as small variations in their concentrations. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on combination of seaFAST-pico™ for sample preparation and HR ICP-SFMS, was demonstrated by direct analysis of seawater form different regions of the world.

  17. Biomonitoring of 20 trace elements in blood and urine of occupationally exposed workers by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, N B; Ivanenko, A A; Solovyev, N D; Zeimal', A E; Navolotskii, D V; Drobyshev, E J

    2013-11-15

    A sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for the determination of Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn in whole blood and urine was designed. Microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid was used for blood samples. Urine samples were analyzed after 1/50 (v/v) dilution with 5% (v/v) nitric acid. For beryllium the necessity of medium resolution mode (R=4000) was shown. Method validation was performed using blood and urine reference materials and by analyzing of spiked samples. For the designed method relative standard deviation (RSD) for the concentration range 0.01-1.0 μg/L was 5-10%. RSD did not exceed 3% when trace elements concentrations were above 1.0 μg/L. Method detection limits (3σ): Ag 0.7 ng/L, Al 16 ng/L, As 3.4 ng/L, Ba 0.02 ng/L, Be 1.5 ng/L, Cd 7.7 ng/L, Co 1.0 ng/L, Cr 2.8 ng/L, Cs 9.8 ng/L, Cu 27 ng/L, Fe 1.1 ng/L, Mn 1.8 ng/L, Ni 17 ng/L, Pb 13 ng/L, Se 0.07 ng/L, Sr 5.7 ng/L, Tl 0.2 ng/L, U 0.1 ng/L, V 0.7 ng/L and Zn 1.2 ng/L. A developed method was applied for trace element biomonitoring of occupationally exposed workers of a beryllium processing enterprise. For preliminary risk assessment technological surface dust had been analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Based upon results of 50 blood and 40 urine samples analyses occupational exposure evaluation was performed. Exposure risks were found not to exceed acceptable ranges. Possible health hazards were found for Be and also Al, Cr, Mn. Occupational health and safety recommendations for the biomonitored enterprise medical care unit were issued as a result of the current investigation.

  18. Concentrations of selected trace elements in human milk and in infant formulas determined by magnetic sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Krachler, M; Prohaska, T; Koellensperger, G; Rossipal, E; Stingeder, G

    2000-08-01

    Magnetic sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied to the reliable determination of the 8 essential trace elements cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and vanadium (V) as well as the 7 nonessential and toxic elements silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), gold (Au), platinum (Pt), scandium (Sc), and titanum (Ti) in 27 transitory and mature human milk samples and in 4 selected infant formulas. This advanced instrumentation can separate spectral overlaps from the analyte signal hampering significantly the determination of many trace elements by conventional ICP-MS. Moreover, superior detection limits in the picogram per liter range can be obtained with such magnetic sector field instruments. Therefore, this is the first study to report, the concentrations of the elements Ag, Au, Pt, Sc, Ti, and V in human milk and in infant formulas. Concentrations of Ag (median: 0.41 microg/L; range: < 0.13-42 microg/L) and Au (median: 0.29 microg/L; range 0.10-2.06 microg/L) showed large variations in human milk that might be associated with dental fillings and jewelry. Pt concentrations were very low with most of the samples below the method detection limit of 0.01 microg/L. Human milk concentrations of Co (median: 0.19 microg/L), Fe (380 microg/L), Mn (6.3 microg/L), Ni (0.79 microg/L), and Se (17 microg/L) were at the low end of the corresponding reference ranges. Concentrations of Cr (24.3 microg/L) in human milk were five times higher than the high end of the reference range. For Al (67 microg/L), As (6.7 microg/L), and V (0.18 microg/L), most of the samples had concentrations well within the reference ranges. All elemental concentrations in infant formulas (except for Cr) were approximately one order of magnitude higher than in human milk.

  19. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  20. Determination of element/Ca ratios in foraminifera and corals using cold- and hot-plasma techniques in inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Li; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lu, Chia-Jung; Chen, Yi-Chi; Chang, Ching-Chih; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Qu, Dingchuang; Gagan, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a rapid and precise procedure for measuring multiple elements in foraminifera and corals by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS) with both cold- [800 W radio frequency (RF) power] and hot- (1200 W RF power) plasma techniques. Our quality control program includes careful subsampling protocols, contamination-free workbench spaces, and refined plastic-ware cleaning process. Element/Ca ratios are calculated directly from ion beam intensities of 24Mg, 27Al, 43Ca, 55Mn, 57Fe, 86Sr, and 138Ba, using a standard bracketing method. A routine measurement time is 3-5 min per dissolved sample. The matrix effects of nitric acid, and Ca and Sr levels, are carefully quantified and overcome. There is no significant difference between data determined by cold- and hot-plasma methods, but the techniques have different advantages. The cold-plasma technique offers a more stable plasma condition and better reproducibility for ppm-level elements. Long-term 2-sigma relative standard deviations (2-RSD) for repeat measurements of an in-house coral standard are 0.32% for Mg/Ca and 0.43% for Sr/Ca by cold-plasma ICP-SF-MS, and 0.69% for Mg/Ca and 0.51% for Sr/Ca by hot-plasma ICP-SF-MS. The higher sensitivity and enhanced measurement precision of the hot-plasma procedure yields 2-RSD precision for μmol/mol trace elements of 0.60% (Mg/Ca), 9.9% (Al/Ca), 0.68% (Mn/Ca), 2.7% (Fe/Ca), 0.50% (Sr/Ca), and 0.84% (Ba/Ca) for an in-house foraminiferal standard. Our refined ICP-SF-MS technique, which has the advantages of small sample size (2-4 μg carbonate consumed) and fast sample throughput (5-8 samples/hour), should open the way to the production of high precision and high resolution geochemical records for natural carbonate materials.

  1. Redox speciation of iron, manganese, and copper in cerebrospinal fluid by strong cation exchange chromatography - sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Nikolay; Vinceti, Marco; Grill, Peter; Mandrioli, Jessica; Michalke, Bernhard

    2017-06-22

    A new method of simultaneous redox speciation of iron (II/III), manganese (II/III), and copper (I/II) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been designed. For the separation of redox species strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX) with isocratic elution was employed. Species were detected using inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-sf-MS), operating at medium resolution. The following parameters were optimized: analytical column, eluent composition and pH, CSF injection volume and dilution factor. Analytical column Dionex IonPac CS5A RFIC 4*250 mm was found to retain and separate species of interest the most effectively under the isocratic elution with a buffer, containing 50 mM ammonium citrate, 7.0 mM pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid at pH = 4.2 and flow rate of 0.8 L min(-1). Injection volume of 50 μL with CSF sample dilution of 1/3 (v/v) with the eluent was shown to result in minimal matrix suppression. For species identification, retention time matching with standards was used. The stability of metalloproteins (ferritin, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin) under elution conditions was evaluated. For the quantification of redox species, external calibration was employed. To avoid column contamination, a blank was run after measurement and all quantification values were blank subtracted. For recovery checks, species quantification data was verified against total content of an element, measured by dynamic reaction cell ICP-MS. Recoveries (sum of quantified species vs. total element determinations) were 82.5 ± 22% (Mn), 92 ± 11% (Fe), and 88.7 ± 12% (Cu). The method was tested using 38 real CSF samples. Limits of detection (3σ) for the CSF samples were 0.5 μg L(-1), 0.6 μg L(-1), and 0.8 μg L(-1) for Fe, Mn, and Cu species, respectively. Retention time precision was 1-7.5% (as RSD), whereas peak area RSDs were in the range 5-11%, both depending on the species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS).

    PubMed

    Cooks, R G; Gelpi, E; Nibbering, N M

    2001-02-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the recently formalized International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS). It is presented here in order to increase awareness of the opportunities for collaboration in mass spectrometry in an international context. It also describes the recent 15th International Mass Spectrometry Conference, held August/September 2000, in Barcelona. Each of the authors is associated with the IMSS. The 15th Conference, which covers all of mass spectrometry on a triennial basis, was chaired by Professor Emilio Gelpi of the Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Barcelona. The outgoing and founding President of the IMSS is Professor Graham Cooks, Purdue University, and the incoming President is Professor Nico Nibbering, University of Amsterdam. Similar material has been provided to the Editors of other journals that cover mass spectrometry.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry for (234)U/(238)Pu Age Dating of Plutonium Materials and Comparison to Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Michael; Alvarez-Sarandes, Rafael; Rasmussen, Gert

    2016-09-06

    Employing a commercial high-resolution inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HR-ICP-OES) instrument, an innovative analytical procedure for the accurate determination of the production age of various Pu materials (Pu powder, cardiac pacemaker battery, (242)Cm heat source, etc.) was developed and validated. This undertaking was based on the fact that the α decay of (238)Pu present in the investigated samples produced (234)U and both mother and daughter could be identified unequivocally using HR-ICP-OES. Benefiting from the high spectral resolution of the instrument (<5 pm) and the isotope shift of the emission lines of both nuclides, (234)U and (238)Pu were selectively and directly determined in the dissolved samples, i.e., without a chemical separation of the two analytes from each other. Exact emission wavelengths as well as emission spectra of (234)U centered around λ = 411.590 nm and λ = 424.408 nm are reported here for the first time. Emission spectra of the isotopic standard reference material IRMM-199, comprising about one-third each of (233)U, (235)U, and (238)U, confirmed the presence of (234)U in the investigated samples. For the assessment of the (234)U/(238)Pu amount ratio, the emission signals of (234)U and (238)Pu were quantified at λ = 424.408 nm and λ = 402.148 nm, respectively. The age of the investigated samples (range: 26.7-44.4 years) was subsequently calculated using the (234)U/(238)Pu chronometer. HR-ICP-OES results were crossed-validated through sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICPMS) analysis of the (234)U/(238)Pu amount ratio of all samples applying isotope dilution combined with chromatographic separation of U and Pu. Available information on the assumed ages of the analyzed samples was consistent with the ages obtained via the HR-ICP-OES approach. Being based on a different physical detection principle, HR-ICP-OES provides an alternative strategy to the well-established mass

  5. Mass spectrometry in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Suter, Marc J-F

    2014-01-01

    In environmental toxicology, mass spectrometry can be applied to evaluate both exposure to chemicals as well as their effects in organisms. Various ultra-trace techniques are employed today to measure pollutants in different environmental compartments. Increasingly, effect-directed analysis is being applied to focus chemical monitoring on sites of ecotoxicological concern. Mass spectrometry is also very instrumental for studying the interactions of chemicals with organisms on the molecular and cellular level, providing new insights into mechanisms of toxicity. In the future, diverse mass spectrometry-based techniques are expected to become even more widely used in this field, contributing to the refinement of currently used environmental risk assessment strategies.

  6. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided.

  7. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  8. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  9. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  11. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  12. Smaller, Lighter Magnetic Sector For Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Tomassian, Albert D.

    1993-01-01

    Miniature, lightweight focal-plane magnetic sector of mass spectrometer (Mattauch-Herzog type) developed. Magnetic sector integral part of portable gas-chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Focal plane covers nominal range of 40 to 240 atomic mass units for 1-keV ion energy. System used for analyzing pollutants in field environments.

  13. Mass spectrometry guided structural biology.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Allison, Timothy M; Hopper, Jonathan Ts; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-10-01

    With the convergence of breakthroughs in structural biology, specifically breaking the resolution barriers in cryo-electron microscopy and with continuing developments in crystallography, novel interfaces with other biophysical methods are emerging. Here we consider how mass spectrometry can inform these techniques by providing unambiguous definition of subunit stoichiometry. Moreover recent developments that increase mass spectral resolution enable molecular details to be ascribed to unassigned density within high-resolution maps of membrane and soluble protein complexes. Importantly we also show how developments in mass spectrometry can define optimal solution conditions to guide downstream structure determination, particularly of challenging biomolecules that refuse to crystallise.

  14. Alfred Nier and the sector field mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John; Kurz, Mark D

    2006-07-01

    Science and technology are intimately related, and advances in science often become possible with the availability of new instrumentation. This has certainly been the case in mass spectrometry, which is used in so many scientific disciplines. Originally developed as an instrument for research in physics it was used in the discovery of isotopes, their recognition as the fundamental species comprising the elements, and the investigation of elemental isotopic composition. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry is a metrological technique of the highest order, and has been widely used in chemical, biochemical, cosmochemical, environmental, geological, physical, and nuclear research. Mass spectrometry presently plays a key role not only in scientific research, but also in industrial operations. This paper highlights the role that Alfred Otto Carl Nier played in bringing mass spectrometry into the mainstream of science. Nier's career spanned a remarkable period in science, and he made crucial contributions to atomic weights, geochronology, isotope geochemistry, nuclear physics, and space science. He is widely viewed as the 'father of modern mass spectrometry', because of his genius with instrumentation, his innovations, and the generosity with which he shared his ideas and designs. It is timely to remember his fundamental work in mass spectrometry, particularly the development of the sector field mass spectrometer, which is still the instrument of choice for many isotope scientists some 66 years after its first appearance in 1940.

  15. Imaging mass spectrometry in microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry tools which allow for the 2-D visualization of the distribution of trace metals, metabolites, surface lipids, peptides and proteins directly from biological samples without the need for chemical tagging or antibodies are becoming increasingly useful for microbiology applications. These tools, comprised of different imaging mass spectrometry techniques, are ushering in an exciting new era of discovery by allowing for the generation of chemical hypotheses based on of the spatial mapping of atoms and molecules that can correlate to or transcend observed phenotypes. In this review, we explore the wide range of imaging mass spectrometry techniques available to microbiologists and describe their unique applications to microbiology with respect to the types of microbiology samples to be investigated. PMID:21822293

  16. Mass spectrometry for malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Demirev, Plamen A

    2004-11-01

    A physical method currently being developed for malaria parasite detection and diagnosis in blood is reviewed in this article. The method - direct laser desorption mass spectrometry - is based on the detection of heme (iron protoporphyrin) as a unique qualitative and quantitative molecular biomarker for malaria. In infected erythrocytes, the parasite sequesters heme in a molecular crystal (hemozoin) - a volume of highly concentrated and purified biomarker molecules. Laser desorption mass spectrometry detects only heme from hemozoin in parasite-infected blood, and not heme that is bound to hemoglobin or other proteins in uninfected blood samples. The method requires only a drop of blood with minimal sample preparation. Laser desorption mass spectrometry may become a rapid and high-throughput tool for specific and sensitive pan-malaria detection at levels below 10 parasites/mul of blood.

  17. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  18. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  19. Applications of ICP magnetic sector multicollector mass spectrometry to basic energy research. Final report for period December 1st, 1993 - May 31st, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, A.N.

    2002-05-01

    The primary aims of this research were threefold: to develop and utilize the new technique of multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and apply it to problems in the earth, ocean, and environmental sciences; to develop new chronometers and improve existing chronometers to allow the accurate determination of the ages of geological features and processes; and to study natural fluid-mediated mass transfer processes and source of components in the crust and the oceans. This technique has now become the preferred method for the determination of the isotopic compositions of a variety of elements in the periodic table. The prototype instrument was used to explore a vast array of isotopic systems and demonstrate applicability to problems as different as the origin of the solar system and smelting methods in the Bronze Age. Highlights of the program are briefly summarized under the following topics: tungsten isotopes and the early solar system; trace siderophile and chalcophile element geochemistry; hafnium isotopes and the early development of the continents; evolution of lead isotopic compositions of the oceans; the isotopic composition and residence time of Hf in seawater; the isotopic compositions of Sr, Hf, Pb, and Nd in dust; U-Th disequilibrium dating of carbonates and soils; in situ U-Th disequilibrium dating of opal.

  20. Sector field mass spectrometers in ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowski, Norbert; Moens, Luc; Vanhaecke, Frank

    1998-11-01

    A new generation of sector field mass spectrometers, with improved analytical figures of merit at even lower prices, is commercially available, giving a strong impetus to the development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) sector field instrument applications in the analytical community. It is the aim of this paper to give an overview of these instruments, to introduce some basic concepts, to discuss their peculiarities and performance, and to present some selected examples of analytical applications to demonstrate the `state of the art'.

  1. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  2. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  3. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A foundation for Environmental Science - Mass Spectrometry: Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies much of the definitive data that environmental scientists rely upon for identifying the molecular compositions (and ultimately the structures) of chemicals. This is not to ignore the complementary, critical roles played by the adjunct practices of sample enrichment (via any of various means of selective extraction) and analyte separation (via the myriad forms of chromatography and electrophoresis).While the power of mass spectrometry has long been highly visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on continued obscurity to the lay public and most non-chemists. Even though mass spectrometry has played a long, historic (and largely invisible) role in establishing or undergirdidng our existing knowledge about environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is ususally the relevance of ssignificance of the knowledge acquired from the application of the tool that has ultimate meaning to the public and science at large - not how the knowledge was acquired. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in

  4. Elemental and isotopic analysis of oral squamous cell carcinoma tissues using sector-field and multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lara; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; de Vicente, Juan Carlos; Pereiro, Rosario; Vanhaecke, Frank; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Elemental and isotopic analysis via single-collector and multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry, respectively, have been explored as a tool for identifying potential differences between non-tumor and oral squamous cell carcinoma tissues. Elemental concentrations of major and minor elements, known to be essential for different processes in the cell (i.e. Na, Ca, Mg, K, P, Fe, Cu and Zn), have been determined and results for cancerous and non-cancerous tissues collected from the same individual have been compared. Among the elements studied, only Mg, K and P turned out to be significantly higher in concentration in the tumor tissues. However, a shift towards higher and wider concentration ranges has also been observed for Cu and Zn in the tumor samples, whereas for Ca lower concentrations were established. Possible isotope ratio variations for Cu and Zn in both biological tissues have also been evaluated with the same goal. δ(66)Zn results did not provide an obvious trend, but in the case of Cu, a clear distinction between the tumor and non-tumor tissues was observed: δ(65)Cu values ranged between -0.68% and 0.03% in the non-tumor tissues, whereas tumor samples turned out to be enriched in (65)Cu, with δ(65)Cu values between 0.10% and 0.93%. These results confirm the considerable potential of isotopic and elemental studies for biomedical purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Finkel, R.; Nelson, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) can be used for efficient detection of long-lived isotopes at part-per-quadrillion sensitivities with good precision. In this article we present an overview of AMS and its recent use in archaeology, geochemistry and biomolecular tracing. All AMS systems use cesium sputter ion sources to produce negative ions from a small button of a solid sample containing the element of interest, such as graphite, metal halide, or metal oxide, often mixed with a metal powder as binder and thermal conductor. Experience shows that both natural and biomedical samples are compatible in a single AMS system, but few other AMS sites make routine {sup 14}C measurements for both dating and tracing. AMS is, in one sense, just `a very sensitive decay counter`, but if AMS sensitivity is creatively coupled to analytical chemistry of certain isotopes, whole new areas of geosciences, archaeology, and life sciences can be explored. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  7. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  8. Mass spectrometry and renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Purcarea, VL; Sisu, I; Sisu, E

    2010-01-01

    The present review represents a concise and complete survey of the literature covering 2004–2009, concerning the mass spectrometric techniques involved in the structural investigation of renal calculi. After a short presentation of the fundamental mass spectrometric techniques (MALDI–TOF, QTOF, MS–MS) as well as hyphenated methods (GC–MS, LC–MS, CE–MS), an extensive study of the urinary proteome analysis as well as the detection and quantification by mass spectrometry of toxins, drugs and metabolites from renal calculi is presented. PMID:20968197

  9. Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of citrus limonoids.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingguo; Schwartz, Steven J

    2003-10-15

    Methods for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) of citrus limonoid aglycones and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of limonoid glucosides are reported. The fragmentation patterns of four citrus limonoid aglycones (limonin, nomilin, obacunone, and deacetylnomilin) and six limonoid glucosides, that is, limonin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (LG), nomilin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NG), nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NAG), deacetyl nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (DNAG), obacunone 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG), and obacunoic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OAG) were investigated using a quadruple mass spectrometer in low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). The four limonoid aglycones and four limonoid glucosides (LG, OG, NAG, and DNAG) were purified from citrus seeds; the other two limonoid glucosides (NG and OAG) were tentatively identified in the crude extract of grapefruit seeds by ESI mass spectrometry in both positive and negative ion analysis. Ammonium hydroxide or acetic acid was added to the mobile phase to facilitate ionization. During positive ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, protonated molecular ion, [M + H]+, or adduct ion, [M + NH3 + H]-, was formed as base peaks when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. Molecular anions or adduct ions with acetic acid ([M + HOAc - H] and [M + HOAc]-) or a deprotonated molecular ion were produced during negative ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, depending on the mobile-phase modifier used. Positive ion ESI-MS of limonoid glucosides produced adduct ions of [M + H + NH3]+, [M + Na]+, and [M + K]+ when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. After collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the limonoid aglycone molecular ions in negative ion APCI analysis, fragment ions indicated structural information of the precursor ions, showing the presence of methyl, carboxyl, and oxygenated ring

  10. High-Performance Method for Determination of Pu Isotopes in Soil and Sediment Samples by Sector Field-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongtang; Zheng, Jian; Ni, Youyi; Men, Wu; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2017-02-21

    Plutonium is extensively studied in radioecology (e.g., soil to plant transfer and radiological assessment) and geochemistry (e.g., sediment dating). Here, we reported a new chemical separation method for rapid determination of Pu in soil and sediment samples, based on the following investigations: extraction behaviors of interfering elements (IEs, for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) measurement) on TEVA resin; decontamination of U using TEVA, UTEVA, and DGA resins; and the impact of coprecipitation on Pu determination. The developed method consists of four steps: HNO3 leaching for Pu release; CaF2/LaF3 coprecipitation for the removal of major metals and U; the proposed TEVA + UTEVA + DGA procedure for the removal of U, Pb, Bi, Tl, Hg, Hf, Pt, and Dy; and ICPMS measurement. The accuracy of this method in determining (239+240)Pu activity and (240)Pu/(239)Pu and (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios was validated by analyzing five standard reference materials (soil, fresh water sediment, and ocean sediment). This method is characterized by its stable and high Pu recovery (90-97% for soil; 92-98% for sediment) and high decontamination factor of U (1.6 × 10(7)), which is the highest reported for soil and sediment samples. In addition, the short analytical time of 12 h and the method detection limits, which are the lowest yet reported in literature, of 0.56 μBq g(-1) (0.24 fg g(-1)) for (239)Pu, 1.2 μBq g(-1) (0.14 fg g(-1)) for (240)Pu, and 0.34 mBq g(-1) (0.09 fg g(-1)) for (241)Pu (calculated on the basis of a 1 g soil sample) allow the rapid determination of ultratrace level Pu in soil and sediment samples.

  11. EMERGING POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry (MS) - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies definitive data that environmental scientists and engineers reply upon for identifying molecular compositions (and ultimately structures) of chemicals. While the power of MS has long been visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on obscurity to the lay public and many scientists. While MS has played a long, historic (and largely invisible) role in establishing our knowledge of environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is usually the relevance or significance of the knowledge acquired from the application of the tool that has ultimate meaning to the public and science at large - not how the data were acquired. Methods (736/800): Mass Spectrometry and the

  12. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  13. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  14. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  15. Glycosaminoglycan Glycomics Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The fact that sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are necessary for the functioning of all animal physiological systems drives the need to understand their biology. This understanding is limited, however, by the heterogeneous nature of GAG chains and their dynamic spatial and temporal expression patterns. GAGs have a regulated structure overlaid by heterogeneity but lack the detail necessary to build structure/function relationships. In order to provide this information, we need glycomics platforms that are sensitive, robust, high throughput, and information rich. This review summarizes progress on mass-spectrometry-based GAG glycomics methods. The areas covered include disaccharide analysis, oligosaccharide profiling, and tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. PMID:23325770

  16. Automated preconcentration of Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Pb, Co, and Mn in seawater with analysis using high-resolution sector field inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Insa; Schlosser, Christian; Rusiecka, Dagmara; Gledhill, Martha; Achterberg, Eric P

    2017-07-11

    A rapid, automated, high-throughput analytical method capable of simultaneous analysis of multiple elements at trace and ultratrace levels is required to investigate the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals in the ocean. Here we present an analytical approach which uses a commercially available automated preconcentration device (SeaFAST) with accurate volume loading and in-line pH buffering of the sample prior to loading onto a chelating resin (WAKO) and subsequent simultaneous analysis of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), cobalt (Co) and manganese (Mn) by high-resolution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). Quantification of sample concentration was undertaken using isotope dilution for Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb, and standard addition for Co and Mn. The chelating resin is shown to have a high affinity for all analyzed elements, with recoveries between 83 and 100% for all elements, except Mn (60%) and Ni (48%), and showed higher recoveries for Ni, Cd, Pb, Co and Mn in direct comparison to an alternative resin (NOBIAS Chelate-PA1). The reduced recoveries for Ni and Mn using the WAKO resin did not affect the quantification accuracy. A relatively constant retention efficiency on the resin over a broad pH range (pH 5-8) was observed for the trace metals, except for Mn. Mn quantification using standard addition required accurate sample pH adjustment with optimal recoveries at pH 7.5 ± 0.3. UV digestion was necessary to increase recovery of Co and Cu in seawater by 15.6% and 11.4%, respectively, and achieved full break-down of spiked Co-containing vitamin B12 complexes. Low blank levels and detection limits could be achieved (e.g., 0.029 nmol L(-1) for Fe and 0.028 nmol L(-1) for Zn) with the use of high purity reagents. Precision and accuracy were assessed using SAFe S, D1, and D2 reference seawaters, and results were in good agreement with available consensus values. The presented method is ideal for

  17. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  18. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  19. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  20. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  1. Affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.S.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1995-02-15

    A new technique, affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry, is described. In this method, a chemically modified membrane is used to selectively adsorb analytes bearing a particular functional group and concentrate them from solution. Release of the bound analyte results in its transfer across the membrane and allows it to be monitored mass spectrometrically, using, in the present case, a benchtop ion trap instrument. Alkylamine-modified cellulose membranes are used to bind substituted benzaldehydes through imine formation at high pH. Release of the bound aldehyde is achieved by acid hydrolysis of the surface-bound imine. Benzaldehyde is detected with excellent specificity at 10 ppm in a complex mixture using this method. Using the enrichment capability of the membrane, a full mass spectrum of benzaldehyde can be measured at a concentration of 10 ppb. The behavior of a variety of other aldehydes is also discussed to illustrate the capabilities of the method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  3. Neuroscience and accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Palmblad, Magnus; Buchholz, Bruce A; Hillegonds, Darren J; Vogel, John S

    2005-02-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had a great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as 3H, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl and 41Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, allowing safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 microg kg(-1)). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the time-scale of decades. We review here how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  4. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Mbughuni, Michael M; Jannetto, Paul J; Langman, Loralie J

    2016-12-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS(n)) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  5. Mass spectrometry in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Enjalbal, C; Martinez, J; Aubagnac, J L

    2000-01-01

    In the fast expanding field of combinatorial chemistry, profiling libraries has always been a matter of concern--as illustrated by the buoyant literature over the past seven years. Spectroscopic methods, including especially mass spectrometry and to a lesser extent IR and NMR, have been applied at different levels of combinatorial library synthesis: in the rehearsal phase to optimize the chemistry prior to library generation, to confirm library composition, and to characterize after screening each structure that exhibits positive response. Most of the efforts have been concentrated on library composition assessment. The difficulties of such analyses have evolved from the infancy of the combinatorial concept, where large mixtures were prepared, to the recent parallel syntheses of collections of discrete compounds. Whereas the complexity of the analyses has diminished, an increased degree of automation was simultaneously required to achieve efficient library component identification and quantification. In this respect, mass spectrometry has been found to be the method of choice, providing rapid, sensitive, and informative analyses, especially when coupled to chromatographic separation. Fully automated workstations able to cope with several hundreds of compounds per day have been designed. After a brief introduction to describe the combinatorial approach, library characterization will be discussed in detail, considering first the solution-based methodologies and secondly the support-bound material analyses.

  6. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MSn) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology. PMID:28149262

  7. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry—especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644965

  8. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  9. Candidate reference measurement procedures for chloride, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and lithium by inductively coupled plasma (isotope dilution) sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-(ID) SFMS) in serum.

    PubMed

    Kramer, U; Kress, M; Reinauer, H; Spannagl, M; Kaiser, P

    2013-01-01

    Standardization of the measurement of electrolyte concentrations in serum is of considerable interest for quality assurance in patient care. To promote the ongoing process of standardization we developed candidate reference measurement procedures of highest metrological order for Cl, K, Na, Ca, Mg, and Li using ICP-(ID) SFMS. Serum samples were diluted with 4 mmol/L nitric acid and were spiked with the internal standard for quantification, separately for each analyte. The samples were introduced in the ICP-SFMS device by continuous infusion using a peristaltic pump. The measurement results were compared with reference measurement procedure values obtained by atom absorption spectroscopy, flame emission spectroscopy, and coulometry. The measurement accuracy and precision was calculated by analyzing certified reference materials and EQAS samples. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) of the ICP-MS procedures for the serum samples was 0.65% for Cl, 0.46% for K, 0.51% for Na, 0.77% for Ca, 0.78% for Mg, and 0.58% for Li. The mean bias from target values of NIST certified reference materials was +0.85% for Cl, -0.46% for K, +0.68% for Na, -0.21% for Ca, +0.27% for Mg, and -0.39% for Li. Candidate reference measurement procedures for 6 electrolytes were developed by high performance magnetic sector field ICP-MS fulfilling the requirements of ISO 15193:2009 for reference measurement procedures with traceability to SI according to ISO 17511:2003 and can be used for setting target values in EQAS and for certification of reference materials.

  10. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  11. Triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry: A real alternative to high resolution magnetic sector instrument for the analysis of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    García-Bermejo, Ángel; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; González, María José; Gómara, Belén

    2015-08-19

    This paper reports on the optimisation, characterisation, validation and applicability of gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in its tandem operation mode (GC-QqQ(MS/MS) for the quantification of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs, dioxins) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in environmental and food matrices. MS/MS parameters were selected to achieve the high sensitivity and selectivity required for the analysis of this type of compounds and samples. Good repeatability for areas (RSD = 1-10%, for PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs) and for ion transition ratios (RSD = 0.3-10%, for PCDD/Fs, and 0.2-15%, for DL-PCBs) and low instrumental limits of detection, 0.07-0.75 pg μL(-1) (for dioxins) and 0.05-0.63 pg μL(-1) (for DL-PCBs), were obtained. A comparative study of the congener specific determination using both GC-QqQ(MS/MS) and gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) was also performed by analysing several fortified samples and certified reference materials (CRMs) with low (feed and foodstuffs), median (sewage sludge) and high (fly ash) toxic equivalency (TEQ) concentration levels, i.e. 0.60, 1.83, 72.9 and 3609 pg WHO-TEQ(PCDD/Fs) g(-1). The agreement between the results obtained for the total TEQs (dioxins) on GC-QqQ(MS/MS) and GC-HRMS in all the investigated samples were within the range of ±4%, and that of DL-PCBs at concentration levels of 0.84 pg WHO-TEQs (DL-PCBs) g(-1), in the case of feedstuffs, was 0.11%. Both instrumental methods have similar and comparable linearity, precision and accuracy. The GC-QqQ(MS/MS) sensitivity, lower than that of GC-HRMS, is good enough (iLODs in the down to low pg levels) to detect the normal concentrations of these compounds in food and environmental samples. These results make GC-QqQ(MS/MS) suitable for the quantitative analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs and a real alternative tool to the reference sector HRMS instruments.

  12. Invited review article: Recent developments in isotope-ratio mass spectrometry for geochemistry and cosmochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Trevor R

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is fundamental to measurements of isotope ratios for applications in isotope geochemistry, geochronology, and cosmochemistry. Magnetic-sector mass spectrometers are most common because these provide the best precision in isotope ratio measurements. Where the highest precision is desired, chemical separation followed by mass spectrometric analysis is carried out with gas (noble gas and stable isotope mass spectrometry), liquid (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), or solid (thermal ionization mass spectrometry) samples. Developments in in situ analysis, including ion microprobes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, have opened up issues concerning homogeneity according to domain size, and allow ever smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. While mass spectrometry is built solidly on developments in the 20th century, there are new technologies that will push the limits in terms of precision, accuracy, and sample efficiency. Developments of new instruments based on time-of-flight mass spectrometers could open up the ultimate levels of sensitivity per sample atom.

  13. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, Dipankar; Milde, David; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Siderophores play important roles in microbial iron piracy, and are applied as infectious disease biomarkers and novel pharmaceutical drugs. Inductively coupled plasma and molecular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with high resolution separations allow characterization of siderophores in complex samples taking advantages of mass defect data filtering, tandem mass spectrometry, and iron-containing compound quantitation. The enrichment approaches used in siderophore analysis and current ICP-MS technologies are reviewed. The recent tools for fast dereplication of secondary metabolites and their databases are reported. This review on siderophores is concluded with their recent medical, biochemical, geochemical, and agricultural applications in mass spectrometry context.

  14. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Quick View

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-24

    MSI QuickView is a software designed to provide a graphical user interface (GUI) for greatly speeding up experimental feedback (visualization and analysis) of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI or IMS) data during data acquisition. Often different software loads the entire data set, i.e., all lines of data into computer memory (RAM). This causes out of memory errors for larger datasets. We solved this in MSI QuickView by reading in the data one line at a time. Only the required information (e.g. the final pixel values for that line of heat map) is maintained in RAM. Interim analysis options include the mean intensity vs. m/z spectrum, intensity vs. time spectrums for up to 6 different m/z values or ranges chosen by the user and heat maps for each line. This assists in validating the usefulness of the particular experiment after scanning the first few lines. In addition, the tool facilitates further processing and analysis of the massive datasets. The user can manually pick different m/z values, time ranges, scroll through the spectra for any line in the data without having to load it in manually, save multiple images, change aspect ratios for the heat maps, and process the heat maps in multiple ways including overlaying images at different m/z values, displaying up to 9 different heat maps, alignment of scans along each line etc. There is no manipulation of the data required by the user to visualize the data.

  15. Mass spectrometry of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Stanly, Christopher; Vilasi, Annalisa; Fiume, Immacolata; Capasso, Giovambattista; Turiák, Lilla; Buzas, Edit I; Vékey, Károly

    2016-01-01

    The review briefly summaries main features of extracellular vesicles, a joint terminology for exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic vesicles. These vesicles are in the center of interest in biology and medical sciences, and form a very active field of research. Mass spectrometry (MS), with its specificity and sensitivity, has the potential to identify and characterize molecular composition of these vesicles; but as yet there are only a limited, but fast-growing, number of publications that use MS workflows in this field. MS is the major tool to assess protein composition of extracellular vesicles: qualitative and quantitative proteomics approaches are both reviewed. Beside proteins, lipid and metabolite composition of vesicles might also be best assessed by MS techniques; however there are few applications as yet in this respect. The role of alternative analytical approaches, like gel-based proteomics and antibody-based immunoassays, are also mentioned. The objective of the review is to give an overview of this fast-growing field to help orient MS-based research on extracellular vesicles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Development, validation, and application of an ultra-performance liquid chromatography-sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of six organotin compounds in human serum.

    PubMed

    Levine, Keith E; Young, Daniel J; Afton, Scott E; Harrington, James M; Essader, Amal S; Weber, Frank X; Fernando, Reshan A; Thayer, Kristina; Hatch, Elizabeth E; Robinson, Veronica G; Waidyanatha, Suramya

    2015-08-01

    Organotin compounds (OTCs) are heavily employed by industry for a wide variety of applications, including the production of plastics and as biocides. Reports of environmental prevalence, differential toxicity between OTCs, and poorly characterized human exposure have fueled the demand for sensitive, selective speciation methods. The objective of this investigation was to develop and validate a rapid, sensitive, and selective analytical method for the simultaneous determination of a suite of organotin compounds, including butyl (mono-, di-, and tri-substituted) and phenyl (mono-, di-, and tri-substituted) species in human serum. The analytical method utilized ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). The small (sub-2 µm) particle size of the UPLC column stationary phase and the sensitivity of the SF-ICP-MS enabled separation and sensitive determination of the analyte suite with a runtime of approximately 3 min. Validation activities included demonstration of method linearity over the concentration range of approximately 0.250-13.661 ng mL(-1), depending on the species; intraday precision of less than 21%, interday precision of less than 18%, intraday accuracy of -5.3% to 19%, and interday accuracy of -14% to 15% for all species; specificity, and matrix impact. In addition, sensitivity, and analyte stability under different storage scenarios were evaluated. Analyte stability was found to be limited for most species in freezer, refrigerator, and freeze-thaw conditions. The validated method was then applied for the determination of the OTCs in human serum samples from women participating in the Snart-Foraeldre/MiljØ (Soon-Parents/Environment) Study. The concentration of each OTC ranged from below the experimental limit of quantitation to 10.929 ng tin (Sn) mL(-1) serum. Speciation values were confirmed by a total Sn analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  18. Mass spectrometry analysis of nucleosides and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Ed; Bond, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely utilised in the study of nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides as components of nucleic acids and as bioactive metabolites in their own right. In this review, the application of mass spectrometry to such analysis is overviewed in relation to various aspects regarding the analytical mass spectrometric and chromatographic techniques applied and also the various applications of such analysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Application of mass spectrometry in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Kleiner, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has arguably become the core technology in proteomics. The application of mass spectrometry based techniques for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of global proteome samples derived from complex mixtures has had a big impact in the understanding of cellular function. Here, we give a brief introduction to principles of mass spectrometry and instrumentation currently used in proteomics experiments. In addition, recent developments in the application of mass spectrometry in proteomics are summarised. Strategies allowing high-throughput identification of proteins from highly complex mixtures include accurate mass measurement of peptides derived from total proteome digests and multidimensional peptide separations coupled with mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins permits the characterisation of protein isoforms. Recent developments in stable isotope labelling techniques and chemical tagging allow the mass spectrometry based differential display and quantitation of proteins, and newly established affinity procedures enable the targeted characterisation of post-translationally modified proteins. Finally, advances in mass spectrometric imaging allow the gathering of specific information on the local molecular composition, relative abundance and spatial distribution of peptides and proteins in thin tissue sections.

  20. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    DOEpatents

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  1. Determination of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in microgram-quantity coral and foraminiferal samples with permil-level precision by cold plasma inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Lu, C.; Lo, L.; Qu, D.; Wei, K.; Gagan, M. K.

    2006-12-01

    A permil-level analytical technique for determination of coral and foraminiferal Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios using inductively coupled plasma sector-field mass spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS, Thermo Electron ELEMENT2) has been established. Cold plasma technique with an 800-W RF power was employed to diminish spectral interference. A wet introduction system with Scott-type double-pass spray chamber and an ESI micro- nebulizer with a sample uptake rate of 50 microliter per minute were used, which can offer low blank and high stability. Intensities of ion beams, ^{24}Mg, ^{43}Ca and 86Sr, were detected in pulse-counting mode. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were determined directly from intensity ratios using external, matrix-matched standard to correct for mass discrimination and low-frequency ratio drift. Other elemental ratios, such as Al/Ca, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca, Cd/Ca, and Ba/Ca were also determined. Three different matrix effects were observed in this system. (1) Acid effect: Elemental intensities and ratios vary with increasing HNO3 from 1-6%. 5% HNO3 was determined to be ideal for routine measurement. (2) Ca effect: Mg/Ca ratio decreases 2.5% with [Ca] from 0.5-2.5 ppm and less than 0.5% with [Ca] from 3-5 ppm. (3) Sr/Ca effect on Mg/Ca: Sr/Ca slightly affects Mg/Ca determination with a slope of 0.18% per mmol/mol. This effect causes only 0.1 s or less for Mg/Ca ratio in both foraminiferal and coral samples. Replicate measurements made on standards and samples show that our method can give an internal precision of 1-2‰ (2RSD) and reproducibility of 4.5‰% for Mg/Ca and 3.5‰ for Sr/Ca. Corresponding errors are 0.05 °C for foraminiferal Mg thermometer and 0.5 °C for coral Sr thermometer. Advantages of this new method include (1) short measurement time of 3 minutes and (2) only 2-mircogram carbonate consumed for each sample, and (3) throughput of 10 samples per hour.

  2. Universal Mass Spectrometry-Based Life Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaves, H. J.; Giri, C.

    2017-02-01

    The search for ET life will be an important 21st century solar system exploration goal. Mass spectrometry offers a comprehensive, rapid way of "chemotyping" environmental samples. Preparation of a reference catalogue of abiotic and biological samples is described.

  3. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  4. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  5. Mass spectrometry in the home and garden.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Bain, Ryan M; Wiley, Joshua S; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  6. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  7. Development of procedure for measurement of Pb isotope ratios in seawater by application of seaFAST sample pre-treatment system and Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassileva, Emilia; Wysocka, Irena

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic Pb in the oceans, derived from high-temperature industrial processes, fuel combustion and incineration can have an isotopic signature distinct from naturally occurring Pb, supplied by rock weathering. To identify the different pollution sources accurately and to quantify their relative contributions, Pb isotope ratios are widely used. Due to the high salt content (approximately 3.5% of total dissolved solids) and very low levels of Pb (typically from 1 to 100 ng L- 1) in seawater the determination of Pb isotope ratios requires preliminary matrix separation and analyte preconcentration. An analytical protocol for the measurements of Pb isotope ratios in seawater combining seaFAST sample pre-treatment system and Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF ICP-MS) was developed. The application of seaFAST system was advantageous, because of its completely closed working cycle and small volumes of chemicals introduced in pre-treatment step, resulting in very low detection limits and procedural blanks. The preconcentration/matrix separation step was also of crucial importance for minimizing the isobaric and matrix interferences, coming from the seawater. In order to differentiate between anthropogenic and natural Pb sources, particular attention was paid to the determination of 204Pb isotope because of its implication in some geological interpretations. The validation of the analytical procedure was effectuated according to the recommendations of the ISO/IEC 17025 standard. The method was validated by processing the common Pb isotope reference material NIST SRM 981. All major sources of uncertainty were identified and propagated together following the ISO/GUM guidelines. The estimation of the total uncertainty associated to each measurement result was fundamental tool for sorting the main sources of possible biases. The developed analytical procedure was applied to the coastal and open seawater samples, collected in different regions of

  8. Glossary of terms for separations coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K

    2010-06-18

    This document is a glossary of terms for separations coupled to mass spectrometry. It covers gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the sample introduction, ionization, and data analysis methods used with these combined techniques. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mass spectrometry: a revolution in clinical microbiology?

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Espinal, Paula; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Messad, Nourredine; Pantel, Alix; Sotto, Albert

    2013-02-01

    Recently, different bacteriological laboratory interventions that decrease reporting time have been developed. These promising new broad-based techniques have merit, based on their ability to identify rapidly many bacteria, organisms difficult to grow or newly emerging strains, as well as their capacity to track disease transmission. The benefit of rapid reporting of identification and/or resistance of bacteria can greatly impact patient outcomes, with an improvement in the use of antibiotics, in the reduction of the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and in mortality rates. Different techniques revolve around mass spectrometry (MS) technology: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), PCR combined with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESIMS), iPLEX MassArray system and other new evolutions combining different techniques. This report emphasizes the (r)evolution of these technologies in clinical microbiology.

  10. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  11. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  12. Mass Spectrometry: A Technique of Many Faces

    PubMed Central

    Olshina, Maya A.; Sharon, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes form the critical foundation for a wide range of biological process, however understanding the intricate details of their activities is often challenging. In this review we describe how mass spectrometry plays a key role in the analysis of protein assemblies and the cellular pathways which they are involved in. Specifically, we discuss how the versatility of mass spectrometric approaches provides unprecedented information on multiple levels. We demonstrate this on the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, a process that is responsible for protein turnover. We follow the various steps of this degradation route and illustrate the different mass spectrometry workflows that were applied for elucidating molecular information. Overall, this review aims to stimulate the integrated use of multiple mass spectrometry approaches for analyzing complex biological systems. PMID:28100928

  13. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  14. Applications of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for food analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Vita; Avellone, Giuseppe; Bongiorno, David; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Muccilli, Vera; Sforza, Stefano; Dossena, Arnaldo; Drahos, László; Vékey, Károly

    2012-10-12

    HPLC-MS applications in the agrifood sector are among the fastest developing fields in science and industry. The present tutorial mini-review briefly describes this analytical methodology: HPLC, UHPLC, nano-HPLC on one hand, mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on the other hand. Analytical results are grouped together based on the type of chemicals analyzed (lipids, carbohydrates, glycoproteins, vitamins, flavonoids, mycotoxins, pesticides, allergens and food additives). Results are also shown for various types of food (ham, cheese, milk, cereals, olive oil and wines). Although it is not an exhaustive list, it illustrates the main current directions of applications. Finally, one of the most important features, the characterization of food quality (including problems of authentication and adulteration) is discussed, together with a future outlook on future directions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  16. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  17. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  18. A history of mass spectrometry in Australia.

    PubMed

    Downard, Kevin M; de Laeter, John R

    2005-09-01

    An interest in mass spectrometry in Australia can be traced back to the 1920s with an early correspondence with Francis Aston who first visited these shores a decade earlier. The region has a rich tradition in both the development of the field and its application, from early measurements of ionization and appearance potentials by Jim Morrison at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) around 1950 to the design and construction of instrumentation including the first use of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for tandem mass spectrometry, the first suite of programs to simulate ion optics (SIMION), the development of early TOF/TOF instruments and orthogonal acceleration and the local design and construction of several generations of a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) instrument. Mass spectrometry has been exploited in the study and characterization of the constituents of this nation's unique flora and fauna from Australian apples, honey, tea plant and eucalyptus oil, snake, spider, fish and frog venoms, coal, oil, sediments and shale, environmental studies of groundwater to geochronological dating of limestone and granite, other terrestrial and meteoritic rocks and coral from the Great Barrier Reef. Peter Jeffery's establishment of geochronological dating techniques in Western Australia in the early 1950s led to the establishment of geochronology research both at the Australian National University and at what is now the Curtin Institute of Technology in the 1960s. This article traces the history of mass spectrometry in its many guises and applications in the island continent of Australia. An article such as this can never be complete. It instead focuses on contributions of scientists who played a major role in the early establishment of mass spectrometry in Australia. In general, those who are presently active in the field, and whose histories are incomplete, have been mentioned at best only briefly despite their important

  19. Targeted Quantitation of Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  20. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  1. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for molecular diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Allman, S. L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, L. Y.; Chung, C. N.; Martin, Steve; Haff, Lawrence

    1996-04-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used for molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Both 3-base deletion and single-base point mutation have been successfully detected by clinical samples. This new detection method can possibly speed up the diagnosis by one order of magnitude in the future. It may become a new biotechnology technique for population screening of genetic disease.

  2. Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry of Complex Organic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates the state of the art in pyrolysis mass spectrometry techniques through applications in: (1) structural determination and quality control of synthetic polymers; (2) quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures; (3) classification and structural characterization of fossil organic matter; and (4) nonsupervised numerical extraction of…

  3. Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry of Complex Organic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates the state of the art in pyrolysis mass spectrometry techniques through applications in: (1) structural determination and quality control of synthetic polymers; (2) quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures; (3) classification and structural characterization of fossil organic matter; and (4) nonsupervised numerical extraction of…

  4. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    DOEpatents

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  5. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  6. Application of mass spectrometry for metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Alton, Kevin B

    2006-06-01

    Metabolism studies play a pivotal role in drug discovery and development. Characterization of metabolic "hot-spots" as well as reactive and pharmacologically active metabolites is critical to designing new drug candidates with improved metabolic stability, toxicological profile and efficacy. Metabolite identification in the preclinical species used for safety evaluation is required in order to determine whether human metabolites have been adequately tested during non-clinical safety assessment. From an instrumental standpoint, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) dominates all analytical tools used for metabolite identification. The general strategies employed for metabolite identification in both drug discovery and drug development settings together with sample preparation techniques are reviewed herein. These include a discussion of the various ionization methods, mass analyzers, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques that are used for structural characterization in a modern drug metabolism laboratory. Mass spectrometry-based techniques, such as stable isotope labeling, on-line H/D exchange, accurate mass measurement to enhance metabolite identification and recent improvements in data acquisition and processing for accelerating metabolite identification are also described. Rounding out this review, we offer additional thoughts about the potential of alternative and less frequently used techniques such as LC-NMR/MS, CRIMS and ICPMS.

  7. Isotope ratio measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Maria

    2005-04-01

    The basic principles of secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry have been shortly revisited. The applications of both techniques as exploited for the isotope ratio measurements in several matrices have been reviewed. Emphasis has been given to research fields in expansions such as solar system studies, medicine, biology, environment and nuclear forensic. The characteristics of the two techniques are discussed in terms of sensitivity and methodology of quantification. Considerations on the different detection possibilities in SIMS are also presented.

  8. Microbial proteomics using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hines, Harry B

    2012-01-01

    Proteomic analyses involve a series of intricate, interdependent steps involving approaches and technical issues that must be fully coordinated to obtain the optimal amount of required information about the test subject. Fortunately, many of these steps are common to most test subjects, requiring only modifications to or, in some cases, substitution of some of the steps to ensure they are relevant to the desired objective of a study. This fortunate occurrence creates an essential core of proteomic approaches and techniques that are consistently available for most studies, regardless of test subject. In this chapter, an overview of some of these core approaches, techniques, and mass spectrometric instrumentation is given, while indicating how such steps are useful for and applied to bacterial investigations. To exemplify how such proteomic concepts and techniques are applicable to bacterial investigations, a practical, quantitative method useful for bacterial proteomic analysis is presented with a discussion of possibilities, pitfalls, and some emerging technology to provide a compilation of information from the diverse literature that is intermingled with experimental experience.

  9. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  10. Initial results of positron ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. L.; Hulett, L. D., Jr.; Mcluckey, S. A.; Glish, G. L.; Eckenrode, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of monoenergetic positrons for the ionization of organic molecules in the gas phase is described. The ionic products are analyzed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and detected to produce a mass spectrum. The ionization mechanisms which can be studied in this way include positron impact at energies above the ionization limit of the target molecules, positronium formation in the Ore gap energy range, and positron attachment at energies less than 1eV. The technique of positron ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) may have analytical utility in that chemical selectivity is observed for one or more of these processes.

  11. Nuclear applications of inorganic mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John

    2010-01-01

    There are several basic characteristics of mass spectrometry that are not always fully appreciated by the science community. These characteristics include the distinction between relative and absolute isotope abundances, and the influence of isotope fractionation on the accuracy of isotopic measurements. These characteristics can be illustrated in the field of nuclear physics with reference to the measurement of nuclear parameters, which involve the use of enriched isotopes, and to test models of s-, r-, and p-process nucleosynthesis. The power of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) to measure trace elements in primitive meteorites to produce accurate Solar System abundances has been essential to the development of nuclear astrophysics. The variety of mass spectrometric instrumentation used to measure the isotopic composition of elements has sometimes been accompanied by a lack of implementation of basic mass spectrometric protocols which are applicable to all instruments. These metrological protocols are especially important in atomic weight determinations, but must also be carefully observed in cases where the anomalies might be very small, such as in studies of the daughter products of extinct radionuclides to decipher events in the early history of the Solar System. There are occasions in which misleading conclusions have been drawn from isotopic data derived from mass spectrometers where such protocols have been ignored. It is important to choose the mass spectrometer instrument most appropriate to the proposed experiment. The importance of the integrative nature of mass spectrometric measurements has been demonstrated by experiments in which long, double beta decay and geochronological decay half-lives have been measured as an alternative to costly radioactive-counting experiments. This characteristic is also illustrated in the measurement of spontaneous fission yields, which have accumulated over long periods of time. Mass spectrometry is also a

  12. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  13. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  14. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  15. Ultrahigh-Mass Mass Spectrometry of Single Biomolecules and Bioparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    Since the advent of soft ionization methods, mass spectrometry (MS) has found widespread application in the life sciences. Mass is now known to be a critical parameter for characterization of biomolecules and their complexes; it is also a useful parameter to characterize bioparticles such as viruses and cells. However, because of the genetic diversity of these entities, it is necessary to measure their masses individually and to obtain the corresponding mean masses and mass distributions. Here, I review recent technological developments that enable mass measurement of ultrahigh-mass biomolecules and bioparticles at the single-ion level. Some representative examples include cryodetection time-of-flight MS of single-megadalton protein ions, Millikan-type mass measurements of single viruses in a cylindrical ion trap, and charge-detection quadrupole ion trap MS of single whole cells. I also discuss the promises and challenges of these new technologies in real-world applications.

  16. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  17. Laser-Cooling-Assisted Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, cotrapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular-dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. This technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  18. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  19. Single-Cell Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Passarelli, Melissa K.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique used to map the distributions of endogenous biomolecules with sub-cellular resolution. Currently, secondary ion mass spectrometry is the predominant technique for single-cell IMS, thanks to its sub-micron lateral resolution and surface sensitivity. However, recent methodological and technological developments aimed at improving the spatial resolution of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) have made this technique a potential platform of single-cell IMS. MALDI opens the field of single-cell IMS to new possibilities, including single cell proteomic imaging and atmospheric pressure analyses; however, sensitivity is a challenge. In this report, we estimate the availability of proteins and lipids in a single cell and discuss strategies employed to improve sensitivity at the single-cell level. PMID:23948695

  20. Dissecting the ubiquitin pathway by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Peng, Junmin

    2007-01-01

    Summary Protein modification by ubiquitin is a central regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Recent proteomics developments in mass spectrometry enable systematic analysis of cellular components in the ubiquitin pathway. Here, we review the advances in analyzing ubiquitinated substrates, determining modified lysine residues, quantifying polyubiquitin chain topologies, as well as profiling deubiquitinating enzymes based on the activity. Moreover, proteomic approaches have been developed for probing the interactome of proteasome and for identifying proteins with ubiquitin-binding domains. Similar strategies have been applied on the studies of the modification by ubiquitin-like proteins as well. These strategies are discussed with respect to their advantages, limitations and potential improvements. While the utilization of current methodologies has rapidly expanded the scope of protein modification by the ubiquitin family, a more active role is anticipated in the functional studies with the emerging of quantitative mass spectrometry. PMID:17055348

  1. Impact of automation on mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan Victoria; Rockwood, Alan

    2015-10-23

    Mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) is an analytical technique that has rapidly grown in popularity in clinical practice. In contrast to traditional technology, mass spectrometry is superior in many respects including resolution, specificity, multiplex capability and has the ability to measure analytes in various matrices. Despite these advantages, LC-MS/MS remains high cost, labor intensive and has limited throughput. This specialized technology requires highly trained personnel and therefore has largely been limited to large institutions, academic organizations and reference laboratories. Advances in automation will be paramount to break through this bottleneck and increase its appeal for routine use. This article reviews these challenges, shares perspectives on essential features for LC-MS/MS total automation and proposes a step-wise and incremental approach to achieve total automation through reducing human intervention, increasing throughput and eventually integrating the LC-MS/MS system into the automated clinical laboratory operations.

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry - from DNA to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    2013-12-01

    A brief review of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is presented. The present work touches on a few technical aspects and recent developments of AMS, and describes two specific applications of AMS, the dating of human DNA with the 14C bomb peak and the search for superheavy elements in nature. Since two extended general reviews on technical developments in AMS [1] and applications of AMS [2] will appear in 2013, frequent reference to these reviews is made.

  3. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  4. Radiation Biomarker Research Using Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    The data was of insufficient quality to obtain definitive biomarkers. Trips were also made to AFRL/HEDR at Brooks City Base to assist with their...sample analysis using the Finnigan LTQ located there. Mr. Mullens and Ms. Nagore assisted with training personnel at AFRL/HEDR and when necessary...techniques with saliva samples and matrix- assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), we have been able to

  5. [Photon burst mass spectrometry technique.] Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank, W.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    The basic tools have been developed and demonstrated for selective detection of Kr isotopes in the Photon Burst Mass Spectrometry technique. The effort is divided into: photon burst measurements on Mg{sup +} demonstrating high isotopic selectivity, charge exchange of Kr{sup +} with Cs and Rb to produce metastable Kr atoms, development of a diode laser system for photon burst detection of Kr{sup +}, and measurements of photon bursts detection of Kr.

  6. Determination of 234U/238U, 235U/238U and 236U/238U Isotope Ratios in Urine Using Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ge; Jones, Robert L.; Saunders, David; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the isotopic composition of uranium in urine at low levels of concentration is important for assessing both military and civilian populations’ exposures to uranium. However, until now there has been no convenient, precise method established for rapid determination of multiple uranium isotope ratios. Here we report a new method to measure 234U/238U, 235U/238U and 236U/238U. It uses solid phase chelation extraction (via TRU columns) of actinides from the urine matrix, followed by measurement using a magnetic sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SF-ICP-MS - Thermo Element XR) equipped with a high efficiency nebulizer (Apex PFA microflow) and coupled with a membrane desolvating introduction system (Aridus II™). This method provides rapid and reliable results, and has been used successfully to analyze Certified Reference Materials (CRM). PMID:24563523

  7. [Sample preparation and bioanalysis in mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Wagner, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of compounds of clinical interest of low molecular weight (<1000 Da) in biological fluids is currently in most cases performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Analysis of these compounds in biological fluids (plasma, urine, saliva, hair...) is a difficult task requiring a sample preparation. Sample preparation is a crucial part of chemical/biological analysis and in a sense is considered the bottleneck of the whole analytical process. The main objectives of sample preparation are the removal of potential interferences, analyte preconcentration, and converting (if needed) the analyte into a more suitable form for detection or separation. Without chromatographic separation, endogenous compounds, co-eluted products may affect a quantitative method in mass spectrometry performance. This work focuses on three distinct parts. First, quantitative bioanalysis will be defined, different matrices and sample preparation techniques currently used in bioanalysis by mass spectrometry of/for small molecules of clinical interest in biological fluids. In a second step the goals of sample preparation will be described. Finally, in a third step, sample preparation strategies will be made either directly ("dilute and shoot") or after precipitation.

  8. Mass Spectrometry of Proteins in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz-Knorr, Michelle; Papantonakis, Michael; Ermer Haglund, David, Jr.

    1999-11-01

    Infrared matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI) is an effective technique for mass identification and structural analysis of biomolecules. We are using liquid glycerol/water matrices in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a liquid nitrogen cooled sample stage to provide a more natural environment for biomolecules. An Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm) and also a tunable free electron laser (2-9 μm) are used to induce desorption and ionization by exciting the O-H and CH2 stretching vibrations in the glycerol. This vibrationally enhanced ionization makes IR-MALDI very efficient, as observed in the mass spectra of small peptides. This work is a first step toward using mass spectrometry to study noncovalently bound protein complexes in vitro and to study proteins in their cellular environment. Supported by the Medical Free Electron Laser Program of the Office of Naval Research and the Vanderbilt Molecular Biophysics Training Grant of the National Institutes of Health

  9. Toward Single-Molecule Nanomechanical Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukes, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a preeminent methodology of proteomics since it provides rapid and quantitative identification of protein species with relatively low sample consumption. Yet with the trend toward biological analysis at increasingly smaller scales, ultimately down to the volume of an individual cell, MS with few-to-single molecule resolution will be required. We report the first realization of MS based on single-biological-molecule detection with nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). NEMS provide unparalleled mass resolution, now sufficient for detection of individual molecular species in real time. However, high sensitivity is only one of several components required for MS. We demonstrate a first complete prototype NEMS-MS system for single-molecule mass spectrometry providing proof-of-principle for this new technique. Nanoparticles and protein species are introduced by electrospray injection from the fluid phase in ambient conditions into vacuum and subsequently delivered to the NEMS detector by hexapole ion optics . Mass measurements are then recorded in real-time as analytes adsorb, one-by-one, onto a phase-locked, ultrahigh frequency (UHF) NEMS resonator. These first NEMS-MS spectra, obtained with modest resolution from only several hundred mass adsorption events, presage the future capabilities of this methodology. We outline the substantial improvements feasible in near term, through recent advances and technological avenues that are unique to NEMS-MS.

  10. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxycirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for on-line fraction during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 34 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  11. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxyscirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for ''on-line fractionation'' during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 1 figure, 11 tables.

  12. Analysis of Glycosaminoglycans Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Gregory O.; Zaia, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear polysaccharides expressed on animal cell surfaces and in extracellular matrices. Their biosynthesis is under complex control and confers a domain structure that is essential to their ability to bind to protein partners. Key to understanding the functions of GAGs are methods to determine accurately and rapidly patterns of sulfation, acetylation and uronic acid epimerization that correlate with protein binding or other biological activities. Mass spectrometry (MS) is particularly suitable for the analysis of GAGs for biomedical purposes. Using modern ionization techniques it is possible to accurately determine molecular weights of GAG oligosaccharides and their distributions within a mixture. Methods for direct interfacing with liquid chromatography have been developed to permit online mass spectrometric analysis of GAGs. New tandem mass spectrometric methods for fine structure determination of GAGs are emerging. This review summarizes MS-based approaches for analysis of GAGs, including tissue extraction and chromatographic methods compatible with LC/MS and tandem MS. PMID:25705143

  13. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  14. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Scheubert, Kerstin; Hufsky, Franziska; Böcker, Sebastian

    2013-03-01

    : The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline.

  15. Improving gene annotation using peptide mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Stephen; Shen, Zhouxin; Ng, Julio; Florea, Liliana; Guigó, Roderic; Briggs, Steven P.; Bafna, Vineet

    2007-01-01

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is a key goal of genome sequencing projects. In spite of tremendous recent advances in computational gene finding, comprehensive annotation remains a challenge. Peptide mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for researching the dynamic proteome and suggests an attractive approach to discover and validate protein-coding genes. We present algorithms to construct and efficiently search spectra against a genomic database, with no prior knowledge of encoded proteins. By searching a corpus of 18.5 million tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) from human proteomic samples, we validate 39,000 exons and 11,000 introns at the level of translation. We present translation-level evidence for novel or extended exons in 16 genes, confirm translation of 224 hypothetical proteins, and discover or confirm over 40 alternative splicing events. Polymorphisms are efficiently encoded in our database, allowing us to observe variant alleles for 308 coding SNPs. Finally, we demonstrate the use of mass spectrometry to improve automated gene prediction, adding 800 correct exons to our predictions using a simple rescoring strategy. Our results demonstrate that proteomic profiling should play a role in any genome sequencing project. PMID:17189379

  16. Biological accelerator mass spectrometry at Uppsala University.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Bryhni, Helge; Palminger-Hallén, Ira; Ståhle, Lars

    2009-03-01

    A new research programme for the biological applications of accelerator mass spectrometry has been initiated at Uppsala University and the first results are presented. A (14)C-labelled pharmaceutical substance has been dissolved in human blood, plasma and urine and diluted over 3 orders of magnitude. The measured drug concentrations were found to be in good agreement with the predicted values. Furthermore, the effect of the sample preparation background contribution has been studied as the sample amount was varied down to sub-microl sizes.

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry of the planetary elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, L. K.; Clacher, A. P.; Morris, K.; King, S. J.; Cresswell, R. G.; Day, J. P.; Livens, F. R.

    1997-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry has been applied for the first time to the detection of 237Np. Sensitivity approaches 105 atoms. A first measurement of the mobility of 237Np in a marine environment is reported, and lends support to the prediction that neptunium should be substantially more mobile than plutonium. Measurements of backgrounds and transmissions for plutonium and neptunium in different charge states are also reported. In addition, the relative negative ion formation probabilities for the monoxide ions of Th, U, Np and Pu have been measured.

  18. Isotopic trace analysis by atomic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffels, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    All the production facilities at Hanford are now shut down. However, the legacy from half a century of plutonium production includes 177 underground storage tanks of up to one million gallons each containing the largest accumulation of high-level radioactive waste in what used to be called ``the free world.`` Hanford`s new mission, in addition to a spectrum of ongoing research and development, is radioactive waste management and environmental restoration. Isotope-ratio mass spectrometry will continue to be an essential tool in monitoring the progress of that mission.

  19. Mass Determination of Entire Amyloid Fibrils by Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Doussineau, Tristan; Mathevon, Carole; Altamura, Lucie; Vendrely, Charlotte; Dugourd, Philippe; Forge, Vincent; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2016-02-12

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled protein structures with important roles in biology (either pathogenic or physiological), and are attracting increasing interest in nanotechnology. However, because of their high aspect ratio and the presence of some polymorphism, that is, the possibility to adopt various structures, their characterization is challenging and basic information such as their mass is unknown. Here we show that charge-detection mass spectrometry, recently developed for large self-assembled systems such as viruses, provides such information in a straightforward manner. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Boundaries of Mass Resolution in Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lössl, Philip; Snijder, Joost; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2014-06-01

    Over the last two decades, native mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study intact proteins and noncovalent protein complexes. Studied experimental systems range from small-molecule (drug)-protein interactions, to nanomachineries such as the proteasome and ribosome, to even virus assembly. In native MS, ions attain high m/z values, requiring special mass analyzers for their detection. Depending on the particular mass analyzer used, instrumental mass resolution does often decrease at higher m/z but can still be above a couple of thousand at m/z 5000. However, the mass resolving power obtained on charge states of protein complexes in this m/z region is experimentally found to remain well below the inherent instrument resolution of the mass analyzers employed. Here, we inquire into reasons for this discrepancy and ask how native MS would benefit from higher instrumental mass resolution. To answer this question, we discuss advantages and shortcomings of mass analyzers used to study intact biomolecules and biomolecular complexes in their native state, and we review which other factors determine mass resolving power in native MS analyses. Recent examples from the literature are given to illustrate the current status and limitations.

  1. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  2. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Profiling of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaodan; Jacob, Naduparambil K.; Amunugama, Ravindra; Lucas, David M.; Knapp, Amy R.; Ren, Chen; Davis, Melanie E.; Marcucci, Guido; Parthun, Mark R.; Byrd, John C.; Fishel, Richard A.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Here we describe the use of reverse-phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (RP-LC-MS) to simultaneously characterize variants and post-translationally modified isoforms for each histone. The analysis of intact proteins significantly reduces the time of sample preparation and simplifies data interpretation. LC-MS analysis and peptide mass mapping have previously been applied to identify histone proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications. However, these studies provided limited characterization of both linker histones and core histones. The current LC-MS analysis allows for the simultaneous observation of all histone PTMs and variants (both replacement and bulk histones) without further enrichment, which will be valuable in comparative studies. Protein identities were verified by the analysis of histone H2A species using RPLC fractionation, AU-PAGE separation and nano-LC-MS/MS. PMID:17254850

  3. Study of odor recorder using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Tomohiro; Nakamoto, Takamichi; Moriizumi, Toyosaka

    It is necessary to determine the recipe of a target odor with sufficient accuracy to realize an odor recorder for recording and reproducing it. We studied the recipe measurement method of a target odor using a mass spectrometry. It was confirmed that the linear superposition was valid when the binary mixture of the apple-flavor components such as isobutyric acid and ethyl valerate was measured. The superposition of a mass spectrum pattern may enable the recipe determination of a multi-component odor easily. In this research, we succeeded in the recipe determinations of orange flavor made up of 14 component odors when its typical recipe, the equalized, the citral-enhanced and the citronellol-enhanced ones were measured.

  4. FAPA mass spectrometry of designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Gierczyk, Blazej; Reszke, Edward; Babij, Michal; Gotszalk, Teodor; Schroeder, Grzegorz; Silberring, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the analysis of designer drugs is described. In this paper, we present application of FAPA MS for identification of exemplary psychotropic drugs: JWH-122, 4BMC, Pentedrone, 3,4-DNNC and ETH-CAT. We have utilized two approaches for introducing samples into the plasma stream; first in the form of a methanolic aerosol from the nebulizer, and the second based on a release of vapors from the electrically heated crucible by thermal desorption. The analytes were ionized by FAPA and identified in the mass analyzer. The order of release of the compounds depends on their volatility. These methods offer fast and reliable structural information, without pre-separation, and can be an alternative to the Electron Impact, GC/MS, and ESI for fast analysis of designer-, and other psychoactive drugs.

  5. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz; Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a technique used to visualize the spatial distribution of biomolecules such as peptides, proteins, lipids or other organic compounds by their molecular masses. Among the different MSI strategies, MALDI-MSI provides a sensitive and label-free approach for imaging of a wide variety of protein or peptide biomarkers from the surface of tissue sections, being currently used in an increasing number of biomedical applications such as biomarker discovery and tissue classification. In the field of rheumatology, MALDI-MSI has been applied to date for the analysis of joint tissues such as synovial membrane or cartilage. This review summarizes the studies and key achievements obtained using MALDI-MSI to increase understanding on rheumatic pathologies and to describe potential diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of these diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Steroid Hormone Analysis by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Steven J.; Soldin, Offie P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND New high-performance liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods are among the most successful approaches to improve specificity problems inherent in many immunoassays. CONTENT We emphasize problems with immunoassays for the measurement of steroids and review the emerging role of LC-MS/MS in the measurement of clinically relevant steroids. The latest generation of tandem mass spectrometers has superior limits of quantification, permitting omission of previously employed derivatization steps. The measurement of steroid profiles in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenal insufficiency, chronic pelvic pain and prostatitis, oncology (breast cancer), and athletes has important new applications. CONCLUSIONS LC-MS/MS now affords the specificity, imprecision, and limits of quantification necessary for the reliable measurement of steroids in human fluids, enhancing diagnostic capabilities, particularly when steroid profiles are available. PMID:19325015

  7. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  8. Radiocarbon positive-ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Shanks, Richard P.; Donzel, Xavier; Gaubert, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Proof-of-principle of a new mass spectrometric technique for radiocarbon measurement is demonstrated. Interfering nitrogen and hydrocarbon molecules are largely eliminated in a charge-exchange cell operating on non-metallic gas. The positive-to-negative ion conversion is the reverse of that conventionally used in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and is compatible with plasma ion sources that may be significantly more efficient and capable of greater output than are AMS sputter ion sources. The Nanogan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source employed exhibited no sample memory and the >50 kyrs age range of AMS was reproduced. A bespoke prototype new instrument is now required to optimise the plasma and cell physics and to realise hypothetical performance gains over AMS.

  9. [Mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory].

    PubMed

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Martró Català, Elisa; Ausina Ruiz, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases are still a cause of high mortality and morbidity rates. Current microbiological diagnostic methods are based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolated microorganisms, which can be obtained in about 24-48 h. Given that the microbiological identification is of major importance for patient management, new diagnostic methods are needed in order to detect and identify microorganisms in a timely and accurate manner. Over the last few years, several molecular techniques based on the amplification of microbial nucleic acids have been developed with the aim of reducing the time needed for the identification of the microorganisms involved in different infectious processes. On the other hand, mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and consistent alternative to conventional methods for microorganism identification. This review describes the most widely used mass spectrometry technologies -matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF)-, both for protein and nucleic acid analysis, as well as the commercial platforms available. Related publications of most interest in clinical microbiology are also reviewed.

  10. Research Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A.; Donahue, D. J.; Burr, G. S.; Beck, W.; Hatheway, A. L.; Biddulph, D. L.; McHargue, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility has been operated at the University of Arizona since 1982. This is an excellent example of a facility which has benefitted from the NSF Earth Sciences Instrumentation and Facilities Program. AMS has many applications to the fields of geochronology, geoarchaeology, paleoclimatology. A wide range of climatic, geologic and archeological records can be characterized by measuring their 14C and 10Be concentrations, using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These records are found not only in the traditional sampling sites such as lake sediments and ice cores, but also in diverse natural accumulates and biogeochemical products such as: loess/paleosol deposits, corals, speleothems, and forest-fire horizons. The in-situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials provides several possibilities of determining their chronology. Thes studies are important for understanding cosmic-ray production of radionuclides in rock surfaces, by which we can draw conclusions about exposure time and erosion. Studies on extraterrestrial materials such as lunar samples allow us to determine the solar and galactic cosmic-ray fluxes in the past, and the cosmogenic 14C and 10Be in meteorites can be used to determine terrestrial ages. In this paper, we will highlight some selected applications of AMS, including dating of some interesting art works and artifacts, to show some of the great range of studies which can be undertaken.

  11. Lipid imaging by mass spectrometry - a review.

    PubMed

    Gode, David; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-03-07

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has proven to be extremely useful for applications such as the spatial analysis of peptides and proteins in biological tissue, the performance assessment of drugs in vivo or the measurement of protein or metabolite expression as tissue classifiers or biomarkers from disease versus control tissue comparisons. The most popular MSI technique is MALDI mass spectrometry. First invented by Richard Caprioli in the mid-1990s, it is the highest performing MSI technique in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity for intact biomolecules and application range today. The unique ability to identify and spatially resolve numerous compounds simultaneously, based on m/z values has inter alia been applied to untargeted and targeted chemical mapping of biological compartments, revealing changes of physiological states, disease pathologies and metabolic faith and distribution of xenobiotics. Many MSI applications focus on lipid species because of the lipids' diverse roles as structural components of cell membranes, their function in the surfactant cycle, and their involvement as second messengers in signalling cascades of tissues and cells. This article gives a comprehensive overview of lipid imaging techniques and applications using established MALDI and SIMS methods but also other promising MSI techniques such as DESI.

  12. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Palop-Borrás, Begoña; Domingo, Diego; Tudó, Griselda

    2016-06-01

    To date, more than 170 species of mycobacteria have been described, of which more than one third may be pathogenic to humans, representing a significant workload for microbiology laboratories. These species must be identified in clinical practice, which has long been a major problem due to the shortcomings of conventional (phenotypic) methods and the limitations and complexity of modern methods largely based on molecular biology techniques. The aim of this review was to briefly describe different aspects related to the use of MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) for the identification of mycobacteria. Several difficulties are encountered with the use of this methodology in these microorganisms mainly due to the high pathogenicity of some mycobacteria and the peculiar structure of their cell wall, requiring inactivation and special protein extraction protocols. We also analysed other relevant aspects such as culture media, the reference methods employed (gold standard) in the final identification of the different species, the cut-off used to accept data as valid, and the databases of the different mass spectrometry systems available. MS has revolutionized diagnosis in modern microbiology; however, specific improvements are needed to consolidate the use of this technology in mycobacteriology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  14. Plasma source mass spectrometry in experimental nutrition.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R M

    1998-01-01

    The development and commercial availability of plasma ion source, specifically inductively coupled plasma, mass spectrometers (ICP-MS) have significantly extended the potential application of stable isotopes for nutritional modeling. The status of research and commercial ICP-MS instruments, and their applications and limitations for stable isotopic studies are reviewed. The consequences of mass spectroscopic resolution and measurement sensitivity obtainable with quadrupole, sector, time-of-flight, and trap instruments on stable isotope analysis are examined. Requirements for reliable isotope measurements with practical biological samples including tissues and fluids are considered. The possibility for stable isotope analysis in chemically separated compounds (speciation) also is explored. On-line compound separations by chromatography or electrophoresis, for example, have been combined instrumentally with ICP-MS. Som possibilities and requirements are described for stable isotope speciation analysis.

  15. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in nutrition research

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, A.H.

    1994-12-31

    Many of the biochemical pathways and processes that form the foundation of modern nutrition research was elucidated using stable isotopes as physiological tracers. Since the discovery of stable isotopes, improvements and innovations in mass spectrometry and chromatography have led to greatly expanded applications. This research project was designed to evaluate gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) as a tool for isotopic tracer studies and to delineate the operational parameters for the analysis of {sup 13}C-labeled cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate. The same isotope ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the development of two additional inlet systems: a continuous-flow inlet for the analyses of {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} and a filament inlet for on-line combustion and isotopic analysis of non-volatile organic compounds. Each of these three inlets was evaluated and their utility in nutrition research illustrated. GC/C/IRMS was used to analyze cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate with good accuracy, precision and little isotopic memory. For all three compounds the detection limits achieved well surpassed currently used technologies. For compounds that can be well separated by GC, GC/C/IRMS is a valuable analytical tool. The continuous-flow inlet provided good accuracy and precision for measurements of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} from breath tests and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} from total energy expenditure tests. Most importantly, the continuous-flow inlet increased sample throughput by at least a factor of three over conventional analytical techniques. The filament inlet provided accurate and precise {sup 13}C ratio measurements of both natural abundance and enriched standards of non-volatile organic compounds of physiological interest.

  16. Isotope ratio analysis by Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Chimiak, L. M.; Dallas, B.; Griep-Raming, J.; Juchelka, D.; Makarov, A.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    Several technologies are being developed to examine the intramolecular isotopic structures of molecules (i.e., site-specific and multiple substitution), but various limitations in sample size and type or (for IRMS) resolution have so far prevented the creation of a truly general technique. We will discuss the initial findings of a technique based on Fourier transform mass spectrometry, using the Thermo Scientific Q Exactive GC — an instrument that contains an Orbitrap mass analyzer. Fourier transform mass spectrometry is marked by exceptionally high mass resolutions (the Orbitrap reaches M/∆M in the range 250,000-1M in the mass range of greatest interest, 50-200 amu). This allows for resolution of a large range of nearly isobaric interferences for isotopologues of volatile and semi-volatile compounds (i.e., involving isotopes of H, C, N, O and S). It also provides potential to solve very challenging mass resolution problems for isotopic analysis of other, heavier elements. Both internal and external experimental reproducibilities of isotope ratio analyses using the Orbitrap typically conform to shot-noise limits down to levels of 0.2 ‰ (1SE), and routinely in the range 0.5-1.0 ‰, with similar accuracy when standardized to concurrently run reference materials. Such measurements can be made without modifications to the ion optics of the Q Exactive GC, but do require specially designed sample introduction devices to permit sample/standard comparison and long integration times. The sensitivity of the Q Exactive GC permits analysis of sub-nanomolar samples and quantification of multiply-substituted species. The site-specific capability of this instrument arises from the fact that mass spectra of molecular analytes commonly contain diverse fragment ion species, each of which samples a specific sub-set of molecular sites. We will present applications of this technique to the biological and abiological chemistry of amino acids, forensic identification of

  17. NITPICK: peak identification for mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Bernhard Y; Kirchner, Marc; Steen , Hanno; Steen, Judith AJ; Hamprecht , Fred A

    2008-01-01

    Background The reliable extraction of features from mass spectra is a fundamental step in the automated analysis of proteomic mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. Results This contribution proposes a sparse template regression approach to peak picking called NITPICK. NITPICK is a Non-greedy, Iterative Template-based peak PICKer that deconvolves complex overlapping isotope distributions in multicomponent mass spectra. NITPICK is based on fractional averagine, a novel extension to Senko's well-known averagine model, and on a modified version of sparse, non-negative least angle regression, for which a suitable, statistically motivated early stopping criterion has been derived. The strength of NITPICK is the deconvolution of overlapping mixture mass spectra. Conclusion Extensive comparative evaluation has been carried out and results are provided for simulated and real-world data sets. NITPICK outperforms pepex, to date the only alternate, publicly available, non-greedy feature extraction routine. NITPICK is available as software package for the R programming language and can be downloaded from . PMID:18755032

  18. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:21728281

  19. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  20. Mass Spectrometry for Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illies, A.; Shevlin, P. B.; Childers, G.; Peschke, M.; Tsai, J.

    1995-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is routinely covered in undergraduate organic chemistry courses and a number of valuable laboratory experiments featuring its use have been discussed (1-7). Although such experiments work well at institutions with limited laboratory enrollments, we typically teach laboratories with enrollments of 160 or more in which it is difficult to allow each student to carry out a meaningful "hands on" mass spectrometry experiment. Since we feel that some practical experience with this technique is important, we have designed a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (gc/ms) exercise that allows each student to analyze the products of a simple synthesis that they have performed. The exercise starts with the microscale SN2 synthesis of 1-bromobutane from 1-butanol as described by Williamson (8). The students complete the synthesis and place one drop of the distilled product in a screw capped vial. The vials are then sealed, labeled with the students name and taken to the mass spectrometry laboratory by a teaching assistant. Students are instructed to sign up for a 20-min block of time over the next few days in order to analyze their sample. When the student arrives at the laboratory, he or she adds 1 ml CH2Cl2 to the sample and injects 0.3 microliters of the solution into the gas chromatograph. The samples typically contain the 1-butanol starting material and the 1-bromobutane product along with traces of dibutyl ether. The figure shows a mass chromatogram along with the mass spectra of the starting material and product from an actual student run. For this analysis to be applicable to large numbers of students, the gc separation must be as rapid as possible. We have been able to analyze each sample in 6 minutes on a 30 m DB-5 capillary column with the following temperature program: 70 oC for 1 min, 70-80 oC at 10 oC/min, 86-140 oC at 67.5 oC/min, 140-210 oC at 70 oC/min, and 210 oC for 1 min. A mass range of 20-200 amu is scanned with a solvent delay of 2

  1. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  2. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  3. Characterisation of DEFB107 by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Bryan J.; Eastwood, Hayden; Clark, Dave J.; Polfer, Nick C.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Dorin, Julia A.; Maxwell, Alison; Langley, Ross J.; Govan, John R. W.; Bernstein, Summer L.; Bowers, Michael T.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2006-05-01

    Mammalian defensins are small endogenous cationic proteins which form a class of antimicrobial peptides that is part of the innate immune response of all mammalian species [R. Lehrer, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2 (9) (2004) 727; T. Ganz, R.I. Lehrer, Curr. Opin. Immunol. 6 (4) (1994) 584] [1] and [2]. We have developed mass spectrometry based strategies for characterising the structure-activity relationship of defensins [D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, N.C. Polfer, P.E. Barran, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (47) (2004) 48671; P.E. Barran, N.C. Polfer, D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, P.R.R. Langridge-Smith, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, R.P. Millar, M.T. Bowers, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 240 (2005) 273] [3] and [4], and here we present data obtained from a five cysteine containing [beta]-defensin, DEFB107. The synthetic product of this human defensin exists with a glutathione capping group, its oxidation state and disulphide connectivity have been determined via accurate mass measurements and peptide mass mapping respectively, and despite possessing three disulphide bridges, it does not fit the [beta]-defensin canonical motif. With the use of molecular modelling, we have generated candidate geometries to discern the influence of disulphide bridging on the overall tertiary structure of DEFB107. These are compared with experimental results from ion mobility measurements. Defensins display activity against a wide variety of pathogens including both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Their mechanism of mode of action is unknown, but is believed to involve defensin aggregation at cell surfaces, followed by cell permeabilisation and hence deathE To probe this mechanism, the localisation of DEFB107 in synthetic vesicles was studied using H/D exchange and mass spectrometry. The results obtained are used to analyse the antimicrobial activity of DEFB107.

  4. Interfacing membrane mimetics with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Michael T.; Hoi, Kin Kuan; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Membrane proteins play critical physiological roles and make up the majority of drug targets. Due to their generally low expression levels and amphipathic nature, membrane proteins represent challenging molecular entities for biophysical study. Mass spectrometry offers several sensitive approaches to study the biophysics of membrane proteins. By preserving noncovalent interactions in the gas phase and using collisional activation to remove solubilization agents inside the mass spectrometer, native mass spectrometry (MS) is capable of studying isolated assemblies that would be insoluble in aqueous solution, such as membrane protein oligomers and protein-lipid complexes. Conventional methods use detergent to solubilize the protein prior to electrospray ionization. Gas-phase activation inside the mass spectrometer removes the detergent to yield the isolated proteins with bound ligands. This approach has proven highly successful for ionizing membrane proteins. With the appropriate choice of detergents, membrane proteins with bound lipid species can be observed, which allows characterization of protein-lipid interactions. However, detergents have several limitations. They do not necessarily replicate the native lipid bilayer environment, and only a small number of protein-lipid interactions can be resolved. In this Account, we summarize the development of different membrane mimetics as cassettes for MS analysis of membrane proteins. Examples include amphipols, bicelles, and picodiscs with a special emphasis on lipoprotein Nanodiscs. Polydispersity and heterogeneity of the membrane mimetic cassette is a critical issue for study by MS. Ever more complex datasets consisting of overlapping protein charge states and multiple lipid-bound entities have required development of new computational, theoretical, and experimental approaches to interpret both mass and ion mobility spectra. We will present the rationale and limitations of these approaches. Starting with the

  5. Detection of gunshot residues using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taudte, Regina Verena; Beavis, Alison; Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the "gold standard" for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis.

  6. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian’an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:24921707

  7. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycology].

    PubMed

    Quiles Melero, Inmaculada; Peláez, Teresa; Rezusta López, Antonio; Garcia-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming an essential tool in most microbiology laboratories. At present, by using a characteristic fungal profile obtained from whole cells or through simple extraction protocols, MALDI-TOF MS allows the identification of pathogenic fungi with a high performance potential. This methodology decreases the laboratory turnaround time, optimizing the detection of mycoses. This article describes the state-of-the-art of the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of human clinical fungal pathogens in the laboratory and discusses the future applications of this technology, which will further improve routine mycological diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Live single-cell mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masujima, Tsutomu

    2009-08-01

    The history from bio-imaging to live single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) is herein reviewed. The limitation of the current bio-imaging method is probing only known molecules, and a method for finding new molecules is needed for cells which, however, show individual behaviors even in the same incubation dish. Single-cell MALDI-TOF/MS has been developed, but it can detect only molecules that can be easily ionized, and not be exhaustive. Recently, the contents of a single cell have been sucked out by a nano-electro spray tip, and directly introduced into MS by nano-spray ionization. Thousands of molecular peaks have been successfully and exhaustively detected, and an extraction method for key molecules was also developed. This new method is now being widely applied to explore site- or state-specific molecules in various aspects of cell dynamisms.

  9. Recent trends in inorganic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Barshick, C.M.; Duckworth, D.C.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    The field of inorganic mass spectrometry has seen substantial change in the author`s professional lifetime (over 30 years). Techniques in their infancy 30 years ago have matured; some have almost disappeared. New and previously unthought of techniques have come into being; some of these, such as ICP-MS, are reasonably mature now, while others have some distance to go before they can be so considered. Most of these new areas provide fertile fields for researchers, both in the development of new analytical techniques and by allowing fundamental studies to be undertaken that were previously difficult, impossible, or completely unforeseen. As full coverage of the field is manifestly impossible within the framework of this paper, only those areas with which the author has personal contact will be discussed. Most of the work originated in his own laboratory, but that of other laboratories is covered where it seemed appropriate.

  10. Characterization of Microorganisms by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Catherine E.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-10-02

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for characterization and analysis of microorganisms, specifically bacteria, is described here as a rapid screening tool. The objective of this technique is not comprehensive protein analysis of a microorganism but rather a rapid screening of the organism and the accessible protein pattern for characterization and distinction. This method is based on the ionization of the readily accessible and easily ionizable portion of the protein profile of an organism that is often characteristic of different bacterial species. The utility of this screening approach is yet to reach its full potential but could be applied to food safety, disease outbreak monitoring in hospitals, culture stock integrity and verification, microbial forensics or homeland security applications.

  11. [Future applications of mass spectrometry in microbiology].

    PubMed

    Vila, Jordi; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Burillo, Almudena; Bouza, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) has been vigorously introduced in many clinical microbiology laboratories for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria and fungi. In fact, the implementation of this methodology can be considered a revolution in these laboratories. In addition to microbial identification, MALDI-TOF MS is being used for the detection of some mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and for the molecular typing of bacteria. A number of current and future applications that increase the versatility of this methodology may also be mentioned. Among these are its direct application on clinical samples, the detection of toxins or specific microbial antigens, and its application in the fields of virology and parasitology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Glass microfabricated nebulizer chip for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Ville; Haapala, Markus; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami

    2007-05-01

    A microfluidic nebulizer chip for mass spectrometry is presented. It is an all-glass device which consists of fusion bonded Pyrex wafers with embedded flow channels and a nozzle at the chip edge. A platinum heater is located on the wafer backside. Fabrication of the chip is detailed, especially glass deep etching, wafer bonding, and metal patterning. Various process combinations of bonding and metallization have been considered (anodic bonding vs. fusion bonding; heater inside/outside channel; metallization before/after bonding; platinum lift-off vs. etching). The chip vaporizes the liquid sample (0.1-10 microL min(-1)) and mixes it with a nebulizer gas (ca. 100 sccm N2). Operating temperatures can go up to 500 degrees C ensuring efficient vaporization. Thermal insulation of the glass ensures low temperatures at the far end of the chip, enabling easy interconnections.

  13. Functional phosphoproteomic mass spectrometry-based approaches

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics tools are crucial for understanding the structure and dynamics of signaling networks. Approaches such as affinity purification followed by MS have also been used to elucidate relevant biological questions in health and disease. The study of proteomes and phosphoproteomes as linked systems, rather than research studies of individual proteins, are necessary to understand the functions of phosphorylated and un-phosphorylated proteins under spatial and temporal conditions. Phosphoproteome studies also facilitate drug target protein identification which may be clinically useful in the near future. Here, we provide an overview of general principles of signaling pathways versus phosphorylation. Likewise, we detail chemical phosphoproteomic tools, including pros and cons with examples where these methods have been applied. In addition, basic clues of electrospray ionization and collision induced dissociation fragmentation are detailed in a simple manner for successful phosphoproteomic clinical studies. PMID:23369623

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in plutonium analysis.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    The paper summarizes the results of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio studies in atmospheric fallout samples collected in 1986 over Gdynia (Poland) as well as three Baltic fish species collected in 1997 using the accelerator mass spectrometry. A new generation of AMS has been developed during last years and this method is an efficient and good technique to measure long-lived radioisotopes in the environment and provides the most accurate determination of the atomic ratios between (240)Pu and (239)Pu. The nuclide compositions of plutonium in filter samples correspond to their means of production. AMS measurements of atmospheric fallout collected in April showed sufficient increase of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio from 0.28 from March to 0.47. Also such high increase of (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, close to reactor core (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, was observed in September and equaled 0.47.

  15. Mass Spectrometry Imaging in Oncology Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, R J A; Bunch, J; McGinnity, D F

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been integrated in to many areas of drug discovery and development. It can have significant impact in oncology drug discovery as it allows efficacy and safety of compounds to be assessed against the backdrop of the complex tumour microenvironment. We will discuss the roles of MSI in investigating compound and metabolite biodistribution and defining pharmacokinetic -pharmacodynamic relationships, analysis that is applicable to all drug discovery projects. We will then look more specifically at how MSI can be used to understand tumour metabolism and other applications specific to oncology research. This will all be described alongside the challenges of applying MSI to industry research with increased use of metrology for MSI. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mass spectrometry methodology in lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian'an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-06-11

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease.

  17. Mass spectrometry and Web 2.0.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K

    2007-10-01

    The term Web 2.0 is a convenient shorthand for a new era in the Internet in which users themselves are both generating and modifying existing web content. Several types of tools can be used. With social bookmarking, users assign a keyword to a web resource and the collection of the keyword 'tags' from multiple users form the classification of these resources. Blogs are a form of diary or news report published on the web in reverse chronological order and are a popular form of information sharing. A wiki is a website that can be edited using a web browser and can be used for collaborative creation of information on the site. This article is a tutorial that describes how these new ways of creating, modifying, and sharing information on the Web are being used for on-line mass spectrometry resources.

  18. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  19. Dating silk by capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; Klauenberg, Kathryn; Ballard, Mary

    2011-10-01

    A new capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) technique is introduced for age estimation of silk textiles based on amino acid racemization rates. With an L to D conversion half-life of ~2500 years for silk (B. mori) aspartic acid, the technique is capable of dating silk textiles ranging in age from several decades to a few-thousand-years-old. Analysis required only ~100 μg or less of silk fiber. Except for a 2 h acid hydrolysis at 110 °C, no other sample preparation is required. The CE-MS analysis takes ~20 min, consumes only nanoliters of the amino acid mixture, and provides both amino acid composition profiles and D/L ratios for ~11 amino acids.

  20. Multiplex mass spectrometry imaging for latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Gargey B; Korte, Andrew R; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed in-parallel data acquisition of orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and ion trap MS and/or MS/MS scans for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS imaging (MSI) to obtain rich chemical information in less data acquisition time. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel application of this multiplex MSI methodology for latent fingerprints. In a single imaging experiment, we could obtain chemical images of various endogenous and exogenous compounds, along with simultaneous MS/MS images of a few selected compounds. This work confirms the usefulness of multiplex MSI to explore chemical markers when the sample specimen is very limited. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  2. Deciphering the histone code using mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueberheide, Beatrix M.; Mollah, Sahana

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, studies surrounding chromatin research have grown exponentially. A major focus of chromatin biology is centered on understanding of how histone modifications alter chromatin structure at the molecular and mechanistic levels. Discoveries are being made at a rapid pace due to the advent of new and innovative techniques. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool in the field of histone research due to its speed, sensitivity, and ease of use. This has resulted in the identification of a number of novel histone modification sites. In consequence, new roles in biological processes have been discovered and hypothetical models, such as the `histone code' have been reaffirmed or refined. One significant advantage to using mass spectrometric techniques is that the combinations of modifications on different sites can be determined which is crucial to deciphering the `histone code'. In this manuscript, the mass spectrometric approaches developed over the past decade for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are discussed.

  3. Atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Furuya, Hiroko; Okazaki, Shigemitsu

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study on the atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization (APP(e)I) of gaseous organic compounds with Ar* has been made. The metastable argon atoms (Ar*: 11.55 eV for (3)P(2) and 11.72 eV for (3)P(0)) were generated by the negative-mode corona discharge of atmospheric-pressure argon gas. By applying a high positive voltage (+500 to +1000 V) to the stainless steel capillary for the sample introduction (0.1 mm i.d., 0.3 mm o.d.), strong ion signals could be obtained. The ions formed were sampled through an orifice into the vacuum and mass-analyzed by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The major ions formed by APP(e)I are found to be molecular-related ions for alkanes, aromatics, and oxygen-containing compounds. Because only the molecules with ionization energies less than the internal energy of Ar* are ionized, the present method will be a selective and highly sensitive interface for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Chen, Sharon S

    2005-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics involves the identification and quantitation of protein components in various biological systems. Stable isotope labelling technology, by both metabolic and chemical methods, has been the most commonly used approach for global proteome-wide profiling. Recently, its capability has been extended from labelled pairs to multiple labels, allowing for the simultaneous quantification of multiplex samples. The ion intensity-based quantitative approach has progressively gained more popularity as mass spectrometry performance has improved significantly. Although some success has been reported, it remains difficult comprehensively to characterise the global proteome, due to its enormous complexity and dynamic range. The use of sub-proteome fractionation techniques permits a simplification of the proteome and provides a practical step towards the ultimate dissection of the entire proteome. Further development of the technology for targeting sub-proteomes on a functional basis - such as selecting proteins with differential expression profiles from mass spectrometric analyses, for further mass spectrometric sequencing in an intelligent manner--is expected in the near future.

  5. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  6. Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

    2013-01-01

    With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach.

  7. Temperature compensation for miniaturized magnetic sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Temperature compensation for a magnetic sector used in mass spectrometry. A high temperature dependant magnetic sector is used. This magnetic sector is compensated by a magnetic shunt that has opposite temperature characteristics to those of the magnet.

  8. Utility of liquid chromatography/fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/thermospray mass spectrometry for structure identification of metabolites of a fluorinated herbicide.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, H; Chott, R C; Solsten, R T

    1992-09-01

    This study demonstrates a useful application of on-line microbore high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fast atom bombardment (FAB) and thermospray (TSP) mass spectrometry techniques for identification of metabolites from the in vitro metabolism of an experimental Monsanto herbicide: 2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl-N-[2-methyl-6- (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]acetamide, 'chloroacetanilide'. The microbore HPLC FAB technique on a high-resolution sector mass spectrometer accelerated identification of polar metabolites from the in vitro metabolism study of the herbicide. It provided good chromatographic resolution and excellent FAB sensitivity with strong protonated molecular ions. Scanning high-resolution LC/FAB mass spectrometry also provided molecular formulae for structural elucidation of unknown metabolites. Sample purification and concentration were minimized. Identification of less polar metabolites was carried out using LC/TSP mass spectrometry with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. LC/TSP mass spectrometry provided useful structural information for both polar and less polar metabolites because their spectra showed more fragmentation than FAB spectra. Glutathione conjugation was the major reaction observed during in vitro incubation of the herbicide. Oxidation of the chloroacetanilide by rat liver enzymes was also a significant metabolic reaction. Seven metabolites were identified, of which four were glutathione conjugates.

  9. Nanospray ion mobility mass spectrometry of selected high mass species.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Iain; Giles, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of electrospray ionization (ESI) and in particular nano-electrospray (nESI) has enabled the routine mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of large protein complexes in native aqueous buffers. Time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometers, in particular the hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) instruments, are well suited to the analysis of large protein complexes. When ionized under native-MS conditions, protein complexes routinely exhibit multiple charge states in excess of m/z 6,000, well above the standard mass range of many quadrupole or ion cyclotron-based instruments. The research area of native MS has expanded considerably in the last decade and has shown particular relevance in the area of protein structure determination. Researchers are now able to routinely measure intact MS spectra of protein complexes above 1 MDa in mass. The advent of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) studies, is now allowing researchers to infer the shape of the protein complex being analyzed. Herein, we describe how to acquire IM-MS data that ranges from inorganic salt clusters of caesium iodide (CsI) to large biomolecular complexes such as the chaperone protein GroEL.

  10. The role of mass spectrometry in atomic weight determinations.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John R

    2009-01-01

    The 1914 Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded to Theodore Richards, whose work provided an insight into the history of the birth and evolution of matter as embedded in the atomic weights. However, the secret to unlocking the hieroglyphics contained in the atomic weights is revealed by a study of the relative abundances of the isotopes. A consistent set of internationally accepted atomic weights has been a goal of the scientific community for over a century. Atomic weights were originally determined by chemical stoichiometry--the so-called "Harvard Method," but this methodology has now been superseded by the "physical method," in which the isotopic composition and atomic masses of the isotopes comprising an element are used to calculate the atomic weight with far greater accuracy than before. The role of mass spectrometry in atomic weight determinations was initiated by the discovery of isotopes by Thomson, and established by the pioneering work of Aston, Dempster, and Nier using sophisticated mass spectrographs. The advent of the sector field mass spectrometer in 1947, revolutionized the application of mass spectrometry for both solids and gases to other fields of science including atomic weights. Subsequently, technological advances in mass spectrometry have enabled atomic masses to be determined with an accuracy better than one part in 10(7), whilst the absolute isotopic composition of many elements has been determined to produce accurate values of their atomic weights. Conversely, those same technological developments have revealed significant variations in the isotope abundances of many elements caused by a variety of physiochemical mechanisms in natural materials. Although these variations were initially seen as an impediment to the accuracy with which atomic weights could be determined, it was quickly realized that nature had provided a new tool to investigate physiochemical and biogeochemical mechanisms in nature, which could be exploited by precise and

  11. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  12. Advantageous Uses of Mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hale, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative protein measurements by mass spectrometry have gained wide acceptance in research settings. However, clinical uptake of mass spectrometric protein assays has not followed suit. In part, this is due to the long-standing acceptance by regulatory agencies of immunological assays such as ELISA assays. In most cases, ELISAs provide highly accurate, sensitive, relatively inexpensive, and simple assays for many analytes. The barrier to acceptance of mass spectrometry in these situations will remain high. However, mass spectrometry provides solutions to certain protein measurements that are difficult, if not impossible, to accomplish by immunological methods. Cases where mass spectrometry can provide solutions to difficult assay development include distinguishing between very closely related protein species and monitoring biological and analytical variability due to sample handling and very high multiplexing capacity. This paper will highlight several examples where mass spectrometry has made certain protein measurements possible where immunological techniques have had a great difficulty. PMID:23365751

  13. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  14. Mass Spectrometry of Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Westphall, Michael S.; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air–droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-μL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing chargere combination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  15. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption.

  16. Single-protein nanomechanical mass spectrometry in real time

    PubMed Central

    Hanay, M.S.; Kelber, S.; Naik, A.K.; Chi, D.; Hentz, S.; Bullard, E.C.; Colinet, E.; Duraffourg, L.; Roukes, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) resonators can detect mass with exceptional sensitivity. Previously, mass spectra from several hundred adsorption events were assembled in NEMS-based mass spectrometry using statistical analysis. Here, we report the first realization of single-molecule NEMS-based mass spectrometry in real time. As each molecule in the sample adsorbs upon the NEMS resonator, its mass and the position-of-adsorption are determined by continuously tracking two driven vibrational modes of the device. We demonstrate the potential of multimode NEMS-based mass spectrometry by analyzing IgM antibody complexes in real-time. NEMS-MS is a unique and promising new form of mass spectrometry: it can resolve neutral species, provides resolving power that increases markedly for very large masses, and allows acquisition of spectra, molecule-by-molecule, in real-time. PMID:22922541

  17. Laser ablation/Fourier transform mass spectrometry of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, William R.; Brenna, J. T.

    1989-10-01

    Laser ablation/ionization followed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry is used to identify and characterize polymers. The mass spectra of several polymers are discussed, including polyimide, polyamic acid, Dupont Tefzel, and polyphenylene sulfide.

  18. Reliability of veterinary drug residue confirmation: high resolution mass spectrometry versus tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2015-01-26

    Confirmation of suspected residues has been a long time domain of tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ). The currently most widely used confirmation strategy relies on the use of two selected reaction monitoring signals (SRM). The details of this confirmation procedure are described in detail in the Commission Decision 93/256/EC (CD). On the other hand, high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is nowadays increasingly used for trace analysis. Yet its utility for confirmatory purposes has not been well explored and utilized, since established confirmation strategies like the CD do not yet include rules for modern HRMS technologies. It is the focus of this paper to evaluate the likelihood of false positive and false negative confirmation results, when using a variety of HRMS based measurement modes as compared to conventional QqQ mass spectrometry. The experimental strategy relies on the chromatographic separation of a complex blank sample (bovine liver extract) and the subsequent monitoring of a number of dummy transitions respectively dummy accurate masses. The term "dummy" refers to precursor and derived product ions (based on a realistic neutral loss) whose elemental compositions (CxHyNzOdCle) were produced by a random number generator. Monitoring a large number of such hypothetical SRM's, or accurate masses inevitably produces a number of mass traces containing chromatographic peaks (false detects) which are caused by eluting matrix compounds. The number and intensity of these peaks were recorded and standardized to permit a comparison among the two employed MS technologies. QqQ performance (compounds which happen to produce a response in two SRM traces at identical retention time) was compared with a number of different HRMS(1) and HRMS(2) detection based modes. A HRMS confirmation criterion based on two full scans (an unfragmented and an all ion fragmented) was proposed. Compared to the CD criteria, a significantly lower probability of false

  19. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird’s view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive. PMID:17481942

  20. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-06-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird's view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive.

  1. Pushing the limits of accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Beene, J. R.; Danchev, M.; Doupé, J.; Fuentes, B.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Hausladen, P. A.; Juras, R. C.; Liang, J. F.; Litherland, A. E.; Liu, Y.; Meigs, M. J.; Mills, G. D.; Mueller, P. E.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Pavan, J.; Sinclair, J. W.; Stracener, D. W.

    2007-06-01

    A renewed interest in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) from nuclear physics laboratories is emerging in connection with Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs). At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) we are exploring the AMS capabilities of the 25-MV tandem accelerator. Behind this effort is the realization that two fields of research - AMS and RIBs - complement each other in techniques. Development of effective and efficient beam purification techniques is of common interest to both AMS and the RIB program. Two main characteristics of the 25-MV tandem provide unique opportunities for performing the highest sensitivity measurements of AMS; namely (i) the highest operating voltage in the world, and (ii) a folded geometry which involves a 180° magnet in the terminal. For the RIB program, we have used AMS techniques to improve the sensitivity of detection of some radioactive species in the measurement of unknown masses of n-rich nuclei. For AMS, we have concentrated in exploring two important isotopes, 14C and 36Cl, for applications that require the highest sensitivity. We have successfully measured 36Cl/Cl ratios as low as a few times 10-16 in seawater samples demonstrating that our setup has the highest sensitivity for this isotope and proving that 36Cl can be measured at the levels required for a tracer in oceanography.

  2. Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Xi; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Guo, Yin-Long

    2016-10-04

    A carbon fiber ionization (CFI) technique was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of various organic compounds with different polarities. The design of the CFI technique was based on the good compatibility and dispersion of samples and solutions in different solvents on carbon fiber. As a fast, convenient, and versatile ionization method, CFI-MS is especially efficient for analyzing many low/nonpolar organic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, long-chain aliphatic aldehydes, sensitive steroids, terpenoids, and organometallic compounds. Some of these compounds may not be well-analyzed by electrospray ionization or electron ionization mass spectrometry. On the basis of our experimental results, the major ion formation mechanism of CFI-MS was suggested to involve desorption in a steam-distillation-like process, and then, ionization occurred mainly via corona discharge under high voltage. CFI-MS could not only work alone but also be coupled with separation techniques. It works well when coupled with supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) as well as in the analysis of exhaled human air. The high flexibility and versatility of CFI-MS has extended its applications in many areas, such as fast chemical screening, clinical testing, and forensic analysis.

  3. Mass spectrometry in bioinorganic analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lobiński, Ryszard; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Szpunar, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    A considerable momentum has recently been gained by in vitro and in vivo studies of interactions of trace elements in biomolecules due to advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) used as a detector in chromatography and capillary and planar electrophoresis. The multi-isotopic (including non-metals such as S, P, or Se) detection capability, high sensitivity, tolerance to matrix, and large linearity range regardless of the chemical environment of an analyte make ICP MS a valuable complementary technique to electrospray MS and MALDI MS. This review covers different facets of the recent progress in metal speciation in biochemistry, including probing in vitro interactions between metals and biomolecules, detection, determination, and structural characterization of heteroatom-containing molecules in biological tissues, and protein monitoring and quantification via a heteroelement (S, Se, or P) signal. The application areas include environmental chemistry, plant and animal biochemistry, nutrition, and medicine. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 25:255-289, 2006.

  4. Chip-mass spectrometry for glycomic studies.

    PubMed

    Bindila, Laura; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of micro- and nanochip front end technologies for electrospray mass spectrometry addressed a major challenge in carbohydrate analysis: high sensitivity structural determination and heterogeneity assessment in high dynamic range mixtures of biological origin. Chip-enhanced electrospray ionization was demonstrated to provide reproducible performance irrespective of the type of carbohydrate, while the amenability of chip systems for coupling with different mass spectrometers greatly advance the chip/MS technique as a versatile key tool in glycomic studies. A more accurate representation of the glycan repertoire to include novel biologically-relevant information was achieved in different biological sources, asserting this technique as a valuable tool in glycan biomarker discovery and monitoring. Additionally, the integration of various analytical functions onto chip devices and direct hyphenation to MS proved its potential for glycan analysis during the recent years, whereby a new analytical tool is on the verge of maturation: lab-on-chip MS glycomics. The achievements until early beginning of 2007 on the implementation of chip- and functional integrated chip/MS in systems glycobiology studies are reviewed here. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  6. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Lipids and Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Dennis, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics, a major part of metabolomics, constitutes the detailed analysis and global characterization, both spatial and temporal, of the structure and function of lipids (the lipidome) within a living system. As with proteomics, mass spectrometry has earned a central analytical role in lipidomics, and this role will continue to grow with technological developments. Currently, there exist two mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approaches, one based on a division of lipids into categories and classes prior to analysis, the “comprehensive lipidomics analysis by separation simplification” (CLASS), and the other in which all lipid species are analyzed together without prior separation, shotgun. In exploring the lipidome of various living systems, novel lipids are being discovered, and mass spectrometry is helping characterize their chemical structure. Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) is being used to investigate the association of lipids and membranes with proteins and enzymes, and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is being applied to the in situ analysis of lipids in tissues. PMID:21469951

  7. US Food and Drug Administration Perspectives on Clinical Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Jeffery, Douglas A; Shea, Yvonne R; Scholl, Peter F; Chan, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro diagnostic devices that measure proteins and peptides are underutilized in clinical practice, and none has been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing or for use in clinical trials. One way to increase their utilization is through enhanced interactions between the FDA and the clinical mass spectrometry community to improve the validation and regulatory review of these devices. As a reference point from which to develop these interactions, this article surveys the FDA's regulation of mass spectrometry-based devices, explains how the FDA uses guidance documents and standards in the review process, and describes the FDA's previous outreach to stakeholders. Here we also discuss how further communication and collaboration with the clinical mass spectrometry communities can identify opportunities for the FDA to provide help in the development of mass spectrometry-based devices and enhance their entry into the clinic.

  8. Mass spectrometry innovations in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Papac, D I; Shahrokh, Z

    2001-02-01

    This review highlights the many roles mass spectrometry plays in the discovery and development of new therapeutics by both the pharmaceutical and the biotechnology industries. Innovations in mass spectrometer source design, improvements to mass accuracy, and implementation of computer-controlled automation have accelerated the purification and characterization of compounds derived from combinatorial libraries, as well as the throughput of pharmacokinetics studies. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry, chemical reaction interface-mass spectrometry and continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry are promising alternatives for conducting mass balance studies in man. To meet the technical challenges of proteomics, discovery groups in biotechnology companies have led the way to development of instruments with greater sensitivity and mass accuracy (e.g., MALDI-TOF, ESI-Q-TOF, Ion Trap), the miniaturization of separation techniques and ion sources (e.g., capillary HPLC and nanospray), and the utilization of bioinformatics. Affinity-based methods coupled to mass spectrometry are allowing rapid and selective identification of both synthetic and biological molecules. With decreasing instrument cost and size and increasing reliability, mass spectrometers are penetrating both the manufacturing and the quality control arenas. The next generation of technologies to simplify the investigation of the complex fate of novel pharmaceutical entities in vitro and in vivo will be chip-based approaches coupled with mass spectrometry.

  9. Illustrating the Concepts of Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry in Introductory Courses: A MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke, Nancy Carter; Lovett, Timothy Neal

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used and versatile tool for scientists in many different fields. Soft ionization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allow for the analysis of biomolecules, polymers, and clusters. This article describes a MALDI mass spectrometry experiment designed for students in introductory…

  10. Illustrating the Concepts of Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry in Introductory Courses: A MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke, Nancy Carter; Lovett, Timothy Neal

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used and versatile tool for scientists in many different fields. Soft ionization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allow for the analysis of biomolecules, polymers, and clusters. This article describes a MALDI mass spectrometry experiment designed for students in introductory…

  11. Analysis of omnoponum by surface-ionization mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek; Khasanov, Usman; Pantsirev, Aleksey; Van Bocxlaer, Jan

    2010-12-01

    This paper provides the development of analytical capabilities of surface-ionization mass spectrometry (SI/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) for narcotic analgesic omnoponum, which perfectly exemplifies a mixture of opium alkaloids. It has been revealed that the investigated opiates solution, omnoponum, is ionized by the surface ionization (SI) method with high sensitivity. In the SI mass spectrum, M+, (M-H)+, (M-H-2nH)+, (M-R)+ and (M-R-2nH)+ ion lines, where M is a molecule, H is the hydrogen atom and R is a radical, were observed. These ion lines consist of combined omnoponum mixture SI mass spectra, i.e. morphine, codeine, thebaine, papaverine, and narcotine. Moreover, while the study of omnoponum by HPLC/MS/MS methods has attested that the mixture really consists of 5 components, it has been demonstrated that the SI/MS method can be utilized for the analysis of this mixture without the necessity of its chromatographic separation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass Spectrometry Imaging: facts and perspectives from a non-mass spectrometrist point of view.

    PubMed

    Cameron, L C

    2012-08-01

    Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI, also called Imaging Mass Spectrometry) can be used to map molecules according to their chemical abundance and spatial distribution. This technique is not widely used in mass spectrometry circles and is barely known by other scientists. In this review, a brief overview of the mass spectrometer hardware used in MSI and some of the possible applications of this powerful technique are discussed. I intend to call attention to MSI uses from cell biology to histopathology for biological scientists who have little background in mass spectrometry. MSI facts and perspectives are presented from a non-mass spectrometrist point of view.

  13. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  14. [Application of mass spectrometry to bacterial identification].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Álvaro Pascual; Ballestero-Téllez, Mónica; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; Iglesias, Manuel Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Correct and rapid identification of bacteria is essential for the correct diagnosis and treatment of infected patients. Until a few years ago, biochemical, colorimetric or even antibiotic sensitivity tests were used to identify genera and species. The main limitations of these methods were the time needed for their performance and the difficulty of distinguishing between microorganisms that were little reactive, highly similar, or difficult to culture. Many of these problems have been solved by the introduction of mass spectrometry (MS) in the laboratory with the use of MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight). Knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of this technology is essential to be able to take maximum advantage of this technique. Not all microorganisms can be identified with the same ease and reliability by MALDI-TOF and microbiologists need to know how to interpret the results obtained with this technique and the available alternatives in order to identify the microorganisms causing the most problems. This article aims to summarise the available information on the correct identification of the main human pathogenic bacteria through the use of MALDI-TOF MS, focusing on Gram-negative, Grampositive and anaerobic microorganisms. The main factors that must be taken into account for the reliable identification of any bacterium are the conditions for culture, sample preparation with the ideal extraction method and especially the use of a correct and updated database. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis. PMID:24977168

  16. Proton Dynamics in Protein Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Lyu, Wenping; Rossetti, Giulia; Konijnenberg, Albert; Natalello, Antonino; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Orozco, Modesto; Sobott, Frank; Grandori, Rita; Carloni, Paolo

    2017-03-16

    Native electrospray ionization/ion mobility-mass spectrometry (ESI/IM-MS) allows an accurate determination of low-resolution structural features of proteins. Yet, the presence of proton dynamics, observed already by us for DNA in the gas phase, and its impact on protein structural determinants, have not been investigated so far. Here, we address this issue by a multistep simulation strategy on a pharmacologically relevant peptide, the N-terminal residues of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ(1-16)). Our calculations reproduce the experimental maximum charge state from ESI-MS and are also in fair agreement with collision cross section (CCS) data measured here by ESI/IM-MS. Although the main structural features are preserved, subtle conformational changes do take place in the first ∼0.1 ms of dynamics. In addition, intramolecular proton dynamics processes occur on the picosecond-time scale in the gas phase as emerging from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations at the B3LYP level of theory. We conclude that proton transfer phenomena do occur frequently during fly time in ESI-MS experiments (typically on the millisecond time scale). However, the structural changes associated with the process do not significantly affect the structural determinants.

  17. Signatures for Mass Spectrometry Data Quality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring data quality and proper instrument functionality is a prerequisite for scientific investigation. Manual quality assurance is time-consuming and subjective. Metrics for describing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) data have been developed; however, the wide variety of LC–MS instruments and configurations precludes applying a simple cutoff. Using 1150 manually classified quality control (QC) data sets, we trained logistic regression classification models to predict whether a data set is in or out of control. Model parameters were optimized by minimizing a loss function that accounts for the trade-off between false positive and false negative errors. The classifier models detected bad data sets with high sensitivity while maintaining high specificity. Moreover, the composite classifier was dramatically more specific than single metrics. Finally, we evaluated the performance of the classifier on a separate validation set where it performed comparably to the results for the testing/training data sets. By presenting the methods and software used to create the classifier, other groups can create a classifier for their specific QC regimen, which is highly variable lab-to-lab. In total, this manuscript presents 3400 LC–MS data sets for the same QC sample (whole cell lysate of Shewanella oneidensis), deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000320–PXD000324. PMID:24611607

  18. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry in Laboratory Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusair, O.; Bauder, W.; Gyürky, G.; Paul, M.; Collon, P.; Fülöp, Zs; Greene, J.; Kinoshita, N.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extreme sensitivity and discrimination power of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allows for the search and the detection of rare nuclides either in natural samples or produced in the laboratory. At Argonne National Laboratory, we are developing an AMS setup aimed in particular at the detection of medium and heavy nuclides, relying on the high ion energy achievable with the ATLAS superconducting linear accelerator and on gas-filled magnet isobaric separation. The setup was recently used for the detection of the 146Sm p-process nuclide and for a new determination of the 146Sm half-life (68.7 My). AMS plays an important role in the measurement of stellar nuclear reaction cross sections by the activation method, extending thus the technique to the study of production of long-lived radionuclides. Preliminary measurements of the 147Sm(γ,n)146Sm are described. A measurement of the 142Nd(α,γ)146Sm and 142Nd(α,n)145Sm reactions is in preparation. A new laser-ablation method for the feeding of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source is described.

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry of small biological samples.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2008-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for isotopic ratio measurements. In the biomedical field, AMS can be used to measure femtomolar concentrations of labeled drugs in body fluids, with direct applications in early drug development such as Microdosing. Likewise, the regenerative properties of cells which are of fundamental significance in stem-cell research can be determined with an accuracy of a few years by AMS analysis of human DNA. However, AMS nominally requires about 1 mg of carbon per sample which is not always available when dealing with specific body substances such as localized, organ-specific DNA samples. Consequently, it is of analytical interest to develop methods for the routine analysis of small samples in the range of a few tens of microg. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator to study small biological samples using AMS. Different methods are presented and compared. A (12)C-carrier sample preparation method is described which is potentially more sensitive and less susceptible to contamination than the standard procedures.

  20. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  1. JAMSS: proteomics mass spectrometry simulation in Java.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rob; Prince, John T

    2015-03-01

    Countless proteomics data processing algorithms have been proposed, yet few have been critically evaluated due to lack of labeled data (data with known identities and quantities). Although labeling techniques exist, they are limited in terms of confidence and accuracy. In silico simulators have recently been used to create complex data with known identities and quantities. We propose Java Mass Spectrometry Simulator (JAMSS): a fast, self-contained in silico simulator capable of generating simulated MS and LC-MS runs while providing meta information on the provenance of each generated signal. JAMSS improves upon previous in silico simulators in terms of its ease to install, minimal parameters, graphical user interface, multithreading capability, retention time shift model and reproducibility. The simulator creates mzML 1.1.0. It is open source software licensed under the GPLv3. The software and source are available at https://github.com/optimusmoose/JAMSS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. 1912: a Titanic year for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Downard, Kevin M

    2012-08-01

    The 1912 sinking of the Titanic continues to capture the imagination and fascination of the general public. The year coincides with the birth of mass spectrometry that began with the cathode ray experiments performed by Joseph John (J. J.) Thomson in Cambridge. Modifications made to Thomson's cathode ray apparatus by Francis William Aston, resulted in an increase in the brightness of the positive rays that aided their detection. This led to the discovery of heavy isotopes for many of the chemical elements in the ensuing decades. As the discovery of (22) Ne was reported in 1913, another of Thomson's students was taking part in an expedition to help save future ocean liners from the fate of the Titanic. Geoffrey Ingram Taylor took part in the first ice patrol of the North Atlantic in 1913 aboard the SS Scotia to investigate the formation and position of icebergs. This article, 100 years on, describes Taylor's work and its impact on safe ocean passage across the Atlantic. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Charging of Proteins in Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Anna C.; Xia, Zijie; Tang, Henry Y. H.; Tainer, John A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2017-02-01

    Factors that influence the charging of protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and function were investigated. Protein ions ranging in molecular weight from 12.3 to 79.7 kDa and pI values from 5.4 to 9.6 were formed from different solutions and reacted with volatile bases of gas-phase basicities higher than that of ammonia in the cell of a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The charge-state distribution of cytochrome c ions formed from aqueous ammonium or potassium acetate is the same. Moreover, ions formed from these two solutions do not undergo proton transfer to 2-fluoropyridine, which is 8 kcal/mol more basic than ammonia. These results provide compelling evidence that proton transfer between ammonia and protein ions does not limit protein ion charge in native electrospray ionization. Both circular dichroism and ion mobility measurements indicate that there are differences in conformations of proteins in pure water and aqueous ammonium acetate, and these differences can account for the difference in the extent of charging and proton-transfer reactivities of protein ions formed from these solutions. The extent of proton transfer of the protein ions with higher gas-phase basicity bases trends with how closely the protein ions are charged to the value predicted by the Rayleigh limit for spherical water droplets approximately the same size as the proteins. These results indicate that droplet charge limits protein ion charge in native mass spectrometry and are consistent with these ions being formed by the charged residue mechanism.

  4. Environmental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the numerous ways in which inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been used for the analysis of environmental samples since it was commercially introduced in 1983. Its multielemental isotopic capability, high sensitivity and wide linear dynamic range makes it ideally suited for environmental analysis. Provided that some care is taken during sample preparation and that appropriate calibration strategies are used to circumvent non-spectroscopic interferences, the technique is readily applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of environmental samples (natural waters, soils, rocks, sediments, vegetation, etc.), using quadrupole, time-of-flight or double-focusing sector-field mass spectrometers. In cases where spectroscopic interferences arising from the sample matrix cannot be resolved, then separation methods can be implemented either on- or off-line, which can simultaneously allow analyte preconcentration, thus further decreasing the already low detection limits that are achievable. In most cases, the blank, prepared by following the same steps as for the sample but without the sample, limits the ultimate detection limits that can be reached.

  5. Interference signals in "third-generation" BEBE sector field mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    1995-08-01

    From the inception of analytical mass spectrometry numerous efforts have been undertaken to minimize artifacts in mass spectra. While double-focusing techniques brought about significant progress in that interference signals in ionsource mass spectra can now be excluded, for MS/MS studies several kinds of artifacts exist when only two sectors are used in MSn (n [greater-or-equal, slanted] 2) experiments. Tandem mass spectrometers having more than two sectors provide the possibility of mass-selecting parent ions under high resolution conditions and thus one might assume that artifact signals can be avoided in these machines. However, this is simply not true, and in this paper we describe possible sources of interference signals in a tandem mass spectrometer of BEBE configuration; similar considerations apply for other configurations of large-scale mass spectrometers as well. Artifact signals will be discussed which originate from limited parent-ion and/or daughter-ion resolution, from fragmentation processes occurring within the analyzers, and of interference signals which can be traced back to other sources.

  6. 3D Imaging by Mass Spectrometry: A New Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Imaging mass spectrometry can generate three-dimensional volumes showing molecular distributions in an entire organ or animal through registration and stacking of serial tissue sections. Here we review the current state of 3D imaging mass spectrometry as well as provide insights and perspectives on the process of generating 3D mass spectral data along with a discussion of the process necessary to generate a 3D image volume. PMID:22276611

  7. Mass spectrometry of Natural Products: Current, Emerging and Future Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bouslimani, Amina; Sanchez, Laura M; Garg, Neha; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2014-01-01

    Although mass spectrometry is a century old technology, we are entering into an exciting time for the analysis of molecular information directly from complex biological systems. In this viewpoint article, we highlight emerging mass spectrometric methods and tools used by the natural product community and give a perspective of future directions where the mass spectrometry field is migrating towards over the next decade. PMID:24801551

  8. Analysis of perchlorate in groundwater by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, C.J.; Beller, H.R.; Halden, R.U.

    2000-05-01

    An electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (ESI/MS/MS) method was developed to measure part-per-billion ({micro}g/L) concentrations of perchlorate in groundwater. Selective and sensitive perchlorate detection was achieved by operating the mass spectrometer in the negative ionization mode and by using MS/MS to monitor the CIO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} to ClO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} transition. The method of standard additions was used to address the considerable signal suppression caused by anions that are typically present in groundwater, such as bicarbonate and sulfate. ESI-MS/MS analysis was rapid, accurate, reproducible, and provided a detection limit of 0.5 {micro}g/L perchlorate in groundwater. Accuracy and precision of the ESI/MS/MS method were assessed by analyzing performance evaluation samples in a groundwater matrix and by comparing ion chromatography (IC) and ESI/MS/MS results for local groundwater samples. Results for the performance evaluation samples differed from the certified values by 4--13%, and precision ranged from 3 to 10% (relative standard deviation). The IC and ESI/MS/MS results were statistically indistinguishable for perchlorate concentrations above the detection limits of both methods.

  9. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble ( apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  10. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble (apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  11. Molecular mass spectrometry imaging in biomedical and life science research.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Strohalm, Martin; Havlíček, Vladimír; Volný, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This review describes the current state of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) in life sciences. A brief overview of mass spectrometry principles is presented followed by a thorough introduction to the MSI workflows, principles and areas of application. Three major desorption-ionization techniques used in MSI, namely, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) are described, and biomedical and life science imaging applications of each ionization technique are reviewed. A separate section is devoted to data handling and current challenges and future perspectives are briefly discussed at the end.

  12. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  13. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  14. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  15. The allure of mass spectrometry: From an earlyday chemist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Tőkés, László

    2017-07-01

    This reminiscing review article is an account of the author's fascination and involvements with mass spectrometry from the perspective of an organic chemist with an interest in natural product chemistry. It covers a period from 1961 through the mid 1990s as mass spectrometry evolved form a novelty technique to become a most widely used analytical technique. Following a brief synopsis of my pathway to mass spectrometry, my research efforts in this field are presented with a focus mainly on evolving principles and technologies which I had personal involvements with. To provide historical perspectives, discussions of these developments are accompanied by brief outlines of the relevant state-of-the-art, shedding light on the technical and conceptual challenges encountered during those early days in mass spectrometry. Examples are presented of my involvements with basic and applied research in mass spectrometry during graduate studies at Stanford University and close to three decade tenure in pharmaceutical research at Syntex Research. My basic research interests focused mainly on principles of electron ionization induced fragmentation mechanisms, with an emphasis on steroids and other model compounds. Extensive deuterium labeling evidence was used to determine the fragmentation mechanisms of the diagnostically significant ions in the spectra of numerous model compounds, uncovering examples of wide-ranging hydrogen transfers, skeletal rearrangements, methyl and phenyl migrations, stereoselective fragmentations and low and high energy fragmentation processes. Depiction of the industrial research phase of my career includes comments on the pivotal role mass spectrometry played on advancing modern pharmaceutical research. Examples are presented of involvements with instrumental developments and a few select cases of applied research, including studies of bile mechanisms in vertebrates, identification of bisphenol-A leaching from sterilized polycarbonate containers, high

  16. Protein Quantitation of the Developing Cochlea Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics allows for the measurement of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a biological system. Additionally, mass spectrometry can also be used to quantify proteins and peptides. However, observing quantitative differences between biological systems using mass spectrometry-based proteomics can be challenging because it is critical to have a method that is fast, reproducible, and accurate. Therefore, to study differential protein expression in biological samples labeling or label-free quantitative methods can be used. Labeling methods have been widely used in quantitative proteomics, however label-free methods have become equally as popular and more preferred because they produce faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Here, we describe the methods by which proteins are isolated and identified from cochlear sensory epithelia tissues at different ages and quantitatively differentiated using label-free mass spectrometry.

  17. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  18. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Chung, C. N.; Allman, S. L.

    1997-05-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, we recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Sanger's enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. Our preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possible be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, we applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  19. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Zhu, Y.F.; Chung, C.N.; Allman, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, the authors recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Snager`s enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. The preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possibly be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, the authors applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  20. Challenges and developments in tandem mass spectrometry based clinical metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ceglarek, Uta; Leichtle, Alexander; Brügel, Mathias; Kortz, Linda; Brauer, Romy; Bresler, Kristin; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg Martin

    2009-03-25

    'Clinical metabolomics' aims at evaluating and predicting health and disease risk in an individual by investigating metabolic signatures in body fluids or tissues, which are influenced by genetics, epigenetics, environmental exposures, diet, and behaviour. Powerful analytical techniques like liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers a rapid, effective and economical way to analyze metabolic alterations of pre-defined target metabolites in biological samples. Novel hyphenated technical approaches like the combination of tandem mass spectrometry combined with linear ion trap (QTrap mass spectrometry) combines both identification and quantification of known and unknown metabolic targets. We describe new concepts and developments of mass spectrometry based multi-target metabolome profiling in the field of clinical diagnostics and research. Particularly, the experiences from newborn screening provided important insights about the diagnostic potential of metabolite profiling arrays and directs to the clinical aim of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine by metabolomics.

  1. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2010 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in environmental mass spectrometry for emerging environmental contaminants over the period of 2008-2009. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2010 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  2. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues, 2008 Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Environmental Mass Spectrometry for Emerging Environmental Contaminants over the period of 2006-2007. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2008 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  3. Mass Spectrometry of Membrane Proteins: A Focus on Aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Kevin L.; Grey, Angus C.; Nicklay, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are abundant, critically important biomolecules that conduct essential functions in all cells and are the targets of a significant number of therapeutic drugs. However, the analysis of their expression, modification, protein–protein interactions, and structure by mass spectrometry has lagged behind similar studies of soluble proteins. Here we review the limitations to analysis of integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins and highlight advances in sample preparation and mass spectrometry methods that have led to the successful analysis of this protein class. Advances in the analysis of membrane protein posttranslational modification, protein–protein interaction, protein structure, and tissue distributions by imaging mass spectrometry are discussed. Furthermore, we focus our discussion on the application of mass spectrometry for the analysis of aquaporins as a prototypical integral membrane protein and how advances in analytical methods have revealed new biological insights into the structure and function of this family of proteins. PMID:23394619

  4. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2010 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in environmental mass spectrometry for emerging environmental contaminants over the period of 2008-2009. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2010 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  5. Recent applications of mass spectrometry in forensic toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, Rodger L.

    1992-09-01

    This review encompasses applications of mass spectrometry reported during the years 1989, 1990 and 1991 for the analysis of cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and their metabolites in physiological specimens.

  6. Mass spectrometry of membrane proteins: a focus on aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Schey, Kevin L; Grey, Angus C; Nicklay, Joshua J

    2013-06-04

    Membrane proteins are abundant, critically important biomolecules that conduct essential functions in all cells and are the targets of a significant number of therapeutic drugs. However, the analysis of their expression, modification, protein-protein interactions, and structure by mass spectrometry has lagged behind similar studies of soluble proteins. Here we review the limitations to analysis of integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins and highlight advances in sample preparation and mass spectrometry methods that have led to the successful analysis of this protein class. Advances in the analysis of membrane protein posttranslational modification, protein-protein interaction, protein structure, and tissue distributions by imaging mass spectrometry are discussed. Furthermore, we focus our discussion on the application of mass spectrometry for the analysis of aquaporins as a prototypical integral membrane protein and how advances in analytical methods have revealed new biological insights into the structure and function of this family of proteins.

  7. Photodissociation mass spectrometry: New tools for characterization of biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Photodissociation mass spectrometry combines the ability to activate and fragment ions using photons with the sensitive detection of the resulting product ions by mass spectrometry. The resulting combination affords a versatile tool for characterization of biological molecules. The scope and breadth of photodissociation mass spectrometry have increased substantially over the past decade as new research groups have entered the field and developed a number of innovative applications that illustrate the ability of photodissociation to produce rich fragmentation patterns, to cleave bonds selectively, and to target specific molecules based on incorporation of chromophores. This review focuses on many of the key developments in photodissociation mass spectrometry over the past decade with a particular emphasis on its applications to biological molecules. PMID:24481009

  8. THE APPLICATION OF MASS SPECTROMETRY TO THE STUDY OF MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research project is to use state-of-the-art mass spectrometric techniques, such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS), to provide "protein mass fingerprinting" and protein sequencing i...

  9. THE APPLICATION OF MASS SPECTROMETRY TO THE STUDY OF MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research project is to use state-of-the-art mass spectrometric techniques, such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS), to provide "protein mass fingerprinting" and protein sequencing i...

  10. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  11. Analysis of chirality by femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Philipp; Urbasch, Gunter; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the field of chirality analysis employing laser ionization mass spectrometry is reviewed. Emphasis is given to femtosecond (fs) laser ionization work from the author's group. We begin by reviewing fundamental aspects of determining circular dichroism (CD) in fs-laser ionization mass spectrometry (fs-LIMS) discussing an example from the literature (resonant fs-LIMS of 3-methylcyclopentanone). Second, we present new data indicating CD in non-resonant fs-LIMS of propylene oxide.

  12. Determination of nitrofuran and chloramphenicol residues by high resolution mass spectrometry versus tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2015-03-03

    An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography based method, coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS), was developed to permit the detection and quantification of various nitrofuran and chloramphenicol residues in a number of animal based food products. This method is based on the hydrolysis of covalently bound metabolites and derivatization with 2-nitrobenzaldehyde. Clean-up is achieved by a liquid/liquid and a reversed phase/solid phase extraction. Not only are the four conventional nitrofurans (nitrofurantoin, furazolidone, nitrofurazone and furaltadone) detected, but also nifursol, nitrovin and nifuroxazide. Furthermore, an underivatizable nitrofuran (nifurpirinol) and another banned drug (chloramphenicol) can be quantified as well. The compounds are detected in the form of their precursor ions, [M+H](+) and [M-H](-), respectively. The mass resolving power of 70,000 FWHM, and the applied mass window ensure sufficient selectivity and sensitivity. Confirmation is obtained by monitoring the HRMS resolved product ions which were derived from the unit-mass resolved precursor ions. The multiplexing capability of the utilized Orbitrap instrument provides not only highly selective, but also sensitive confirmatory signals. This method has been validated according to the CD 2002/657/EC for the following matrices: muscle, liver, kidney, fish, honey, eggs and milk.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Complex Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus In the two decades since mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was first applied to visualize the distribution of peptides across biological tissues and cells, the technique has become increasingly effective and reliable. MSI excels at providing complementary information to existing methods for molecular analysis—such as genomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics—and stands apart from other chemical imaging modalities through its capability to generate information that is simultaneously multiplexed and chemically specific. Today a diverse family of MSI approaches are applied throughout the scientific community to study the distribution of proteins, peptides, and small-molecule metabolites across many biological models. The inherent strengths of MSI make the technique valuable for studying microbial systems. Many microbes reside in surface-attached multicellular and multispecies communities, such as biofilms and motile colonies, where they work together to harness surrounding nutrients, fend off hostile organisms, and shield one another from adverse environmental conditions. These processes, as well as many others essential for microbial survival, are mediated through the production and utilization of a diverse assortment of chemicals. Although bacterial cells are generally only a few microns in diameter, the ecologies they influence can encompass entire ecosystems, and the chemical changes that they bring about can occur over time scales ranging from milliseconds to decades. Because of their incredible complexity, our understanding of and influence over microbial systems requires detailed scientific evaluations that yield both chemical and spatial information. MSI is well-positioned to fulfill these requirements. With small adaptations to existing methods, the technique can be applied to study a wide variety of chemical interactions, including those that occur inside single-species microbial communities, between cohabitating microbes, and between microbes

  14. Calculating Measurement Uncertainties for Mass Spectrometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essex, R. M.; Goldberg, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    A complete and transparent characterization of measurement uncertainty is fundamentally important to the interpretation of analytical results. We have observed that the calculation and reporting of uncertainty estimates for isotopic measurement from a variety of analytical facilities are inconsistent, making it difficult to compare and evaluate data. Therefore, we recommend an approach to uncertainty estimation that has been adopted by both US national metrology facilities and is becoming widely accepted within the analytical community. This approach is outlined in the ISO "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement" (GUM). The GUM approach to uncertainty estimation includes four major steps: 1) Specify the measurand; 2) Identify uncertainty sources; 3) Quantify components by determining the standard uncertainty (u) for each component; and 4) Calculate combined standard uncertainty (u_c) by using established propagation laws to combine the various components. To obtain a desired confidence level, the combined standard uncertainty is multiplied by a coverage factor (k) to yield an expanded uncertainty (U). To be consistent with the GUM principles, it is also necessary create an uncertainty budget, which is a listing of all the components comprising the uncertainty and their relative contribution to the combined standard uncertainty. In mass spectrometry, Step 1 is normally the determination of an isotopic ratio for a particular element. Step 2 requires the identification of the many potential sources of measurement variability and bias including: gain, baseline, cup efficiency, Schottky noise, counting statistics, CRM uncertainties, yield calibrations, linearity calibrations, run conditions, and filament geometry. Then an equation expressing the relationship of all of the components to the measurement value must be written. To complete Step 3, these potential sources of uncertainty must be characterized (Type A or Type B) and quantified. This information

  15. Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton

    DOE PAGES

    Allison, Kyle; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2014-09-26

    The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet fieldmore » $$\\sigma$$ which has a very large VEV $$f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $$\\zeta_i$$, where $$\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $$\\sigma$$ in the $$\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$$ limit. The singlet field $$\\sigma$$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.« less

  16. Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Kyle; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2014-09-26

    The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field $\\sigma$ which has a very large VEV $f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $\\zeta_i$, where $\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $\\sigma$ in the $\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The singlet field $\\sigma$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

  17. The allure of mass spectrometry: From an earlyday chemist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    1 This reminiscing review article is an account of the author's fascination and involvements with mass spectrometry from the perspective of an organic chemist with an interest in natural product chemistry. It covers a period from 1961 through the mid 1990s as mass spectrometry evolved form a novelty technique to become a most widely used analytical technique. Following a brief synopsis of my pathway to mass spectrometry, my research efforts in this field are presented with a focus mainly on evolving principles and technologies which I had personal involvements with. To provide historical perspectives, discussions of these developments are accompanied by brief outlines of the relevant state‐of‐the‐art, shedding light on the technical and conceptual challenges encountered during those early days in mass spectrometry. Examples are presented of my involvements with basic and applied research in mass spectrometry during graduate studies at Stanford University and close to three decade tenure in pharmaceutical research at Syntex Research. My basic research interests focused mainly on principles of electron ionization induced fragmentation mechanisms, with an emphasis on steroids and other model compounds. Extensive deuterium labeling evidence was used to determine the fragmentation mechanisms of the diagnostically significant ions in the spectra of numerous model compounds, uncovering examples of wide‐ranging hydrogen transfers, skeletal rearrangements, methyl and phenyl migrations, stereoselective fragmentations and low and high energy fragmentation processes. Depiction of the industrial research phase of my career includes comments on the pivotal role mass spectrometry played on advancing modern pharmaceutical research. Examples are presented of involvements with instrumental developments and a few select cases of applied research, including studies of bile mechanisms in vertebrates, identification of bisphenol‐A leaching from sterilized polycarbonate

  18. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  19. NCBI Peptidome: a new repository for mass spectrometry proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Ji, Li; Barrett, Tanya; Ayanbule, Oluwabukunmi; Troup, Dennis B; Rudnev, Dmitry; Muertter, Rolf N; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Soboleva, Alexandra; Slotta, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    Peptidome is a public repository that archives and freely distributes tandem mass spectrometry peptide and protein identification data generated by the scientific community. Data from all stages of a mass spectrometry experiment are captured, including original mass spectra files, experimental metadata and conclusion-level results. The submission process is facilitated through acceptance of data in commonly used open formats, and all submissions undergo syntactic validation and curation in an effort to uphold data integrity and quality. Peptidome is not restricted to specific organisms, instruments or experiment types; data from any tandem mass spectrometry experiment from any species are accepted. In addition to data storage, web-based interfaces are available to help users query, browse and explore individual peptides, proteins or entire Samples and Studies. Results are integrated and linked with other NCBI resources to ensure dissemination of the information beyond the mass spectroscopy proteomics community. Peptidome is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/peptidome.

  20. Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Eric J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of individual cells and subcellular structures provide unique analytical capabilities for biological and biomedical research, including determination of the biochemical heterogeneity of cellular populations and intracellular localization of pharmaceuticals. Two mass spectrometry technologies—secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS)—are most often used in micro-bioanalytical investigations. Recent advances in ion probe technologies have increased the dynamic range and sensitivity of analyte detection by SIMS, allowing two- and three-dimensional localization of analytes in a variety of cells. SIMS operating in the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) mode can routinely reach spatial resolutions at the submicron level; therefore, it is frequently used in studies of the chemical composition of subcellular structures. MALDI MS offers a large mass range and high sensitivity of analyte detection. It has been successfully applied in a variety of single-cell and organelle profiling studies. Innovative instrumentation such as scanning microprobe MALDI and mass microscope spectrometers enable new subcellular MSI measurements. Other approaches for MS-based chemical imaging and profiling include those based on near-field laser ablation and inductively-coupled plasma MS analysis, which offer complementary capabilities for subcellular chemical imaging and profiling. PMID:22498881

  1. Differential mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry history, theory, design optimization, simulations, and applications.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bradley B; Nazarov, Erkinjon G; Londry, Frank; Vouros, Paul; Covey, Thomas R

    2016-10-01

    This review of differential mobility spectrometry focuses primarily on mass spectrometry coupling, starting with the history of the development of this technique in the Soviet Union. Fundamental principles of the separation process are covered, in addition to efforts related to design optimization and advancements in computer simulations. The flexibility of differential mobility spectrometry design features is explored in detail, particularly with regards to separation capability, speed, and ion transmission. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:687-737, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Noncovalent Shiga-like toxin assemblies: characterization by means of mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan P; Green, Brian N; Smith, Daniel C; Jennings, Keith R; Moore, Katherine A H; Slade, Susan E; Roberts, Lynne M; Scrivens, James H

    2005-06-14

    Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLTx), produced by enterohemorrhagic strains of Escherichia coli (EHEC), belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related AB(5) protein toxins that are associated with human disease. EHEC infection often gives rise to hemolytic colitis, while toxin-induced kidney damage is one of the major causes of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute renal failure in children. As such, an understanding and analysis of the noncovalent interactions that maintain the quaternary structure of this toxin are fundamentally important since such interactions have significant biochemical and medical implications. This paper reports on the analysis of the noncovalent homopentameric complex of Shiga-like toxin B chain (SLTx-B(5)) using electrospray ionization (ESI) triple-quadrupole (QqQ) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and the analysis of the noncovalent hexameric holotoxin (SLTx-AB(5)) using ESI time-of-flight (TOF) MS. The triple-quadrupole analysis revealed highly charged monomer ions dissociate from the multiprotein complex to form dimer, trimer, and tetramer product ions, which were also seen to further dissociate. The ESI-TOFMS analysis of SLTx-AB(5) revealed the complex remained intact and was observed in the gas phase over a range of pHs. Theses findings demonstrate that the gas-phase structure observed for both the holotoxin and the isoloated B chains correlates well with the structures reported to exist in the solution phase for these proteins. Such analysis provides a rapid screening technique for assessing the noncovalent structure of this family of proteins and other structurally related toxins.

  3. DETERMINATION OF ELEMENTAL COMPOSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY WITHOUT MASS CALIBRANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widely applicable mass calibrants, including perfluorokerosene, are available for gas-phase introduction of analytes ionized by electron impact (EI) prior to analysis using high resolution mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, no all-purpose calibrants are available for recently dev...

  4. DETERMINATION OF ELEMENTAL COMPOSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY WITHOUT MASS CALIBRANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widely applicable mass calibrants, including perfluorokerosene, are available for gas-phase introduction of analytes ionized by electron impact (EI) prior to analysis using high resolution mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, no all-purpose calibrants are available for recently dev...

  5. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  6. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  7. mzML—a Community Standard for Mass Spectrometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Lennart; Chambers, Matthew; Sturm, Marc; Kessner, Darren; Levander, Fredrik; Shofstahl, Jim; Tang, Wilfred H.; Römpp, Andreas; Neumann, Steffen; Pizarro, Angel D.; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Tasman, Natalie; Coleman, Mike; Reisinger, Florian; Souda, Puneet; Hermjakob, Henning; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Deutsch, Eric W.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a fundamental tool for discovery and analysis in the life sciences. With the rapid advances in mass spectrometry technology and methods, it has become imperative to provide a standard output format for mass spectrometry data that will facilitate data sharing and analysis. Initially, the efforts to develop a standard format for mass spectrometry data resulted in multiple formats, each designed with a different underlying philosophy. To resolve the issues associated with having multiple formats, vendors, researchers, and software developers convened under the banner of the HUPO PSI to develop a single standard. The new data format incorporated many of the desirable technical attributes from the previous data formats, while adding a number of improvements, including features such as a controlled vocabulary with validation tools to ensure consistent usage of the format, improved support for selected reaction monitoring data, and immediately available implementations to facilitate rapid adoption by the community. The resulting standard data format, mzML, is a well tested open-source format for mass spectrometer output files that can be readily utilized by the community and easily adapted for incremental advances in mass spectrometry technology. PMID:20716697

  8. A Developmental History of Polymer Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergne, Matthew J.; Hercules, David M.; Lattimer, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    The history of the development of mass spectroscopic methods used to characterize polymers is discussed. The continued improvements in methods and instrumentation will offer new and better ways for the mass spectral characterization of polymers and mass spectroscopy (MS) should be recognized as a complementary polymer characterization method along…

  9. A Developmental History of Polymer Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergne, Matthew J.; Hercules, David M.; Lattimer, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    The history of the development of mass spectroscopic methods used to characterize polymers is discussed. The continued improvements in methods and instrumentation will offer new and better ways for the mass spectral characterization of polymers and mass spectroscopy (MS) should be recognized as a complementary polymer characterization method along…

  10. Decoding protein modifications using top-down mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Siuti, Nertila; Kelleher, Neil L

    2008-01-01

    Top-down mass spectrometry is an emerging technology which strives to preserve the post-translationally modified forms of proteins present in vivo by measuring them intact, rather than measuring peptides produced from them by proteolysis. The top-down technology is beginning to capture the interest of biologists and mass spectrometrists alike, with a main goal of deciphering interaction networks operative in cellular pathways. Here we outline recent approaches and applications of top-down mass spectrometry as well as an outlook for its future. PMID:17901871

  11. Top-Down Mass Spectrometry: Proteomics to Proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Patrie, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    This chapter highlights many of the fundamental concepts and technologies in the field of top-down mass spectrometry (TDMS), and provides numerous examples of contributions that TD is making in biology, biophysics, and clinical investigations. TD workflows include variegated steps that may include non-specific or targeted preparative strategies, orthogonal liquid chromatography techniques, analyte ionization, mass analysis, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and informatics procedures. This diversity of experimental designs has evolved to manage the large dynamic range of protein expression and diverse physiochemical properties of proteins in proteome investigations, tackle proteoform microheterogeneity, as well as determine structure and composition of gas-phase proteins and protein assemblies.

  12. Phylogenetic classification and identification of bacteria by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Anja; Sauer, Sascha

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are a convenient source of intrinsic marker proteins, which can be detected efficiently by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The patterns of protein masses observed can be used for accurate classification and identification of bacteria. Key to the reliability of the method is a robust and standardized procedure for sample preparations, including bacterial culturing, chemical treatment for bacterial cell wall disruption and for protein extraction, and mass spectrometry analysis. The protocol is an excellent alternative to classical microbiological classification and identification procedures, requiring minimal sample preparation efforts and costs. Without cell culturing, the protocol takes in general <1 h.

  13. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  14. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  15. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  16. Mass Spectrometry-Based Tissue Imaging of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Fowler, Joseph W.M.; Waxer, Jonathan F.; Gatti, Richard A.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue samples is a promising analytical tool that has quickly become associated with biomedical and pharmacokinetic studies. It eliminates several labor-intensive protocols associated with more classical imaging techniques, and provides accurate, histological data at a rapid pace. Because mass spectrometry is used as the readout, MSI can be applied to almost any molecule, especially those that are biologically relevant. Many examples of its utility in the study of peptides and proteins have been reported; here we discuss its value in the mass range of small molecules. We explore its success and potential in the analysis of lipids, medicinals, and metal-based compounds by featuring representative studies from mass spectrometry imaging laboratories around the globe. PMID:24952187

  17. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Structural Analysis of Marine Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Yinzhi; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Lili; Yu, Guangli

    2014-01-01

    Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out. PMID:24983643

  18. Use of mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Jin; Perdian, David; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  19. Use of Mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Jin; Perdian, David C.; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward S.; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  20. Applications of mass spectrometry to structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lang, Yinzhi; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Lili; Yu, Guangli

    2014-06-30

    Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out.

  1. Characterization of Thiolate-Protected Gold Nanoparticles by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Kellen M.; Cliffel, David E.; McLean, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a highly versatile nanomaterial, with wide-ranging physical properties dependent upon the protecting thiolate ligands and gold core size. These nanoparticles serve as a scaffold for a diverse and rapidly increasing number of applications, extending from molecular electronics to vaccine development. Key to the development of such applications is the ability to quickly and precisely characterize synthesized AuNPs. While a unique set of challenges have inhibited the potential of mass spectrometry in this area, recent improvements have made mass spectrometry a dominant technique in the characterization of small AuNPs, specifically those with discrete sizes and structures referred to as monolayer-protected gold clusters (MPCs). The unique ability of mass spectrometry to analyze the protecting monolayer of the AuNP may cause it to become a major technique in the characterization of larger AuNPs. The development of mass spectrometry techniques for AuNP characterization has begun to reveal interesting new areas of research. This report is a discussion of the historical challenges in this field, the emerging techniques which aim to meet those challenges, and the future role of mass spectrometry in the growing field of thiolate-protected AuNPs. PMID:20419232

  2. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  3. Identification of unknown surfactants using electrospray mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy preceded by liquid ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Fukazawa, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Takashi; Sato, Hisakuni

    2002-05-01

    Commercially available but completely unknown surfactants used in the tin-lead plating industry were successfully identified by using electrospray mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy techniques, preceded by liquid ionization mass spectrometry used to obtain the preliminary information. The mass spectral data suggested that ethoxylated nonionic surfactants having a homologous distribution of molecular weights like 520, 564, 608, 652, 696, etc. were present. The NMR data suggested the presence of two aromatic rings and a quaternary carbon for the hydrophobe moiety instead of the well-known alkyl chains or alkylphenols. The unknown surfactants were finally concluded to be novel nonionic 4-(alpha,alpha-dimethylbenzyl)-phenol ethoxylates.

  4. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  5. Pharmaceutical metabolite profiling using quadrupole/ion mobility spectrometry/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric C Y; New, Lee Sun; Yap, Chun Wei; Goh, Lin Tang

    2009-02-01

    The use of hybrid quadrupole ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q/IMS/TOFMS) in the metabolite profiling of leflunomide (LEF) and acetaminophen (APAP) is presented. The IMS drift times (T(d)) of the drugs and their metabolites were determined in the IMS/TOFMS experiments and correlated with their exact monoisotopic masses and other in silico generated structural properties, such as connolly molecular area (CMA), connolly solvent-excluded volume (CSEV), principal moments of inertia along the X, Y and Z Cartesian coordinates (MI-X, MI-Y and MI-Z), inverse mobility and collision cross-section (CCS). The correlation of T(d) with these parameters is presented and discussed. IMS/TOF tandem mass spectrometry experiments (MS(2) and MS(3)) were successfully performed on the N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine glutathione (NAPQI-GSH) adduct derived from the in vitro microsomal metabolism of APAP. As comparison, similar experiments were also performed using hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (QTRAPMS) and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). The abilities to resolve the product ions of the metabolite within the drift tube and fragment the ion mobility resolved product ions in the transfer travelling wave-enabled stacked ring ion guide (TWIG) demonstrated the potential applicability of the Q/IMS/TOFMS technique in pharmaceutical metabolite profiling.

  6. Mass-spectrometry-based microbial metabolomics: recent developments and applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Xu, Guowang

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is an omics technique aiming at qualitatively and quantitatively describing a metabolome by various analytical platforms. It is an indispensable component of modern systems biology. Microbial metabolomics can be roughly classified as metabolic footprint analysis and metabolic fingerprint analysis depending on the analyte origins. Both of them have been beneficial to microbiological research for different reasons. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are popular analytical strategies prevailing in the metabolomics field. In this review, chromatography-mass-spectrometry-based microbial metabolomic analysis steps are summarized, including sample collection, metabolite extraction, instrument analysis, and data analysis. Moreover, their applications in some representative fields are discussed as examples. The aim of this review is to present briefly recent technical advances in mass-spectrometry-based analysis, and to highlight the value of modern applications of microbial metabolomics.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  8. Ion mobility–mass spectrometry for structural proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yueyang; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2012-01-01

    Ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry has been an important tool in the fields of chemical physics and analytical chemistry for decades, but its potential for interrogating the structure of proteins and multiprotein complexes has only recently begun to be realized. Today, ion mobility– mass spectrometry is often applied to the structural elucidation of protein assemblies that have failed high-throughput crystallization or NMR spectroscopy screens. Here, we highlight the technology, approaches and data that have led to this dramatic shift in use, including emerging trends such as the integration of ion mobility–mass spectrometry data with more classical (e.g., ‘bottom-up’) proteomics approaches for the rapid structural characterization of protein networks. PMID:22292823

  9. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  10. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated With Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reducing pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production. PMID:25801585

  11. Determination of oxidative protein modifications using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Mark J

    2014-07-01

    Numerous oxidative modifications to proteins and amino acids have been identified with most susceptible, to varying degrees, of some form of oxidative modification. The consequence of oxidation on protein structure and function reveals that some of these modifications are functionally important. The discovery and accurate characterization/description of existing and new modifications requires modern instrumentation, great care, and attention to detail, especially if the modifications are present in low stoichiometric quantities or they only exist transiently. The focus of this brief review is on the use of mass spectrometry, protein chemistry, and proteomics methods and tools to identify oxidatively modified proteins and peptides along with the characterization of specific sites. Many of the specialized mass spectrometry technologies and techniques are becoming more widely available in research laboratories with mass spectrometry or proteomics facilities allowing even non-expert researchers in the field to accurately determine modifications. Illustrative examples of some approaches are provided from the author's work, collaborative research projects, and elsewhere.

  12. Mass spectrometry imaging for in situ kinetic histochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Katherine B.; Bowen, Benjamin P.; McAlhany, Stephanie; Huang, Yurong; Price, John C.; Mao, Jian-hua; Hellerstein, Marc; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Tissues are composed of diverse cell subpopulations each with distinct metabolic characteristics that influence overall behavior. Unfortunately, traditional histopathology imaging techniques are ‘blind’ to the spatially ordered metabolic dynamics within tissue. While mass spectrometry imaging enables spatial mapping of molecular composition, resulting images are only a static snapshot in time of molecules involved in highly dynamic processes; kinetic information of flux through metabolic pathways is lacking. To address this limitation, we developed kinetic mass spectrometry imaging (kMSI), a novel technique integrating soft desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with clinically accepted in vivo metabolic labeling of tissue with deuterium to generate images of kinetic information of biological processes. Applied to a tumor, kMSI revealed heterogeneous spatial distributions of newly synthesized versus pre-existing lipids, with altered lipid synthesis patterns distinguishing region-specific intratumor subpopulations. Images also enabled identification and correlation of metabolic activity of specific lipids found in tumor regions of varying grade. PMID:23584513

  13. Laser mass spectrometry at high vibrational excitation density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, R. F., Jr.; Baltz-Knorr, M.; Ermer, D. R.; Papantonakis, M. R.; Schriver, K. E.

    2003-06-01

    We describe a novel approach to infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry using a tunable, picosecond pulse laser to selectively excite specific modes of a solid, thereby creating a high local density of vibrational quanta. The concept is based on recent results from our experiments employing a free-electron laser to explore 'matrix-less' mass spectrometry in which an infrared chromophore intrinsic to the sample, rather than an exogenous matrix, is excited by the laser. Examples from both environmental mass spectrometry and a proteomics-driven research project are presented, showing how the principle of selective vibrational excitation can be used to make possible novel and useful ion generation protocols. We conclude with an analysis of possible mechanisms for the phenomena of infrared desorption, ablation and ionization using very short laser pulses. Prospects for achieving similar results with more conventional laser sources are discussed.

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  15. Mass spectrometry and inhomogeneous ion optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    Work done in several areas to advance the state of the art of magnetic mass spectrometers is described. The calculations and data necessary for the design of inhomogeneous field mass spectrometers, and the calculation of ion trajectories through such fields are presented. The development and testing of solid state ion detection devices providing the capability of counting single ions is discussed. New techniques in the preparation and operation of thermal-ionization ion sources are described. Data obtained on the concentrations of copper in rainfall and uranium in air samples using the improved thermal ionization techniques are presented. The design of a closed system static mass spectrometer for isotopic analyses is discussed. A summary of instrumental aspects of a four-stage mass spectrometer comprising two electrostatic and two 90 deg. magnetic lenses with a 122-cm radius used to study the interaction of ions with solids is presented.

  16. Determination of water content using mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Hughes, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Mass spectrometer is used to measure small quantities of water present in different materials. System has been applied in measuring water and gases desorbed from microcircuitry insulation, can also be used with foods, polymeric materials, and organic solvents.

  17. Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobi, A.; Hall, C.; Slutsky, S.; Yen, Y.-R.; Aharmin, B.; Auger, M.; Barbeau, P. S.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Cleveland, B.; Conley, R.; Cook, J.; Cook, S.; Counts, I.; Craddock, W.; Daniels, T.; Davis, C. G.; Davis, J.; deVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolinski, M. J.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W.; Farine, J.; Fierlinger, P.; Franco, D.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Gratta, G.; Green, C.; Hagemann, C.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; Herrin, S.; Hughes, M.; Hodgson, J.; Juget, F.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K.; Leonard, D. S.; Lutter, G.; Mackay, D.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M.; Mong, B.; Montero Díez, M.; Morgan, P.; Müller, A. R.; Neilson, R.; Odian, A.; O'Sullivan, K.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Prescott, C. Y.; Pushkin, K.; Rivas, A.; Rollin, E.; Rowson, P. C.; Sabourov, A.; Sinclair, D.; Skarpaas, K.; Stekhanov, V.; Strickland, V.; Swift, M.; Twelker, K.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Weber, M.; Wichoski, U.; Wodin, J.; Wright, J. D.; Yang, L.

    2012-05-01

    We describe purity measurements of the natural and enriched xenon stockpiles used by the EXO-200 double beta decay experiment based on a mass spectrometry technique. The sensitivity of the spectrometer is enhanced by several orders of magnitude by the presence of a liquid nitrogen cold trap, and many impurity species of interest can be detected at the level of one part-per-billion or better. We have used the technique to screen the EXO-200 xenon before, during, and after its use in our detector, and these measurements have proven useful. This is the first application of the cold trap mass spectrometry technique to an operating physics experiment.

  18. Major roles for minor bacterial lipids identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Teresa A

    2016-10-17

    Mass spectrometry of lipids, especially those isolated from bacteria, has ballooned over the past two decades, affirming in the process the complexity of the lipidome. With this has come the identification of new and interesting lipid structures. Here is an overview of several novel lipids, from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with roles in health and disease, whose structural identification was facilitated using mass spectrometry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop.

  19. Issues and opportunities in accelerator mass spectrometry for stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Matteson, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has developed in the last 30 years many notable applications to the spectrometry of radioisotopes, particularly in radiocarbon dating. The instrumentation science of trace element AMS (TEAMS) that analyzes stable isotopes, also called Accelerator SIMS or MegaSIMS, while unique in many features, has also shared in many of these significant advances and has pushed TEAMS sensitivity to concentration levels surpassing many competing mass spectroscopic technologies. This review examines recent instrumentation developments, the capabilities of the new instrumentation and discernable trends for future development.

  20. Technical Challenges in Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a strategy for analysis, and quantification of the complete collection of metabolites present in biological samples. Metabolomics is an emerging area of scientific research because there are many application areas including clinical, agricultural, and medical researches for the biomarker discovery and the metabolic system analysis by employing widely targeted analysis of a few hundred preselected metabolites from 10–100 biological samples. Further improvement in technologies of mass spectrometry in terms of experimental design for larger scale analysis, computational methods for tandem mass spectrometry-based elucidation of metabolites, and specific instrumentation for advanced bioanalysis will enable more comprehensive metabolome analysis for exploring the hidden secrets of metabolism. PMID:27900235

  1. Purifying protein complexes for mass spectrometry: applications to protein translation.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J; Fleischer, Tracey C; Weaver, Connie M; Gerbasi, Vincent R; Jennings, Jennifer L

    2005-03-01

    Proteins control and mediate most of the biological activities in the cell. In most cases, proteins either interact with regulatory proteins or function in large molecular assemblies to carryout biological processes. Understanding the functions of individual proteins requires the identification of these interacting proteins. With its speed and sensitivity, mass spectrometry has become the dominant method for identifying components of protein complexes. This article reviews and discusses various approaches to purify protein complexes and analyze the proteins using mass spectrometry. As examples, methods to isolate and analyze protein complexes responsible for the translation of messenger RNAs into polypeptides are described.

  2. Structurally selective imaging mass spectrometry by imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLean, John A; Fenn, Larissa S; Enders, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the utility of structurally based separations combined with imaging mass spectrometry (MS) by ion mobility-MS (IM-MS) approaches. The unique capabilities of combining rapid (mus-ms) IM separations with imaging MS are detailed for an audience ranging from new to potential practitioners in IM-MS technology. Importantly, imaging IM-MS provides the ability to rapidly separate and elucidate various types of endogenous and exogenous biomolecules (e.g., nucleotides, carbohydrates, peptides, and lipids), including isobaric species. Drift tube and traveling wave IM-MS instrumentation are described and specific protocols are presented for calculating ion-neutral collision cross sections (i.e., apparent ion surface area or structure) from experimentally obtained IM-MS data. Special emphasis is placed on the use of imaging IM-MS for the analysis of samples in life sciences research (e.g., thin tissue sections), including selective imaging for peptide/protein and lipid distributions. Future directions for rapid and multiplexed imaging IM-MS/MS are detailed.

  3. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts.

  4. Tackling saponin diversity in marine animals by mass spectrometry: data acquisition and integration.

    PubMed

    Decroo, Corentin; Colson, Emmanuel; Demeyer, Marie; Lemaur, Vincent; Caulier, Guillaume; Eeckhaut, Igor; Cornil, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Saponin analysis by mass spectrometry methods is nowadays progressively supplementing other analytical methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Indeed, saponin extracts from plant or marine animals are often constituted by a complex mixture of (slightly) different saponin molecules that requires extensive purification and separation steps to meet the requirement for NMR spectroscopy measurements. Based on its intrinsic features, mass spectrometry represents an inescapable tool to access the structures of saponins within extracts by using LC-MS, MALDI-MS, and tandem mass spectrometry experiments. The combination of different MS methods nowadays allows for a nice description of saponin structures, without extensive purification. However, the structural characterization process is based on low kinetic energy CID which cannot afford a total structure elucidation as far as stereochemistry is concerned. Moreover, the structural difference between saponins in a same extract is often so small that coelution upon LC-MS analysis is unavoidable, rendering the isomeric distinction and characterization by CID challenging or impossible. In the present paper, we introduce ion mobility in combination with liquid chromatography to better tackle the structural complexity of saponin congeners. When analyzing saponin extracts with MS-based methods, handling the data remains problematic for the comprehensive report of the results, but also for their efficient comparison. We here introduce an original schematic representation using sector diagrams that are constructed from mass spectrometry data. We strongly believe that the proposed data integration could be useful for data interpretation since it allows for a direct and fast comparison, both in terms of composition and relative proportion of the saponin contents in different extracts. Graphical Abstract A combination of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry methods, including ion mobility spectroscopy, is developed to afford a

  5. Mass spectrometry imaging, an emerging technology in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience.

  6. Analysis of proteins and proteomes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mann, M; Hendrickson, R C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-01

    A decade after the discovery of electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), methods that finally allowed gentle ionization of large biomolecules, mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool in protein analysis and the key technology in the emerging field of proteomics. The success of mass spectrometry is driven both by innovative instrumentation designs, especially those operating on the time-of-flight or ion-trapping principles, and by large-scale biochemical strategies, which use mass spectrometry to detect the isolated proteins. Any human protein can now be identified directly from genome databases on the basis of minimal data derived by mass spectrometry. As has already happened in genomics, increased automation of sample handling, analysis, and the interpretation of results will generate an avalanche of qualitative and quantitative proteomic data. Protein-protein interactions can be analyzed directly by precipitation of a tagged bait followed by mass spectrometric identification of its binding partners. By these and similar strategies, entire protein complexes, signaling pathways, and whole organelles are being characterized. Posttranslational modifications remain difficult to analyze but are starting to yield to generic strategies.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Imaging, an Emerging Technology in Neuropsychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience. PMID:23966069

  8. Mass spectrometry methods for the analysis of biodegradable hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alalwiat, Ahlam

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of hybrid materials and surfactant blends by using mass spectrometry (MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), liquid chromatography (LC), and ion mobility (IM) spectrometry combined with measurement and simulation of molecular collision cross sections. Chapter II describes the principles and the history of mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography (LC). Chapter III introduces the materials and instrumentation used to complete this dissertation. In chapter IV, two hybrid materials containing poly(t-butyl acrylate) (PtBA) or poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) blocks attached to a hydrophobic peptide rich in valine and glycine (VG2), as well as the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and VG2 peptide precursor materials, are characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Collision cross-sections and molecular modeling have been used to determine the final architecture of both hybrid materials. Chapter V investigates a different hybrid material, [BMP-2(HA)2 ], comprised of a dendron with two polyethylene glycol (PEG) branches terminated by a hydroxyapatite binding peptide (HA), and a focal point substituted with a bone morphogenic protein mimicking peptide (BMP-2). MALDI-MS, ESI-MS and IM-MS have been used to characterize the HA and BMP-2 peptides. Collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) have been employed in double stage (i.e. tandem) mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments to confirm the sequences of the two peptides HA and BMP-2. The MALDI-MS, ESI-MS and IM-MS methods were also applied to characterize the [BMP-2(HA)2] hybrid material. Collision cross-section measurements and molecular modeling indicated that [BMP-2(HA)2] can attain folded or extended conformation, depending on its degree of protonation (charge state). Chapter VI focuses on the analysis of

  9. Electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry in biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, W J; Jonsson, A P; Liu, S; Rai, D K; Wang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, biological MS has changed out of all recognition. This is primarily due to the development in the 1980s of 'soft ionization' methods that permit the ionization and vaporization of large, polar, and thermally labile biomolecules. These developments in ionization mode have driven the design and manufacture of smaller and cheaper mass analysers, making the mass spectrometer a routine instrument in the biochemistry laboratory today. In the present review the revolutionary 'soft ionization' methods will be discussed with particular reference to electrospray. The mass analysis of ions will be described, and the concept of tandem MS introduced. Where appropriate, examples of the application of MS in biochemistry will be provided. Although the present review will concentrate on the MS of peptides/proteins and lipids, all classes of biomolecules can be analysed, and much excellent work has been done in the fields of carbohydrate and nucleic acid biochemistry. PMID:11311115

  10. Electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry in biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, W J; Jonsson, A P; Liu, S; Rai, D K; Wang, Y

    2001-05-01

    Over the last 20 years, biological MS has changed out of all recognition. This is primarily due to the development in the 1980s of 'soft ionization' methods that permit the ionization and vaporization of large, polar, and thermally labile biomolecules. These developments in ionization mode have driven the design and manufacture of smaller and cheaper mass analysers, making the mass spectrometer a routine instrument in the biochemistry laboratory today. In the present review the revolutionary 'soft ionization' methods will be discussed with particular reference to electrospray. The mass analysis of ions will be described, and the concept of tandem MS introduced. Where appropriate, examples of the application of MS in biochemistry will be provided. Although the present review will concentrate on the MS of peptides/proteins and lipids, all classes of biomolecules can be analysed, and much excellent work has been done in the fields of carbohydrate and nucleic acid biochemistry.

  11. A New Accelerator-Based Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gove, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Tandem electrostatic accelerators produce beams of positive ions which are used to penetrate atomic nuclei in a target, inducing nuclear reactions whose study elucidates varied properties of the nucleus. Uses of the system, which acts like a mass spectrometer, are discussed. These include radiocarbon dating measurements. (JN)

  12. A New Accelerator-Based Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gove, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Tandem electrostatic accelerators produce beams of positive ions which are used to penetrate atomic nuclei in a target, inducing nuclear reactions whose study elucidates varied properties of the nucleus. Uses of the system, which acts like a mass spectrometer, are discussed. These include radiocarbon dating measurements. (JN)

  13. Mass spectrometry on the surface of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, J.; Rohner, U.; Benz, W.; Wurz, P.

    2003-04-01

    The proposed Mercury Surface Element of the BepiColombo mission will place a lander on Mercury equipped with a geochemistry instrumentation package. We will discuss the utility of elemental and isotopic analyses of individual mineral grains in the hermean regolith, and present relevant results from a prototype laser-ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

  14. A new derivative for oxosteroid analysis by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rigdova, K.; Wang, Y.; Ward, M.; Griffiths, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a new method for oxosteroid identification utilizing “tandem mass tag hydrazine” (TMTH) carbonyl-reactive derivatisation reagent. TMTH is a reagent with a chargeable tertiary amino group attached through a linker to a carbonyl-reactive hydrazine group. Thirty oxosteroids were analysed after derivatisation with TMTH by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and were found to give high ion-currents compared to underivatised molecules. ESI-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of the derivatives yielded characteristic fragmentation patterns with specific mass reporter ions derived from the TMT group. A shotgun ESI-MS method incorporating TMTH derivatisation was applied to a urine sample. PMID:24525129

  15. A new derivative for oxosteroid analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rigdova, K; Wang, Y; Ward, M; Griffiths, W J

    2014-04-11

    Here we report a new method for oxosteroid identification utilizing "tandem mass tag hydrazine" (TMTH) carbonyl-reactive derivatisation reagent. TMTH is a reagent with a chargeable tertiary amino group attached through a linker to a carbonyl-reactive hydrazine group. Thirty oxosteroids were analysed after derivatisation with TMTH by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and were found to give high ion-currents compared to underivatised molecules. ESI-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of the derivatives yielded characteristic fragmentation patterns with specific mass reporter ions derived from the TMT group. A shotgun ESI-MS method incorporating TMTH derivatisation was applied to a urine sample. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions.

  17. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  18. Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science

    SciTech Connect

    Wurz, P.; Whitby, J. A.; Managadze, G. G.

    2009-06-16

    Knowing the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary objects allows the study of their origin and evolution within the context of our solar system. Exploration plans in planetary research of several space agencies consider landing spacecraft for future missions. Although there have been successful landers in the past, more landers are foreseen for Mars and its moons, Venus, the jovian moons, and asteroids. Furthermore, a mass spectrometer on a landed spacecraft can assist in the sample selection in a sample-return mission and provide mineralogical context, or identify possible toxic soils on Mars for manned Mars exploration. Given the resources available on landed spacecraft mass spectrometers, as well as any other instrument, have to be highly miniaturised.

  19. Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurz, P.; Whitby, J. A.; Managadze, G. G.

    2009-06-01

    Knowing the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary objects allows the study of their origin and evolution within the context of our solar system. Exploration plans in planetary research of several space agencies consider landing spacecraft for future missions. Although there have been successful landers in the past, more landers are foreseen for Mars and its moons, Venus, the jovian moons, and asteroids. Furthermore, a mass spectrometer on a landed spacecraft can assist in the sample selection in a sample-return mission and provide mineralogical context, or identify possible toxic soils on Mars for manned Mars exploration. Given the resources available on landed spacecraft mass spectrometers, as well as any other instrument, have to be highly miniaturised.

  20. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  1. Statistical design of mass spectrometry calibration procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.

    1996-11-01

    The main objective of this task was to agree on calibration procedures to estimate the system parameters (i.e., dead-time correction, ion-counting conversion efficiency, and detector efficiency factors) for SAL`s new Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer. SAL will use this mass spectrometer in a clean-laboratory which was opened in December 1995 to measure uranium and plutonium isotopes on environmental samples. The Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer has a multi-detector system with seven Faraday cup detectors and one ion- counter for the measurement of very small signals (e.g. 10{sup -17} Ampere range). ORNL has made preliminary estimates of the system parameters based on SAL`s experimental data measured in late 1994 when the Finnigan instrument was relatively new. SAL generated additional data in 1995 to verify the calibration procedures for estimating the dead-time correction factor, the ion-counting conversion factor and the Faraday cup detector efficiency factors. The system parameters estimated on the present data will have to be reestablished when the Finnigan MAT-262 is moved-to the new clean- laboratory. Different methods will be used to analyzed environmental samples than the current measurement methods being used. For example, the environmental samples will be electroplated on a single filament rather than using the current two filament system. An outline of the calibration standard operating procedure (SOP) is included.

  2. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  3. MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY (R823292)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with mass spectrometry (MS) is very attractive for the direct identification of analyte molecules, for the possibility of selectivity enhancement, and for the structure confirmation and analysis in a MS-MS mode. The...

  4. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Heinrich; Hunsucker, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the essential characteristics of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), especially as they relate to its applications in quantitative analysis. Approaches to quantification by MALDI-TOF MS are presented and published applications are critically reviewed. PMID:19106161

  5. MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY (R823292)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with mass spectrometry (MS) is very attractive for the direct identification of analyte molecules, for the possibility of selectivity enhancement, and for the structure confirmation and analysis in a MS-MS mode. The...

  6. Colloquium: 100 years of mass spectrometry: Perspectives and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Simon; Jjunju, Fred P. M.; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is widely regarded as the most sensitive and specific general purpose analytical technique. More than a century has passed for MS since the ground-breaking work of Nobel laureate Sir Joseph John Thomson in 1913. This Colloquium aims to (1) give an historical overview of the major instrumentation achievements that have driven mass spectrometry forward in the past century, including those leading up to the initial work of Thomson, (2) provide the nonspecialist with an introduction to MS, and (3) highlight some key applications of MS and explore the current and future trends. Because of the vastness of the subject area and quality of the manifold research efforts that have been undertaken over the last 100 years, which have contributed to the foundations and subsequent advances in mass spectrometry, it should be understood that not all of the key contributions may have been included in this Colloquium. Mass spectrometry has embraced a multitude of scientific disciplines and to recognize all of the achievements is an impossible task, such has been the diverse impact of this invaluable technique. Scientific progress is usually made via the cumulative effort of a large number of researchers; the achievements reported herein are only a representation of that effort.

  7. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  8. Quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Clair, J. M.; Spencer, K. M.; Beaver, M. R.; Crounse, J. D.; Paulot, F.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2014-04-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) enables online, rapid, in situ detection and quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. Two different CIMS approaches are demonstrated employing the strengths of single quadrupole mass spectrometry and triple quadrupole (tandem) mass spectrometry. Both methods are generally capable of the measurement of hydroxyacetone, an analyte with known but minimal isobaric interferences. Tandem mass spectrometry provides direct separation of the isobaric compounds glycolaldehyde and acetic acid using distinct, collision-induced dissociation daughter ions. The single quadrupole CIMS measurement of glycolaldehyde was demonstrated during the ARCTAS-CARB (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites - California Air Resources Board) 2008 campaign, while triple quadrupole CIMS measurements of glycolaldehyde and hydroxyacetone were demonstrated during the BEARPEX (Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment) 2009 campaign. Enhancement ratios of glycolaldehyde in ambient biomass-burning plumes are reported for the ARCTAS-CARB campaign. BEARPEX observations are compared to simple photochemical box model predictions of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation at the site.

  9. Analysis of proteins using DIGE and MALDI mass spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work the sensitivity of the quantitative proteomics approach 2D-DIGE/MS (twoDimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis / Mass Spectrometry) was tested by detecting decreasing amounts of a specific protein at the low picomole and sub-picomole range. Sensitivity of the 2D-D...

  10. Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Ben

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Ben Bowen discusses "Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers.

  11. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestal, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews techniques for online coupling of high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, emphasizing those suitable for application to nonvolatile samples. Also summarizes the present status, strengths, and weaknesses of various techniques and discusses potential applications of recently developed techniques for combined liquid…

  12. May the Best Molecule Win: Competition ESI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Sarah; Wilson, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has become invaluable in the characterization of macromolecular biological systems such as nucleic acids and proteins. Recent advances in the field of mass spectrometry and the soft conditions characteristic of electrospray ionization allow for the investigation of non-covalent interactions among large biomolecules and ligands. Modulation of genetic processes through the use of small molecule inhibitors with the DNA minor groove is gaining attention as a potential therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the development of a competition method using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to probe the interactions of multiple DNA sequences with libraries of minor groove binding molecules. Such an approach acts as a high-throughput screening method to determine important information including the stoichiometry, binding mode, cooperativity, and relative binding affinity. In addition to small molecule-DNA complexes, we highlight other applications in which competition mass spectrometry has been used. A competitive approach to simultaneously investigate complex interactions promises to be a powerful tool in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors with high specificity and for specific, important DNA sequences. PMID:26501262

  13. Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2015-01-01

    Infrared laser ablation sample transfer (IR-LAST) is a novel ambient sampling technique for mass spectrometry. In this technique, a pulsed mid-IR laser is used to ablate materials that are collected for mass spectrometry analysis; the material can be a solid sample or deposited on a sample target. After collection, the sample can be further separated or analyzed directly by mass spectrometry. For IR-LAST sample transfer tissue imaging using MALDI mass spectrometry, a tissue section is placed on a sample slide and material transferred to a target slide by scanning the tissue sample under a focused laser beam using transmission-mode (back side) IR laser ablation. After transfer, the target slide is analyzed using MALDI imaging. The spatial resolution is approximately 400 μm and limited by the spread of the laser desorption plume. IR-LAST for MALDI imaging provides several new capabilities including ambient sampling, area to spot concentration of ablated material, multiple ablation and analysis from a single section, and direct deposition on matrix-free nanostructured targets.

  14. Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Bowen, Ben

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab's Ben Bowen discusses "Coming to a hospital near you: mass spectrometry imaging" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL MASS SPECTROMETRY: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES, 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Environmental Mass Spectrometry over the period of 2004-2005. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2006 are also included. Analytical Chemistry's current policy is to limit reviews to include 100-200 s...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL MASS SPECTROMETRY: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES, 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Environmental Mass Spectrometry over the period of 2004-2005. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2006 are also included. Analytical Chemistry's current policy is to limit reviews to include 100-200 s...

  17. Multiple parallel mass spectrometry for lipid and vitamin D analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has become the method of choice for analysis of complex lipid samples. Two types of ionization sources have emerged as the most commonly used to couple LC to MS: atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization ...

  18. On-Line Synthesis and Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Ryan M.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Raab, Shannon A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students learn how to use ESI to accelerate chemical synthesis and to couple it with on-line mass spectrometry for structural analysis. The Hantzsch synthesis of symmetric 1,4-dihydropyridines is a classic example of a one-pot reaction in which multiple intermediates can serve to indicate the progress of the reaction…

  19. MASS SPECTROMETRY OF INDIVIDUAL AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Typically, in real-time aerosol mass spectrometry (RTAMS), individual airborne particles
    are ablated and ionized with a single focused laser pulse. This technique yields information that
    permits bulk characterization of the particle, but information about the particle's sur...

  20. Analysis of proteins using DIGE and MALDI mass spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work the sensitivity of the quantitative proteomics approach 2D-DIGE/MS (twoDimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis / Mass Spectrometry) was tested by detecting decreasing amounts of a specific protein at the low picomole and sub-picomole range. Sensitivity of the 2D-D...

  1. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives

    Treesearch

    J.J. Karchesy; L.Y. Foo; Richard W. Hemingway; E. Barofsky; D.F. Barofsky

    1989-01-01

    Condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives were studied by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) to assess the feasibility of using this technique for determining molecular weight and structural information about these compounds. Both positive- and negative-ion spectra provided useful data with regard to molecular weight, cation species present, and presence of...

  2. Diagnosing Prion Diseases: Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mass spectrometry is an established means of quantitating the prions present in infected hamsters. Calibration curves relating the area ratios of the selected analyte peptides and their oxidized analogs to stable isotope labeled internal standards were prepared. The limit of detection (LOD) and limi...

  3. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Adaway, Joanne E; Keevil, Brian G; Owen, Laura J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory medicine has seen the introduction and evolution of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in routine clinical laboratories over the last 10-15 years. There still exists a wide diversity of assays from very esoteric and highly specialist manual assays to more simplified kit-based assays. The technology is not static as manufacturers are continually making improvements. Mass spectrometry is now commonly used in several areas of diagnostics including therapeutic drug monitoring, toxicology, endocrinology, paediatrics and microbiology. Some of the most high throughput analyses or common analytes include vitamin D, immunosuppressant monitoring, androgen measurement and newborn screening. It also offers flexibility for the measurement of analytes in a variety of different matrices which would prove difficult with immunoassays. Unlike immunoassays or high-pressure liquid chromatography assays using ultraviolet or fluorescence detection, mass spectrometry offers better specificity and reduced interferences if attention is paid to potential isobaric compounds. Furthermore, multiplexing, which enables multiple analytes to be measured with the same volume of serum is advantageous, and the requirement for large sample volumes is decreasing as instrument sensitivity increases. There are many emerging applications in the literature. Using mass spectrometry to identify novel isoforms or modified peptides is possible as is quantification of proteins and peptides, with or without protein digests. Future developments by the manufacturers may also include mechanisms to improve the throughput of samples and strategies to decrease the level of skill required by the operators.

  4. DMS-prefiltered mass spectrometry for the detection of biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2008-04-01

    Technologies based on Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS) are ideally matched to rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of chemicals like biomarkers. Biomarkers linked to exposure to radiation, exposure to CWA's, exposure to toxic materials (TICs and TIMs) and to specific diseases are being examined in a number of laboratories. Screening for these types of exposure can be improved in accuracy and greatly speeded up by using DMS-MS instead of slower techniques like LC-MS and GC-MS. We have performed an extensive series of tests with nanospray-DMS-mass spectroscopy and standalone nanospray-DMS obtaining extensive information on chemistry and detectivity. DMS-MS systems implemented with low-resolution, low-cost, portable mass-spectrometry systems are very promising. Lowresolution mass spectrometry alone would be inadequate for the task, but with DMS pre-filtration to suppress interferences, can be quite effective, even for quantitative measurement. Bio-fluids and digests are well suited to ionization by electrospray and detection by mass-spectrometry, but signals from critical markers are overwhelmed by chemical noise from unrelated species, making essential quantitative analysis impossible. Sionex and collaborators have presented data using DMS to suppress chemical noise, allowing detection of cancer biomarkers in 10,000-fold excess of normal products 1,2. In addition, a linear dynamic range of approximately 2,000 has been demonstrated with accurate quantitation 3. We will review the range of possible applications and present new data on DMS-MS biomarker detection.

  5. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  6. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  7. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: principles, perspectives, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R

    2008-10-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a modern and rapidly developing methodology for qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their posttranslational modification, subcellular localization, and interaction partners. It enables characterization of entire proteomes with unprecedented sensitivity and precision, providing platforms for identification of biomarkers and drug targets.

  8. Thorium resonance ionization mass spectrometry for geochronological and geochemical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Johnson, S.G.; Nogar, N.; Murrell, M.T.; Miller, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) is being developed to measure thorium isotopics from geological samples. These measurements, in conjunction with uranium measurements by thermal ionization, permit geochronological dating in the timescale of 10,000 to 350,000 years. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  9. On-Line Synthesis and Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Ryan M.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Raab, Shannon A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students learn how to use ESI to accelerate chemical synthesis and to couple it with on-line mass spectrometry for structural analysis. The Hantzsch synthesis of symmetric 1,4-dihydropyridines is a classic example of a one-pot reaction in which multiple intermediates can serve to indicate the progress of the reaction…

  10. Applications of Mass Spectrometry for Cellular Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of cellular lipids is an enabling technology for lipidomics, which is a rapidly-developing research field. In this review, we briefly discuss the principles, advantages, and possible limitations of electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry-based methodologies for the analysis of lipid species. The applications of these methodologies to lipidomic research are also summarized. PMID:25598407

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1997-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is a mass spectrometric method of detecting long-lived radioisotopes without regard to their decay products or half-life. The technique is normally applied to geochronology, but recently has been developed for bioanalytical tracing. AMS detects isotope concentrations to parts per quadrillion, quantifying labeled biochemicals to attomole levels in milligram- sized samples. Its advantages over non-isotopeic and stable isotope labeling methods are reviewed and examples of analytical integrity, sensitivity, specificity, and applicability are provided.

  12. Application of Laser Mass Spectrometry to Art and Archaeology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulian, Lase Lisa E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Muliadi, Sarah; Owens, Shawn; McGovern, Patrick E.; Schmidt, Catherine M.; Trentelman, Karen A.; deVries, Mattanjah S.

    2011-01-01

    REMPI laser mass spectrometry is a combination of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and time of flight mass spectrometry, This technique enables the collection of mass specific optical spectra as well as of optically selected mass spectra. Analytes are jet-cooled by entrainment in a molecular beam, and this low temperature gas phase analysis has the benefit of excellent vibronic resolution. Utilizing this method, mass spectrometric analysis of historically relevant samples can be simplified and improved; Optical selection of targets eliminates the need for chromatography while knowledge of a target's gas phase spectroscopy allows for facile differentiation of molecules that are in the aqueous phase considered spectroscopically indistinguishable. These two factors allow smaller sample sizes than commercial MS instruments, which in turn will require less damage to objects of antiquity. We have explored methods to optimize REMPI laser mass spectrometry as an analytical tool to archaeology using theobromine and caffeine as molecular markers in Mesoamerican pottery, and are expanding this approach to the field of art to examine laccaic acid in shellacs.

  13. [New mass spectrometry techniques applied to the study of venoms].

    PubMed

    Auvin-Guette, C

    2002-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is a technique for the analysis and very sensitive identification of molecules. It allows one to determine the mass of the studied product, whether pure or in a mixture, and provides some information on its molecular structure. In the particular case of peptides, this method can, under certain conditions, also provide information on the amino acid sequence. There are two complementary methods in mass spectrometry for the study of the biological molecules: i) ionisation by laser desorption assisted by matrix (MALDI) coupled to a mass analyser of the time of flight type (TOF), which is very effective for the direct study of a mixture of products and ii) ionisation by electronebulisation (ESI) coupled to mass analysers of the quadripolar type and time of flight (Qq-TOF), which allows the interfacing between high phase liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. These two complementary techniques were already used to draw up toxin charts of snake and spider venoms. The purpose is to be able to characterise species based on an actual peptide print of poisonous gland secretions.

  14. Mass spectrometry provides warning of carbon monoxide exposure via trifluoromethane.

    PubMed

    Woehick, H J; Dunning, M; Nithipatikom, K; Kulier, A H; Henry, D W

    1996-06-01

    The chemical breakdown of isoflurane, enflurane, or desflurane in dried carbon dioxide absorbents may produce carbon monoxide. Some mass spectrometers can give false indications of enflurane during anesthetic breakdown. During clinical anesthesia with isoflurane or desflurane, the presence of carbon monoxide in respiratory gas was confirmed when enflurane was inappropriately indicated by a clinical mass spectrometer that identified enflurane at mass to charge ratio = 69. In vitro, isoflurane, enflurane, or desflurane in oxygen was passed through dried carbon dioxide absorbents at 35, 45, and 55 degrees C. Gases were analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry identified several clinical incidents in which 30-410 ppm carbon monoxide was measured in respiratory gas. Trifluoromethane was produced during in vitro breakdown of isoflurane or desflurane. Although these inappropriately indicated quantities of "enflurane" correlated (r2 > 0.95) to carbon monoxide concentrations under a variety of conditions, this ratio varied with temperature, anesthetic agent, absorbent type, and water content. Trifluoromethane causes the inappropriate indication of enflurane by mass spectrometry, and indicates isoflurane and desflurane breakdown. Because the ratio of carbon monoxide to trifluoromethane varies with conditions, this technique cannot be used to quantitatively determine the amount of carbon monoxide to which a patient is exposed. If any warning of anesthetic breakdown results from this technique then remedial steps should be taken immediately to stop patient exposure to carbon monoxide. No warning can be provided for the breakdown of enflurane by this technique.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for capillary electrophoresis (CE) with on-line mass spectrometric detection (CE/MS) is driven by the need for accurate, robust and sensitive glycomics analysis for basic biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and analysis of recombinant protein therapeutics. One important capability is to profile glycan mixtures with respect to the patterns of substituents including sialic acids, acetate, sulfate, phosphate, and other groups. There is additional need for an MS-compatible separation system capable of resolving carbohydrate isomers. This review summarizes applications of CS/MS to analysis of carbohydrates, glycoproteins and glycopeptides that have appeared since 2008. Readers are referred to recent comprehensive reviews covering earlier publications. PMID:23386333

  16. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The development of methods for capillary electrophoresis (CE) with on-line mass spectrometric detection (CE/MS) is driven by the need for accurate, robust, and sensitive glycomics analysis for basic biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and analysis of recombinant protein therapeutics. One important capability is to profile glycan mixtures with respect to the patterns of substituents including sialic acids, acetate, sulfate, phosphate, and other groups. There is additional need for an MS-compatible separation system capable of resolving carbohydrate isomers. This chapter summarizes applications of CS/MS to analysis of carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and glycopeptides that have appeared since 2008. Readers are referred to recent comprehensive reviews covering earlier publications.

  17. MASS SPECTROMETRY IMAGING FOR DRUGS AND METABOLITES

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Sturm, Robert; Li, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that provides two- and three-dimensional spatial maps of multiple compounds in a single experiment. This technique has been routinely applied to protein, peptide, and lipid molecules with much less research reporting small molecule distributions, especially pharmaceutical drugs. This review’s main focus is to provide readers with an up-to-date description of the substrates and compounds that have been analyzed for drug and metabolite composition using MSI technology. Additionally, ionization techniques, sample preparation, and instrumentation developments are discussed. PMID:21515430

  18. Fermentation exhaust gas analysis using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckland, B.; Brix, Fastert, H.; Gbewonyo, K.; Hunt, G.; Jain, D.

    1985-11-01

    A Perkin Elmer MGA-1200 mass spectrometer has been coupled with a mini-computer and a sampling manifold to analyze up to 8 components in the exhaust gases of fermentors. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrogen are typically analyzed, but ethanol for yeast fermentations can also be tested by heating the line from the fermentor to the sampling manifold. Specifications, operation, and performance of the system are described. The system has been used for process control, the study of fermentation kinetics, and process development. 8 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  19. Early discovery drug screening using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Marshall M

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric methods useful for early discovery drug screening are reviewed. All methods described involve studies of non-covalent complexes between biopolymer receptors and small molecule ligands formed in the condensed phase. The complexes can be sprayed intact directly into the gas phase by ESI-MS using gentle experimental conditions. Gas phase screening applications are illustrated for drug ligand candidates non-covalently interacting with peptides, proteins, RNA, and DNA. In the condensed phase, the complexes can be also isolated, denatured and analyzed by ESI-MS to identify the small molecule ligands. Condensed phase drug screening examples are illustrated for the ESI-MS ancillary techniques of affinity chromatography, ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and capillary electrophoretic methods. Solid phase drug screening using MALDI-MS is illustrated for small molecule ligands bound to MALDI affinity probe tips and to beads. Since ESI and MALDI principally produce molecular ions, high throughput screening is achieved by analyzing mass indexed mixtures.

  20. Analysis of Milk Oligosaccharides by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lauren D; Ruhaak, L Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2017-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are a highly abundant constituent in human milk, and its protective and prebiotic properties have attracted considerable attention. HMOs have been shown to directly and indirectly benefit the overall health of the infant due to a number of functions including serving as a beneficial food for gut bacteria, block to pathogens, and aiding in brain development. Researchers are currently exploring whether these structures may act as possible disease and nutrition biomarkers. Because of this, rapid-throughput methods are desired to investigate biological activity in large patient sets. We have optimized a rapid-throughput protocol to analyze human milk oligosaccharides using micro-volumes of human breast milk for nutritional biomarkers. This method may additionally be applied to other biological fluid substrates such as plasma, urine, and feces. The protocol involves lipid separation via centrifugation, protein precipitation using ethanol, alditol reduction with sodium borohydride, and a final solid-phase extraction purification step using graphitized carbon cartridges. Samples are analyzed using HPLC-Chip/TOF-MS and data filtered on Agilent MassHunter using an in-house library. Individual structural identification is matched against a previously developed HMO library using accurate mass and retention time. Using this method will allow in-depth characterization and profiling of HMOs in large patient sets, and will ease the process of discovering significant nutritional biomarkers in human milk.

  1. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  2. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  3. Environmental applications for the analysis of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans using mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, E.J.; Schellenberg, D.H.; Taguchi, V.Y. )

    1991-01-01

    A mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry-multiple reaction monitoring (MS/MS-MRM) technique for the analysis of all tetra- through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (Cl{sub x}DD, x = 4-8) and dibenzofurans (Cl{sub x}DF, x = 4-8) has been developed at the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) utilizing a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Optimization of instrumental parameters using the analyte of interest in a direct insertion probe (DIP) resulted in sensitivities approaching those obtainable by high-resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) methods. All congeners of dioxins and furans were detected in the femtogram range. Results on selected samples indicated that for some matrices, fewer chemical interferences were observed by MS/MS than by HRMS. The technique used to optimize the instrument for chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) and chlorinated dibenzofurans (CDFs) analysis is adaptable to other analytes.

  4. Complete Hexose Isomer Identification with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Gabe; Pohl, Nicola L. B.

    2015-04-01

    The first analytical method is presented for the identification and absolute configuration determination of all 24 aldohexose and 2-ketohexose isomers, including the D and L enantiomers for allose, altrose, galactose, glucose, gulose, idose, mannose, talose, fructose, psicose, sorbose, and tagatose. Two unique fixed ligand kinetic method combinations were discovered to create significant enough energetic differences to achieve chiral discrimination among all 24 hexoses. Each of these 24 hexoses yields unique ratios of a specific pair of fragment ions that allows for simultaneous determination of identification and absolute configuration. This mass spectrometric-based methodology can be readily employed for accurate identification of any isolated monosaccharide from an unknown biological source. This work provides a key step towards the goal of complete de novo carbohydrate analysis.

  5. Advances in structure elucidation of small molecules using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The structural elucidation of small molecules using mass spectrometry plays an important role in modern life sciences and bioanalytical approaches. This review covers different soft and hard ionization techniques and figures of merit for modern mass spectrometers, such as mass resolving power, mass accuracy, isotopic abundance accuracy, accurate mass multiple-stage MS(n) capability, as well as hybrid mass spectrometric and orthogonal chromatographic approaches. The latter part discusses mass spectral data handling strategies, which includes background and noise subtraction, adduct formation and detection, charge state determination, accurate mass measurements, elemental composition determinations, and complex data-dependent setups with ion maps and ion trees. The importance of mass spectral library search algorithms for tandem mass spectra and multiple-stage MS(n) mass spectra as well as mass spectral tree libraries that combine multiple-stage mass spectra are outlined. The successive chapter discusses mass spectral fragmentation pathways, biotransformation reactions and drug metabolism studies, the mass spectral simulation and generation of in silico mass spectra, expert systems for mass spectral interpretation, and the use of computational chemistry to explain gas-phase phenomena. A single chapter discusses data handling for hyphenated approaches including mass spectral deconvolution for clean mass spectra, cheminformatics approaches and structure retention relationships, and retention index predictions for gas and liquid chromatography. The last section reviews the current state of electronic data sharing of mass spectra and discusses the importance of software development for the advancement of structure elucidation of small molecules. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12566-010-0015-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21289855

  6. Estimating the Efficiency of Phosphopeptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Xue, Liang; Arrington, Justine V.; Wang, Pengcheng; Paez Paez, Juan Sebastian; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Tao, W. Andy

    2017-03-01

    Mass spectrometry has played a significant role in the identification of unknown phosphoproteins and sites of phosphorylation in biological samples. Analyses of protein phosphorylation, particularly large scale phosphoproteomic experiments, have recently been enhanced by efficient enrichment, fast and accurate instrumentation, and better software, but challenges remain because of the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation and poor phosphopeptide ionization efficiency and fragmentation due to neutral loss. Phosphoproteomics has become an important dimension in systems biology studies, and it is essential to have efficient analytical tools to cover a broad range of signaling events. To evaluate current mass spectrometric performance, we present here a novel method to estimate the efficiency of phosphopeptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry. Phosphopeptides were directly isolated from whole plant cell extracts, dephosphorylated, and then incubated with one of three purified kinases—casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinase 6, and SNF-related protein kinase 2.6—along with 16O4- and 18O4-ATP separately for in vitro kinase reactions. Phosphopeptides were enriched and analyzed by LC-MS. The phosphopeptide identification rate was estimated by comparing phosphopeptides identified by tandem mass spectrometry with phosphopeptide pairs generated by stable isotope labeled kinase reactions. Overall, we found that current high speed and high accuracy mass spectrometers can only identify 20%-40% of total phosphopeptides primarily due to relatively poor fragmentation, additional modifications, and low abundance, highlighting the urgent need for continuous efforts to improve phosphopeptide identification efficiency.

  7. Estimating the Efficiency of Phosphopeptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Xue, Liang; Arrington, Justine V.; Wang, Pengcheng; Paez Paez, Juan Sebastian; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Tao, W. Andy

    2017-06-01

    Mass spectrometry has played a significant role in the identification of unknown phosphoproteins and sites of phosphorylation in biological samples. Analyses of protein phosphorylation, particularly large scale phosphoproteomic experiments, have recently been enhanced by efficient enrichment, fast and accurate instrumentation, and better software, but challenges remain because of the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation and poor phosphopeptide ionization efficiency and fragmentation due to neutral loss. Phosphoproteomics has become an important dimension in systems biology studies, and it is essential to have efficient analytical tools to cover a broad range of signaling events. To evaluate current mass spectrometric performance, we present here a novel method to estimate the efficiency of phosphopeptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry. Phosphopeptides were directly isolated from whole plant cell extracts, dephosphorylated, and then incubated with one of three purified kinases—casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinase 6, and SNF-related protein kinase 2.6—along with 16O4- and 18O4-ATP separately for in vitro kinase reactions. Phosphopeptides were enriched and analyzed by LC-MS. The phosphopeptide identification rate was estimated by comparing phosphopeptides identified by tandem mass spectrometry with phosphopeptide pairs generated by stable isotope labeled kinase reactions. Overall, we found that current high speed and high accuracy mass spectrometers can only identify 20%-40% of total phosphopeptides primarily due to relatively poor fragmentation, additional modifications, and low abundance, highlighting the urgent need for continuous efforts to improve phosphopeptide identification efficiency. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Imaging mass spectrometry with nuclear microprobes for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Honda, Y.; Ninomiya, S.; Seki, T.; Aoki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2009-06-01

    A mass spectrometric technique using nuclear microprobes is presented in this paper for biological applications. In recent years, imaging mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important technique for visualizing the spatial distribution of molecular species in biological tissues and cells. However, due to low yields of large molecular ions, the conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), that uses keV primary ion beams, is typically applied for imaging of either elements or low mass compounds. In this study, we performed imaging mass spectrometry using MeV ion beams collimated to about 10 μm, and successfully obtained molecular ion images from plant and animal cell sections. The molecular ion imaging of the pollen section showed high intensities of PO3- ions in the pollen cytoplasm, compared to the pollen wall, and indicated the heterogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. The 3T3-L1 cell image revealed the high intensity of PO3- ions, in particular from the cell nucleus. The result showed that not only the individual cell, but also the cell nucleus could be identified with the present imaging technique.

  9. Resonant Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry: An Alternative to AMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Klaus; Trautmann, N.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2001-02-15

    Resonant laser ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has developed into a versatile experimental method particularly concerning applications for highly selective ultratrace analaysis. Apart from providing nearly complete isobaric suspression and high overall efficiency, the possibolility for combining optical isotpic selectivity with that of hte mass spectrometer leads to remarkable specifications. The widespread analytical potential and applicability of different techniques based on resonant laser ionization is demonstrated in investigations on stable and radioactive ultratrace isotopes with the focus on applications which require high selectivity, concerning, e.g., the noble gas isotopes, 81,85KR, PU isotopes, 89,90SR, 99Tc and 41Ca. Selective ultratrace determination of these radioisotopes proved access to a variety of fundamental research problems in environmental sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, archaeology, and biomedicine, which previously were often an exclusive domain for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS).

  10. LILBID-mass spectrometry of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase TOM.

    PubMed

    Mager, Frauke; Sokolova, Lucie; Lintzel, Julia; Brutschy, Bernhard; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-11-17

    In the present work we applied a novel mass spectrometry method termed laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) to the outer mitochondrial membrane protein translocon TOM to analyze its subunit composition and stoichiometry. With TOM core complex, purified at high pH, we demonstrate that a TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa is composed of at least two Tom40 and Tom22 molecules, respectively, and more than five small Tom subunits between 5.5 and 6.4 kDa. We show that the multiprotein complex has a total molecular mass higher than 170 depending on the number of Tom5, Tom6 and Tom7 molecules bound.

  11. Recent developments in Penning-trap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, M.

    2016-06-01

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry provides atomic masses with the highest precision. At accelerator-based on-line facilities it is applied to investigate exotic radionuclides in the context of tests of fundamental symmetries, nuclear structure studies, and nuclear astrophysics research. Recent progress in slowing down radioactive ion-beams in buffer-gas cells in combination with advanced ion-manipulation techniques has paved the way to reach nuclides ever-more far from stability. In this endeavor many efforts are underway to increase the sensitivity, the efficiency, and the precision of Penning-trap mass spectrometry. In this article some recent experimental developments are addressed with the focus on the phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance technique and the Fourier transform ion-cyclotron-resonance technique.

  12. Identification of metabolites of hexazinone by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiser, R W; Belasco, I J; Rhodes, R C

    1983-11-01

    The metabolites of hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione ] obtained in the rat and in plants were identified by mass spectrometry. Rat urine metabolites were identified from direct probe spectra obtained on metabolites separated by thin-layer chromatography. Sugarcane metabolites were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry of the trimethylsilyl derivatives. The major metabolic routes were found to be hydroxylation of the cyclohexyl group and demethylation. All identifications were confirmed by synthesis and direct comparison of chromatographic data and mass spectra. Hexazinone is metabolized quickly and extensively in the biological systems studied, and is relatively nonpersistent in the environment.

  13. Determination of 135Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. M.; Charles, C. R. J.; Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W. E.; Cornett, R. J.; Litherland, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    The ratio of anthropogenic 135Cs and 137Cs isotopes is characteristic of a uranium fission source. This research evaluates the technique of isotope dilution (yield tracing) for the purpose of quantifying 135Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry with on-line isobar separation. Interferences from Ba, Zn2, and isotopes of equal mass to charge ratios were successfully suppressed. However, some sample crosstalk from source contamination remains. The transmission and di-fluoride ionization efficiencies of Cs isotopes were found to be 8 × 10-3 and 1.7 × 10-7 respectively. This quantification of 135Cs using yield tracing by accelerator mass spectrometry shows promise for future environmental sample analysis once the issues of sample crosstalk and low efficiency can be resolved.

  14. Electrochemistry-mass spectrometry in drug metabolism and protein research.

    PubMed

    Permentier, Hjalmar P; Bruins, Andries P; Bischoff, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The combination of electrochemistry coupled on-line to mass spectrometry (EC-MS) forms a powerful analytical technique with unique applications in the fields of drug metabolism and proteomics. In this review the latest developments are surveyed from both instrumental and application perspectives. The limitations and solutions for coupling an electrochemical system to a mass spectrometer are discussed. The electrochemical mimicking of drug metabolism, specifically by Cytochrome P450, is high-lighted as an application with high biomedical relevance. The EC-MS analysis of proteins also has promising new applications for both proteomics research and biomarker discovery. EC-MS has furthermore advantages for improved analyte detection with mass spectrometry, both for small molecules and large biomolecules. Finally, potential future directions of development of the technique are briefly discussed.

  15. Analysis of lipids: metal oxide laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McAlpin, Casey R; Voorhees, Kent J; Corpuz, April R; Richards, Ryan M

    2012-09-18

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has been used for lipid analysis; however, one of the drawbacks of this technique is matrix interference peaks at low masses. Metal oxide surfaces are described here for direct, matrix-free analysis of small (MW < 1000 Da) lipid compounds, without interferences in the resulting spectra from traditional matrix background peaks. Spectra from lipid standards produced protonated and sodiated molecular ions. More complex mixtures including vegetable oil shortening and lipid extracts from bacterial and algal sources provided similar results. Mechanistic insight into the mode of ionization from surface spectroscopy, negative ion mass spectrometry, and stable isotope studies is also presented. The metal oxide system is compared to other reported matrix-free systems.

  16. POTAMOS mass spectrometry calculator: computer aided mass spectrometry to the post-translational modifications of proteins. A focus on histones.

    PubMed

    Vlachopanos, A; Soupsana, E; Politou, A S; Papamokos, G V

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used technique for protein identification and it has also become the method of choice in order to detect and characterize the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Many software tools have been developed to deal with this complication. In this paper we introduce a new, free and user friendly online software tool, named POTAMOS Mass Spectrometry Calculator, which was developed in the open source application framework Ruby on Rails. It can provide calculated mass spectrometry data in a time saving manner, independently of instrumentation. In this web application we have focused on a well known protein family of histones whose PTMs are believed to play a crucial role in gene regulation, as suggested by the so called "histone code" hypothesis. The PTMs implemented in this software are: methylations of arginines and lysines, acetylations of lysines and phosphorylations of serines and threonines. The application is able to calculate the kind, the number and the combinations of the possible PTMs corresponding to a given peptide sequence and a given mass along with the full set of the unique primary structures produced by the possible distributions along the amino acid sequence. It can also calculate the masses and charges of a fragmented histone variant, which carries predefined modifications already implemented. Additional functionality is provided by the calculation of the masses of fragments produced upon protein cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes that are most widely used in proteomics studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Trends in biochemical and biomedical applications of mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelpi, Emilio

    1992-09-01

    This review attempts an in-depth evaluation of progress and achievements made since the last 11th International Mass Spectrometry Conference in the application of mass spectrometric techniques to biochemistry and biomedicine. For this purpose, scientific contributions in this field at major international meetings have been monitored, together with an extensive appraisal of literature data covering the period from 1988 to 1991. A bibliometric evaluation of the MEDLINE database for this period provides a total of almost 4000 entries for mass spectrometry. This allows a detailed study of literature and geographical sources of the most frequent applications, of disciplines where mass spectrometry is most active and of types of sample and instrumentation most commonly used. In this regard major efforts according to number of publications (over 100 literature reports) are concentrated in countries like Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, UK and the USA. Also, most of the work using mass spectrometry in biochemistry and biomedicine is centred on studies on biotransformation, metabolism, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, which have been carried out on samples of blood, urine, plasma and tissue, by order of frequency of use. Human and animal studies appear to be evenly distributed in terms of the number of reports published in the literature in which the authors make use of experimental animals or describe work on human samples. Along these lines, special attention is given to the real usefulness of mass spectrometry (MS) technology in routine medical practice. Thus the review concentrates on evaluating the progress made in disease diagnosis and overall patient care. As regards prevailing techniques, GCMS continues to be the mainstay of the state of the art methods for multicomponent analysis, stable isotope tracer studies and metabolic profiling, while HPLC--MS and tandem MS are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research. However

  18. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-02-23

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  19. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Mark L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  20. An introduction to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chernushevich, I V; Loboda, A V; Thomson, B A

    2001-08-01

    A brief introduction is presented to the basic principles and application of a quadrupole-time-of-flight (TOF) tandem mass spectrometer. The main features of reflecting TOF instruments with orthogonal injection of ions are discussed. Their operation and performance are compared with those of triple quadrupoles with electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) TOF mass spectrometers. Examples and recommendations are provided for all major operational modes: mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem MS (MS/MS), precursor ion scans and studies of non-covalent complexes. Basic algorithms for liquid chromatography/MS/MS automation are discussed and illustrated by two applications.

  1. Microscale mass spectrometry systems, devices and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John Michael

    2016-06-21

    Mass spectrometry systems or assemblies therefore include an ionizer that includes at least one planar conductor, a mass analyzer with a planar electrode assembly, and a detector comprising at least one planar conductor. The ionizer, the mass analyzer and the detector are attached together in a compact stack assembly. The stack assembly has a perimeter that bounds an area that is between about 0.01 mm.sup.2 to about 25 cm.sup.2 and the stack assembly has a thickness that is between about 0.1 mm to about 25 mm.

  2. Microscale mass spectrometry systems, devices and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John Michael

    2017-04-11

    Mass spectrometry systems or assemblies therefore include an ionizer that includes at least one planar conductor, a mass analyzer with a planar electrode assembly, and a detector comprising at least one planar conductor. The ionizer, the mass analyzer and the detector are attached together in a compact stack assembly. The stack assembly has a perimeter that bounds an area that is between about 0.01 mm.sup.2 to about 25 cm.sup.2 and the stack assembly has a thickness that is between about 0.1 mm to about 25 mm.

  3. Basic characterization of 233U: Determination of age and 232U content using sector field ICP-MS, gamma spectrometry and alpha spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramebäck, H.; Nygren, U.; Lagerkvist, P.; Verbruggen, A.; Wellum, R.; Skarnemark, G.

    2008-03-01

    The possibility to determine the age, i.e. the time since the last chemical separation, of 233U was studied using two fundamentally different measurement techniques: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gamma spectrometry. Moreover, the isotope ratio 232U/233U was measured using both alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry. For the two materials analysed, all measurement results were in agreement, i.e. consistent within the combined uncertainties. One of the materials was also measured using gamma spectrometry under field conditions. This measurement was also in agreement with the other results on this material.

  4. Rapid discrimination of bacteria by paper spray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Jarmusch, Alan K; Pirro, Valentina; Pincus, David H; Clay, Bradford G; Gervasi, Gaspard; Cooks, R Graham

    2014-08-05

    Paper spray mass spectrometry ambient ionization is utilized for rapid discrimination of bacteria without sample preparation. Bacterial colonies were smeared onto filter paper precut to a sharp point, then wetted with solvent and held at a high potential. Charged droplets released by field emission were sucked into the mass spectrometer inlet and mass spectra were recorded. Sixteen different species representing eight different genera from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were investigated. Phospholipids were the predominant species observed in the mass spectra in both the negative and positive ion modes. Multivariate data analysis based on principal component analysis, followed by linear discriminant analysis, allowed bacterial discrimination. The lipid information in the negative ion mass spectra proved useful for species level differentiation of the investigated Gram-positive bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria were differentiated at the species level by using a numerical data fusion strategy of positive and negative ion mass spectra.

  5. Mass Processing—An Improved Technique for Protein Identification with Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Josh A.; Jennings, Mark E.; Matthews, Dwight E.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis following tryptic digestion of polyacrylamide gel pieces is a common technique used to identify proteins. This approach is rapid, sensitive, and user friendly, and is becoming widely available to scientists in a variety of biological fields. Here we introduce a simple and effective strategy called “mass processing” where the list of masses generated from a mass spectrometer undergoes two stages of data reduction before identification. Mass processing improves the ability to identify in-gel tryptic-digested proteins by reducing the number of nonsample masses submitted to protein identification database search engines. Our results demonstrate that mass processing improves the statistical score and rank of putative protein identifications, especially with low-quantity samples, thus increasing the ability to confidently identify proteins with mass spectrometry data. PMID:15585819

  6. The role of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry in the analysis of protein reference standards.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Caroline; O'Connor, Gavin; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2013-08-06

    To achieve comparability of measurement results of protein amount of substance content between clinical laboratories, suitable reference materials are required. The impact on measurement comparability of potential differences in the tertiary and quaternary structure of protein reference standards is as yet not well understood. With the use of human growth hormone as a model protein, the potential of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry as a tool to assess differences in the structure of protein reference materials and their interactions with antibodies has been investigated here.

  7. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James A.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Devary, Brooks J.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.

    2007-09-03

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane, (C6H6N12O12, MW 438) {CL-20}, is a high-energy propellent that has been recently developed and successfully tested (Nielsen et al. 1998). CL-20 releases more energy on ignition and is more stable to accidental detonation than currently used energetic materials. It is expected to replace many of the energetic materials currently being used by the Department of Defense (DoD). The EPA method 8330 (EPA 1997) for the analysis of explosives and metabolites in soils calls for the use of UV/Vis detection. High performance liquid chromatography has been used to quantify CL-20 and precursor concentration (Bazaki et al. 1998`) at relatively high concentrations. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to identify different crystal forms of CL-20 (4 isomers; Kim et al. 1998). Campbell et al. (1997) utilized particle beam mass spectrometry for the analysis of enzymatic degradation of explosives. Introduction and recent improvements of ionization techniques such as electrospray (ES) have allowed the mass spectrometer to become more widely used in liquid chromatography. Schilling(1996) also examined explosive components and metabolites using electrospray (ES) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Schilling’s results showed that compared to thermospray LC/MS, APCI and ES were more sensitive than thermospray by at least an order of magnitude. 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), 10 nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water have been analyzed using solid phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-APCI mass spectrometry (Cassada et al. 1999). The method detection limits indicate that nitramine and nitroaromatic compounds can be routinely determined in ground water samples using electrospray LC/MS with concentration techniques utilizing solid-phase extraction. Miller et al. (1996) studied nitrated explosives with mobile phase

  8. Characterization of Bacteria by Particle Beam Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Platz, Robert M.; Friedlander, Sheldon K.; Vilker, Vincent L.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is described for detecting and characterizing bacteria on a single-particle basis by mass spectrometry. The method involves generation of a particle beam of single whole cells which are rapidly volatilized and ionized in vacuum in the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The particle beam can be generated, with minimal sample handling, from a naturally occurring aerosol or from a solution of bacteria that can be dispersed as an aerosol. The mass spectrum is generated by successively measuring the average intensities of different mass peaks. The average intensity is obtained by measuring the ion intensity distribution at the particular mass (m/e) for ion pulses from more than 1,000 bacteria particles. Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas putida samples were analyzed to test the capability of the instrument for differentiating among species of bacteria. Significant ion-intensity information was produced over the m/e range of 50 to 300, an improvement over previous pyrolysis-mass spectrometry results. The complex mass spectra contained a few unique peaks which could be used for the differentiation of the bacteria. A statistical analysis of the variations in peak intensities among the three bacteria provided a quantitative measure of the reproducibility of the instrument and its ability to differentiate among bacteria. The technique could lead to a new rapid method for the analysis of microorganisms and could be used for the detection of airborne pathogens on a continuous, real-time basis. Images PMID:16346802

  9. Optimization of Whole-Body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the mass spectrometry imaging literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism ...

  10. Optimization of Whole-Body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the mass spectrometry imaging literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism ...

  11. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND COMMUNICATING SCIENCE: PHARMACEUTICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A foundation for Environmental Science - Mass Spectrometry: Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies much of the...

  12. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND COMMUNICATING SCIENCE: PHARMACEUTICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A foundation for Environmental Science - Mass Spectrometry: Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies much of the...

  13. Mass fatality preparedness in the death care sector.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Magda, Lori A; Riley, Halley E M; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2011-10-01

    To characterize mass fatality preparedness of the death care sector (ie, funeral industry organizations) and to determine the workforce's ability and willingness to report to duty during a hypothetical high fatality pandemic event. Anonymous, Web-based, cross-sectional survey of a national funeral industry sample. Preparedness was characterized using descriptive statistics. Factors significantly associated with ability and willingness were identified using chi-squared bivariate analysis. Respondents (N = 492) generally rated their organizational preparedness planning as suboptimal; only six of thirteen preparedness checklist items were typically in place. In contrast, response intentions were uniformly high; more than 80% of the respondents were willing to report to work, although high prevalence of secondary obligations might hinder this. Preparedness strategies that address interorganizational, surge capacity, and personal emergency planning are likely to be most efficacious. STATEMENT OF CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Occupational medicine plays an important role in emergency preparedness and response. Funeral industry organizations could benefit from skills and resources of occupational medicine, including training, fit testing, development of plans, and coordination and hosting of planning exercises.

  14. Search for low-mass dark-sector Higgs bosons.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Benitez, J F; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-05-25

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the standard model-dark-sector mixing angle and the dark-sector coupling constant.

  15. Advances in 193 nm excimer lasers for mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Esser, Hans-Gerd; Bonati, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Ongoing progress in mass analysis applications such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry of solid samples and ultraviolet photoionization mediated sequencing of peptides and proteins is to a large extent driven by ultrashort wavelength excimer lasers at 193 nm. This paper will introduce the latest improvements achieved in the development of compact high repetition rate excimer lasers and elaborate on the impact on mass spectrometry instrumentation. Various performance and lifetime measurements obtained in a long-term endurance test over the course of 18 months will be shown and discussed in view of the laser source requirements of different mass spectrometry tasks. These sampling type applications are served by excimer lasers delivering pulsed 193 nm output of several mJ as well as fast repetition rates which are already approaching one Kilohertz. In order to open up the pathway from the laboratory to broader market industrial use, sufficient component lifetimes and long-term stable performance behavior have to be ensured. The obtained long-term results which will be presented are based on diverse 193 nm excimer laser tube improvements aiming at e.g. optimizing the gas flow dynamics and have extended the operational life the laser tube for the first time over several billion pulses even under high duty-cycle conditions.

  16. DNA analysis by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gut, Ivo Glynne

    2004-05-01

    The last decade has seen an increased demand for high-throughput DNA analysis. This is mainly due to the human genome sequencing project that is now completed. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was pinpointed early on as a technology that could be of great use for sequence variation analysis in the post-genome sequencing era. Applications developed first on this platform were for SNP genotyping. Several strategies for allele-discrimination (hybridization, cleavage, ligation, and primer extension) were combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric detection. Nowadays, in practice, only primer extension methods are applied for large-scale SNP genotyping studies with MALDI-TOF detection. Problems surrounding the integration of SNP genotyping by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry at high throughput are largely mastered now. Mass spectrometry geared presentations at the HUGO Mutation Detection Meeting in Palm Cove, Australia almost exclusively focused on novel applications that go beyond standard SNP genotyping. These applications are more demanding in terms of chemistry and molecular biology. Molecular haplotyping, expression profiling, DNA methylation analysis, and mutation detection are now being demonstrated.

  17. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  18. Native Mass Spectrometry: What is in the Name?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leney, Aneika C.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is nowadays one of the cornerstones of biomolecular mass spectrometry and proteomics. Advances in sample preparation and mass analyzers have enabled researchers to extract much more information from biological samples than just the molecular weight. In particular, relevant for structural biology, noncovalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes can now also be analyzed by MS. For these types of analyses, assemblies need to be retained in their native quaternary state in the gas phase. This initial small niche of biomolecular mass spectrometry, nowadays often referred to as "native MS," has come to maturation over the last two decades, with dozens of laboratories using it to study mostly protein assemblies, but also DNA and RNA-protein assemblies, with the goal to define structure-function relationships. In this perspective, we describe the origins of and (re)define the term native MS, portraying in detail what we meant by "native MS," when the term was coined and also describing what it does (according to us) not entail. Additionally, we describe a few examples highlighting what native MS is, showing its successes to date while illustrating the wide scope this technology has in solving complex biological questions.

  19. Peptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry with alternate fragmentation modes.

    PubMed

    Guthals, Adrian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2012-09-01

    The high-throughput nature of proteomics mass spectrometry is enabled by a productive combination of data acquisition protocols and the computational tools used to interpret the resulting spectra. One of the key components in mainstream protocols is the generation of tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra by peptide fragmentation using collision induced dissociation, the approach currently used in the large majority of proteomics experiments to routinely identify hundreds to thousands of proteins from single mass spectrometry runs. Complementary to these, alternative peptide fragmentation methods such as electron capture/transfer dissociation and higher-energy collision dissociation have consistently achieved significant improvements in the identification of certain classes of peptides, proteins, and post-translational modifications. Recognizing these advantages, mass spectrometry instruments now conveniently support fine-tuned methods that automatically alternate between peptide fragmentation modes for either different types of peptides or for acquisition of multiple MS/MS spectra from each peptide. But although these developments have the potential to substantially improve peptide identification, their routine application requires corresponding adjustments to the software tools and procedures used for automated downstream processing. This review discusses the computational implications of alternative and alternate modes of MS/MS peptide fragmentation and addresses some practical aspects of using such protocols for identification of peptides and post-translational modifications.

  20. Cortisol production rates measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, N.V.; Yergey, A.L. )

    1990-04-01

    Cortisol production rates (FPRs) in physiologic and pathologic states in humans have been investigated over the past 30 years. However, there has been conflicting evidence concerning the validity of the currently accepted value of FPRs in humans (12 to 15 mg/m2/d) as determined by radiotracer methodology. The present study reviews previous methods proposed for the measurement of FPRs in humans and discusses the applications of the first method for the direct determination of 24-hour plasma FPRs during continuous administration of a stable isotope, using a thermospray high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. The technique is fast, sensitive, and, unlike gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, does not require derivatization, allowing on-line detection and quantification of plasma cortisol after a simple extraction procedure. The results of determination of plasma FPRs by stable tracer/mass spectrometry are directly in units of mass/time and, unlike radiotracer methods, are independent of any determination of volume of distribution or cortisol concentration. Our methodology offers distinct advantages over radiotracer techniques in simplicity and reliability since only single measurements of isotope ratios are required. The technique was validated in adrenalectomized patients. Circadian variations in daily FRPs were observed in normal volunteers, and, to date, results suggest a lower FRP in normal children and adults than previously believed. 88 references.

  1. New Types of Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle (Contractor) and MDS Sciex (Participant) and ESA, Inc. (Participant) is to research, develop and apply new types of ionization sources and sampling/inlet systems for analytical mass spectrometry making use of the Participants state-of-the-art atmospheric sampling mass spectrometry electrochemical cell technology instrumentation and ancillary equipment. The two overriding goals of this research project are: to understand the relationship among the various instrumental components and operational parameters of the various ion sources and inlet systems under study, the chemical nature of the gases, solvents, and analytes in use, and the nature and abundances of the ions ultimately observed in the mass spectrometer; and to develop new and better analytical and fundamental applications of these ion sources and inlet systems or alternative sources and inlets coupled with mass spectrometry on the basis of the fundamental understanding obtained in Goal 1. The end results of this work are expected to be: (1) an expanded utility for the ion sources and inlet systems under study (such as the analysis of new types of analytes) and the control or alteration of the ionic species observed in the gas-phase; (2) enhanced instrument performance as judged by operational figures-of-merit such as dynamic range, detection limits, susceptibility to matrix signal suppression and sensitivity; and (3) novel applications (such as surface sampling with electrospray) in both applied and fundamental studies. The research projects outlined herein build upon work initiated under the previous CRADA between the Contractor and MDS Sciex on ion sources and inlet systems for mass spectrometry. Specific ion source and inlet systems for exploration of the fundamental properties and practical implementation of these principles are given.

  2. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lucy; Yan, Fangzhi; Bach, Stephen; Pihakari, Katianna; Klein, David

    2016-01-01

    Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices. PMID:26784175

  3. Establishing Drug Resistance in Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Hagan, Nathan S.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and 13C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  4. Establishing drug resistance in microorganisms by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Demirev, Plamen A; Hagan, Nathan S; Antoine, Miquel D; Lin, Jeffrey S; Feldman, Andrew B

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and (13)C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  5. The Use of Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Introduce General Chemistry Students to Percent Mass and Atomic Mass Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Brian W.; Schaefer, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to instrumental analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts of mass percent and the calculation of atomic mass. Working in small groups, students use the GC to separate and quantify the percent composition…

  6. The Use of Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Introduce General Chemistry Students to Percent Mass and Atomic Mass Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Brian W.; Schaefer, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to instrumental analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts of mass percent and the calculation of atomic mass. Working in small groups, students use the GC to separate and quantify the percent composition…

  7. Sharing and community curation of mass spectrometry data with GNPS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Don Duy; Watrous, Jeramie; Kapono, Clifford A; Luzzatto-Knaan, Tal; Porto, Carla; Bouslimani, Amina; Melnik, Alexey V; Meehan, Michael J; Liu, Wei-Ting; Crüsemann, Max; Boudreau, Paul D; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Kersten, Roland D; Pace, Laura A; Quinn, Robert A; Duncan, Katherine R; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Floros, Dimitrios J; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Kleigrewe, Karin; Northen, Trent; Dutton, Rachel J; Parrot, Delphine; Carlson, Erin E; Aigle, Bertrand; Michelsen, Charlotte F; Jelsbak, Lars; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Pevzner, Pavel; Edlund, Anna; McLean, Jeffrey; Piel, Jörn; Murphy, Brian T; Gerwick, Lena; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Yang, Yu-Liang; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Maansson, Maria; Keyzers, Robert A; Sims, Amy C; Johnson, Andrew R.; Sidebottom, Ashley M; Sedio, Brian E; Klitgaard, Andreas; Larson, Charles B; P., Cristopher A Boya; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Gonzalez, David J; Silva, Denise B; Marques, Lucas M; Demarque, Daniel P; Pociute, Egle; O'Neill, Ellis C; Briand, Enora; Helfrich, Eric J. N.; Granatosky, Eve A; Glukhov, Evgenia; Ryffel, Florian; Houson, Hailey; Mohimani, Hosein; Kharbush, Jenan J; Zeng, Yi; Vorholt, Julia A; Kurita, Kenji L; Charusanti, Pep; McPhail, Kerry L; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Vuong, Lisa; Elfeki, Maryam; Traxler, Matthew F; Engene, Niclas; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Vining, Oliver B; Baric, Ralph; Silva, Ricardo R; Mascuch, Samantha J; Tomasi, Sophie; Jenkins, Stefan; Macherla, Venkat; Hoffman, Thomas; Agarwal, Vinayak; Williams, Philip G; Dai, Jingqui; Neupane, Ram; Gurr, Joshua; Rodríguez, Andrés M. C.; Lamsa, Anne; Zhang, Chen; Dorrestein, Kathleen; Duggan, Brendan M; Almaliti, Jehad; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Phapale, Prasad; Nothias, Louis-Felix; Alexandrov, Theodore; Litaudon, Marc; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Kyle, Jennifer E; Metz, Thomas O; Peryea, Tyler; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; VanLeer, Danielle; Shinn, Paul; Jadhav, Ajit; Müller, Rolf; Waters, Katrina M; Shi, Wenyuan; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Lixin; Knight, Rob; Jensen, Paul R; Palsson, Bernhard O; Pogliano, Kit; Linington, Roger G; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Lopes, Norberto P; Gerwick, William H; Moore, Bradley S; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bandeira, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    The potential of the diverse chemistries present in natural products (NP) for biotechnology and medicine remains untapped because NP databases are not searchable with raw data and the NP community has no way to share data other than in published papers. Although mass spectrometry techniques are well-suited to high-throughput characterization of natural products, there is a pressing need for an infrastructure to enable sharing and curation of data. We present Global Natural Products Social molecular networking (GNPS, http://gnps.ucsd.edu), an open-access knowledge base for community wide organization and sharing of raw, processed or identified tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. In GNPS crowdsourced curation of freely available community-wide reference MS libraries will underpin improved annotations. Data-driven social-networking should facilitate identification of spectra and foster collaborations. We also introduce the concept of ‘living data’ through continuous reanalysis of deposited data. PMID:27504778

  8. Characterization of a model Phillips catalyst by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Di Croce, Pascal Gabriel; Aubriet, Frédéric; Chéty-Gimondo, Rachel; Muller, Jean-François; Grange, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A model Phillips catalyst for ethylene polymerization, prepared by spin coating a Cr(III)(Cr(acac)3) precursor on a silicon wafer, was submitted to an oxidative activation. Laser ablation Fourier transform mass spectrometry provided direct information on molecular species at the silicon wafer surface during activation. At 350 degrees C the chromium precursor was degraded, while chromium oxide species were formed. The chromium concentration decreased with temperature. The activated model catalyst was active for ethylene polymerization. Using complementary techniques (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry), the polymer was identified as crystalline polyethylene. After 1 h of polymerization at 160 degrees C, dome-like structures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Their morphologies were constituted of regions of parallel aligned lamellae of polymer.

  9. Current Status and Future Perspectives of Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nimesh, Surendra; Mohottalage, Susantha; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Prem

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is employed for mapping proteins, lipids and metabolites in biological tissues in a morphological context. Although initially developed as a tool for biomarker discovery by imaging the distribution of protein/peptide in tissue sections, the high sensitivity and molecular specificity of this technique have enabled its application to biomolecules, other than proteins, even in cells, latent finger prints and whole organisms. Relatively simple, with no requirement for labelling, homogenization, extraction or reconstitution, the technique has found a variety of applications in molecular biology, pathology, pharmacology and toxicology. By discriminating the spatial distribution of biomolecules in serial sections of tissues, biomarkers of lesions and the biological responses to stressors or diseases can be better understood in the context of structure and function. In this review, we have discussed the advances in the different aspects of mass spectrometry imaging processes, application towards different disciplines and relevance to the field of toxicology. PMID:23759983

  10. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  11. Analysis of Protein O-GlcNAcylation by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junfeng; Hart, Gerald W

    2017-02-02

    O-linked β-D-N-acetyl glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) addition (O-GlcNAcylation), a post-translational modification of serine/threonine residues of proteins, is involved in diverse cellular metabolic and signaling pathways. Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation underlies the initiation and progression of multiple chronic diseases including diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Numerous methods have been developed for the analysis of protein O-GlcNAcylation, but instead of discussing the classical biochemical techniques, this unit covers O-GlcNAc characterization by combining several enrichment methods and mass spectrometry detection techniques [including collision-induced dissociation (CID), higher energy collision dissociation (HCD), and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry]. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Challenges ahead for mass spectrometry and proteomics applications in epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Benedikt M

    2010-02-01

    Inheritance of biological information to future generations depends on the replication of DNA and the Mendelian principle of distribution of genes. In addition, external and environmental factors can influence traits that can be propagated to offspring, but the molecular details of this are only beginning to be understood. The discoveries of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications on chromatin and histones provided entry points for regulating gene expression, an area now defined as epigenetics and epigenomics. Mass spectrometry turned out to be instrumental in uncovering molecular details involved in these processes. The central role of histone post-translational modifications in epigenetics related biological processes has revitalized mass spectrometry based investigations. In this special report, current approaches and future challenges that lay ahead due to the enormous complexity are discussed.

  13. Imaging Mass Spectrometry on the Nanoscale with Cluster Ion Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-12-02

    Imaging with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is reaching a mature level of development. When, using a variety of molecular ion projectiles to stimulate desorption, 3-dimensional imaging with the selectivity of mass spectrometry can now be achieved with submicrometer spatial resolution and <10 nm depth resolution. In this Perspective, stock is taken regarding what it will require to routinely achieve these remarkable properties. Some issues include the chemical nature of the projectile, topography formation, differential erosion rates, and perhaps most importantly, ionization efficiency. Shortcomings of existing instrumentation are also noted. One key part of this discussion involves speculation onmore » how best to resolve these issues.« less

  14. Protein identification using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry is an efficient technique for the identification of peptides on the basis of their fragmentation pattern (MS/MS scan). It can generate individual spectra for each peptide, thereby creating a powerful tool for protein identification on the basis of peptide characterization. This important advance in automatic data acquisition has allowed an efficient association between liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, and the use of nanocolumns and nanoelectrospray ionization has dramatically increased the efficiency of this method. Now large sets of peptides can be identified at a femtomole level. At the end of the process, batch processing of the MS/MS spectra produces peptide lists that identify purified proteins or protein mixtures with high confidence.

  15. Examining Histone Posttranslational Modification Patterns by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants and posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are essential for epigenetic regulation of transcriptional expression. Single and/or combinatorial PTMs of histones play important roles in development and disease formation. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a powerful tool to study histone variants and PTMs as it not only can identify novel PTMs but also can provide quantitative measurement of a spectrum of histone variants and PTMs in the same sample. In this chapter, we employ a combination of chemical derivation and high resolution mass spectrometry to identify and quantify multiple histone variants and PTMs. Histones are acid extracted and modified with propionyl groups, and subsequently produces suitable sizes of fragments for MS analysis by trypsin digestion. The newly generated N-termini of histone peptides can be differentially marked by stable isotope labeling in a second reaction of propionylation, which enables direct comparison between two different samples in the following MS analysis. PMID:22910200

  16. Analytical validation of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmaceutical development

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Bradly D; Ognibene, Ted; Vogel, John S

    2011-01-01

    The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 14C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the 14C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least 1 year, linear over four orders of magnitude with an analytical range from 0.1 Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Furthermore, accuracy was excellent (between 1 and 3%), while precision expressed as coefficient of variation was between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of 14C, respectively (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with 14C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. Accelerator mass spectrometry provides a sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices. PMID:21083256

  17. An insight into high-resolution mass-spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-passow, J. E.; Oberg, A. L.; Therneau, T. M.; Bergen, H. R.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool with much promise in global proteomic studies. The discipline of statistics offers robust methodologies to extract and interpret high-dimensional mass-spectrometry data and will be a valuable contributor to the field. Here, we describe the process by which data are produced, characteristics of the data, and the analytical preprocessing steps that are taken in order to interpret the data and use it in downstream statistical analyses. Because of the complexity of data acquisition, statistical methods developed for gene expression microarray data are not directly applicable to proteomic data. Areas in need of statistical research for proteomic data include alignment, experimental design, abundance normalization, and statistical analysis. PMID:19325168

  18. Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry in bioanalytical sciences.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Silberring, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques are gaining growing interest due to their specific features, such as the need for little or no sample preparation, its high analysis speed, and the ambient experimental conditions. Samples can be analyzed in gas, liquid, or solid forms. These techniques allow for a wide range of applications, like warfare agent detection, chemical reaction control, mass spectrometry imaging, polymer identification, and food safety monitoring, as well as applications in biomedical science, e.g., drug and pharmaceutical analysis, medical diagnostics, biochemical analysis, etc. Until now, the main drawback of plasma-based techniques is their quantitative aspect, but a lot of efforts have been done to improve this obstacle.

  19. Microfabricated devices: A new sample introduction approach to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Iulia M; Grym, Jakub; Foret, Frantisek

    2006-01-01

    Instrument miniaturization is one way of addressing the issues of sensitivity, speed, throughput, and cost of analysis in DNA diagnostics, proteomics, and related biotechnology areas. Microfluidics is of special interest for handling very small sample amounts, with minimal concerns related to sample loss and cross-contamination, problems typical for standard fluidic manipulations. Furthermore, the small footprint of these microfabricated structures leads to instrument designs suitable for high-density, parallel sample processing, and high-throughput analyses. In addition to miniaturized systems designed with optical or electrochemical detection, microfluidic devices interfaced to mass spectrometry have also been demonstrated. Instruments for automated sample infusion analysis are now commercially available, and microdevices utilizing chromatographic or capillary electrophoresis separation techniques are under development. This review aims at documenting the technologies and applications of microfluidic mass spectrometry for the analysis of proteomic samples. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Scoring Large Scale Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Datasets with MIST

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, Erik; Von Dollen, John; Cimermancic, Peter; Gulbahce, Natali; Sali, Andrej; Krogan, Nevan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments can identify a large number of protein interactions but only a fraction of these interactions are biologically relevant. Here, we describe a comprehensive computational strategy to process raw AP-MS data, perform quality controls and prioritize biologically relevant bait-prey pairs in a set of replicated AP-MS experiments with Mass spectrometry interaction STatistics (MiST). The MiST score is a linear combination of prey quantity (abundance), abundance invariability across repeated experiments (reproducibility), and prey uniqueness relative to other baits (specificity); We describe how to run the full MiST analysis pipeline in an R environment and discuss a number of configurable options that allow the lay user to convert any large-scale AP-MS data into an interpretable, biologically relevant protein-protein interaction network. PMID:25754993

  1. Analytical validation of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Keck, Bradly D; Ognibene, Ted; Vogel, John S

    2010-03-01

    The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of (14)C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the (14)C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least 1 year, linear over four orders of magnitude with an analytical range from 0.1 Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Furthermore, accuracy was excellent (between 1 and 3%), while precision expressed as coefficient of variation was between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of (14)C, respectively (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with (14)C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. Accelerator mass spectrometry provides a sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices.

  2. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-28

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  3. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; He, Jianbo; Shen, Dejun; Saxton, Romaine E.; Chang, Helena R.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management. PMID:19662217

  4. Characterizing Glycoproteins by Mass Spectrometry in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E

    2017-01-01

    The glycosylation systems of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) are considered archetypal examples of both N- and O-linked glycosylations in the field of bacterial glycosylation. The discovery and characterization of these systems both have revealed important biological insight into C. jejuni and have led to the refinement and enhancement of methodologies to characterize bacterial glycosylation. In general, mass spectrometry-based characterization has become the preferred methodology for the study of C. jejuni glycosylation because of its speed, sensitivity, and ability to enable both qualitative and quantitative assessments of glycosylation events. In these experiments the generation of insightful data requires the careful selection of experimental approaches and mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. As such, it is essential to have a deep understanding of the technologies and approaches used for characterization of glycosylation events. Here we describe protocols for the initial characterization of C. jejuni glycoproteins using protein-/peptide-centric approaches and discuss considerations that can enhance the generation of insightful data.

  5. Advanced Quantification of Plutonium Ionization Potential to Support Nuclear Forensic Evaluations by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    QUANTIFICATION OF PLUTONIUM IONIZATION POTENTIAL TO SUPPORT NUCLEAR FORENSIC EVALUATIONS BY RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY by Craig T...PLUTONIUM IONIZATION POTENTIAL TO SUPPORT NUCLEAR FORENSIC EVALUATIONS BY RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...mass spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of the debris from nuclear

  6. Vapor Pressure Determination of VM Using the Denunder-Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    2012 – Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vapor Pressure Determination of VM Using the Denuder– Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Technique 5a... Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) Vapor pressure 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF...9 1 VAPOR PRESSURE DETERMINATION OF VM USING THE DENUDER– LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY–MASS SPECTROMETRY

  7. Determining the topology of virus assembly intermediates using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Knapman, Tom W; Morton, Victoria L; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Stockley, Peter G; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2010-10-30

    We have combined ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry with tandem mass spectrometry to characterise large, non-covalently bound macromolecular complexes in terms of mass, shape (cross-sectional area) and stability (dissociation) in a single experiment. The results indicate that the quaternary architecture of a complex influences its residual shape following removal of a single subunit by collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. Complexes whose subunits are bound to several neighbouring subunits to create a ring-like three-dimensional (3D) architecture undergo significant collapse upon dissociation. In contrast, subunits which have only a single neighbouring subunit within a complex retain much of their original shape upon complex dissociation. Specifically, we have determined the architecture of two transient, on-pathway intermediates observed during in vitro viral capsid assembly. Knowledge of the mass, stoichiometry and cross-sectional area of each viral assembly intermediate allowed us to model a range of potential structures based on the known X-ray structure of the coat protein building blocks. Comparing the cross-sectional areas of these potential architectures before and after dissociation provided tangible evidence for the assignment of the topologies of the complexes, which have been found to encompass both the 3-fold and the 5-fold symmetry axes of the final icosahedral viral shell. Such insights provide unique information about virus assembly pathways that could allow the design of anti-viral therapeutics directed at the assembly step. This methodology can be readily applied to the structural characterisation of many other non-covalently bound macromolecular complexes and their assembly pathways. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Computational and Statistical Analysis of Protein Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Noble, William Stafford; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput proteomics experiments involving tandem mass spectrometry produce large volumes of complex data that require sophisticated computational analyses. As such, the field offers many challenges for computational biologists. In this article, we briefly introduce some of the core computational and statistical problems in the field and then describe a variety of outstanding problems that readers of PLoS Computational Biology might be able to help solve. PMID:22291580

  9. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry of Substituted Silane High Polymers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    REPORT NO. 170) ’ Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry of Substituted Silane High Polymers* T. Mgnea, . Baaji R. by T. Magnera, V. Balaji, R...reverse it necessary and identify by block number) Laser ablation of a variety of polysilanes at 308 nm using fluences of 150-250 m./Q per pulse, well...rapid ablation of neat solid polysilanes with UV laser light suggested their potential utility as self-developing phocoresists. 3 Further interest in this

  10. Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Heath, Brandi S.; Roach, Patrick J.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Semmes, O. John

    2012-01-03

    We present the first results showing the ambient imaging of biological samples in their native environment using nanospray desorption ionization (nanoDESI) mass spectrometry. NanoDESI is an ambient pressure ionization technique that enables precise control of ionization of molecules from substrates. We demonstrate highly sensitive and robust analysis of tissue samples with high spatial resolution (<12 {mu}m) without sample preparation, which will be essential for applications in clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, molecular biology, and biochemistry.

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry for quantitative in vivo tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S

    2005-04-19

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) counts individual rare, usually radio-, isotopes such as radiocarbon at high efficiency and specificity in milligram-sized samples. AMS traces very low chemical doses ({micro}g) and radiative doses (100 Bq) of isotope labeled compounds in animal models and directly in humans for pharmaceutical, nutritional, or toxicological research. Absorption, metabolism, distribution, binding, and elimination are all quantifiable with high precision after appropriate sample definition.

  12. Targeting Synaptic Pathology with a Novel Affinity Mass Spectrometry Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmalm, Ann; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Honer, William G.; Moreno, Julie A.; Jakobsson, Joel; Mallucci, Giovanna R.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Öhrfelt, Annika

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel strategy for studying synaptic pathology by concurrently measuring levels of four SNARE complex proteins from individual brain tissue samples. This method combines affinity purification and mass spectrometry and can be applied directly for studies of SNARE complex proteins in multiple species or modified to target other key elements in neuronal function. We use the technique to demonstrate altered levels of presynaptic proteins in Alzheimer disease patients and prion-infected mice. PMID:24973420

  13. Removal of detergents from protein digests for mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Yee-Guide; Nieves, Edward; Angeletti, Ruth; Stanley, E. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Detergents are commonly used for the extraction of hydrophobic proteins and must be removed for sensitive detection of peptides by mass spectrometry (MS). We demonstrate that ethyl acetate (EA) is able to extract octylglycoside (OG) from a protease digest without loss of peptides or interference with the MS peptide spectral profile. EA extraction was also found to reduce interference of SDS, NP-40 or Triton X-100 in the MS analysis. PMID:18713617

  14. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry metabolite analysis and imaging.

    PubMed

    Greving, Matthew P; Patti, Gary J; Siuzdak, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) is a matrix-free desorption/ionization approach that is particularly well-suited for unbiased (untargeted) metabolomics. An overview of the NIMS technology and its application in the detection of biofluid and tissue metabolites are presented. (To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  15. Dissociation techniques in mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew W; Cooper, Helen J

    2011-09-07

    The field of proteomics, the large-scale analysis of proteins, has undergone a huge expansion over the past decade. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics relies on the dissociation of peptide and/or protein ions to provide information on primary sequence and sites of post-translational modifications. Fragmentation techniques include collision-induced dissociation, electron capture dissociation and electron transfer dissociation. Here, we describe each of these techniques and their use in proteomics. The principles, advantages, limitations, and applications are discussed.

  16. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  17. Kinetic Studies of Reactions in Solution Using Fast Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-13

    of Reactions in Solution Using Fast Mass Spectrometry Sb. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0235 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd . PROJECT...salt and detergent in electrokinetic separations using a spinning disk. We also applied this technique, we believe with great success, to study...chromatography to MS Salts and detergents used in the mobile phase for electro- kinetic separations suppress ionization efficiencies and con

  18. Application of MALDI Mass Spectrometry in Natural Products Analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ricardo; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Silva, Denise Brentan

    2016-05-01

    This article presents the utility of mass spectrometry with a MALDI ionization source in natural products analysis. The advantages and drawbacks of this technique for natural products analyses will be presented and discussed. In addition, the structural determination of secondary metabolites using MALDI-MS/MS will be explored, which can guide MALDI experimental methods and stimulate new research in this area. Finally, several important approaches for MALDI data processing will be discussed.

  19. Charge Prediction of Lipid Fragments in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schrom, Brian T.; Kangas, Lars J.; Ginovska, Bojana; Metz, Thomas O.; Miller, John H.

    2011-12-18

    An artificial neural network is developed for predicting which fragment is charged and which fragment is neutral for lipid fragment pairs produced from a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry simulation process. This charge predictor is integrated into software developed at PNNL for in silico spectra generation and identification of metabolites known as Met ISIS. To test the effect of including charge prediction in Met ISIS, 46 lipids are used which show a reduction in false positive identifications when the charge predictor is utilized.

  20. Visualization of lipid droplet composition by direct organelle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Ledbetter, Nicole R; James, Christopher N; Hoffman, William D; Case, Charlene R; Verbeck, Guido F; Chapman, Kent D

    2011-02-04

    An expanding appreciation for the varied functions of neutral lipids in cellular organisms relies on a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of lipid production and packaging into cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). Conventional lipid profiling procedures involve the analysis of tissue extracts and consequently lack cellular or subcellular resolution. Here, we report an approach that combines the visualization of individual LDs, microphase extraction of lipid components from droplets, and the direct identification of lipid composition by nanospray mass spectrometry, even to the level of a single LD. The triacylglycerol (TAG) composition of LDs from several plant sources (mature cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) embryos, roots of cotton seedlings, and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and leaves) were examined by direct organelle mass spectrometry and revealed the heterogeneity of LDs derived from different plant tissue sources. The analysis of individual LDs makes possible organellar resolution of molecular compositions and will facilitate new studies of LD biogenesis and functions, especially in combination with analysis of morphological and metabolic mutants. Furthermore, direct organelle mass spectrometry could be applied to the molecular analysis of other subcellular compartments and macromolecules.

  1. Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry of Synthetic Polymers and Advanced Materials.

    PubMed

    Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2017-02-01

    Multidimensional mass spectrometry interfaces a suitable ionization technique and mass analysis (MS) with fragmentation by tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2) ) and an orthogonal online separation method. Separation choices include liquid chromatography (LC) and ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS), in which separation takes place pre-ionization in the solution state or post-ionization in the gas phase, respectively. The MS step provides elemental composition information, while MS(2) exploits differences in the bond stabilities of a polymer, yielding connectivity and sequence information. LC conditions can be tuned to separate by polarity, end-group functionality, or hydrodynamic volume, whereas IMS adds selectivity by macromolecular shape and architecture. This Minireview discusses how selected combinations of the MS, MS(2) , LC, and IMS dimensions can be applied, together with the appropriate ionization method, to determine the constituents, structures, end groups, sequences, and architectures of a wide variety of homo- and copolymeric materials, including multicomponent blends, supramolecular assemblies, novel hybrid materials, and large cross-linked or nonionizable polymers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Significant advancement of mass spectrometry imaging for food chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Food contains various compounds that have an impact on our daily lives. Many technologies have been established to analyze these molecules of interest in foods. However, the analysis of the spatial distribution of these compounds in foods using conventional technology, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is difficult. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is considered an ideal complementary approach. MALDI-MSI is a two-dimensional MALDI-MS technology that can detect compounds in a tissue section without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling. MALDI-MSI can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of chemical compounds or biomolecules in foods. Although the methodology of MALDI-MSI in food science is not yet fully established, the versatility of MALDI-MSI is expected to open a new frontier in food science. Herein, we describe the principles and applications of MALDI-MSI in food science and related fields.

  3. Mass spectrometry theory and application to adrenal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wooding, Kerry M; Auchus, Richard J

    2013-05-22

    The diagnosis and management of adrenal diseases hinge upon accurate determination of hormone concentrations in blood and other body fluids. The advent of immunoassays for various steroid hormones has enabled the remarkable progress in adrenal disease over the last several decades, with some limitation. Sequential immunoassay of single analytes is a tedious process, which requires aliquots for each assay. In many complex adrenal diseases, including adrenal cancer and congenital adrenal hyperplasia, the patterns or ratios of multiple steroids rather than the value of any one steroid is more relevant. Although gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of urinary steroid metabolites has been employed to profile steroid production, throughput is slow, and availability is sparse. Recent generations of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry instruments (LC-MS/MS) provide the throughput and sensitivity required to measure many steroids simultaneously using small samples for commercial and research uses. Even in the best hands, however, LC-MS/MS suffers from limitations and requires diligent attention to detail during method development and implementation. This article reviews the theory, instrumentation principles and terminology, and practical application of mass spectrometry to clinical adrenal disorders.

  4. Triboelectric nanogenerators for sensitive nano-coulomb molecular mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Anyin; Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Zhong Lin; Fernández, Facundo M

    2017-02-27

    Ion sources for molecular mass spectrometry are usually driven by direct current power supplies with no user control over the total charges generated. Here, we show that the output of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can quantitatively control the total ionization charges in mass spectrometry. The high output voltage of TENGs can generate single- or alternating-polarity ion pulses, and is ideal for inducing nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) and plasma discharge ionization. For a given nanoESI emitter, accurately controlled ion pulses ranging from 1.0 to 5.5 nC were delivered with an onset charge of 1.0 nC. Spray pulses can be generated at a high frequency of 17 Hz (60 ms in period) and the pulse duration is adjustable on-demand between 60 ms and 5.5 s. Highly sensitive (∼0.6 zeptomole) mass spectrometry analysis using minimal sample (18 pl per pulse) was achieved with a 10 pg ml(-1) cocaine sample. We also show that native protein conformation is conserved in TENG-ESI, and that patterned ion deposition on conductive and insulating surfaces is possible.

  5. Macromolecule mass spectrometry: citation mining of user documents.

    PubMed

    Kostoff, Ronald N; Bedford, Clifford D; del Río, J Antonio; Cortes, Héctor D; Karypis, George

    2004-03-01

    Identifying research users, applications, and impact is important for research performers, managers, evaluators, and sponsors. Identification of the user audience and the research impact is complex and time consuming due to the many indirect pathways through which fundamental research can impact applications. This paper identified the literature pathways through which two highly-cited papers of 2002 Chemistry Nobel Laureates Fenn and Tanaka impacted research, technology development, and applications. Citation Mining, an integration of citation bibliometrics and text mining, was applied to the >1600 first generation Science Citation Index (SCI) citing papers to Fenn's 1989 Science paper on Electrospray Ionization for Mass Spectrometry, and to the >400 first generation SCI citing papers to Tanaka's 1988 Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry paper on Laser Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Bibliometrics was performed on the citing papers to profile the user characteristics. Text mining was performed on the citing papers to identify the technical areas impacted by the research, and the relationships among these technical areas.

  6. Mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins from human blood.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peihong; Bowden, Peter; Zhang, Du; Marshall, John G

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to convey the accelerating rate and growing importance of mass spectrometry applications to human blood proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry can rapidly detect and identify the ionizable peptides from the proteins in a simple mixture and reveal many of their post-translational modifications. However, blood is a complex mixture that may contain many proteins first expressed in cells and tissues. The complete analysis of blood proteins is a daunting task that will rely on a wide range of disciplines from physics, chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, electromagnetic instrumentation, mathematics and computation. Therefore the comprehensive discovery and analysis of blood proteins will rank among the great technical challenges and require the cumulative sum of many of mankind's scientific achievements together. A variety of methods have been used to fractionate, analyze and identify proteins from blood, each yielding a small piece of the whole and throwing the great size of the task into sharp relief. The approaches attempted to date clearly indicate that enumerating the proteins and peptides of blood can be accomplished. There is no doubt that the mass spectrometry of blood will be crucial to the discovery and analysis of proteins, enzyme activities, and post-translational processes that underlay the mechanisms of disease. At present both discovery and quantification of proteins from blood are commonly reaching sensitivities of ∼1 ng/mL.

  7. Triboelectric nanogenerators for sensitive nano-coulomb molecular mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Anyin; Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Zhong Lin; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2017-05-01

    Ion sources for molecular mass spectrometry are usually driven by direct current power supplies with no user control over the total charges generated. Here, we show that the output of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can quantitatively control the total ionization charges in mass spectrometry. The high output voltage of TENGs can generate single- or alternating-polarity ion pulses, and is ideal for inducing nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) and plasma discharge ionization. For a given nanoESI emitter, accurately controlled ion pulses ranging from 1.0 to 5.5 nC were delivered with an onset charge of 1.0 nC. Spray pulses can be generated at a high frequency of 17 Hz (60 ms in period) and the pulse duration is adjustable on-demand between 60 ms and 5.5 s. Highly sensitive (˜0.6 zeptomole) mass spectrometry analysis using minimal sample (18 pl per pulse) was achieved with a 10 pg ml-1 cocaine sample. We also show that native protein conformation is conserved in TENG-ESI, and that patterned ion deposition on conductive and insulating surfaces is possible.

  8. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Peter J.; McKown, Henry S.; Smith, David H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit.

  9. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

    1982-04-26

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of whole-grain phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, Ville Mikael; Hanhineva, Kati

    2017-05-24

    Whole grains are a rich source of several classes of phytochemicals, such as alkylresorcinols, benzoxazinoids, flavonoids, lignans, and phytosterols. A high intake of whole grains has been linked to a reduced risk of some major noncommunicable diseases, and it has been postulated that a complex mixture of phytochemicals works in synergy to generate beneficial health effects. Mass spectrometry, especially when coupled with liquid chromatography, is a widely used method for the analysis of phytochemicals owing to its high sensitivity and dynamic range. In this review, the current knowledge of the mass spectral properties of the most important classes of phytochemicals found in cereals of common wheat, barley, oats, and rye is discussed.

  11. Characterization of individual particles in gaseous media by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    An introduction is given to a system for particle analysis by mass spectrometry (PAMS) which employs particle-beam techniques to measure mass spectra on a continuous real-time basis. The system is applied to particles of both organic and inorganic compounds, and the measurements give the chemical characteristics of particles in mixtures and indicate source apportionment. The PAMS system can be used for process control and studying heterogeneous/catalytic reactions in particles, and can be fitted to study the real-time attributes of PAMS.

  12. Tissue MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Beine, Birte; Diehl, Hanna C; Meyer, Helmut E; Henkel, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique to visualize molecular features of tissues based on mass detection. This chapter focuses on MALDI MSI of peptides and provides detailed operational instructions for sample preparation of cryoconserved and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Besides sample preparation we provide protocols for the MALDI measurement, tissue staining, and data analysis. On-tissue digestion and matrix application are described for two different commercially available and commonly used spraying devices: the SunCollect (SunChrom) and the ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonik GmbH).

  13. Improved mass spectrometry compatibility is afforded by ammoniacal silver staining

    PubMed Central

    Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Luche, Sylvie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2006-01-01

    Sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis of protein digestion-derived peptides is a key issue for detailed characterization of proteins or identification at low quantities. In gel-based proteomics studies, the sequence coverage greatly depends on the protein detection method. It is shown here that ammoniacal silver detection methods offer improved sequence coverage over standard silver nitrate methods, while keeping the high sensitivity of silver staining With the development of 2D-PAGE-based proteomics, another burden is placed on the detection methods used for protein detection on 2D-gels. Besides the classical requirements of linearity, sensitivity and homogeneity from one protein to another, detection methods must now take into account another aspect, namely their compatibility with mass spectrometry. This compatibility is evidenced by two different and complementary aspects, which are i) the absence of adducts and artefactual modifications on the peptides obtained after protease digestion of a protein detected and digested in –gel and ii) the quantitative yield of peptides recovered after digestion and analyzed by the mass spectrometer. While this quantitative yield is not very important per se, it is however a crucial parameter as it strongly influences the signal to noise ratio of the mass spectrum, and thus the number of peptides that can be detected from a given protein input, especially at low protein amounts. This influences in turn the sequence coverage, and thus the detail of the analysis provided by the mass spectrometer. PMID:16548061

  14. High Resolution Double-Focusing Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, J.; Deerberg, M.; Hilkert, A.; Schlüter, H.-J.; Schwieters, J.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years isotope ratio mass spectrometry has extended to the capability of quantifying very small isotope signatures related with low abundances and simultaneously detecting molecular masses such as isotopomers and isotopologues containing clumped isotopes. Some of those applications are limited by molecular interferences like different gas molecules with the same nominal mass, e.g. Ar/O2, adducts of the same molecule or of different molecules, and very small isotope abundances. The Thermo Scientific MAT 253 ULTRA is the next generation of high precision gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which combines a 10 KV gas ionization source (Thermo Scientific MAT 253) with a double focusing multi-collector mass analyzer (Thermo Scientific Neptune) and reduces those limitations by measuring isotope ratios on a larger dynamic range with high precision. Small ion beam requirements and high sensitivity are achieved by signal-to-noise improvements through enhanced ion beam amplification in faraday cups and ion counters. Interfering backgrounds, e.g. interfering isotopologues or isobaric ions of contaminants, are dramatically decreased by a dynamic range increase combined with high evacuation leading to undisturbed ion transmission through the double-focusing analyser. Furthermore, automated gain calibration for mathematical baseline corrections, switchable detector arrays, ion source control, analyser focusing and full data export is controlled under Isodat data control. New reference/sample strategies are under investigation besides incorporation of the continuous-flow technique and its versatile inlet devices. We are presenting first results and applications of the MAT 253 Ultra.

  15. Liquid chromatography/microspray mass spectrometry for bacterial investigations.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, T; Davis, M T; Stahl, D C; Lee, T D

    1999-01-01

    Cellular proteins (biomarkers) specific to any individual microorganism, determined by the direct mass spectral analysis of the corresponding intact cellular suspension, can be applied for the rapid and specific identification of the organisms present in unknown samples. The components of the bacterial suspensions, after a rapid separation over a C18 reversed-phase microcapillary column, were directly subjected to on-line electrospray ionization followed by analysis using an ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. This approach is equally effective for gram-positive as well as gram-negative bacteria but has a distinct advantage over our earlier reported method involving matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). During electrospray ionitation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), liquid samples can be directly analyzed and there is the potential for developing tandem mass spectral methods for more specific identification of the individual organisms present in crude bacterial mixtures. The total analysis time leading to unambiguous bacterial identification in samples was less than 10 minutes and the results were quite reproducible. Miniaturization of the instrumentation along with total automation of this simple process could have immense impact on field operations. Routine, rapid, cost-effective field monitoring of environmental samples, agricultural products, samples from food processing, industrial sites and health institutions for suspected bacterial contamination could be a reality in the near future. Potential utility in biological, medical, bioprocessing, pharmaceutical, and other industrial research is also enormous.

  16. Direct infusion mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for human metabonomics? A serum metabonomic study of kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Yu, Quan; Yan, Xiaomei; Hang, Wei; Zheng, Jiaxin; Xing, Jinchun; Huang, Benli

    2010-11-01

    Serum samples from kidney cancer patients and healthy controls were analyzed by both direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with a high resolution ESI-Q-TOFMS. The classification and biomarker discovery capacities of the two methods were compared, and MS/MS experiments were carried out to identify potential biomarkers. DIMS had comparable classification and prediction capabilities to LC-MS but consumed only ~5% of the analysis time. With regard to biomarker discovery, twenty-three variables were found as potential biomarkers by DIMS, and 48 variables were obtained by LC-MS. DIMS is recommended to be a fast diagnostic method for kidney cancer, while LC-MS is necessary when comprehensive screening of biomarkers is required.

  17. Measurement of the 135Cs half-life with accelerator mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. M.; Cornett, R. J.; Charles, C. R. J.; Zhao, X. L.; Kieser, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 135Cs is quoted as having a half-life of 2.3 Myr. However, there are three published values ranging from 1.8 to 3 Myr. This research reviews previous measurements and reports a new measurement of the half-life using newly developed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques along with β and γ radiometric analysis. The half-life was determined to be (1.6 ±0.6 ) ×106 yr by AMS and (1.3 ±0.2 ) ×106 yr by ICPMS with 95% confidence. The two values agree with each other but differ from the accepted value by ˜40 % .

  18. Analysis of polar lipids in the serum from rats fed shiitake by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shanggong; Peng, Min; Ronis, Martin; Badger, Thomas; Fang, Nianbai

    2010-12-22

    Consumption of a shiitake mushroom diet has been reported to have effects on serum phospholipids. However, much less is known about the effect on serum polar lipids including lysophospholipids and free fatty acids. In the present study, the effects of a shiitake diet were evaluated on the basis of identification and quantification of individual polar lipid components in rat serum using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. By comparison with standards and published data, 50 lysophospholipids and 32 free fatty acids were identified, and the concentrations of 27 polar lipids in rat serum were determined. Shiitake diets decreased the levels of all individual polar lipid components in the serum of male rat. The total level of serum polar lipids in males fed 4% shiitake diets (1365.71 mol/L) was significantly lower than that of the control (2270.26 mol/L). However, shiitake diets did not significantly affect the levels of serum polar lipids in female rats.

  19. Neuropeptide Signaling in Crustaceans Probed by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhidan

    Neuropeptides are one of the most diverse classes of signaling molecules whose identities and functions are not yet fully understood. They have been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes, including feeding-related and motivated behaviors, and also environmental adaptations. In this work, improved mass spectrometry-based analytical platforms were developed and applied to the crustacean systems to characterize signaling molecules. This dissertation begins with a review of mass spectrometry-based neuropeptide studies from both temporal- and spatial-domains. This review is then followed by several chapters detailing a few research projects related to the crustacean neuropeptidomic characterization and comparative analysis. The neuropeptidome of crayfish, Orconectes rusticus is characterized for the first time using mass spectrometry-based tools. In vivo microdialysis sampling technique offers the capability of direct sampling from extracellular space in a time-resolved manner. It is used to investigate the secreted neuropeptide and neurotransmitter content in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, in this work. A new quantitation strategy using alternative mass spectrometry data acquisition approach is developed and applied for the first time to quantify neuropeptides. Coupling of this method with microdialysis enables the study of neuropeptide dynamics concurrent with different behaviors. Proof-of-principle experiments validating this approach have been carried out in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis to study feeding- and circadian rhythm-related neuropeptide changes using micoridialysis in a time-resolved manner. This permits a close correlation between behavioral and neurochemical changes, providing potential candidates for future validation of regulatory roles. In addition to providing spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) technique enables the characterization of signaling molecules while preserving the temporal resolution. A

  20. Considerations in the analysis of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Wales, Thomas E.; Eggertson, Michael J.; Engen, John R.

    2013-01-01

    i. Summary A major component of a hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry experiment is the analysis of protein and peptide mass spectra to yield information about deuterium incorporation. The processing of data that are produced includes the identification of each peptic peptide to create a master table/array of peptide sequence, retention time and retention time range, mass range and undeuterated mass. The amount of deuterium incorporated into each of the peptides in this array must then be determined. Various software platforms have been developed in order to perform this specific type of data analysis. We describe the fundamental parameters to be considered at each step along the way and how data processing, either by an individual or by software, must approach the analysis. PMID:23666730