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Sample records for sediment effect concentrations

  1. Temperature Effect on Suspended Cohesive Sediment Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, S.; Chandra, V.

    2016-12-01

    The deposition of suspended cohesive sediments takes place in the form of flocculation which is governed by flow and sediment characteristics. Suspended cohesive sediments adsorb contaminants from surrounding environment during their transport from river to the ocean. These sediments partially settle at low velocity regions along the river and huge amount of sediments settle at the estuaries. The settled sediments affect both biological and chemical dynamics of aquatic environment. Hence, it is important to understand the behaviour of suspended cohesive sediments under different flow and sediment conditions. Temperature is one such parameter which influences the flow behaviour. In literature, the effect of water temperature on the behaviour of suspended cohesive sediments has received very little attention. Research studies based on settling column experiments have stated that cohesive sediment settling velocity increases with an increase of water temperature. In contrary, annular flume based studies have reported that the settling velocity increases with decrease of water temperature. Hence, this research work is mainly focussed to find the effect of temperature on suspended cohesive sediment concentration. Experiments are conducted at high water temperatures (30°, 40° and 50°C) in an annular flume using Kaolin (d50=7.9μm) at different bed shear stresses (0.01, 0.05 and 0.1Pa) and concentrations (1, 2 and 4g/L). Ionized water is used for conducting the experiments. The temporal variation of suspended cohesive sediment concentration and corresponding mean floc size are reported.

  2. Comparison of test specific sediment effect concentrations with marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Long, E.R.; MacDonald, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends (NS and T) Bioeffects Assessment program and studies conducted by the National Biological Service, numerous sediment quality assessment surveys have recently been conducted along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US using the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development tests with pore water. Additional toxicity tests were also conducted in conjunction with most of these studies. The areas that have been sampled include Boston harbor, Massachusetts; Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, and Savannah River, South Carolina; St. Simon Sound, Georgia; Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrew Bay, and Pensacola Bay, Florida; Galveston Bay, Lavaca Bay, and Sabine Lake, Texas, and 200 stations in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. Sufficient data are now available from this series of surveys to calculate test specific sediment effect concentrations (SECs). Based on these recent studies, SECs were developed for the sea urchin porewater and amphipod tests and compared with existing marine sediment quality assessment guidelines.

  3. Effects of watershed management practices on sediment concentrations in the southwestern United States: Management implications

    Treesearch

    Vicente L. Lopes; Peter F. Ffolliott; Malchus B. Baker

    2000-01-01

    Effects of watershed management practices on suspended sediment concentrations from ponderosa pine forests and pinyon-juniper woodlands in the Southwestern United States are examined. Completely cleared and strip-cut ponderosa pine watersheds produced higher sediment concentrations than the control. Likewise, cabled and herbicide-treated pinyon-juniper watersheds...

  4. Light attenuation - a more effective basis for the management of fine suspended sediment than mass concentration?

    PubMed

    Davies-Colley, Robert J; Ballantine, Deborah J; Elliott, Sandy H; Swales, Andrew; Hughes, Andrew O; Gall, Mark P

    2014-01-01

    Fine sediment continues to be a major diffuse pollution concern with its multiple effects on aquatic ecosystems. Mass concentrations (and loads) of fine sediment are usually measured and modelled, apparently with the assumption that environmental effects of sediment are predictable from mass concentrations. However, some severe impacts of fine sediment may not correlate well with mass concentration, notably those related to light attenuation by suspended particles. Light attenuation per unit mass concentration of suspended particulate matter in waters varies widely with particle size, shape and composition. Data for suspended sediment concentration, turbidity and visual clarity (which is inversely proportional to light beam attenuation) from 77 diverse New Zealand rivers provide valuable insights into the mutual relationships of these quantities. Our analysis of these relationships, both across multiple rivers and within individual rivers, supports the proposition that light attenuation by fine sediment is a more generally meaningful basis for environmental management than sediment mass. Furthermore, optical measurements are considerably more practical, being much cheaper (by about four-fold) to measure than mass concentrations, and amenable to continuous measurement. Mass concentration can be estimated with sufficient precision for many purposes from optical surrogates locally calibrated for particular rivers.

  5. Development and evaluation of consensus-based sediment effect concentrations for polychlorinated biphenyls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Donald D.; Dipinto, Lisa M.; Field, Jay; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Long, Edward R.; Swartz, Richard C.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment-quality guidelines (SQGs) have been published for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using both empirical and theoretical approaches. Empirically based guidelines have been developed using the screening-level concentration, effects range, effects level, and apparent effects threshold approaches. Theoretically based guidelines have been developed using the equilibrium-partitioning approach. Empirically-based guidelines were classified into three general categories, in accordance with their original narrative intents, and used to develop three consensus-based sediment effect concentrations (SECs) for total PCBs (tPCBs), including a threshold effect concentration, a midrange effect concentration, and an extreme effect concentration. Consensus-based SECs were derived because they estimate the central tendency of the published SQGs and, thus, reconcile the guidance values that have been derived using various approaches. Initially, consensus-based SECs for tPCBs were developed separately for freshwater sediments and for marine and estuarine sediments. Because the respective SECs were statistically similar, the underlying SQGs were subsequently merged and used to formulate more generally applicable SECs. The three consensus-based SECs were then evaluated for reliability using matching sediment chemistry and toxicity data from field studies, dose-response data from spiked-sediment toxicity tests, and SQGs derived from the equilibrium-partitioning approach. The results of this evaluation demonstrated that the consensus-based SECs can accurately predict both the presence and absence of toxicity in field-collected sediments. Importantly, the incidence of toxicity increases incrementally with increasing concentrations of tPCBs. Moreover, the consensus-based SECs are comparable to the chronic toxicity thresholds that have been estimated from dose-response data and equilibrium-partitioning models. Therefore, consensus-based SECs provide a unifying synthesis of existing

  6. An evaluation of benthic community measures using laboratory-derived sediment effect concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, F.J.; Canfield, T.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment effect concentrations (SECs) are contaminant sediment concentrations which are frequently associated with sediment toxicity. Recently, a number of different SECs have been calculated from laboratory toxicity tests with field collected sediments using Chironomus tentans, Chironomus riparius, and Hyalella azteca. Toxicity endpoints included (depending upon species) lethality, growth and sexual maturation. The authors selected the Effect Range Median (ERM) calculated for 28-d Hyalella azteca as an SEC for evaluating six different benthic community measures as indicators of contaminated sediment. The benthic measures included: taxa richness, chironomid genera richness, percent chironomid deformity, chironomid biotic index, ratio of chironomids/oligochaetes, and oligochaete biotic index. Benthic measures were obtained for 31 stations from the Great Lakes and 13 stations from Milltown Reservoir and Clark Fork River, MT. Each benthic measure was ranked from 1 to 100 and individual ranks and various combinations of ranks were plotted against the ratio of chemical concentration at the site/ERM calculated for that chemical (similar to a toxic unit approach) and the sum of the ERM ratios (sum of toxic units). Preliminary analysis indicates that, in general, benthic measures varied widely in relatively uncontaminated stations, confounding any underlying relationship that may have existed. The absence of chironomids, in areas with suitable habitat, seems to be indicative of grossly contaminated stations, but not an endpoint useful for discriminating stations with contaminant concentrations closer to the SEC. The usefulness of benthic measures as diagnostic tools for contaminated sediments and potential ways to improve these measures will be discussed.

  7. Effect of suspended-sediment concentration on nitrification in river water: importance of suspended sediment-water interface.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Yang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Xueqing

    2009-05-15

    High suspended sediment (SPS) concentrations exist in many Asian river systems. In this research, the effects of SPS concentration on nitrification in river water systems were studied. With orwithout introducing ammonium-oxidizing bacteria isolated from the water and sediment samples of the Yellow River, the microbially mediated nitrification rate increased with SPS concentration as described by the power function y = a x x(b), where y is the nitrification rate, x is the SPS concentration, and a and b are constants. With an indigenous ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, nitrification rate constants, i.e., K4 (micromax/Ks) values obtained from the Monod model, were 0.0016, 0.0036, 0.0040, 0.0063, 0.0066, 0.0071, and 0.0077 day(-1) microM(-1) for the systems with SPS concentrations of 0, 0.2 1.0, 5.0, 10, 20, and 40 g/L, respectively. The sorption percentage of NH4+-N increased with SPS concentration as a power function. Bacteria tend to attach onto SPS, and the maximum specific growth rate at the SPS-water interface was about twice that in the water phase. An increase of bacterial population and nitrification rate constant with SPS as a power function resulted in an increase of nitrification rate with SPS as a power function. Therefore, the high SPS concentration caused by erosion and bottom sediment resuspension and other factors will accelerate ammonium oxidation in many turbid river systems. This has useful implications for nitrogen removal from river systems.

  8. The effect of environmental and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics on nitrate reduction rates in river sediment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen; Dinh, Quoc Tuc; Chevreuil, Marc; Garnier, Josette; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline; Labadie, Pierre; Laverman, Anniet M

    2013-07-01

    The use of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine has led to increased presence of these compounds and antibiotic resistance in the environment. In this study, the effect of low, environmentally relevant (mg L(-1)) concentrations of vancomycin (VA), flumequine (FLU), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) on nitrate reduction rates was studied in river sediments. Nitrate reduction rates were determined by supplying intact sediments for several weeks with both nitrate and antibiotics (ng L(-1), μg L(-1), and mg L(-1) concentrations), including a non-amended control. Furthermore the concentrations of the three investigated antibiotics were measured in the initial (natural) sediments and the sediments supplied with the antibiotics. The antibiotic concentrations in the sediments decreased (on average 62% for FLU and 93% for SMX) during the experiments, indicating loss of antibiotics due to sorption or (bio) degradation. Nitrate reduction rates were not affected by environmental concentrations of VA, FLU and SMX. FLU and SMX only partially inhibited nitrate reduction rates at high, therapeutic concentrations by 41 and 39% respectively. The three tested antibiotics significantly enhanced the production of nitrite, an intermediate in dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Nitrite production increased 1.9 and 1.4 fold for environmental VA concentrations (107 and 187 μg L(-1) respectively), application of 58 mg L(-1) SMX resulted in a 7.5 fold increase and augmented 16 and 8.5 fold in the presence of respectively 13 μg L(-1) and 52 mg L(-1) FLU. Even though inhibition of nitrate reduction rates was observed at therapeutic antibiotic concentrations, nitrate reduction proceeded under all experimental conditions, indicating the presence of resistance toward these antibiotics among the nitrate reducing bacteria. The accumulation of nitrite suggests that the nitrite reduction step was more affected than the overall nitrate reduction process.

  9. Effect of water-sediment regulation of the Xiaolangdi reservoir on the concentrations, characteristics, and fluxes of suspended sediment and organic carbon in the Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Dong, Jianwei; Wang, Minghu; Xie, Hui; Xia, Na; Li, Husheng; Zhang, Xiaotian; Mou, Xinli; Wen, Jiaojiao; Bao, Yimeng

    2016-11-15

    Water-sediment regulation (WSR) of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir in the Yellow River is different from other water conservancy projects, with sediment resuspending along the river downstream of the reservoir during water regulation while some suspended sediment depositing during sediment regulation. In this study, samples were collected before, during, and after WSR to investigate the effect of WSR on the suspended sediment and organic carbon downstream of the reservoir. The suspended sediment concentration ([SPS]) increased with the river flow velocity (V) as a power function ([SPS]=1.348V(2.519)) during the three periods. The suspended sediment grain size decreased along the river during water and sediment regulations and after WSR; they were generally below 200μm with the fine particles (<50μm) of 68.0%-93.7% and positively correlated with the flow velocity. The black carbon content in suspended sediment elevated along the river during both water and sediment regulations, and it increased with 2-50μm fraction during water regulation and with <2μm fraction during sediment regulation, suggesting that black carbon mainly exists in fine particles and is influenced by both suspended sediment source and characteristics. There was no significant difference in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration during water regulation, sediment regulation, and after WSR, inferring that the effect of sediment resuspension/deposition on DOC concentration was insignificant. The contribution of DOC flux (27.3%) during WSR period to the annual flux was comparable to that (22.6%) of water, but lower than the sediment (32.5%) and particulate organic carbon (POC) (49.5%). This study suggests that WSR will exert significant influence on the concentrations, characteristics and fluxes of POC (p<0.05) and sediment (p<0.05) but have no significant influence on DOC (p>0.1) of the Yellow River.

  10. Effect of sulphur concentration on bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated dredged sediments.

    PubMed

    Fang, D; Zhao, L; Yang, Z Q; Shan, H X; Gao, Y; Yang, Q

    2009-11-01

    The sulphur-based bioleaching process using sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been demonstrated to be a feasible technology for removing heavy metals from contaminated sediments, but the excess sulphur application will lead to the re-acidification of bioleached sediments. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of sulphur concentration on the bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated sediments, with the ultimate purpose of minimizing the sulphur addition. The results showed that the inoculation of 7% of indigenous SOB, containing 3.6 x 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) mL(-1), and addition of elemental sulphur as a substrate (0.5 to 7.0 g L(-1)) resulted in a sharp decrease in sediment pH from an initial pH 8.0 to pH 1.4-2.4 and an increase in ORP (oxidation-reduction potential) from -10 mV to 500 mV within 10 days of bioleaching. Although the increase in sulphur concentration enhanced the rates of pH reduction and ORP elevation, the bioleaching process with the addition of 3.0 g L(-1) of sulphur was already sufficient to reach conditions of acidity (pH < 2.0) and ORP (500 mV) necessary for a satisfactory removal of metals, and, at day 10, 71.8% of Cu, 58.2% of Zn, and 25.3% of Cr were removed from the sediments. During the bioleaching process, Zn removal increased with a reduction in pH, whereas the removal of Cu and Cr increased not only with a reduction in pH but also with an increase in ORP. Results of sequential selective extraction indicated that the final levels of metal removals were dependent on their speciation distribution in the original sediments, and after bioleaching those unremoved metals in the bioleached sediments mainly existed in the residual fraction.

  11. Hysteresis effects in suspended sediment concentration of an allogenic river channel in a very arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guo-An; Disse, Markus; Yu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Suspended sediment dynamics of the Tarim River, an allogenic and perennial river flowing in a very arid environment in China, are analyzed to examine the hysteresis effects based on data of flow discharge (Q) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) from two hydrologic gauging stations in the river in the last five decades (1960-2011). Strong hysteresis effects existed in the sediment rating curves of the Tarim River. Under similar flow conditions, the first flood event in a year quite often causes higher suspended sediment concentration (SSC value), and form a rating curve visibly different from later flood processes. The successive flood events often form rating curves gradually from left to right progressively with time on the SSC-Q plot, indicating that higher flow intensity is needed for later flood events to reach the same SSC value of the earlier flood events. Three hysteresis loop forms, i.e., clockwise, anti-clockwise and Figure-eight existed with occurrence frequency of 57%, 27.3% and 15.6% respectively, showing that clockwise loop is the major hysteresis form and sediment load is generally derived from the channel bed. The very weak banks due to composition of quite homogeneous noncohesive particles (fine sand, silt and almost no clay content) often induce bank failure, which complicates suspended sediment dynamics and causes to shape different hysteresis loops. Somehow random but occurrence of bank collapse with higher possibility near the peak and at the falling limb of a flood hydrograph is probably the major reason causing anti-clockwise and figure-eight hysteresis loops.

  12. Evaluation of sediment effect concentrations (SECs) for Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Haveriand, P.S.; Henke, C.E.; Kemble, N.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    A data base for sediment toxicity and chemistry was generated for field-collected sediments from sites across the United States. Toxicity tests were conducted for 10 to 32 d with Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius. Characterizations of sediment included organic carbon, percentage water, particle size, metals, AVS, chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, dioxins and furans, or PAHs. Three types of SECs were calculated: (1) Effect Ranges Low and Median (ERL and ERM), (2) Threshold and Probable Effect Levels (TEL and PEL), and (3) Apparent Effect Threshold (AET). SECs were normalized to: (1) dry weight, (2) total organic carbon, or (3) AVS. SECs were generated primarily for metals and PAHs. Ranges of concentrations were typically too narrow to adequately evaluate SECs for butyltins, methyl mercury, dioxins and furans, chlorinated pesticides, or PCBs. Use of ERLs or TELs to predict the toxicity of samples minimized Type 2 error (toxic sample predicted to be non-toxic), but resulted in a relatively high Type 1 error (non-toxic sample predicted to be toxic). In contrast, use of AETs to predict toxicity resulted in higher Type 2 error and lower Type 1 error. Use of ERMs or PELs resulted in moderate Type 1 and 2 error when predicting the toxicity of samples. Selection of appropriate SECs requires decisions regarding the acceptability of incorrectly classifying the toxicity of sediment samples.

  13. Effect of sediment remediation on polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations in tomatoes grown near New Bedford Harbor.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Alison C; Altshul, Larisa M; Vorhees, Donna J

    2007-10-01

    Measurements of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener concentrations and profiles from produce grown near New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, USA, before, during, and after remediation of PCB-contaminated sediment are presented. Samples of tomatoes collected from locations upwind and downwind relative to harbor contamination are compared with the use of measurements of 47 individual PCB congeners. The PCB concentration in the locally grown tomatoes, as expressed by the sum of congeners, is highest during the period of harbor dredging and drops to its lowest point after remediation, which included dredging and excavation. The downwind location is characterized by higher concentrations of PCBs than the upwind location in every time period. Principal component analysis is used to distinguish both the effect of remediation over time and the effect of cultivation location on the congener profiles. Evidence of the PCB congener profile representing the contaminated harbor sediments is strongest during the dredging period and in the downwind location. These results have important implications for understanding human exposure via the food chain and highlight the importance of considering exposure pathways related to atmospheric transport during remediation of contaminated sediments.

  14. A model to predict threshold concentrations for toxic effects of chlorinated benzenes in sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchsman, P.C.; Duda, D.J.; Barber, T.R.

    1999-09-01

    A probabilistic model was developed to predict effects threshold concentrations for chlorinated benzenes in sediment. Based on published quantitative structure-activity relationships relating the toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to the degree of chlorination, congeners with the same number of chlorine substitutions were considered toxicologically equivalent. Hexachlorobenzene was excluded from the assessment based on a lack of aquatic toxicity at the water solubility limit. The equilibrium partitioning approach was applied in a probabilistic analysis to derive predicted effects thresholds (PETs) for each chlorinated benzene group, with model input distributions defined by published log K{sub ow} values and aquatic toxicity data extracted from the published literature. The probabilistic distributions of PETs generally increased with chlorination, with 20th percentile values ranging from 3.2 mg/kg{sub 1{degree}OC} for chlorobenzene to 67 mg/kg{sub 1%OC} for tetrachlorobenzene congeners. The toxicity of total chlorinated benzenes in sediment can be assessed by applying the PETs in a toxic index model, based on the assumption that multiple chlorinated benzene congeners will show approximately additive toxicity, as characteristic of nonpolar narcotic toxicants. The 20th percentile PET values are one to two orders of magnitude higher than published screening-level guidelines, suggesting that the screening-level guidelines will provide overly conservative assessments in most cases. Relevant spiked sediment toxicity data are very limited but seem consistent with the probabilistic model; additional testing could be conducted to confirm the model's predictions.

  15. Effects of suspended sediment concentration and grain size on three optical turbidity sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Gustavo Henrique; Capel, Paul D.; Minella, Jean P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Optical turbidity sensors have been successfully used to determine suspended sediment flux in rivers, assuming the relation between the turbidity signal and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) has been appropriately calibrated. Sediment size, shape and colour affect turbidity and are important to incorporate into the calibration process. Materials and methods: This study evaluates the effect of SSC and particle size (i.e. medium sand, fine sand, very fine sand, and fines (silt + clay)) on the sensitivity of the turbidity signal. Three different turbidity sensors were used, with photo detectors positioned at 90 and 180 degrees relative to the axis of incident light. Five different sediment ratios of sand:fines (0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0) were also evaluated for a single SSC (1000 mg l-1). Results and discussion: The photo detectors positioned at 90 degrees were more sensitive than sensor positioned at 180 degrees in reading a wide variety of grain size particles. On average for the three turbidity sensors, the sensitivity for fines were 170, 40, and 4 times greater than sensitivities for medium sand, fine sand, and very fine sand, respectively. For an SSC of 1000 mg l-1 with the treatments composed of different proportions of sand and fines, the presence of sand in the mixture linearly reduced the turbidity signal. Conclusions: The results indicate that calibration of the turbidity signal should be carried out in situ and that the attenuation of the turbidity signal due to sand can be corrected, as long as the proportion of sand in the SSC can be estimated.

  16. Calculation and evaluation of sediment effect concentrations for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus riparius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Haverland, Pamela S.; Brunson, Eric L.; Canfield, Timothy J.; Dwyer, F. James; Henke, Chris; Kemble, Nile E.; Mount, David R.; Fox, Richard G.

    1996-01-01

    Procedures are described for calculating and evaluating sediment effect concentrations (SECs) using laboratory data on the toxicity of contaminants associated with field-collected sediment to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus riparius. SECs are defined as the concentrations of individual contaminants in sediment below which toxicity is rarely observed and above which toxicity is frequently observed. The objective of the present study was to develop SECs to classify toxicity data for Great Lake sediment samples tested with Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius. This SEC database included samples from additional sites across the United States in order to make the database as robust as possible. Three types of SECs were calculated from these data: (1) Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Median (ERM), (2) Threshold Effect Level (TEL) and Probable Effect Level (PEL), and (3) No Effect Concentration (NEC). We were able to calculate SECs primarily for total metals, simultaneously extracted metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The ranges of concentrations in sediment were too narrow in our database to adequately evaluate SECs for butyltins, methyl mercury, polychlorinated dioxins and furans, or chlorinated pesticides. About 60 to 80% of the sediment samples in the database are correctly classified as toxic or not toxic depending on type of SEC evaluated. ERMs and ERLs are generally as reliable as paired PELs and TELs at classifying both toxic and non-toxic samples in our database. Reliability of the SECs in terms of correctly classifying sediment samples is similar between ERMs and NECs; however, ERMs minimize Type I error (false positives) relative to ERLs and minimize Type II error (false negatives) relative to NECs. Correct classification of samples can be improved by using only the most reliable individual SECs for chemicals (i.e., those with a higher percentage of correct classification). SECs

  17. Effect of oxalic acid treatment on sediment arsenic concentrations and lability under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Bostick, Benjamin C; Mailloux, Brian J; Ross, James M; Chillrud, Steven N

    2016-07-05

    Oxalic acid enhances arsenic (As) mobilization by dissolving As host minerals and competing for sorption sites. Oxalic acid amendments thus could potentially improve the efficiency of widely used pump-and-treat (P&T) remediation. This study investigates the effectiveness of oxalic acid on As mobilization from contaminated sediments with different As input sources and redox conditions, and examines whether residual sediment As after oxalic acid treatment can still be reductively mobilized. Batch extraction, column, and microcosm experiments were performed in the laboratory using sediments from the Dover Municipal Landfill and the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund sites. Oxalic acid mobilized As from both Dover and Vineland sediments, although the efficiency rates were different. The residual As in both Dover and Vineland sediments after oxalic acid treatment was less vulnerable to microbial reduction than before the treatment. Oxalic acid could thus improve the efficiency of P&T. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the Vineland sediment samples still contained reactive Fe(III) minerals after oxalic acid treatment, and thus released more As into solution under reducing conditions than the treated Dover samples. Therefore, the efficacy of enhanced P&T must consider sediment Fe mineralogy when evaluating its overall potential for remediating groundwater As. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Oxalic Acid Treatment on Sediment Arsenic Concentrations and Lability under Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Ross, James M.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Oxalic acid enhances arsenic (As) mobilization by dissolving As host minerals and competing for sorption sites. Oxalic acid amendments thus could potentially improve the efficiency of widely used pump-and-treat (P&T) remediation. This study investigates the effectiveness of oxalic acid on As mobilization from contaminated sediments with different As input sources and redox conditions, and examines whether residual sediment As after oxalic acid treatment can still be reductively mobilized. Batch extraction, column, and microcosm experiments were performed in the laboratory using sediments from the Dover Municipal Landfill and the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund sites. Oxalic acid mobilized As from both Dover and Vineland sediments, although the efficiency rates were different. The residual As in both Dover and Vineland sediments after oxalic acid treatment was less vulnerable to microbial reduction than before the treatment. Oxalic acid could thus improve the efficiency of P&T. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the Vineland sediment samples still contained reactive Fe(III) minerals after oxalic acid treatment, and thus released more As into solution under reducing conditions than the Dover samples. Therefore, the efficacy of P&T must consider sediment Fe mineralogy when evaluating its overall potential for remediating groundwater As. PMID:26970042

  19. Effects of salinity and particle concentration on sediment hydrodynamics and critical bed-shear-stress for erosion of fine grained sediments used in wetland restoration projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose-Hajra, M.; McCorquodale, A.; Mattson, G.; Jerolleman, D.; Filostrat, J.

    2015-03-01

    Sea-level rise, the increasing number and intensity of storms, oil and groundwater extraction, and coastal land subsidence are putting people and property at risk along Louisiana's coast, with major implications for human safety and economic health of coastal areas. A major goal towards re-establishing a healthy and sustainable coastal ecosystem has been to rebuild Louisiana's disappearing wetlands with fine grained sediments that are dredged or diverted from nearby rivers, channels and lakes to build land in open water areas. A thorough geo-hydrodynamic characterization of the deposited sediments is important in the correct design and a more realistic outcome assessment of the long-term performance measures for ongoing coastal restoration projects. This paper evaluates the effects of salinity and solid particle concentration on the re-suspension characteristics of fine-grained dredged sediments obtained from multiple geographic locations along the Gulf coast. The critical bed-shear-stress for erosion has been evaluated as a function of sedimentation time. The sediment hydrodynamic properties obtained from the laboratory testing were used in a numerical coastal sediment distribution model to aid in evaluating sediment diversions from the Mississippi River into Breton Sound and Barataria Bay.

  20. Calculation of sediment effect concentrations (SECs) for Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Haverland, P.S.; Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    A data base for sediment toxicity and chemistry was generated with field-collected sediments using 10 to 32 d tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus riparius. Physical characterizations of sediment included organic carbon, percentage water, and particle size. Chemical characterizations of sediment included total metals, butyltins, methyl-mercury, acid volatile sulfide, (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals, chlorinated pesticides, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dioxins and furans, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Samples which significantly reduced survival, length, or maturation of test organisms relative to the control were classified as ``toxic``. A 10-fold difference in concentration for at least one chemical among the samples at each site was checked. If the concentration of a chemical measured in a toxic sample was less than or equal to the mean concentration of the chemical in the non-toxic samples at a site, then the chemical in this toxic sample was classified as ``no concordance`` (and then designated as a non-toxic in the calculations of SECs). The authors will discuss how the data base was created and the criteria used to calculate SECs (three types of SECs were calculated: (1) ERL and MM, (2) TEL and PEL, and (3) AET).

  1. Using a spiked sediment bioassay to establish a no-effect concentration for dioxin exposure to the amphipod, Ampelisca abdita

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.R.; Chappie, D.J.; Duda, D.J.; Fuchsman, P.C.; Finley, B.L.

    1998-03-01

    A recent study conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported a highly significant correlation between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) concentrations and amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) mortality in sediment samples collected from the lower Passaic River and Newark Bay. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the potential effects of 2,3,7,8-TCDD on benthic invertebrates under controlled laboratory exposures. In this study, 10-d whole-sediment bioassays using the marine amphipod A. abdita were conducted on spiked sediment samples representing a range of 2,3,7,8-TCDD concentrations. No effects on survival or growth relative to controls were observed at any test concentration. The highest 2,3,7,8-TCDD concentration reported from the NOAA study was 0.62 {micro}g/kg. Therefore, the lack of 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxicity in this study indicates that the mortality observed in the NOAA study was probably due to factors or chemicals other than 2,3,7,8-TCDD. This study demonstrates the utility of spiked sediment bioassays in evaluating cause and effect relationships between sediment contamination and benthic invertebrate mortality.

  2. Effects of suspended sediment concentration on the absorption and scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrie, Gregory E.; Ladner, Sherwin; Gould, Richard A., Jr.

    1997-02-01

    The scattering coefficient (b) for the nearshore waters off the coast of North Carolina near Camp Lejeune is strongly influenced by suspended sediment concentration and total particulate cross-sectional area (xg). In-situ measurements of a and b were made using a WET Labs AC9 meter. Estimates of suspended sediment concentration and total particulate cross-sectional area were determined from laser particle size analyses of surface water samples. The SeaWiFS bio-optical algorithm was modified for Case II waters and used to estimate a and bb from remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). After conversion from backscattering (bb) to total scattering (b), modeled a and b values from the modified SeaWiFS algorithm were compared to the measured values. The differences between the measured and estimated values appear to be directly related to increases in suspended sediment concentration and xg. Correlations of about 0.90 were obtained for b vs xg and bb vs xg.

  3. Sediment concentration and turbidity changes during culvert removals

    Treesearch

    Randy B. Foltz; Kristina A. Yanosek; Timothy M. Brown

    2008-01-01

    The concentrations of sediment and turbidity in stream water were monitored during culvert removals to determine the short term effects of road obliteration. Sediment concentration was measured at 11 stream crossings among two locations in Idaho and one in Washington. Sediment concentration immediately below the culvert outlet exceeded levels above the culvert outlet...

  4. Effect of river landscape on the sediment concentrations of antibiotics and corresponding antibiotic resistance genes (ARG).

    PubMed

    Pei, Ruoting; Kim, Sung-Chul; Carlson, Kenneth H; Pruden, Amy

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the sediments of the mixed-landscape Cache La Poudre River, which has previously been studied and shown to have high concentrations of antibiotics related to urban and agricultural activities. River sediments were sampled during two events (high-flow and low-flow) from five sites with varying urban and agricultural impact levels. Polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) detection assays were conducted for four sulfonamide resistance gene families, using newly designed primers, and five tetracycline resistance gene families, using previously published primers. Sul(I), sul(II), tet(W), and tet(O) gene families were further quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Resistance to four classes of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides, ionophores, and macrolides) was also investigated using a culture-based approach. The quantities of resistance genes normalized to the 16S gene copy number were significantly different between the sites, with higher resistance gene concentrations at the impacted sites than at the pristine site. Total resistant CFUs were over an order of magnitude lower at the pristine site, but differences were less apparent when normalized to the total CFUs. Six tetracyclines and six sulfonamides were also quantified in the sediments and were found to be highest at sites impacted by urban and agricultural activity, with no antibiotics detected at the pristine sit. To the knowledge of the authors, this study is the first to demonstrate a relationship between urban and agricultural activity and microbial resistance in river sediments using quantitative molecular tools.

  5. Development of site-specific sediment no-effect concentrations based on synoptic chemical analyses and toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sferra, J.; Barber, T.; Fuchsman, P.; Sheehan, P.

    1995-12-31

    Site-specific maximum observed no-effect concentrations (MONECs) were developed using sediment chemistry and toxicity test data concomitantly collected from 33 sample locations in a river system adjacent to a RCRA facility in Ohio. Physical and chemical analyses included VOCs, SVOCs, metals, pesticides and PCBs, acid volatile sulfides and simultaneously extracted metals, ammonia, total organic carbon and grain size. Concentrations of hydrophobic, non-polar organic compounds were normalized to 1% total organic carbon contents, as the bioavailability of these compounds was considered to be primarily controlled by sediment organic carbon content through adsorption. Toxicity tests conducted using Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca were analyzed for impacts to survival and growth endpoints for both species. Samples were separated into two categories for each test endpoint, depending on whether toxicity was observed. MONECs were defined as the highest measured chemical concentration that did not produce a significant effect in toxicity tests. MONEC values were derived for each species and test endpoint, and the lowest of these four values was adopted as the site-specific MONEC for each chemical. Site-specific MONECs were used as a tool to assist in the identification of chemicals contributing to observed sediment toxicity.

  6. Equilibrium Partitioning Approach for Assessing Toxicity of Contaminants in Sediments: Linking Measured Concentrations to Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of approaches exist for assessing the degree, extent and/or risk of metals contamination in sediments. Selection of the “correct” approach depends on the nature of the question being asked (e.g., the degree of metals contamination in marine sediments may be estimated by...

  7. Effect of high flow events on spatiotemporal variation of E. coli concentrations in creek sediments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sediments can harbor large populations of Escherichia coli often times in greater amounts than the overlying water column. Resuspension of sediments during storm events causes the release of E. coli which drastically changes microbial water quality metrics. It is not well known how populations of E....

  8. Equilibrium Partitioning Approach for Assessing Toxicity of Contaminants in Sediments: Linking Measured Concentrations to Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of approaches exist for assessing the degree, extent and/or risk of metals contamination in sediments. Selection of the “correct” approach depends on the nature of the question being asked (e.g., the degree of metals contamination in marine sediments may be estimated by...

  9. The effects of sediment depth and oxygen concentration on the use of organic matter: An experimental study using an infiltration sediment tank.

    PubMed

    Freixa, A; Rubol, S; Carles-Brangarí, A; Fernàndez-Garcia, D; Butturini, A; Sanchez-Vila, X; Romaní, A M

    2016-01-01

    Water flowing through hyporheic river sediments or artificial recharge facilities promotes the development of microbial communities with sediment depth. We performed an 83-day mesocosm infiltration experiment, to study how microbial functions (e.g., extracellular enzyme activities and carbon substrate utilization) are affected by sediment depth (up to 50 cm) and different oxygen concentrations. Results indicated that surface sediment layers were mainly colonized by microorganisms capable of using a wide range of substrates (although they preferred to degrade carbon polymeric compounds, as indicated by the higher β-glucosidase activity). In contrast, at a depth of 50 cm, the microbial community became specialized in using fewer carbon substrates, showing decreased functional richness and diversity. At this depth, microorganisms picked nitrogenous compounds, including amino acids and carboxyl acids. After the 83-day experiment, the sediment at the bottom of the tank became anoxic, inhibiting phosphatase activity. Coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic communities, promoted by greater physicochemical heterogeneity, was also observed in deeper sediments. The presence of specific metabolic fingerprints under oxic and anoxic conditions indicated that the microbial community was adapted to use organic matter under different oxygen conditions. Overall the heterogeneity of oxygen concentrations with depth and in time would influence organic matter metabolism in the sediment tank. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Concentrations of DDTs and dieldrin in Long Island Sound sediment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijia; Li, Xiqing; Zhang, Pengfei; Melcer, Michael E; Wu, Youxian; Jans, Urs

    2012-03-01

    The concentrations of three frequently detected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and one degradation product, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD, dieldrin, and p,p'-DDE were determined in recently collected (2005-2006) and archived (1986-1989) surficial sediments and sediment cores from Long Island Sound (LIS). The concentration of dieldrin ranged from 0.05 to 5.27 ng g(-1) dry weight in the surficial sediments, and from 0.05 to 11.7 ng g(-1) dry weight in the sediment cores. Total DDXs (the sum of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT) concentrations ranged from 1.31 to 33.2 ng g(-1) in surficial sediments and 1.11 to 66.4 ng g(-1) in sediment cores. The results indicate that the three OCPs and DDE were still widely present in LIS surficial sediments two decades after the use of these pesticides in the United States was banned. In addition, the surficial concentrations did not decrease significantly when compared to the concentrations in archived samples collected two decades ago. Sediments in the western part of LIS were more contaminated (with concentrations in some western sites being still above probable effect levels) than those in the eastern part, probably as a result of the net westward sediment transport in LIS. The three OCPs and DDE were detected at all depths (down to ~50 cm) in the sediment cores, and concentration profiles indicated a depositional sedimentary environment with significant sediment mixing. Such mixing may redistribute OCPs deposited earlier (deeper in sediment bed) to the sediment surface and lead to enhanced persistence of OCP concentrations in surficial sediments. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  11. Effect of policy-induced measures on suspended sediments and total phosphorus concentrations from three Norwegian agricultural catchments.

    PubMed

    Bechmann, Marianne; Stålnacke, Per

    2005-05-15

    In Norway, agricultural subsidies have, since the late 1980s, been targeted to reduce soil erosion, transfer of soil particles and phosphorus (P) losses. The subsidies led to, e.g., a fourfold increase in the area not ploughed from 1991 to 2001 and a reduced P fertiliser consumption by 60%, especially in areas with high livestock density. Moreover, in the late 1980s agricultural point sources of P from storage facilities of manure and fodder were reduced. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of these policy-induced measures and changed agricultural practices on suspended sediment (SS) and total P (TP) concentrations in three agricultural catchments (1, 3 and 87 km2). Results from the statistical trend analyses for the study period (14-17 years) showed weak, but statistically significant (p<0.05), downward trends in concentrations of TP and SS in the two streams with a high initial TP or SS concentration. In the stream with low initial concentrations of TP and SS, however, no statistically significant trends were shown. The stream with the highest initial concentration of SS showed a statistically significant downward trend in both TP and SS concentrations. The catchment with low initial concentration of SS and medium livestock density showed no detectable trends, while the catchment with high livestock density and low concentrations of SS in the stream showed a statistically significant downward trend in TP concentrations. The results from this study suggest that subsidies and mitigation measures can reduce concentrations of TP and SS in streamwater in highly polluted catchments, although the reduction is small compared to the variations between catchments.

  12. Effect of flexibility on the growth of concentration fluctuations in a suspension of sedimenting fibers: Particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Saintillan, David

    2016-01-15

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to study the stability of a sedimenting suspension of weakly flexible fibers. It is well known that a suspension of rigid rods sedimenting under gravity at low Reynolds number is unstable to concentration fluctuations owing to hydrodynamic interactions. Flexible fibers, however, reorient while settling and even weak flexibility can alter their collective dynamics. In our recent work [Manikantan et al., “The instability of a sedimenting suspension of weakly flexible fibres,” J. Fluid Mech. 756, 935–964 (2014)], we developed a mean-field theory to predict the linear stability of such a system. Here, we verify these predictions using accurate and efficient particle simulations based on a slender-body model. We also demonstrate the mechanisms by which flexibility-induced reorientation alters suspension microstructure, and through it, its stability. Specifically, we first show that the anisotropy of the base state in the case of a suspension of flexible fibers has a destabilizing effect compared to a suspension of rigid rods. Second, a conflicting effect of flexibility is also shown to suppress particle clustering and slow down the growth of the instability. The relative magnitude of filament flexibility and rotational Brownian motion dictates which effect dominates, and our simulations qualitatively follow theoretically predicted trends. The mechanism for either effects is tied to the flexibility-induced reorientation of particles, which we illustrate using velocity and orientation statistics from our simulations. Finally, we also show that, in the case of an initially homogeneous and isotropic suspension, flexibility always acts to suppress the growth of the instability.

  13. Effect of flexibility on the growth of concentration fluctuations in a suspension of sedimenting fibers: Particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Saintillan, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to study the stability of a sedimenting suspension of weakly flexible fibers. It is well known that a suspension of rigid rods sedimenting under gravity at low Reynolds number is unstable to concentration fluctuations owing to hydrodynamic interactions. Flexible fibers, however, reorient while settling and even weak flexibility can alter their collective dynamics. In our recent work [Manikantan et al., "The instability of a sedimenting suspension of weakly flexible fibres," J. Fluid Mech. 756, 935-964 (2014)], we developed a mean-field theory to predict the linear stability of such a system. Here, we verify these predictions using accurate and efficient particle simulations based on a slender-body model. We also demonstrate the mechanisms by which flexibility-induced reorientation alters suspension microstructure, and through it, its stability. Specifically, we first show that the anisotropy of the base state in the case of a suspension of flexible fibers has a destabilizing effect compared to a suspension of rigid rods. Second, a conflicting effect of flexibility is also shown to suppress particle clustering and slow down the growth of the instability. The relative magnitude of filament flexibility and rotational Brownian motion dictates which effect dominates, and our simulations qualitatively follow theoretically predicted trends. The mechanism for either effects is tied to the flexibility-induced reorientation of particles, which we illustrate using velocity and orientation statistics from our simulations. Finally, we also show that, in the case of an initially homogeneous and isotropic suspension, flexibility always acts to suppress the growth of the instability.

  14. Effect of contaminant concentration on aerobic microbial mineralization of DCE and VC in stream-bed sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Discharge of DCE and VC to an aerobic surface water system simultaneously represents a significant environmental concern and, potentially, a non-engineered opportunity for efficient contaminant bioremediation. The potential for bioremediation, however, depends on the ability of the stream-bed microbial community to efficiently and completely degrade DCE and VC over a range of contaminant concentrations. The purposes of the studies reported here were to assess the potential for aerobic DCE and VC mineralization by stream-bed microorganisms and to evaluate the effects of DCE and VC concentrations on the apparent rates of aerobic mineralization. Bed-sediment microorganisms indigenous to a creek, where DCE-contaminated groundwater continuously discharges, demonstrated rapid mineralization of DCE and VC under aerobic conditions. Over 8 days, the recovery of [1,2-14C]DCE radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 17% to 100%, and the recovery of [1,2- 14C]VC radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 45% to 100%. Rates of DCE and VC mineralization increased significantly with increasing contaminant concentration, and the response of apparent mineralization rates to changes in DCE and VC concentrations was adequately described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics.Discharge of DCE and VC to an aerobic surface water system simultaneously represents a significant environmental concern and, potentially, a non-engineered opportunity for efficient contaminant bioremediation. The potential for bioremediation, however, depends on the ability of the stream-bed microbial community to efficiently and completely degrade DCE and VC over a range of contaminant concentrations. The purposes of the studies reported here were to assess the potential for aerobic DCE and VC mineralization by stream-bed microorganisms and to evaluate the effects of DCE and VC concentrations on the apparent rates of aerobic mineralization. Bed-sediment microorganisms indigenous to a creek, where DCE-contaminated groundwater

  15. g Dependent particle concentration due to sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Zouganelis, George D.

    2012-11-01

    Sedimentation of particles in a fluid has long been used to characterize particle size distribution. Stokes' law is used to determine an unknown distribution of spherical particle sizes by measuring the time required for the particles to settle a known distance in a fluid of known viscosity and density. In this paper, we study the effects of gravity on sedimentation by examining the resulting particle concentration distributed in an equilibrium profile of concentration C m, n above the bottom of a container. This is for an experiment on the surface of the Earth and therefore the acceleration of gravity had been corrected for the oblateness of the Earth and its rotation. Next, at the orbital altitude of the spacecraft in orbit around Earth the acceleration due to the central field is corrected for the oblateness of the Earth. Our results show that for experiments taking place in circular or elliptical orbits of various inclinations around the Earth the concentration ratio C m, n / C m, ave , the inclination seems to be the most ineffective in affecting the concentration among all the orbital elements. For orbital experiment that use particles of diameter d p =0.001 μm the concentration ratios for circular and slightly elliptical orbits in the range e=0-0.1 exhibit a 0.009 % difference. The concentration ratio increases with the increase of eccentricity, which increases more for particles of larger diameters. Finally, for particles of the same diameter concentration ratios between Earth and Mars surface experiments are related in the following way C_{(m,n)_{mathit{Earth}}} = 0.99962 C_{(m,n)_{mathit{Mars}}}.

  16. Concentration-dependent sedimentation of colloidal rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogic, Z.; Philipse, A. P.; Fraden, S.; Dhont, J. K. G.

    2000-11-01

    In this paper we first develop an approximate theory for the leading order concentration dependence of the sedimentation coefficient for rodlike colloids/polymers/macromolecules. To first order in volume fraction φ of rods, the sedimentation coefficient is written as 1+αφ. For large aspect ratios L/D (L is the rod length, D its thickness) α is found to vary like ∝(L/D)2/ln(L/D). This theoretical prediction is compared to experimental results. Then, experiments on fd virus are described, both in the isotropic and nematic phase. First-order in concentration results for this very long and thin (semiflexible) rod are in agreement with the above-mentioned theoretical prediction. Sedimentation profiles for the nematic phase show two sedimentation fronts. This result indicates that the nematic phase becomes unstable with the respect to isotropic phase during sedimentation.

  17. Grain size effect on PBDE and PCB concentrations in sediments from the intertidal zone of Bohai Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingru; Zheng, Binghui; Qin, Yanwen; Jiao, Lixin; Zhang, Lei

    2010-11-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are of great environmental concern because their concentrations in the environment are increasing exponentially, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous contaminants, although their usage ceased in most industrialized countries in the mid-1970s. This research provides particle-scale understanding of PBDE and PCB distribution in sediments obtained from the three intertidal flats of Bohai Bay, China. The sediments were fractionated into three size groups (<31, 31-63, and >63μm diameter). The PBDE, PCB, and total organic matter contents were not associated with grain size, and the lowest total organic matter was found in the 31-63μm fraction at all three sites. The PCBs and PBDEs were distributed differently among the various fractions from the three sites. The highest level of PCBs and PBDEs occurred in the 31-63μm fraction of the Dagukou sediments, and their lowest levels were found in Lujuhe sediments. In the Qikou sediments, the lowest PCB level occurred in the 31-63μm fraction and the lowest PBDE level was found in the <31μm fraction. These results indicate that the environmental behavior of PBDEs and PCBs are affected by the texture and organic matter content of sediments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of increasing temperatures on methane concentrations and methanogenesis during experimental incubation of sediments from oligotrophic and mesotrophic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Andrea; Lyautey, Emilie; Montuelle, Bernard; Casper, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Global warming is expected to raise temperatures in freshwater lakes, which have been acknowledged to contribute up to 10% of the atmospheric methane concentrations. Increasing temperature enhances methane production and oxidation rates, but few studies have considered the balance between both processes at experimentally higher temperatures within lake sediments. The temperature dependence of methane concentrations, methane production rates, and methanogenic (mcrA) and methanotrophic (pmoA) community size was investigated in intact sediment cores incubated with aerobic hypolimnion water at 4, 8, and 12°C over 3 weeks. Sediment cores of 25 cm length were collected at two temperate lakes—Lake Stechlin (Germany; mesotrophic-oligotrophic, maximum depth 69.5 m) and Lake Geneva (France/Switzerland; mesotrophic, maximum depth 310 m). While methane production rates in Lake Stechlin sediments did not change with increasing temperatures, methane concentrations decreased significantly. In contrast, methane production rates increased in 20-25 cm in Lake Geneva sediments with increasing temperatures, but methane concentrations did not differ. Real-time PCR demonstrated the methanogenic and methanotrophic community size remained stable independently of the incubation temperature. Methane concentrations as well as community sizes were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in Lake Stechlin than in Lake Geneva, while potential methane production rates after 24 h were similar in both lakes, with on average 2.5 and 1.9 nmol g-1 DW h-1, respectively. Our results suggest that at higher temperatures methane oxidation could balance, and even exceed, methane production. This suggests that anaerobic methane oxidation could be involved in the methane balance at a more important rate than previously anticipated.

  19. The effect of cross-sectional velocity and concentration variations on suspended sediment transport rates in tidal creeks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Seane; Gardner, L. R.; Kjerfve, Björn

    1992-10-01

    Instantaneous suspended sediment transport rates over numerous tidal cycles have been determined for two tidal creeks in South Carolina: Town Creek, North Inlet, and Bass Creek, Kiawah Island. Three different calculation methods were employed: (1) area-integrated product of sediment concentration, velocity, and sample subarea (Method I, the true transport rate); (2) product of instantaneous channel cross-section area, cross-sectionally averaged velocity, and cross-sectionally averaged concentration (Method II); and (3) product of instantaneous discharge and sediment concentration at a single, near-surface, mid-channel sample location (Method III). Logistical and financial constraints at times dictate use of Method III rather than the more rigorous Method I. Deviations between Method II (and/or III) and Method I as a percentage of the Method I transport rates can be large (up to 120%). Fortunately the largest percent deviations occur at times of low Method I transport. As a result, linear regressions of Method I transport rates against those of Methods II or III yield correlation coefficients r2 > 0·9. Thus Method II or III transport rates can be corrected by regression analysis to give reliable estimates of the Method I transport rate. Accordingly, it may be possible to calculate tidal residual suspended sediment transport rates for the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site at North Inlet using daily water sample data, providing an accurate hypsometric model can be developed for estimating instantaneous discharge from continuous tide data.

  20. Pollutant Concentrations and Toxic Effects on the Red Alga Ceramium tenuicorne of Sediments from Natural Harbors and Small Boat Harbors on the West Coast of Sweden.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Britta; Hansson, Tomas; Bengtsson, Henrik; Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin

    2016-04-01

    This investigation set out to analyze the toxicity of surface sediments in a number of natural harbors and small boat harbors on the west coast of Sweden. This was done with the growth inhibition method with Ceramium tenuicorne. Also, concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), irgarol, organotin compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the sediments were analyzed. The small boat harbors were heavily polluted by Cu, Zn, butyltins, and PAHs, and to a lesser extent by Pb. The Cu, Pb, Zn, and butyltins probably originated from their past and/or present use in antifouling paints, whereas the PAHs probably had multiple sources, including boat motor exhausts. The measured toxicity of the sediment was generally related to their Cu, Zn, and butyltin content, although other toxic substances than those analyzed here probably contributed to the toxicity in some of the harbors. The natural harbor sediments contained less pollutants and were less toxic than the small boat harbor sediments. Nevertheless, our data indicate that the boating pressure today may be high enough to produce toxic effects even in natural harbors in pristine areas. The strongest relationship between toxicity and the major pollutants was obtained when the sediment toxicity was expressed as gram wet weight per liter compared with gram dry weight per liter and gram total organic carbon per liter. Hence, for pollutants that can be elutriated with natural sea water, sediment toxicity expressed as gram wet weight per liter appears preferable.

  1. A data reconnaissance on the effect of suspended-sediment concentrations on dissolved-solids concentrations in rivers and tributaries in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D; Anning, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The Colorado River is one of the most important sources of water in the western United States, supplying water to over 35 million people in the U.S. and 3 million people in Mexico. High dissolved-solids loading to the River and tributaries are derived primarily from geologic material deposited in inland seas in the mid-to-late Cretaceous Period, but this loading may be increased by human activities. High dissolved solids in the River causes substantial damages to users, primarily in reduced agricultural crop yields and corrosion. The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Program was created to manage dissolved-solids loading to the River and has focused primarily on reducing irrigation-related loading from agricultural areas. This work presents a reconnaissance of existing data from sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) in order to highlight areas where suspended-sediment control measures may be useful in reducing dissolved-solids concentrations. Multiple linear regression was used on data from 164 sites in the UCRB to develop dissolved-solids models that include combinations of explanatory variables of suspended sediment, flow, and time. Results from the partial t-test, overall likelihood ratio, and partial likelihood ratio on the models were used to group the sites into categories of strong, moderate, weak, and no-evidence of a relation between suspended-sediment and dissolved-solids concentrations. Results show 68 sites have strong or moderate evidence of a relation, with drainage areas for many of these sites composed of a large percentage of clastic sedimentary rocks. These results could assist water managers in the region in directing field-scale evaluation of suspended-sediment control measures to reduce UCRB dissolved-solids loading.

  2. Combined effects of land reclamation, channel dredging upon the bioavailable concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Victoria Harbour sediment, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, J T K; Leung, H M; Yue, P Y K; Au, C K; Wong, Y K; Cheung, K C; Li, W C; Yung, K K L

    2017-01-15

    The up-to-date concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediment materials of Victoria Harbour was investigated so as to evaluate the pollution potential associated with the reclamation projects in Hong Kong. A total of 100 sediment samples were collected at 20 locations. Except the control point in reservoir, the PAHs concentrations were detectable levels all sites (131-628.3ng/g, dw) and such values were higher than Dutch Target and Intervention Values (the New Dutch standard in 2016). The PAHs concentration indicating that construction waste and wastewater discharges were the main pollutant sources. Results of correlation in single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) studies also revealed that the PAHs concentration was highly correlated (<0.01) with DNA migration (i.e. the length of tail moment of fish cells) in 5mg/ml of PAHs. The above observation indicates that the PAHs present in the sediment may substantially effect the marine ecosystem. Although the dredged sediment can be a useful sea-filling material for land reclamation; however, the continuing leaching of PAHs and its impact on the aquatic environment need to be studied further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl congener concentration and sediment supplementation on rates of methanogenesis and 2,3,6-trichlorobiphenyl dechlorination in an anaerobic enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, A.W.; May, H.D. ); Blake, C.K. ); Price, W.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The release of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into the environment has caused public concern. PCBs are know known to be susceptible to biodegradation; PCBs in the Hudson river have been shown to be extensively dechlorinated, but the rate of dechlorination in anaerobic environments have been slow, over months or years. This study tested the effects of PCB concentration and sediment supplementation with 2,3,6-trichlorobiphenol, on the rate of PCB dechlorination and methanogenesis. The rates of meta dechlorination in sediment supplemented cultures were measured in the laboratory, including both the rate per bacterial cell and the rate of methanogenesis when dechlorination increases. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Effects of cultivation and reforestation on suspended sediment concentrations: a case study in a mountainous catchment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N. F.; Chen, F. X.; Zhang, H. Y.; Wang, Y. X.; Shi, Z. H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how sediment concentrations vary with land use/cover is critical for evaluating the current and future impacts of human activities on river systems. This paper presents suspended sediment concentration (SSC) dynamics and the relationship between SSC and discharge (Q) in the 8973 km2 Du catchment and its sub-catchment (4635 km2). In the Du catchment and its sub-catchment, 4235 and 3980 paired SSC-Q samples, respectively, were collected over 30 years. Under the influence of the Household Contract Responsibility System and Grain-for-Green projects in China, three periods were designated, the original period (1980s), cultivation period (1990s) and reforestation period (2000s). The results of a Mann-Kendall test showed that rainfall slightly increased during the study years; however, the annual discharge and sediment load significantly decreased. The annual suspended sediment yield of the Du catchment varied between 1.3 × 108 and 1.0 × 1010 kg, and that of the sub-catchment varied between 6.3 × 107 and 4.3 × 109 kg. The SSCs in the catchment and sub-catchment fluctuated between 1 and 22400 g m-3 and between 1 and 31800 g m-3, respectively. The mean SSC of the Du catchment was relatively stable during the three periods (±83 g m-3). ANOVA (analysis of variance) indicated that the SSC did not significantly change under cultivation for low and moderate flows, but was significantly different under high flow during reforestation of the Du catchment. The SSC in the sub-catchment was more variable, and the mean SSC in the sub-catchment varied from 1058 ± 2217 g m-3 in the 1980s to 1256 ± 2496 g m-3 in the 1990s and 891 ± 1558 g m-3 in the 2000s. Reforestation significantly decreased the SSCs during low and moderate flows, whereas cultivation increased the SSCs during high flow. The sediment rating curves showed a stable relationship between the SSC and Q in the Du catchment during the three periods. However, the SSC-Q of the sub-catchment exhibited

  5. Effects of cultivation and reforestation on suspended sediment concentrations: a case study in a mountainous catchment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N. F.; Chen, F. X.; Zhang, H. Y.; Wang, Y. X.; Shi, Z. H.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding how sediment concentrations vary with land use/cover is critical for evaluating the current and future impacts of human activities on river systems. This paper presents suspended sediment concentration (SSC) dynamics and the relationship between SSC and discharge (Q) in the 8973 km2 Du catchment and its sub-catchment (4635 km2). In the Du catchment and its sub-catchment, 4235 and 3980 paired Q-SSC samples, respectively, were collected over 30 years. Under the influence of the "Household Contract Responsibility System" and Grain-for-Green projects in China, three periods were designated, the original period (1980s), cultivation period (1990s), and reforestation period (2000s). The results of a Mann-Kendall test showed that rainfall slightly increased during the study years; however, the annual discharge and sediment load significantly decreased. The annual suspended sediment yield of the Du catchment varied between 4 and 332 kg s-1, and that of the sub-catchment varied between 2 and 135 kg s-1. The SSCs in the catchment and sub-catchment fluctuated between 1 and 22 400 g m-3 and between 1 and 31 800 g m-3, respectively. The mean SSC of the Du catchment was relatively stable during the three periods (±83 g m-3). ANOVA indicated that the SSC did not significantly change under cultivation for low and moderate flows, but was significantly different under high flow during reforestation of the Du catchment. The SSC in the sub-catchment was more variable, and the mean-SSC in the sub-catchment varied from 1058 g m-3 in the 1980s to 1256 g m-3 in the 1990s and 891 g m-3 in the 2000s. Reforestation significantly decreased the SSCs during low and moderate flows, whereas cultivation increased the SSCs during high flow. The sediment rating curves showed a stable relationship between the SSC and Q in the Du catchment during the three periods. However, the SSC-Q of the sub-catchment exhibited scattered relationships during the original and cultivation periods and a

  6. Optimal estimation of suspended-sediment concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Optimal estimators are developed for computation of suspended-sediment concentrations in streams. The estimators are a function of parameters, computed by use of generalized least squares, which simultaneously account for effects of streamflow, seasonal variations in average sediment concentrations, a dynamic error component, and the uncertainty in concentration measurements. The parameters are used in a Kalman filter for on-line estimation and an associated smoother for off-line estimation of suspended-sediment concentrations. The accuracies of the optimal estimators are compared with alternative time-averaging interpolators and flow-weighting regression estimators by use of long-term daily-mean suspended-sediment concentration and streamflow data from 10 sites within the United States. For sampling intervals from 3 to 48 days, the standard errors of on-line and off-line optimal estimators ranged from 52.7 to 107%, and from 39.5 to 93.0%, respectively. The corresponding standard errors of linear and cubic-spline interpolators ranged from 48.8 to 158%, and from 50.6 to 176%, respectively. The standard errors of simple and multiple regression estimators, which did not vary with the sampling interval, were 124 and 105%, respectively. Thus, the optimal off-line estimator (Kalman smoother) had the lowest error characteristics of those evaluated. Because suspended-sediment concentrations are typically measured at less than 3-day intervals, use of optimal estimators will likely result in significant improvements in the accuracy of continuous suspended-sediment concentration records. Additional research on the integration of direct suspended-sediment concentration measurements and optimal estimators applied at hourly or shorter intervals is needed.

  7. Assessment of crude oil biodegradation in arctic seashore sediments: effects of temperature, salinity, and crude oil concentration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priyamvada; Schiewer, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The expected increase in offshore oil exploration and production in the Arctic may lead to crude oil spills along arctic shorelines. To evaluate the potential effectiveness of bioremediation to treat such spills, oil spill bioremediation in arctic sediments was simulated in laboratory microcosms containing beach sediments from Barrow (Alaska), spiked with North Slope Crude, and incubated at varying temperatures and salinities. Biodegradation was measured via respiration rates (CO2 production); volatilization was quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometry (GC/MS) analysis of hydrocarbons sorbed to activated carbon, and hydrocarbons remaining in the sediment were quantified by GC/flame ionization detector (FID). Higher temperature leads to increased biodegradation by naturally occurring microorganisms, while the release of volatile organic compounds was similar at both temperatures. Increased salinity had a small positive impact on crude oil removal. At higher crude oil dosages, volatilization increased, however CO2 production did not. While only a small percentage of crude oil was completely biodegraded, a larger percentage was volatilized within 6-9 weeks.

  8. The effects of unpaved roads on suspended sediment concentration of third- to fifth-order streams- A case study from southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomaz, E. L.; Vestena, L. R.; Ramos-Scharron, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Unpaved roads have earned a reputation of inducing adverse effects on downstream water resources by increasing suspended sediment concentration because they typically generate sediment at rates up to several orders of magnitude above background and because they may enhance the efficiency of sediment delivery to fluvial networks. Although much research has been conducted on road effects in forested landscapes, proper understanding of their hydro-geomorphic role in rural areas is still desired. Unpaved roads are fundamental in the agricultural systems employed for the cultivation of maize and black beans on topographically-steep, marginal lands of southern Brazil. Marginal lands generate a sizeable fraction of the agricultural production in the state of Paraná, one of Brazil's agricultural powerhouses. This study documents the localized impacts on suspended sediment concentration of seven unpaved road crossings in the Guarabiroba River Catchment, Paraná, Brazil. A total of 156 suspended sediment samples were manually collected both upstream and downstream of road-crossings between 22-Apr-09 and 26-Apr-10 during 14 rainfall events ranging between 16 and 96 mm in total rainfall. The average length of road directly delivering runoff to each crossing varied from 0.56 - 2.4 km, and the size of the catchment areas of the third to fifth order monitored streams ranged from 0.3 to 13.5 km2. In addition to stream samples, 78 samples representing unpaved road runoff were collected during the same rain events. Upstream and downstream mean concentration values were compared for each storm at every site based on a paired t-test analysis (0.05% level). Mean suspended sediment concentration at stream segments located upstream of road crossings was 0.04 mg L-1 (s.d. = 0.05 mg L-1), while the mean downstream concentration was 0.11 mg L-1 (s.d. = 0.14 mg L-1) or 2.9 times higher than upstream samples. Meanwhile, road runoff had an average concentration of 0.93 mg L-1 (s.d. = 0.97 mg

  9. Falling-stream turbidimeter as a means of measuring sediment concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, Harold P.; Olson, Richard C.

    1972-01-01

    The ratio of suspended-sediment concentration to the square root of the median particle size of sand-sized sediments was found to be a useful parameter for elimination of the effect of particle size in the relative transparency-concentration relationships. Thus it was possible to evaluate the effect of the different type of sediment on the relative transparency independent of particle size. The use of this parameter to eliminate the effect of particle size was unsuccessful for finer sediments. -

  10. Effects of mining activities on heavy metal concentrations in water, sediment, and macroinvertebrates in different reaches of the Pilcomayo River, South America.

    PubMed

    Smolders, A J P; Lock, R A C; Van der Velde, G; Medina Hoyos, R I; Roelofs, J G M

    2003-04-01

    From 1997 until 1999 the extent and the ecological effects of zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium pollution were studied in different reaches of the South American Pilcomayo River. A comparison of metal concentrations in water, sediment, and chironomid larvae, as well as the diversity of macroinvertebrate species, was made between sites near the origin of the Pilcomayo River, with hardly any mining activities, sites in the Potosí region, with intensive mining, and sites located 500 km or further downstream of Potosí, in the Chaco plain. Samples were also collected in an unpolluted river (Cachi Mayu River) and in the Tarapaya River, which is strongly contaminated by mine tailings (1000 tons a day). The upper parts of the Pilcomayo River are strongly affected by the release of mine tailings from the Potosí mines where mean concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in water, filtered water, sediment, and chironomid larvae were up to a thousand times higher than the local background levels. The diversity of the benthic macroinvertebrate community was strongly reduced in the contaminated parts; 97% of the benthic macroinvertebrates consisted of chironomid larvae. The degree of contamination in the lower reaches of the river, however, was fairly low because of sedimentation processes and the strong dilution of mine tailings with enormous amounts of clean sediment from erosion processes. Analysis of sediment cores from the Ibibobo floodplain, however, reveal an increase of the heavy metal concentrations in the lower reaches since the introduction of the contaminating flotation process in the mine industry in 1985.

  11. Entrainment at a sediment concentration interface in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Jorge; Shringarpure, Mrugesh; Cantero, Mariano; Balachandar, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we address the role of turbulence on entrainment at a sediment concentration interface. This process can be conceived as the entrainment of sediment-free fluid into the bottom sediment-laden flow, or alternatively, as the entrainment of sediment into the top sediment-free flow. We have performed direct numerical simulations for fixed Reynolds and Schmidt numbers while varying the values of Richardson number and particle settling velocity. The analysis performed shows that the ability of the flow to pick up a given sediment size decreases with the distance from the bottom, and thus only fine enough sediment particles are entrained across the sediment concentration interface. For these cases, the concentration profiles evolve to a final steady state in good agreement with the well-known Rouse profile. The approach towards the Rouse profile happens through a transient self-similar state. Detailed analysis of the three dimensional structure of the sediment concentration interface shows the mechanisms by which sediment particles are lifted up by tongues of sediment-laden fluid with positive correlation between vertical velocity and sediment concentration. Finally, the mixing ability of the flow is addressed by monitoring the center of mass of the sediment-laden layer. With the support of ExxonMobil, NSF, ANPCyT, CONICET.

  12. Effects of near-bottom water oxygen concentration on biogeochemical cycling of C, N and S in sediments of the Gulf of Gdansk (southern Baltic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukawska-Matuszewska, Katarzyna; Kielczewska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Sediments from four sampling sites in the Gulf of Gdansk were sampled to test how different oxygen concentrations in near-bottom water affects biogeochemical cycling of C, N and S. Vertical distributions of content of organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN) and total sulfur (TS) and number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sediments were determined. Pore water total alkalinity (TA), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), sulfate, hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate were analyzed and benthic fluxes of DIC, hydrogen sulfide and ammonium were calculated. Concentrations of OC and TN decreased and concentration of TS increased with sediment depth. Highest concentrations of OC, TN and TS were observed in silty clay sediments from hypoxic and anoxic sediments below the permanent halocline. Organic matter (OM) accumulation in sediments and oxygen deficiency in near-bottom water stimulate preservation of OC and burial of TS in this area. Concentrations of TA, DIC, hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate in pore water increased, while concentration of sulfate decreased with sediment depth. Hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate was a significant additional source of TA in pore water under hypoxic and anoxic conditions. Mineralization of OM at oxygen concentrations <2 ml l-1 occurred mainly via bacterial sulfate reduction. Diurnal hydrogen sulfide fluxes under hypoxic conditions ranged from 400 to 1240 μmol m-2 d-1. Ammonium fluxes were estimated on 534 - 924 μmol m-2 d-1. Corresponding fluxes measured under anoxic conditions were 266 μmol m-2 d-1 and 106 μmol m-2 d-1. Sediments under oxic conditions became a place of the intensive regeneration of carbon - DIC flux from sediment reached 2775 μmol m-2 day-1. Sediment-water DIC fluxes under hypoxic and anoxic conditions were much lower and ranged from 1015 to 1208 μmol m-2 d-1.

  13. Dissolved Concentrations of PAHs and PCBs Are Often Over-predicted Using Sediment Concentrations and Literature Koc Values

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing amount of chemical and biological evidence that using sediment concentrations and commonly applied Koc values frequently overpredicts interstitial water concentrations of HOCs, and thereby overestimates uptake and/or effects of those chemicals on exposed or...

  14. Dissolved Concentrations of PAHs and PCBs Are Often Over-predicted Using Sediment Concentrations and Literature Koc Values

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing amount of chemical and biological evidence that using sediment concentrations and commonly applied Koc values frequently overpredicts interstitial water concentrations of HOCs, and thereby overestimates uptake and/or effects of those chemicals on exposed or...

  15. Derivation of Rouse equation for sediment concentration using Shannon entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhakar, Manotosh; Ghoshal, Koeli; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-01-01

    Sediment concentration is fundamental for determining sediment transport in open channels. The Rouse equation, one of several methods for computing sediment concentration, has been derived using deterministic hydraulic principles. This study derives the Rouse equation using the Shannon entropy theory. The derivation requires a hypothesis on the cumulative probability distribution function of sediment concentration in terms of flow depth which is formulated in a general form and can specialize in several specific forms reported in the literature. The advantage of using the entropy theory is that it permits quantification of uncertainty associated with concentration and determination of parameters in terms of specified information, such as mean concentration.

  16. Metal concentrations in urban riparian sediments along an urbanization gradient

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Bain; Ian D. Yesilonis; Richard V. Pouyat

    2012-01-01

    Urbanization impacts fluvial systems via a combination of changes in sediment chemistry and basin hydrology. While chemical changes in urban soils have been well characterized, similar surveys of riparian sediments in urbanized areas are rare. Metal concentrations were measured in sediments collected from riparian areas across the urbanization gradient in Baltimore, MD...

  17. The effect of an oil drilling operation on the trace metal concentrations in offshore bottom sediments of the Campos Basin oil field, SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rezende, C E; Lacerda, L D; Ovalle, A R C; Souza, C M M; Gobo, A A R; Santos, D O

    2002-07-01

    The concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, Ba, V, Sn and As in offshore bottom sediments from the Bacia de Campos oil field, SE Brazil, were measured at the beginning and at 7 months after completion of the drilling operation. Concentrations of Al, Fe, Ba, Cr, Ni and Zn were significantly higher closer to the drilling site compared to stations far from the site. Average concentrations of Al, Cu, and in particular of Ni, were significantly higher at the end of the drilling operation than at the beginning. Comparison between drilling area sediments with control sediments of the continental platform, however, showed no significant difference in trace metal concentrations. Under the operation conditions of this drilling event, the results show that while changes in some trace metal concentrations do occur during drilling operations, they are not significantly large to be distinguished from natural variability of the local background concentrations.

  18. Relation of waterfowl poisoning to sediment lead concentrations in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Audet, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Day, D.

    2000-01-01

    For many years, waterfowl have been poisoned by lead after ingesting contaminated sediment in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, in Idaho. Results of studies on waterfowl experimentally fed this sediment were combined with results from field studies conducted in the Basin to relate sediment lead concentration to injury to waterfowl. The first step in the model estimated exposure as the relation of sediment lead concentration to blood lead concentration in mute swans (Cygnus olor), ingesting 22% sediment in a rice diet. That rate corresponded to the 90th percentile of sediment ingestion estimated from analyses of feces of tundra swans (Olor columbianus) in the Basin. Then, with additional laboratory studies on Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) fed the sediment, we developed the general relation of blood lead to injury in waterfowl. Injury was quantified by blood lead concentrations, ALAD (-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase) activity, protoporphyrin concentrations, hemoglobin concentrations, hepatic lead concentrations, and the prevalence of renal nuclear inclusion bodies. Putting the exposure and injury relations together provided a powerful tool for assessing hazards to wildlife in the Basin. The no effect concentration of sediment lead was estimated as 24 mg/kg and the lowest effect level as 530 mg/kg. By combining our exposure equation with data on blood lead concentrations measured in moribund tundra swans in the Basin, we estimated that some mortality would occur at a sediment lead concentration as low as 1800 mg/kg.

  19. The effect of the new Massachusetts Bay sewage outfall on the concentrations of metals and bacterial spores in nearby bottom and suspended sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Casso, M.A.; Rendigs, R. R.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Since the new outfall for Boston's treated sewage effluent began operation on September 6, 2000, no change has been observed in concentrations of silver or Clostridium perfringens spores (an ecologically benign tracer of sewage), in bottom sediments at a site 2.5 km west of the outfall. In suspended sediment samples collected with a time-series sediment trap located 1.3 km south of the outfall, silver and C. perfringens spores increased by 38% and 103%, respectively, in post-outfall samples while chromium, copper, and zinc showed no change. All metal concentrations in sediments are <50% of warning levels established by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. An 11-year data set of bottom sediment characteristics collected three times per year prior to outfall startup provides perspective for the interpretation of post-outfall data. A greater than twofold increase in concentrations of sewage tracers (silver and C. perfringens) was observed in muddy sediments following the exceptional storm of December 11-16, 1992 that presumably moved contaminated inshore sediment offshore. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration in rivers using acoustic methods.

    PubMed

    Elçi, Sebnem; Aydin, Ramazan; Work, Paul A

    2009-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current meters (ADV, ADCP, and ADP) are widely used in water systems to measure flow velocities and velocity profiles. Although these meters are designed for flow velocity measurements, they can also provide information defining the quantity of particulate matter in the water, after appropriate calibration. When an acoustic instrument is calibrated for a water system, no additional sensor is needed to measure suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This provides the simultaneous measurements of velocity and concentration required for most sediment transport studies. The performance of acoustic Doppler current meters for measuring SSC was investigated in different studies where signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and suspended sediment concentration were related using different formulations. However, these studies were each limited to a single study site where neither the effect of particle size nor the effect of temperature was investigated. In this study, different parameters that affect the performance of an ADV for the prediction of SSC are investigated. In order to investigate the reliability of an ADV for SSC measurements in different environments, flow and SSC measurements were made in different streams located in the Aegean region of Turkey having different soil types. Soil samples were collected from all measuring stations and particle size analysis was conducted by mechanical means. Multivariate analysis was utilized to investigate the effect of soil type and water temperature on the measurements. Statistical analysis indicates that SNR readings ob tained from the ADV are affected by water temperature and particle size distribution of the soil, as expected, and a prediction model is presented relating SNR readings to SSC mea surements where both water temperature and sediment characteristics type are incorporated into the model. The coefficients of the suggested model were obtained using the multivariate anal ysis. Effect of high turbidity

  1. A study of flow in alluvial channels: the effect of large concentrations of fine sediment on the mechanics of flow in a small flume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haushild, William Leland; Simons, Daryl Baldwin; Richadrson, Everett V.

    1961-01-01

    concentration with the dune bed form and was increased by as much as 550 percent for the transition, standing wave, and antidune forms of bed roughness. Resistance to flow was less (C/√ g increased by 45 percent) with fine sediment-laden flow than with clear-water flow for the dune, and transition bed forms; and was greater (C/√ g   reduced by 25 percent) for the standing waves and the antidunes. A narrow range of bentonite concentration for each form of bed roughness was established as a limit below which only minor changes in bed form, bed material transport, and resistance to flow occurred. The variation of the liquid properties, specific weight and viscosity, for water-bentonite dispersions were studied and their effect on the properties of the bed material particles measured. The fall velocity of the particles in a dispersion of 100, 000 parts per million fine sediment in water was reduced to about one-half their fall velocity in clear water.

  2. Rare earth elements in intertidal sediments of Bohai Bay, China: concentration, fractionation and the influence of sediment texture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Gao, Xuelu; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung

    2014-07-01

    Surface sediments from intertidal Bohai Bay were assessed using a four-step sequential extraction procedure to determine their concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) and the chemical forms in which those elements were present. The normalized ratios La/Gd and La/Yb showed that LREE contents were not significantly higher than the middle REEs or HREE contents. A negative Ce anomaly and positive Eu were observed in sand and silty sand sediments, whereas no significant Ce or Eu anomaly was found in clayey silt sediments. Residual fraction of REEs accounted for the majority of their total concentrations. Middle REEs were more easily leached than other REEs, especially in clayey silt sediment. REEs contents in the surface sediment from the intertidal Bohai Sea were consistent with data from the upper continental crust and China shallow sea sediments, indicating that they were generally unaffected by heavily anthropogenic effects from adjacent areas.

  3. Sediment acoustic index method for computing continuous suspended-sediment concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.; Straub, Timothy D.; Wood, Molly S.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2016-07-11

    Once developed, sediment acoustic index ratings must be validated with additional suspended-sediment samples, beyond the period of record used in the rating development, to verify that the regression model continues to adequately represent sediment conditions within the stream. Changes in ADVM configuration or installation, or replacement with another ADVM, may require development of a new rating. The best practices described in this report can be used to develop continuous estimates of suspended-sediment concentration and load using sediment acoustic surrogates to enable more informed and accurate responses to diverse sedimentation issues.

  4. Accurate mass replacement method for the sediment concentration measurement with a constant volume container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yunyun; Chen, Tianqin; Yan, Jun; Lei, Tingwu

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of sediment concentration in water is of great importance in soil erosion research and soil and water loss monitoring systems. The traditional weighing method has long been the foundation of all the other measuring methods and instrument calibration. The development of a new method to replace the traditional oven-drying method is of interest in research and practice for the quick and efficient measurement of sediment concentration, especially field measurements. A new method is advanced in this study for accurately measuring the sediment concentration based on the accurate measurement of the mass of the sediment-water mixture in the confined constant volume container (CVC). A sediment-laden water sample is put into the CVC to determine its mass before the CVC is filled with water and weighed again for the total mass of the water and sediments in the container. The known volume of the CVC, the mass of sediment-laden water, and sediment particle density are used to calculate the mass of water, which is replaced by sediments, therefore sediment concentration of the sample is calculated. The influence of water temperature was corrected by measuring water density to determine the temperature of water before measurements were conducted. The CVC was used to eliminate the surface tension effect so as to obtain the accurate volume of water and sediment mixture. Experimental results showed that the method was capable of measuring the sediment concentration from 0.5 up to 1200 kg m‑3. A good liner relationship existed between the designed and measured sediment concentrations with all the coefficients of determination greater than 0.999 and the averaged relative error less than 0.2%. All of these seem to indicate that the new method is capable of measuring a full range of sediment concentration above 0.5 kg m‑3 to replace the traditional oven-drying method as a standard method for evaluating and calibrating other methods.

  5. Sediment concentration rating curves for a monsoonal climate: upper Blue Nile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moges, Mamaru A.; Zemale, Fasikaw A.; Alemu, Muluken L.; Ayele, Getaneh K.; Dagnew, Dessalegn C.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2016-07-01

    Information on sediment concentration in rivers is important for design of reservoirs and for environmental applications. Because of the scarcity of continuous sediment data, methods have been developed to predict sediment loads based on few discontinuous measurements. Traditionally, loads are being predicted using rating curves that relate sediment load to discharge. The relationship assumes inherently a unique relationship between concentration and discharge and therefore although performing satisfactorily in predicting loads, it may be less suitable for predicting concentration. This is especially true in the Blue Nile Basin of Ethiopia where concentrations decrease for a given discharge with the progression of the rainy monsoon phase. The objective of this paper is to improve the sediment concentration predictions throughout the monsoon period for the Ethiopian highlands with a modified rating type equation. To capture the observed sediment concentration pattern, we assume that the sediment concentration was at the transport limit early in the rainy season and then decreases linearly with effective rainfall towards source-limited concentration. The modified concentration rating curve was calibrated for the four main rivers in the Lake Tana basin where sediment concentrations affect fish production and tourism. Then the scalability of the rating type equation was checked in three 100 ha watersheds for which historic data were available. The results show that for predicting sediment concentrations, the (modified) concentration rating curve was more accurate than the (standard) load rating curve as expected. In addition loads were predicted more accurately for three of the four rivers. We expect that after more extensive testing over a wider geographical area, the proposed concentration rating curve will offer improved predictions of sediment concentrations in monsoonal climates.

  6. Statistical comparisons of heavy-metal concentrations in river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. S.

    1996-02-01

    Statistical t tests were used to determine lead, copper, and chromium enrichment in sediments from the Lower Branch of the Rouge River in southeast Michigan, USA. Both absolute metal concentrations and ratios of trace metal to conservative metal concentrations were used to compare sampled sites along the Lower Branch of the Rouge River to background sites in the headwaters region. Concentration ratios were used to reduce the effects of certain chemical and physical characteristics on the level of metal contained in a given sediment. Results from the comparison of sample sites to the background reveal metal enrichment at several sites, particularly along the highly urbanized, downstream section of the river. This section of the Lower Branch of the Rouge River exhibits significant lead and copper contamination, as well as measurable chromium enrichment when using either concentrations alone or ratios as methods of comparison. The areas of metal enrichment appear to coincide closely with areas of known anthropogenic activities. Of particular interest, however, is the enrichment of lead and copper at two upstream sites where the statistical tests suggest an anthropogenic source for the enrichment, but where no previously known cultural activities existed. These data prompted a historical search of records, which discovered several abandoned landfills immediately upstream of the metal enrichment sites.

  7. Sediment concentration rating curves for a monsoonal climate: upper Blue Nile Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moges, M. A.; Zemale, F. A.; Alemu, M. L.; Ayele, G. K.; Dagnew, D. C.; Tilahun, S. A.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Information on sediment content in rivers is important for design of reservoirs and for environmental applications. Because of scarcity of continuous sediment data, methods have been developed to predict sediment loads based on few discontinuous measurements. Traditionally, loads are being predicted using rating curves that relate sediment load to discharge. The relationship assumes inherently a unique relationship between concentration and discharge and therefore although performing satisfactorily in predicting loads, it may be less suitable for predicting concentration. This is especially true in the Blue Nile basin of Ethiopia where concentrations decrease for a given discharge with the progression of the rainy monsoon phase. The objective of this paper is to improve the sediment concentration predictions throughout the monsoon period for the Ethiopian highlands with a modified rating type equation. To capture the observed sediment concentration pattern, we assume that the sediment concentration was at the transport limit early in the rainy season and then decrease linearly with effective rainfall towards source limited concentration. The modified concentration rating curve was calibrated for the four main rivers in the Lake Tana basin where sediment concentrations affect fish production and tourism. Then the scalability of the rating type equation was checked in three 100-ha watersheds for which historic data was available. The results show, that for predicting sediment concentrations, the (modified) concentration rating curve was more accurate than the (standard) load rating curve as expected. In addition loads were predicted more accurately for three of the four rivers. We expect that after more extensive testing over a wider geographical area, the proposed concentration rating curve will offer improved predictions of sediment concentrations in monsoonal climates.

  8. Adsorption and transport of As (V) in soil columns: Effect of As concentration, pH and sediment properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been proposed that ground water contaminated with low concentrations of As (V) be remediated by infiltration and recharge into infiltration basins using the subsurface materials to adsorb the metal. This low cost remediation scheme allows for production of water that meets the drinking water ...

  9. Effect of pH, sulphate concentration and total organic carbon on mercury accumulation in sediments in the Volta Lake at Yeji, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kwaansa-Ansah, E E; Voegborlo, R B; Adimado, A A; Ephraim, J H; Nriagu, J O

    2012-03-01

    In this study, pH, total organic carbon, sulphate concentration and mercury concentrations of sediment samples from the Volta Lake at Yeji in the northern part of Ghana were determined. The results indicate that pH ranged from 6.32 to 8.21, total organic carbon ranged from 0.17 to 3.02 g/kg and sulphate concentration from 10.00 to 57.51 mg/kg. Total mercury concentrations ranged from 32.61 to 700 ng/g which is below the International Atomic Energy Agency recommended value of 810 ng/g. Humic substance-bound mercury ranged from 81.15 to 481.31 mg/kg in sediments and its two fractions existed as humic acid-bound mercury > fulvic acid-bound mercury with the ratio of humic substance-bound mercury to fulvic acid-bound mercury as 1.62 on the average. Humic substance-bound mercury and the two fractions fulvic acid-bound mercury and humic substance-bound mercury in sediments were favorably determined and found to correlate significantly positive with total organic carbon (r = 0.538) and total mercury (r = 0.574). However, there were poor correlations between SO(4) (2-) concentrations and humic substance-bound mercury (r = -0.391) as well as the two fractions; fulvic acid (r = -0.406) and humic acid (r = -0.381). By assuming that methyl mercury is mostly formed in sediments, these significant relations suggest that the efficiency of mercury being methylated from a given inorganic form depends on the amount, and most likely biochemical composition of total organic carbon in the lake sediment but not the SO(4) (2-) concentration.

  10. The effect of the "Great Flood of 1993" on subsequent suspended sediment concentrations and fluxes in the Mississippi River Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    During the spring/summer of 1993, the upper Midwestern USA experienced unusually heavy precipitation (200-350% above normal). More than 500 gauging stations in the region were simultaneously above flood stage, and nearly 150 major rivers and tributaries over-topped their banks. This was one of the costliest floods in the history of the USA, and came to be known as the "Great Flood of 1993". An examination of the long-term daily sediment record for the Mississippi River at Thebes, Illinois (representing the middle, or lower part of the upper basin), indicates that the flood had a severe and long-lasting impact on subsequent suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) and annual suspended sediment fluxes in the basin. At Thebes, pre1993 (1981-1992) median discharge and SSC were about 5400 m3 s-1 and 304 mg L-1, respectively; whereas, post-1993 (1994-2004) median discharge and SSC were about 5200 m3 s-1 and 189 mg L-1, respectively. Clearly, the 1993 flood removed substantial amounts of "stored" bed sediment and/or readily erodible flood plain deposits, eliminating a major source of SSC for the Thebes site. Examination of additional, but discontinuous sediment records (covering the period from 1981-2004) for other sites in the basin indicates that current post-flood declines in SSC and suspended sediment fluxes range from a low of about 10% to a high of about 36%.

  11. The effects of exploratory petroleum drilling in the northwest gulf of mexico on trace metal concentrations in near rig sediments and organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothe, Paul N.; Presley, B. J.

    1987-10-01

    For a typical offshore petroleum well, 500 1000 t (dry weight excluding cuttings) of drilling fluid solids are discharged into the sea. In this study, concentrations of selected trace elements present in drilling fluids (Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, V), were determined in surface sediments and macroepifauna around a Gulf of Mexico exploratory drilling site before, during, and after drilling operations. Observed significant increases in the levels of Fe in organisms and Ba and Cr in sediments were attributable to drilling discharges. Shrimp, which constitute the largest commercial fishery in the region, were intensively studied. Shrimp collected during the last few days of drilling had abdominal muscle Fe concentrations more than twice those in shrimp sampled before or after drilling. Enhanced Fe solubility (bioavailability) in sea-water, caused by soluble organic chelating agents in the drilling fluids, is the most likely explanation for the observed increases. Significant increases in sediment Ba were observed at all sampling radii but large increases (up to 7.5 fold) were only observed within a few hundred meters of the drilling site. An accurate mass balance of total discharged (excess) Ba present in sediments within 1000 m of the drilling site was determined. Only 9.3% of the total Ba used, and presumably other similar drilling mud components traced by Ba, was present within 1000 m at the conclusion of drilling. After 2.6 mo, only 6.6% was present. Significant sediment resuspension and transport occurring in the high current nearshore study site (24 m water depth) was responsible for the low retention and rapid loss of discharged Ba in the sediment. The largest mean increase in sediment Cr (26%) occurred at the 1000 m sampling radii.

  12. The effects of exploratory petroleum drilling in the northwest Gulf of Mexico on trace metal concentrations in near rig sediments and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Boothe, P.N.; Presley, B.J. )

    1987-01-01

    For a typical offshore petroleum well, 500-1000 t (dry weight excluding cuttings) of drilling fluid solids are discharged into the sea. In this study, concentrations of selected trace elements present in drilling fluids (Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, V), were determined in surface sediments and macroepifauna around a Gulf of Mexico exploratory drilling site before, during, and after drilling operations. Observed significant increases in the levels of Fe in organisms and Ba and Cr in sediments were attributable to drilling discharges. Shrimp, which constitute the largest commercial fishery in the region, were intensively studied. Shrimp collected during the last few days of drilling had abdominal muscle Fe concentrations more than twice those in shrimp sampled before or after drilling. Enhanced Fe solubility (bioavailability) in sea-water, caused by soluble organic chelating agents in the drilling fluids, is the most likely explanation for the observed increases. Significant increases in sediment Ba were observed at all sampling radii but large increases (up to 7.5 fold) were only observed within a few hundred meters of the drilling site. An accurate mass balance of total discharged (excess) Ba present in sediments within 1000 m of the drilling site was determined. Only 9.3% of the total Ba used, and presumably other similar drilling mud components traced by Ba, was present within 1000 m at the conclusion of drilling. After 2.6 mo. only 6.6% was present. Significant sediment resuspension and transport occurring in the high current nearshore study site (24 m water depth) was responsible for the low retention and rapid loss of discharged Ba in the sediment. The largest mean increase in sediment Cr (26%) occurred at the 1,000 m sampling radii.

  13. Application of a regional procedure to assess the risk to fish from high sediment concentrations.

    PubMed

    Watts, Carol D; Naden, Pamela S; Cooper, David M; Gannon, Beate

    2003-10-01

    Periods of high suspended sediment concentration in rivers can affect the behaviour, health and habitat of freshwater fish. A simple regional model relating daily mean suspended sediment concentration in rivers to flow and percentage of cropped and urban land has been applied to the Lower Swale, UK. The model uses a GIS catchment coverage of hydrological response units (HRUs) of area 5-8 km2, each of which is assumed hydrologically independent and drains to an identified river reach. The sediment delivery properties of each HRU are a function of its land use characteristics determined from existing databases, and hydrological conditions determined from effective rainfall measurements. Daily mean suspended sediment concentrations for each river reach were derived by cumulating simulated HRU flows and sediment loads down successive reaches. A map of the modelled 10% quantile sediment concentrations is presented for both HRUs and river reaches. The map is substantially different from existing erosion risk maps because the delivery model is driven by flow in addition to land use, rather than by soil type. Frequency curves showing the exceedance probability of mean simulated sediment concentrations over 1-6-day durations have been derived using peaks-over-threshold techniques. Maps of the risk of harm to fish, based on the probability of 1- and 4-day sediment concentrations exceeding 80 mg l(-1), are presented. Such maps can be used to assess the impact of sediment on fish and for setting appropriate river water quality objectives.

  14. Millimolar concentrations of zinc and other metal cations cause sedimentation of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kejnovsky, E; Kypr, J

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that DNA sediments in the presence of millimolar concentrations of zinc or related metal cations and that EDTA entirely dissolves the sediment. The sedimentation is promoted by alkaline pH but the pH dependence is abolished by submillimolar concentrations of phosphate anions. We suspect that the metal cations generate sedimenting particles of insoluble hydroxides or phosphates for which DNA has a strong affinity. The events involved in DNA-metal phosphate co-sedimentation are similar to the processes that enable calcium phosphate-assisted transfection. Hence, work with even submillimolar concentrations of zinc and most other metal cations, which many DNA-binding proteins need for their activities, requires care to avoid the sedimentation of DNA. Literature reporting about zinc effects on DNA is discussed from the point of view of the present results. PMID:9826751

  15. Extraction and concentration of phenolic compounds from water and sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1980-01-01

    Continuous liquid-liquid extractors are used to concentrate phenols at the ??g l-1 level from water into dichloromethane; this is followed by Kuderna-Danish evaporative concentration and gas chromatography. The procedure requires 5 h for 18 l of sample water. Overall concentration factors around 1000 are obtained. Overall concentration efficiencies vary from 23.1 to 87.1%. Concentration efficiencies determined by a batch method suitable for sediments range from 18.9 to 73.8%. ?? 1980.

  16. The effect of grain size and surface area on organic matter, lignin and carbohydrate concentration, and molecular compositions in Peru Margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Tsamakis, E.; Keil, R.G.; Eglinton, T.I.; Montlucon, D.B.; Hedges, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    A C-rich sediment sample from the Peru Margin was sorted into nine hydrodynamically-determined grain size fractions to explore the effect of grain size distribution and sediment surface area on organic matter content and composition. The neutral monomeric carbohydrate composition, lignin oxidation product yields, total organic carbon, and total nitrogen contents were determined independently for each size fraction, in addition to sediment surface area and abundance of biogenic opal. The percent organic carbon and percent total nitrogen were strongly related to surface area in these sediments. In turn, the distribution of surface area closely followed mass distribution among the textural size classes, suggesting hydrodynamic controls on grain size also control organic carbon content. Nevertheless, organic compositional distinctions were observed between textural size classes. Total neutral carbohydrate yields in the Peru Margin sediments were found to closely parallel trends in total organic carbon, increasing in abundance among grain size fractions in proportion to sediment surface area. Coincident with the increases in absolute abundance, rhamnose and mannose increased as a fraction of the total carbohydrate yield in concert with surface area, indicating these monomers were preferentially represented in carbohydrates associated with surfaces. Lignin oxidation product yields varied with surface area when normalized to organic carbon, suggesting that the terrestrially-derived component may be diluted by sorption of marine derived material. Lignin-based parameters suggest a separate source for terrestrially derived material associated with sand-size material as opposed to that associated with silts and clays. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. Metal concentrations in sediments and clams in four Moroccan estuaries.

    PubMed

    Cheggour, M; Chafik, A; Fisher, N S; Benbrahim, S

    2005-03-01

    Metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, Mn and Fe) were analyzed seasonally over three years in sediments and in tissues of the clam Scrobicularia plana in four Moroccan Atlantic estuaries: Loukkos, Sebou, Bou Regreg and Oum er Rbia. Of these metals, Cd was at the lowest concentrations in sediment. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, and to a lesser extent Ni, in sediments suggest greater contamination in Sebou and Bou Regreg than in the other estuaries. The fluctuations of Mn and Fe concentrations in the fine surface sediments reflect their continental origin and show seasonal variations that indicate soil run-off following rain events. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, and especially Ni in clam tissues in these estuaries were generally higher than in some other common bioindicator bivalve species. The seasonal variations in S. plana's tissue metal concentrations are linked to patterns of reproductive activity for all metals except Cd and possibly Zn, whose tissue concentrations may be regulated. Mn and Fe concentrations in S. plana were positively correlated to sediment levels of these metals.

  18. Isopycnic sedimentation of DNA in metrizamide: the effect of low concentrations of ions on buoyant density and hydration.

    PubMed

    Birnie, G D; MacPhail, E; Rickwood, D

    1974-07-01

    Metrizamide, an inert, non-ionic organic compound, dissolves in water to give a dense solution in which DNA bands isopycnically at a density corresponding to that of fully hydrated DNA. Density-gradient centrifugation in solutions of metrizamide has been used to determine the effects of very dilute solutions of salts on the buoyant density of native and denatured DNA. It has been shown that the buoyant density of DNA is dependent on both the counter-cation and the anion present. Interpretation of the data in terms of the degree of hydration of the macromolecule indicates that (i), NaDNA is more highly hydrated than CsDNA; and (ii), the hydration of NaDNA varies with anion in the order sulphate< fluoride< chloride< bromide< iodide. It is suggested that isopycnic centrifugation in metrizamide is a simple method for determining the effects of salts (and other small molecules) on the hydration of nucleic acids under conditions of high ratios of salt to DNA (> 5 x 10(3) moles/mole) while high (0.999) water activity is maintained.

  19. Heavy metal concentrations and toxicity in water and sediment from stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Kristin; Viklander, Maria; Scholes, Lian; Revitt, Mike

    2010-06-15

    Sedimentation is a widely used technique in structural best management practices to remove pollutants from stormwater. However, concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants. This study has concentrated on stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks and reports on the accumulated metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and the associated toxicity to the bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The metal concentrations are compared with guidelines and the toxicity results are assessed in relation to samples for which metal concentrations either exceed or conform to these values. The water phase metal concentrations were highest in the ponds whereas the sedimentation tanks exhibited a distinct decrease towards the outlet. However, none of the water samples demonstrated toxicity even though the concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn exceeded the threshold values for the compared guidelines. The facilities with higher traffic intensities had elevated sediment concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn which increased towards the outlet for the sedimentation tanks in agreement with the highest percentage of fine particles. The sediments in both treatment facilities exhibited the expected toxic responses in line with their affinity for heavy metals but the role of organic carbon content is highlighted.

  20. Converting near-bottom OBS measurements into suspended sediment concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    A method of estimating the mass proportion of nonhomogeneous sediment constituents in suspension is presented. This method provides a more accurate conversion of OBS measurements (volts) to suspended sediment concentrations (grams per liter). Given a set of calibration coefficients of end-members, the method allows one to obtain the spatially and temporally varying in situ coefficients that are used in the conversion. Field and/or laboratory experiments are needed to verify the method.

  1. Importance of interactions between the water column and the sediment for microbial concentrations in streams.

    PubMed

    Rehmann, Chris R; Soupir, Michelle L

    2009-10-01

    The effect of interactions between the sediment and water column on concentrations of microbes in streams is quantified with a one-dimensional, steady state model. The effects of nine main parameters describing the flow, sediment transport, and microbial growth and decay are encapsulated in two dimensionless parameters: the Damköhler number Da, or the ratio of the time scales of advection and net growth, and the sediment interaction parameter S, or the ratio of the amount of microbes lost or gained in the sediment and the amount of microbes lost or gained in the water column. Applications of the model illustrate the importance of the sediment and identify parameters that require further study. The model predicts the field measurements of Jamieson et al. (2005b) within a factor of 2 in two of three cases, while concentrations predicted by ignoring the sediment exceed the measured values. In general, the effects of ignoring interactions with the sediment depend on Da and S. The loading predicted to meet water quality standards when the sediment is considered can be either greater than or less than the loading predicted when it is not considered. The applications of the model and an analysis of uncertainty suggest that further work on the settling velocity, attached fraction, resuspension rate, and net growth rate in the sediment would help to improve predictions of the fate and transport of microbes.

  2. Effect of environmental setting on sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentrations in Albemarle-Pamlico drainage basin, North Carolina and Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, G.; Harned, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Environmental settings were defined, through an overlay process, as areas of coincidence between categories of three mapped variables - land use, surficial geology, and soil drainage characteristics. Expert judgment was used in selecting factors thought to influence sediment and nutrient concentrations in the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage area. This study's findings support the hypothesis that environmental settings defined using these three variables can explain variations in the concentration of certain sediment and nutrient constituents. This finding underscores the importance of developing watershed management plans that account for differences associated with the mosaic of natural and anthropogenic factors that define a basin's environmental setting. At least in the case of sediment and nutrients in the Albemarle-Pamlico region, a watershed management plan that focuses only on anthropogenic factors, such as point-source discharges, and does not account for natural characteristics of a watershed and the influences of these characteristics on water quality, may lead to water-quality goals that are over- or underprotective of key environmental features and to a misallocation of the resources available for environmental protection.

  3. Terrigenous transportation to the Okinawa Trough and the influence of typhoons on suspended sediment concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Changwei; Jiang, Wensheng; Song, Dehai

    2010-06-01

    The source and transport mechanisms of land-derived Okinawa Trough sediments were studied using the field data of temperature, salinity and turbidity in the East China Seas. The results suggest that there are two primary sediments sources from the Chinese Mainland to the Okinawa Trough: one is the Old Huanghe River submarine delta, and the other is the Changjiang River sediments, which are distributed at the Changjiang River estuary and the off-coast of Zhejiang and Fujian provinces. It is difficult for the Huanghe River suspended sediments to arrive in the Okinawa Trough via the new estuary. Although the Taiwan warm current blocks the seaward terrigenous transportation to a certain extent, part of the coastal suspended sediments are transported to the outer shelf. Suspended particulate matter is unable to get through the barrier of the Kuroshio Current under normal conditions. However, episodic events, such as winter storms, internal-tidal waves and turbidity flows, are capable of transporting suspended particulate matter into the Okinawa Trough. The super typhoon "Ewiniar" induced strong waves and influenced the thermocline depth and suspended sediment concentration of the East China Seas. The typhoon-induced waves pushed the thermocline depth down to around 40 m and caused the resuspension of large volumes of sediments in its path. In the other East China Seas regions, the typhoon-induced swells deepened the thermocline depth by about 5 m and increased suspended sediment concentrations. The typhoon effect on suspended sediment concentration of the East China Seas disappeared within 2 weeks.

  4. Utilizing Turbidity and Measurements of Suspended Sediment Concentrations to Better Understand Sediment Transport within Urban Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, T. M.; Napieralski, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Rouge River watershed in Southeast Michigan is an urban watershed, which has been exposed to more than 100 years of anthropogenic activities related to industrialization and urbanization. This urbanization has degraded water quality by increasing erosion and altering the transport mechanism and chemistry of bed and suspended sediments. This study aims to explore the relationship between development within the Lower Rouge watershed and watershed hydrology through an examination of USGS discharge data, stream water quality and suspended sediment loads during storm and base flow. Two YSI dataloggers are used to continuously measure water quality parameters during baseflow and storm events (varying hydrologic conditions), including: turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, salinity, total dissolved solids, and temperature. Depth-integrated sediment samples are collected and analyzed for sediment concentration using Imhoff cones and filtration methods. Correlations between discharge weighted continuous turbidity measurements and discharge weighted suspended sediment samples are used to estimate sediment loads; essentially, turbidity readings and measured sediment concentrations form a near-linear relationship. In addition, sediment samples are analyzed for inorganic heavy metal contaminants common to Southeast Michigan to characterize both suspended sediments and sediments frequently deposited on adjacent floodplains. These metals (i.e. Lead, Copper, Chromium, Nickle) are commonly known as the “Michigan Metals” and represent indicator species of mobilized and deposited contaminants associated with urbanization and industrialization. The results will provide a baseline for better understanding the transport and fate of contaminated sediments within the Rouge watershed, as well as guide ongoing development and management practices along the Rouge River.

  5. The effects of sediment and mercury mobilization in the South Yuba River and Humbug Creek Confluence Area, Nevada County, California: Concentrations, speciation, and environmental fate-Part 1: Field characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, Jacob A.; Alpers, Charles N.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Hothem, Roger L.; Wright, Scott A.; Ellett, Kevin; Beaulieu, Elizabeth; Agee, Jennifer L.; Kakouros, Evangelos; Kieu, Le H.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Blum, Alex E.; May, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Millions of pounds of mercury (Hg) were deposited in the river and stream channels of the Sierra Nevada from placer and hard-rock mining operations in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The resulting contaminated sediments are relatively harmless when buried and isolated from the overlying aquatic environment. The entrained Hg in the sediment constitutes a potential risk to human and ecosystem health should it be reintroduced to the actively cycling portion of the aquatic system, where it can become methylated and subsequently bioaccumulated in the food web. Each year, sediment is mobilized within these fluvial systems during high stormflows, transporting hundreds of tons of Hg-laden sediment downstream. The State of California and resource-management agencies, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service, are concerned about additional disturbances, such as from suction gold dredging activities, which have the potential to mobilize Hg associated with buried sediment layers elevated in Hg that are otherwise likely to remain buried under normal storm conditions. The BLM initiated a study looking at the feasibility of removing Hg-contaminated sediment at the confluence of the South Yuba River and Humbug Creek in the northern Sierra Nevada of California by using standard suction-dredge technology. Additionally, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) supported a comprehensive characterization of the intended dredge site. Together, the BLM and SWRCB supported a comprehensive characterization of Hg contamination at the site and the potential effects of sediment disturbance at locations with historical hydraulic mining debris on downstream environments. The comprehensive study consisted of two primary components: field studies and laboratory experiments. The field component, described in this report, had several study elements: 1) a preliminary, small-scale, in-stream dredge test; 2) comprehensive characterization of grain

  6. Dietary assimilation of cadmium associated with bacterial exopolymer sediment coatings by the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus: Effects of Cd concentration and salinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlekat, C.E.; Decho, Alan W.; Chandler, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial extracellular substances (also known as exopolysaccharides, or EPS) may serve as vectors for trophic transfer of metals in benthic systems because these ubiquitous sediment coatings can sorb high concentrations of toxic metals, and because many benthic invertebrates assimilate EPS sediment coatings upon ingestion. We conducted 3 sets of experiments to determine the assimilative bioavailability of EPS-associated Cd to the benthic amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus as a function of Cd concentration and salinity. Bioavailability was measured as L. plumulosus Cd assimilation efficiency (AE) from EPS-coated silica (EPS-Si) and from uncoated silica (NC-Si) using modified pulse-chase methods with the gamma-emitting radioisotope 109Cd. Cd AE was significantly greater from NC-Si than from EPS-Si at 7.5???, but not at 2.5 or 25???. Overall, Cd AE from EPS-Si was between 15.1 and 21.5%. Because EPS-Si sorbed more Cd than NC-Si, EPS coatings magnified the amount of Cd amphipods accumulated at each salinity by up to a factor of 10. Salinity did not directly affect Cd AE from EPS-Si, but because Cd-EPS partitioning increased with decreasing salinity, amphipods accumulated more Cd from EPS at the lowest Cd-EPS incubation salinity (2.5 ???) than at higher salinities (7.5 and 25 ???). Finally, Cd concentration in EPS exhibited an inverse relationship with Cd AE at 2.5 ???, but not at 25 ???. Specifically, Cd AE was 12 times greater at 1 compared with 10 ??g Cd ??g-1 EPS. Together, these results show that estuarine benthos can accumulate Cd from EPS sediment coatings, but that the degree to which this phenomenon occurs is dependent upon seawater salinity and Cd concentration in EPS.

  7. Persistent chlordane concentrations in long island sound sediment: Implications from chlordane, 210Pb, and 137Cs profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, L.; Li, X.; Crusius, J.; Jans, U.; Melcer, M.E.; Zhang, P.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of chlordane, a banned termiticide and pesticide, were examined in recently collected surficial sediment (10 sites) and sediment cores (4 sites) in Long Island Sound (LIS).The highest chlordane concentrations were observed in western LIS, near highly urbanized areas. Chlordane concentrations did not decrease significantly in the past decade when compared to the data collected in 1996, consistent with the observation of near-constant chlordane levels in blue mussel tissues collected during the same time period. Chlordane concentrations in many of the sites exceeded levels above which harmful effects on sediment-dwelling organisms are expected to frequently occur. Chlordane concentrations in two of the four sediment cores showed a peak below the sediment surface, suggesting reduced chlordane inputs in recent years. The lack of a chlordane concentration maximum below the sediment surface in the other two cores, coupled with the lack of a well-defined 137Cs peak, indicated significant sediment mixing. Simulations of 137Cs and 210Pb profiles in sediment cores with a simple sediment-mixing model were used to constrain both the deposition rate and the bioturbation rate of the sediment. Simulations of the chlordane profiles indicated continued chlordane input to LIS long after chlordane was phased out in the U.S. Continued chlordane input and significant sediment mixing may have contributed to the persistent chlordane concentrations in surficial sediment, which poses long-term threats to benthic organisms in LIS.

  8. Persistent chlordane concentrations in Long Island Sound sediment: implications from chlordane, 210Pb, and 137Cs profiles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijia; Li, Xiqing; Crusius, John; Jans, Urs; Melcer, Michael E; Zhang, Pengfei

    2007-11-15

    Concentrations of chlordane, a banned termiticide and pesticide, were examined in recently collected surficial sediment (10 sites) and sediment cores (4 sites) in Long Island Sound (LIS). The highest chlordane concentrations were observed in western LIS, near highly urbanized areas. Chlordane concentrations did not decrease significantly in the past decade when compared to the data collected in 1996, consistent with the observation of near-constant chlordane levels in blue mussel tissues collected during the same time period. Chlordane concentrations in many of the sites exceeded levels above which harmful effects on sediment-dwelling organisms are expected to frequently occur. Chlordane concentrations in two of the four sediment cores showed a peak below the sediment surface, suggesting reduced chlordane inputs in recent years. The lack of a chlordane concentration maximum below the sediment surface in the other two cores, coupled with the lack of a well-defined 137Cs peak, indicated significant sediment mixing. Simulations of 137Cs and 210Pb profiles in sediment cores with a simple sediment-mixing model were used to constrain both the deposition rate and the bioturbation rate of the sediment. Simulations of the chlordane profiles indicated continued chlordane input to LIS long after chlordane was phased out in the U.S. Continued chlordane input and significant sediment mixing may have contributed to the persistent chlordane concentrations in surficial sediment, which poses long-term threats to benthic organisms in LIS.

  9. Suspended-sediment concentrations during dam decommissioning in the Elwha River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Duda, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, the National Park Service commenced the incremental removal of two century-old dams along the Elwha River, Washington, in order to restore ecological and sediment-delivery processes (U.S. Department of the Interior, 1996; Duda and others, 2008, 2011; Curran and others, 2009). Elwha Dam (32-m high; 8 km from the Strait of Juan de Fuca) was completed in 1913, and Glines Canyon Dam (64-m high; 22 km from the Strait of Juan de Fuca) was completed in 1927 (fig. 1). Elwha Dam formed Lake Aldwell and Glines Canyon Dam formed Lake Mills. During the decommissioning period, each dam was notched from the top down in progressive steps to allow a metered release of sediment to downstream river reaches (Randle and others, 1996; Randle and Bountry, 2010; Czuba and others, 2011). Throughout the project, decommissioning was periodically ceased (termed “deconstruction hold periods”) to reduce effects of increased sediment concentration on migrating fish or to accomplish sediment-transport management targets (U.S. Department of the Interior, 1996; Czuba and others, 2011). Dam decommissioning started in September 2011 with both dams. Elwha Dam was completely removed by April 2012, which permitted unregulated release of sediment trapped in Lake Aldwell. Lake Mills Reservoir ceased to exist in autumn 2012 as the prograding delta of sediment in the reservoir finally abutted the lowered Glines Canyon Dam structure. In cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was asked to measure turbidity and calculate suspended-sediment concentrations in the lower Elwha River during the dam-decommissioning and river-restoration project. During the project, USGS operated a turbidity sensor at a water-quality monitoring station in the lower Elwha River (fig. 1), which collected data at 15-min increments. The USGS also collected suspended-sediment samples from the lower Elwha River about 380 m downstream of the

  10. Accurate determination of the sedimentation flux of concentrated suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Rakotomalala, N.; Salin, D.

    1995-10-01

    Flow rate jumps are used to generate propagating concentration variations in a counterflow stabilized suspension (a liquid fluidized bed). An acoustic technique is used to measure accurately the resulting concentration profiles through the bed. Depending on the experimental conditions, we have observed self-sharpening, or/and self-spreading concentration fronts. Our data are analyzed in the framework of Kynch's theory, providing an accurate determination of the sedimentation flux [CU(C); U(C) is the hindered sedimentation velocity of the suspension] and its derivatives in the concentration range 30%-60%. In the vicinity of the packing concentration, controlling the flow rate has allowed us to increase the maximum packing up to 60%.

  11. Particle sedimentation monitoring in high-concentration slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Yoshihiro; Kato, Zenji; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the sedimentation states of particles in high-concentration slurries were elucidated by monitoring their internal states. We prepared transparent high-concentration silica slurries by adjusting the refractive index of the aqueous glycerol liquid in which the particles were dispersed to match that of the silica particles. In addition, a fluorescent dye was dissolved in the liquid. Then, we directly observed the individual and flocculated particles in the slurries during sedimentation by confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy. The particles were found to sediment very slowly while exhibiting fluctuating motion. The particle sedimentation rate in the high-concentration slurry with the aqueous glycerol solution (η =0.068 Pa. s ) and a particle volume fraction on the order of 0.3 was determined to be 1.58 ± 0.66 μ m. min-1 on the basis of the obtained image sequences for 24.9 h. In-situ observation provides a large amount of information about the sedimentation behavior of particles in condensed matter.

  12. Estimation of suspended sediment flux in streams using continuous turbidity and flow data coupled with laboratory concentrations

    Treesearch

    Jack Lewis

    2002-01-01

    The widening use of sediment surrogate measurements such as turbidity necessitates consideration of new methods for estimating sediment flux. Generally, existing methods can be simply be used in new ways. The effectiveness of a method varies according to the quality of the surrogate data and its relation to suspended sediment concentration (SSC). For this discussion,...

  13. Tidal variations in suspended sediment concentration in the Ems estuary: origin and resulting sediment flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Kreeke, J.; Day, C. M.; Mulder, H. P. J.

    1997-12-01

    Variations in suspended sediment concentration, having frequencies of M2 and higher, were examined using observations at four elevations and extending over a period of eight M2 tidal cycles. Most of the variance in the concentration records was at the M2, M4, M6, M8 and M10 frequencies. For the higher elevations the major contribution was at the M4 frequency. The energy at the M2 frequency was the result of the water columns passing the measurement station carrying larger volumes of sediment during ebb than during flood. Energy at the M4, M6, M8 and M10 frequencies was related to (1) corresponding energies in the time series of the vertical mixing strength (local current speed) and (2) nonlinear interactions between time dependent settling velocities and concentration and time dependent mixing strength and concentration. For periods smaller than 2 h, variations in concentration and mixing strength took on a stochastic nature. Disregarding the contribution of the mean concentration and velocity, at the lower elevations the major contribution to the net (over the eight tidal cycles) sediment flux was from the M2 variations in concentration and velocity. At the higher elevations, variations at the M2, M4, M6-M10 frequency contributed equally to the net sediment flux. High frequency (>0.5 h -1) fluctuations contributed little to the net flux.

  14. Evaluation of bleach-sedimentation for sterilising and concentrating Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum specimens.

    PubMed

    Chew, Rusheng; Calderón, Carmen; Schumacher, Samuel G; Sherman, Jonathan M; Caviedes, Luz; Fuentes, Patricia; Coronel, Jorge; Valencia, Teresa; Hererra, Beatriz; Zimic, Mirko; Huaroto, Lucy; Sabogal, Ivan; Escombe, A Rod; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2011-10-11

    Bleach-sedimentation may improve microscopy for diagnosing tuberculosis by sterilising sputum and concentrating Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We studied gravity bleach-sedimentation effects on safety, sensitivity, speed and reliability of smear-microscopy. This blinded, controlled study used sputum specimens (n = 72) from tuberculosis patients. Bleach concentrations and exposure times required to sterilise sputum (n = 31) were determined. In the light of these results, the performance of 5 gravity bleach-sedimentation techniques that sterilise sputum specimens (n = 16) were compared. The best-performing of these bleach-sedimentation techniques involved adding 1 volume of 5% bleach to 1 volume of sputum, shaking for 10-minutes, diluting in 8 volumes distilled water and sedimenting overnight before microscopy. This technique was further evaluated by comparing numbers of visible acid-fast bacilli, slide-reading speed and reliability for triplicate smears before versus after bleach-sedimentation of sputum specimens (n = 25). Triplicate smears were made to increase precision and were stained using the Ziehl-Neelsen method. M. tuberculosis in sputum was successfully sterilised by adding equal volumes of 15% bleach for 1-minute, 6% for 5-minutes or 3% for 20-minutes. Bleach-sedimentation significantly decreased the number of acid-fast bacilli visualised compared with conventional smears (geometric mean of acid-fast bacilli per 100 microscopy fields 166, 95%CI 68-406, versus 346, 95%CI 139-862, respectively; p = 0.02). Bleach-sedimentation diluted paucibacillary specimens less than specimens with higher concentrations of visible acid-fast bacilli (p = 0.02). Smears made from bleach-sedimented sputum were read more rapidly than conventional smears (9.6 versus 11.2 minutes, respectively, p = 0.03). Counting conventional acid-fast bacilli had high reliability (inter-observer agreement, r = 0.991) that was significantly reduced (p = 0.03) by bleach-sedimentation (to r = 0

  15. Evaluation of bleach-sedimentation for sterilising and concentrating Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum specimens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bleach-sedimentation may improve microscopy for diagnosing tuberculosis by sterilising sputum and concentrating Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We studied gravity bleach-sedimentation effects on safety, sensitivity, speed and reliability of smear-microscopy. Methods This blinded, controlled study used sputum specimens (n = 72) from tuberculosis patients. Bleach concentrations and exposure times required to sterilise sputum (n = 31) were determined. In the light of these results, the performance of 5 gravity bleach-sedimentation techniques that sterilise sputum specimens (n = 16) were compared. The best-performing of these bleach-sedimentation techniques involved adding 1 volume of 5% bleach to 1 volume of sputum, shaking for 10-minutes, diluting in 8 volumes distilled water and sedimenting overnight before microscopy. This technique was further evaluated by comparing numbers of visible acid-fast bacilli, slide-reading speed and reliability for triplicate smears before versus after bleach-sedimentation of sputum specimens (n = 25). Triplicate smears were made to increase precision and were stained using the Ziehl-Neelsen method. Results M. tuberculosis in sputum was successfully sterilised by adding equal volumes of 15% bleach for 1-minute, 6% for 5-minutes or 3% for 20-minutes. Bleach-sedimentation significantly decreased the number of acid-fast bacilli visualised compared with conventional smears (geometric mean of acid-fast bacilli per 100 microscopy fields 166, 95%CI 68-406, versus 346, 95%CI 139-862, respectively; p = 0.02). Bleach-sedimentation diluted paucibacillary specimens less than specimens with higher concentrations of visible acid-fast bacilli (p = 0.02). Smears made from bleach-sedimented sputum were read more rapidly than conventional smears (9.6 versus 11.2 minutes, respectively, p = 0.03). Counting conventional acid-fast bacilli had high reliability (inter-observer agreement, r = 0.991) that was significantly reduced (p = 0.03) by bleach-sedimentation

  16. An evaluation of sediment rating curves for estimating suspended sediment concentrations for subsequent flux calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of actual suspended sediment concentration (SSC) measurements, hydrologists have used sediment rating (sediment transport) curves to estimate (predict) SSCs for subsequent flux calculations. Various evaluations of the sediment rating-curve method were made using data from long-term, daily sediment-measuring sites within large (>1 000 000 km2), medium ( 1000 km2), and small (<1000 km2) river basins in the USA and Europe relative to the estimation of suspended sediment fluxes. The evaluations address such issues as the accuracy of flux estimations for various levels of temporal resolution as well as the impact of sampling frequency on the magnitude of flux estimation errors. The sediment rating-curve method tends to underpredict high, and overpredict low SSCs. As such, the range of errors associated with concomitant flux estimates for relatively short time-frames (e.g. daily, weekly) are likely to be substantially larger than those associated with longer time-frames (e.g. quarterly, annually) because the over- and underpredictions do not have sufficient time to balance each other. Hence, when error limits must be kept under ??20%, temporal resolution probably should be limited to quarterly or greater. The evaluations indicate that over periods of 20 or more years, errors of <1% can be achieved using a single sediment rating curve based on data spanning the entire period. However, somewhat better estimates for the entire period, and markedly better annual estimates within the period, can be obtained if individual annual sediment rating curves are used instead. Relatively accurate (errors sediment fluxes can be obtained from hydrologically based monthly measurements/samples. For 5-year periods or longer, similar results can be obtained from measurements/samples collected once every 2 months. In either case, hydrologically based sampling, as opposed to calendar-based sampling is likely to limit the magnitude of flux estimation

  17. Surficial sediment erodibility from time-series measurements of suspended sediment concentrations: development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Rooni; Winterwerp, Johan C.

    2017-06-01

    Numerical models of fine sediment transport depend on different approaches to parameterize the erosion properties of surficial sediment strata. These properties, namely the critical shear stress for erosion and the erosion rate coefficient, are crucial for reproducing the short-term and long-term sediment dynamics of the system. Methods to parameterize these properties involve either specialized laboratory measurements on sediment samples or optimization by model calibration. Based on observations of regular patterns in the variation of suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) over the tidal cycle in a small, narrow estuary, an alternate approach, referred to as the entrainment flux method, for quantifying the erosion properties of surficial bed strata is formulated and applied. The results of this method are shown to be analogous to the erosion data used to formulate the standard linear erosion formulation developed by various authors. The erosion properties inferred from the entrainment flux method are also compared to direct measurements of erodibility on sediment samples from the same site using the Gust microcosm apparatus. The favorable comparison of the two approaches suggests that the entrainment flux method can be used to infer and quantify the erodibility of surficial sediment strata in similar small and narrow estuaries. This method has certain advantages, chiefly its ease of implementation and the fact that it uses SSC time series which would typically be expected to be available for the study of or for model application at a given site. Guidelines for selecting the appropriate dataset for the application of the method are also presented.

  18. Acetate concentrations and oxidation in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Acetate concentrations and rates of acetate oxidation and sulfate reduction were measured in S. alterniflora sediments in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Pore water extracted from cores by squeezing or centrifugation contained in greater than 0.1 mM acetate and, in some instances, greater than 1.0 mM. Pore water sampled nondestructively contained much less acetate, often less than 0.01 mM. Acetate was associated with roots, and concentrations varied with changes in plant physiology. Acetate turnover was very low whether whole core or slurry incubations were used. Radiotracers injected directly into soils yielded rates of sulfate reduction and acetate oxidation not significantly different from core incubation techniques. Regardless of incubation method, acetate oxidation did not account for a substantial percentage of sulfate reduction. These results differ markedly from data for unvegetated coastal sediments where acetate levels are low, oxidation rate constants are high, and acetate oxication rates greatly exceed rates of sulfate reduction. The discrepancy between rates of acetate oxidation and sulfate reduction in these marsh soils may be due either to the utilization of substrates other than acetate by sulfate reducers or artifacts associated with measurements of organic utilization by rhizosphere bacteria. Care must be taken when interpreting data from salt marsh sediments since the release of material from roots during coring may affect the concentrations of certain compounds as well as influencing results obtained when sediment incubations are employed.

  19. The effects of oil exploration and production in the Fladen Ground: composition and concentration of hydrocarbons in sediment samples collected during 2001 and their comparison with sediment samples collected in 1989.

    PubMed

    Russell, M; Webster, L; Walsham, P; Packer, G; Dalgarno, E J; McIntosh, A D; Moffat, C F

    2005-06-01

    Due to the potentially accumulative nature of the Fladen Ground, an area of intense oil activity in the North Sea, a survey was carried out in 1989 to map the distribution of contamination in relation to these oil activities. All the sediments collected were screened by ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and selected samples were analysed for n-alkanes (by GC-FID), PAHs and biomarkers (by GC-MSD). This survey was repeated in 2001, with all the 1989 sites being resampled. All of these sediments were analysed for UVF oil equivalents, PAHs, n-alkanes and biomarkers. The concentrations of these parameters decreased between 1989 and 2001, with average decreases ranging from 43% to 88%. In addition, no significant difference was found, for all the parameters, between near field (<5 km from an oil installation) and far field (>5 km from an oil installation) sites in 2001 indicating that the Fladen Ground is approaching a 'steady state' or background concentration for contamination.

  20. Understanding coastal morphodynamic patterns from depth-averaged sediment concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, F.; Falqués, A.; de Swart, H. E.; Dodd, N.; Garnier, R.; Calvete, D.

    2015-06-01

    This review highlights the important role of the depth-averaged sediment concentration (DASC) to understand the formation of a number of coastal morphodynamic features that have an alongshore rhythmic pattern: beach cusps, surf zone transverse and crescentic bars, and shoreface-connected sand ridges. We present a formulation and methodology, based on the knowledge of the DASC (which equals the sediment load divided by the water depth), that has been successfully used to understand the characteristics of these features. These sand bodies, relevant for coastal engineering and other disciplines, are located in different parts of the coastal zone and are characterized by different spatial and temporal scales, but the same technique can be used to understand them. Since the sand bodies occur in the presence of depth-averaged currents, the sediment transport approximately equals a sediment load times the current. Moreover, it is assumed that waves essentially mobilize the sediment, and the current increases this mobilization and advects the sediment. In such conditions, knowing the spatial distribution of the DASC and the depth-averaged currents induced by the forcing (waves, wind, and pressure gradients) over the patterns allows inferring the convergence/divergence of sediment transport. Deposition (erosion) occurs where the current flows from areas of high to low (low to high) values of DASC. The formulation and methodology are especially useful to understand the positive feedback mechanisms between flow and morphology leading to the formation of those morphological features, but the physical mechanisms for their migration, their finite-amplitude behavior and their decay can also be explored.

  1. Metal concentrations in surface sediments of Boston Harbor: Changes with time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Buchholtz ten Brink, M.; Manheim, F. T.

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of metals in surface sediments of Boston Harbor have decreased during the period 1977–1993. This conclusion is supported by analysis of: (1) surface sediments collected at monitoring stations in the outer harbor between 1977 and 1993; (2) metal concentration profiles in sediment cores from depositional areas of the harbor; and (3) historical data from a contaminated-sediment database, which includes information on metal and organic contaminants and sediment texture. The background and matrix-corrected concentrations of lead (Pb) measured in the surficial layer (0–2 cm) of cores decreased by an average of 46%±12% among four locations in the outer harbor during the 16 y period. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), silver (Ag), and zinc (Zn) exhibited similar trends. Results from our sediment sampling are supported by historical data that were compiled from diverse sources into a regional sediment database. This sediment database contains approximately 3000 samples; of these, about 460 samples were collected and analyzed for Cu, Hg, or Zn and many other sediment parameters in Boston Harbor surface sediments between 1971–1993. The database indicates that the concentrations of these three metals also decreased with time in Boston’s Inner Harbor. The decreases in metal concentrations that are observed in more recent years parallel a general decrease in the flux of metals to the harbor, implemented by: (1) ending the sewage sludge discharge to the Harbor in December, 1991; (2) greater source reduction (e.g. recovery of silver from photographic processing) and closing or moving of industries; (3) improvements in wastewater handling and sewage treatment; and (4) diminishing use of lead in gasoline beginning about 1973. Despite the general decrease in metal concentrations in Boston Harbor surface sediments, the concentrations of Ag and Hg measured at some outer harbor stations in 1993 were still at, or above, the level associated with

  2. Geochemical controls on lead concentrations in stream water and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium distribution of lead in solution and adsorbed on cation exchange sites in sediment theoretically may be calculated from equations representing selectivities of substrate for lead over H+, Ca2+ and Na+, and the stabilities of lead solute species. Such calculations include consideration of total concentrations of major ions, cation exchange capacity (CEC) of substrate, and pH, at values expected in various natural systems. Measurements of CEC and selectivity coefficients were made for synthetic halloysite, a finely divided amorphous 1:1 clay prepared by precipitation from a mixture of solutions of aluminum and silica. Where suspended sediment having the same properties is present in concentrations of 10-1,000 mg/1 at pH 6-8, more than 90% of the lead present can be adsorbed on sediment surfaces. The cation exchange behavior of lead and other minor cationic species in natural systems could be predicted by this type of model if enough other supporting information were available. Information of the type needed describing natural stream sediments, however, is presently inadequate for accurate predictions. ?? 1976.

  3. Mercury concentrations in Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) and sediments in the Columbia River basin.

    PubMed

    Linley, Timothy; Krogstad, Eirik; Mueller, Robert; Gill, Gary; Lasorsa, Brenda

    2016-10-01

    The accumulation of mercury was investigated in Pacific lamprey and stream sediments in the Columbia River basin. Mercury concentrations in larval lamprey differed significantly among sample locations (p < 0.001) and were correlated with concentrations in sediments (r(2)  = 0.83). Adult concentrations were highly variable (range, 0.1-9.5 μg/g) and unrelated to holding time after collection. The results suggest that Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River basin may be exposed to mercury levels that have adverse ecological effects. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2571-2576. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  4. Rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium distribution coefficients of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium sorption were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium chemical transport properties of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine the rate of strontium sorption and strontium distribution coefficients (K(d)s) between aqueous and solid phases. Rate experiments indicate that strontium in solution reached an apparent equilibrium with the sediment in 26 h. K(d)s were derived using the linear isotherm model at initial sodium concentrations from 100 to 5,000 mg/l and initial potassium concentrations from 2 to 150 mg/l. K(d)s ranged from 56 ?? 2 to 62 ?? 3 ml/g at initial aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium equal to or less than 300 and 150 mg/l, respectively. K(d)s hinged from 4.7 ?? 0.2 to 19 ?? 1 ml/g with initial aqueous concentrations of sodium between 1,000 and 5,000 mg/l. These data indicate that sodium concentrations greater than 300 mg/l in wastewater increase the availability of strontium for transport beneath waste disposal ponds at the INEL by decreasing strontium sorption on the surficial sediment. Wastewater concentrations of sodium and potassium less than 300 and 150 mg/l, respectively, have little effect on the availability of strontium for transport.The rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium sorption were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium chemical transport properties of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine the rate of strontium sorption and strontium distribution coefficients (Kds) between aqueous and solid phases. Rate experiments indicate that strontium in solution reached an apparent equilibrium with the sediment in 26

  5. Multispectral Remotely Sensed Model for Assessment of Suspended Sediment Concentration in Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Asif; Nasu, Seigo; Takagi, Masataka

    Soil erosion is a widespread problem causing the deterioration of both land and water resources. The water quality and quantity "Q and Q" connection is vital for sustainable water resources development and management. The prime objective of the research work is to quantify suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters by means of ALOS and ASTER satellite data. In this research work multispectral data and optical modeling is integrated to cope with lack of ground truth data. Modeling and monitoring of suspended sediment in water bodies is complex owing to many influencing parameters. Remote sensing makes it possible to monitor the water bodies effectively and efficiently and is most successfully used as part of a multidisciplinary approach to addressing natural resource questions. The strong relationship between suspended sediments and water surface reflectance leads to develop the efficient and effective algorithms for suspended sediments assessment in water bodies. Reflectance of ALOSAVNIR-2 Band 3 and Band 4 and ASTER Band 3B and Band 2 was found to be the best predictor of suspended sediment concentration in surface waters. The developed model and monitoring system is a useful practical tool for monitoring suspended sediments on seasonal bases and during floods. The research work demonstrates the feasibility of remotely sensed data for monitoring of suspended sediments in water bodies with and without ground truth data.

  6. Priming effects in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontikaki, Evina; Thornton, Barry; Witte, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Continental margin sediments (<2000 m) cover merely 15 % of the ocean's seafloor but are responsible for more than 70 % of the global benthic mineralization. Understanding when these systems act as a source or sink of carbon (C) is thus of primary importance if we are to produce reliable global C budgets and predict the effects of future perturbations on the global C cycle. The chemical nature of organic matter (OM) is thought to be one of the major controls on the degradation/preservation balance in sediments; labile and refractory OM pools degrade at different rates but not independently. Priming effects (PE), i.e. changes in the decomposition of refractory organic matter following inputs of labile OM, have the potential to alter the C budget in sediments but have been largely ignored by marine scientists. Climate-driven changes in primary production, and land erosion and run-off are likely to change the quantity and composition of organic matter inputs in marine ecosystems and influence the magnitude and direction of PEs in seawater and sediments. Here, we attempt to evaluate the importance of priming effects on C cycling in marine sediments by use of labelled substrates of different quantity and quality in stable isotope tracer experiments and argue that PEs need to be incorporated in global change models.

  7. Radioisotope Concentration in Lake Sediments of Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, A. Rangel; Viloria, T.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Palacios, D.

    2007-10-26

    Maracaibo Lake is one of the most important water basing and oil producing regions in Venezuela. Changes in the local environment have been monitored for chemical pollution in the past. For this study we selected a set of sediment samples collected in the shore and analyzed for its radioisotope content. Results show the gamma emitting isotopes distribution. Isotopes concentrations have been determined within the natural K, Th and U families.

  8. Evaluation of suspended sediment concentrations, sediment fluxes and sediment depositions along a reservoir by using laser diffraction and acoustic backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizano, Laura; Haun, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The construction of dams and reservoirs disturb the natural morphological behavior of rivers. A natural settling effect occurs due to the reduced turbulences and flow velocities. As a consequence, reservoirs fill up with sediments which results in a reduction of storage volume, influences the operation of hydropower plants and leads in several cases to flood protection problems. The sediment depositions in reservoirs are standardly evaluated by using bathymetric data, obtained by a single beam sonar from pre-defined cross sections or by an extensive evaluation of the reservoir bed by a side scan sonar. However, a disadvantage of this method is that it is not possible to evaluate the pore water content of the depositions, which may lead as consequence to an uncertainty in the measured amount of deposited sediments. Given that a major part of sediments entering reservoirs are transported in suspension, sediment flux measurements along defined transects could give more reliable information on the settled amount of sediments and additional information on the sediment transport mechanism within the reservoir. An evaluation of the sediment fluxes is in practice often conducted by a single suspended sediment concentration (SSC) measurement in combination with a cross sectional calibration factor to take changes in the SSC along the transect into account. However, these calibration factors are often developed only for one specific in-situ condition and may give unreliable results in case that the boundaries change e.g. the hydraulic conditions. Hence an evaluation of the sediment fluxes along the whole transect would give a more reliable number for the amount of transported sediments through the reservoir. This information can afterwards be used to calculate the amount of settled sediments in different sections of the reservoir and the amount of sediments which will enter the intake. For this study the suspended sediment transport within the Peñas Blancas reservoir in

  9. Biotic drivers of fluvial sediment transport: Aggregate effects of sediment mobilisation by crayfish on catchment-scale sediment yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stephen; Mathers, Kate; Reeds, Jake; Extence, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Small but prolific organisms may be significant zoogeomorphic agents that make cumulative contributions to the large-scale terrestrial sediment cascade in, as yet, unknown and unquantified ways. One such organism is the signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), which has invaded many European rivers. The geographical extent and abundance of this animal ensure innumerable local, small-scale interactions with the fluvial sediment system that have the potential to yield a substantial effect when aggregated across larger spatial and temporal scales. Here we estimate, for the first time, the proportion of the total annual sediment yield associated with crayfish activity in an infested river and examine the variability in crayfish-driven sediment flux integrated across daily, monthly and seasonal time scales. We focused on one of several mechanisms by which crayfish activities affect sediment dynamics: the mobilisation of fine sediments by foraging, fighting and burrowing under hydraulic conditions that are otherwise insufficient to entrain sediment. On the Brampton Branch of the River Nene, UK, a 12-month record of suspended sediment concentration (derived from a calibration of turbidity data against measured SSC) allowed calculation of sediment fluxes and integrated sediment loads at ten-minute intervals. Concurrent measurements of water depth and crayfish movements (using PIT tagging) confirmed that night-time crayfish activity was often associated with increased sediment fluxes in the absence of any change in hydraulic conditions. Sediment loads calculated for these periods of crayfish activity were compared with total loads to estimate the contribution made to sediment mobilisation by crayfish. Crayfish-induced fluxes were most significant during summer low-flows, becoming less important during winter when the crayfish were inactive and competent high flows dominated sediment transport. Nevertheless, the seasonal cumulative effect of crayfish was substantial and

  10. An evaluation of sediment rating curves for estimating suspended sediment concentrations for subsequent flux calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Arthur J.

    2003-12-01

    In the absence of actual suspended sediment concentration (SSC) measurements, hydrologists have used sediment rating (sediment transport) curves to estimate (predict) SSCs for subsequent flux calculations. Various evaluations of the sediment rating-curve method were made using data from long-term, daily sediment-measuring sites within large (>1 000 000 km2), medium (<1 000 000 to >1000 km2), and small (<1000 km2) river basins in the USA and Europe relative to the estimation of suspended sediment fluxes. The evaluations address such issues as the accuracy of flux estimations for various levels of temporal resolution as well as the impact of sampling frequency on the magnitude of flux estimation errors.The sediment rating-curve method tends to underpredict high, and overpredict low SSCs. As such, the range of errors associated with concomitant flux estimates for relatively short time-frames (e.g. daily, weekly) are likely to be substantially larger than those associated with longer time-frames (e.g. quarterly, annually) because the over- and underpredictions do not have sufficient time to balance each other. Hence, when error limits must be kept under +/-20%, temporal resolution probably should be limited to quarterly or greater.The evaluations indicate that over periods of 20 or more years, errors of <1% can be achieved using a single sediment rating curve based on data spanning the entire period. However, somewhat better estimates for the entire period, and markedly better annual estimates within the period, can be obtained if individual annual sediment rating curves are used instead. Relatively accurate (errors <+/-20%) annual suspended sediment fluxes can be obtained from hydrologically based monthly measurements/samples. For 5-year periods or longer, similar results can be obtained from measurements/samples collected once every 2 months. In either case, hydrologically based sampling, as opposed to calendar-based sampling is likely to limit the magnitude of

  11. USING TURBIDITY DATA TO PREDICT SUSPENDED SEDIMENT CONCENTRATIONS: POSSIBILITIES, LIMITATIONS, AND PITFALLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk will look at the relationships between turbidity and suspended sediment concentrations in a variety of geographic areas, geomorphic river types, and river sizes; and attempt to give guidance on using existing turbidity data to predict suspended sediment concentrations.

  12. A Time Series Separation and Reconstruction (TSSR) Technique to Estimate Daily Suspended Sediment Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    High suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) from natural and anthropogenic sources are responsible for biological impairments of many streams, rivers, lakes, and estuaries, but techniques to estimate sediment concentrations or loads accurately at the daily temporal resolution a...

  13. A Time Series Separation and Reconstruction (TSSR) Technique to Estimate Daily Suspended Sediment Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    High suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) from natural and anthropogenic sources are responsible for biological impairments of many streams, rivers, lakes, and estuaries, but techniques to estimate sediment concentrations or loads accurately at the daily temporal resolution a...

  14. Metal concentrations in stream biofilm and sediments and their potential to explain biofilm microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Dopheide, Andrew; Lewis, Gillian D

    2013-02-01

    Concentrations of metals associated with sediments have traditionally been analysed to assess the extent of heavy metal contamination in freshwater environments. Stream biofilms present an alternative medium for this assessment which may be more relevant to the risk incurred by stream ecosystems as they are intensively grazed by aquatic organisms at a higher trophic level. Therefore, we investigated zinc, copper and lead concentrations in biofilms and sediments of 23 stream sites variously impacted by urbanisation. Simultaneously, biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan community structure was analysed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm associated metals explained a greater proportion of the variations observed in bacterial and ciliate communities than did sediment associated-metals. This study suggests that the analysis of metal concentrations in biofilms provide a good assessment of detrimental effects of metal contaminants on aquatic biota.

  15. Sedimentation of concentrated monodisperse colloidal suspensions: role of collective particle interaction forces.

    PubMed

    Vesaratchanon, Jan S; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh T

    2008-06-01

    The sedimentation velocities and concentration profiles of low-charge, monodisperse hydroxylate latex particle suspensions were investigated experimentally as a function of the particle concentration to study the effects of the collective particle interactions on suspension stability. We used the Kossel diffraction technique to measure the particle concentration profile and sedimentation rate. We conducted the sedimentation experiments using three different particle sizes. Collective hydrodynamic interactions dominate the particle-particle interactions at particle concentrations up to 6.5 vol%. However, at higher particle concentrations, additional collective particle-particle interactions resulting from the self-depletion attraction cause particle aggregation inside the suspension. The collective particle-particle interaction forces play a much more important role when relatively small particles (500 nm in diameter or less) are used. We developed a theoretical model based on the statistical particle dynamics simulation method to examine the role of the collective particle interactions in concentrated suspensions in the colloidal microstructure formation and sedimentation rates. The theoretical results agree with the experimentally-measured values of the settling velocities and concentration profiles.

  16. Concentrations and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface coastal sediments of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coastal sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico have a high potential of being contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), due to extensive petroleum exploration and transportation activities. In this study we evaluated the spatial distribution and contamination sources of PAHs, as well as the bioavailable fraction in the bulk PAH pool, in surface marsh and shelf sediments (top 5 cm) of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Results PAH concentrations in this region ranged from 100 to 856 ng g−1, with the highest concentrations in Mississippi River mouth sediments followed by marsh sediments and then the lowest concentrations in shelf sediments. The PAH concentrations correlated positively with atomic C/N ratios of sedimentary organic matter (OM), suggesting that terrestrial OM preferentially sorbs PAHs relative to marine OM. PAHs with 2 rings were more abundant than those with 5–6 rings in continental shelf sediments, while the opposite was found in marsh sediments. This distribution pattern suggests different contamination sources between shelf and marsh sediments. Based on diagnostic ratios of PAH isomers and principal component analysis, shelf sediment PAHs were petrogenic and those from marsh sediments were pyrogenic. The proportions of bioavailable PAHs in total PAHs were low, ranging from 0.02% to 0.06%, with higher fractions found in marsh than shelf sediments. Conclusion PAH distribution and composition differences between marsh and shelf sediments were influenced by grain size, contamination sources, and the types of organic matter associated with PAHs. Concentrations of PAHs in the study area were below effects low-range, suggesting a low risk to organisms and limited transfer of PAHs into food web. From the source analysis, PAHs in shelf sediments mainly originated from direct petroleum contamination, while those in marsh sediments were from combustion of fossil fuels. PMID:24641695

  17. Land use impacts on trace metal concentrations of suburban stream sediments in the Helsinki region, Finland.

    PubMed

    Kuusisto-Hjort, Paula; Hjort, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to statistically analyze the effect of different suburban land use types on trace metal contamination of suburban streams. Acid extractable metal concentrations (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd) of stream bed sediments (<63 μm) and high-flow suspended sediments were determined for 61 suburban and six baseline catchments in the Helsinki metropolitan region, Finland. Our results showed that the average suburban metal concentrations were 3-5-fold compared to baseline values for stream bed sediments and 2-9-fold for suspended sediments. Correlation analyses revealed moderate relationships between the land use parameters of the contributing catchment and the metal concentrations. Metals, particularly Zn and Cu, were most strongly correlated with proportions of dense suburban land use and imperviousness. In addition, industrial land use appeared to be particularly important for describing the variations of suspended sediment metal concentrations. Our findings present statistical evidence that the intensity of urbanization and industrial land use provides an indication of metal contamination even within the suburban environment.

  18. Bioaccumulation of PCBs Across Concentration Gradients in Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus quantify the relationships between the chemical residues in sediments and benthic invertebrates, and these relationships are expressed as biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF). At some field sites, BSAFs decr...

  19. Bioaccumulation of PCBs Across Concentration Gradients in Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus quantify the relationships between the chemical residues in sediments and benthic invertebrates, and these relationships are expressed as biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF). At some field sites, BSAFs decr...

  20. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN RESIDUES OF AHR AGONISTS IN FISH AND CONCENTRATIONS IN WATER AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relationships between Residues of AhR Agonists in Fish and Concentrations in Water and Sediment. Cook, PM*, Burkhard, LP, Mount, DR, US-EPA, NHEERL, MED, Duluth, MN. The bioaccumulation visualization approach of Burkhard et al. (2002) can be effectively used to describe the bioa...

  1. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN RESIDUES OF AHR AGONISTS IN FISH AND CONCENTRATIONS IN WATER AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relationships between Residues of AhR Agonists in Fish and Concentrations in Water and Sediment. Cook, PM*, Burkhard, LP, Mount, DR, US-EPA, NHEERL, MED, Duluth, MN. The bioaccumulation visualization approach of Burkhard et al. (2002) can be effectively used to describe the bioa...

  2. Analysis of suspended-sediment concentrations and radioisotope levels in the Wild Rice River basin, northwestern Minnesota, 1973-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Mark E.; McCullough, Carolyn J.; Wilkinson, Philip M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined historical suspended-sediment data and activities of fallout radioisotopes (lead-210 [210Pb], cesium-137 [137Cs], and beryllium-7 [7Be]) associated with suspended sediments and source-area sediments (cultivated soils, bank material, and reference soils) in the Wild Rice River Basin, a tributary to the Red River of the North, to better understand sources of suspended sediment to streams in the region. Multiple linear regression analysis of suspended-sediment concentrations from the Wild Rice River at Twin Valley, Minnesota indicated significant relations between suspended-sediment concentrations and streamflow. Flow-adjusted sediment concentrations tended to be slightly higher in spring than summer-autumn. No temporal trends in concentration were observed during 1973-98. The fallout radioisotopes were nearly always detectable in suspended sediments during spring-summer 1998. Mean 210Pb and 7Be activities in suspended sediment and surficial, cultivated soils were similar, perhaps indicating little dilution of suspended sediment from low-isotopic-activity bank sediments. In contrast, mean 137Cs activities in suspended sediment indicated a mixture of sediment originating from eroded soils and from eroded bank material, with bank material being a somewhat more important source upstream of Twin Valley, Minnesota; and approximately equal fractions of bank material and surficial soils contributing to the suspended load downstream at Hendrum, Minnesota. This study indicates that, to be effective, efforts to reduce sediment loading to the Wild Rice River should include measures to control soil erosion from cultivated fields.

  3. Evolution of sediment metal concentrations in a tidal marsh restoration project.

    PubMed

    Teuchies, Johannes; Beauchard, Olivier; Jacobs, Sander; Meire, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The combination of flood prevention and tidal marsh restoration will be implemented on a large scale in the Schelde estuary (Belgium). Densely populated and industrialized, this estuary was found to be severely contaminated with trace metals. In this study we evaluated the effect of tidal restoration on sediment trace metal concentrations. To asses historical contamination of embanked-, a restored- and natural tidal areas, deep sediment cores were sampled while the evolution of metal concentrations was determined by means of superficial samples taken during 10 sampling campaigns spread over the first 3 years of the restoration project. Metal concentrations in the natural tidal marsh reflected the estuaries' contamination history. Fertilization by irrigation caused high metal concentrations in superficial soil layers of some embanked areas. However, reintroduction of the tide resulted in deposition of a new sediment layer with lower metal concentrations, comparable to the natural tidal marsh. Despite diagenetic mobility of manganese no diagenetic movements of the trace metals were observed during these first three years. Removal of metals from the estuary and burial of contaminated sediments in the restored site emphasize the potential of these restoration projects to decrease metal contamination risks. However, more research under field conditions on the effects of changes in land use and inundation related changes in metal bioavailability is needed to draw clear conclusions on the environmental consequences.

  4. Total phosphorus content of river sediments in relationship to calcium, iron and organic matter concentrations.

    PubMed

    House, William A; Denison, Frank H

    2002-01-23

    Data on the total concentrations of phosphorus, calcium, iron and organic matter in surface bed-sediments taken from rivers in the Thames catchment (Wey, Blackwater, Thame and Kennet), the River Swale in Yorkshire (data excludes the organic matter content) as well as the headwaters of the Great Ouse, are collated and compared. Total concentrations of phosphorus, iron and calcium range from 1.7-649, 12-8,333 and 9-4,605 micromol g(-1) (dry weight), respectively, with organic matter in the range of 0.6-19% by dry weight. For the Wey, Blackwater and Great Ouse, sewage inflows had no detectable effect on the sediment concentrations of total calcium, iron and organic matter whereas for the Blackwater and Great Ouse, the total phosphorus contents of the sediment were higher downstream of the effluent input in comparison with a less impacted upstream location. Relationships between the total phosphorus content of the sediments and contents of iron, calcium and organic matter indicated marked differences between the rivers. Although the organic matter content of the sediments was found to be a significant predictor for the total phosphorus concentration for the Blackwater and Great Ouse, the total iron content was also useful for the Blackwater and total calcium for the Great Ouse. It is postulated that this difference is a result of the sediment processes that are known to occur in these two systems, i.e. co-precipitation of phosphate with calcite in the Great Ouse and the formation of vivianite in anoxic sediments of the Blackwater.

  5. Cadmium concentration in sea bottom sediment and its potential risk in the upper Gulf of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ei Tun, Zin Hnin; Parkpian, Preeda; Delaune, R D; Gambrell, R P; Jugsujinda, Aroon

    2009-02-15

    Untreated or partially treated waste water discharge from industrial and domestic sources entering the Upper Gulf of Thailand have been reported to increase cadmium concentration in bottom sediment. This study was directed at providing a better understanding of cadmium transformation in the sediment from the area. Sediment samples collected from Chao Phraya River mouth (CPY), Bang Pakong River mouth (BPK) and Klong Dan estuary (KD) located in the Upper Gulf of Thailand were analyzed for cadmium concentration in various sediment particle size fractions. Using laboratory microcosms, cadmium release from sediment as affected by salinity and sediment redox condition was studied. A higher concentration of cadmium (0.2-0.6 microg/g dry weight) was measured in finer sediment particle size fractions (<0.075 mm) as compared to courser fractions at all sampling stations. Cadmium release from the sediment to water was influenced by both salinity and redox condition. Sediment was spiked with 10 ppm cadmium which is the cadmium level in sediment adopted by the Australia and New Zealand sediment quality guidelines which can cause adverse environmental impacts. Experiments conducted showed soluble cadmium concentration at sediment oxidation reduction conditions representative of bottom sediment were at levels that can adversely impact aquatic organisms, according to the PCADMIUM water quality guideline. In Thailand, there is no sediment quality guideline. Based on these experiments, 10 ppm of cadmium in sediment was recommended as a regulatory guidelines for allowable levels of cadmium in sediment in the study area.

  6. Microplastic concentrations in beach sediments along the German Baltic coast.

    PubMed

    Stolte, Andrea; Forster, Stefan; Gerdts, Gunnar; Schubert, Hendrik

    2015-10-15

    The contamination with microplastic particles and fibres was evaluated on beaches along the German Baltic coast. Sediments were sampled near the Warnow and Oder/Peene estuaries, on Rügen island and along the Rostock coast to derive possible entry pathways. Seasonal variations were monitored along the Rostock coast from March to July 2014. After density separation in saline solution, floating particles were found to be dominated by sand grains. Water surface tension is shown to be sufficient to explain floatation of grains with sizes less than 1.5mm. Selecting intensely coloured particles and fibres, we find lower limits of the microplastic concentrations of 0-7 particles/kg and 2-11 fibres/kg dry sediment. The largest microplastic contaminations are measured at the Peene outlet into the Baltic Sea and in the North Sea Jade Bay. City discharges, industrial production sites, fishing activity and tourism are the most likely sources for the highest microplastic concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gravity sedimentation of granulocytapheresis concentrates with hydroxyethyl starch efficiently removes red blood cells and retains neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Barbara J; Yau, Yu Ying; Byrne, Phyllis J; Stroncek, David F; Leitman, Susan F

    2010-06-01

    Transfusion of granulocytapheresis concentrates can be limited by the volume of incompatible donor red blood cells (RBCs) in the component. Efficient reduction of RBCs in granulocyte units would result in safe transfusion of RBC-incompatible units. Granulocyte concentrates were collected by continuous-flow apheresis from granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone-stimulated volunteer donors, with 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) added continuously during apheresis as a RBC sedimenting agent to enhance granulocyte collection efficiency. After collection, the component was placed in a plasma extractor for 4 hours. A sharp line of demarcation between the starch-sedimented RBCs and the granulocyte-rich supernatant developed, and the supernatant was transferred to a sterilely docked transfer pack. RBC reduction and white blood cell recovery were determined. Gravity sedimentation was performed on 165 granulocyte concentrates. Mean sedimentation time was 267 minutes (range, 150-440 min). RBC depletion was 92% (range, 71%-99%) with mean residual RBC content of 3.2 +/- 1.4 mL. Twelve percent of components contained less than 2 mL of RBCs. Mean granulocyte and platelet (PLT) recoveries were 80 and 81%, respectively. There were no transfusion reactions or signs of hemolysis after transfusion of 66 RBC-incompatible granulocyte concentrates (RBC volume, 1.6-8.2 mL). The remaining concentrates were used for topical or intrapleural applications. RBCs were significantly reduced and granulocytes and PLTs effectively retained in G-CSF/steroid-mobilized granulocyte components collected with HES and processed by gravity sedimentation. This procedure allows safe transfusion of RBC-incompatible sedimented granulocyte units and may be used to expand the pool of available granulocyte donors for specific recipients.

  8. Improved estimation of sediment source contributions by concentration-dependent Bayesian isotopic mixing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Upadhayay, Hari; Bodé, Samuel; Griepentrog, Marco; Bajracharya, Roshan Man; Blake, Will; Cornelis, Wim; Boeckx, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    The implementation of compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) analyses of biotracers (e.g. fatty acids, FAs) as constraints on sediment-source contributions has become increasingly relevant to understand the origin of sediments in catchments. The CSSI fingerprinting of sediment utilizes CSSI signature of biotracer as input in an isotopic mixing model (IMM) to apportion source soil contributions. So far source studies relied on the linear mixing assumptions of CSSI signature of sources to the sediment without accounting for potential effects of source biotracer concentration. Here we evaluated the effect of FAs concentration in sources on the accuracy of source contribution estimations in artificial soil mixture of three well-separated land use sources. Soil samples from land use sources were mixed to create three groups of artificial mixture with known source contributions. Sources and artificial mixture were analysed for δ13C of FAs using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The source contributions to the mixture were estimated using with and without concentration-dependent MixSIAR, a Bayesian isotopic mixing model. The concentration-dependent MixSIAR provided the closest estimates to the known artificial mixture source contributions (mean absolute error, MAE = 10.9%, and standard error, SE = 1.4%). In contrast, the concentration-independent MixSIAR with post mixing correction of tracer proportions based on aggregated concentration of FAs of sources biased the source contributions (MAE = 22.0%, SE = 3.4%). This study highlights the importance of accounting the potential effect of a source FA concentration for isotopic mixing in sediments that adds realisms to mixing model and allows more accurate estimates of contributions of sources to the mixture. The potential influence of FA concentration on CSSI signature of sediments is an important underlying factor that determines whether the isotopic signature of a given source is observable

  9. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat images

    SciTech Connect

    Mertes, L.A.K.; Smith, M.O.; Adams, J.B. )

    1993-03-01

    A method has been developed, based on spectral mixture analysis, to estimate the concentration of suspended sediment in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat MSS and TM images. Endmembers were derived from laboratory reflectance measurements of water-sediment mixtures with a range of sediment concentrations. Using these references spectra, the authors applied a linear mixture analysis to multispectral images after accounting for instrument and atmosphere gains and offsets. Sediment concentrations were estimated for individual pixels from the mixture analysis results based on a nonlinear calibration curve relating laboratory sediment concentrations and reflectance to endmember fractions. The uncertainty in the sediment concentrations derived from this analysis for three Amazon images is predicted to be within [plus minus] 20 mg/L, and the concentrations fall within a range of concentrations of suspended sediment that were measured at several times and places in the field over the past 15 years. The emphasis of their work is to use the patterns of sediment concentrations to compute the approximate volumes of sediment that are transferred between the main channel and floodplain of the Amazon River. However, the methodology can be applied universally if the optical properties of water and sediment at the site are known, and it is, therefore, useful for the study of suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of wetlands elsewhere.

  10. EVALUATION OF A FLUOROMETRIC SCREENING METHOD FOR PREDICTING TOTAL PAH CONCENTRATIONS IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A flurorometric screening method was used to estimate total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments collected from the St. Louis River Area of Concern in northeastern Minnesota. Sediments were collected as part of a Regional Environmental Monitoring and Asses...

  11. EVALUATION OF A FLUOROMETRIC SCREENING METHOD FOR PREDICTING TOTAL PAH CONCENTRATIONS IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A flurorometric screening method was used to estimate total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments collected from the St. Louis River Area of Concern in northeastern Minnesota. Sediments were collected as part of a Regional Environmental Monitoring and Asses...

  12. Suspended-sediment concentration regimes in Tennessee biological reference streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diehl, Timothy H.; Wolfe, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Suspended-sediment-concentration (SSC) regimes of five biological reference streams in Tennessee were characterized from 15-minute SSC records spanning 1 to 4 water years (October 1 through September 30) between 2004 and 2008. These streams represent least disturbed conditions for their respective ecoregions and have exceptional biodiversity in terms of fish or aquatic invertebrates. SSC regimes in streams, when plotted in terms of duration above a given SSC at a given annual frequency such as the annual maximum or the annual tenth longest duration, can be compared directly to published biological impairment thresholds derived from experimental trials. Based on such comparison, the SSC regimes of all five reference streams reached published impairment thresholds at least 10 times per water year for all years of record. The results suggest that the published impairment thresholds are not directly applicable to streams in Tennessee and, by extension, the southeastern United States.

  13. Increasing precision of turbidity-based suspended sediment concentration and load estimates.

    PubMed

    Jastram, John D; Zipper, Carl E; Zelazny, Lucian W; Hyer, Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Turbidity is an effective tool for estimating and monitoring suspended sediments in aquatic systems. Turbidity can be measured in situ remotely and at fine temporal scales as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration (SSC), providing opportunity for a more complete record of SSC than is possible with physical sampling approaches. However, there is variability in turbidity-based SSC estimates and in sediment loadings calculated from those estimates. This study investigated the potential to improve turbidity-based SSC, and by extension the resulting sediment loading estimates, by incorporating hydrologic variables that can be monitored remotely and continuously (typically 15-min intervals) into the SSC estimation procedure. On the Roanoke River in southwestern Virginia, hydrologic stage, turbidity, and other water-quality parameters were monitored with in situ instrumentation; suspended sediments were sampled manually during elevated turbidity events; samples were analyzed for SSC and physical properties including particle-size distribution and organic C content; and rainfall was quantified by geologic source area. The study identified physical properties of the suspended-sediment samples that contribute to SSC estimation variance and hydrologic variables that explained variability of those physical properties. Results indicated that the inclusion of any of the measured physical properties in turbidity-based SSC estimation models reduces unexplained variance. Further, the use of hydrologic variables to represent these physical properties, along with turbidity, resulted in a model, relying solely on data collected remotely and continuously, that estimated SSC with less variance than a conventional turbidity-based univariate model, allowing a more precise estimate of sediment loading, Modeling results are consistent with known mechanisms governing sediment transport in hydrologic systems.

  14. Marine sediment sample preparation for analysis for low concentrations of fine detrital gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, H. Edward; Hubert, Arthur; Phillips, R. Lawrence

    1967-01-01

    Analyses by atomic absorption for detrital gold in more than 2,000 beach, offshore, marine-terrace, and alluvial sands from southern Oregon have shown that the values determined from raw or unconcentrated sediment containing small amounts of gold are neither reproducible nor representative of the initial sample. This difficulty results from a 'particle sparsity effect', whereby the analysis for gold in a given sample depends more upon the occurrence of random flakes of gold in the analyzed portion than upon the actual gold content of the sample. The particle sparsity effect can largely be eliminated by preparing a gold concentrate prior to analysis. A combination of sieve, gravimetric, and magnetic separation produces a satisfactory concentrate that yields accurate and reproducible analyses. In concentrates of nearly every marine and beach sand studied, the gold occurs in the nonmagnetic fraction smaller than 0.124 mm and with a specific gravity greater than 3.3. The grain size of gold in stream sediments is somewhat more variable. Analysis of concentrates provides a means of greatly increasing the sensitivity of the analytical technique in relation to the initial sample. Gold rarely exceeds 1 part per million in even the richest black sand analyzed; to establish the distribution of gold (and platinum) in marine sediments and its relationship to source and environmental factors, one commonly needs to know their content to the part per billion range. Analysis of a concentrate and recalculation to the value in the initial sample permits this degree of sensitivity.

  15. Estimation of Biota Sediment Accumulation Factor (BSAF) from Paired Observations of Chemical Concentrations in Biota and Sediment (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In March 2009, EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) released the final report entitled, Estimation of Biota Sediment Accumulation Factor (BSAF) from Paired Observations of Chemical Concentrations in Biota and Sediment. This report was written in response...

  16. Estimation of Biota Sediment Accumulation Factor (BSAF) from Paired Observations of Chemical Concentrations in Biota and Sediment (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In March 2009, EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) released the final report entitled, Estimation of Biota Sediment Accumulation Factor (BSAF) from Paired Observations of Chemical Concentrations in Biota and Sediment. This report was written in response...

  17. Impact of plant growth and morphology and of sediment concentration on sediment retention efficiency of vegetative filter strips: Flume experiments and VFSMOD modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Thomas; François, Sébastien; Lutts, Stanley; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Bielders, Charles L.

    2014-04-01

    Vegetative filter strips (VFS) implemented downstream to the source of pollution can trap sediments and thus limit sediment export from agricultural fields. However, their retention efficiencies are determined by many factors, among others the type of plant species and its growth stage. The impact of plant growth and morphology, as well as of incoming sediment concentration, on the efficiency of VFS to trap sediments was assessed by means of an experimental flume. Two different plant species were tested, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens, after 2 and 4 months of plant growth and for 2 different incoming silty-loam sediment concentrations. Measured retention efficiencies were compared to simulated values using VFSMOD based on goodness-of-fit indicators that take into account uncertainty linked to the measurements. The sediment storage capacity upstream of the VFS was limited in terms of mass, and therefore an increase in sediment concentration led to a decrease in sediment retention efficiency. After 2 months of plant growth, plant morphology affected the VFS potential to trap sediments, as reflected in the higher retention efficiency of T. repens due to its creeping shoot architecture. However, plant growth and development modified the plant morphology and VFS trapping potential. Indeed, L. perenne VFS retention efficiency increased from 35% after 2 months of growth to 50% after 4 months, due to the tillering capacity of grass species. Conversely, the trapping efficiency of T. repens decreased from 49% to 40% after 4 months. This highlights the possible degradation of VFS with time, which in the case of T.repens was due to an increased heterogeneity of plant density within the strips. These modifications of plant characteristics with growth stage, which affected sediment trapping efficiencies, can be effectively integrated into mechanistic models like VFSMOD, mainly through stem spacing and Manning's surface roughness coefficient inputs. Since these parameters

  18. Influence of acid volatile sulfides and metal concentrations on metal partitioning in contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-S.; Lee, B.-G.; Luoma, S.N.; Choi, H.J.; Koh, C.-H.; Brown, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) on the partitioning of Cd, Ni, and Zn in porewater (PW) and sediment as reactive metals (SEM, simultaneously extracted metals) was investigated in laboratory microcosms. Two spiking procedures were compared, and the effects of vertical geochemical gradients and infaunal activity were evaluated. Sediments were spiked with a Cd-Ni-Zn mixture (0.06, 3, 7.5 ??mol/g, respectively) containing four levels of AVS (0.5, 7.5, 15, 35 ??mol/g). The results were compared to sediments spiked with four levels of Cd-Ni-Zn mixtures at one AVS concentration (7.5 ??mol/g). A vertical redox gradient was generated in each treatment by an 18-d incubation with an oxidized water column. [AVS] in the surface sediments decreased by 65-95% due to oxidation during incubation; initial [AVS] was maintained at 0.5-7.5 cm depth. PW metal concentrations were correlated with [SEM - AVS] among all data. But PW metal concentrations were variable, causing the distribution coefficient, Kd(pw) (the ratio of [SEM] to PW metal concentrations) to vary by 2-3 orders of magnitude at a given [SEM - AVS]. One reason for the variability was that vertical profiles in PW metal concentrations appeared to be influenced by diffusion as well as [SEM - AVS]. The presence of animals appeared to enhance the diffusion of at least Zn. The generalization that PW metal concentrations are controlled by [SEM - AVS] is subject to some important qualifications if vertical gradients are complicated, metal concentrations vary, or equilibration times differ.The influence of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) on the partitioning of Cd, Ni, and Zn in porewater (PW) and sediment as reactive metals (SEM, simultaneously extracted metals) was investigated in laboratory microcosms. Two spiking procedures were compared, and the effects of vertical geochemical gradients and infaunal activity were evaluated. Sediments were spiked with a Cd-Ni-Zn mixture (0.06, 3, 7.5 ??mol/g, respectively) containing

  19. Trace contaminant concentration affects mineral transformation and pollutant fate in hydroxide-weathered Hanford sediments.

    PubMed

    Perdrial, Nicolas; Rivera, Nelson; Thompson, Aaron; O'Day, Peggy A; Chorover, Jon

    2011-12-15

    Prior work has shown that when silicaceous sediments are infused with caustic radioactive waste, contaminant fate is tightly coupled to ensuing mineral weathering reactions. However, the effects of local aqueous geochemical conditions on these reactions are poorly studied. Thus, we varied contaminant concentration and pCO(2) during the weathering of previously uncontaminated Hanford sediments over 6 months and 1 year in a solution of caustic waste (pH 13, high ionic strength). Co-contaminants Sr, Cs and I were added at "low" (Cs/Sr: 10(-5)m; I: 10(-7)m) and "high" (Cs/Sr: 10(-3)m; I: 10(-5)m) concentrations, and headspace was held at atmospheric or undetectable (<10ppmv) CO(2) partial pressure. Solid phase characterization revealed the formation of the zeolite chabazite in "high" samples, whereas feldspathoids, sodalite and cancrinite, were formed preferentially in "low" samples. Sr, Cs and I were sequestered in all reacted sediments. Native calcite dissolution in the CO(2)-free treatment drove the formation of strätlingite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)·8H(2)O) and diminished availability of Si and Al for feldspathoid formation. Results indicate that pCO(2) and contaminant concentrations strongly affect contaminant speciation in waste-weathered sediments, and are therefore likely to impact reaction product stability under any remediation scenario.

  20. Application of dimensionless sediment rating curves to predict suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, and annual sediment loads for rivers in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Groten, Joel T.; Lorenz, David L.; Koller, Karl S.

    2016-10-27

    Consistent and reliable sediment data are needed by Federal, State, and local government agencies responsible for monitoring water quality, planning river restoration, quantifying sediment budgets, and evaluating the effectiveness of sediment reduction strategies. Heightened concerns about excessive sediment in rivers and the challenge to reduce costs and eliminate data gaps has guided Federal and State interests in pursuing alternative methods for measuring suspended and bedload sediment. Simple and dependable data collection and estimation techniques are needed to generate hydraulic and water-quality information for areas where data are unavailable or difficult to collect.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, completed a study to evaluate the use of dimensionless sediment rating curves (DSRCs) to accurately predict suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs), bedload, and annual sediment loads for selected rivers and streams in Minnesota based on data collected during 2007 through 2013. This study included the application of DSRC models developed for a small group of streams located in the San Juan River Basin near Pagosa Springs in southwestern Colorado to rivers in Minnesota. Regionally based DSRC models for Minnesota also were developed and compared to DSRC models from Pagosa Springs, Colorado, to evaluate which model provided more accurate predictions of SSCs and bedload in Minnesota.Multiple measures of goodness-of-fit were developed to assess the effectiveness of DSRC models in predicting SSC and bedload for rivers in Minnesota. More than 600 dimensionless ratio values of SSC, bedload, and streamflow were evaluated and delineated according to Pfankuch stream stability categories of “good/fair” and “poor” to develop four Minnesota-based DSRC models. The basis for Pagosa Springs and Minnesota DSRC model effectiveness was founded on measures of goodness

  1. Concentration, distribution, and bioavailability of mercury and methylmercury in sediments of Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.P.; Lawrence, A.L.

    1999-11-01

    For the Chesapeake Bay, sediments in regions such as Baltimore Harbor have total mercury (Hg) concentrations that exceed environmental effects guidelines. However, fish concentrations do not appear elevated. Indeed, the factors controlling the transfer of sedimentary Hg, especially as monomethylmercury (MMHg), the most bioaccumulative form of Hg, to these aquatic organisms are poorly understood. To examine this, the authors have investigated the distribution and bioavailability of Hg and MMHg to benthic organisms in Baltimore harbor and the Chesapeake Bay, in Maryland, USA. The results discussed here show that sediment concentration for both total Hg and MMHg covaries with sediment organic content and that this parameter is a better predictor, for surface sediments, of concentration than iron content, acid volatile sulfide (AVS), or other factors. Furthermore, correlations between inorganic Hg and MMHg in benthic biota with sediment levels suggest that variation in the bioaccumulation factor (SBAF) for invertebrates is best explained in terms of sediment organic content. thus, the results from this study emphasize the importance of organic matter in regions removed from point source input in controlling both the concentration and bioavailability of MMHg to organisms. Because of the exponential nature of the SBAF/organic content relationship, there is a nonlinear organism response to MMHg in sediments that must be considered in any estimation of the toxic effect of sediment MMHg. Also, as a result of the decoupling between total Hg and MMHg concentration and bioavailability in surface sediments, any remediation evaluation of bioavailability and/or toxicity that is based only on total Hg concentration is unlikely to provide a reliable prediction.

  2. Effects of intensive mariculture on sediment biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Antonio; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Mirto, Simone; Holmer, Marianne; Danovaro, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    The exponential growth of off-shore mariculture that has occurred worldwide over the last 10 years has raised concern about the impact of the waste produced by this industry on the ecological integrity of the sea bottom. Investigations into this potential source of impact on the biochemistry of the sea floor have provided contrasting results, and no compelling explanations for these discrepancies have been provided to date. To quantify the impact of fish-farm activities on the biochemistry of sediments, we have investigated the quantity and biochemical composition of sediment organic matter in four different regions in the temperate-warm Mediterranean Sea: Akrotiri Bay (Cyprus), Sounion Bay (Greece), Pachino Bay (Italy), and the Gulf of Alicante (Spain). In these four study regions, the concentrations of phytopigments, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids in the sediments were measured, comparing locations receiving wastes from fish farms to control locations in two different habitats: seagrass beds and soft nonvegetated substrates. Downward fluxes were also measured in all of the regions, up to 200 m from the fish farms, to assess the potential spatial extent of the impact. In all four regions, with the exception of seagrass sediments in Spain, the biochemistry of the sediments showed significant differences between the control and fish-farm locations. However, the variables explaining the differences observed varied among the regions and between habitats, suggesting idiosyncratic effects of fish-farm waste on the biochemistry of sediments. These are possibly related to differences in the local physicochemical variables that could explain a significant proportion of the differences seen between the control and fish-farm locations. Biodeposition derived from the fish farms decreased with increasing distance from the fish-farm cages, but with different patterns in the four regions. Our results indicate that quantitative and qualitative changes in the organic loads of

  3. The effect of manipulations of freshwater sediments on responses of benthic invertebrates in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Day, K.E.; Kirby, R.S.; Reynoldson, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    Manipulations of freshwater sediment were performed to remove indigenous organisms prior to conducting toxicity tests with three species of benthic invertebrates. The effects of these treatments on end points in bioassays were compared within and between two sediments, i.e., a ``clean`` sediment and a ``contaminated`` sediment. In addition, the effects of manipulations on the physicochemical structure of the two sediments and the presence of metals, PAHs, and PCBs in the contaminated sediment were examined. The amphipod Hyalella azteca was most sensitive to the manipulations and had low survival in sediment that was sterilized. Growth (milligrams dry weight per individual) was affected by the presence of contaminants. Survival of Chironomus riparius was not affected by any manipulation but was reduced by contaminants as well as indigenous organisms. Growth of C. riparius was higher in autoclaved sediment but lower in sediment containing endemic tubificid worms. Production of young by Tubifex tubifex increased in sediment that was irradiated, possibly due to increased detrital material. Particle size distribution, metals, nutrients, and PAHs varied little as a function of manipulation; however, sieving of sediment through 250-{micro}m mesh did reduce percent total organic carbon (TOC), percent loss on ignition (LOI), and concentrations of some PCBs in either clean or contaminated sediment. Manipulation of sediments to remove endemic species should be determined on a case-by-case basis and is specific to the organisms used in toxicity tests.

  4. Modelling the effect of fine sediment on salmonid spawning habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Sear, David; Collins, Adrian; Jones, Iwan; Naden, Pam

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse fine sediment delivery to rivers is recognised as a widespread problem in the UK. Furthermore, projections suggest that sediment pressures may increase in the future due to both climate change and land use changes. This fine sediment infiltrates into the bed and clogs up salmonid spawning gravels. Fine sediment has been found to reduce survival rates of salmonid eggs in both field and laboratory experiments, with the main hypotheses used to explain this being (a) fine sediment reduces gravel permeability and intra-gravel flow velocities; (b) intra-gravel O2 concentrations decrease due to reduced supply and increased consumption by organic sediments; and (c) clay particles block the exchange of O2 across the egg membrane. The SIDO (Sediment Intrusion and Dissolved Oxygen)-UK model is a physically based numerical model which stimulates the effect of fine sediment intrusion on the abiotic characteristics of the salmonid redd, along with the consequences for egg development and survival. The first 2 hypotheses above are represented, while the third is not yet included. Field observations from the River Ithon, Wales, have been used to calibrate the model using sediment accumulation data. The model was then used to assess the impact of varying sediment inputs upon the sediment intrusion rates, abiotic redd characteristics and fish egg survival rates. Results indicate that egg survival is highly sensitive to the discharge and the suspended sediment concentrations, particularly to changes in the supply rate of sand particles, rather than silt and clay. This can be explained by the increased likelihood of blocking of intra-gravel pores by larger sand particles, which reduce intra-gravel flow velocities and the supply of oxygen rich water. A doubling of the sand concentration results in a 51% increase in red infilling, which causes a 24% reduction in the average intra-gravel flow velocity. A corresponding 20% decrease of the average O2 concentration is evident which

  5. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment on Rana sphenocephala tadpoles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Krest, S.K.; Ortiz-Santaliestra, M.

    2006-01-01

    We exposed larval southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala) to lead-contaminated sediments to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of this metal. Tadpoles were laboratory-raised from early free-swimming stage through metamorphosis at lead concentrations of 45, 75, 180, 540, 2360, 3940, 5520, and 7580 mg/kg dry weight in sediment. Corresponding pore water lead concentrations were 123, 227, 589, 1833, 8121, 13,579, 19,038, and 24,427 ug/L. Tadpoles exposed to lead concentrations in sediment of 3940 mg/kg or higher died within 2 to 5 days of exposure. At lower concentrations, mortality through metamorphosis ranged from 3.5% at 45 mg/kg lead to 37% at 2360 mg/kg lead in sediment. The LC50 value for lead in sediment was 3728 mg/kg (95% CI=1315 to 72,847 mg/kg), which corresponded to 12,539 ug/L lead in pore water (95% CI= 4000 to 35,200 ug/L). Early growth and development were depressed at 2,360 mg/kg lead in sediment (8100 ug/L in pore water) but differences were not evident by the time of metamorphosis. The most obvious effect of lead was its pronounced influence on skeletal development. Whereas tadpoles at 45 mg/kg lead in sediment did not display permanent abnormalities, skeletal malformations increased in frequency and severity at all higher lead concentrations. By 2360 mg/kg, 100% of surviving metamorphs displayed severe spinal problems, reduced femur and humerus lengths, deformed digits, and other bone malformations. Lead concentrations in tissues correlated positively with sediment and pore water concentrations.

  6. Numerical simulation of suspended sediment concentration by 3D coupled wave-current model in the Oujiang River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; You, Xue-yi

    2017-04-01

    A 3D sediment transport model based on the modified environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) and the nearshore waves simulation model (SWAN) is developed to study the change of suspended sediment concentration and bottom shear stress under the actions of pure current and wave-current. After being validated by the field measured data, the proposed sediment transport model is applied in the Oujiang River Estuary, China. The results show that the ratios of both bottom shear stress and suspended sediment concentration of pure current to those of wave-current show a gradually increase from shallow nearshore water to deep open sea. The results also show that the proportion of wave contributions on bottom shear stress and sediment concentration are above 60%, approximately 20-30% and less than 10% for the water depth of less than 5 m, 5-10 m and more than 20 m, respectively. For the waters among islands, the proportion of wave contribution to bottom shear stress and sediment concentration is reduced to 10-20% for -5 m water depth and this is more obvious for the waves of large amplitude. The bottom stress and suspended sediment concentration between islands are mainly controlled by tidal current, and the effect of wave is not significant.

  7. Prediction and forecast of Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) on the Upper Yangtze basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, José Pedro; Hassan, Marwan; Lu, Xixi; Franca, Mário J.

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport in suspension may represent 90% or more of the global annual flux of sediment. For instance, more than 99% of the sediment supplied to the sea by the Yangtze River is suspended load. Suspended load is an important component for understanding channel dynamics and landscape evolution. Sediments transported in suspension are a major source of nutrients for aquatic organisms in riparian and floodplain habitats, and play a beneficial role acting as a sink in the carbon cycle. Excess of fine sediments may also have adverse effects. It can impair fish spawning by riverbed clogging, disturb foraging efficiency of hunting of river fauna, cause algae and benthos scouring, reduce or inhibit exchanges through the hyporheic region. Accumulation of fine sediments in reservoirs reduces storage capacity. Although fine sediment dynamics has been the focus of many studies, the current knowledge of sediment sources, transfer, and storage is inadequate to address fine sediment dynamics in the landscape. The theoretical derivation of a complete model for suspended sediment transport at the basin scale, incorporating small scale processes of production and transport, is hindered because the underlying mechanisms are produced at different non-similar scales. Availability of long-term reliable data on suspended sediment dynamics is essential to improve our knowledge on transport processes and to develop reliable sediment prediction models. Over the last 60 years, the Yangtze River Commission has been measuring the daily Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) at the Pingshan station. This dataset provides a unique opportunity to examine temporal variability and controls of fine sediment dynamics in the Upper Yangtze basin. The objective of this study is to describe temporal variation of fine sediment dynamics at the Pingshan station making use of the extensive sediment monitoring program undertaken at that location. We test several strategies of prediction and forecast

  8. Trends in suspended-sediment concentration at selected stream sites in Kansas, 1970-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, James E.; Pope, Larry M.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment relative to streams and impoundments is important to those involved directly or indirectly in the development and management of water resources. Monitoring the quantity of sediment in streams and impoundments is important because: (1) sediment may degrade the water quality of streams for such uses as municipal water supply, (2) sediment is detrimental to the health of some species of aquatic animals and plants, and (3) accumulation of sediment in water-supply impoundments decreases the amount of storage and, therefore, water available for users. One of the objectives of the Kansas Water Plan is to reduce the amount of sediment in Kansas streams by 2010. During the last 30 years, millions of dollars have been spent in Kansas watersheds to reduce sediment transport to streams. Because the last evaluation of trends in suspended-sediment concentrations in Kansas was completed in 1985, 14 sediment sampling sites that represent 10 of the 12 major river basins in Kansas were reestablished in 2000. The purpose of this report is to present the results of time-trend analyses at the reestablished sediment data-collection sites for the period of about 1970?2002 and to evaluate changes in the watersheds that may explain the trends. Time-trend tests for 13 of 14 sediment sampling sites in Kansas for the period from about 1970 to 2002 indicated that 3 of the 13 sites tested had statistically significant decreasing suspended-sediment concentrations; however, only 2 sites, Walnut River at Winfield and Elk River at Elk Falls, had trends that were statistically significant at the 0.05 probability level. Increasing suspended-sediment concentrations were indicated at three sites although none were statistically significant at the 0.05 probability level. Samples from five of the six sampling sites located upstream from reservoirs indicated decreasing suspended-sediment concentrations. Watershed impoundments located in the

  9. Trends in suspended-sediment concentration at selected stream sites in Kansas, 1970-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, James E.; Pope, Larry M.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment relative to streams and impoundments is important to those involved directly or indirectly in the development and management of water resources. Monitoring the quantity of sediment in streams and impoundments is important because: (1) sediment may degrade the water quality of streams for such uses as municipal water supply, (2) sediment is detrimental to the health of some species of aquatic animals and plants, and (3) accumulation of sediment in water-supply impoundments decreases the amount of storage and, therefore, water available for users. One of the objectives of the Kansas Water Plan is to reduce the amount of sediment in Kansas streams by 2010. During the last 30 years, millions of dollars have been spent in Kansas watersheds to reduce sediment transport to streams. Because the last evaluation of trends in suspended-sediment concentrations in Kansas was completed in 1985, 14 sediment sampling sites that represent 10 of the 12 major river basins in Kansas were reestablished in 2000. The purpose of this report is to present the results of time-trend analyses at the reestablished sediment data-collection sites for the period of about 1970?2002 and to evaluate changes in the watersheds that may explain the trends. Time-trend tests for 13 of 14 sediment sampling sites in Kansas for the period from about 1970 to 2002 indicated that 3 of the 13 sites tested had statistically significant decreasing suspended-sediment concentrations; however, only 2 sites, Walnut River at Winfield and Elk River at Elk Falls, had trends that were statistically significant at the 0.05 probability level. Increasing suspended-sediment concentrations were indicated at three sites although none were statistically significant at the 0.05 probability level. Samples from five of the six sampling sites located upstream from reservoirs indicated decreasing suspended-sediment concentrations. Watershed impoundments located in the

  10. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2011-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2008 (October 1, 2007–September 30, 2008). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2007 through September 2008. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  11. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2010-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments.Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2006 through September 2007. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  12. High concentration suspended sediment measurments using acontinuous fiber optic in-stream transmissometer

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Chris G.; Laycak, Danny T.; Hoppes, William; Tran,Nguyen T.; Shi, Frank G.

    2004-05-26

    Suspended sediment loads mobilized during high flow periods in rivers and streams are largely uncharacterized. In smaller and intermittent streams, a large storm may transport a majority of the annual sediment budget. Therefore monitoring techniques that can measure high suspended sediment concentrations at semi-continuous time intervals are needed. A Fiber optic In-stream Transmissometer (FIT) is presented for continuous measurement of high concentration suspended sediment in storm runoff. FIT performance and precision were demonstrated to be reasonably good for suspended sediment concentrations up to 10g/L. The FIT was compared to two commercially available turbidity devices and provided better precision and accuracy at both high and low concentrations. Both turbidity devices were unable to collect measurements at concentrations greater than 4 g/L. The FIT and turbidity measurements were sensitive to sediment particle size. Particle size dependence of transmittance and turbidity measurement poses the greatest problem for calibration to suspended sediment concentration. While the FIT was demonstrated to provide acceptable measurements of high suspended sediment concentrations, approaches to real-time suspended sediment detection need to address the particle size dependence in concentration measurements.

  13. A phase-space reconstruction approach to prediction of suspended sediment concentration in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, B.

    2002-02-01

    The use of phase-space reconstruction approach for understanding and predicting suspended sediment concentration dynamics in rivers is investigated. According to this approach, the dynamic changes of the suspended sediment concentration phenomenon are represented by reconstructing (or embedding) the single-dimensional (or variable) suspended sediment concentration series in a multi-dimensional phase-space. After representing the dynamics in the phase-space, a local approximation method is employed for making predictions. The approach is employed for representing and predicting the dynamics of the daily suspended sediment concentration observed in the Mississippi River basin (at St. Louis, MO) in the United States of America. The predicted suspended sediment concentrations are found to be in very good agreement with the observed ones; not only are the major trends well captured but the minor (noisy) fluctuations reasonably preserved as well. The near-accurate predictions indicate the appropriateness of the phase-space reconstruction approach for understanding the suspended sediment concentration phenomenon. The results (i.e. optimal embedding dimension) also reveal that the suspended sediment concentration dynamics are dominantly influenced by three variables, suggesting that the suspended sediment concentration (and other sediment transport related) phenomena could be viewed from a low-dimensional chaotic dynamic perspective.

  14. Heavy metal concentrations in Louisiana waterways, sediments, and biota

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, K.J.; Berzins, D.

    1994-12-31

    In this investigation polarographic methods (along with GFAAS and ICP) have been used to study the distribution of lead and chromium in Bayou Trepagnier and Devil`s Swamp. Both laboratory and field research have been conducted. Separation and extraction methodology appropriate for analysis of the contaminants at these sites have been developed. Particular attention has been paid to extraction methods for chromium which do not lead to valence state conversion. The availability of such techniques is essential to take full advantage of polarography, a method capable of performing speciation analysis. The results indicate that there is a very inhomogeneous distribution of heavy metals in these environments. In Devil`s Swamp, for example, separation and analysis of aqueous and variously sized particulate moieties in the water and sediment compartments were conducted to determine the partition of lead between them. The results showed that the average lead content was 14.7 ppb and 19.8 ppm, respectively, in these compartments. Apparently bull frogs in Devil`s Swamp can bioaccumulate lead (compared to the measured water level), since the muscle concentration was found to be about 0.6 ppm. This phenomenon is being investigated in a Xenopus frog laboratory model of heavy metal uptake. The basic methodology validated in this study should be fairly generally applicable to assays of other heavy metals.

  15. Distribution Characteristics, Concentrations, and Sources of Cd and Pb in Laoxiawan Channel Sediments from Zhuzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Abass, Olusegun-Kazeem; Wen, Xin-Yu; Huang, Huan-Fang; Qu, Cheng-Kai; Qi, Shi-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Twenty sediment cores encompassing surface (0-20 cm) and deeper (50-60 cm) sediment layers were retrieved from the 3000 m-long Laoxiawan Channel, which receives industrial effluents from Zhuzhou City (China). Analytical results showed that cadmium (Cd) concentrations ranged between 115.7-1126.7 and 108.8-2059.3 mg/kg while lead (Pb) values ranged between 234-3000 and 145-4292 mg/kg in the surface and bottom sediments, respectively. The results also indicated that high levels of Cd and Pb were present in the vicinity of the channel mouth and confluence area. Indices for potential ecological risk and geo-accumulation were used to evaluate the environmental effects and intensity of heavy metal pollution over time. High concentrations of Cd and Pb in the bottom sediments of Laoxiawan Channel were mainly associated with wastewater discharge (10(6) m(3)/year). Thus, the Laoxiawan Channel may be an important metal contaminant source for the Xiang River.

  16. Effect of sediment size on bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated sediments of Izmir Inner Bay.

    PubMed

    Guven, Duyusen E; Akinci, Gorkem

    2013-09-01

    The effect of sediment size on metals bioleaching from bay sediments was investigated by using fine (< 45 microm), medium (45-300 microm), and coarse (300-2000 microm) size fractions of a sediment sample contaminated with Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Chemical speciation of the metals in bulk and size fractions of sediment were studied before and after bioleaching. Microbial activity was provided with mixed cultures of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The bioleaching process was carried out in flask experiments for 48 days, by using 5% (W/V) of solid concentration in suspension. Bioleaching was found to be efficient for the removal of selected heavy metals from every size fraction of sediments, where the experiments with the smaller particles resulted in the highest solubilization ratios. At the end of the experimental period, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn were solubilized to the ratios of 68%, 88%, 72%, and 91% from the fine sediment, respectively. Higher removal efficiencies can be explained by the larger surface area provided by the smaller particles. The changes in the chemical forms of metals were determined and most of the metal releases were observed from the reducible and organic fractions independent from grain size. Higher concentrations were monitored in the residual fraction after bioleaching period, suggesting they are trapped in this fraction, and cannot be solubilized under natural conditions.

  17. Shallow Sediment Trace Metal Concentrations and Short-Term Accumulation Rates in the Neponset River Estuary, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Zhu, J.; Olsen, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Neponset River estuary is a small estuary that drains into the Boston Harbor on the east coast of the United States. It is also a highly urbanized estuary and has a long history of urban development over 450 years. In July 2006, six sediment cores were collected in the Neponset River estuary to examine particle dynamics and sediment accumulation via radionuclide (Beryllium-7) dating, and to determine sediment metal concentrations (As, Cu, Pb, and Zn) via ED-XRF measurements. Measured sediment Be-7 profiles indicate various sedimentation environments, where sediment accumulation, resuspension or redeposition is likely to occur. High metal concentrations were often corresponding to high Be-7 inventories in sediment cores. Possible sources of trace metal contaminants in the water column include: storm water run-off, Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), a well-documented industrial pollution event that occurred upstream in the early to mid twentieth century, and the resuspension of sediment. Existing and future data will provide baseline information for quantifying the effects of the proposed and pending environmental restoration project, which includes the removal of the Baker Dam. The combined pre- and post-Dam removal data may then be used in cost-benefit analyses for other similar estuarine restoration projects.

  18. Trace-element concentrations in streambed sediment across the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.

    1999-01-01

    Trace-element concentrations in 541 streambed-sediment samples collected from 20 study areas across the conterminous United States were examined as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Sediment samples were sieved and the <63-μm fraction was retained for determination of total concentrations of trace elements. Aluminum, iron, titanium, and organic carbon were weakly or not at all correlated with the nine trace elements examined:  arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc. Four different methods of accounting for background/baseline concentrations were examined; however, normalization was not required because field sieving removed most of the background differences between samples. The sum of concentrations of trace elements characteristic of urban settings - copper, mercury, lead, and zinc - was well correlated with population density, nationwide. Median concentrations of seven trace elements (all nine examined except arsenic and selenium) were enriched in samples collected from urban settings relative to agricultural or forested settings. Forty-nine percent of the sites sampled in urban settings had concentrations of one or more trace elements that exceeded levels at which adverse biological effects could occur in aquatic biota.

  19. Trace-element concentrations in streambed sediment across the conterminous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, K.C. )

    1999-08-01

    Trace-element concentrations in 541 streambed-sediment samples collected from 20 study areas across the conterminous United States were examined as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Sediment samples were sieved and the < 63-[micro]m fraction was retained for determination of total concentrations of trace elements. Aluminum, iron, titanium, and organic carbon were weakly or not at all correlated with the nine trace elements examined: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc. Four different methods of accounting for background/baseline concentrations were examined; however, normalization was not required because field sieving removed most of the background differences between samples. The sum of concentrations of trace elements characteristic of urban settings -- copper, mercury, lead, and zinc -- was well correlated with population density, nationwide. Median concentrations of seven trace elements (all nine examined except arsenic and selenium) were enriched in samples collected from urban settings relative to agricultural of forested settings. Forty-nine percent of the sites sampled in urban setting had concentrations of one or more trace elements that exceeded levels at which adverse biological effects could occur in aquatic biota.

  20. Experimental design for the evaluation of struvite sedimentation obtained from an ammonium concentrated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Castro, Samuel Rodrigues; Araújo, Mahira Adna Cota; Lange, Liséte Celina

    2013-01-01

    Chemical precipitation of struvite as a technique of ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)-N) removal from concentrated wastewater has been shown to be an attractive alternative due to its high effectiveness, reaction rate, simplicity, environmental sustainability and, especially, the application potential of the generated solids for the fertilizer industry. The technique of experimental design has been used in order to identify and evaluate the optimum conditions of chemical precipitation reaction applied in a struvite sedimentation study. The preliminary tests were performed using synthetic effluent with a concentration equal to 500.0 mg N L(-1). The stoichiometric ratio Mg:NH(4):PO(4) equal to 1.5:1.0:1.25 and pH equal to 8.5 were taken to be the optimum conditions, where a NH(4)-N removal equal to 98.6% was achieved with only 10-min reaction time. This condition has been used to evaluate the struvite sedimentation from synthetic wastewaters, intending to check the optimum conditions achieved by the experimental design in different initial concentrations, 1,000 and 2,000 mg N L(-1). The results were typical of a good zonal sedimentation and can be used in the scale up the system.

  1. Development and testing of a sampling device for the analyses of suspended sediment concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schletterer, Martin; Reindl, Robert; Unterlercher, Franz; Hauer, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Suspended sediment concentrations are not equal in time as well as within a cross section. For calibration, sampling is needed within a cross profile (using e.g. sampler US P-61-A1) or nearby of a SSC sensor. However, due to insufficient hydraulic efficiency, uncontrolled handling under water as well as lack in accuracy in starting and closing the suspended sediment sampling, the well-established extracting of water samples by hand (dip or grab sample) lacks reproducibility. Due to these shortcomings a novel measuring device has been developed for suspended sediment sampling in rivers. For the design of the presented sampler the experiences of previous technical concepts of direct suspended sediment sampling in rivers have been considered. The sampling device consists of 2 tubes: a filling pipe (8x1 mm = 6 mm inner diameter) and an exhaust pipe (6x1 mm = 4 mm inner diameter). The filling pipe is equipped thread (M8x1 mm) to attach the "measuring nozzle" made of brass. We compared three different nozzles (D4, D5, D6) in order to investigate possible effects of different filling times. Both tubes are connected (TIG -Tungsten Inert-Gaswelding) by a flat steel. All parts (despite the nozzles) are made from stainless steel. On the tubes a plastic screw cap is mounted which allows to attach (and quickly change) standard sampling bottles. A mount enables that the device can be attached to a commercially available "GARDENA aluminium handle", thus using this rod samples can be taken at certain localities. The measurement device has been designed to improve the accuracy of suspended sediment sampling in rivers. The target was to achieve an optimum in hydraulic efficiency without disturbing the natural transport dynamics. Thus, the water sample gained from this sampling device supports the calibration and validation of indirect suspended sediment sampling devices (e.g. SSC sensor). We present the design of the sampler as well as field data in comparison with conventional dip

  2. Indices of benthic community tolerance in contaminated Great Lakes sediments: Relations with sediment contaminant concentrations, sediment toxicity, and the sediment quality triad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.; Schmitt, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the toxic-units model developed by Wildhaber and Schmitt (1996) as a predictor of indices of mean tolerance to pollution (i.e., Lenat, 1993; Hilsenhoff, 1987) and other benthic community indices from Great Lakes sediments containing complex mixtures of environmental contaminants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls - PCBs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs, pesticides, chlorinated dioxins, and metals). Sediment toxic units were defined as the ratio of the estimated pore-water concentration of a contaminant to its chronic toxicity as estimated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) or other applicable standard. The total hazard of a sediment to aquatic life was assessed by summing toxic units for all contaminants quantified. Among the benthic community metrics evaluated, total toxic units were most closely correlated with Lenat's (1993) and Hilsenhoff's (1987) indices of community tolerance (T(L), and T(H), respectively); toxic units accounted for 42% (T(L)) and 53% (T(H)) of variability in community tolerance as measured by Ponar grabs. In contrast, taxonomic richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity were not correlated (P > 0.05) with toxic units. Substitution of order- or family-level identifications for lowest possible (mostly genus- or species-) level identifications in the calculation of T(L) and T(H) indices weakened the relationships with toxic units. Tolerance values based on order- and family-level identifications of benthos for artificial substrate samples were more strongly correlated with toxic units than tolerance values for benthos from Ponar grabs. The ability of the toxic-units model to predict the other two components (i.e., laboratory-measured sediment toxicity and benthic community composition) of the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) may obviate the need for the SQT in some situations.

  3. Tracking Metal Pollution in Lake Chapala: Concentrations in Water, Sediments, and Fish.

    PubMed

    Torres, Zaria; Mora, Miguel A; Taylor, Robert J; Alvarez-Bernal, Dioselina

    2016-09-01

    We measured concentrations of selected metals (Al, Ba, Cu, Mn, Hg, Sr, V, and Zn) in water, sediments, and fish from Lake Chapala and a reference site to evaluate potential negative effects on wildlife, particularly fish-eating birds. Fish metal concentrations ranged from 0.05 µg/g wet weight (ww) for Al and Cu to 64.70 µg/g ww for Sr. There was a positive and significant correlation between fish length and metals particularly for Ba, Cu, Mn, and Zn in Lake Chapala (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant correlations between metal concentrations and δ(15)N values in fish indicating no biomagnification through the food web. Overall, metal concentrations in water, sediments, and fish were similar to and in some cases below those reported for Lake Chapala over the last 20 years. Also, metal concentrations were below those that could be of concern for negative effects on fish and wildlife of Lake Chapala.

  4. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Lionberger, Megan A.

    2007-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2005 (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2004 through September 2005. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  5. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2005-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 2003 (October 1, 2002-September 30, 2003). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, one site in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2002 through September 2003. Calibration curves and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  6. Spatial and temporal patterns of turbidity, sediment concentration and load across nested scales in an urban watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, J. T.; Welty, C.; Miller, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    In a highly regulated area such as the Chesapeake Bay watershed, suspended sediment is a matter of primary concern. However, there are few continuous sediment-concentration records available to quantify urban sediment loads. Near real-time turbidity and discharge data have been collected continuously for more than three years at six stream gages representing three nested watershed scales (1-2 sq km, 5-6 sq km, 14 sq km) in the highly impervious Dead Run watershed, located in Baltimore County, MD. Suspended sediment point samples have been collected for multiple storm events at five of the six sites, to establish provisional relationships between turbidity and suspended sediment concentrations. Using these calculated relationships and USGS discharge data, we can quantify sediment loads at each station. Turbidity-discharge relationships vary both spatially and temporally, highlighting the extreme heterogeneity of an urban watershed. Spatially, relationships change from headwaters to mouth, potentially suggesting a variation in sediment sources. Temporally, relationships change both seasonally and annually. The lowest turbidity values are consistently seen in the fall, while values in winter, spring, and summer display a high inter-annual variability. Sediment loads and yields calculated for four representative storms are compared across nested watershed scales to assess evidence for sources or sinks at different locations within the drainage network. Yields at the mouth of the watershed (DRKR) for large storms were higher than an area-weighted average of the two contributing sites (DR3, DR4), potentially suggesting additional source areas of sediment within the watershed. This highlights the ability of near real-time data to assist in developing more effective approaches in mitigating sediment transport by helping to identifying consistent trends, locations of hot spots, and patterns of sediment arrival.

  7. Vertical distribution of (137)Cs activity concentration in marine sediments at Amvrakikos Gulf, western of Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsabaris, C; Patiris, D L; Fillis-Tsirakis, E; Kapsimalis, V; Pilakouta, M; Pappa, F K; Vlastou, R

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present work is the study of (137)Cs migration in sediment column taking into account the sedimentation rate in the Amvrakikos Gulf, at the western part of Greece. Marine core sediments were collected and the measurements were performed using the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry method. The vertical distribution of (137)Cs activity concentration, as part of anthropogenic marine radioactivity, provided averaged sedimentation rate by identifying the depths of activity concentrations due to the Chernobyl accident and the nuclear tests signals. Furthermore, (137)Cs measurements were reproduced using the proposed one-dimensional diffusion-advection model which provides mainly as an output, the sedimentation rate and the average diffusivity of (137)Cs in the sediment column. The proposed model estimates the temporal variation of (137)Cs activity concentration from 1987 (one year after the Chernobyl accident) till today (2014).

  8. Toxicity risk assessment of mercury, DDT and arsenic legacy pollution in sediments: A triad approach under low concentration conditions.

    PubMed

    Marziali, L; Rosignoli, F; Drago, A; Pascariello, S; Valsecchi, L; Rossaro, B; Guzzella, L

    2017-03-31

    The determination of sediment toxicity is challenging due to site-specific factors affecting pollutants distribution and bioavailability, especially when contamination levels are close to expected non-effect concentrations. Different lines of evidence and sensitive tools are necessary for a proper toxicity risk assessment. We examined the case study of the Toce River (Northern Italy), where past industrial activities determined Hg, DDT and As enrichment in sediments. A triad approach comprising chemical, ecotoxicological and ecological analyses (benthic invertebrates) was carried out for risk assessment of residual contamination in river sediments. A "blank" site upstream from the industrial site was selected to compare the other sites downstream. Sediment, water and benthic invertebrate samplings were carried out following standard protocols. Results emphasized that despite the emissions of the industrial site ceased about 20years ago, sediments in the downstream section of the river remain contaminated by Hg, DDT and As with concentrations exceeding Threshold Effect Concentrations. A chronic whole-sediment test with Chironomus riparius showed decreased development rate and a lower number of eggs per mass in the contaminated sediments. Benthic community was analyzed with the calculation of integrated (STAR_ICMi) and stressor-specific metrics (SPEARpesticide and mean sensitivity to Hg), but no significant differences were found between upstream and downstream sites. On the other hand, multivariate analysis (partial Redundancy Analysis and variation partitioning) emphasized a slight impact on invertebrate community, accounting for 5% variation in taxa composition. Results show that legacy contaminants in sediments, even at low concentrations, may be bioavailable and possibly toxic for benthic invertebrates. At low concentration levels, sensitive and site-specific tools need to be developed for a proper risk analysis.

  9. Aerobic Biofilms Grown from Athabasca Watershed Sediments Are Inhibited by Increasing Concentrations of Bituminous Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, John R.; Sanschagrin, Sylvie; Roy, Julie L.; Swerhone, George D. W.; Korber, Darren R.; Greer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Sediments from the Athabasca River and its tributaries naturally contain bitumen at various concentrations, but the impacts of this variation on the ecology of the river are unknown. Here, we used controlled rotating biofilm reactors in which we recirculated diluted sediments containing various concentrations of bituminous compounds taken from the Athabasca River and three tributaries. Biofilms exposed to sediments having low and high concentrations of bituminous compounds were compared. The latter were 29% thinner, had a different extracellular polysaccharide composition, 67% less bacterial biomass per μm2, 68% less cyanobacterial biomass per μm2, 64% less algal biomass per μm2, 13% fewer protozoa per cm2, were 21% less productive, and had a 33% reduced content in chlorophyll a per mm2 and a 20% reduction in the expression of photosynthetic genes, but they had a 23% increase in the expression of aromatic hydrocarbon degradation genes. Within the Bacteria, differences in community composition were also observed, with relatively more Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria and less Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes in biofilms exposed to high concentrations of bituminous compounds. Altogether, our results suggest that biofilms that develop in the presence of higher concentrations of bituminous compounds are less productive and have lower biomass, linked to a decrease in the activities and abundance of photosynthetic organisms likely due to inhibitory effects. However, within this general inhibition, some specific microbial taxa and functional genes are stimulated because they are less sensitive to the inhibitory effects of bituminous compounds or can degrade and utilize some bitumen-associated compounds. PMID:24056457

  10. Concentration and spatial distribution of selected constituents in Detroit River bed sediment adjacent to Grassy Island, Michigan, August 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoard, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    In August 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, collected sediment?core samples from the bed of the Detroit River adjacent to Grassy Island. The goal of the sampling was to assess the distribution and concentration of chemical constituents in sediment adjacent to Grassy Island, which was operated from 1960 to 1982 as a confined disposal facility to hold dredge spoils. On August 31, 2006, seven samples were collected at four locations in the Detroit River on the north, south, east, and west sides of the island. Metals concentrations in the riverbed sediment tended to be higher on the west side of the island, whereas organic?compound concentrations were generally higher on the east side. Comparison of results from this sampling to concentrations reported in previous studies indicates that the concentrations of inorganic constituents, mainly metals, in the riverbed sediment around Grassy Island fell within the range of concentrations found regionally throughout the Detroit River and in most cases have lower mean and median values than found elsewhere regionally in the Detroit River. Comparison of results from the August 31, 2006, sampling to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency risk?based sediment?quality guidelines indicates that 18 organic constituents for which an ecological screening level (ESL), and (or) a threshold effect concentration (TEC), and (or) a probable effect concentration (PEC) has been defined exceeded one or more of these guidelines at least once. Further work would be needed to determine whether constituent concentrations in the river sediment are related to constituent runoff from Grassy Island.

  11. Comparative calculation of suspended sediment loads with respect to hysteresis effects (in the Petzenkirchen catchment, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, A.; Strauss, P.; Krueger, T.; Quinton, J. N.

    2010-07-01

    SummaryStreams in intensively used agricultural catchments are frequently characterised by high transport of suspended solids during rainfall events. Due to a high variability in runoff, the sediment concentration relationship during and between different events and various hysteresis effects, instantaneous sediment concentrations and event loads are difficult to calculate. We tested the applicability of turbidity measurements for calculating instantaneous sediment concentrations and loads in a small agricultural catchment in Austria. We calibrated quasi-continuous turbidity measurements using additional water sampling and employed these calibrated sediment concentrations as benchmark sediment concentrations. Four different methods to calculate instantaneous sediment concentrations were tested on 19 events. A generalized rating curve approach resulted in a considerable bias for both event specific sediment concentrations and total sediments loads. Fitting of event-specific rating curves still misrepresented instantaneous sediment concentrations for the different events, but gave load estimations that were in a range of 5% of the benchmark values. Two approaches accounting explicitly for hysteresis exhibited the best fit and provided load estimations that were in a range of 0-1% deviation to the benchmark sediment concentrations. Nevertheless, several limitations to the hysteresis model approach were identified. Testing the various hysteresis effects against other event parameters such as total rainfall amount, maximum rainfall intensity and initial soil water content revealed interactions to these parameters that could predefine parameter values of the hysteresis model approach.

  12. Comparative Calculation of Suspended Sediment Loads with Respect to Hysteresis Effects (in the Petzenkichen Catchment, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Alexander; Strauss, Peter; Krueger, Tobias

    2010-05-01

    Streams in intensively used agricultural catchments are frequently characterised by high transport of suspended solids during rainfall events. Due to a high variability in runoff, the sediment concentration relationship during and between different events and various hysteresis effects, instantaneous sediment concentrations and event loads are difficult to calculate. We tested the applicability of turbidity measurements for calculating instantaneous sediment concentrations and loads in a small agricultural catchment in Austria. We calibrated quasi-continuous turbidity measurements using additional water sampling and employed these calibrated sediment concentrations as benchmark sediment concentrations. Four different methods to calculate instantaneous sediment concentrations were tested on 19 events. A generalized rating curve approach resulted in a considerable bias for both event specific sediment concentrations and total sediments loads. Fitting of event specific rating curves still misrepresented instantaneous sediment concentrations for the different events, but gave load estimations that were in a range of 5% of the benchmark values. Two approaches accounting explicitly for hysteresis exhibited the best fit and provided load estimations that were in a range of 0 - 1% deviation to the benchmark sediment concentrations. Nevertheless, several limitations to the hysteresis model approach were identified. Testing the various hysteresis effects against other event parameters such as total rainfall amount, maximum rainfall intensity and initial soil water content revealed interactions to these parameters that could predefine parameter values of the hysteresis model approach.

  13. Variations in suspended sediment and associated trace element concentrations in selected riverine cross sections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowltz, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed sampling and subsequent analyses of riverine suspended sediment obtained from six rivers in the United States indicate substantial differences in suspended sediment concentrations and possibly in some associated trace elements, depending on whether depth- and width-integrated, point, or pumping samples are used. In addition, the data from time-series, depth-integrated sampling indicate that there can be substantial short-term (on the order of 20-30 min) spatial and/or temporal variations in suspended-sediment concentrations. Despite this, major element concentrations are remarkably stable both spatially and temporally. Trace element concentrations are generally stable; however, some spatial and temporal variations may occur.

  14. Trends in suspended-sediment loads and concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin, 1950–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Sprague, Lori A.; Blevins, Dale W.

    2011-01-01

    Trends in loads and concentrations of suspended sediment and suspended sand generally were downward for stations within the Mississippi River Basin during the 60-, 34-, and 12-year periods analyzed. Sediment transport in the lower Mississippi River has historically been, and continues to be, most closely correlative to sediment contributions from the Missouri River, which generally carried the largest annual suspended-sediment load of the major Mississippi River subbasins. The closure of Fort Randall Dam in the upper Missouri River in 1952 was the single largest event in the recorded historical decline of suspended-sediment loads in the Mississippi River Basin. Impoundments on tributaries and sediment reductions as a result of implementation of agricultural conservation practices throughout the basin likely account for much of the remaining Mississippi River sediment transport decline. Scour of the main-stem channel downstream from the upper Missouri River impoundments is likely the largest source of suspended sand in the lower Missouri River. The Ohio River was second to the Missouri River in terms of sediment contributions, followed by the upper Mississippi and Arkansas Rivers. Declines in sediment loads and concentrations continued through the most recent analysis period (1998–2009) at available Mississippi River Basin stations. Analyses of flow-adjusted concentrations of suspended sediment indicate the recent downward temporal changes generally can be explained by corresponding decreases in streamflows.

  15. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2003-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 2001 (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). Optical backscatterance sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended sediment at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the electrical output of the optical backscatterance sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2000 through September 2001. Calibration curves and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  16. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2004-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002). Optical backscatterance sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended sediment at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the electrical output of the optical backscatterance sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2001 through September 2002. Calibration curves and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  17. Metals concentrations in sediments and oyster Crassostrea gigas from La Pitahaya lagoon, Sinaloa, NW Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Varela, R.; Muñoz Sevilla, N.; Campos Villegas, L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, P.; Gongora Gomez, A.; MP, J.

    2013-05-01

    This present study was performed in a culture of Crassostrea gigas in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa, México. The main objective is to identify the enrichment pattern of trace elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Hg, As, V) also was determine concentrations thereof in oyster. Four sampling sites were selected, two smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly , the region of culture and connection with the sea ; and each sampling consisted of 4 sample sediments and 50 oysters of commercial size per mounth . Concentrations of trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The higher concentration of elements in certain samples clearly suggests that they are directly fed by the smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly. These small channels often carry the contaminants which are absorbed and deposited in the sediments. The results were also compared with the Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Medium (ERM) of NOAA and it indicates that Ni is above the ERL values. Cadmium, lead, chrome and copper concentrations exceeded the limits permissible of bivalbe mollusks established by the sanitary regulations

  18. Effect of surfactant addition on phenanthrene biodegradation in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsomides, H.J.; Hughes, J.B.; Thomas, J.M.; Ward, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine whether commercial surfactants enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sediments. Phenanthrene was chosen as a representative PAH. An inoculum of PAH-degrading microorganisms, enriched from an aquatic sediment, was used in sediment-water slurry microcosm biodegradation experiments. Of seven nonionic surfactants tested, only one (Triton X-100) did not inhibit phenanthrene mineralization at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Temporal studies on Triton X-100 revealed that while it initially inhibited mineralization in sediment-free microcosms, after 1 week Triton X-100 slightly improved phenanthrene biotransformation and mineralization in microcosms with and without sediment. For all treatments, phenanthrene disappearance was complete after 9 d. and mineralization reached 50 to 65% after 12 d. Sorption to the sediment appears to have reduced the free aqueous surfactant concentration, thereby reducing surfactant toxicity to the microorganisms. These results suggest that many surfactants are toxic to PAH-degrading microorganisms, and while surfactant addition may not always have adverse effects on biodegradation, the use of surfactants might not be necessary to achieve complete contaminant removal.

  19. Effect of surfactant addition on phenanthrene biodegradation in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsomides, H.J.; Hughes, J.B.; Thomas, J.M.; Ward, C.H.

    1995-06-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine whether commercial surfactants enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sediments. Phenanthrene was chosen as a representative PAH; an inoculum of PAH-degrading microorganisms, enriched from an aquatic sediment, was used in sediment-water slurry microcosm biodegradation experiments. Of seven non-ionic surfactants tested, only one (Triton X-100) did not inhibit phenanthrene mineralization at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Temporal studies on Triton X-100 revealed that while it initially inhibited mineralization in sediment-free microcosms, after 1 week Triton X-100 slightly improved phenanthrene biotransformation and mineralization in microcosms with and without sediment. For all treatments, phenanthrene disappearance was complete after 9 d, and mineralization reached 50 to 65% after 12 d. Sorption to the sediment appears to have reduced the free aqueous surfactant concentration, thereby reducing surfactant toxicity to the microorganisms. These results suggest that many surfactants are toxic to PAH-degrading microorganisms, and while surfactant addition may not always have adverse effects on biodegradation, the use of surfactants might not be desirable to achieve complete contamination removal.

  20. Spectral calibration of CBERS 2B multispectral satellite images to assess suspended sediment concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino da Silva, André Giskard; Amaro, Venerando E.; Stattegger, Karl; Schwarzer, Klaus; Vital, Helenice; Heise, Björn

    2015-06-01

    In this study, 11 CBERS 2B and 1 LANDSAT 5-TM satellite images from 2008 were used to estimate the suspended sediment concentration and the total suspended sediment load of the Parnaíba River (NE-Brazil). The calculation of the amount of sediment in suspension was performed using Tassan's algorithm, which was originally developed for use on LANDSAT 5-TM images; therefore, the CBERS 2B images were spectrally calibrated using LANDSAT 5-TM at-satellite radiance. The application of atmospheric correction to the images was necessary to account for meteorological influence on the spectral data prior to the calculation of the suspended sediment concentration. Three types of dark object subtraction and the 6S model were tested, and one type of dark object subtraction was chosen as the appropriate atmospheric correction method. Tassan's algorithm requires in situ calibration; therefore, suspended sediment concentrations measured in water samples from the Parnaíba River mouth were used to calibrate the algorithm. The results revealed that the variation of suspended sediment concentration was strongly influenced by seasonal precipitation. In 2008, the suspended sediment released by the Parnaíba River was approximately 2.54 × 106 tons. The discharged sediment formed a sediment plume on the inner continental shelf. The extension of the plume depended on the specific hydrodynamic conditions that were forced mainly by the strength of river runoff, longshore currents, tidal currents and amplitudes, and wind and wave climate.

  1. The relationship between unconfined compressive strength and leachate concentration of stabilised contaminated sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir Aliyu, Mohammed; Tarmizi Abd Karim, Ahmad; -Ming Chan, Chee

    2016-11-01

    Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) treatment was used in this study to immobilise copper (Cu) in contaminated river sediment. The sediment was artificially contaminated by spiking the solution of Copper sulphate (CuSO4.5H2O) to so as to get an average of 1000 ppm target concentration. Portland composite cement and Rice husk ash (RHA) were used as S/S agents. The amount of cement added to the mixture was l0% and while rice husk ash at the rate of 5%, l0%, 15% and 20% to the total dry weight of the mixture and then was cured for 7, 14 and 28 days. The unconfined compressive strength test (UCS) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the S/S treatments. From the results obtained it indicates that the partial replacement of cement with RHA in the binder system has increased the strength and the leachate concentration of copper was less in the treated sediment samples if compared with the untreated ones.

  2. Did streamflow or suspended sediment concentration changes reduce sediment load in the middle reaches of the Yellow River?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Li, Rui; Chen, Lili; Lin, Pengfei

    2017-03-01

    The continuous ecological restoration of the Loess Plateau, which aims to reduce the sediment entering into the Yellow River, is known throughout the world for two strategies: the integrated soil conservation project that began in the 1970s, and the "Grain for Green" project that began in the 1990s. However, the topic of whether the muddy water in the middle Yellow River run clearer remains debatable, and, in fact, response to the topic is reasonably well documented in regard to hydrological changes in the sediment source area. Six sub-catchments nested in the Beiluo River basin - one of the major sediment sources for the Yellow River - were selected, with data series ranging from 1957 to 2009. The Mann-Kendall and Pettitt tests were used for trend detection. A simple method was developed based on the distribution of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) versus water discharge. Using this method, we evaluated the quantities of sediment yield reduction attributed to streamflow and SSC changes due to the two strategies. The results showed that annual sediment yield in 5 out of 6 stations significantly decreased, with rates varying from -4 to -217 t·km-2·yr-1. Significant decreases in daily and event streamflow and suspended sediment concentration were identified, especially at a high SSC (top 1-5%). During the integrated soil conservation period, the sediment yield was reduced mainly by decreases in high flow and high SSC conditions. In contrast, during the "Grain for Green" period, sediment yield was reduced due to decreases in streamflow and SSC at all magnitudes. It was concluded that rainfall-sediment load dynamics have changed in the context of ecological restoration. Changes in both streamflow and the SSC-water discharge relationship induced the sediment yield reduction over time; in other words, the streamflow in the middle reaches of Yellow River became clearer during periods of ecological restoration. Moreover, the increased annual sediment yield at the

  3. Evaluating suitability of MODIS-Terra images for reproducing historic sediment concentrations in water bodies: Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaba, Essayas; Philpot, William; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2014-02-01

    Government and NGO funded conservation programs are being implemented in developing countries with the potential benefit of reduced sediment inflow into fresh water lakes. However, these claims are difficult to verify due to limited historical sediment concentration data in lakes and rivers. Remote sensing can potentially aid in monitoring sediment concentration. With almost daily availability over the past ten years and consistent atmospheric correction applied to the images, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 250 meter images are potential resources capable of monitoring future concentrations and reconstructing historical sediment concentration records. In this paper, site-specific relationships are developed between reflectance in near-infrared (NIR) images and three factors: total suspended solids (TSS), turbidity and Secchi depth for Lake Tana near the mouth of the Gumara River. The first two sampling campaigns on November 27, 2010 and May 13, 2011 are used in calibration. Reflectance in the NIR varies linearly with turbidity (R2 = 0.89) and TSS (R2 = 0.95). Secchi depth fit best to an exponential relation with R2 of 0.74. The relationships are validated using a third sample set collected on November 7, 2011 with RMSE of 11 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) for Turbidity, 16.5 mg l-1 for TSS and 0.12 meters for Secchi depth. The MAE was 10% for TSS, 14% for turbidity and 0.1% for Secchi depth. Using the relationship for TSS, a 10-year time series of sediment concentration in Lake Tana near the Gumara River was plotted. It was found that after the severe drought of 2002 and 2003 the concentration in the lake increased significantly. The results showed that MODIS images are potential cost effective tools to monitor suspended sediment concentration and obtain a past history of concentration for evaluating the effect of best management practices.

  4. Mercury concentrations in estuarine sediments, Lavaca and Matagorda bays, Texas, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, David S.; Snyder, Grant L.; Taylor, R. Lynn

    1998-01-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 7471 (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption) was an acceptable analytical method for determining the total mercury concentrations in the Lavaca-Matagorda Bays estuarine sediment samples. Measurement of additional trace metals would aid in the characterization of total mercury concentrations and in the identification of concentrator/collector relations that are principally responsible for the adsorption of mercurous compounds to particulates in the bottom sediments.

  5. Accumulation and effects of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles to sediment-dwelling invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ramskov, Tina; Forbes, Valery E; Gilliland, Douglas; Selck, Henriette

    2015-09-01

    Sediment is increasingly recognized as the major sink for contaminants including nanoparticles (NPs). Thus, sediment-living organisms are especially susceptible to NP exposure. Studies of the fate and effects of NPs in the sediment matrix are still in their infancy, and data from such studies are in high demand. Here, we examine the effects of exposure to sediment mixed with either aqueous Ag (administered as AgNO3) or Ag NPs (13nm, citrate-capped) at a nominal exposure concentration of 100μg Ag/g dry weight sediment on four benthic invertebrates: two clones of the gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum (clones A and B) and two polychaete species (Capitella teleta, Capitella sp. S). Our results show that both species sensitivity and Ag form (aqueous Ag, Ag NPs) play a role in bioaccumulation and effects. Following two weeks of exposure, both clones of P. antipodarum were found to be insensitive towards both Ag forms (generally low Ag accumulation, no toxicity). In contrast, the two Capitella species varied widely with respect to Ag uptake and observed toxicity. Capitella sp. S was adversely affected by both aqueous Ag (mortality) and Ag NPs (growth), whereas C. teleta was not affected by either Ag form. For neither polychaete species was the observed toxicity directly related to bioaccumulation. Therefore, future nano-ecotoxicological research should focus on understanding differences in uptake and handling mechanisms among species and the relationship between bioaccumulation and toxicity.

  6. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. We investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by ???70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  7. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  8. Estimating flow concentration and sediment redistribution on saline rangeland communities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In arid and semi-arid rangelands where vegetation is typically sparse, a synergistic relationship is assumed to exist between spatial distribution of plants and hydrologic and erosion processes. In these environments, an accurate understanding of sediment transport processes is key to developing in...

  9. Sediment carbon concentration and transport from small pastured watersheds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the current emphasis on the role of carbon in the environment, agricultural systems and their impacts on the carbon cycle are important parts of the overall issue. Pasture systems and carbon that is transported attached to sediment has been addressed at the North Appalachian Experimental Waters...

  10. Metal concentrations in sediments from tourist beaches of Miri City, Sarawak, Malaysia (Borneo Island).

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, R; Jonathan, M P; Roy, Priyadarsi D; Wai-Hwa, L; Prasanna, M V; Sarkar, S K; Navarrete-López, M

    2013-08-15

    Forty-three sediment samples were collected from the beaches of Miri City, Sarawak, Malaysia to identify the enrichment of partially leached trace metals (PLTMs) from six different tourist beaches. The samples were analyzed for PLTMs Fe, Mn, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn. The concentration pattern suggest that the southern side of the study area is enriched with Fe (1821-6097 μg g(-1)), Mn (11.57-90.22 μg g(-1)), Cr (51.50-311 μg g(-1)), Ni (18-51 μg g(-1)), Pb (8.81-84.05 μg g(-1)), Sr (25.95-140.49 μg g(-1)) and Zn (12.46-35.04 μg g(-1)). Compared to the eco-toxicological values, Cr>Effects range low (ERL), Lowest effect level (LEL), Severe effect level (SEL); Cu>Unpolluted sediments, ERL, LEL; Pb>Unpolluted sediments and Ni>ERL and LEL. Comparative results with other regions indicate that Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn are higher, indicating an external input rather than natural process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of a salt marsh plant (Halimione portulacoides) on the concentrations and potential mobility of metals in sediments.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C Marisa R; Mucha, Ana P; Bordalo, A A; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2008-09-15

    Influence of Halimione portulacoides, commonly found in temperate salt marshes, on sediment metal contents, speciation and potential mobility in case of sediment re-suspension was evaluated. Both colonized and non-colonized sediments were studied for total Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn contents and metal fraction exchangeable to water collected in situ. Sediment elutriates, prepared with water collected from each site, were used to simulate a sediment re-suspension phenomenon. As the characteristics and degree of contamination of sediments may influence system behaviour, salt marshes of two Portuguese estuaries, Cavado (NW coast) and Sado (SW coast), were studied. Cu, Pb and Zn contents higher than ERL (quality guideline, effect range-low) were observed, indicating potential risks for living organisms. Strong Cu-complexing organic ligands, also determined in both water and elutriates, were higher in rhizosediment elutriates, at concentrations similar, or even higher, to those of Cu. Such ligands condition metals speciation in the water column and probably also metal bioavailability. From rhizosediment significant amounts of Cu and Zn were transferred to the aqueous phase, concentrations 2-8 times higher than concentrations present in water. In contrast, elutriates of non-colonized sediment removed metals from water, Cu and Zn levels in elutriates being 2-6 times lower than initial ones. Cd and Pb levels in water and elutriates were not measurable in most cases. Results clearly indicate that metals potential solubility in the rhizosphere of plants was markedly higher than that in the surrounding sediment. The obtained results indicated that H. portulacoides presence (and probably other salt marsh plants) may cause a marked increase in metals concentrations in dissolved phase (pore water or even water column if rhizosediment is re-suspended). As salt marsh plants may be abundant in temperate and subtropical estuaries and costal lagoons, this phenomenon should not be disregard in

  12. Suspended-sediment concentration and pool sedimentation data for the Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, September 2000 through October 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Peter R.; Zelt, Ronald B.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents data on streamflow, suspended-sediment concentration, geomorphic measurements of pools, and particle-size distribution of surficial bed material, collected along a 5-mile reach of the Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park. The study was done in cooperation with the National Park Service. The Park Service was concerned about the potential effects that road reconstruction would have on water quality. A streamflow-gaging station and two automatic pumping samplers were installed in September 2000 to collect suspended-sediment samples. The gage and samplers were operated seasonally from March through September 2001. The geomorphic survey of pools and sampling of bed material occurred during October 2000.

  13. Sediment Metal Concentration Survey Along the Mine-Affected Molonglo River, NSW, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wadige, Chamani P M Marasinghe; Taylor, Anne M; Krikowa, Frank; Maher, William A

    2016-04-01

    Metal concentrations were measured in sediments of the mine-affected Molonglo River to determine current metal concentrations and distribution along the river. Compared with an uncontaminated site at 6.5 km upstream of the Captains Flat mine, sediments collected from the river at ≤12.5 km distance below the mine had a significantly higher percentage of finely divided silt and clay with higher concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The measured metal concentrations in the mine affected sites of the river were in the following order: Zn = 697-6818 > Pb = 23-1796 > Cu = 10-628 > Cd = 0.13-8.7 µg/g dry mass. The highest recorded metal concentrations were Cd at 48, Cu at 45, Pb at 240, and Zn at 81 times higher than the background concentrations of these metals in the river sediments. A clear sediment metal-contamination gradient from the mine site to 63 km downstream was established for Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the river sediments. Compared with sediment metal concentrations before a major flood in 2010, only Zn concentrations increased. For all of the mine-affected sites studied, Cd and Zn concentrations exceeded the (ANZECC/ARMCANZ, Australian and New Zealand guidelines for fresh and marine water quality. Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council/Agriculture and Resource Management Council of Australia and New Zealand, 2000) interim sediment-quality guidelines low values for Cd (1.5 µg/g dry mass) and the high value for Zn (410 µg/g dry mass). Existing metal loads in the riverbed sediments may still be adversely affecting the river infauna.

  14. Combined effects of the fungicide propiconazole and agricultural runoff sediments on the aquatic bryophyte Vesicularia dubyana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglan; Riise, Gunnhild; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Greulich, K; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2005-09-01

    Pesticides, firmly attached to the topsoil, might enter nearby watercourses at periods with high erosive loss of sediments. Therefore, exposure of aquatic organisms to these low mobility pesticides, in many cases, will coincide with a high sediment concentration. In this study, both individual and combined effects of propiconazole and runoff sediment on the aquatic model bryophyte Vesicularia dubyana are studied. Individual exposure to propiconazole induced responses in V. dubyana at rather low concentration levels (approximately 1 microg/L), showing that harmful effects of propiconazole potentially may occur in watercourses draining propiconazole-treated fields. Individual exposure to the sediment size fractions S1 (0.16-2 microm) and S2 (0.03-0.16 microm) caused plant stress at a concentration of 100 mg/L. The coarser fraction S1 showed strong inhibition effects on photosynthesis, probably due to light attenuation. Compared to S1, the suspension with the finer fraction S2 showed lower turbidity, higher nutrient content, and a higher proportion of sediment-bound propiconazole. The combined effects of propiconazole and suspended sediment are dependent on concentrations of sediment and propiconazole. At low sediment concentration (e.g., 100 mg/L), neither S1 nor S2 reduce the toxicity of propiconazole, as only 2% of propiconazole are bound to particles. An increase in sediment concentration decreases the bioavailable concentration of propiconazole; however, at the same time, this increases the turbidity, thereby inhibiting plant photosynthesis.

  15. Spatial Evaluation of Heavy Metals Concentrations in the Surface Sediment of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yong; Jiao, Wei; Yu, Hui; Niu, Yuan; Pang, Yong; Xu, Xiangyang; Guo, Xiaochun

    2015-11-27

    With regard to the size of China's freshwater lakes, Taihu Lake ranks third and it plays an important role in the supply of drinking water, flood prevention, farming and navigation, as well as in the travelling industry. The problem of environmental pollution has attracted widespread attention in recent years. In order to understand the levels, distribution and sources of heavy metals in sediments of Taihu Lake, random selection was carried out to obtain 59 samples of surface sediment from the entire lake and study the concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni. Toxic units were also calculated to normalize the toxicities caused by various heavy metals. As a result, Cd and Cu in sediment were considered lower than the effect range low (ERL) at all regions where samples were gathered, while Pb and Ni were categorized into ERL-effect range median (ERM) at over 22% of the regions where samples were obtained. Nevertheless, all average concentrations of the samples were below the level of potential effect. According to the findings of this research, significant spatial heterogeneity existed in the above heavy metals. In conclusion, the distribution areas of heavy metals with higher concentrations were mainly the north bays, namely Zhushan Bay, Meiliang Bay as well as Gonghu Bay. The distribution areas of Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni with higher concentration also included the lake's central region, whereas the uniform distribution areas of those with lower concentrations were the lake's southeast region. In addition, it was most probable that the spatial distribution of heavy metals was determined by river inputs, whereas atmospheric precipitation caused by urban and traffic contamination also exerted considerable effects on the higher concentrations of Pb and Cd. Through evaluating the total amount of toxic units (ΣTU), it was found that higher toxicity existed primarily in the north bays and central region of the lake. If the heavy metals were sorted by the reduction of mean

  16. Spatial Evaluation of Heavy Metals Concentrations in the Surface Sediment of Taihu Lake

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yong; Jiao, Wei; Yu, Hui; Niu, Yuan; Pang, Yong; Xu, Xiangyang; Guo, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    With regard to the size of China’s freshwater lakes, Taihu Lake ranks third and it plays an important role in the supply of drinking water, flood prevention, farming and navigation, as well as in the travelling industry. The problem of environmental pollution has attracted widespread attention in recent years. In order to understand the levels, distribution and sources of heavy metals in sediments of Taihu Lake, random selection was carried out to obtain 59 samples of surface sediment from the entire lake and study the concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni. Toxic units were also calculated to normalize the toxicities caused by various heavy metals. As a result, Cd and Cu in sediment were considered lower than the effect range low (ERL) at all regions where samples were gathered, while Pb and Ni were categorized into ERL-effect range median (ERM) at over 22% of the regions where samples were obtained. Nevertheless, all average concentrations of the samples were below the level of potential effect. According to the findings of this research, significant spatial heterogeneity existed in the above heavy metals. In conclusion, the distribution areas of heavy metals with higher concentrations were mainly the north bays, namely Zhushan Bay, Meiliang Bay as well as Gonghu Bay. The distribution areas of Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni with higher concentration also included the lake’s central region, whereas the uniform distribution areas of those with lower concentrations were the lake’s southeast region. In addition, it was most probable that the spatial distribution of heavy metals was determined by river inputs, whereas atmospheric precipitation caused by urban and traffic contamination also exerted considerable effects on the higher concentrations of Pb and Cd. Through evaluating the total amount of toxic units (ΣTU), it was found that higher toxicity existed primarily in the north bays and central region of the lake. If the heavy metals were sorted by the reduction of

  17. Heavy metal concentration in sediment, benthic, benthopelagic, and pelagic fish species from Musa Estuary (Persian Gulf).

    PubMed

    Abdolahpur Monikh, Fazel; Safahieh, Alireza; Savari, Ahmad; Doraghi, Abdolmajid

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb was measured in sediment and three fish species collected from Musa Estuary, Persian Gulf. The concentration order of heavy metals in sediment were Ni > Co > Cu > Pb > Cd >. Concentrations of the heavy metals in the fish were apparently different among the three species. The concentrations of Cd and Ni in fish were Johnius belangerii > Euryglossa orientalis > Liza abu, while the Co and Cu levels were L. abu > E. orientalis > J. belangerii and E. orientalis > L. abu > J. belangerii, respectively. Result of regression analysis showed that there were no significant relationships between metal concentration in fish tissues and sediment, except for Ni concentration in the J. belangerii liver. The concentrations of studied metals in fish muscle were below the permissible limits proposed by FAO, WHO, and EC.

  18. PREDICTING ESTUARINE SEDIMENT METAL CONCENTRATIONS AND INFERRED ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS: AN INFORMATION THEORETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Empirically derived values associating sediment metal concentrations with degraded ecological conditions provide important information to assess estuarine condition. However, resources limit the number, magnitude, and frequency of monitoring programs to gather these data. As su...

  19. PREDICTING ESTUARINE SEDIMENT METAL CONCENTRATIONS AND INFERRED ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS: AN INFORMATION THEORETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Empirically derived values associating sediment metal concentrations with degraded ecological conditions provide important information to assess estuarine condition. However, resources limit the number, magnitude, and frequency of monitoring programs to gather these data. As su...

  20. Effect of biostimulation on the microbial community in PCB-contaminated sediments through periodic amendment of sediment with iron.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa Varadhan, A; Khodadoust, Amid P; Brenner, Richard C

    2011-10-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by indigenous dehalorespiring microorganisms in contaminated sediments may be enhanced via biostimulation by supplying hydrogen generated through the anaerobic corrosion of elemental iron added to the sediment. In this study, the effect of periodic amendment of sediment with various dosages of iron on the microbial community present in sediment was investigated using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) over a period of 18 months. Three PCB-contaminated sediments (two freshwater lake sediments and one marine sediment) were used. Signature biomarker analysis of the microbial community present in all three sediments revealed the enrichment of Dehalococcoides species, the population of which was sustained for a longer period of time when the sediment microcosms were amended with the lower dosage of iron (0.01 g iron per g dry sediment) every 6 months as compared to the blank system (without iron). Lower microbial stress levels were reported for the system periodically amended with 0.01 g of iron per g dry sediment every 6 months, thus reducing the competition from other hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms like methanogens, iron reducers, and sulfate reducers. The concentration of hydrogen in the system was found to be an important factor influencing the shift in microbial communities in all sediments with time. Periodic amendment of sediment with larger dosages of iron every 3 months resulted in the early prevalence of Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing bacteria followed by methanogens. An average pH of 8.4 (range of 8.2-8.6) and an average hydrogen concentration of 0.75% (range of 0.3-1.2%) observed between 6 and 15 months of the study were found to be conducive to sustaining the population of Dehalococcoides species in the three sediments amended with 0.01 g iron per g dry sediment. Biostimulation of indigenous PCB dechlorinators by the periodic amendment of contaminated sediments with low dosages of

  1. Seasonal variation of monomethylmercury concentrations in surface sediments of the Tagus Estuary (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Canário, João; Branco, Vasco; Vale, Carlos

    2007-07-01

    Surface sediments (0-2cm) were collected at 40 sites along the Tagus Estuary in July and December 2004. The sediments were analysed for total mercury, monomethylmercury (MMHg) and interpretative parameters (e.g. redox potential, pH, C(org)). No significant differences in total Hg, pH, Al, Fe, Mn and C(org) were found between sediments collected in the two periods, but MMHg concentrations were higher in July. On average sediments were warmer and more reducing in summer. On the basis of these results, an increase of 7kg of MMHg (+37%) in surface sediments of the Tagus Estuary was estimated. Presumably higher temperatures in summer promote the increase of microbial activity and higher methylation rates. The alterations observed in this study point to the potential importance of seasonal changes in MMHg production at surface sediments with eventual changes in the MMHg uptake by benthic invertebrates and other organisms in the food web.

  2. Variations in the concentrations of heavy metals through enforcement of a rest-year system and dredged sediment capping at the Yellow Sea-Byung dumping site, Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chang-Soo; Song, Ki-Hoon; Choi, Ki-Young; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Hye-Eun; Jung, Jun-Mo; Kim, Chang-Joon

    2017-07-18

    In 2014, the concentrations of 13 heavy metals in surface sediments from 14 sampling stations were analyzed and compared to samples from previous years to evaluate the remediation effectiveness of the "rest-year" (RY) system and capping with dredged material at the Yellow Sea-Byung dumping site offshore Korea. Since the 2006 introduction of the RY system, annual variations in metal concentrations at stations within the RY zone have gradually decreased over time. Heavy metal concentrations at most stations were lower than sediment quality guidelines, indicating the success of the RY system. Additionally, the effects of capping the contaminated sediment with dredged materials were investigated. The results indicate that dredged materials successfully capped the contaminated sediment within the dredged material dumping area, as the concentrations of Cr and total organic carbon were significantly reduced. We conclude that dredged materials may be used as capping materials for the remediation of contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Concentrations of Elements in Sediments and Selective Fractions of Sediments, and in Natural Waters in Contact with Sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Wagner, Richard J.; Sanzolone, Richard F.; Cox, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-eight composite and replicate sediment samples from 8 Lake Roosevelt sites were collected and analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 2 non-metals, 20 metals, and 4 lanthanide and actinide elements. All elements were detected in all sediment samples except for silver (95 percent of the elements detected for 1,008 analyses), which was detected only in 4 samples. Sequential selective extraction procedures were performed on single composite samples from the eight sites. The percentage of detections for the 31 elements analyzed ranged from 76 percent for the first extraction fraction using a weak extractant to 93 percent for the four-acid dissolution of the sediments remaining after the third sequential selective extraction. Water samples in various degrees of contact with the sediment were analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 5 non-metals, 25 metals, and 16 lanthanide and actinide elements. The filtered water samples included 10 samples from the reservoir water column at 8 sites, 32 samples of porewater, 55 samples from reservoir water overlying sediments in 8 cores from the site incubated in a field laboratory, and 24 water samples that were filtered after being tumbled with sediments from 8 sites. Overall, the concentrations of only 37 percent of the 6,776 analyses of the 121 water samples were greater than the reporting limit. Selenium, bismuth, chromium, niobium, silver, and zirconium were not detected in any water samples. The percentage of concentrations for the water samples that were above the reporting limit ranged from 14 percent for the lanthanide and actinide elements to 77 percent for the alkali and alkaline earth elements. Concentrations were greater than reporting limits in only 23 percent of the analyses of reservoir water and 29 percent of the analyses of reservoir water overlying incubation cores. In contrast, 47 and 48 percent of the concentrations of porewater and water samples tumbled with sediments, respectively

  4. Sediment concentration - water discharge hysteresis during runoff events in Norwegian agricultural rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greipsland, Inga; Skarbøvik, Eva

    2017-04-01

    Reduced sediment losses from agricultural areas is a priority in Norway, mainly because of the associated transport of pollutants such as phosphorous or pesticides. At the same time, it is shown that a large proportion of the annual total runoff and soil loss often occurs during relatively short episodes. Understanding the dynamics of short-term events is therefore important in order to estimate sediment and pollutant losses, and to assess pollutant sources. Suspended sediment concentrations are often closely related to water discharge, but this relationship is seldom unequivocal and can vary by several orders of magnitude due to such factors as hysteresis, seasonality, and antecedent flow episodes (e.g., decrease of sediment availability in multi-peaked events). The aim of this research was to quantify seasonal differences in sediment concentration - water discharge hysteresis during runoff events in two agricultural catchments in Norway with different scales (5 km2 and 300 km2). Hourly records of turbidity (SEBA Hydrometric turbidity sensors) that correlated well with suspended sediment concentration, and hourly water discharge records were used in the analysis. Events were classified according to the Hysteresis Index (HI) developed by Lawler et al, (2006 Sci. Total Environ. 360:109-126). The HI was correlated with parameters such as precipitation, sediment transport, season, and previous water discharge events. The results indicate differences in the HI across scales and between seasons. Seasonality can be explained by variations in land use and climate; while differences between catchments can be attributed to scale and dominant sediment pathways.

  5. Trace element concentrations in surface estuarine and marine sediments along the Mississippi Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Warren, Crystal; Duzgoren-Aydin, Nurdan S; Weston, James; Willett, Kristine L

    2012-01-01

    Hurricanes are relatively frequent ecological disturbances that may cause potentially long-term impacts to the coastal environment. Hurricane Katrina hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 2005, and caused a storm surge with the potential to change the trace element content of coastal surface sediments. In this study, surface estuarine and marine sediments were collected monthly following the storm from ten sites along the Mississippi Gulf Coast (Mobile Bay, Grand Bay Bayous Heron and Cumbest, Pascagoula, Ocean Springs, Biloxi Gulf, Back Biloxi Bay, Gulfport Gulf, Gulfport Courthouse Rd, and Gulfport Marina). Concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to evaluate their temporal and spatial variations in the year following Hurricane Katrina. Sediments were characterized by pH, particle size distribution and total carbon and nitrogen content. Trace element contents of the sediments were determined in both <2 mm and <63 μm grain size fractions. Results revealed no significant temporal and spatial variability in trace element concentrations, in either size fraction. Potential ecological risk of the sediments was assessed by using NOAA SQuiRTs' guideline values; most concentrations remained below probable adverse effects guidelines to marine organisms suggesting that trace elements redistributed by Hurricane Katrina would not cause an adverse impact on resident organisms. Instead, the concentrations of trace elements were site-dependent, with specific contaminants relating to the use of the area prior to Hurricane Katrina.

  6. Quantifying the concentration of ferrimagnetic particles in sediments using rock magnetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, Ioan; Banerjee, Subir K.; Berquó, Thelma S.

    2010-08-01

    We have developed a quantification method that uses mainly room temperature rock magnetic measurements to calculate concentrations of ferrimagnetic particles in sediments. Our method uses saturation magnetization (Ms) as a total ferrimagnetic concentration proxy, the saturation remanence ratio (Mrs/Ms) as a magnetic grain-size proxy, the anhysteretic remanence ratio (χa/Mrs) to estimate inter-particle magnetostatic interactions, and the normalized susceptibility of the ferrimagnetic fraction (χf/Ms) to calculate the proportion of ultrafine, superparamagnetic particles. This approach eliminates the effect of dilution of the magnetic properties by weakly magnetic matter, and allows the calculation of direct concentrations (or fluxes for dated sedimentary profiles) of constituent ferrimagnetic components. We test our method on a short sediment core from an urban Minnesota lake, for which we calculate ferrimagnetic fluxes of four magnetic components, and compare their pre- and post-European settlement values. Our quantification technique can be applied for reconstructing past environmental changes in a range of sedimentary environments, and is particularly useful for large sets of samples, where detailed magnetic unmixing methods are unfeasible due to time or instrument constraints.

  7. Natural trace metal concentrations in estuarine and coastal marine sediments of the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Windom, H.L.; Schropp, S.J.; Calder, F.D.; Ryan, J.D.; Smith, R.G. Jr.; Burney, L.C.; Lewis, F.G.; Rawlinson, C.H.

    1989-03-01

    Over 450 sediment samples from estuarine and coastal marine areas of the southeastern US remote from contaminant sources were analyzed for trace metals. Although these sediments are compositionally diverse, As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni, and Zn concentrations covary significantly with aluminum, suggesting that natural aluminosilicate minerals are the dominant natural metal bearing phases. Cd and Hg do not covary with aluminum apparently due to the importance of the contribution of natural organic phases to their concentration in sediments. It is suggested that the covariance of metals with aluminum provides a useful basis for identification and comparison of anthropogenic inputs to southeastern US coastal/estuarine sediments. By use of this approach sediments from the Savannah River, Biscayne Bay, and Pensacola Bay are compared.

  8. Trends in sediment metal concentrations in the River Avoca, South-east Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Anne; Gray, N F

    2004-12-01

    Variation in sediment metal concentrations in the River Avoca, which is severely polluted by acid mine drainage (AMD) discharged from the abandoned sulphur and copper mines in Avoca, is reported. A survey of surface and subsurface sediments was repeated after seven years during exceptionally low flow conditions in 2001. The present study found that the reference (up-stream) site used in the original 1994 study was itself impacted by AMD, showing sediment metal enrichment by AMD to be greater than originally thought. The new reference site contained elevated Pb (570 microg g(-1)) in the subsurface sediment due to abandoned Pb-Zn mines 25 km further upstream. Concentrations of Cu (43 microg g(-1)), Zn (349 microg g(-1)) and Fe (4.0%) were normal for uncontaminated rivers. All the downstream sites showed sediment metal enrichment arising from the AMD (Cu and Zn p < 0.001; Fe p < 0.01). Subsurface concentrations of metals immediately below the mixing zone were Cu 904 microg g-1 (sd 335), Zn 723 microg g-1 (sd 93), Fe 6.3% (sd 1.5) and Pb 463 microg g(-1) (sd 279). Monthly variation in metal concentrations at sites was not significantly different (p > 0.05). Although surface sediment metal concentrations were more variable, they followed similar trends to subsurface sediment. There were no significant differences in the subsurface sediment concentrations for either Cu or Zn over the period 1994 and 2001 immediately below the mines, although at the lowest site Zn had decreased by 35% over the period (p < 0.01). However there was a significant (p < 0.01) decrease over the period in the Fe concentration at all the impacted sites. This corresponds to a reduction in Fe concentration in the AMD and indicates that some remediation has occurred in the river since 1994.

  9. Response of a tidal freshwater marsh to changes in sea level and suspended-sediment concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palinkas, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    Tidal marshes are among the world's most valuable ecosystems from a variety of perspectives, but they are also perhaps the most threatened by environmental changes, such as increased rates of sea-level rise and decreased concentrations of fluvial suspended sediments. In this study, time-series measurements of sedimentation over 5 years (2010-2014) at Dyke Marsh Preserve (Potomac River, VA, USA) are used to evaluate the influence of environmental drivers on sediment accretion within the marsh. To do so, bimonthly (deposition on ceramic tiles) and seasonal-scale (from 7Be (half-life 53.3 d) measurements) sedimentation rates are placed in the context of factors that can influence inorganic sediment availability and delivery to the marsh platform, specifically winds, river discharge, suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC; calculated from rating curves), and local sea level. Because of marsh geography and dominant storm patterns in this area, the influence of events is complex - wind speed and direction are negatively correlated with local sea level but positively correlated with SSC. This is, stronger winds from a more westerly direction drive water seaward of the marsh platform; increased precipitation results in higher river discharge and SSC from runoff and/or sediment resuspension. At the bimonthly scale, changes in sea level are correlated with both the rate and character (organic content) of sediments collected on tiles, but there was no relationship between sedimentation rates and SSC. Instead, bimonthly sedimentation rates are correlated with the fluvial sediment load (product of river discharge and SSC), which is not often included in models of marsh accretion. These trends are similar for seasonal-scale observations, though statistical tests are not as robust. These results suggest that, while events drive sedimentation within the marsh, their influence can be obscured over longer time scales that incorporate quiescent times of non-deposition.

  10. Effects of sediment resuspension on the degradation of phenanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, L.A.; Gulnick, J.; Brownawell, B.J.; Taylor, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Degradation of bulk organic matter in sediments is enhanced by oxic/anoxic cycling, a feature common in coastal sediments which are resuspended into overlying waters. The authors are examining the effect of periodic cycling of sediment between an oxic water column and a reducing sediment bed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation by altering resuspension frequency in controlled laboratory exposures. Rates of initial degradation in coastal sediment have been studied for {sup 14}C-labeled phenanthrene in sediments that were suspended at the following frequencies: 12/day, 6/day, 1/day, 0.25/day and 0/day in liter-sized flow through chambers. Results to date show that degradation rates are initially log linear, with the greatest initial rates (2.4--2.7%/day) occurring in the first three treatments. In treatments resuspended less frequently, this rate decreases with time and is followed at 10--12 days, by another rate increase, which may indicate the stimulation of a bacterial subpopulation. Rates of PAH mineralization are tied to the lability and mineralization of other pools of sediment organic matter, that in turn are also affected also by oxic/anoxic cycling. Addition of fresh diatom detritus stimulated the rates of phenanthrene degradation in resuspension experiments where labile organic matter had already been consumed and microbial activity was low; in contrast diatom addition depressed phenanthrene degradation in sediment exposures with more labile organic matter remaining. The authors are further addressing the behavior of phenanthrene in exposures where they vary the concentration of initial phenanthrene and the concentration and nature of co-substrates.

  11. Regional background concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in coastal sediments of the South Sea of Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunho; Choi, Man Sik; Lee, Ji Youn; Jang, Dong Jun

    2014-06-01

    The background concentration (BC) of metals in coastal sediments may be a useful tool for assessing the extent of sediment contamination by human activities. This study presents an approach to establish BCs that are applicable at the regional scale, particularly for coastal areas with relatively tortuous coastlines and complex coastal geology and/or geomorphology like the South Sea of Korea. The approach is based on the sorption hypothesis for metal enrichment of coastal sediments and was verified using 33 core and 187 surface sediments. The concentrations of major and heavy metals, grain size parameters, organic carbon, and sedimentation rates were determined. Cs was selected as the most suitable geochemical normalizer to correct the grain-size effect. Non-contaminated samples from core sediments were selected according to the sedimentation rate, 32 types of profile pattern based on metal concentrations and metal/Cs ratios, and their variability in past sediments. Metal concentrations in the selected non-contaminated samples were well correlated with Cs, with a given Cs amounts in surface sediments corresponding to the lowest metal concentrations. This result supported the use of a procedure based on the sorption hypothesis, which was then used to synthesize all core samples and establish the regional BC of heavy metals in the coastal sediments. Linear regression equations between metal and Cs concentrations provided the following BCs of metals in coastal sediments in the South Sea of Korea: 70 (Cr), 13 (Co), 30 (Ni), 13 (Cu), 87 (Zn), and 23 (Pb)mg/kg at 8mg/kg of Cs (mean concentration of 393 sediments).

  12. Lead concentrations in sediments and blue-winged teals (Anas discors) from El Palmar State Reserve, Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Adán, Echeverría-García; Gerardo, Gold-Bouchot

    2013-10-01

    Reserve regulations at El Palmar State Reserve, Yucatan, Mexico, prohibit the use of lead (Pb) shot, but hunters continue to use it, and no enforcement is implemented. Pb was quantified in sediments and in blue-winged teal Anas discors. No shot pellets were found in the sediment samples, nor were differences in sediment Pb concentrations observed within the reserve between popular hunting sites and those no longer used for hunting. However, there were differences between the hunting sites and sediments from an adjacent area where hunting is prohibited. Average Pb concentrations were highest at hunting entrances (15.69 ± 18.69 mg/kg) and lowest at decoy locations (5.24 ± 4.84 mg/kg). These averages are lower than the lowest effects level (31 mg/kg), although 10 samples exceeded this level. Pb-shot prevalence in gizzards was 4.88% (n = 41). Pb levels exceeded 5.0 mg/kg dry weight in one or more of the tested tissues (liver, gizzard, and bone) in 14 (34.14%; 7 female, 7 male; 11 adult, 3 juvenile) of the total birds. Bird weight, sex, and age had no effect on Pb concentration. Hunting using Pb shot in the reserve clearly affects Pb levels in sediments and in A. discors that winter there.

  13. The prediction of aquatic sediment-associated trace element concentration using selected geochemical factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Hooper, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Multiple linear regression models calculated from readily obtainable chemical and physical parameters can explain a high percentage (70 per cent or greater) of observed sediment-trace element variance for Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co, As, Sb, Se, and Hg in a widely divergent suite of 60 sediment samples. The geochemical parameters included in the models were of physical (e.g. grain size, surface area) and a chemical (e.g. organic matter, amorphous iron oxides) nature. Comparison between actual and predicted trace element concentrations obtained from the models may provide a means of defining "average' sediment trace element concentrations. -from Authors

  14. Factors influencing arsenic concentrations and species in mangrove surface sediments from south-east NSW, Australia.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, S R; Maher, W A; Krikowa, F; Ubrihien, R

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic concentrations and speciation of 55 mangrove surface sediment samples from the south-eastern coast of NSW, Australia, have been measured. Arsenic concentrations were in the range 1.6-8.6 μg/g dry mass. All arsenic concentration values were well below 20 μg/g, the ANZEC/ARMCANZ interim sediment quality guideline-low trigger value. The bulk sediment pH was 6.0-7.3 and Eh -80 to -260 mV. The sediments contained variable silt-clay (2-30 % w/w), iron (668-12721 μg/g), manganese (1-115 μg/g), sulphur (70-18400 μg/g) and carbon (5-90 mg/g) concentrations. Arsenic concentrations correlated with silt and clay content, iron and manganese concentrations, indicating silt-clay particles covered and coated with iron and manganese (oxy) hydroxides scavenged arsenic. Arsenic extracted with 0.5 M phosphoric acid (68-95 %) was present only as inorganic arsenic (55-91 %), indicating that other arsenic species such as arsenobetaine derived from marine animal tissues rapidly degrade in sediments. The unextractable arsenic was correlated with increases in organic carbon, iron and manganese content. In conclusion, the cycling of arsenic in mangrove sediments is essentially the cycling of inorganic arsenic and primarily controlled by the redox cycling of carbon, sulphur, iron and manganese.

  15. Sediment concentrations and loads in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida, 1980-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonntag, Wayne H.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

    1984-01-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the magnitude of sediment loads and the general spatial and temporal patterns of sediment transport in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida. Mean concentrations of suspended sediment generally were higher in the Jupiter Inlet area than in the remainder of the embayment area. Concentrations of suspended sediment varied with season and weather conditions. Concentrations in selected tributaries following Tropical Storm Dennis in August 1981 immediately increased as much as 16 times over concentrations before the storm. Suspended-sediment loads from the tributaries were also highly seasonal and storm related. During a 61-day period of above-average rainfall that included Tropical Storm Dennis, 5 major tributaries discharged 926 tons (short) of suspended sediment to the estuary, accounting for 74 percent of the input for the 1981 water year and 49 percent of the input for the 20-month study period. Suspended-sediment loads at Jupiter Inlet and at the mouth of the estuary embayment on both incoming and outgoing tides far exceeded tributary loads, but the direction of long-term, net tidal transport was not determined. (USGS)

  16. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F; Adams, Rachel G; Cargill, John G; Gan, Jay; Gouin, Todd; Gschwend, Philip M; Hawthorne, Steven B; Helm, Paul; Witt, Gesine; You, Jing; Escher, Beate I

    2014-04-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake into benthic organisms and exchange with the overlying water column. Consequently, Cfree provides a more relevant dose metric than total sediment concentration. Recent developments in PSMs have significantly improved our ability to reliably measure even very low levels of Cfree . Application of PSMs in sediments is preferably conducted in the equilibrium regime, where freely dissolved concentrations in the sediment are well-linked to the measured concentration in the sampler via analyte-specific partition ratios. The equilibrium condition can then be assured by measuring a time series or a single time point using passive samplers with different surface to volume ratios. Sampling in the kinetic regime is also possible and generally involves the application of performance reference compounds for the calibration. Based on previous research on hydrophobic organic contaminants, it is concluded that Cfree allows a direct assessment of 1) contaminant exchange and equilibrium status between sediment and overlying water, 2) benthic bioaccumulation, and 3) potential toxicity to benthic organisms. Thus, the use of PSMs to measure Cfree provides an improved basis for the mechanistic understanding of fate and transport processes in sediments and has the potential to significantly improve risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments.

  17. Controls of suspended sediment concentration, nutrient content, and transport in a subtropical wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Schaffranek, R.W.; Larsen, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Redistribution of largely organic sediment from low elevation sloughs to higher elevation ridges is a leading hypothesis for the formation and maintenance of the native ridge and slough landscape pattern found in peat wetlands of the Florida Everglades. We tested this redistribution hypothesis by measuring the concentration and characteristics of suspended sediment and its associated nutrients in the flowpaths of adjacent ridge and slough plant communities. Over two wet seasons we found no sustained differences in suspended sediment mass concentrations, particle-associated P and N concentrations, or sizes of suspended particles between ridge and slough sites. Discharge of suspended sediment, particulate nutrients, and solutes were nearly double in the slough flowpath compared to the ridge flowpath due solely to deeper and faster water flow in sloughs. Spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment were not related to water velocity, consistent with a hypothesis that the critical sheer stress causing entrainment is not commonly exceeded in the present-day managed Everglades. The uniformity in the concentrations and characteristics of suspended sediment at our research site suggests that sediment and particulate nutrient redistribution between ridges and sloughs does not occur, or rarely occurs, in the modern Everglades.

  18. Potential use of river suspended-sediment observations to evaluate the effects of seismic shaking on sediment yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avşar, Ulaş

    2014-05-01

    It has been empirically proved that large earthquakes (M>6) trigger landslides and shattering of landscapes, which increase the sediment yield in drainage basins and hence sediment delivery to the rivers. Besides the historical records reporting eyewitness accounts of muddy rivers after earthquakes, this phenomenon was also supported by quantitative analyses on the suspended sediment load of rivers before and after the Chi-Chi Earthquake (Mw=7.6) in 1999 in Taiwan. Observations and understanding of this phenomenon is crucial to trace the sedimentological fingerprints of paleoearthquakes in marine and lacustrine sedimentary sequences. This study presents the evaluation of the publicly available river discharge and suspended-sediment concentration measurements to assess the possible effects of earthquakes on sediment yields in Turkey. For this purpose, measurements from 10 hydrometric stations are utilized, which are located near the epicentres of the 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake (Mw=6.2), the 1999 İzmit Earthquake (Mw=7.4) and the 1999 Düzce Earthquake (Mw=7.2). The dataset contains ca. 1600 measurements between 1991 and 2005. At only a few stations, anomalies in sediment concentration are observed immediately after the earthquakes. On the other hand, at most of the stations, the data through longer periods after the earthquakes (3-4 years) reveal slight increases in sediment concentration. The low temporal resolution of the measurements (every 20-30 days) limits the observation of possible sudden increase in sediment concentration immediately after the earthquakes. According to the preliminary results, sediment yield seems to be affected from seismic shaking. However, for more robust results, longer-term measurements with higher temporal resolution are required. The future study will focus on a quantitative evaluation and modelling on expected sediment yield after seismic shaking.

  19. The use of heavy metal top soil concentrations for the validation of overbank floodplain sedimentation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Olaf; Rode, Michael; Schulz, Marcus

    2010-05-01

    In floodplains of lowland rivers, the transport, sedimentation, and remobilization of fine sediments is highly variable in space and time. Therefore, it is often difficult to validate sediment transport models due to the lack of appropriate data. The objective of this study is to show that heavy metal concentrations in the top soil (upper 15 cm) of a highly polluted floodplain are related to the deposition of fine sediments and thus can be used to assess the plausibility of a two-dimensional (2D) hydraulic and sediment transport model. In a floodplain, heavy metals are bonded to fine sediments, and the deposition of heavy metals originates from a long history of floods. Heavy metal concentrations can be used as a time-integrated indicator of sedimentation, if during a defined period of heavy metal contamination the total deposition of fine sediments is less than a defined topsoil sampling depth. We provided evidence for this hypothesis studying a 45km²-floodplain of River Mulde (Germany). For the assessment of heavy metal top soil concentrations, 126 samples were available. Hydraulics, sedimentation patterns, and concentrations of particle-bonded pollutants were calculated with a 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model (TELEMAC 2D). The calibration of critical velocities of sedimentation and erosion of the model was based on sediment trap exposures during a flood event with a ten-year recurrence interval (Schulz et al. 2009). The calculated sedimentation of the calibrated model was subdivided into three classes: low sedimentation (<0.1 mm), medium sedimentation (0.1 mm < sedimentation < 1 mm), and high sedimentation (> 1mm). Heavy metal concentrations of the floodplain soil were classified according to these simulated spatially distributed sedimentation classes. The analysis of the measured and modelled values clearly showed that the mean values of the classified concentrations of arsenic (As), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn) were increasing with

  20. Concentration Levels and Ecological Risks of Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Surface Sediments of Tianjin Coastal Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Chaoqi; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Zhen; Yang, Junjun

    2013-01-01

    Sediments were sampled from different surface water bodies in Tianjin coastal area, China, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured using GC/MS or GC/ECD. The purposes were to investigate the concentration levels of the POPs and to assess their ecological risks. The results showed that all the 16 priority PAHs were detected from the 10 sediments sampled with the total concentrations of the 16 PAHs ranging from 274.06 μg/kg to 2656.65 μg/kg, while the concentrations of the halogenated POPs were generally low except in the Dagu waste discharging river where the total concentrations of 24 OCPs, 35 PCBs, and 14 PBDEs were 3103.36 μg/kg, 87.31 μg/kg, and 13.88 μg/kg, respectively. In the studied sediments, PAHs exhibited risks to benthonic organisms; particularly the concentrations of naphthalene and/or acenaphthene exceeded their probable effect concentrations in several locations. In comparison, only in the Dagu waste discharging river, OCPs exhibited risks with the concentrations of heptachlor epoxide and lindane exceeding their probable effect concentrations. PCBs and PBDEs posed rare risks in the studied area. PMID:23401668

  1. Concentration levels and ecological risks of persistent organic pollutants in the surface sediments of Tianjin coastal area, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Chaoqi; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Zhen; Yang, Junjun

    2013-01-01

    Sediments were sampled from different surface water bodies in Tianjin coastal area, China, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured using GC/MS or GC/ECD. The purposes were to investigate the concentration levels of the POPs and to assess their ecological risks. The results showed that all the 16 priority PAHs were detected from the 10 sediments sampled with the total concentrations of the 16 PAHs ranging from 274.06 μg/kg to 2656.65 μg/kg, while the concentrations of the halogenated POPs were generally low except in the Dagu waste discharging river where the total concentrations of 24 OCPs, 35 PCBs, and 14 PBDEs were 3103.36 μg/kg, 87.31 μg/kg, and 13.88 μg/kg, respectively. In the studied sediments, PAHs exhibited risks to benthonic organisms; particularly the concentrations of naphthalene and/or acenaphthene exceeded their probable effect concentrations in several locations. In comparison, only in the Dagu waste discharging river, OCPs exhibited risks with the concentrations of heptachlor epoxide and lindane exceeding their probable effect concentrations. PCBs and PBDEs posed rare risks in the studied area.

  2. Bacterial response to dynamic metal concentrations in the surface sediments of a solar saltern (Goa, India).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Flory; Kerkar, Savita; Krishnan, K P

    2013-05-01

    The Ribandar solar saltern, situated adjacent to the Mandovi estuary is influenced by the barge transport of ferromanganese ore to the Mormugao harbour (Arabian Sea). The current study focuses on the distribution of metals and related heterotrophic bacterial populations in the surface sediments (0-10 cm) of the Ribandar salterns (Goa, India) during the salt-making (January to May) and non salt-making seasons (August and November). The concentrations of heavy metals in the sediments ranged from 17.2 ± 2.8 to 26.3 ± 6.7 % Fe; 0.6 ± 0.2 to 0.9 ± 0.2 % Mn; 27.6 ± 7.3 to 51 ± 8.3 ppm Ni; 28.4 ± 8.9 to 35.2 ± 10.6 ppm Co; 44 ± 21.6 to 62.8 ± 23.6 ppm Zn; 0.1 ± 0.01 ppm Cd and 1.7 ± 0.1 to 2.6 ± 0.7 ppm Pb and were much higher than those reported at the same site in a previous study by Kerkar (2004). Hg concentrations were below detection limits. In general, computation of "geoaccumulation index" revealed the sediments as 'uncontaminated to moderately contaminated' with Fe, Mn, Ni, Co, Pb and Zn during the salt-making season. The abundance of metal-tolerant bacteria was comparatively restricted to the salt-making season and was higher than the non salt-making season. Fe-, Mn-, Ni-, Co- and Pb- (200 ppm) tolerant bacteria were retrieved and restricted to the surface sediments (0-5 cm), Cd and Fe being the two most regulatory elements governing bacterial populations in the non salt-making season. However, during the salt-making season, the concentration of Zn was found to be pivotal in regulating the counts of Fe-, Mn- and Ni-tolerant bacteria. In general, the strength of correlation of metals and microbes was higher in the non salt-making season as compared to the salt-making season. This would probably indicate metal-induced limitations in microbial populations in the non salt-making season and the absence of this effect during the salt-making season. In this study, we test the hypothesis that solar salterns behave as ecological sinks with a potential to

  3. Bedload monitoring under conditions of ultra-high suspended sediment concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liébault, F.; Jantzi, H.; Klotz, S.; Laronne, J. B.; Recking, A.

    2016-09-01

    The bedload response of the Moulin Ravine, a small alluvial system draining a very active Mediterranean badlands landscape entrenched into Jurassic black marls of the Southern French Prealps, has been investigated using an automatic Reid bedload slot sampler. This site is known for its exceptional sediment transport conditions thanks to a long-term monitoring program that started in the late 1980s, revealing a mean annual bedload yield of 2810 t km-2 yr-1, and suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) during flow events commonly reaching 100 g L-1. With the deployment of the slot sampler, it has been possible to record instantaneous bedload fluxes during 10 s time increments and to investigate bedload response under flow conditions with ultra-high SSCs. Bedload records cover 4 flashy summer flow events induced by heavy convective storms including a 20-yr return period event. Due to the very high SSC conditions these events challenge bedload monitoring. Even if slot sampling has been recognized as insensitive to fine sediments (silts and clays), it has never been tested in such exceptional muddy flow conditions. The bedload slot sampler performed well in such conditions. A flow-invariant proportion of fines (∼15-20%) was captured in the slot sampler during flows. This proportion is equivalent to its content in the active bedload layer during summer flows, suggesting that fines enter the slot embedded with coarse particles. Instantaneous bedload fluxes recorded in the Moulin are amongst the highest hitherto reported values worldwide, providing evidence of the exceptional sediment transport conditions of marly alpine badlands. The dimensionless entrainment threshold is one order of magnitude higher than commonly reported for gravel-bed rivers, likely reflecting the cohesion effect of fines intruded in the channel surface and subsurface.

  4. Effective Discharge and Annual Sediment Yield on Brazos River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhnia, M.; Salehi, M.; Keyvani, A.; Ma, F.; Strom, K. B.; Raphelt, N.

    2012-12-01

    Geometry of an alluvial river alters dynamically over the time due to the sediment mobilization on the banks and bottom of the river channel in various flow rates. Many researchers tried to define a single representative discharge for these morphological processes such as "bank-full discharge", "effective discharge" and "channel forming discharge". Effective discharge is the flow rate in which, the most sediment load is being carried by water, in a long term period. This project is aimed to develop effective discharge estimates for six gaging stations along the Brazos River from Waco, TX to Rosharon, TX. The project was performed with cooperation of the In-stream Flow Team of the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB). Project objectives are listed as: 1) developing "Flow Duration Curves" for six stations based on mean-daily discharge by downloading the required, additional data from U.S Geological Survey website, 2) developing "Rating Curves" for six gaging stations after sampling and field measurements in three different flow conditions, 3) developing a smooth shaped "Sediment Yield Histogram" with a well distinguished peak as effective discharge. The effective discharge was calculated using two methods of manually and automatic bin selection. The automatic method is based on kernel density approximation. Cross-sectional geometry measurements, particle size distributions and water field samples were processed in the laboratory to obtain the suspended sediment concentration associated with flow rate. Rating curves showed acceptable trends, as the greater flow rate we experienced, the more sediment were carried by water.

  5. Empirical model for estimating vertical concentration profiles of re-suspended, sediment-associated contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. W.; Cheng, P. D.; Li, W.; Chen, J. H.; Pang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.

    2017-03-01

    Vertical distribution processes of sediment contaminants in water were studied by flume experiments. Experimental results show that settling velocity of sediment particles and turbulence characteristics are the major hydrodynamic factors impacting distribution of pollutants, especially near the bottom where particle diameter is similar in size to vortex structure. Sediment distribution was uniform along the distance, while contaminant distribution slightly lagged behind the sediment. The smaller the initial sediment concentration was, the more time it took to achieve a uniform concentration distribution for suspended sediment. A contaminants transportation equation was established depending on mass conservation equations. Two mathematical estimation models of pollutant distribution in the overlying water considering adsorption and desorption were devised based on vertical distribution of suspended sediment: equilibrium partition model and dynamic micro-diffusion model. The ratio of time scale between the sediment movement and sorption can be used as the index of the models. When this ratio was large, the equilibrium assumption was reasonable, but when it was small, it might require dynamic micro-diffusion model.

  6. Microspatial Variation in Carbohydrate Concentrations with Depth in the Upper Millimetres of Intertidal Cohesive Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, I. S.; Paterson, D. M.

    1998-03-01

    The carbohydrates present in surface sediments represent a readily available carbon source and their polymeric components increase sediment stability. Information regarding the occurrence of these carbohydrates is therefore important in the consideration of biogeochemical cycling, heterotrophic metabolism and sediment transport. The distributions of carbohydrates within the surface sediments of three intertidal mud flats were examined on a microscale (200 μm). The carbohydrates were operationally separated into two fractions and these differed in their distribution with depth. Dry mass concentration increased significantly with depth in the upper 2 mm and the structure of surface sediment changed visibly within a short distance of the surface. The upper 300 μm of the sediment was highly porous but became compact by 4 mm. Epipelic diatoms and cyanobacteria were observed at high densities in the upper 300 μm. In addition, the concentration of colloidal carbohydrates increased significantly in a landwards direction along a short transect. Furthermore, the distribution of sediment carbohydrates was apparently influenced by sediment bed morphology and these findings are discussed.

  7. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Lionberger, Megan A.

    2009-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water-year 2006 (October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, one site in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2005 through September 2006. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  8. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2010 (October 1, 2009–September 30, 2010). Turbidity sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, one site in San Pablo Bay, three sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the turbidity sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be computed. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2009 through September 2010. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  9. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2012-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2009 (October 1, 2008–September 30, 2009). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, one site in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2008 through September 2009. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  10. Combined use of remote sensing and continuous monitoring to analyse the variability of suspended-sediment concentrations in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, C.A.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Stumpf, R.P.; Lindsay, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of suspended-sediment concentration data in San Francisco Bay is complicated by spatial and temporal variability. In situ optical backscatterance sensors provide continuous suspended-sediment concentration data, but inaccessibility, vandalism, and cost limit the number of potential monitoring stations. Satellite imagery reveals the spatial distribution of surficial-suspended sediment concentrations in the Bay; however, temporal resolution is poor. Analysis of the in situ sensor data in conjunction with the satellite reflectance data shows the effects of physical processes on both the spatial and temporal distribution of suspended sediment in San Francisco Bay. Plumes can be created by large freshwater flows. Zones of high suspended-sediment concentrations in shallow subembayments are associated with wind-wave resuspension and the spring-neap cycle. Filaments of clear and turbid water are caused by different transport processes in deep channels, as opposed to adjacent shallow water.

  11. Combined Use of Remote Sensing and Continuous Monitoring to Analyse the Variability of Suspended-Sediment Concentrations in San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, C. A.; Schoellhamer, D. H.; Stumpf, R. P.; Lindsay, C. L.

    2001-12-01

    Analysis of suspended-sediment concentration data in San Francisco Bay is complicated by spatial and temporal variability. In situ optical backscatterance sensors provide continuous suspended-sediment concentration data, but inaccessibility, vandalism, and cost limit the number of potential monitoring stations. Satellite imagery reveals the spatial distribution of surficial-suspended sediment concentrations in the Bay; however, temporal resolution is poor. Analysis of the in situ sensor data in conjunction with the satellite reflectance data shows the effects of physical processes on both the spatial and temporal distribution of suspended sediment in San Francisco Bay. Plumes can be created by large freshwater flows. Zones of high suspended-sediment concentrations in shallow subembayments are associated with wind-wave resuspension and the spring-neap cycle. Filaments of clear and turbid water are caused by different transport processes in deep channels, as opposed to adjacent shallow water. Crown

  12. Effects of antibacterials use in aquaculture on biogeochemical processes in marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deyi; Hu, Yingying; Wang, Juying; Ye, Sai; Li, Ai

    2006-08-15

    The effects of chloramphenicol on microorganism in marine sediment were studied by spiked experiments in this paper. The results showed that high concentrations of chloramphenicol could inhibit the activities of microorganism in sediment, and that the growth of strains Pseudomons and Acinetobacter in sediment that can degrade organic matters were inhibited apparently. Furthermore, the resistance of heterotrophic bacteria in sediment had developed due to the use of antibacterials. Based on the above results potential environmental effects of antibacterials on microorganism in marine sediment were analyzed.

  13. Settlement success of Favia fragum planulae exposed to different sediment types and concentrations from southern Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sedimentation has been reported to adversely affect coral ecosystems, but the precise effects of sediment on coral larval settlement and metamorphosis are not well understood. Planulae from laboratory-cultured Favia fragum colonies were collected and exposed to sediment collected...

  14. Settlement success of Favia fragum planulae exposed to different sediment types and concentrations from southern Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sedimentation has been reported to adversely affect coral ecosystems, but the precise effects of sediment on coral larval settlement and metamorphosis are not well understood. Planulae from laboratory-cultured Favia fragum colonies were collected and exposed to sediment collected...

  15. Influence of acid volatile sulfide and metal concentrations on metal bioavailability to marine invertebrates in contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, B.-G.; Lee, J.-S.; Luoma, S.N.; Choi, H.J.; Koh, C.-H.

    2000-01-01

    allowed use of metal concentrations typical of nature and evaluation of processes important to chronic metal exposure. A vertical sediment column similar to that often found in nature was used to facilitate realistic biological behavior. Results showed that AVS or porewater (PW) metals controlled bioaccumulation in only 2 of 15 metal-animal combinations. Bioaccumulation of all three metals by the bivalves was related significantly to metal concentrations extracted from sediments (SEM) but not to [SEM - AVS] or PW metals. SEM predominantly influenced bioaccumulation of Ni and Zn in N. arenaceodentata, but Cd bioaccumulation followed PW Cd concentrations. SEM controlled tissue concentrations of all three metals in H. filiformis and S. missionensis, with minor influences from metal-sulfide chemistry. Significant bioaccumulation occurred when SEM was only a small fraction of AVS in several treatments. Three factors appeared to contribute to the differences between these bioaccumulation results and the results from toxicity tests reported previously: differences in experimental design, dietary uptake, and biological attributes of the species, including mode and depth of feeding.Microcosms were used to simulate environmentally realistic metal, acid volatile sulfide (AVS), and geochemical gradients in sediments to evaluate effects of metal bioavailability. The 18-d study involved five test species: two bivalves and three polychaetes. Two series of experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of metal concentration and AVS on bioaccumulation, respectively. The metals of interest were cadmium, nickel, and zinc. Results showed that the concentrations of pore-water Cd, Ni, and Zn were controlled by the concentration of AVS. Organisms bioaccumulated significant amounts of metals from the sediments when the simultaneously extracted metal was only a small fraction of the AVS. Bioavailability increased linearly with the sediment metal concentration irrespective of AVS or pore-w

  16. Prediction of suspended-sediment concentrations at selected sites in the Fountain Creek watershed, Colorado, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Mau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments, Colorado Water Conservation Board, Colorado Springs City Engineering, and the Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, began a small-scale pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a computational model of streamflow and suspended-sediment transport for predicting suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the Fountain Creek watershed in Colorado. Increased erosion and sedimentation damage have been identified by the Fountain Creek Watershed Plan as key problems within the watershed. A recommendation in the Fountain Creek Watershed plan for management of the basin is to establish measurable criteria to determine if progress in reducing erosion and sedimentation damage is being made. The major objective of this study was to test a computational method to predict local suspended-sediment loads at two sites with different geomorphic characteristics in order to evaluate the feasibility of using such an approach to predict local suspended-sediment loads throughout the entire watershed. Detailed topographic surveys, particle-size data, and suspended-sediment samples were collected at two gaged sites: Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07103970), and Sand Creek above mouth at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07105600). These data were used to construct three-dimensional computational models of relatively short channel reaches at each site. The streamflow component of these models predicted a spatially distributed field of water-surface elevation, water velocity, and bed shear stress for a range of stream discharges. Using the model predictions, along with measured particle sizes, the sediment-transport component of the model predicted the suspended-sediment concentration throughout the reach of interest. These computed concentrations were used with predicted flow patterns and channel morphology to

  17. A field investigation of the relationship between zinc and acid volatile sulfide concentrations in freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, Gerald T.; Liber, Karsten; Call, Daniel J.; Markee, Thomas P.; Canfield, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding relationships between cationic metals such as cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc, and amorphous iron sulfides, measured as acid volatile sulfide (AVS), is key to predicting metal bioavailability and toxicity insediments. The objective of the present study was to assess seasonal and spatial variations of AVS in freshwater sediments contaminated with zinc. Sediments were sampled from three streams with varying levels of zinc contamination at two different times, March and June of 1995, representing cold- and warm-weather situations. Interstitial (pore) water concentrations of zinc, and solid phase concentrations of AVS and zinc were measured in surficial and deep sediment horizons. Toxicity tests (10-d) with the amphipodHyalella azteca were conducted using intact cores. Sediment zinc concentrations from six sites within the primary test stream differed by about five-fold, and also varied seasonally. Acid volatile sulfide concentrations were generally lower than those of zinc, and pore water zinc concentrations typically were elevated. There was a positive correlation between solid-phase AVS and zinc concentrations, suggesting that the system was dominated by zinc, as opposed to iron sulfides. In contrast to expectations arising from some studies of seasonal variations of AVS in iron-dominated systems, AVS concentrations were smaller in June than in March. However, this was likely due to a major storm event and associated sediment scouring before the June sampling, rather than to seasonal processes related to variations in temperature and dissolved oxygen. Based upon an indirect analysis of depth variations in AVS, there was some indication that zinc sulfide might be less prone to oxidation than iron sulfide. There was a strong correlation between toxicity of the sediment samples toH. azteca and interstitial water concentrations of zinc; however, the possible contribution of other contaminants to sediment toxicity cannot be dismissed.

  18. [Effects of probiotics on Penaeus vannamei pond sediments].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanbo; Zha, Longying; Xu, Zirong

    2006-09-01

    This paper studied the effects of probiotics on the sediment of Penaeus vannamei pond during 117 days of culture period. The results showed that probiotics application significantly decreased the concentrations of total nitrogen, total phosphorous, and sulfide in sediment, but no significant difference was observed in total plate count (TPC) of microbes between treated and control ponds. The final average presumptive vibrio count (PVC) of treated pond sediment (3.65 x 10(3) cfu x g(-1)) was significantly lower than that of the control (1.16 x 10(5) cfu x g(-1)), while the average number of BS (Bacillus), AB (ammonifying bacteria), PSOB (presumptive sulphur oxidizing bacteria) and SRB (sulphur reducing bacteria) in treated pond sediment was higher than that of the control. These data showed that probiotics could decrease the nutrients (nitrogen, phosphate and sulfur) accumulation and improve the composition of bacterial populations in pond sediment, and thus, supply a good sediment environment for the healthily culture of the shrimp.

  19. A method for using shoreline morphology to predict suspended sediment concentration in tidal creeks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign, Scott; Currin, Carolyn; Piehler, Michael; Tobias, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Improving mechanistic prediction of shoreline response to sea level rise is currently limited by 1) morphologic complexity of tidal creek shorelines that confounds application of mechanistic models, and 2) availability of suspended sediment measurements to parameterize mechanistic models. To address these challenges we developed a metric to distinguish two morphodynamic classes of tidal creek and tested whether this metric could be used to predict suspended sediment concentration. We studied three small tidal creeks in North Carolina, U.S.A. We collected suspended sediment at one non-tidal and two tidal sites in each creek and measured the wetland and channel width using a geographic information system. In each creek, tidal harmonics were measured for one year, sediment accretion on the salt marsh was measured for three years, and shoreline erosion was measured from aerial photographs spanning 50 years. Additional total suspended solids measurements from seven creeks reported in a national database supplemented our analysis. Among the three intensively studied creeks, shoreline erosion was highest in the most embayed creek (having a wider channel than the width of adjoining wetlands) and lowest in the wetland-dominated creek (having a channel narrower than the width of adjoining wetlands). Wetland sediment accretion rate in the wetland-dominated creek was four times higher than the accretion in the embayed creek. The wetland-dominated tidal creek had over twice the suspended sediment as the most embayed creek. Based on these results, we conclude that our metric of embayed and contrasting wetland-dominated creek morphology provides a guide for choosing between two types of morphodynamic models that are widely used to predict wetland shoreline change. This metric also allowed us to parse the 10 tidal creeks studied into two groups with different suspended sediment concentrations. This relationship between suspended sediment concentration and creek morphology provides

  20. Concentration of selected trace elements and PCBs in sediments from the Adriatic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, S W; Hamilton, T F; Coquery, M; Villeneuve, J-P; Horvat, M

    2000-07-26

    A broad baseline study of the levels and distributions of trace metals and PCB compounds in sediments has been undertaken. PCB concentrations in surface sediments reflect the source of these contaminates in the region. The highest PCB concentrations as Aroclor 1260 (approximately 10 ng g{sup -1}) were found in sediments near the outflow of the Po river. The lowest concentrations (1.5 ng g{sup -1} dry) were associated with the sediments from the Jabuka Pit in the Middle Adriatic. These values are quite similar to total PCBs (<1.0-17) measured in surface sediments sampled off the coast of Croatia in 1977-78. Thus, based on the limited amount of new data available, it appears that there has been little, if any, decrease in PCB loading in Adriatic sediments over the past 15 years. Downcore profiles of PCBs in sediment cores are also discussed from a pollution history standpoint. Likewise, total mercury in surface sediments was also highest at stations off the Po (403-499 ng g{sup -1} dry) and lowest (67-224 ng g{sup -1}) in the Jabuka Pit. In one core located just south of the Po outflow, total Hg concentrations at all depths were relatively high decreasing gradually from approximately 400 ng g{sup -1} in the top 4 cm to roughly 200 ng g{sup -1} at a depth of 32 cm. Using a {sup 210}Pb-derived sedimentation rate of 0.26 em Y{sup -1} for this station, it appears that anthropogenic inputs of mercury may have been responsible for the gradual increase in total mercury noted over the last 125 years.

  1. Influence of poultry litter land application on the concentrations of estrogens in water and sediment within a watershed.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qi; Adams, Paige; Lu, Junhe; Cabrera, Miguel; Huang, Qingguo

    2013-07-01

    This research studied the occurrence of estrogens in the Upper Satilla watershed, Georgia, USA, which was impacted by poultry litter land application and discharge from a sewage treatment plant (STP) receiving poultry wastes. Over 14 months, four estrogens in stream water, sediment, suspended particles, and STP samples were quantified by LC/MS. Estrogens were consistently found in the STP influent with high concentrations while they were below the detection limits in the majority of stream water, suspended particles, and sediment. Estrone, 17β-estradiol, and estriol were found in 18% of stream water samples with concentrations up to 46.4, 67.2, and 125 ng L(-1), respectively. However, 17α-ethinylestradiol was only detected in STP samples. Estrogens were found in 14% of suspended particle samples with the median concentration being 27.5 ng g(-1) for estrone, 104.5 ng g(-1) for 17β-estradiol, and 93.9 ng g(-1) for estriol. The estrogen concentrations in sediment were <4.95 ng g(-1), indicating that sediment is not a major sink for estrogens in this watershed. The quantitative analysis of the temporal and spatial distribution of the estrogens suggests the occasional elevation of estrogens in the watershed above the predicted-no-effect-concentrations to fish likely to be associated with litter disposal and rainfall events.

  2. Effect of sediment properties on the sorption of C12-2-LAS in marine and estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Rico-Rico, Angeles; Temara, Ali; Behrends, Thilo; Hermens, Joop L M

    2009-02-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) are anionic high production volume surfactants used in the manufacture of cleaning products. Here, we have studied the effect of the characteristics of marine and estuarine sediments on the sorption of LAS. Sorption experiments were performed with single sediment materials (pure clays and sea sand), with sediments treated to reduce their organic carbon content, and with field marine and estuarine sediments. C12-2-LAS was used as a model compound. Sorption to the clays montmorillonite and kaolinite resulted in non-linear isotherms very similar for both clays. When reducing the organic content, sorption coefficients decreased proportionally to the fraction removed in fine grain sediments but this was not the case for the sandy sediment. The correlation of the sediment characteristics with the sorption coefficients at different surfactant concentrations showed that at concentrations below 10 microg C12-2-LAS/L, the clay content correlated better with sorption, while the organic fraction became more significant at higher concentrations.

  3. Reducing sediment concentration and soil loss using organic and inorganic amendments at plot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Homaee, M.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.

    2015-04-01

    Various organic and inorganic mulches are used for soil conservation purposes, the effectiveness of which on soil characteristics has not been comprehensively considered from different aspects. The present study surveys the efficiency of straw mulch, manure and TA-200 polyacrylamide with respective rates of 500, 300 and 50 g m-2 in changing sediment concentration and soil loss. The experiments were conducted for sandy-loam soil taken from a summer rangeland, the Alborz Mountains, northern Iran. The experiments were performed under laboratory conditions with simulated rainfall intensities of 30, 50, 70 and 90 mm h-1 and a slope of 30%. The results showed that the straw mulch decreased soil erosion at rate of 45.60% compared to the control plots and performed better than manure (8.98% reduction) and PAM (4.74% reduction). The results showed that the maximum reduction in sediment concentration and soil loss for all soil amendments occurred at the rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1 with the rates of 58.69 and 63.24% for straw mulch, 14.65 and 13.14% for manure and 20.15 and 23.44% for TA-200.

  4. Sediment chronology and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations and fluxes in Cayuga Lake, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Heit, M.; Tan, Y.L.; Miller, K.M.; Quanci, J.; Marinetti, C.; Silvestri, S.; Swain, A.M.; Winkler, M.G.

    1986-02-01

    We describe experiments aimed at determining the deposition history of energy-related, particulate-associated, potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) deposited in the sediments of Cayuga Lake in the Finger Lakes Region of Central New York State. The sediment cores were chronologically dated from measurements of artificial and natural radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, Pu-isotopes, /sup 210/Pb) and pollen. Diatoms and charcoal were used to determine historic changes in the Cayuga Lake basin. These methods showed agreement in chronology and also indicated that the sediments were not mixed or diffused to any great extent so that clear pollutant trends could be established. Historic changes in concentrations (ng/g dry wt.) and flux (ng/cm/sup 2//yr) of 3 to 7 ring PAH compounds were determined. Estimates of the atmospheric component of PAH flux to the sediments were made using the ratio of /sup 137/Cs inventories in sediments to that deposited on undisturbed soils.

  5. The relationship between seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica) decline and sulfide porewater concentration in carbonate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Maria Ll.; Marbà, Núria; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2007-07-01

    In this study we test the hypothesized negative relationship between seagrass status and porewater hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) levels, through a comparative analysis within a range of seven Posidonia oceanica meadows growing over carbonate sediments in the NW Mediterranean Sea around Mallorca Island. The studied meadows range from meadows growing on sediments with very low sulfide porewater concentrations (4.6 μM) to those growing over higher sulfide conditions (33.5 μM). Organic matter content, sulfate reduction rates and sulfide porewater concentrations in the sediments were determined concurrently with the assessment of demographic plant dynamics (specific mortality and net population growth rates). Sulfide porewater concentration increased with increasing organic matter content in the sediment, while net population growth decreased significantly with low increases of sulfide concentrations. Our results confirm the previously suspected vulnerability of seagrass meadows growing on carbonate sediments to increased sulfide levels. An excess of 10 μmols H 2S L -1 porewater is identified to already conduce P. oceanica meadows to decline, which this study identifies, particularly, as strongly sensitive to sulfides. The results reported here suggest that even moderate increases in organic carbon inputs may lead to enhancement of dissolved sulfides and may be an important factor for seagrass status in these iron-depleted carbonate sediments from the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Historical changes in the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Lake Peipsi sediments.

    PubMed

    Punning, Jaan-Mati; Terasmaa, Jaanus; Vaasma, Tiit; Kapanen, Galina

    2008-09-01

    The distribution of 11 individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was analysed in a (210)Pb dated sediment core from the deepest area of Lake Peipsi and in four surface sediment samples taken from littoral areas. According to the concentrations in the core three groups of PAHs may be distinguished: (1) relatively stable concentrations of PAHs within the whole studied time interval; (2) very low concentrations in sediments accumulated before intensive anthropogenic impact (from 19th century up to the 1920s) following a slight increase and (3) an overall increase in PAH concentrations since the 1920s up to the present. Comprehensive analysis of PAHs in the core and monitoring data obtained in the 1980s together with the lithology of sediments show that an increase of anthropogenically induced PAHs correlates well with the history of fuel consumption in Estonia and speaks about atmospheric long-distance transport of PAHs. The continuous increase of PAH concentrations since the 1920s do not support the earlier hypothesis about the dominating impact of the oil shale fired power plants near the lake, because their emissions decreased significantly in the 1990s. The concentration of PAHs in the deep lake core sample correlates well with the content of organic matter, indicating absorption and co-precipitation with plankton in the sediment.

  7. Cadmium distribution in sediment and the lugworm Arenicola marina in a low concentration exposure experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Everaarts, J.M.; SaralaDevi, K.

    1996-12-31

    In the central and southern North Sea, and in the Dutch coastal zone, total cadmium (Cd) concentrations in water are 0.02 {+-} 0.01 {mu}g/L and 0.06 {+-} 0.02 {mu}g/L, respectively Cadmium in the estuarine waters of the Dutch Wadden Sea varied from 0.3 {+-} 0.01 {mu}g/L in the western part to 0.08 {+-} 0.03 {mu}g/L in the eastern part. In whole sediment, the Cd background concentration for the Wadden Sea is 0.5 {+-} 0.01 {mu}g/g dry weight (dw), whereas the reference concentration is 0.08 {+-} 0.02 {mu}g/g dw. The concentrations of total-Cd in surface bulk sediments (0-2 cm) of the central North Sea (Oyster Grounds), and of intertidal mud-flats in the western Wadden Sea varied from 0.05 to 0.15 {mu}g/g dw and from 0.13 to 0.46 {mu}g dw, respectively (calculated from Kahn et al. 1992). These concentration ranges match the reference Cd concentration for Wadden Sea whole sediment (0.5 {+-} 0.01) {mu}g/g dw. Cadmium concentrations in surface sediments of the Dutch coastal zone and estuaries are only slightly elevated compared to the 0.2 {mu}g/g dw, considered as the background concentrations in pristine areas, but well below the level of 10 {mu}g/g dw at heavily contaminated sites. This laboratory study reports on the distribution of cadmium in the sediment column, and the uptake in the blood/coelomic fluid, intestine and body-wall of lugworms at low cadmium concentration exposure. The aim was to determine possible interaction between the vertical distribution of sediment-bound cadmium and the bioturbating activity of lugworms. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A Flow-through Exposure System for Evaluating Suspended Sediments Effects on Aquatic Life.

    PubMed

    Suedel, Burton C; Wilkens, Justin L

    2017-01-09

    This paper describes the Fish Larvae and Egg Exposure System (FLEES). The flow-through exposure system is used to investigate the effects of suspended sediment on various aquatic species and life stages in the laboratory by using pumps and automating delivery of sediment and water to simulate suspension of sediment. FLEES data are used to develop exposure-response curves between the effects on aquatic organisms and suspended sediment concentrations at the desired exposure duration. The effects data are used to evaluate management practices used to reduce the interactions between aquatic organisms and anthropogenic causes of suspended sediments. The FLEES is capable of generating total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations as low as 30 to as high as 800 mg/L, making this system an ideal choice for evaluating the effects of TSS resulting from many activities including simulating low ambient levels of TSS to evaluating sources of suspended sediments from dredging operations, vessel traffic, freshets, and storms.

  9. Metal concentrations in water and sediments from tourist beaches of Acapulco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jonathan, M P; Roy, P D; Thangadurai, N; Srinivasalu, S; Rodríguez-Espinosa, P F; Sarkar, S K; Lakshumanan, C; Navarrete-López, M; Muñoz-Sevilla, N P

    2011-04-01

    A survey on the metal concentrations (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V, Zn) in beach water and sediments is reported from the tourist destination of Acapulco city on the Pacific coast of Mexico. The concentration of dissolved trace metals (DTMs) in beach water and acid leachable trace metals (ALTMs) in sediments indicated that they are anthropogenic in nature due to the increased tourist activities in the crowded beach locations. The statistical analysis indicates Fe and Mn play a major role as metal scavengers in both the medium (water and sediment) and the higher value of other metals is site specific in the study area, indicating that they are transported from the local area. Comparison results suggest that the beach water quality has deteriorated more than the sediments and special care needs to be taken to restore the beach quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Baseline assessment of heavy metal concentrations in surficial sediment from Kachemak Bay, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Apeti, Dennis A; Hartwell, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal inputs to coastal Alaska ecosystems are driven by sediment loads from glacial meltwater and river outflows. This study characterized the spatial distribution of 16 major and trace metals in five strata in Kachemak Bay, as well as sediment total organic carbon content and grain size. Homer Harbor, a shallow harbor within the study area, contained elevated metal concentrations compared to the other strata. Outside the harbor, several metals, including Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn, were significantly higher in the eastern strata than in the western portions of the bay. The opposite was true for a few other metals, such as Hg. However, most metal concentrations were below the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's sediment quality guidelines for sediment toxicity to benthic communities.

  11. The influence of grain size, grain color, and suspended-sediment concentration on light attenuation: why fine-grained terrestrial sediment is bad for coral reef ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt; Norris, Benjamin; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Sediment has been shown to be a major stressor to coral reefs globally. Although many researchers have tested the impact of sedimentation on coral reef ecosystems in both the laboratory and the field and some have measured the impact of suspended sediment on the photosynthetic response of corals, there has yet to be a detailed investigation on how properties of the sediment itself can affect light availability for photosynthesis. We show that finer-grained and darker-colored sediment at higher suspended-sediment concentrations attenuates photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) significantly more than coarser, lighter-colored sediment at lower concentrations and provide PAR attenuation coefficients for various grain sizes, colors, and suspended-sediment concentrations that are needed for biophysical modeling. Because finer-grained sediment particles settle more slowly and are more susceptible to resuspension, they remain in the water column longer, thus causing greater net impact by reducing light essential for photosynthesis over a greater duration. This indicates that coral reef monitoring studies investigating sediment impacts should concentrate on measuring fine-grained lateritic and volcanic soils, as opposed to coarser-grained siliceous and carbonate sediment. Similarly, coastal restoration efforts and engineering solutions addressing long-term coral reef ecosystem health should focus on preferentially retaining those fine-grained soils rather than coarse silt and sand particles.

  12. The influence of grain size, grain color, and suspended-sediment concentration on light attenuation: Why fine-grained terrestrial sediment is bad for coral reef ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Norris, Ben K.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.

    2015-09-01

    Sediment has been shown to be a major stressor to coral reefs globally. Although many researchers have tested the impact of sedimentation on coral reef ecosystems in both the laboratory and the field and some have measured the impact of suspended sediment on the photosynthetic response of corals, there has yet to be a detailed investigation on how properties of the sediment itself can affect light availability for photosynthesis. We show that finer-grained and darker-colored sediment at higher suspended-sediment concentrations attenuates photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) significantly more than coarser, lighter-colored sediment at lower concentrations and provide PAR attenuation coefficients for various grain sizes, colors, and suspended-sediment concentrations that are needed for biophysical modeling. Because finer-grained sediment particles settle more slowly and are more susceptible to resuspension, they remain in the water column longer, thus causing greater net impact by reducing light essential for photosynthesis over a greater duration. This indicates that coral reef monitoring studies investigating sediment impacts should concentrate on measuring fine-grained lateritic and volcanic soils, as opposed to coarser-grained siliceous and carbonate sediment. Similarly, coastal restoration efforts and engineering solutions addressing long-term coral reef ecosystem health should focus on preferentially retaining those fine-grained soils rather than coarse silt and sand particles.

  13. Continuous automated sensing of streamflow density as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentration sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Figueroa Alamo, Carlos; Gray, John R.; Fletcher, William

    2001-01-01

    A newly refined technique for continuously and automatically sensing the density of a water-sediment mixture is being tested at a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station in Puerto Rico. Originally developed to measure crude oil density, the double bubbler instrument measures fluid density by means of pressure transducers at two elevations in a vertical water column. By subtracting the density of water from the value measured for the density of the water-sediment mixture, the concentration of suspended sediment can be estimated. Preliminary tests of the double bubbler instrument show promise but are not yet conclusive.

  14. Onsager’s reciprocal relations for electroacoustic and sedimentation: Application to (concentrated) colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin-Bertin, S.; Chassagne, C.

    2015-05-21

    In this article, the relations for electroacoustic phenomena, such as sedimentation potential, sedimentation intensity, colloid vibration potential, colloid vibration intensity/current, or electric sonic amplitude, are given, on the basis of irreversible thermodynamics. This formalism allows in particular to discuss the different expressions for concentrated suspensions found by various authors, which are of great practical interest. It was found that some existing expressions have to be corrected. Relations between the electrophoretic mobilities assessed by the different experiments are derived.

  15. PCB concentrations in sediments from the Gulf of Nicoya estuary, Pacific coast of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Spongberg, Alison L

    2004-12-01

    Thirty-one sediment samples collected from 1996-2003 from the Gulf of Nicoya estuary on the northwestern coast of Costa Rica, have been obtained for PCB analyses. This is part of the first study to evaluate the PCB contamination in coastal Costa Rica. Overall, the concentrations are low, especially when compared to sediments from more temperate climates and/or sediments from more heavily industrialized areas. Values average less than 3 ng/g dw sediment, however, a few samples contained up to 7 ng/g dw sediment. Sediments with the highest concentrations were located in the Punta Morales area, where muds were sampled from among mangrove roots. The Puntarenas samples had surprisingly low PCB concentrations, likely due to their sandy lithology. The congener distribution within the majority of the samples showed signs of either recent sources or lack of degradation. However, a few sites, specifically some of the inter-gulf islands and more remote samples had congener distributions indicative of airborne contaminants and/or degradation. Considering the presence of airborne PCBs in the Gulf of Papagayo to the north, the lack of airborne PCBs and more varied congener distribution in the Gulf of Nicoya estuary was surprising.

  16. Effectiveness of bioremediation in reducing toxicity in oiled intertidal sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Tremblay, G.H.; Siron, R.

    1995-12-31

    A 123-day field study was conducted with in situ enclosures to compare the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies based in inorganic and organic fertilizer additions to accelerate the biodegradation rates and reduce the toxicity of Venture{trademark} condensate stranded within sand-beach sediments. Comparison of the two fertilizer formulations with identical nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations showed that the organic fertilizer stimulated bacterial productivity within the oiled sediments to the greatest extent. However, detailed chemical analysis indicated that inorganic fertilizer additions were the most effective in enhancing condensate biodegradation rates. The Microtox{reg_sign} Solid-Phase Test (SPT) bioassay was determined to be sensitive to Venture Condensate in laboratory tests. Subsequent application of this procedure to oiled sediment in the field showed a reduction in sediment toxicity over time. However, the Microtox{reg_sign} bioassay procedure did not identify significant reductions in sediment toxicity following bioremediation treatment. An observed increase in toxicity following periodic additions of the organic fertilizer was attributed to rapid biodegradation rates of the fertilizer, which resulted in the production of toxic metabolic products.

  17. PAH related effects on fish in sedimentation ponds for road runoff and potential transfer of PAHs from sediment to biota.

    PubMed

    Grung, Merete; Petersen, Karina; Fjeld, Eirik; Allan, Ian; Christensen, Jan H; Malmqvist, Linus M V; Meland, Sondre; Ranneklev, Sissel

    2016-10-01

    Road runoff is an important source of pollution to the aquatic environment, and sedimentation ponds have been installed to mitigate effects on the aquatic environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate if a) fish from sedimentation ponds were affected by road pollution and; b) the transfer of PAHs from road runoff material to aquatic organisms was substantial. Minnow from a sedimentation pond (Skullerud) near Oslo (Norway) had higher levels of CYP1A enzyme and DNA stand breaks than minnow from the nearby river, but high concentrations of PAH-metabolites in bile revealed that both populations were highly exposed. Principal component analysis revealed that CYP1A and age of fish were correlated, while levels of PAH-metabolites were not correlated to CYP1A or DNA damage. Minnow from a lake un-affected by traffic had much lower levels of PAH-metabolites than the exposed fish, and also an improved condition. The latter results indicate that fish health was affected by road runoff. A closer investigation of PAH levels of the ecosystems of two sedimentation ponds (Skullerud and Vassum) and nearby environments were conducted. The concentration of the 16 EPA PAHs in sediments of the sedimentation ponds were high (1900-4200ngg(-1)), and even higher levels were observed in plants. Principal component analysis of selected ion chromatograms of PAHs showed a clear separation of plants vs. sediments. The plants preferentially accumulated the high molecular PAHs, both from sedimentation ponds with a petrogenic PAH isomer ratio in sediments; and from a lake with pyrogenic PAH isomer ratio in sediments.

  18. Tide-induced suspended sediment transport: depth-averaged concentrations and horizontal residual fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qian; Flemming, Burg

    2010-05-01

    Depth-averaged suspended sediment concentrations (DASSC) and horizontal residual fluxes (HRF) are derived analytically in order to distinguish the relative contributions of different forcing factors (and their interactions), including tidal currents, tidal heights, and horizontal DASSC gradients. On this basis the effect of horizontal advection and local resuspension and deposition processes can be clarified. The analytical solution of the temporal evolution of the DASSC is obtained based on three main assumptions: (1) the effect of vertical circulation on the suspended sediment transport is small, this being associated with the well-mixed nature of the water body; (2) sediment resuspension is proportional to the square of the depth-averaged velocity multiplied by a constant resuspension capacity, this being associated with an erosion constant, the drag coefficient and a critical shear stress, deposition resulting from the vertical sediment inventory multiplied by a constant deposition capacity, which is related to the sediment settling velocity and the ratio between the near-bed SSC and the sediment inventory; and (3) the DASSC gradient is constant over time. If the tidal current velocities and tidal heights are decomposed to non-periodic M2 and M4 compositions at the study site, and neglecting the high-order (>1) trivial terms, the analytical solution can be written as the sum of eight components. The eight components (E1 to E8) of the analytical solution indicate different processes affecting the DASSC. The non-periodic E1 component corresponds to the SSC averaged over depth and tidal cycle, being controlled by the suspension capacity and the combined effect of the DASSC gradient and the residual velocity. The E2, E3 and E4 components show the M2 variations. The E5 and E6 components represent the M4 variations, whereas the E7 and E8 components demonstrate the M6 variations of the DASSC. The E6 component is caused by the M2 velocity, and is considered to

  19. Distribution of the concentration of heavy metals associated with the sediment particles accumulated on road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zafra, C A; Temprano, J; Tejero, I

    2011-07-01

    The heavy metal pollution caused by road run-off water constitutes a problem in urban areas. The metallic load associated with road sediment must be determined in order to study its impact in drainage systems and receiving waters, and to perfect the design of prevention systems. This paper presents data regarding the sediment collected on road surfaces in the city of Torrelavega (northern Spain) during a period of 65 days (132 samples). Two sample types were collected: vacuum-dried samples and those swept up following vacuuming. The sediment loading (g m(-2)), particle size distribution (63-2800 microm) and heavy metal concentrations were determined. The data showed that the concentration of heavy metals tends to increase with the reduction in the particle diameter (exponential tendency). The concentrations ofPb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd, Fe, Mn and Co in the size fraction <63 microm were 350, 630, 124, 57, 56, 38, 3231, 374 and 51 mg kg(-1), respectively (average traffic density: 3800 vehicles day(-1)). By increasing the residence time of the sediment, the concentration increases, whereas the ratio of the concentration between the different size fractions decreases. The concentration across the road diminishes when the distance between the roadway and the sampling siteincreases; when the distance increases, the ratio between size fractions for heavy metal concentrations increases. Finally, the main sources of heavy metals are the particles detached by braking (brake pads) and tyre wear (rubber), and are associated with particle sizes <125 microm.

  20. Chronic effects of organochlorine exposure in sediment to the marine polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, M.H.; Chapman, P.M.; Johns, D.M.; Paine, M.D.

    1997-07-01

    Organisms exposed to organochlorinated compounds in sediments are likely to suffer chronic rather than acute effects. Thus, acute toxicity tests are unlikely to truly assess their potential impact. A 120-d toxicity test was designed to assess the impact of polychlorinated biphenyl on the marine polychaete Neanthes arenacedodentata. A two-tiered approach was used: Tier 1 involved reference sediment spiked with a range of concentrations of the organochlorine bracketing the concentrations found in natural sediments, and tier 2 involved field sediments collected from a coastal area contaminated with high concentrations of the same organochlorine. Testing measured a number of endpoints, including survival, growth, and reproduction. Survival and growth were unaffected in either tier by any of the test sediments. Reproductive endpoints, however, were depressed in both tiers relative to the reference sediment.

  1. Ecotoxicological effects of activated carbon addition to sediments.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Suijkerbuijk, Martin P W; Schmitt, Heike; Sinnige, Theo L

    2009-08-01

    Activated carbon (AC) addition is a recently developed technique for the remediation of sediments and soils contaminated with hydrophobic organic chemicals. Laboratory and field experiments have demonstrated that the addition of 3-4% of AC can reduce aqueous concentrations and the bioaccumulation potential of contaminants. However, one aspect of the technique that has hardly received any attention is the possible occurrence of secondary, eco(toxico)logical effects, i.e., effects of AC addition on the health, behavior, and habitat quality of local organisms. In the present study, several ecotoxicological effects were investigated in AC-water and AC-enriched (0-25%) sediment systems. It was demonstrated that (i) powdered activated carbons can be toxic to aquatic invertebrates (Lumbriculus variegatus, Daphnia magna, and Corophium volutator) based on different mechanisms and preferably should be washed prior to application; (ii) Asellus aquaticus and Corophium volutator may physically avoid AC-enriched sediments; (iii) exposure of Lumbriculus variegatus to AC-enriched sediments lead to a time and dose-dependent reduction in the worms' lipid content, which was most probably caused by the observation that (iv) worm egestion rates decreased drastically upon AC addition, indicating that the presence of AC disturbed feeding behavior; and (v) there were no obvious effects on the microbiological community structure. All in all, these results suggest potential ecotoxicological effects of powdered AC addition and stress the need for a detailed further investigation of secondary effects of the technique, prior to any large-scale field application.

  2. Evaluation of ADCP backscatter inversion to suspended sediment concentration in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyo-Bong; Lee, Guan-hong

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), designed for measuring velocity profiles, are widely used for the estimation of suspended sediment concentration from acoustic backscatter strength, but its application to estuarine environments requires further refinement. In this study, we examined the inversion capability of two ADCPs with 600 and 1200 kHz in three Korean estuaries: the supra-macrotidal Han River Estuary (HRE), microtidal Nakdong River Estuary (NRE), and anthropogenically altered macrotidal Yeongsan River Estuary (YRE). In particular, we examined the relative importance of the sound attenuations due to water (αw) and sediment (αs) in response to sediment characteristics (size and concentration) as well as changing salinity and temperature. The inverted concentration was compared with reference concentrations obtained either from water samples or Optical Backscatter Sensors. In NRE and YRE, where suspended sediment concentrations were less than 0.2 g/l, the acoustic inversion performed poorly only with αs (r = 0.20 and 0.38 for NRE and YRE, respectively), but well with αw (r = 0.66 and 0.42 for NRE and YRE, respectively). Thus, it is important to accurately constrain αw in low-concentration estuarine environments. However, we did not find that the varying αw performed considerably better than the constant αw. On the other hand, the acoustic inversion was poorest at HRE regardless of αw and αs (r = 0.71 and mean relative error = 45%). The large discrepancy appears to result from the poorly constrained, spatially and temporally varying sediment characteristics (grain size, density and concentration) due to non-local sediment transport in the macrotidal HRE.

  3. Long-term changes in the effluent loads from pulp and paper mills, the introduction of BAT technology, and their effects on extractable organic halogens concentrations in sediment in part of the Bothnian Bay.

    PubMed

    Pöykiö, R; Nurmesniemi, H; Kivilinna, V A; Kuokkanen, T

    2010-01-01

    The Bothnian Bay at Kemi, which is the northernmost basin of the Gulf of Bothnia in the Baltic Sea, is affected by effluents from point sources such as pulp and paper mills and municipal sewage plant. During the period 1988-2008, the accumulated values of effluent volume, BOD7, CODCr, Tot-P, Tot-N, TSS and AOX from these point sources fell considerably as follows: 1) effluent volume by 24%, BOD7 by 92%, CODCr by 74%, Tot-P by 79%, Tot-N by 38%, TSS by 76% and AOX by 93%. The decrease in the effluent loadings is due to the introduction of Best Available Techniques (BAT) for the production processes and wastewater treatment at the pulp and paper mills. According to the long-term monitoring program that has been carried out every third year between 1997-2009, the decreasing trend in EOX-concentrations in the top 2 cm of the bottom sediment reflects the decrease in organochlorine discharges (AOX) from the mills. In 1997, the EOX concentrations in bottom sediment varied between 3-70 μg of Cl g(-1) (dry weight), and in 2009 between 1.2-31 μg of Cl g(-1) (dry weight).

  4. [Concentration characteristics and ecological risk of persistent organic pollutants in the surface sediments of Tianjin coastal area].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Shu; Chen, Chao-Qi; Hou, Zhen; Yang, Jun-Jun

    2012-10-01

    Surface sediments were sampled from various surface water bodies in Tianjin coastal area, and four types of persistent organic pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organic pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured. The purposes were to investigate the concentration characteristics of the four types of pollutants and to assess their ecological risks. The results showed that all the 16 priority PAHs were detected from the 10 sediments sampled from the Tianjin coastal area. The total concentrations of the 16 PAHs ranged from 274.06 microg x kg(-1) to 2656.65 microg x kg(-1), with the average being 1 198.51 microg x kg(-1). Combustion of fossil fuel such as coal and gasoline was the major source of PAHs in the surface sediments, while input of petroleum products might occur in some locations. In the Dagu discharging river, the total concentration of 22 OCPs was 3 103.36 microg x kg(-1), the total concentration of 35 PCBs and the total concentration of 14 PBDEs were 87.31 microg x kg(-1) and 13.88 microg x kg(-1), respectively. The concentrations of OCPs, PCBs and PBDEs in other sampling locations were low. The total organic carbon in the surface sediments had good correlation with PAHs but not with OCPs, PCBs and PBDEs, and this might be due to the fact that PAHs mainly came from area pollution while the other compounds mainly came from point pollution. In the sediments, PAHs (particularly low molecular weight PAHs) had high ecological risk; in multiple locations, the concentrations of naphthalene and/or acenaphthene exceeded their probable effect concentrations, indicating that they were most likely causing adverse effects to benthonic organisms. In the Dagu discharging river, the concentrations of heptachlor epoxide and lindane (gamma-BHC) exceeded their probable effect concentrations and were most likely causing adverse effects to benthonic organisms. The OCPs in other

  5. Copper effects on bacterial activity of estuarine silty sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela; Fernandes, Sandra; Sobral, Paula; Alcântara, Fernanda

    2007-07-01

    , mainly, by the great intensification of bacterial biomass production and leucine turnover rate. We conclude that the bacterial community of silty estuarine sediments seems to withstand considerable concentrations of copper at the cost of reduced bacterial organic matter degradation and of the almost halting of bacterial production. The toxic effects elicited by copper on protein and carbohydrate degradation were not rapidly repaired by erosion and oxygenation of the sediment cells but, in contrast, bacterial biomass production and leucine turnover were rapidly and efficiently reactivated.

  6. Cadmium dynamics in estuarine sediments: Effects of salinity and lugworm bioturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, A.D.; Banta, G.T.; Andersen, O.

    2000-02-01

    The authors investigated the effects of lugworm bioturbation on the fate of Cd added either to a thin layer at the sediment surface or homogeneously mixed throughout the sediment. In both situations, the Cd release to the overlying water was highest when lugworms were not present, most likely because bioturbation transported Cd-contaminated sediment away from the sediment surface. Also, irrigation transported water-borne Cd back into the sediment. When Cd was added to the sediment surface, a Cd peak emerged at the feeding depth of the worm within 1 d because of the transport of water-borne Cd down into the sediment by lugworm irrigation. In addition, the conveyor-belt feeding mode of the worm caused both burial of Cd by fecal casts and a gradual spreading of the Cd distribution within the sediment column. When Cd was added to the entire sediment column, bioturbation caused a net transport of Cd upwards, resulting in the surface layers having higher Cd concentrations than the deeper layers, indicating a net release of Cd from deeper sediments. The distribution of Cd in lugworms depended on the Cd exposure situation and suggested that worms were exposed mainly to water-borne Cd when Cd was added to the top of the sediment, whereas worms were exposed mainly by ingesting Cd-labeled sediment when Cd was mixed homogeneously throughout the sediment.

  7. Acoustic observations of near-bed sediment concentration and flux statistics above migrating sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. W.; Hay, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    A coherent Doppler profiler was used to measure coincident time series of velocity (u,w), sediment mass concentration (c), and sediment grain size (d), above mobile sand dunes in unidirectional flow (˜1 m/s, ˜1 m water depth). The measurements are used to extract statistical distributions of sediment concentration and flux just above the bed. Observed mass fluxes (uc,wc) were well fit by quasi-exponential distributions, at all positions along the dune profile, similar to previous observations of single-particle momenta for bed load over flat beds. Observed concentrations of moving particles were well fit by negative-binomial distributions, also similar to previous observations over flat beds. These probability distributions relate to two recent stochastic theories, previously derived and verified for uniform flow over flat beds. It is hypothesized that these theories may also be used as a local approximation in natural-scale flows with bed forms.

  8. Anthropogenic lead concentrations and sources in Baltic Sea sediments based on lead isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Zaborska, Agata

    2014-08-15

    The Gulf of Gdańsk is influenced by heavy metals of anthropogenic origin. In this study, temporal concentration changes of Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cu were studied in six, 50 cm long sediment cores. The main aim of the study was to concentrate on the history of Pb fluxes and Pb isotopic composition ((206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb) to trace Pb sources. The lowest Pb concentrations (19 μg g(-1)) were measured in sediments deposited circa 1860, while the highest Pb concentrations (63-147 μg g(-1)) were measured in sediments deposited between 1960s and 70s. Pre-industrial Pb fluxes were 7 Pb m(2)year(-1), while after WWII they reached 199 Pb m(2)year(-1). Highest (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios (∼1.22) were measured in the oldest sediment layers, and the lowest (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios (∼1.165) were measured in the sediments deposited in 1970s-90s. During the period of highest Pb contamination, the anthropogenic Pb fraction reached up to 93%. A general discussion of the Pb sources, emissions, and loads for Poland is included. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Organo-iodine formation in soils and aquifer sediments at ambient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Schwehr, K A; Santschi, P H; Kaplan, D J; Yeager, C M; Brinkmeyer, R

    2009-10-01

    One of the key risk drivers at radioactive waste disposal facilities is radioiodine, especially 129I. As iodine mobility varies greatly with iodine speciation, experiments with 129I-contaminated aquifer sediments from the Savannah River Site located in Aiken, SC, were carried out to test iodine interactions with soils and aquifer sediments. Using tracer 125I- and stable 127I- additions, it was shown that such interactions were highly dependent on I- concentrations added to sediment suspensions, contact time with the sediment, and organic carbon (OC) content, resulting in an empirical particle-water partition coefficient (Kd) that was an inverse power function of the added I- concentration. However, Kd values of organically bound 127I were 3 orders of magnitude higher than those determined after 1-2 weeks of tracer equilibration, approaching those of OC. Under ambient conditions, organo-iodine (OI) was a major fraction (67%) of the total iodine in the dissolved phase and by implication of the particulate phase. As the total concentration of amended I- increased, the fraction of detectable dissolved OI decreased. This trend, attributed to OC becoming the limiting factor in the aquifer sediment explains why at elevated I-concentrations OI is often not detected.

  10. An effective gravitational temperature for sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Segrè, P N; Liu, F; Umbanhowar, P; Weitz, D A

    2001-02-01

    The slow sedimentation of suspensions of solid particles in a fluid results in complex phenomena that are poorly understood. For a low volume fraction (phi) of particles, long-range hydrodynamic interactions result in surprising spatial correlations in the velocity fluctuations; these are reminiscent of turbulence, even though the Reynolds number is very low. At higher values of phi, the behaviour of sedimentation remains unclear; the upward back-flow of fluid becomes increasingly important, while collisions and crowding further complicate inter-particle interactions. Concepts from equilibrium statistical mechanics could in principle be used to describe the fluctuations and thereby provide a unified picture of sedimentation, but one essential ingredient--an effective temperature that provides a mechanism for thermalization--is missing. Here we show that the gravitational energy of fluctuations in particle number can act as an effective temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that the high-phi behaviour is in fact identical to that at low phi, provided that the suspension viscosity and sedimentation velocity are scaled appropriately, and that the effects of particle packing are included.

  11. An evaluation of selenium concentrations in water, sediment, invertebrates, and fish from the Solomon River Basin.

    PubMed

    May, Thomas W; Fairchild, James F; Petty, Jim D; Walther, Michael J; Lucero, Jeff; Delvaux, Mike; Manring, Jill; Armbruster, Mike

    2008-02-01

    The Solomon River Basin is located in north-central Kansas in an area underlain by marine geologic shales. Selenium is an indigenous constituent of these shales and is readily leached into the surrounding groundwater. Portions of the Basin are irrigated primarily through the pumping of selenium-contaminated groundwater from wells onto fields in agricultural production. Water, sediment, macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected from various sites in the Basin in 1998 and analyzed for selenium. Selenium concentrations were analyzed spatially and temporally and compared to reported selenium toxic effect thresholds for specific ecosystem components: water, sediments, food-chain organisms, and wholebody fish. A selenium aquatic hazard assessment for the Basin was determined based on protocol established by Lemly. Throughout the Basin, water, macroinvertebrate, and whole fish samples exceeded levels suspected of causing reproductive impairment in fish. Population structures of several fish species implied that successful reproduction was occurring; however, the influence of immigration of fish from low-selenium habitats could not be discounted. Site-specific fish reproduction studies are needed to determine the true impact of selenium on fishery resources in the Basin.

  12. An evaluation of selenium concentrations in water, sediment, invertebrates, and fish from the Solomon River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Fairchild, J.F.; Petty, J.D.; Walther, M.J.; Lucero, J.; Delvaux, M.; Manring, J.; Armbruster, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Solomon River Basin is located in north-central Kansas in an area underlain by marine geologic shales. Selenium is an indigenous constituent of these shales and is readily leached into the surrounding groundwater. Portions of the Basin are irrigated primarily through the pumping of selenium-contaminated groundwater from wells onto fields in agricultural production. Water, sediment, macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected from various sites in the Basin in 1998 and analyzed for selenium. Selenium concentrations were analyzed spatially and temporally and compared to reported selenium toxic effect thresholds for specific ecosystem components: water, sediments, food-chain organisms, and wholebody fish. A selenium aquatic hazard assessment for the Basin was determined based on protocol established by Lemly. Throughout the Basin, water, macroinvertebrate, and whole fish samples exceeded levels suspected of causing reproductive impairment in fish. Population structures of several fish species implied that successful reproduction was occurring; however, the influence of immigration of fish from low-selenium habitats could not be discounted. Site-specific fish reproduction studies are needed to determine the true impact of selenium on fishery resources in the Basin. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  13. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F; Adams, Rachel G; Cargill, John G; Gan, Jay; Gouin, Todd; Gschwend, Philip M; Hawthorne, Steven B; Helm, Paul; Witt, Gesine; You, Jing; Escher, Beate I

    2014-01-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake into benthic organisms and exchange with the overlying water column. Consequently, Cfree provides a more relevant dose metric than total sediment concentration. Recent developments in PSMs have significantly improved our ability to reliably measure even very low levels of Cfree. Application of PSMs in sediments is preferably conducted in the equilibrium regime, where freely dissolved concentrations in the sediment are well-linked to the measured concentration in the sampler via analyte-specific partition ratios. The equilibrium condition can then be assured by measuring a time series or a single time point using passive samplers with different surface to volume ratios. Sampling in the kinetic regime is also possible and generally involves the application of performance reference compounds for the calibration. Based on previous research on hydrophobic organic contaminants, it is concluded that Cfree allows a direct assessment of 1) contaminant exchange and equilibrium status between sediment and overlying water, 2) benthic bioaccumulation, and 3) potential toxicity to benthic organisms. Thus, the use of PSMs to measure Cfree provides an improved basis for the mechanistic understanding of fate and transport processes in sediments and has the potential to significantly improve risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:197–209. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:24288295

  14. Analysis of suspended-sediment concentrations and discharges at four long-term sediment stations in central and southern Illinois, 1975-92 water years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terrio, Paul J.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis District, have jointly operated four sediment stations in central and southern Illinois since May 1975--Illinois River at Valley City, Kaskaskia River at Cooks Mills, Kaskaskia River near Venedy Station, and Big Muddy River at Murphysboro. A comprehensive analysis of the historical data from these sediment stations was done to determine changes in the concentrations or amounts of suspended sediment transported in the streams. Generally, the highest suspended-sediment concentrations were found in the Illinois River at Valley City (the station with the largest drainage area), and the lowest concentrations were in the Kaskaskia River at Cooks Mills (the station with the smallest drainage area). Suspended-sediment concentrations were typically high in the spring and summer (March through August) and low in the fall or winter (September through February). The seasonal Kendall test for trends indicated a statistically significant downward trend in suspended-sediment concentrations at three of the sediment stations, including a downward trend of 5.50 milligrams per liter per year in the Illinois River at Valley City. Median suspended-sediment discharges at the four sediment stations ranged from 47.1 to 3,260 tons per day and corresponded to the size of the drainage areas. The largest median suspended sediment yield, 0.12 tons per square mile per day, was in the Illinois River at Valley City. Suspended-sediment discharges during the spring were larger than during other seasons. The seasonal Kendall test for trends indicated a statistically significant downward trend in suspended sediment discharges at two of the sediment stations (Kaskaskia River at Cooks Mills and Big Muddy River at Murphysboro).

  15. Sediment trace metal concentrations from the mudflats of Kuala Juru and Kuala Muda of Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Mat, I.; Maah, M.J. )

    1994-11-01

    About 4-5000 ha of the mudflats along the western coast of Peninsular Malaysia are currently utilized for the semi-culture of the economically important marine bivalve, Anadara granosa. Therefore, information on the status of the trace metal pollution in the culture areas is of considerable value in the interest of public health when shellfish from this area are available for consumption. As an initial assessment of the degree of trace metal pollution in the sediments, an approach to analyze the non-residual (non-lattice held) trace metal concentrations should be of prime consideration rather than the total metal content in the sediments. This approach has the advantage that it is not necessary to restrict the comparison of the non- residual metal fraction to sediments having similar textural composition. For the above reasons, assorted acids are used to partially extract the non-residual trace metal fraction. The partial extraction of sediment-bound trace metals is not only providing information on the strength of association between metals and sediment compositions but also the potential availability of these metals to aquatic organisms. It has been shown that the bioavailability of trace metals to the aquatic biota is best related to the easily leachable, non-residual fraction rather than the total sediment bound trace metals. Therefore, it makes very little sense to consider the total metal content in the sediment to be bioavailable to cause damage to aquatic organisms or to the aquatic ecosystems. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tab.

  16. Lake Disruptions on Sediment Mobility and Effects on Benthic Chlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, A. K.; Marcarelli, A. M.; Arp, C. D.; Wurtsbaugh, W.; Baker, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    Watershed structure can have a profound effect on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of streams. We investigated stream reaches above and below lakes in three watersheds that varied in the size and numbers of lakes in the Sawtooth Mountains to address how lakes affect sediment mobility and how this in turn affects algal biomass. During base flow, we gathered physical data such as pebble counts, stream geometry, and gradient to calculate sediment mobility. Chlorophyll a was measured as the biological response variable. We found that excess shear stress in lake outflows was <1, while excess shear stress was >1 in inflows, indicating that inflow sediments were mobile. Chlorophyll a concentrations were at least 10X greater at outflow sites compared to inflow sites. At one watershed where chlorophyll a was measured at a variety of sites on rocks of median sediment size (D50), there was a positive correlation between D50 and algal biomass (R2 =0.31, p=0.02). Other experiments indicated that lower chlorophyll a at inflow sites was due to increased bed mobility and not due to abrasion by bedload. Together, these results support the hypothesis that sediment trapping by lakes leads to increased substrate stability, and in turn allows increased periphyton growth.

  17. Sediment transport capacity of concentrated flows on steep loessial slope with erodible beds.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hai; Liu, Gang; Liu, Puling; Zheng, Fenli; Zhang, Jiaqiong; Hu, Feinan

    2017-05-24

    Previous research on sediment transport capacity has been inadequate and incomplete in describing the detachment and transport process of concentrated flows on slope farmlands during rill development. An indoor concentrated flow scouring experiment was carried out on steep loessial soil slope with erodible bed to investigate the sediment transport capacity under different flow rates and slope gradients. The results indicated that the sediment transport capacity increases with increasing flow rate and slope gradient, and these relationships can be described by power functions and exponential functions, respectively. Multivariate, nonlinear regression analysis showed that sediment transport capacity was more sensitive to slope gradient than to flow rate, and it was more sensitive to unit discharge per unit width than to slope gradient for sediment transport capacity in this study. When similar soil was used, the results were similar to those of previous research conducted under both erodible and non-erodible bed conditions. However, the equation derived from previous research under non-erodible bed conditions with for river bed sand tends to overestimate sediment transport capacity in our experiment.

  18. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration from turbidity measurements for agrarian watersheds of Navarre (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrona, Cecilia; Campo-Bescós, Miguel A.; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Studies of soil erosion at watershed scales have addressed this phenomenon from a holistic perspective, linking and prioritizing the dominant influence of the different factors involved in this complex process. Thus, the pattern of sediment transport in a watershed is an excellent indicator of the type and intensity of the dominant erosion processes as well as of the relationships between precipitation, infiltration and runoff. An optimal characterization of the dynamics of sediment requires reliable measurements and recording of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) at the watershed outlet at a small time scale (minutes) since SSC normally fluctuates rapidly during storm events. But the latter is economically feasible only through indirect measurements; for example, by using turbidimeter. In fact, turbidity is a common subrogate of suspended sediment concentration; but for this purpose it is necessary first to define a suitable (empirical) turbidity-SSC model. But this is not an easy task since the wide range of possible suspended particles of different nature and composition (e.g., silt, clay, organic matter and microorganisms) often lead to a weak association between SSC and turbidity. In Navarre (Spain), soil erosion is an important problem affecting agricultural land. For this reason, the local Government owns and maintains a network of four experimental watersheds to assess the impact on the environment of typical agrarian activities. So that, the amount of sediment and solutes evacuated at the exit of each watershed has been recorded, along with other relevant hydrological and meteorological data. Furthermore, turbidity has been measured every ten minutes. But turbidity-SSC model - determined from average daily data of SSC- currently in use is unsatisfactory, especially for spring and summer events. The aim of this study is to find an appropriate turbidity-SSC relationship for (each of) the agrarian experimental watersheds of Navarre. Regression

  19. Effect of bioturbation on metal-sulfide oxidation in surficial freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.S.; Ankley, G.T.; Leonard, E.N.

    1996-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) in controlling the bioavailability of several cationic metals in anoxic sediments. However, metal-sulfide complexes can be relatively labile with respect to oxidation associated with factors such as seasonal changes in rates of oxidation/production of AVS. Another potentially important mechanism of AVS oxidation in surficial sediments is bioturbation. The authors used different densities of the burrowing oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus in a series of laboratory experiments to evaluate the effect of bioturbation on oxidation of AVS and subsequent bioavailability of cadmium and zinc spiked into freshwater sediments. Metal bioavailability was determined directly by bioaccumulation in the test organisms and indirectly through analysis of interstitial (pore) water metal concentrations. In the studies, horizon-specific sediment analyses were conducted to assess spatial differences in AVS and pore-water metal concentrations specifically related to organism activity. Burrowing activity of the oligochaete significantly reduced AVS concentrations in surficial sediments in a density-dependent manner and resulted in elevated interstitial water concentrations of cadmium but not zinc. Concentrations of cadmium in pore water from deeper horizons were consistently lower than those in the surficial sediments. The bioaccumulation of cadmium, but not zinc, but the oligochaetes. Overall, the results indicate that bioturbation can enhance the bioavailability of some cationic metals in surficial sediments, via oxidation of AVS, and demonstrate the importance of analyzing surficial sediments when assessing bioavailability of metals in sediments.

  20. Effects of cadmium-enriched sediment on fish and amphibian embryo-larval stages

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, P.C.; Birge, W.J.; Black, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    Aquatic toxicity tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of cadmium-enriched sediment on embryo-larval stages of the goldfish (Carassius auratus), leopard frog (Rana pipiens), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Natural stream sediment was collected and enriched with cadmium to nominal concentrations of 1.0, 10.0, 100, and 1000 mg/kg. Enriched sediments were placed in Pyrex dishes and covered with 350 ml of reconstituted water. Fertilized eggs were placed in the dishes and maintained through 4 days posthatching, giving a total exposure time of 6 to 7 days. For all tests the cadmium concentrations ranged from 1.1 to 76.5 micrograms/liter in water above sediments containing 1 to 1000 mg Cd/kg, respectively. Although low frequencies of mortality were observed in all tests, goldfish, leopard frog, and bass exposed to sediments enriched to 1000 mg Cd/kg accumulated 4.61, 12.55, and 60.0 micrograms Cd/g, respectively. No significant correlations were found between mortality of the goldfish and leopard frog and the cadmium concentrations in either water or sediment. However, all three species showed strong correlations between cadmium concentrations in water and tissue, sediment and tissue, and water and sediment. Tissue cadmium concentrations were related to the length of time test organisms were in direct contact with cadmium-enriched sediment.

  1. Effect of feeding in 30-day bioaccumulation assays using Hyalella azteca in fluoranthene-dosed sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Driscoll, S.K.; Landrum, P.F.

    1997-04-01

    Current protocols for conducting freshwater sediment bioaccumulation tests recommend that food not be added to exposures, whereas toxicity tests require food addition. To determine effects of adding food on exposure, 30-d sediment exposures were conducted with Hyalella azteca to sediment dosed with four fluoranthene concentrations. Accumulation was significantly greater in fed versus nonfed animals at all dose levels after 96 h of exposure and continued to be greater after 30 d in the low dose levels. At sediment concentrations above 478 nmol/g dry weight, survival of unfed animals dropped to 34% after 30 d. After 30 d of exposure, growth and reproduction were observed in fed animals exposed to sediment 10-d studies reported in the literature using sediment with comparable organic carbon concentrations. Samples of sediment in exposure breakers taken from the sediment-water interface (flocculant layer) and 1 to 2 cm below the interface had large differences in fluoranthene and organic carbon concentrations. The concentration of fluoranthene was 2 to 10 times greater in the flocculant layer, the area inhabited by H. azteca, compared to the deeper sediment. These data raise questions concerning the interpretation of standard toxicity and bioaccumulation tests when food is routinely added.

  2. Metal-contaminated Sediment Effects on Biofilm Communities: Impairment of Multiple Stream Ecosystem Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, G.; Costello, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photosynthetic biofilms are crucial drivers of many important stream ecosystem functions (e.g., primary and secondary production, N cycling), yet we have a limited understanding of how these critical communities respond to contaminated sediments. Divalent metals (e.g., Cu, Ni, Zn) are ubiquitous in urban streams and may be contributing to the decline in ecosystem function in urban waters. We exposed natural biofilm communities in five different streams to a common sediment amended with four concentrations of Ni and Cu. Contaminated sediments were placed into cups, covered with mesh disks for biofilm attachment, and secured to the streambed. After 6 weeks, biofilm-colonized disks were analyzed for net primary production (NPP), chlorophyll a, and metal content. Sediments below the biofilms were analyzed for total metals, acid volatile sulfide, and high-resolution vertical dissolved oxygen concentrations. Additional biofilm disks were separated from the sediment and fed to Lymnaea stagnalis to assess indirect effects of sediment metal on grazers. Among our five streams, we found variation in the biofilm response to metals with the most productive stream (Elm Creek) showing the strongest negative response to metal-contaminated sediment. Contaminated sediments in Elm Creek reduced biofilm growth, slowed primary production, and prevented penetration of oxygen into surface sediments. In the less productive streams, biofilms did not reduce NPP in the presence of sediment metal and there was still substantial penetration of oxygen into sediments; however, metals moved out of the sediment and accumulated in the biofilm. L. stagnalis exposed to metal-contaminated biofilms fed at a slower rate than those given clean biofilms. This study suggests that biofilms, and the biogeochemical cycles they drive, can potentially be impaired by contaminated sediment but the response is context dependent. Further, indirect dietary effects of contaminated sediment occur more widely than

  3. The influence of extraction procedure on ion concentrations in sediment pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Jackson, B.P.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment pore water has the potential to yield important information on sediment quality, but the influence of isolation procedures on the chemistry and toxicity are not completely known and consensus on methods used for the isolation from sediment has not been reached. To provide additional insight into the influence of collection procedures on pore water chemistry, anion (filtered only) and cation concentrations were measured in filtered and unfiltered pore water isolated from four sediments using three different procedures: dialysis, centrifugation and vacuum. Peepers were constructed using 24-cell culture plates and cellulose membranes, and vacuum extractors consisted of fused-glass air stones attached with airline tubing to 60cc syringes. Centrifugation was accomplished at two speeds (2,500 and 10,000 x g) for 30 min in a refrigerated centrifuge maintained at 4?C. Only minor differences in chemical characteristics and cation and anion concentrations were found among the different collecting methods with differences being sediment specific. Filtering of the pore water did not appreciably reduce major cation concentrations, but trace metals (Cu and Pb) were markedly reduced. Although the extraction methods evaluated produced pore waters of similar chemistries, the vacuum extractor provided the following advantages over the other methods: (1) ease of extraction, (2) volumes of pore water isolated, (3) minimal preparation time and (4) least time required for extraction of pore water from multiple samples at one time.

  4. Distribution of heavy metal concentrations in surface sediments in Dubai Creeks, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Howari, Fares M

    2005-01-01

    Dubai is developing rapidly and many developmental activities are concentrated around its Creek. The present study reports the lateral distribution of heavy metals and compares it with local historical record of heavy metal concentrations. For this purpose surface sediment samples were collected and analyzed for metal contents, total organic carbon content (TOC), mineralogy and grain size. The percentages of the different grain size fraction of the collected sediments were as follow 65% for sand size, 15% for silt size fraction, and the rest accounted for clay size fraction. The microscopic analyses indicate that the sediment composed mainly from carbonate and quartz with traces of rock fragments. Such mineral composition is not believed to be a potential source of heavy metal. The study found that the average recorded heavy metal concentrations in the collected sediment samples were 87, 96, 127, 38.5, and 279 ppm for Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, respectively. Those values were slightly higher than metal concentrations recoded in 2001 with 1.22 (Cr), 2.5 (Cu), 2.87 (Ni), 0.69 (Pb), and 2.1 (Zn) folds. However, in 2001 and 2003 the measured metal contents, along the creek, were lower than those of the average earth crust. Along the Creek most metals recorded the highest concentrations in the upper reach of the Creek. The distribution of the measured heavy metals was not affected significantly with the TOC values. The present study also documented obvious related point sources of pollution.

  5. Heavy metal concentrations in water, suspended matter, and sediment from Gökova Bay, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Balkis, Nuray; Aksu, Abdullah; Okuş, Erdoğan; Apak, Reşat

    2010-08-01

    The contents of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, Cd, and Hg) dissolved in water and suspended solids of Gökova Bay--partly and fully sampled in 2005 and 2006, respectively--are quite higher than the average values encountered in uncontaminated sea water. The high concentrations are associated with terrestrial inputs from the mining zones and anthropogenic (domestic+industrial) sources. Moreover, the distribution of Fe and Cu is affected by primary production because these elements function as nutrients in biological activities. The Cr, Ni, and Fe concentrations of surface sediments are above the shale average. The Cr and Ni contents of surface sediments representative of river mouths strongly correlate with total phosphorus contents. In a sulfide-poor environment, Pb and Cu were concentrated at a higher ratio in surface sediments than Cd, probably due to higher stabilities of their surface complexes with amorphous iron oxides and clay minerals existing as major components in the sediments. The exceptional enrichment of Zn may be attributed to double oxide formation with amorphous iron oxides in sediments. The high metal values are most probably caused by terrestrial inputs from anthropogenic sources and the mining zones at the southeast part of the bay. The Al, Mn, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Hg contents are below the shale average. The low values have possibly originated from the coarse-grained sandy sediments having a low affinity for metals. There are no distinct differences in the metal distributions in water and suspended matter between the years 2005 and 2006 in the bay, probably due to low sedimentation rates.

  6. A catchment-wide assessment of bed sediment metal concentrations in the first industrial city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Rachel; Rothwell, James; Woodward, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    Manchester is often heralded as the 'first industrial city'. Rapid industrialisation in the 18th and 19th centuries saw vast quantities of fine-grained sediments (e.g. boiler ash and cinders) and contaminants (e.g. dyes, bleaches, and chemicals) deposited into the river channels of the Irwell and Mersey in a manner largely unchecked until the 1970s. Although water quality has improved in recent decades, there is a paucity of information on fluvial sediment quality and the extent to which a legacy of historical contamination persists in the contemporary river network. Forty five sites were sampled across the Irwell and Mersey catchments during low flow conditions in spring/summer 2015. Fine-grained bed sediment was collected using the Lambert and Walling (1988) method. Wet sieving was used to isolate the <63 μm fraction for geochemical analysis. Heavy metal concentrations were obtained via XRF with a particular focus on As, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. In order to explore controls on sediment-associated metal concentrations, additional characteristics of the bed sediment were also investigated, including particle size and organic matter content. Enrichment factors, based on mean concentrations obtained from pre-industrial floodplain deposits, were calculated. The enrichment factors reveal severe or very severe metal contamination across the whole catchment, including the headwater basins. Relationships between bed sediment quality and hotspots of historic industrial activity have been examined - these reveal complex spatial patterns associated with the high number and variety of historic contaminant inputs. These data form the first baseline assessment and will be used within a larger project investigating the impact of extreme hydrological events on bed sediment quality and transfer in these catchments.

  7. Areal distribution and concentrations of contaminants of concern in surficial streambed and lakebed sediments, Lake Erie-Lake Saint Clair Drainages, 1990-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rheaume, S.J.; Button, D.T.; Myers, Donna N.; Hubbell, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Concerns about elevated concentrations of contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls and mercury in aquatic bed sediments throughout the Great Lakes Basin have resulted in a need for better understanding of the scope and severity of the problem. Various organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, trace metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are a concern because of their ability to persist and accumulate in aquatic sediments and their association with adverse aquatic biological effects. The areal distribution and concentrations in surficial bed sediments of 20 contaminants of concern with established bed-sediment-toxicity guidelines were examined in relation to their potential effects on freshwater aquatic biota. Contaminants at more than 800 sampling locations are characterized in this report. Surficial bed-sediment-quality data collected from 1990 to 1997 in the Lake Erie?Lake Saint Clair Drainages were evaluated to reflect recent conditions. In descending order, concentrations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenanthrene, total polychlorinated biphenyls, chrysene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, and mercury were the contaminants that most commonly exceeded levels associated with probable adverse effects on aquatic benthic organisms. The highest concentrations of most of these contaminants in aquatic bed sediments are confined to the 12 specific geographic Areas of Concern identified in the 1987 Revisions to the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1972. An exception is arsenic, which was detected at concentrations exceeding threshold effect levels at many locations outside Areas of Concern.

  8. Concentrations of selected heavy metals in benthic diatoms and sediment in the Westerschelde Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, M.C.P.; Scheppingen, Y. van

    1996-12-31

    In recent years considerable data have been compiled on heavy metal levels in biota in marine and estuarine environments. With respect to the fauna, much information is available on accumulation and effects of heavy metals in birds, fish and benthic macrofauna. Accumulation of heavy metals in aquatic flora has been studied mostly in benthic macroalgae, in particular in relation to the use as a biological monitor. The response of planktonic algal species to heavy metals has been studied extensively in cultured populations. Also. heavy metal concentrations in natural plankton have been studied. As far as we know, very few data are available on the concentrations of heavy metals in the lowest benthic trophic level, the benthic microflora. It is a major food supply for numerous intertidal species, so it is obvious that microflora might play an important role in the accumulation of contaminants through coastal food chains. The aim of this research was to adjust a recently developed collection technique for benthic diatoms so that it is suitable for large-scale field studies. The method was then used to assess the concentration of the heavy metals Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in benthic diatoms and sediments along an estuarine gradient. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The effects of wildfire on the sediment yield of a coastal California watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Hatten, J.A.; Pasternack, G.B.; Gray, A.B.; Goni, M.A.; Wheatcroft, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of two wildfires separated by 31 yr in the chaparral-dominated Arroyo Seco watershed (293 km) of California provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the effects of wildfire on suspended-sediment yield. Here, we compile discharge and suspended-sediment sampling data from before and after the fires and show that the effects of the postfire responses differed markedly. The 1977 Marble Cone wildfire was followed by an exceptionally wet winter, which resulted in concentrations and fluxes of both fine and coarse suspended sediment that were ˜35 times greater than average (sediment yield during the 1978 water year was 11,000 t/km2/yr). We suggest that the combined 1977–1978 fire and flood had a recurrence interval of greater than 1000 yr. In contrast, the 2008 Basin Complex wildfire was followed by a drier than normal year, and although suspended-sediment fluxes and concentrations were significantly elevated compared to those expected for unburned conditions, the sediment yield during the 2009 water year was less than 1% of the post–Marble Cone wildfire yield. After the first postfire winters, sediment concentrations and yield decreased with time toward prefire relationships and continued to have significant rainfall dependence. We hypothesize that the differences in sediment yield were related to precipitation-enhanced hillslope erosion processes, such as rilling and mass movements. The millennial-scale effects of wildfire on sediment yield were explored further using Monte Carlo simulations, and these analyses suggest that infrequent wildfires followed by floods increase long-term suspended-sediment fluxes markedly. Thus, we suggest that the current approach of estimating sediment yield from sediment rating curves and discharge data—without including periodic perturbations from wildfires—may grossly underestimate actual sediment yields.

  10. EFFECTS OF STORAGE ON THE TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS SPIKED WITH FLUORANTHENE TO THE AMPHIPOD, RHEPOXYNIUS ABRONIUS

    EPA Science Inventory


    To determine the effect of storage on contaminant bioavailability and toxicity, two sediment types, a fine sand and silty sand, were spiked with nine concentrations of fluoranthene (0.0-50 mg/dry kg) then stored at 4?C for up to 170d. Toxicity of the stored sediment was dete...

  11. A step decrease in sediment concentration in a highly modified tidal river delta following the 1983 El Niño floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hestir, Erin L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Morgan-King, Tara; Ustin, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities in watersheds can have profound effects on sediment transport through river systems to estuaries. Disturbance in a watershed combined with alterations to the hydro-climatologic regime may result in changes to the sediment flux, and exacerbate the impacts of extreme events (such as large-magnitude floods) on sediment transport. In the San Francisco Estuary, suspended sediment has been declining over the past 30 years as a result of declining sediment supply, contributing to dramatic changes in the ecology and geomorphology of the estuary. However, the decline has not been gradual. Recent observations of an abrupt decrease in suspended sediments in the San Francisco Bay have been explained by a model that suggests that the step change has occurred due to exceedance of a sediment regulation threshold that triggered the change from a sediment transport regime to a supply-limited system. We investigated structural changes in the historical record of total suspended solids (TSS) concentration measured in the upper estuary to verify the model predictions. TSS in the upper estuary exhibited an abrupt step decrease in 1983 corresponding to the record-high winter and summer flows from the 1982 to 1983 El Niño event. After this step change, TSS concentrations had a significant declining trend despite subsequent near-record high flows. The abrupt change in TSS followed by the declining trend provides evidence for the hypothesis of sediment supply limitation in the San Francisco Estuary.

  12. Comparing polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and patterns in the Saginaw River using sediment, caged fish, and semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Echols, K.R.; Gale, R.W.; Schwartz, T.R.; Huckins, J.N.; Williams, L.L.; Meadows, J.C.; Morse, D.; Petty, J.D.; Orazio, C.E.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    Three techniques of assessing bioavailable polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Saginaw River, MI, were compared: sediments, caged fish, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). SPMDs and caged fish were placed in the river for 28 days at five sites where sediments were also sampled. The samples were analyzed for PCB congeners to determine concentrations and patterns. Total PCB concentrations ranged from 33 to 280 ng/g (dry weight) in sediments, 46 to 290 ng/g (wet weight) in caged fish, and 77 to 790 ng/g in SPMDs. Previously reported rates of PCB accumulation by SPMDs were used to estimate aqueous concentrations from the PCB concentrations detected in the SPMDs. Sediment-water partition coefficients were used to estimate aqueous PCB concentrations from sediment. Steady-state bioconcentration factors and depuration rate constants were used to estimate dissolved PCB concentrations from caged channel catfish. Relative PCB patterns from the SPMDs, caged fish, and sediment were compared using principal components analysis. SPMD and sediment samples provide complementary information. Sediments reflect long-term accumulation and weathering, while SPMDs integrate water concentrations only during the sampling period. Because of higher water solubilities of lower-chlorinated PCBs these predominate in the SPMDs as compared to in the fish and sediments. Contaminant profile differences between caged fish and SPMDs are likely due to metabolism and depuration of certain PCB congeners by fish.Three techniques of assessing bioavailable polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Saginaw River, Ml, were compared: sediments, caged fish, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). SPMDs and caged fish were placed in the river for 28 days at five sites where sediments were also sampled. The samples were analyzed for PCB congeners to determine concentrations and patterns. Total PCB concentrations ranged from 33 to 280 ng/g (dry weight) in sediments, 46 to 290 ng/g (wet weight) in

  13. Present and Reference Concentrations and Yields of Suspended Sediment in Streams in the Great Lakes Region and Adjacent Areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Saad, David A.; Heisey, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    In-stream suspended sediment and siltation and downstream sedimentation are common problems in surface waters throughout the United States. The most effective way to improve surface waters impaired by sediments is to reduce the contributions from human activities rather than try to reduce loadings from natural sources. Total suspended sediment/solids (TSS) concentration data were obtained from 964 streams in the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy River Basins from 1951 to 2002. These data were used to estimate median concentrations, loads, yields, and volumetrically (flow) weighted (VW) concentrations where streamflow data were available. SPAtial Regression-Tree Analysis (SPARTA) was applied to land-use-adjusted (residualized) TSS data and environmental-characteristic data to determine the natural factors that best described the distribution of median and VW TSS concentrations and yields and to delineate zones with similar natural factors affecting TSS, enabling reference or natural concentrations and yields to be estimated. Soil properties (clay and organic-matter content, erodibility, and permeability), basin slope, and land use (percentage of agriculture) were the factors most strongly related to the distribution of median and VW TSS concentrations. TSS yields were most strongly related to amount of precipitation and the resulting runoff, and secondarily to the factors related to high TSS concentrations. Reference median TSS concentrations ranged from 5 to 26 milligrams per liter (mg/L), reference median annual VW TSS concentrations ranged from 10 to 168 mg/L, and reference TSS yields ranged from about 980 to 90,000 kilograms per square kilometer per year. Independent streams (streams with no overlapping drainage areas) with TSS data were ranked by how much their water quality exceeded reference concentrations and yields. Most streams exceeding reference conditions were in the central part of the study area, where agricultural activities

  14. Fine sediment impacts on Salmonid spawning success: Relative effects of pore blockage and oxygen demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, I.; Sear, D.; Collins, A.; Jones, I.; Naden, P.

    2013-12-01

    Salmonids act as geomorphic agents constructing a spawning habitat (redd) with fine sediment being washed out of the bed, increasing porosity around the incubating eggs. However, during the incubation period fine sediment infiltrates back into the river bed and degrades the habitat quality. Fine sediment has been found to reduce survival rates of salmonid eggs in both field and laboratory experiments, with the main hypotheses used to explain this being (a) fine sediment reduces gravel permeability and intra-gravel flow velocities; (b) intra-gravel O2 concentrations decrease due to reduced supply and increased consumption by organic sediments; and (c) clay particles block the exchange of O2 across the egg membrane. The SIDO (Sediment Intrusion and Dissolved Oxygen)-UK model is a physically based numerical model which stimulates the effect of fine sediment intrusion on the abiotic characteristics of the salmonid redd, along with the consequences for egg development and survival. This has been used to assess the sensitivity of salmonid egg survival to changes in the quantity and composition of fine sediment, including particle size and sediment oxygen demand. Results indicate that egg survival is highly sensitive to the discharge and the suspended sediment concentrations, particularly to changes in the supply rate of sand particles, rather than silt and clay. This can be explained by the increased likelihood of blocking of intra-gravel pores by larger sand particles, which reduce intra-gravel flow velocities and the supply of oxygen rich water. Furthermore, this effect of sediment mass has been found to be more important than the sediment oxygen consumption process. These findings have implications for how we manage the sediment delivery problem, especially as future projections indicate increased sediment delivery under climate and land management change.

  15. Analysis of heavy metals concentration in water and sediment in the Hara biosphere reserve, southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Mohsen; Mansouri, Borhan; Nabizadeh, Sahar; Pourkhabbaz, Alireza

    2014-02-01

    This study determined the concentration of heavy metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn) in water and sediments at nine sites in the Hara biosphere reserve of southern Iran during the summer and winter 2010. Determination of Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn in water was carried out by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (Shimadzu, AA 610s) and in sediment by flame atomic absorption spectrometer (Perkin Elmer, AA3030). Results showed that the heavy metal concentrations in the water samples decreased in the sequence of Zn > Al > Cu > Cr, while in sediment samples were Cr > Zn > Cu > Al. Data analysis indicated that with the exception of Al, there was a Pearson's correlation coefficient between pH and Cu, Zn, and Cr at α = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.001 in sediment (in winter), respectively. There were also significant differences between heavy metals of Cr, Cu, and Zn during the two seasons (p < 0.001) in the water and sediment.

  16. Sorption of nonionic surfactant oligomers to sediment and PCE DNAPL: Effects on PCE distribution between water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    John, W.W.; Bao, G.; Johnson, W.P.; Stauffer, T.B.

    2000-02-15

    Introduction of surfactant mixtures to the subsurface for the purpose of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation requires consideration of the effects of surfactant sorption to sediment and nonaqueous phase liquids. These effects include alteration of the solubilizing properties of the surfactant mixture and alteration of the sorption properties of the stationary phase. Sorption of octylphenol ethoxylate (EO) surfactant oligomers to a low organic carbon content (f{sub oc}) aquifer sediment and to dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) consisting of tetrachloroethene (PCE) was examined in batch experiments. At aqueous surfactant concentrations far below the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the mixture, sorption to sediment was characterized by an initial steep isotherm for both high and low EO content oligomers, with somewhat greater uptake of high EO content oligomers. This stage of sorption resulted in mild increases in the equilibrium constant, k{sub d,PCEr} for distribution of PCE between solution (including surfactant) and sediment (including sorbed surfactant). As the aqueous surfactant concentration increased, surface aggregation of low EO content oligomers on the sediment commenced, and a dramatic increase in K{sub d,PCE} was observed. At aqueous surfactant concentrations increasing above the CMC, the formation of solution micelles caused the sorbed surfactant concentrations to plateau and then decrease. This decrease in sorbed surfactant, along with competition by micelles for contaminant, likely contributed to the observed rapid decrease in K{sub d,PCE} toward zero. Surfactant sorption to PCE DNAPL was greater relative to sediment by 1--2 orders of magnitude, with much greater uptake of the low EO content oligomers. Sorption of all but the lowest EO content oligomers to the PCE DNAPL was terminated by micellization.

  17. Effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on phytotoxicity of sediments contaminated by phenanthrene and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Song, Biao; Zeng, Guangming; Gong, Jilai; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Jiaqin; Deng, Canhui; Yan, Jin; Xu, Piao; Lai, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min

    2017-04-01

    To implement effective control and abatement programs for contaminants accumulating in sediments, strategies are needed for evaluating the quality of amended sediments. In this study, phytotoxicity of the sediments contaminated by cadmium and phenanthrene was evaluated after in situ remediation with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbents. Adsorption experiments and measurement of aqueous concentrations of the contaminants in overlying water were used to investigate the remediation effectiveness from physical and chemical aspects. The results indicated that MWCNTs showed a much better adsorption performance towards phenanthrene and Cd(II) compared with the sediments. The in situ remediation with MWCNTs could distinctly decrease the aqueous concentrations of phenanthrene and Cd(II) released from the sediments, reducing environmental risk towards overlying water. Influences of MWCNTs dose, MWCNTs diameter, and contact time on phtotoxicity of the contaminated sediments were studied. No significant inhibition of the amended sediments on germination of the test species was observed in the experiments, while the root growth was more sensitive than biomass production to the changes of contaminant concentrations. The analysis of Pearson correlation coefficients between evaluation indicators and associated remediation parameters suggested that phytotoxicity of sediments might inaccurately indicate the changes of pollutant content, but it was significant in reflecting the ecotoxicity of sediments after remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instrument: A case study of Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwinovantyo, Angga; Manik, Henry M.; Prartono, Tri; Susilohadi; Ilahude, Delyuzar

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the parameters needed to determine the characteristics of sediment transport. However, the measurement of SSC nowadays still uses conventional technique and it has limitations; especially in temporal resolution. With advanced technology, the measurement can use hydroacoustic technology such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). ADCP measures the intensity of backscatter as echo intensity unit from sediment particles. The frequency of ADCP used in this study was 400 kHz. The samples were measured and collected from Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. The highest concentration of suspended sediment was 98.89 mg L-1 and the lowest was 45.20 mg L-1. Time series data showed the tidal condition affected the SSC. From the research, we also made correction from sound signal losses effect such as spherical spreading and sound absorption to get more accurate results by eliminating these parameters in echo intensity data. Simple linear regression analysis at echo intensity measured from ADCP to direct measurement of SSC was performed to obtain the estimation of the SSC. The comparison result of estimation of SSC from ADCP measurements and SSC from laboratory analyses was insignificantly different based on t-test statistical analysis with 95% confidence interval percentage.

  19. Tidal river sediments in the Washington, D.C. area. 111 Biological effects associated with sediment contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Schlekat, C.E.; McGee, B.L.; Boward, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    Sediment toxicity and benthic marcroinvertebrate community structure were measured as one component of a study conceived to determine the distribution and effect of sediment contamination in tidal freshwater portions of the Potomac and Anacostia rivers in the Washington, D.C., area. Samples were collected at 15 sites. Analyses included a partial life cycle (28 d) whole sediment test using the amphipod Hyalella azteca (Talitridae) and an assessment of benthic community structure. Survival and growth (as estimated by amphipod length) were experimental endpoints for the toxicity test. Significant mortality was observed in 5 to 10 sites in the lower Anacostia River basin and at the main channel Potomac River site. Sublethal toxicity, as measured by inhibition of amphipod growth, was not observed. Toxicity test results were in general agreement with synoptically measured sediment contaminant concentrations. Porewater total ammonia (NH{sub 3} + NH{sub 4}{sup +}) appears to be responsible for the toxicity of sediments from the Potomac River, while correlation analysis and simultaneously extracted metals: acid volatile sulfide (SEM:AVA) results suggest that the toxicity associated with Anacostia River sediments was due to organic compounds. Twenty-eight macroinvertebrate taxa were identified among all sites, with richness varying from 5 to 17 taxa per site. Groups of benthic assemblages identified by group-average cluster analysis exhibited variable agreement with sediment chemical and sediment toxicity results. Integration of toxicological, chemical, and ecological components suggests that adverse environmental effects manifest in lower Anacostia River benthos result from chemical contamination of sediment. 37 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Heavy metals' concentration in sediment, shrimp and two fish species from the northwest Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Monikh, Fazel Abdolahpur; Maryamabadi, Ammar; Savari, Ahmad; Ghanemi, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals (cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn)) were measured in hepatopancreas and muscle of a commercial shrimp (Metapenaeus affinis), in the muscle, liver and gills of two fish species (Thryssa vitrirostris and Johnius belangerii) and in the sediment samples taken from the mouth of the Arvand river, Meleh estuary and Musa estuary in the northeast Persian Gulf. Concentration of heavy metals varied depending on different tissues, species and sampling sites. Liver of fish and hepatopancreas of shrimp exhibited higher metals' concentration than the other tissues. Generally, in the mouth of the Arvand river, the highest concentration of metals was found in benthic species; while in the mouth of Musa estuary, the highest level of the metals was found in pelagic fish species. Bioaccumulation factors were observed to follow the order: J. belangerii-liver-Cd > T. vitrirostris-liver-Pb > M. affinis-hepatopancreas-Zn >M. affinis-hepatopancreas-Cu >M. affinis- hepatopancreas-Ni. The analysed heavy metals were found in sediment samples at mean concentration in the sediment quality guideline proposed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Regional Organization for the Protection of The Marine Environment (ROPME), except for Ni concentration in some cases.

  1. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads in the Steele Bayou Basin, northwestern Mississippi, 2010–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Matthew B.; Murphy, Jennifer C.; Stocks, Shane J.

    2017-06-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Vicksburg District, monitored streamflow, water quality, and sediment at two stations on the Steele Bayou in northwestern Mississippi from October 2010 through September 2014 to characterize nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads in areas where substantial implementation of conservation efforts have been implemented. The motivation for this effort was to quantify improvements, or lack thereof, in water quality in the Steele Bayou watershed as a result of implementing large- and small-scale best-management practices aimed at reducing nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads. The results of this study document the hydrologic, water-quality, and sedimentation status of these basins following over two decades of ongoing implementation of conservation practices.Results from this study indicate the two Steele Bayou stations have comparable loads and yields of total nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended sediment when compared to other agricultural basins in the southeastern and central United States. However, nitrate plus nitrite yields from basins in the Mississippi River alluvial plain, including the Steele Bayou Basin, are generally lower than other agricultural basins in the southeastern and central United States.Seasonal variation in nutrient and sediment loads was observed at both stations and for most constituents. About 50 percent of the total annual nutrient and sediment load was observed during the spring (February through May) and between 25 and 50 percent was observed during late fall and winter (October through January). These seasonal patterns probably reflect a combination of seasonal patterns in precipitation, runoff, streamflow, and in the timing of fertilizer application.Median concentrations of total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and suspended sediment were slightly higher at the upstream station, Steele Bayou near Glen Allan

  2. Effect of Vegetation on Sediment Transport across Salt Marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, D. J.; Kirwan, M. L.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Ganju, N. K.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes are a classic example of ecogeomorphology where interactions between plants and sediment transport govern the stability of a rapidly evolving ecosystem. In particular, plants slow water velocities which facilitates deposition of mineral sediment, and the resulting change in soil elevation influences the growth and species distribution of plants. The ability of a salt marsh to withstand sea level rise (SLR) is therefore dependent, among other factors, on the availability of mineral sediment. Here we measure suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) along a transect from tidal channel to marsh interior, exploring the role biomass plays in regulating the magnitude and spatial variability in vertical accretion. Our study was conducted in Spartina alterniflora dominated salt marshes along the Atlantic Coast from Massachusetts to Georgia. At each site, we deployed and calibrated optical back scatter turbidity probes to measure SSC in 15 minute intervals in a tidal channel, on the marsh edge, and in the marsh interior. We visited each site monthly to measure plant biomass via clip plots and vertical accretion via two types of sediment tiles. Preliminary results confirm classic observations that biomass is highest at the marsh edge, and that SSC and vertical accretion decrease across the marsh platform with distance from the channel. We expect that when biomass is higher, such as in southern sites like Georgia and months late in the growing season, SSC will decay more rapidly with distance into the marsh. Higher biomass will likely also correspond to increased vertical accretion, with the greatest effect at marsh edge locations. Our study will likely demonstrate how salt marsh plants interact with sediment transport dynamics to control marsh morphology and thus contribute to marsh resilience to SLR.

  3. Uranium series isotopes concentration in sediments at San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Méndez-García, C.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of the radioisotopes concentrations were determined in sediments near the surface and core samples extracted from two reservoirs located in an arid region close to Chihuahua City, Mexico. At San Marcos reservoir one core was studied, while from Luis L. Leon reservoir one core from the entrance and another one close to the wall were investigated. ²³²Th-series, ²³⁸U-series, ⁴⁰K and ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations (AC, Bq kg⁻¹) were determined by gamma spectrometry with a high purity Ge detector. ²³⁸U and ²³⁴U ACs were obtained by liquid scintillation and alpha spectrometry with a surface barrier detector. Dating of core sediments was performed applying CRS method to ²¹⁰Pb activities. Results were verified by ¹³⁷Cs AC. Resulting activity concentrations were compared among corresponding surface and core sediments. High ²³⁸U-series AC values were found in sediments from San Marcos reservoir, because this site is located close to the Victorino uranium deposit. Low AC values found in Luis L. Leon reservoir suggest that the uranium present in the source of the Sacramento – Chuviscar Rivers is not transported up to the Conchos River. Activity ratios (AR) ²³⁴U/²³⁸U and ²³⁸U/²²⁶Ra in sediments have values between 0.9–1.2, showing a behavior close to radioactive equilibrium in the entire basin. ²³²Th/²³⁸U, ²²⁸Ra/²²⁶Ra ARs are witnesses of the different geological origin of sediments from San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs.

  4. Uranium series isotopes concentration in sediments at San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-García, C.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; García-Tenorio, R.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of the radioisotopes concentrations were determined in sediments near the surface and core samples extracted from two reservoirs located in an arid region close to Chihuahua City, Mexico. At San Marcos reservoir one core was studied, while from Luis L. Leon reservoir one core from the entrance and another one close to the wall were investigated. 232Th-series, 238U-series, 40K and 137Cs activity concentrations (AC, Bq kg-1) were determined by gamma spectrometry with a high purity Ge detector. 238U and 234U ACs were obtained by liquid scintillation and alpha spectrometry with a surface barrier detector. Dating of core sediments was performed applying CRS method to 210Pb activities. Results were verified by 137Cs AC. Resulting activity concentrations were compared among corresponding surface and core sediments. High 238U-series AC values were found in sediments from San Marcos reservoir, because this site is located close to the Victorino uranium deposit. Low AC values found in Luis L. Leon reservoir suggest that the uranium present in the source of the Sacramento - Chuviscar Rivers is not transported up to the Conchos River. Activity ratios (AR) 234U/overflow="scroll">238U and 238U/overflow="scroll">226Ra in sediments have values between 0.9-1.2, showing a behavior close to radioactive equilibrium in the entire basin. 232Th/overflow="scroll">238U, 228Ra/overflow="scroll">226Ra ARs are witnesses of the different geological origin of sediments from San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs.

  5. Mud On the Move: Measuring Suspended Sediment Concentrations within Tidal Wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaway, J.; Ferner, M.; Lacy, J. R.; Schile, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Supply of suspended sediment is critical for the development and sustainability of tidal wetlands. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is also a key parameter used in calibrating wetland accretion models, which aid in understanding restoration dynamics and projecting resilience to sea-level rise. Despite the importance of suspended sediment, few field studies have directly measured SSC within tidal wetlands, relying instead on measurements in adjacent waters or focusing on long-term rates of sediment accretion. We refined and tested a simple method for collecting SSC samples within wetlands on an incoming high tide, using siphon collectors. Bottles were positioned during low tide at set locations along transects extending away from either channels or the lower boundary of the vegetated wetland. This sampling protocol was developed collaboratively, with substantial input from local wetland managers and other stakeholders within the San Francisco Bay area and beyond. Simultaneously, we measured time series of SSC, water level, and tidal currents in the subtidal shallows, on the intertidal mudflats, and in two channels within the wetland. We observed significant sediment export during king tides in the wetland channels. Cumulative suspended sediment flux (SSF) over four days during the January 2014 king tides was approximately 10 tons/m of channel width, towards the bay. During neap tides SSF in the channels was directed landward but was lower in magnitude. Elevated velocities in the channels during ebb king tides suggest that resuspension within the channels, rather than erosion of the wetland, accounts for much of the bayward SSF. Within the wetland, SSC from the siphon samplers was highest at the bayward end of the cross-shore transects, indicating landward sediment flux. Taken together with long term accretion data which indicates sediment accumulation within the wetland, our results suggest that sediment is primarily supplied across the wetland-Bay interface

  6. Element concentrations in bed sediment of the Yellowstone River basin, Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming; a retrospective analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.A.; Zelt, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical data for bed sediment were analyzed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program investigation of the Yellowstone River Basin in parts of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming. The primary data set consisted of about 13,000 samples collected during 1974-79 for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Data were available for 50 elements, although not all samples were analyzed for all elements. Element concentrations varied spatially and were associated with geologic settings or ecoregions. Factor analysis indicated three groups of associated elements: factor 1 elements were strongly correlated with basaltic rocks, factor 2 elements were strongly correlated with granitic rocks, and factor 3 elements were strongly correlated with carbonate rocks. Scores for factor 1 were highest for bed-sediment samples associated with volcanic rocks of Tertiary and Cretaceous age in the Absaroka volcanic field and crystalline rocks of Precambrian age in the Beartooth Mountains. Scores for factor 2 were highest for samples associated with volcanic rocks of Quaternary age on the Yellowstone Plateau, crystalline rocks of Precambrian age, and sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age in the Wyoming Basin ecoregion. Scores for factor 3 were highest in samples associated with sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age and volcanic rocks of Cretaceous and Tertiary age. Descriptive statistics are presented to serve as a baseline for element concentrations in bed sediment associated with eight geologic settings or ecoregions in the study unit. Some of the concentrations of chromium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc in bed-sediment samples from areas of crystalline rocks in the Beartooth Mountains and other formations in the western part of the study unit exceeded sediment-quality assessment values associated with toxic effects to aquatic life.

  7. Sediment movement along the U.S. east coast continental shelf-II. Modelling suspended sediment concentration and transport rate during storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyne, V.D.; Butman, B.; Grant, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term near-bottom wave and current observations and a one-dimensional sediment transport model are used to calculate the concentration and transport of sediment during winter storms at 60-80 m water depth along the southern flank of Georges Bank and in the Mid-Atlantic Bight. Calculations are presented for five stations, separated by more than 600 km alongshelf, that have different bottom sediment texture, bedforms and current conditions. A modified version of the sediment transport model presented by Grant and Glenn (1983, Technical Report to the American Gas Association), Glenn (1983, D.Sc. Thesis, M.I.T.), and Glenn and Grant (1987, Journal of Geophysical Research, 92, 8244-8264) is used to examine the influence of wave-current interaction, sediment stratification, and limitations on the erodibility of the bottom sediments on the concentration of sediment in the water column and on transport. Predicted suspended sediment concentrations are higher than observed, based on beam transmissometer measurements, unless an erosion limit of order a few millimeters for sediments finer than 94 ??m is imposed. The agreement between predicted and measured beam attenuation is better at stations that have significant amounts of silt plus clay in the surficial sediments than for stations with sandy sediments. Sediment concentrations during storms estimated by Moody et al. (1987, Continental Shelf Research, 7, 609-628) are within 50% of the model predictions. Sediment transport rates for sediments 94 ??m and finer are determined largely by the concentrations in the surficial sediment and the erosion depth limit. Large alongshelf transports in the direction of storm-driven currents are inferred for stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight. During a 115-day period in winter 1979-1980, the net transport of sediment along the shelf was westward; benthic storms (defined as periods when the bottom wave stress exceeded the current stress by 2 dyn cm-2) occurred between 23 and 73% of the

  8. Controls on Bacterial Concentrations in Sediment Grab Samples from the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batta, J.; Mailloux, B. J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.; Ferguson, A. S.; Cheung, J.; Layton, A.

    2010-12-01

    High levels of fecal bacteria resulting from sewage-related pollution are often present in the Hudson River Estuary. Die-off of the fecal bacteria in surface waters is relatively rapid but the fecal bacteria can also attach to particles and settle. It is known that fecal bacteria are present in the shallow sediments but controls on their distribution have not been closely examined. The goal of this work is to examine the relationship between the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria and sediment properties including estimates of sediment age. Forty sediment surface grabs were obtained from the Hudson River Estuary. Twenty samples were collected from near the George Washington Bridge (GWB) and twenty samples from a 15 mile transect near Hudson New York. Concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria were determined by the cultured based Enterolert and Colilert tests (Idexx Laboratories) and molecular based techniques for E. coli and Bacteroides. Sediments were analyzed for total metals, total organic carbon, grain size, and gamma emitting radionuclides including Beryllium-7, Lead-210, and Cesium-137. Enterococcus was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 88 cells/g and a range of 4 to 817 cells /g. Culturable E. Coli was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 168 cells /g and a range of 5 to 2247 cells /g. Enterococcus concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the northern transect. Molecular based concentrations were determined for the GWB samples and were significantly higher than culture based concentrations. Bacteroides was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 1.1x106 copies/g and a range of 3.9x104 to 4.7x106 copies /g. Molecular E. Coli was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 3.0x106 copies/g and a range of 8.7x104 to 8.9x107 copies /g. The results clearly show that a significant amount of fecal bacteria are present in the sediments. Simple linear correlations between bacterial concentrations and sediment

  9. PAH concentrations in lake sediment decline following ban on coal-tar-based pavement sealants in Austin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Mahler, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have concluded that coal-tar-based pavement sealants are a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban settings in large parts of the United States. In 2006, Austin, TX, became the first jurisdiction in the U.S. to ban the use of coal-tar sealants. We evaluated the effect of Austin’s ban by analyzing PAHs in sediment cores and bottom-sediment samples collected in 1998, 2000, 2001, 2012, and 2014 from Lady Bird Lake, the principal receiving water body for Austin urban runoff. The sum concentration of the 16 EPA Priority Pollutant PAHs (∑PAH16) in dated core intervals and surficial bottom-sediment samples collected from sites in the lower lake declined about 44% from 1998–2005 to 2006–2014 (means of 7980 and 4500 μg kg–1, respectively), and by 2012–2014, the decline was about 58% (mean of 3320 μg kg–1). Concentrations of ∑PAH16 in bottom sediment from two of three mid-lake sites decreased by about 71 and 35% from 2001 to 2014. Concentrations at a third site increased by about 14% from 2001 to 2014. The decreases since 2006 reverse a 40-year (1959–1998) upward trend. Despite declines in PAH concentrations, PAH profiles and source-receptor modeling results indicate that coal-tar sealants remain the largest PAH source to the lake, implying that PAH concentrations likely will continue to decline as stocks of previously applied sealant gradually become depleted.

  10. PAH concentrations in lake sediment decline following ban on coal-tar-based pavement sealants in Austin, Texas.

    PubMed

    Van Metre, Peter C; Mahler, Barbara J

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have concluded that coal-tar-based pavement sealants are a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban settings in large parts of the United States. In 2006, Austin, TX, became the first jurisdiction in the U.S. to ban the use of coal-tar sealants. We evaluated the effect of Austin's ban by analyzing PAHs in sediment cores and bottom-sediment samples collected in 1998, 2000, 2001, 2012, and 2014 from Lady Bird Lake, the principal receiving water body for Austin urban runoff. The sum concentration of the 16 EPA Priority Pollutant PAHs (∑PAH16) in dated core intervals and surficial bottom-sediment samples collected from sites in the lower lake declined about 44% from 1998-2005 to 2006-2014 (means of 7980 and 4500 μg kg(-1), respectively), and by 2012-2014, the decline was about 58% (mean of 3320 μg kg(-1)). Concentrations of ∑PAH16 in bottom sediment from two of three mid-lake sites decreased by about 71 and 35% from 2001 to 2014. Concentrations at a third site increased by about 14% from 2001 to 2014. The decreases since 2006 reverse a 40-year (1959-1998) upward trend. Despite declines in PAH concentrations, PAH profiles and source-receptor modeling results indicate that coal-tar sealants remain the largest PAH source to the lake, implying that PAH concentrations likely will continue to decline as stocks of previously applied sealant gradually become depleted.

  11. Heavy metal concentrations in litteral sediments from the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Amin, O; Ferrer, L; Marcovecchio, J

    1996-07-01

    For the first time the concentration of trace metals (Fe, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd and total Hg) of sediments from the coastal zone of the Beagle Channel (Tierra del Fuego, in Southern Argentina) were measured. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was utilized in order to determine the metal contents. The level of metals as observed in the sediments was recognized as the natural background, even though the use of normalization of lead, copper, and zinc to iron allowed the identification of the main sources of metal pollution for this environment. In order to develop future environmental monitoring programmes for the area of Ushuaia city and the Beagle Channel, the present results need to be considered.

  12. Radionuclide concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue within the Rio Grande drainage basin

    SciTech Connect

    Booher, J.L.; Fresquez, P.R.; Carter, L.F.; Gallaher, B.M.; Mullen, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    In 1992-93, Los Alamos National Laboratory collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey in an effort to characterize radionuclide concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue within the Rio Grande drainage basin from Colorado to Texas. Bed sediment was sampled from 18 locations for cesium ({sup 137}Cs), tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu), americium ({sup 241}Am), total uranium ({sup tot}U) and alpha, beta, and gamma activity. Fish tissue was sampled from 12 locations for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu and {sup tot}U.

  13. AMS measurement of 10Be concentrations in marine sediments from Chile Trench at the TANDAR laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Arazi, A.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Martí, G. V.; Negri, A. E.; Abriola, D.; Capurro, O. A.; Cardona, M. A.; de Barbará, E.; Gollan, F.; Hojman, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Samsolo, N.; Togneri, M.; Villanueva, D.

    2017-03-01

    The 10Be/9Be ratios in marine sediments samples from the Southern Chile Trench have been measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The samples were measured at the TANDAR accelerator, where the discrimination of the 10Be radionuclides was achieved by means of a passive absorber in front of an ionization chamber. This setup along with the high voltage available, provided a complete suppression of the 10B isobar interference. The obtained values for the 10Be concentrations, of the order of 109 atoms/g, are the first 10Be measurements from the Southern Chile Trench and offer an excellent tracer to quantitatively study the recycling of sediments in Andean magmas.

  14. Effect of feeding in 30-day bioaccumulation assays using Hyalella azteca in fluoranthene-dosed sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Current protocols for conducting freshwater sediment bioaccumulation tests require that food be added to exposures. To determine effects of adding food, 30-day bioaccumulation assays were conducted with H. azteca exposed to sediment dosed with four concentrations (0.05 to 1,267 nmol/g dry weight) of fluoranthene. Accumulation was significantly greater in fed versus non-fed animals at all dose levels after 96 and 240 hours of exposure and continued to be greater after 30 days in the low dose levels. At sediment concentrations above 634 nmol/g dw, survival of unfed animals dropped to 34% after 30 days, However, after 30 days, reproduction was observed in fed animals exposed to sediment concentrations > 16 times the expected LC50 calculated for fluoranthene in sediment. These data raise questions concerning the interpretation of standard toxicity and bioaccumulation tests when food is routinely added.

  15. Toward multi-day-ahead forecasting of suspended sediment concentration using ensemble models.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Mohamad Javad; Jafari Nodoushan, Ehsan; Kalarestaghi, Naghi; Chau, Kwok Wing

    2017-10-09

    This study explores two ideas to made an improvement on the artificial neural network (ANN)-based models for suspended sediment forecasting in several time steps ahead. In this regard, both observed and forecasted time series are incorporated as input variables of the models when applied for more than one lead time. Secondly, least-square ensemble models employing multiple wavelet-ANN models are developed to increase the performance of the single model. For this purpose, different wavelet families are linked with the ANN model and performance of each model is evaluated using error measures. The Skagit River near Mount Vernon in Washington county is selected as the case study. The daily flow discharge and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the current day are considered as input variables to predict suspended sediment concentration in the next day. For more lead times, the input structure is updated by adding the forecast of SSC in the previous time step. Results of this study demonstrate that incorporating both observed and predicted variables in the input structure improves performance of conventional models in which those only employ observed time series as input variables. Moreover, ensemble model developed for each lead time outperforms the best single wavelet-ANN model which indicates superiority of the ensemble model over the other one. Findings of this study reveal that acceptable forecasts of daily suspended sediment concentration up to 3 days in advance can be achieved using the proposed methodology.

  16. Comparison of methods for the concentration of suspended sediment in river water for subsequent chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowltz, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugation, settling/centrifugation, and backflush-filtration procedures have been tested for the concentration of suspended sediment from water for subsequent trace-metal analysis. Either of the first two procedures is comparable with in-line filtration and can be carried out precisely, accurately, and with a facility that makes the procedures amenable to large-scale sampling and analysis programs. There is less potential for post-sampling alteration of suspended sediment-associated metal concentrations with the centrifugation procedure because sample stabilization is accomplished more rapidly than with settling/centrifugation. Sample preservation can be achieved by chilling. Suspended sediment associated metal levels can best be determined by direct analysis but can also be estimated from the difference between a set of unfiltered-digested and filtered subsamples. However, when suspended sediment concentrations (<150 mg/L) or trace-metal levels are low, the direct analysis approach makes quantitation more accurate and precise and can be accomplished with simpler analytical procedures.

  17. Sediment concentrations, flow conditions, and downstream evolution of two turbidity currents, Monterey Canyon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping; Octavio E. Sequeiros,; Noble, Marlene A.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of turbidity currents to carry sand and coarser sediment from shallow to deep regions in the submarine environment has attracted the attention of researchers from different disciplines. Yet not only are field measurements of oceanic turbidity currents a rare achievement, but also the data that have been collected consist mostly of velocity records with very limited or no suspended sediment concentration or grain size distribution data. This work focuses on two turbidity currents measured in Monterey Canyon in 2002 with emphasis on suspended sediment from unique samples collected within the body of these currents. It is shown that concentration and grain size of the suspended material, primarily controlled by the source of the gravity flows and their interaction with bed material, play a significant role in shaping the characteristics of the turbidity currents as they travel down the canyon. Before the flows reach their normal or quasi-steady state, which is defined by bed slope, bed roughness, and suspended grain size, they might pass through a preliminary adjustment stage where they are subject to capacity-driven deposition, and release heavy material in excess. Flows composed of fine (silt/clay) sediments tend to be thicker than those with sands. The measured velocity and concentration data confirm that flow patterns differ between the front and body of turbidity currents and that, even after reaching normal state, the flow regime can be radically disrupted by abrupt changes in canyon morphology.

  18. Effects of tubificid bioturbation on pore structures in sediment and the migration of sediment particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaorui; Hua, Xiuyi; Zheng, Fang; Dong, Deming; Liang, Dapeng; Guo, Zhiyong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effects of tubificid bioturbation near the water-sediment interface on pore structures and the migration of sediment particles were evaluated using a series of simulations. In these experiments, the distribution and variation of the tubificid burrows and the macropores in the sediment were investigated by X-ray computed tomography (CT) and digital image collecting, without sampling or disturbing the sediment. The migration of the sediment particles was also determined using CT by adding BaSO4 microspheres to the sediment as a tracer. The effects of tubificid bioturbation on the distribution and migration of contaminants in the sediment were verified by adding Pb-containing sediment layers to the sediment. The results indicate that after the addition of the tubificids, both the burrows and the macropores in the sediments increased with time, and the rate of increase slowed gradually. With the increased worm density, the burrows and the pore structures also increased. The in-depth distribution of the burrows and macropores was determined by the settlement time of the worms: with the settlement time increasing from 3 to 19 days, the depth of the zone with the highest density of burrows and macropores increased from 0-30 to 30-50 mm and from 0-10 to 30-60 mm, respectively. The distribution of the burrows and macropores was closely related to the distribution of the tubificids. Thickening of the oxidized zones in the superficial sediments in the presence of tubificid bioturbation was also observed. The main action of tubificids on the sediment particles was the transport of particles from the inner sediment (especially in the range of 30-50 mm in depth) to the water-sediment interface. The migration of Pb in the contaminated sediment with tubificid bioturbation could be interpreted by the variation in the burrows and macropores and the migration of sediment particles. Both the formation and the variation in the burrows and macropores, as well as

  19. Model-based interpretation of sediment concentration and vertical flux measurements in a shallow estuarine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Andreas; Lacy, Jessica R.; Gladding, Steve; Holleman, Rusty; Stacey, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model describing tidally varying vertical mixing and settling was used to interpret sediment concentrations and vertical fluxes observed in the shoals of South San Francisco Bay by two acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) at elevations of 0.36 m and 0.72 m above bed. Measured sediment concentrations changed by up to 100 g m−3 over the semidiurnal tidal cycle. These dynamics were dominated by local resuspension and settling. Multiple particle class models suggested the existence of a class with fast settling velocities (ws of 9.0 × 10−4 m s−1 in spring and 5.8 × 10−4 m s−1 in fall) and a slowly settling particle fraction (ws of <1 × 10−7 m s−1 in spring and 1.4 × 10−5 m s−1 in fall). Modeled concentrations of slowly settling particles at 0.36 m were as high as 20 g m−3 during fall and varied with the spring-neap cycle while fine sediment concentrations in spring were constant around 5 g m−3. Analysis of in situ water column floc size distributions suggested that floc properties in the lower part of the water column were most likely governed by particle-size distribution on the bed and not by coagulation, validating our multiple particle size approach. A comparison of different sediment bed models with respect to model performance, sensitivity, and identifiability suggested that the use of a sediment erosion model linear in bottom shear stress τb (E = M (τb − τc)) was the most appropriate choice to describe the field observations when the critical shear stress τc and the proportionality factor M were kept constant.

  20. Interannual heavy element and nutrient concentration trends in the top sediments of Venice Lagoon (Italy).

    PubMed

    Masiol, Mauro; Facca, Chiara; Visin, Flavia; Sfriso, Adriano; Pavoni, Bruno

    2014-12-15

    The elemental composition of surficial sediments of Venice Lagoon (Italy) in 1987, 1993, 1998 and 2003 were investigated. Zn and Cr concentrations resulted in higher than background levels, but only Cd and Hg were higher than legal quality standards (Italian Decree 2010/260 and Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC). Contaminants with similar spatial distribution are sorted into three groups by means of correlation analysis: (i) As, Co, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn; (ii) Ni, Cr; (iii) Hg. Interannual concentrations are compared by applying a factor analysis to the matrix of differences between subsequent samplings. A general decrease of heavy metal levels is observed from 1987 to 1993, whereas particularly high concentrations of Ni and Cr are recorded in 1998 as a consequence of intense clam fishing, subsequently mitigated by better prevention of illegal harvesting. Due to the major role played by anthropogenic sediment resuspension, bathymetric variations are also considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Partition of organochlorine concentrations among suspended solids, sediments and brown mussel Perna perna, in tropical bays.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Petrus; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Longo, Renan; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Malm, Olaf; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-11-01

    For evaluating the brown mussel Perna perna as a sentinel organism regarding environmental concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), the present study reports original data on the relationship between the concentrations of these chemicals in bottom surface sediments, suspended solids (SS) and concentrations bioaccumulated by this bivalve. Three P. perna cultivation areas, located at three bays in southeastern Brazil were used in this study. The three estuaries are under different degrees of environmental impact. Variations in the OCP and PCB concentrations bioaccumulated by the bivalves tended to be similar to those observed in the sediment, but differed from those found in SS. This latter difference might suggest that the SS trapping apparatuses should have been left in place for approximately 60 days (not only 15 days). This longer period would allow the integration of the environmental variability of the OCP and PCB burden adsorbed to this compartment. Authors encourage future studies to evaluate P. perna exposure to OCPs and PCBs through the evaluation of sediment concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Geospatial approach towards enumerative analysis of suspended sediment concentration for Ganges-Brahmaputra Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Palak; Kunte, Pravin D.

    2016-10-01

    This study presents an easy, modular, user-friendly, and flexible software package for processing of Landsat 7 ETM and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS data for estimating suspended particulate matter concentrations in the coastal waters. This package includes 1) algorithm developed using freely downloadable SCILAB package, 2) ERDAS Models for iterative processing of Landsat images and 3) ArcMAP tool for plotting and map making. Utilizing SCILAB package, a module is written for geometric corrections, radiometric corrections and obtaining normalized water-leaving reflectance by incorporating Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS and Landsat 7 ETM+ data. Using ERDAS models, a sequence of modules are developed for iterative processing of Landsat images and estimating suspended particulate matter concentrations. Processed images are used for preparing suspended sediment concentration maps. The applicability of this software package is demonstrated by estimating and plotting seasonal suspended sediment concentration maps off the Bengal delta. The software is flexible enough to accommodate other remotely sensed data like Ocean Color monitor (OCM) data, Indian Remote Sensing data (IRS), MODIS data etc. by replacing a few parameters in the algorithm, for estimating suspended sediment concentration in coastal waters.

  3. Effects of land disturbance on runoff and sediment yield after natural rainfall events in southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaomeng; Li, Tianyang; He, Binghui; He, Xiaorong; Yao, Yun

    2017-02-21

    Severe soil erosion occurs in southwestern China owing to the large expanses of urbanization and sloping land. This field monitoring study was conducted to record the rainfall events, runoff, and sediment yield in 20-, 40-, and 60-m plots under conditions of artificial disturbance or natural restoration in the purple soil area of southwestern China. The study took place during the rainy season, and the plots were situated on a 15° slope. The results showed that rainstorms and heavy rainstorms generated runoff and sediment yield. Rainfall intensity had a significantly positive power relationship with runoff rate and sediment yield rate in artificially disturbed plots but not in naturally restored plots. Plot length had a significant effect on runoff rate under artificial disturbance but not natural restoration. Within the same land disturbance category, there was no significant effect of plot length on sediment yield rate but there was a significant effect on sediment concentration. Overall, runoff rate, sediment yield rate, and sediment concentration showed remarkable effects of land disturbance across all plot lengths: naturally restored plots had 62.8-77.5% less runoff, 95.1-96.3% less sediment yield, and 63.1-73.5% lower sediment concentration than artificially disturbed plots. The relationship between runoff rate and sediment rate under the different land disturbances could be described by an exponential function. The results not only demonstrate the effectiveness of natural restoration for controlling runoff and sediment yield but also provide useful information for the design of field studies, taking into consideration the complexity of terrestrial systems.

  4. Effect of water quality improvement on the remediation of river sediment due to the addition of calcium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Tao, Yi; Zhou, Kuiyu; Zhang, Qiqi; Chen, Guangyao; Zhang, Xihui

    2017-01-01

    In situ sediment remediation technique is commonly used to control the release of pollutants from sediment. Addition of calcium nitrate to sediment has been applied to control the release of phosphorus from sediments. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of water quality improvement on the remediation of river sediment with the addition of calcium nitrate. The results demonstrated that the redox-potential of sediments increased from -282mV to -130mV after 28days of calcium nitrate treatment. The acid volatile sulphide in the sediments significantly decreased (by 54.9% to 57.1%), whereas the total organic carbon decreased by 9.7% to 10.2%. However, the difference between these and water quality improvement was not significant. Due to the addition of calcium nitrate, low phosphate concentration in the water column and interstitial phosphate in the sediment were observed, indicating that the calcium nitrate was beneficial to controlling the release of phosphorus from river sediment. The decrease in phosphorus release could be attributed to the fixation of iron-phosphorus and calcium-phosphorus due to the addition of calcium nitrate. The addition of calcium nitrate to sediment caused the oxidation of sulphide to sulphate, hence resulting in high nitrate and sulphate concentrations in the water column, and high interstitial nitrate and sulphate concentrations in the sediment. The results also showed that only the water quality improvement had a significant effect on the interstitial nitrate and sulphate concentrations in the sediment.

  5. Heavy metal concentration in mangrove surface sediments from the north-west coast of South America.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cadena, J C; Andrade, S; Silva-Coello, C L; De la Iglesia, R

    2014-05-15

    Mangrove ecosystems are coastal estuarine systems confined to the tropical and subtropical regions. The Estero Salado mangrove located in Guayaquil, Ecuador, has suffered constant disturbances during the past 20 years, due to industrial wastewater release. However, there are no published data for heavy metals present in its sediments and the relationship with anthropogenic disturbance. In the present study, metal concentrations were evaluated in surface sediment samples of the mangrove, showing that B, Cd, Cu, Pb, Se, V, and Zn levels exceeded those declared in international environmental quality standards. Moreover, several metals (Pb, Sn, Cd, Ag, Mo, Zn and Ni) could be linked to the industrial wastewater present in the studied area. In addition, heavy metal levels detected in this mangrove are higher than previous reports on mangrove sediments worldwide, indicating that this mangrove ecosystem is one of the most disrupted on earth.

  6. Cytotoxicity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles towards freshwater sediment microorganisms at low exposure concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Jyoti; Kumar, Deepak; Mathur, Ankita; Naseer, Arif; Kumar, Ravi Ranjan; Thanjavur Chandrasekaran, Prathna; Chaudhuri, Gouri; Pulimi, Mrudula; Raichur, Ashok M.; Babu, S.; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Nagarajan, R.; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2014-11-15

    There is a persistent need to assess the effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the aquatic ecosystem owing to their increasing usage in consumer products and risk of environmental release. The current study is focused on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle-induced acute toxicity at sub-ppm level (≤1 ppm) on the three different freshwater sediment bacterial isolates and their consortium under two different irradiation (visible light and dark) conditions. The consortium of the bacterial isolates was found to be less affected by the exposure to the nanoparticles compared to the individual cells. The oxidative stress contributed considerably towards the cytotoxicity under both light and dark conditions. A statistically significant increase in membrane permeability was noted under the dark conditions as compared to the light conditions. The optical and fluorescence microscopic images showed aggregation and chain formation of the bacterial cells, when exposed to the nanoparticles. The electron microscopic (SEM, TEM) observations suggested considerable damage of cells and bio-uptake of nanoparticles. The exopolysaccrides (EPS) production and biofilm formation were noted to increase in the presence of the nanoparticles, and expression of the key genes involved in biofilm formation was studied by RT-PCR. - Highlights: • Toxicity of NPs towards freshwater sediment bacteria at sub-ppm concentrations. • Decreased toxicity of the nanoparticles in the consortium of microorganisms. • Enhanced bacterial resistance through EPS and biofilm formation in the presence of NPs. • Considerable surface damage of cells and internalization of NPs. • Gene expression analyses related to biofilm formation in the presence of NPs.

  7. Seasonal and Spatial Variability in Lake Michigan Sediment Small-Subunit rRNA Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Barbara J.; Moser, Duane P.; Baker, Brett J.; Alm, Elizabeth W.; Maurer, Max; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Stahl, David A.

    2001-01-01

    We have used molecular biological methods to study the distribution of microbial small-subunit rRNAs (SSU rRNAs), in relation to chemical profiles, in offshore Lake Michigan sediments. The sampling site is at a depth of 100 m, with temperatures of 2 to 4°C year-round. RNA extracted from sediment was probed with radiolabeled oligonucleotides targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic SSU rRNAs, as well as with a universal probe. The coverage of these probes in relation to the present sequence database is discussed. Because ribosome production is growth rate regulated, rRNA concentrations are an indicator of the microbial populations active in situ. Over a 1-year period, changes in sedimentary SSU rRNA concentrations followed seasonal changes in surface water temperature and SSU rRNA concentration. Sedimentary depth profiles of oxygen, reduced manganese and iron, and sulfate changed relatively little from season to season, but the nitrate concentration was approximately fivefold higher in April and June 1997 than at the other times sampling was done. We propose that sediment microbial SSU rRNA concentrations at our sampling site are influenced by seasonal inputs from the water column, particularly the settling of the spring diatom bloom, and that the timing of this input may be modulated by grazers, such that ammonia becomes available to sediment microbes sooner than fresh organic carbon. Nitrate production from ammonia by autotrophic nitrifying bacteria, combined with low activity of heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria in the absence of readily degradable organic carbon, could account for the cooccurrence of high nitrate and low SSU rRNA concentrations. PMID:11525985

  8. Comparability of suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Glysson, G.D.; Turcios, L.M.; Schwarz, G.E.

    2000-01-01

    Two laboratory analytical methods ? suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and total suspended solids (TSS) ? are predominantly used to quantify concentrations of suspended solid-phase material in surface waters of the United States. The analytical methods differ. SSC data are produced by measuring the dry weight of all the sediment from a known volume of a water-sediment mixture. TSS data are produced by several methods, most of which entail measuring the dry weight of sediment from a known volume of a subsample of the original. An evaluation of 3,235 paired SSC and TSS data, of which 860 SSC values include percentages of sand-size material, shows bias in the relation between SSC and TSS ?SSC values tend to increase at a greater rate than their corresponding paired TSS values. As sand-size material in samples exceeds about a quarter of the sediment dry weight, SSC values tend to exceed their corresponding paired TSS values. TSS analyses of three sets of quality-control samples (35 samples) showed unexpectedly small sediment recoveries and relatively large variances in the TSS data. Two quality-control data sets (18 samples) that were analyzed for SSC showed both slightly deficient sediment recoveries, and variances that are characteristic of most other quality-control data compiled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Sediment Laboratory Quality Assurance Program. The method for determining TSS, which was originally designed for analyses of wastewater samples, is shown to be fundamentally unreliable for the analysis of natural-water samples. In contrast, the method for determining SSC produces relatively reliable results for samples of natural water, regardless of the amount or percentage of sand-size material in the samples. SSC and TSS data collected from natural water are not comparable and should not be used interchangeably. The accuracy and comparability of suspended solid-phase concentrations of the Nation?s natural waters would be greatly

  9. Reopening abandoned forest roads in northern Idaho, USA: Quantification of runoff, sediment concentration, infiltration, and interrill erosion parameters

    Treesearch

    R. B. Foltz; N. S. Copeland; W. J. Elliot

    2009-01-01

    This study measured runoff and sediment concentration from the tire track and from the non-tire track to determine infiltration, interrill erodibility, and vegetative cover impacts of reopening an abandoned forest road. Runoff was lowest on the non-track portion of the abandoned road and highest on the reopened road. Sediment concentrations were significantly higher on...

  10. The effect of sediment trap poisons on particulate phosphorus integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truesdale, K.; Benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Styles, R.; Tappa, E.

    2004-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus (P) in marine systems has been complicated by a lack of information regarding the flux of particulate P from surface waters to the seafloor. This is because one of the most common ways to collect sinking particles is through the use of sediment traps where poisons are often added to reduce post depositional biological processing. Although few in number, several studies have suggested that these poisons may also affect sample integrity, particularly with respect to P. In this study, we examined the effects of three preservatives (mercuric chloride, formalin, and sodium azide) on P concentrations in marine sediments collected from a range of coastal and open ocean environments: the Black Sea (BS), Cariaco Basin (CB), Gulf of Mexico (GoM), and Winyah Bay (WB). Duplicate samples with controls were exposed to each preservative, and the loss of P to the supernatant was monitored over a period of six months. P losses to the supernatant happened rapidly, with most of the P loss occurring within the first 2 - 5 days of exposure. Formalin was consistently the least effective in preserving P sample integrity, with ~ 5 % of the initial P found in the supernatant for sediments of the BS, ~12 % from the GoM, ~ 20 % in CB, and as much as 40 % in WB. Mercuric chloride was the second least effective preservative, with P losses of 20 % in WB and < 5 % in the other sediments. In contrast, sodium azide, appeared to be the most effective trap solution, with P losses never exceeding more than 5 % of the total P measured in the sediment. In most of our experiments with formalin and sodium azide, the dominant form of P found in the supernatant occurred as soluble reactive P. However, mercuric chloride consistently had dissolved organic P concentrations greater than 50 % of the total P measured in the supernatant, confirming earlier studies that mercuric chloride releases ATP during preservation. Our results suggest that P losses in sediment traps

  11. A comparison of load estimates using total suspended solids and suspended-sediment concentration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glysson, G.D.; Gray, J.R.; Schwarz, G.E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results to-date from a continuing investigation into the differences between total suspended solids (TSS) and suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) data and the ramifications of using each type of data to estimate sediment loads. It compares estimates of annual suspended-sediment loads that were made using regression equations developed from paired TSS and SSC data, to annual loads computed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) using traditional techniques and SSC data. Load estimates were compared for 10 stations where sufficient TSS and SSC paired data were available to develop sediment-transport curves for the same time period that daily suspended-sediment records were available. Results of these analyses indicate that as the time frame over which the estimates were made increases, the overall errors associated with the estimates decreases with respect to loads computed using traditional USGS techniques. Using SSC data to compute loads tends to produce estimates closer to those computed by traditional techniques than those computed from TSS data. Loads computed from TSS data tend to be negatively biased with respect to those computed by traditional USGS techniques.

  12. Effects of sediment characteristics on the toxicity of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Kemble, N.E.; May, T.W.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of sediment characteristics, acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and organic matter (OM), on the toxicity of chromium (Cr) in freshwater sediments. We conducted chronic (28-42-d) toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca exposed to Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in water and in spiked sediments. Waterborne Cr(VI) caused reduced survival of amphipods with a median lethal concentration (LC50) of 40 ??g/L. Cr(VI) spiked into test sediments with differing levels of AVS resulted in graded decreases in AVS and sediment OM. Only Cr(VI)-spiked sediments with low AVS concentrations (<1 ??mol/g) caused significant amphipod mortality. Waterborne Cr(III) concentrations near solubility limits caused decreased survival of amphipods at pH 7 and pH 8 but not at pH 6. Sediments spiked with high levels of Cr(III) did not affect amphipod survival but had minor effects on growth and inconsistent effects on reproduction. Pore waters of some Cr(III)-spiked sediments contained measurable concentrations of Cr(VI), but observed toxic effects did not correspond closely to Cr concentrations in sediment or pore waters. Our results indicate that risks of Cr toxicity are low in freshwater sediments containing substantial concentrations of AVS.

  13. Seasonal variation of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd concentrations in the root-sediment system of Spartina maritima and Halimione portulacoides from Tagus estuary salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Caçador, I; Vale, C; Catarino, F

    2000-04-01

    Concentrations of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd have been determined in leaves, stems and roots of Spartina maritima and Halimione portulacoides from the Tagus estuary salt mash (Corroios) and in the sediments between their roots. Biological materials and sediments were sampled every 2 months, between July 1991 and July 1992. Root biomass increased from July to September and from January to March. The greatest metal concentrations occurred in the roots, with lowest levels in January and increasing levels during the growth periods. Zn, Pb and Cu in sediments exhibited a corresponding change in concentrations, reaching maximum in January and subsequently decreasing in spring. The ratios between metal concentrations in the root and in sediments were higher for H. portulacoides when compared to S. maritima, whose roots are surrounded by a more acidic and reduced sediment environment. It was concluded, therefore, that H. portulacoides is a more effective accumulator of metals than S. maritima, and both root-sediment systems exhibited a seasonal variation of metal concentrations.

  14. Concentrations and sources apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from the Uganda side of Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Kerebba, Nasifu; Ssebugere, Patrick; Kwetegyeka, Justus; Arinaitwe, Kenneth; Wasswa, John

    2017-04-19

    This study presents the levels and possible sources of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments from the Napoleon Gulf and Murchison Bay of Lake Victoria. Sediment samples were extracted and cleaned up for PAHs using UNEP, 1992, and EPA method 3630C protocols. The analysis of sample extracts was carried out using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. Fifteen congeners, mostly the high molecular weight PAHs (HPAHs) (4-6 rings) were detected. Total (∑) concentrations varied from 44.2 to 80.2 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.) at the Napoleon Gulf, while those at the Murchison Bay ranged from 17.0 to 55.0 ng g(-1) d.w. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in the concentrations of PAHs among sites (p < 0.05, ANOVA). It was noted that the concentrations for most sampling sites were far below the lowest effect levels based on the Sediment Quality Guidelines, except for one station at the Napoleon Gulf. Principal component analysis and diagnostic ratios indicated that PAHs of combustion and petroleum origin were dominant and brought about mainly by atmospheric deposition.

  15. Long-Term Trends in Trace Metals Concentrations in Sediment in Lakes in Adirondack Park, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, A.; Judd, C. D.; Swami, K.; Ahmed, T.; Husain, L.

    2007-12-01

    The industrial Midwestern states consume large quantities of fossil fuel and emit large quantities of trace elements, SO2 and other chemicals. Owing to their long residence time these pollutants can be transported hundreds of miles downwind. These chemical species are removed from the atmosphere by wet and dry deposition and are ultimately deposited in lake sediments. Through the sedimentation process the pollution records can be stored for centuries. In this work we have attempted to retrieve the deposition of 25 trace elements for the past ~170 years by analyzing lake sediment cores from lakes located in the Adirondack Mountains. Sediment cores were collected from four lakes (Clear Pond, West Pine Pond, Bear Pond and Deer Pond) located in the Adirondack Park, NY. These lakes are at high altitude and some are inaccessible except by boat, and have minimum human activity (no motor boats, no camping and away from major roads). Coring was carried out by a gravity driven coring device. The cores were sectioned, weighed, freeze-dried, ground to a fine powder, and homogenized for analysis. The sediment cores were dated using 210Pb radioactive dating. The 137Cs activity was measured for an independent verification of 210Pb technique. Trace metals concentration were determined by microwave digestion method followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) analysis. The top sixteen sections of the West Pine Pond sediment core (representing from about 1835 to 2005) were analyzed for Sr, Ba, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag,Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Be, Tl, and Pb. During pre industrial era the concentrations of Pb, Se and Tl were very low and constant. Pb showed a sharp increase in concentration after around 1880 and a sharp decrease in concentration after about 1990. The concentration of Se increased slowly after pre industrial era. The concentrations of about eight of these elements were determined in quarterly composites of daily aerosol

  16. Concentrations and annual fluxes of sediment-associated chemical constituents from conterminous US coastal rivers using bed sediment data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Elrick, Kent A.; Smith, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal rivers represent a significant pathway for the delivery of natural and anthropogenic sediment-associated chemical constituents to the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the conterminous USA. This study entails an accounting segment using published average annual suspended sediment fluxes with published sediment-associated chemical constituent concentrations for (1) baseline, (2) land-use distributions, (3) population density, and (4) worldwide means to estimate concentrations/annual fluxes for trace/major elements and total phosphorus, total organic and inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, and sulphur, for 131 coastal river basins. In addition, it entails a sampling and subsequent chemical analysis segment that provides a level of ‘ground truth’ for the calculated values, as well as generating baselines for sediment-associated concentrations/fluxes against which future changes can be evaluated. Currently, between 260 and 270 Mt of suspended sediment are discharged annually from the conterminous USA; about 69% is discharged from Gulf rivers (n = 36), about 24% from Pacific rivers (n = 42), and about 7% from Atlantic rivers (n = 54). Elevated sediment-associated chemical concentrations relative to baseline levels occur in the reverse order of sediment discharges:Atlantic rivers (49%)>Pacific rivers (40%)>Gulf rivers (23%). Elevated trace element concentrations (e.g. Cu, Hg, Pb, Zn) frequently occur in association with present/former industrial areas and/or urban centres, particularly along the northeast Atlantic coast. Elevated carbon and nutrient concentrations occur along both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts but are dominated by rivers in the urban northeast and by southeastern and Gulf coast (Florida) ‘blackwater’ streams. Elevated Ca, Mg, K, and Na distributions tend to reflect local petrology, whereas elevated Ti, S, Fe, and Al concentrations are ubiquitous, possibly because they have substantial natural as well as anthropogenic sources

  17. Discrimination of sediment provenance in the Yellow Sea: Secondary grain-size effect and REE proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hoi-Soo; Lim, Dhongil; Jeong, Do-Hyun; Xu, Zhaokai; Li, Tiegang

    2016-06-01

    This study analyzed grain size and elemental concentrations (Al, Mg, Fe, and rare earth elements (REEs)) in 91 surface sediments to elucidate sediment provenance in the Yellow Sea. Elemental concentrations were normalized by Al concentration (Celement/CAl) to minimize the sediment grain-size effect (GSE). However, noticeable linear relationships between Al concentration (or mean grain size) and the ratio (e.g., Mg/Al or Fe/Al) appeared unexpectedly in pair diagrams. The spatial distribution patterns of Fe/Al and Mg/Al ratios were also similar to the pattern of mean grain size. This implies that the GSE was not removed completely, even after the normalization process. Thus, great care must be taken when applying the ratios of Celement/CAl as a proxy of sediment provenance. To improve provenance discrimination of the sediments in the Yellow Sea, the difference between the REE distribution patterns of Chinese and Korean river sediments, expressed as δ (δ = REE∗(La) - REE∗(Lu)), was calculated, and the spatial distribution patterns of the δ values were mapped. The δ values gradually increased from the western to the eastern part of the Yellow Sea, except for low δ values in the southeastern part of the Yellow Sea. This result indicates that the majority of Chinese and Korean river sediments are accumulating near to their respective coasts, except for a deposit along the southwestern coast of Korea in which a considerable amount of sediment from Chinese rivers has been accumulating.

  18. Predicting the toxicity of sediment-associated trace metals with simultaneously extracted trace metal: Acid-volatile sulfide concentrations and dry weight-normalized concentrations: A critical comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.R.; MacDonald, D.D.; Cubbage, J.C.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    The relative abilities of sediment concentrations of simultaneously extracted trace metal: acid-volatile sulfide (SEM:AVS) and dry weight- normalized trace metals to correctly predict both toxicity and nontoxicity were compared by analysis of 77 field-collected samples. Relative to the SEM:AVS concentrations, sediment guidelines based upon dry weight-normalized concentrations were equally or slightly more accurate in predicting both nontoxic and toxic results in laboratory tests.

  19. Variations of nitrogen nutrient concentrations in the sediment pore waters of the northwestern Mediterranean continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernex, François; Baratie, Raymond; Span, Daniel; Vandelei Fernandes, Lazaro

    1989-09-01

    This contribution presents information on nitrogen nutrients dissolved in the sediment pore waters of the oligotrophic northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The areas studied are situated in various geographical environments, adjacent to or offshore from a river mouth and on wide or narrow parts of the continental shelf. Near the pro-delta of the Rhoˆne River, which carries about 5 × 10 6 t y -1 of solid matter, measurements indicate that the rate of nitrogen nutrient production (ammonification) reaches frequently (or even exceeds) 2 × 10 6 μmol cm -3 s -1. The production rate near the mouth of the Siagne River, a mountain stream, is generally lower, at 10 -7 μmol -3 s -1; exceptionally, it reaches 10 6 to 1.5 × 10 -6 μmol cm -3 s -1. Adjacent to any river mouth, the concentrations of inorganic nitrogen species dissolved in the surficial sediments vary with time. A similar pattern occurs at locations far from a river mouth. High levels of organic matter in the sediments in the latter areas is related to planktonic blooms, which occur mainly in spring. There is more temporal variation in concentrations in sediments just below the sediment-seawater boundary, than in the deeper deposits. Ammonia concentrations increase regularly, with depth, within the sediment. In contrast, the nitrate profiles are frequently irregular and show a concentration maximum at 1 or 2 cm below the interface; then, below a minimum value at 5-8 cm, then a second maximum at 10-15 cm. According to incubation experiments, the production of nitrate occurs at 15-20 cm, where oxygen is still present at concentrations higher than 1-1.5 mg l -1. The low nitrate concentrations at about 6-8 cm appear to result from relatively high denitrifying activity at this level within the sediments. Concentrations of the nitrogen nutrients are generally higher in the surficial sediment pore waters, than in the overlying seawater. There is a flux of these species from the sediment to the seawater. In continental

  20. Application of PAH concentration profiles in lake sediments as indicators for smelting activity.

    PubMed

    Warner, Wiebke; Ruppert, Hans; Licha, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    The ability of lake sediment cores to store long-term anthropogenic pollution establishes them as natural archives. In this study, we focus on the influence of copper shale mining and smelting in the Mansfeld area of Germany, using the depth profiles of two sediment cores from Lake Süßer See. The sediment cores provide a detailed chronological deposition history of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals in the studied area. Theisen sludge, a fine-grained residue from copper shale smelting, reaches the lake via deflation by wind or through riverine input; it is assumed to be the main source of pollution. To achieve the comparability of absolute contaminant concentrations, we calculated the influx of contaminants based on the sedimentation rate. Compared to the natural background concentrations, PAHs are significantly more enriched than heavy metals. They are therefore more sensitive and selective for source apportionment. We suggest two diagnostic ratios of PAHs to distinguish between Theisen sludge and its leachate: the ratio fluoranthene to pyrene ~2 and the ratio of PAH with logKOW<5.7 to PAH with a logKOW>5.7 converging to an even lower value than 2.3 (the characteristic of Theisen sludge) to identify the particulate input in lake environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Field deployment of polyethylene devices to measure PCB concentrations in pore water of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jeanne E; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-08-15

    Sediment pore water concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated mudflat in San Francisco Bay, CA were determined by field-deployed polyethylene devices (PEDs). Sequential sampling of PEDs deployed in the field showed large differences in uptake rates and time to equilibrium compared to PEDs mixed with field-collected sediment in the laboratory. We demonstrate a modeling approach that involves the use of impregnated performance reference compounds (PRCs) and interpretation of the data either by PCB molar volume adjustment or environmental adjustment factors to measure pore water concentrations of 118 PCB congeners. Both adjustment methods predicted comparable sampling rates, and PCB pore water concentrations estimated by use of the molar volume adjustment method were similar to values analytically measured in pore waters from the laboratory and field. The utility of PEDs for sampling pore water in the field was evaluated at a tidal mudflat amended with activated carbon to sequester PCBs. Pore water concentrations decreased up to 60% within 18 months after activated carbon amendment, as compared to a mechanical-mixed control plot Results of this study illustrate PEDs provide an inexpensive, in situ method to measure total PCB contamination in sediment pore water using a small set of PRCs.

  2. Arsenic concentrations in Baltic Sea sediments close to chemical munitions dumpsites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełdowski, Jacek; Szubska, Marta; Emelyanov, Emelyan; Garnaga, Galina; Drzewińska, Anna; Bełdowska, Magdalena; Vanninen, Paula; Östin, Anders; Fabisiak, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    In addition to natural sources and land-originated pollution, the Baltic Sea has another anthropogenic source of arsenic in bottom sediments-arsenic-based Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA). To examine the potential usage of arsenic contents results for monitoring the leakage from chemical weapons, sediment samples were collected from officially reported and potential chemical weapon dumpsites located in the Baltic Sea, and total and inorganic arsenic concentrations were analyzed. Results showed an elevated arsenic content in dumpsite areas compared to reference areas. Correlations of arsenic with other metals and organic matter were studied to elucidate any unusual behavior of arsenic in the dumpsites. In the area of the Bornholm Deep, such behavior was observed for inorganic arsenic. It appears that in close vicinity of dumped munitions, the inorganic arsenic concentration of sediments is not correlated with either organic matter content or authigenic minerals formation, as is commonly observed elsewhere. Investigations on CWA concentrations, performed within the CHEMSEA (Chemical Munition Search and Assesment) project, allowed us to compare the results of arsenic concentrations with the occurrence of arsenic-containing CWA.

  3. Metal concentrations in water, sediment, and fish from sewage-fed aquaculture ponds of Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, S; Ghosh, L; Rai, S P; Ayyappan, S

    2009-12-01

    The concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, and zinc were investigated in the sewage-fed pond water, sediment, and the various organs of Labeo rohita, Catla catla, Cirrhinus mrigala, Oreochromis mossambicus, and Cyprinus carpio cultured in sewage-fed ponds, Kolkata, India. Among the metals, cadmium, lead, and zinc were detected in water and, except lead, were below the water quality guideline levels for the protection of freshwater aquatic life proposed by CEQG (Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines) and AENV (Alberta Environment). Therefore, lead could pose danger to aquatic organisms. All the five metals were detected in the sediment and, except cadmium and lead, were below the sediment quality guideline levels for aquatic life proposed by EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). Therefore, these two metals could be toxic to aquatic organisms. Significant (P > 0.05) differences were observed among the five fish species for all these metals accumulation. Also, significant (P > 0.05) differences were noticed among these metals accumulation in fish organs. Cadmium showed the least bioaccumulation, while zinc showed the highest bioaccumulation in all the fish species. Though the metal concentration in the different fish tissues was variable, the highest concentration was found in kidney and the lowest in the muscle. Concentrations of these metals in the muscle tissue of all the fish species were well below the consumption safety tolerance in fish set by WHO/FAO, and thus, so far as these metals are concerned, these sewage-fed cultured fishes are safe and suitable for human consumption.

  4. Effects of sewage-impacted sediment on reproduction in the benthic crustacean Leptocheirus plumulosus.

    PubMed

    Zulkosky, A M; Ferguson, P L; McElroy, A E

    2002-01-01

    Several organic contaminants in sewage effluent have been shown to elicit an estrogenic response in juvenile fish. Comparatively little emphasis has been placed on assessing these effects in marine invertebrates, particularly benthic organisms inhabiting sediment where lipophilic contaminants tend to persist. The present study examined reproductive effects in the benthic crustacean Leptocheirus plumulosus exposed to sewage-impacted sediment from Jamaica Bay, New York. Data from chronic 28-day tests showed a 50% reduction in the average number of young (juveniles + embryos) produced per surviving female in exposures to sediment from Jamaica Bay (JB). Nonylphenol ethoxylate ('NPEO) concentrations at this site were measured at 44.2 microg/g dw, concentrations two orders of magnitude higher than reference site concentrations in central Long Island Sound (CLIS). Dose-response studies with nonylphenol (NP) amended reference sediment, however, did not significantly affect reproduction suggesting that other contaminants may have contributed to the effects observed.

  5. Elevated in-home sediment contaminant concentrations - the consequence of a particle settling-winnowing process from Hurricane Katrina floodwaters.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Nicholas A; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Thibodeaux, Louis J

    2008-01-01

    Sediment samples were collected from two homes which were flooded in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. The samples were analyzed for trace metals and semi-volatile organic compounds using techniques based on established EPA methods. The data showed higher concentrations of some metals and semi-volatile organic pollutants than reported in previous outdoor sampling events of soils and sediments. The Lake Pontchartrain sediments became resuspended during the hurricane, and this material subsequently was found in the residential areas of New Orleans following levee breaches. The clay and silt particles appear to be selectively deposited inside homes, and sediment contaminant concentrations are usually greatest within this fraction. Re-entry advisories based on outdoor sample concentration results may have under-predicted the exposure levels to homeowners and first responders. All contaminants found in the sediment sampled in this study have their origin in the sediments of Lake Pontchartrain and other localized sources.

  6. Response of coliform populations in streambed sediment and water column to changes in nutrient concentrations in water.

    PubMed

    Shelton, D R; Pachepsky, Y A; Kiefer, L A; Blaustein, R A; McCarty, G W; Dao, T H

    2014-08-01

    As sediments increasingly become recognized as reservoirs of indicator and pathogen microorganisms, an understanding of the persistence of indicator organisms becomes important for assessment and predictions of microbial water quality. The objective of this work was to observe the response of water column and sediment coliform populations to the change in nutrient concentrations in the water column. Survival experiments were conducted in flow-through chambers containing sandy sediments. Bovine feces were collected fresh and introduced into sediment. Sixteen days later, the same fecal material was autoclaved and diluted to provide three levels - 1×, 0.5×, and 0.1× of nutrient concentrations - spike in water column. Total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial concentrations were monitored in water and sediment. Bacteria responded to the nutrient spike with initial growth both in the water column and in sediment. The response of bacterial concentrations in water column was nonlinear, with no significant changes at 0.1 and .5× spikes, but a substantial change at 1× spike. Bacteria in sediment responded to the spikes at all added nutrient levels. Coliform inactivation rates both in sediment and in water after the initial growth occurred, were not significantly different from the inactivation rates before spike. These results indicate that introduction of nutrients into the water column results in nonlinear response of E. coli concentrations both in water and in sediments, followed by the inactivation with the same rate as before introduction of nutrients. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Correlating organic carbon concentration and composition with mineralogy in deep-sea pelagic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Estes, E. R.; Hansel, C. M.; Anderson, C. H.; Murray, R. W.; Dyar, M. D.; Nordlund, D.; Wankel, S. D.; Spivack, A. J.; Sauvage, J.; McKinley, C. C.; Homola, K.; Present, T. M.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    The majority of organic matter sinking in the ocean is remineralized to carbon dioxide before it reaches the sea floor. Of the organic carbon (OC) that does reach the sediment-water interface, only a small fraction is buried. Organisms residing in the sediment column utilize minerals such as metal oxides as electron donors to degrade a portion of this carbon. However, there is evidence that these metal oxides may also, by adsorbing OC, enhance its preservation and thereby act as a sink for OC on geological timescales. The goal of this research is to examine the potential for mineral-based protection of OC in suboxic and oxic pelagic sediments. Using Elemental Analysis - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, we characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of OC and nitrogen in sediments collected during the R/V Knorr expedition 223 to the western subtropical North Atlantic in November 2014. Organic carbon concentrations range from 0.05 to 0.25 mol OC/kg sediment while organic nitrogen (ON) varies from 0.01 to 0.026 mol ON/kg sediment. OC concentrations initially decrease with depth but stabilize ~10 meters below core top, suggesting that OC is protected against remineralization since electron acceptors are still present to fuel anaerobic respiration. At the suboxic site, the ratio of OC/ON decreases sharply in the top two meters of the core and then stabilizes at a OC/ON value of approximately 5, illustrating an enrichment in ON relative to Redfield ratios. Oxidized solid-phase manganese (Mn), presumably Mn(III,IV) oxides, decreases with depth indicating active redox cycling. Conversely, solid-phase Fe(III) content as a proportion of total Fe remains relatively constant with depth. X-ray diffraction and density separations to isolate specific mineral classes, such as metal oxides and clays, were also employed to better correlate mineralogy with trends in OC concentrations. The relatively stable OC concentrations at depth suggest that OC is protected against

  8. Mercury concentrations in Pacific lamprey ( Entosphenus tridentatus ) and sediments in the Columbia River basin: Mercury in Columbia River Pacific lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Linley, Timothy; Krogstad, Eirik; Mueller, Robert; Gill, Gary; Lasorsa, Brenda

    2016-06-21

    We investigated mercury accumulation in Pacific lamprey and sediments in the Columbia River basin. Mercury concentrations in larval lamprey differed significantly among sample locations (P < 0.001) and were correlated with concentrations in sediments (r2 = 0.83), whereas adult concentrations were highly variable (range 0.1–9.5 µg/g) and unrelated to holding time after collection. The results suggest that Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River basin may be exposed to mercury levels that have adverse ecological effects.

  9. Effects of algal turfs and sediment on coral settlement.

    PubMed

    Birrell, Chico L; McCook, Laurence J; Willis, Bette L

    2005-01-01

    Successful settlement and recruitment of corals is critical to the resilience of coral reefs. Given that many degraded reefs are dominated by benthic algae, recovery of coral populations after bleaching and other disturbances requires successful settlement amidst benthic algae. Algal turfs often accumulate sediments, sediments are known to inhibit coral settlement, and reefs with high inputs of terrestrial sediments are often dominated by turfs. We investigated the impacts of two algal turf assemblages, and of sediment deposits, on settlement of the coral Acropora millepora (Ehrenberg). Adding sediment reduced coral settlement, but the effects of different algal turfs varied. In one case, algal turfs inhibited coral settlement, whereas the other turf only inhibited settlement when combined with sediments. These results provide the first direct, experimental evidence of effects of filamentous algal turfs on coral settlement, the variability in those effects, and the potential combined effects of algal turfs and trapped sediments.

  10. Laboratory application of laser grain-size analyzer in determining suspended sediment concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Feng, Xiuli; Liu, Jie; Lin, Lin

    2014-06-01

    Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is an important parameter in marine sedimentology. With the development of technology, many acoustic and optical devices, such as the Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry, have been designed to measure in situ SSC and grain size distribution. But due to fund or other restrictions, many experiments were only conducted in laboratory, using an indoor laser grain-size analyzer and gravimetric method to measure grain size distribution and concentration, respectively. In this study the laboratory experiment is simplified by omitting the tiring step of gravimetric method. The connections between SSC and other parameters (obscuration, D50 and sorting index) were investigated based on 124 surface sediment samples collected from different offshore areas. A new method is developed for determining SSC in laboratory using a laser grain-size analyzer.

  11. Hydrogen concentrations as an indicator of the predominant terminal electron-accepting reactions in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Goodwin, S.

    1988-01-01

    Factors controlling the concentration of dissolved hydrogen gas in anaerobic sedimentary environments were investigated. Results, presented here or previously, demonstrated that, in sediments, only microorganisms catalyze the oxidation of H2 coupled to the reduction of nitrate, Mn(IV), Fe(III), sulfate, or carbon dioxide. Theoretical considerations suggested that, at steady-state conditions, H2 concentrations are primarily dependent upon the physiological characteristics of the microorganism(s) consuming the H2 and that organisms catalyzing H2 oxidation, with the reduction of a more electrochemically positive electron acceptor, can maintain lower H2 concentrations than organisms using electron acceptors which yield less energy from H2 oxidation. The H2 concentrations associated with the specified predominant terminal electron-accepting reactions in bottom sediments of a variety of surface water environments were: methanogenesis, 7-10 nM; sulfate reduction, 1-1.5 nM; Fe(III) reduction, 0.2 nM; Mn(IV) or nitrate reduction, less than 0.05 nM. Sediments with the same terminal electron acceptor for organic matter oxidation had comparable H2 concentrations, despite variations in the rate of organic matter decomposition, pH, and salinity. Thus, each terminal electron-accepting reaction had a unique range of steady-state H2 concentrations associated with it. Preliminary studies in a coastal plain aquifer indicated that H2 concentrations also vary in response to changes in the predominant terminal electron-accepting process in deep subsurface environments. These studies suggest that H2 measurements may aid in determining which terminal electron-accepting reactions are taking place in surface and subsurface sedimentary environments. ?? 1988.

  12. Suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, particle sizes, surrogate measurements, and annual sediment loads for selected sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin, water years 2011 through 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groten, Joel T.; Ellison, Christopher A.; Hendrickson, Jon S.

    2016-12-20

    Accurate measurements of fluvial sediment are important for assessing stream ecological health, calculating flood levels, computing sediment budgets, and managing and protecting water resources. Sediment-enriched rivers in Minnesota are a concern among Federal, State, and local governments because turbidity and sediment-laden waters are the leading impairments and affect more than 6,000 miles of rivers in Minnesota. The suspended sediment in the lower Minnesota River is deleterious, contributing about 75 to 90 percent of the suspended sediment being deposited into Lake Pepin. The Saint Paul District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District collaborate to maintain a navigation channel on the lower 14.7 miles of the Minnesota River through scheduled dredging operations. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has adopted a sediment-reduction strategy to reduce sediment in the Minnesota River by 90 percent by 2040.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District, collected suspended-sediment, bedload, and particle-size samples at five sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin during water years 2011 through 2014 and surrogate measurements of acoustic backscatter at one of these sites on the lower Minnesota River during water years 2012 through 2016 to quantify sediment loads and improve understanding of sediment-transport relations. Annual sediment loads were computed for calendar years 2011 through 2014.Data collected from water years 2011 through 2014 indicated that two tributaries, Le Sueur River and High Island Creek, had the highest sediment yield and concentrations of suspended sediment. These tributaries also had greater stream gradients than the sites on the Minnesota River. Suspended fines were greater than suspended sand at all sites in the study area. The range of median particle sizes matched

  13. Methane Concentrations and Biogeochemistry in Lake Sediments from Stordalen Mire, Sub-Arctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, M.; DeStasio, J.; Erickson, L.; Johnson, J. E.; Varner, R. K.; Setera, J.; Prado, M. F.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Lake sediments are an important global carbon sink of both allochthonous and autochthonous inputs. However, lakes are also known to emit carbon in gaseous form, most often as methane (CH4) or carbon dioxide (CO2), which are potent greenhouse gases. As northern latitudes warm, it is increasingly important to understand these gases and the sediments that store them. In July of 2013 we took 48 cores at 16 sites throughout three lakes surrounding a mire underlain by degrading permafrost in sub-arctic Sweden. The goal was to characterize the sedimentology and geochemistry of the lake sediments to better understand the production, distribution, and flux of CO2 and CH4 from these lakes. Villasjön is a shallow lake less than 1.5 meters deep, Mellan Harrsjön has a maximum depth of 7 meters and is stream-fed, and Inre Harrsjön has a maximum depth of 5 meters and is connected to Mellan Harrsjön. Published radiocarbon dates suggest that all three lakes formed approximately 3400 years ago. At each sample site, we retrieved 2 to 4 cores from the lake bottom, approximately 40-80 cm in length. The cores were sub-sampled for measurements of bulk TOC, TC, TN, TS, and CaCO3 (by difference) using a CHNS Elemental Analyzer, and grain size using a laser particle size analyzer. Headspace CO2 and CH4 by gas chromatography and infrared gas analysis (IRGA) yielded production rates and CH4 sediment concentrations. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from porewater extractions were analyzed using IRGA and stable carbon isotopes of DIC were analyzed via a Quantum Cascade Laser. The recovered sediments in the cores from all three lakes were composed of three layers: an upper layer of organic rich sediment (30-40 cm thick), a middle transition layer of mixed organic and lithogenic materials (5-10 cm thick), and a deep layer of grey lithogenic clay with less organic carbon (of variable thickness). Preliminary results from the 12 Villasjön sites indicate that CH4 is present and produced from the

  14. Trace metal concentrations in suspended particles, sediments and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) from Jiaozhou Bay of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Mu, Qinglin

    2006-10-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM), sediments and clams were collected at three sites in Jiaozhou Bay to assess the magnitude of trace metal pollution in the area. Metal concentrations in SPM (Cu: 40.11-203; Zn: 118-447; Pb: 50.1-132; Cd: 0.55-4.39; Cr: 147.6-288; Mn: 762-1670 microg/g), sediments (Cu: 17.64-34.26; Zn: 80.79-110; Pb: 24.57-49.59; Cd: 0.099-0.324; Cr: 41.6-88.1; Mn: 343-520 microg/g) and bivalves (Cu: 6.41-19.76; Zn: 35.5-85.5; Pb: 0.31-1.01; Cd: 0.51-0.67; Mn: 27.45-67.6 microg/g) are comparable to those reported for other moderately polluted world environments. SPM showed a less clear pattern. Metal concentrations in sediments displayed a clear geographical trend with values increasing with proximity to major urban centers. The clams (on dry weight) showed a complex pattern due to the variability introduced by age-related factors. Cd showed an apparent reverse industrial trend with higher concentrations in clams collected at distant stations. Zn, Pb and Mn showed no clear geographical pattern, whereas Cu increased in the clams collected in the most industrialized area. In addition, the bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were calculated. The result indicated that the studied Ruditapes philippinarum in Jiaozhou Bay possessed different bioaccumulation capacities for Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb and Mn, and Cd, Zn had a relatively high assimilation of those metals from sediment particles. A significant relationship with clam age was observed for Zn (positive) and Cu (negative) suggesting different physiological requirements for both metals with age. Trace metal concentrations measured in the tissue of the investigated clam were in the range considered safe by the WHO for human use.

  15. Impact of urbanization on the concentrations and distribution of organic contaminants in boreal lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Honkonen, Olga; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea

    2013-02-01

    The main goal of this study was to evaluate the impacts of a middle-sized Finnish urban area on the quality of sediments in an adjacent boreal lake. We investigated the sources and distribution of organic pollutants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)) in the sediments from urban stormwater traps and from Lake Vesijärvi. Grab surface sediment samples were taken from Lake Vesijärvi at various distances (25-2,000 m) from four major stormwater drainage outlets and at 15 urban stormwater traps in areas with different degrees of urbanization. These samples were analysed for 16 PAHs and 28 PCBs with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The concentrations of pollutants in the lake sediments were elevated in the vicinity of the urban shore (∑PAH 3-16, ∑PCB up to 0.02-0.3 mg/kg dw) and decreased as a function of distance (∑PAH 0.1-2.5, ∑PCB 0.01-0.3 mg/kg dw at a distance of more than 500 m from the shore), whereas contamination levels in suburban areas were notably lower (∑PAH 0.1-3, ∑PCB < LOQ-0.03 mg/kg dw; did not decline with distance). Possible sources and pathways of contamination were also investigated. The majority of stormwater trap sediments contained predominantly asphalt-derived PAHs due to pulverized pavement. PAHs in lake sediments were of pyrogenic origin, including the combustion of gasoline, diesel and coal. Suggested pathways of lake contamination are urban runoff discharge, boat traffic and atmospheric deposition.

  16. Effects of organic amendments on the toxicity and bioavailability of cadmium and copper in spiked formulated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the partitioning and toxicity of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) spiked into formulated sediments containing two types of organic matter (OM), i.e., cellulose and humus. Amendments of cellulose up to 12.5% total organic carbon (TOC) did not affect partitioning of Cd or Cu between sediment and pore water and did not significantly affect the toxicity of spiked sediments in acute toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. In contrast, amendments of natural humus shifted the partitioning of both Cd and Cu toward greater concentrations in sediment and lesser concentrations in pore water and significantly reduced toxic effects of both metals. Thresholds for toxicity, based on measured metal concentrations in whole sediment, were greater for both Cd and Cu in sediments amended with a low level of humus (2.9% TOC) than in sediments without added OM. Amendments with a high level of humus (8.9% TOC) eliminated toxicity at the highest spike concentrations of both metals (sediment concentrations of 12.4 ??g Cd/g and 493 ??g Cu/g). Concentrations of Cd in pore water associated with acute toxicity were similar between sediments with and without humus amendments, suggesting that toxicity of Cd was reduced primarily by sorption to sediment OM. However, toxic effects of Cu in humus treatments were associated with greater pore-water concentrations than in controls, suggesting that toxicity of Cu was reduced both by sorption and by complexation with soluble ligands. Both sorption and complexation by OM tend to make proposed sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) based on total metal concentrations more protective for high-OM sediments. Our results suggest that the predictive ability of SQGs could be improved by models of metal interactions with natural OM in sediment and pore water.

  17. Phosphorus amendment reduces hematological effects of lead in mallards ingesting contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Audet, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d?Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to sediments would reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of lead to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) as related to adverse hematological effects and altered plasma chemistries. Mallards received diets containing 12% clean sediment (controls) or 12% sediment from three different CDARB sites containing 4520, 5390, or 6990 :g/g lead (dw) with or without phosphoric acid amendment. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in all CDARB treatment groups and ranged from geometric mean values of 5.0 ug/g for the first two sites to 6.2 ug/g for the third site. With amendments, all blood lead concentrations became 41% to 64% lower. Red blood cell ALAD activity was depressed by 90% or more with lead-contaminated sediment from all sites and did not differ with amended diets. Free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP) concentrations were elevated by contaminated sediment from all sites. Amendment decreased the elevations in FEP by as much as 80%. Hematocrit values and hemoglobin concentrations were lower for all lead site sediments by as much as 30% for site 3. Plasma enzyme activities for ALT, CK, and LDH-L were elevated by as much as 2.2-fold, and plasma creatinine concentration was 1.7-fold higher for site 3 sediment. Amendments restored hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma enzyme activities so that they did not differ from controls. Although amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead and alleviated many of the adverse hematological effects, lead concentrations in the blood of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those believed to be harmful to waterfowl under the present conditions.

  18. Shipboard magnetic field "noise" reveals shallow heavy mineral sediment concentrations in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Anjana K.; Vogt, Peter R.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Newell, Wayne; Cronin, Thomas M.; Willard, Debra A.; Hagen, Rick A.; Brozena, John; Hofstra, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Shipboard magnetic field data collected over Chesapeake Bay exhibit low-amplitude, short-wavelength anomalies that most likely indicate shallow concentrations of heavy mineral sediments. Piston core layers and black sand beach samples exhibit enhanced magnetic susceptibilities and carry remanent magnetization, with mineralogical analyses indicating ilmenite and trace magnetite and/or maghemite and hematite. The anomalies are subtle and would be filtered as noise using traditional approaches, but can instead be highlighted using spectral methods, thus providing nearly continuous coverage along survey tracks. The distribution of the anomalies provides constraints on relevant sorting mechanisms. Comparisons to sonar data and previous grab samples show that two of three areas surveyed exhibit short-wavelength anomalies that are clustered over sand-covered areas, suggesting initial sorting through settling mechanisms. This is supported by a correlation between core magnetic susceptibility and grain size. Near the Choptank River, where sediment resuspension is wave-dominated, anomalies show a sharp decrease with seafloor depth that cannot be explained by signal attenuation alone. In Pocomoke Sound, where both tidal currents and wave-action impact sediment resuspension, anomalies show a more gradual decrease with depth. Near the mouth of the bay, where there is a higher influx of sediments from the continental shelf, short-wavelength anomalies are isolated and do not appear to represent heavy mineral sand concentrations. These combined observations suggest the importance of further sorting by erosional processes in certain parts of the bay. Additionally, comparisons of these data to cores sampling pre-Holocene sediments suggest that the sorting of heavy minerals in higher energy, shallow water environments provides a mechanism for correlations between core magnetic susceptibility and sea-level changes.

  19. Peat formation concentrates arsenic within sediment deposits of the Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckey, Jason W.; Schaefer, Michael V.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Dittmar, Jessica; Pacheco, Juan Lezama; Benner, Shawn G.; Fendorf, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Mekong River Delta sediment bears arsenic that has been released to groundwater under anaerobic conditions over the past several thousand years. The oxidation state, speciation, and distribution of arsenic and the associated iron bearing phases are crucial determinants of As reactivity in sediments. Peat from buried mangrove swamps in particular may be an important host, source, or sink of arsenic in the Mekong Delta. The total concentration, speciation, and reactivity of arsenic and iron were examined in sediments in a Mekong Delta wetland by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and selective chemical extractions. Total solid-phase arsenic concentrations in a peat layer at a depth of 6 m below ground increased 10-fold relative to the overlying sediment. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy revealed that arsenic in the peat was predominantly in the form of arsenian pyrite. Arsenic speciation in the peat was examined further at the micron-scale using μXRF and μX-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis. The multiple energy μXRF mapping and μXANES routine was repeated for both iron and sulfur phase analyses. Our μXRF/μXANES analyses confirm arsenic association with pyrite - a less reactive host phase than iron (hydr)oxides under anaerobic conditions. The arsenian pyrite likely formed upon deposition/formation of the peat in a past estuarine environment (∼5.5 ka BP), a process that is not expected under current geochemical conditions. Presently, arsenian pyrite is neither a detectable source nor a sink for aqueous arsenic in our sediment profile, and under present geochemical conditions represents a stable host of As under the reducing aquifer conditions of the Mekong Delta. Furthermore, organic carbon within the peat is unable to fuel Fe(III) reduction, as noted by the persistence of goethite which can be reduced microbially with the

  20. The Maude Weir sediments. 2. Effect of weir storage on magnetic properties and associated chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockford, R. H.; Willett, I. R.

    2000-10-01

    The magnetic properties of river sediments have been used to determine the sources of sediments. However, changes in magnetic properties during transport and sedimentation may occur. This paper examines the effect of reduction on the magnetic properties of sediments from the Maude Weir, NSW. For all sediment samples from the Maude Weir, for both cores and grab samples, there was an inverse relationship between particle size and concentration of magnetic minerals,as measured by magnetic susceptibility. The magnetic grain size, as measured by the ratio SIRM/, declined through the particle size range. This was attributed to dissolution of the finer grains of the magnetic minerals owing to the chemically reduced state of the sediments. As reducing conditions can alter both the concentration and magnetic grain size of sediments, it is important that the state of chemical reduction be considered when using mineral magnetism as a source tracer for dam sediments. There was a good relationship between total Fe and magnetic susceptibility and total phosphorus. The relationships mentioned above applied to all sediment samples and locations, even though there was substantial variation in the particle size distribution of the samples.

  1. Modeling Cd partitioning in oxic lake sediments and Cd concentrations in a freshwater bivalve

    SciTech Connect

    Tessier, A.

    1994-12-31

    The author measured cadmium concentrations in the biotic (soft tissues of a freshwater bivalve) and abiotic (oxic sediments and overlying water, diagenetic iron and manganese oxides) compartments of a large number of lakes. The lakes encompass a large range in pH and in Cd concentrations, and are distributed over a geographical area of about 350,000 km{sup 2}. The distribution of Cd between the sediments and the overlying water can be described by sorption to a limited number of sedimentary phases; apparent binding constants of Cd to these phases can be determined from in situ measurements. This approach is somewhat similar to that of ``Trace Metal Equilibrium Partitioning`` which has been considered by the US EPA for the development of sediment quality criteria. The author shows that the binding constants, together with the abundance of the sorbing phases, total sedimentary cadmium concentration and water pH, can be used to predict successfully cadmium accumulation in the freshwater bivalve.

  2. Metal concentrations and mobility in marine sediment and groundwater in coastal reclamation areas: a case study in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kouping; Jiao, Jiu J

    2008-02-01

    The concentrations of metals in the buried marine sediment and groundwater were differently affected by land reclamation. Nine metals (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) in sediment and coastal groundwater from reclamation areas in Shenzhen were examined. The gradually decreased concentrations (V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn) in sediment and relatively higher concentrations (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Cd) in groundwater within reclamation areas were observed. The increase of V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu and Cd concentrations in groundwater within reclamation areas subsequently after land reclamation should be resulted from the mobilization of these metals accumulated in the sediment. These metals appear to be easily mobilized from solid phase to solution phase after reclamation. The physico-chemical changes such as reduction in pH and salinity in water environment induced by land reclamation appear to be responsible for metal mobility in the sediment-groundwater system.

  3. Total mercury concentration in sediment from the continental shelf of central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, R. M.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Bauer, V.; Ryan, J. P.; Flegal, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    In order to understand the biogeochemical distribution of mercury (Hg) and locate specific Hg hot spots in the coastal region of central California, total mercury (HgT) concentration were measured in 43 archived sediment cores collected between Año Nuevo and the southern end of Monterey Bay. The samples were taken from USGS in Menlo Park, California on May 4th 2012. The cores were collected through the Environmental Management Assessment Program (EMAP), with ID sites: M-1-95-MB, P-2-95-MB and P-1-97-MB. For the purpose of this study we assumed that there has been negligible diagenesis on trace metal Hg since samples were taken. Total Hg concentrations were measured on the top five cm of the cores and yielded a mean of 0.037 μg g-1, and ranged from 0.013 to 0.113 μg g-1. In addition, the 43 samples were split into nine transects, and transects found near the mouth of Monterey Bay submarine canyon (MBSC) contained the highest concentration of HgT, with a mean concentration of 0.043 μg g-1, and ranged from 0.038 to 0.113 μg g-1. This substantial increase in HgT concentration near MBSC might be a product of the bathymetry acting as a sink or interaction between internal waves and the canyon's rim. This allows reactivation of surface sediment, which can separate fine grained sand, mud and clay content near the mid-shelf region and the canyon rim. Three depth profiles with 0-30 cm intervals were measured for HgT concentrations. Cores averaged mean HgT concentrations of 0.032, 0.040, and 0.037 μg g-1, while each profile ranged from 0.025-0.043, 0.028-0.065 and 0.022-0.051 μg g-1. Each depth profile had slight variations in HgT concentrations. One core located between Daven Port and Santa Cruz displayed decreasing HgT concentration with increasing depth. The inconsistency seen in the depth profiles might be products of external factors such as textural changes as depth increases, changes in Hg fluxes, bio mixing, and diagenesis such as redox reactions. Furthermore

  4. Areal distribution and concentration of contaminants of concern in surficial streambed and lakebed sediments, Lake St. Clair and tributaries, Michigan, 1990-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rachol, Cynthia M.; Button, Daniel T.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the Lake St. Clair Regional Monitoring Project, the U.S. Geological Survey evaluated data collected from surficial streambed and lakebed sediments in the Lake Erie-Lake St. Clair drainages. This study incorporates data collected from 1990 through 2003 and focuses primarily on the U.S. part of the Lake St. Clair Basin, including Lake St. Clair, the St. Clair River, and tributaries to Lake St. Clair. Comparable data from the Canadian part of the study area are included where available. The data are compiled into 4 chemical classes and consist of 21 compounds. The data are compared to effects-based sediment-quality guidelines, where the Threshold Effect Level and Lowest Effect Level represent concentrations below which adverse effects on biota are not expected and the Probable Effect Level and Severe Effect Level represent concentrations above which adverse effects on biota are expected to be frequent.Maps in the report show the spatial distribution of the sampling locations and illustrate the concentrations relative to the selected sediment-quality guidelines. These maps indicate that sediment samples from certain areas routinely had contaminant concentrations greater than the Threshold Effect Concentration or Lowest Effect Level. These locations are the upper reach of the St. Clair River, the main stem and mouth of the Clinton River, Big Beaver Creek, Red Run, and Paint Creek. Maps also indicated areas that routinely contained sediment contaminant concentrations that were greater than the Probable Effect Concentration or Severe Effect Level. These locations include the upper reach of the St. Clair River, the main stem and mouth of the Clinton River, Red Run, within direct tributaries along Lake St. Clair and in marinas within the lake, and within the Clinton River headwaters in Oakland County.Although most samples collected within Lake St. Clair were from sites adjacent to the mouths of its tributaries, samples analyzed for trace-element concentrations

  5. Visualizing the internal structure of subaqueous, high-concentration sediment-laden flows: implication of rheology to flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perillo, M. M.; Buttles, J.; Mohrig, D. C.; Kane, I.; Pontén, A.; Brown, D.; Minton, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    Subaqueous sediment-laden flows are thought to be the main mechanism transporting sediments to the deep sea. Understanding the processes governing these flows is crucial to building predictive models of flow behaviour, sediment transport and deposition and is applicable to a wide range of disciplines. Physical modelling using a wide range of experimental facilities and measurement techniques has significantly advanced our understanding of these sediment-laden flows and their ability to erode, transport and deposit sediments. However, for the case of high-sediment concentration flows, measuring flow and depositional properties is still a challenge. Here, we present results from an acoustic reflection technique that allows for direct and noninvasive visualization of the internal structure of high concentration, clay-rich, sand-laden flows with a range of initial yield strengths (0-26 Pa). As the acoustic signal travels through the sediment-laden flow, it encounters zones of varying acoustic impedance that are due to temporal and spatial changes in sediment concentration, grain size and sorting, and flow mixing. The reflected signal is processed and interpreted using seismic techniques developed in exploration geophysics. The ultrasonic reflection data captured two distinct flow stages, an active stage and a post-depositional creeping stage. The clay-rich sand-laden flows showed stratification expressed by three clear vertical zones: (a) an upper relatively dilute turbulent zone, (b) a zone with high sediment concentration and significantly reduced mixing and (c) an aggrading bed of static grains.

  6. Concentrations and sources of PAHs in surface sediments of the Fenhe reservoir and watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Hong; Tian, Ying-Ze; Shi, Guo-Liang; Guo, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiang; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Sixteen PAHs in surface sediments at 28 sites throughout Fenhe reservoir and watershed were measured. The ∑PAHs concentrations ranged from 539.0 to 6281.7 with the mean of 2214.8ng/g. The 2-3 rings PAHs, contributing 55 percent to ∑PAHs, were the dominant species. Twenty-eight sites were grouped into three segments: Fenhe principal stream, estuaries of main branch streams, and Fenhe reservoir. ∑PAHs was highest in the estuaries of main branch streams. The ecological risk assessment was studied by biological thresholds. The results showed levels of PAHs might cause mild but not acute adverse biological effects. In addition, PAHs ratios, PCA/MLR and hierarchical clustering analysis were applied to evaluate the possible sources. Coal combustion (35 percent), diesel and gasoline emissions (29 percent and 16 percent, respectively) might be the important sources. For sites in Fenhe reservoir, the major sources were complex, while other two segments were mainly influenced by coal combustion source.

  7. Coupling Between the Changes in CO2 Concentration and Sediment Biogeochemistry in the Salinas De San Pedro Mudflat, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaie Boroon, M.; Diaz, S.; Torres, V.; Lazzaretto, T.; Dehyn, D.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effects of elevated carbon dioxide [CO2] on biogeochemistry of marsh sediment including speciation of selected heavy metals in Salinas de San Pedro mudflat in California. The Salinas de San Pedro mudflat has higher carbon (C) content than the vast majority of fully-vegetated salt marshes even with the higher tidal action in the mudflat. Sources for CO2 were identified as atmospheric CO2 as well as due to local fault degassing process. We measured carbon dioxide [CO2], methane [CH4], total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen, salinity, and heavy metal concentration in various salt marsh locations. Overall, our results showed that CO2 concentration ranging from 418.7 to 436.9 [ppm], which are slightly different in various chambers but are in good agreement with some heavy metal concentrations values in mudflat at or around the same location. The selected metal concentration values (ppm) ranging from 0.003 - 0.011(As); 0.001-0.005 (Cd); 0.04-0.02 (Cr); 0.13-0.38 (Cu); 0.11-0.38 (Pb); 0.0009-0.020 (Se); and 0.188-0.321 (Zn). The low dissolved O2 [ppm] in the pore water sediment indicates suboxic environment. Additionally, CO2 [ppm] and loss on ignition (LOI) [%] correlated inversely; the higher CO2 content, the lower was the LOI; that is to say the excess CO2 may caused higher rates of decomposition and therefore it leads to lower soil organic matter (LOI) [%] on the mudflat surface. It appears that the elevated CO2 makes changes in salt marsh pore water chemistry for instance the free ionic metal (Cu2+, Pb2+, etc.) speciation is one of the most reactive form because simply assimilated by the non-decayed or alive organisms in sediment of salt marsh and/or in water. This means that CO2 not only is a sign of improvement in plant productivity, but also activates microbial decomposition through increases in dissolved organic carbon availability. CO2 also increases acidification processes such as anaerobic degradation of microorganism and oxidation of

  8. Effects of copper and the sea lice treatment Slice on nutrient release from marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Mayor, D J; Solan, M; McMillan, H; Killham, K; Paton, G I

    2009-04-01

    Copper-based antifoulant paints and the sea lice treatment Slice are widely used, and often detectable in the sediments beneath farms where they are administered. Ten-day, whole sediment mesocosm experiments were conducted to examine how increasing sediment concentrations of copper or Slice influenced final water column concentrations of ammonium-nitrogen (NH(4)-N), nitrate+nitrite-nitrogen (NO(X)-N) and phosphate-phosphorus (PO(4)-P) in the presence of the non-target, benthic organisms Corophium volutator and Hediste diversicolor. Nominal sediment concentrations of copper and Slice had significant effects on the resulting concentrations of almost all nutrients examined. The overall trends in nutrient concentrations at the end of the 10-day incubations were highly similar between the trials with either copper or Slice, irrespective of the invertebrate species present. This suggests that nutrient exchange from the experimental sediments was primarily influenced by the direct effect of copper/Slice dose on the sediment microbial community, rather than the indirect effect of reduced bioturbation/irrigation due to increased macrofaunal mortality.

  9. Effects of clay minerals and organic matter in formulated sediments on the bioavailability of sediment-associated uranium to the freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sarah E; Liber, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that bioavailability influences metal toxicity in aquatic ecosystems. However, the factors and mechanisms that influence uranium (U) bioavailability and toxicity in sediment have not been thoroughly evaluated, despite evidence that suggests different sediment components can influence the sorption and interaction of some metals. Given that dissolved U is generally accepted as being the primary bioavailable fraction of U, it is hypothesized that adsorption and interaction of U with different sediment components will influence the bioavailability of U in sediment. We investigated the effects of key sediment physicochemical properties on the bioavailability of U to a model freshwater benthic invertebrate, Chironomus dilutus. Several 10-day spiked sediment bioaccumulation experiments were performed, exposing C. dilutus larvae to a variety of formulated sediments spiked with different concentrations of U (5, 50 and/or 200 mg U/kg d.w.). Mean accumulation of U in C. dilutus larvae decreased significantly from 1195 to 10 mg U/kg d.w. as kaolin clay content increased from 0% to 60% in sediment spiked with 50 mg U/kg d.w. Similarly, higher organic matter content also resulted in a significant reduction of U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae, indicating a reduction in U bioavailability. Concentrations of U in both the overlying water and sediment pore water displayed a strong positive relationship to U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae (r(2) = 0.77, p<0.001 and r(2) = 0.57, p < 0.001, respectively) for all experiments, while total U concentrations in the sediment had a poor relationship to U bioaccumulation (r(2) = 0.10, p = 0.028). Results from this research confirm that sediment clay and organic matter content play a significant role in altering U bioavailability, which is important in informing risk assessments of U contaminated sites and in the development of site-specific sediment quality guidelines for U.

  10. Concentrations of chlorinated organic compounds in biota and bed sediment in streams of the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.

    1997-01-01

    Samples of resident biota and bed sediments were collected in 1992 from 18 sites on or near the floor of the San Joaquin Valley, California, for analysis of 33 organochlorine compounds. The sites were divided into five groups on the basis of physiographic region and land use. Ten compounds were detected in tissue, and 15 compounds were detected in bed sediment. The most frequently detected compound in both media was p,p'-DDE. Concentrations of ??DDT (sum of o,p'- and p, p' forms of DDD, DDE, and DDT) were statistically different among groups of sites for both tissue and sediment (Kruskal- Wallis, p < 0.05). Concentrations in both media were highest in streams draining the west side of the valley. Concentrations of ??DDT in tissue were significantly correlated with specific conductance, pH, and total alkalinity (p < 0.05), which are indicators of the proportion of irrigation return flows in stream discharge. Concentrations in sediment on a dry-weight basis were not correlated with these water-quality parameters, but total organic carbon (TOC) normalized concentrations were significantly correlated with specific conductance and pH (p < 0.05). Regressions of the concentration of ??DDT in tissue, as a function of ??DDT in bed sediment, were significant and explained up to 76% of the variance in the data. The concentration of ??DDT in sediment may be related to mechanisms of soil transport to surface water with bioavailability of compounds related to the concentration of TOC in sediment. The results of this study did not indicate any clear advantage to using either bed sediment or tissues in studies of organochlorine chemicals in the environment. Some guidelines for protection of fish and wildlife were exceeded. Concentrations of organochlorine chemicals in biota, and perhaps sediment, have declined from concentrations measured in the 1970s and 1980s, but remain high compared to other regions of the United States.

  11. Adapting SWAT hillslope erosion model to predict sediment concentrations and yields in large Basins.

    PubMed

    Vigiak, Olga; Malagó, Anna; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean

    2015-12-15

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is used worldwide for water quality assessment and planning. This paper aimed to assess and adapt SWAT hillslope sediment yield model (Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation, MUSLE) for applications in large basins, i.e. when spatial data is coarse and model units are large; and to develop a robust sediment calibration method for large regions. The Upper Danube Basin (132,000km(2)) was used as case study representative of large European Basins. The MUSLE was modified to reduce sensitivity of sediment yields to the Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) size, and to identify appropriate algorithms for estimating hillslope length (L) and slope-length factor (LS). HRUs gross erosion was broadly calibrated against plot data and soil erosion map estimates. Next, mean annual SWAT suspended sediment concentrations (SSC, mg/L) were calibrated and validated against SSC data at 55 gauging stations (622 station-years). SWAT annual specific sediment yields in subbasin reaches (RSSY, t/km(2)/year) were compared to yields measured at 33 gauging stations (87station-years). The best SWAT configuration combined a MUSLE equation modified by the introduction of a threshold area of 0.01km(2) where L and LS were estimated with flow accumulation algorithms. For this configuration, the SSC residual interquartile was less than +/-15mg/L both for the calibration (1995-2004) and the validation (2005-2009) periods. The mean SSC percent bias for 1995-2009 was 24%. RSSY residual interquartile was within +/-10t/km(2)/year, with a mean RSSY percent bias of 12%. Residuals showed no bias with respect to drainage area, slope, or spatial distribution. The use of multiple data types at multiple sites enabled robust simulation of sediment concentrations and yields of the region. The MUSLE modifications are recommended for use in large basins. Based on SWAT simulations, we present a sediment budget for the Upper Danube Basin. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Control of sediment concentration in major rivers of the Nepal Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crave, A.; Andermann, C.; Gloaguen, R.; Bonnet, S.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment concentration in river systems of active mountain belts is key indicators to estimate present-day erosion rates. Erosion in the Himalayas is mainly controlled by the annual recurrence and intensity of the Indian summer monsoon system. But nevertheless short lasting events can be responsible for more than the half of the material transported. Temporal variability in concentration is attributed by changes of discharge and hence access to different supply sources as well as alteration of mobilization properties. Controlling factors are precipitation rates and intensities, vegetation cover, duration and limit of annual snow cover as well as seismic events. Today remotely sensed area-wide measurements are available to relate single observable events, such as extreme suspended sediment concentration peaks to their eventual sources. Due to the distinct seasonality, Himalayan rivers experience a distinct annual hydrographe which is highly repetitive. These annual flood cycles cause seasonal hysteresis loops in suspended concentration engraved by short events. Here we present a study on several major rivers in the Nepal Himalayas analyzing there discharge - sediment concentration relationship and its relation with upstream controlling properties, detected by remote sensing. Due to political unsteadiness and difficult accessible terrain, river gauging stations are rare and data not always available. Our station data covers nearly all major rivers, spanning a rainfall gradient from East to West along the Himalayan front. The average annual increase of discharge during monsoon is 1 to two magnitudes with respect to winter baseflow. Considerable Suspended concentrations (100 - 1000 g/l) are observable only within the monsoon season. Short lasting events however can catapult concentration for few short periods above 103 g/l. The occurrence of such events is commonly before peak discharge and its frequency varies from year to year. In same cases one or two events account

  14. Organic carbon concentration profiles in recent cave sediments: records of agricultural pollution or diagenesis?

    PubMed

    Bottrell, S H

    1996-01-01

    Recent (<7 years old) cave sediments in Speedwell Cavern, Derbyshire, show an approximately exponential decay of organic carbon with depth. This phenomenon was thought to be due to one of two causes: (i) changing agricultural practice within the catchment feeding the cave, especially the increased use of sewage sludge and animal slurry as fertilizer; (ii) a relatively constant organic carbon concentration over time in the input sediment, with subsequent carbon mineralization during diagenesis. Carbon isotope composition of the organic material and the evolution of H/C ratio with depth indicate that the latter hypothesis is correct and that the profiles result from microbial diagenesis, not increased organic carbon inputs. By comparison with sediment of known (7 years) age, temporal decay constants for organic matter can be derived; these lie between rates previously determined for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments and soils. The H/C ratio of organic matter can be modelled as a function of time and proceeds in a similar fashion to soil organic material.

  15. Acoustic measurement of suspended sediment concentration profiles in an oscillatory boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, Francisco; García, Marcelo H.

    2012-09-01

    The use of an Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) to obtain phase-averaged velocity and turbulent Reynolds stress profiles inside an oscillatory boundary layer flow is described in detail and possible error sources are summarized. Since the instrument also reports the acoustic backscatter, a novel application of the same ultrasound profilers to obtain phase-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles and the errors involved in this technique are carefully discussed. The experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water-Sediment Tunnel (LOWST), which has been a recent addition to the experimental facilities of the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The results showed that for the selected transducer frequency and flow, the instrument ability to characterize turbulence is compromised by the presence of Doppler noise and the size of the sampling volume. Regarding the suspended sediment estimation, it was found that the calibration obtained using water samples yielded good results, allowing for the study of the suspended sediment evolution along the oscillation.

  16. Exposure and effects of sediment-spiked fludioxonil on macroinvertebrates and zooplankton in outdoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao H; Brock, Theo C M; Barone, Lidia E; Belgers, J Dick M; Boerwinkel, Marie-Claire; Buijse, Laura; van Wijngaarden, René P A; Hamer, Mick; Roessink, Ivo

    2017-08-25

    Information from effects of pesticides in sediments at an ecosystem level, to validate current and proposed risk assessment procedures, is scarce. A sediment-spiked outdoor freshwater microcosm experiment was conducted with fludioxonil (lipophilic, non-systemic fungicide) to study exposure dynamics and treatment-related responses of benthic and pelagic macroinvertebrates and zooplankton. Besides blank control and solvent control systems the experiment had six different treatment levels (1.7-614mga.s./kg dry sediment) based around the reported 28-d No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for Chironomus riparius (40mga.s./kg dry sediment). Twelve systems were available per treatment of which four were sacrificed on each of days 28, 56 and 84 after microcosm construction. Fludioxonil persisted in the sediment and mean measured concentrations were 53-82% of the initial concentration after 84days. The dissipation rate increased with the treatment level. Also exposure concentrations in overlying water were long-term, with highest concentrations 28days after initiation of the experiment. Sediment-dwelling Oligochaeta and pelagic Rotifera and Cladocera showed the most pronounced treatment-related declines. The most sensitive sediment-dwelling oligochaete was Dero digitata (population NOEC 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). The same NOEC was calculated for the sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrate community. The most sensitive zooplankton species was the cladoceran Diaphanosoma brachyurum (NOEC of 1.6μga.s./L in overlying water corresponding to 5.0mga.s./kg dry sediment). At the two highest treatments several rotifer taxa showed a pronounced decrease, while the zooplankton community-level NOEC was 5.6μga.s./L (corresponding to 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). Zooplankton taxa calanoid Copepoda and Daphnia gr. longispina showed a pronounced treatment-related increase (indirect effects). Consequently, an assessment factor of 10 to the chronic laboratory NOECs of Chironomus riparius

  17. Numerical study of instability of nanofluids: the coagulation effect and sedimentation effect.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu; Fan, Jianren; Hu, Yacai

    2011-02-28

    This study is a numerical study on the coagulation as well as the sedimentation effect of nanofluids using the Brownian dynamics method. Three cases are simulated, focusing on the effects of the sizes, volume fraction, and ζ potentials of nano-particles on the formation of coagulation and sedimentation of nanofluids. The rms fluctuation of the particle number concentration, as well as the flatness factor of it, is employed to study the formation and variation of the coagulation process. The results indicate a superposition of coagulation and sedimentation effect of small nano-particles. Moreover, it is stable of nanofluids with the volume fraction of particles below the limit of "resolution" of the fluids. In addition, the effect of ζ potentials is against the formation of coagulation and positive to the stability of nanofluids.

  18. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in marine sediments along Nagapattinam - Pondicherry coastal waters, Southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Kamalakannan, K; Balakrishnan, S; Sampathkumar, P

    2017-04-15

    In this present study, petroleum hydrocarbons were statistically analyzed in three different coastal sediment cores viz., (N1, P1 and P2) from the Southeast coast of Tamil Nadu, India to examine the viability of PHCs. The significant positive relationship between mud (silt+clay+sand) and PHC unveiled that high specific surface of area of mud content raise the level of PHCs. Cluster analysis was used to discriminate the sediment samples based on their degree of contamination. The present study shows that instead of expensive and destructive PHC chemical methods, magnetic susceptibility is found to be a suitable, cheap and rapid method for detailed study of PHC in marine sediments. This baseline PHCs data can be used for regular ecological monitoring and effective management for the mining and tourism related activities in the coastal ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of modeling and suspended sediment concentration measurements for quantifying net suspended sediment transport through a large tidally dominated inlet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, Li H.; Wright, Scott A.; Elias, Edwin; Hanes, Daniel M.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Largier, John; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    Sediment exchange at large energetic inlets is often difficult to quantify due complex flows, massive amounts of water and sediment exchange, and environmental conditions limiting long-term data collection. In an effort to better quantify such exchange this study investigated the use of suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) measured at an offsite location as a surrogate for sediment exchange at the tidally dominated Golden Gate inlet in San Francisco, CA. A numerical model was calibrated and validated against water and suspended sediment flux measured during a spring–neap tide cycle across the Golden Gate. The model was then run for five months and net exchange was calculated on a tidal time-scale and compared to SSC measurements at the Alcatraz monitoring site located in Central San Francisco Bay ~ 5 km from the Golden Gate. Numerically modeled tide averaged flux across the Golden Gate compared well (r2 = 0.86, p-value

  20. The effect of oil sands tailings pond sediments on embryo-larval walleye (Sander vitreus).

    PubMed

    Raine, J C; Turcotte, D; Tumber, V; Peru, K M; Wang, Z; Yang, C; Headley, J V; Parrott, J L

    2017-10-01

    Walleye (Sander vitreus) are a commercially important North American fish species that inhabit the Athabasca River. This river flows through the Athabasca oil sands where natural sources of bitumen erode from the McMurray formation. Little information is available on responses of walleye embryos to oil sands tailings pond sediments in a laboratory setting. The current study describes the design and implementation of a daily-renewal bioassay to assess the potential effects of tailings pond sediments from the Athabasca oil sands area on walleye development. Developing walleye embryos were exposed to increasing concentrations of two tailings pond sediments (collected in the Athabasca oil sands area) until the completion of yolk absorption in control fish. Sediments from the tailings pond represent a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs. During the 31 day exposure, the walleye were examined for mortalities, weight, length and developmental abnormalities to provide an initial evaluation of the effects of the oil sands tailings pond sediments. Walleye embryo survival differed between the tailings pond sediments, and survival decreased with increasing sediment concentration. Alkylated PAH content differed between the two tailings pond sediments and lower embryo survival corresponded to higher total and alkylated PAH content. Tailings pond sediment-exposed walleye exhibited a delay in development, as well as increased percentages of larvae with heart and yolk sac edema, and cranial and spinal malformations. These abnormalities in development are often associated with PAH and alkylated PAH exposure. This study provides an exposure design that can be used to assess sediment toxicity to early developmental stages of a fish species not commonly tested in the lab, and lays the groundwork for future studies with this and other difficult-to-culture species. These results offer information on the potential effects of tailings pond sediments

  1. Trace element, semivolatile organic, and chlorinated organic compound concentrations in bed sediments of selected streams at Fort Gordon, Georgia, February-April 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Lashun K.; Journey, Celeste; Stringfield, Whitney J.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Wellborn, John B.; Ratliff, Hagan; Abrahamsen, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    sediment samples from most nonreference sites exceeded concentrations in samples from reference sites at Fort Gordon. Bed sediments from one of the nonreference sites sampled contained the highest concentrations of copper and lead with elevated levels of zinc and chromium relative to reference sites. The percentage change of major ions, trace elements, and total organic carbon that had been detected at sites previously sampled in May 1998 and current bed sediment sites ranged from -4 to 8 percent with an average percentage change of less than 1 percent. Concentrations of major ions and trace elements in bed sediments exceeded probable effect levels for aquatic life (based on the amphipod Hyalella azteca) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at 46 and 69 percent of the current and previously sampled locations, respectively. The greatest frequency of exceedances for major ions and trace elements in bed sediments was observed for lead. Concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls were detected in bed sediment samples at 94 percent of the sites currently sampled. Detections of these organic compounds were reported with greater frequency in bed sediments at upstream sampling locations, when compared to downstream locations. The greatest number of detections of these compounds was reported for bed sediment samples collected from two creeks above a lake. The percentage change of semivolatile organic compounds detected at previously sampled and current bed sediment sites ranged from -68 to 100 percent with the greatest percentage increase reported for one of the creeks above the lake. Concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds and polychlorinated biphenyls in bed sediments exceeded aquatic life criteria established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at three sites. Contaminant compounds exceeding aquatic life criteria included fluoranthene, phenanthrene, anthracene, benzo(a)anthracene

  2. A Stochastic Framework For Sediment Concentration Estimation By Accounting Random Arrival Processes Of Incoming Particles Into Receiving Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Hung, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study attempts to apply queueing theory to develop a stochastic framework that could account for the random-sized batch arrivals of incoming sediment particles into receiving waters. Sediment particles, control volume, mechanics of sediment transport (such as mechanics of suspension, deposition and resuspension) are treated as the customers, service facility and the server respectively in queueing theory. In the framework, the stochastic diffusion particle tracking model (SD-PTM) and resuspension of particles are included to simulate the random transport trajectories of suspended particles. The most distinguished characteristic of queueing theory is that customers come to the service facility in a random manner. In analogy to sediment transport, this characteristic is adopted to model the random-sized batch arrival process of sediment particles including the random occurrences and random magnitude of incoming sediment particles. The random occurrences of arrivals are simulated by Poisson process while the number of sediment particles in each arrival can be simulated by a binominal distribution. Simulations of random arrivals and random magnitude are proposed individually to compare with the random-sized batch arrival simulations. Simulation results are a probabilistic description for discrete sediment transport through ensemble statistics (i.e. ensemble means and ensemble variances) of sediment concentrations and transport rates. Results reveal the different mechanisms of incoming particles will result in differences in the ensemble variances of concentrations and transport rates under the same mean incoming rate of sediment particles.

  3. [Variation of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in water-sediment system and influence of overlying water on the algae growth].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-yong; Jin, Xiang-can; Guo, Jian-ning; Sheng, Li

    2007-10-01

    The effect of biosidal treatment of initial sediment, addition of inhibitor and addition of phosphorus on the transform of nitrogen and phosphorus in the sediment-water simulative system were studied. S. quadricaudain was cultured in overlying waters took from the above experiment sets when the above experiment completed. The result indicated that, biosidal treatment enhanced the concentration of TP while there was no obvious effect on N. The TP, DTP and TN concentrations were closely between inhibitor addition set and the control set in the sediment-water simulative system but the content of NO3(-)-N of the set with inhibitor addition reached 19.2 mg x L(-1), which was much higher than that of the control set. The sediment significantly adsorbed the P added to the system, and the content of TP decreased when the system reached balance. Algae biomass of the biosidal treatment set was higher than that of the control set, and the main cause was sterilizer leaded to higher concentration of TP of the biosidal treatment set. The highest Algae biomass of the group with inhibitor (224.5 x 10(4) unit x L(-1)) was much higher than that of the control set (26 x 10(4) unit x L(-1)), and that was 5-10 times than that of other sets (sterilized set 22.5 x 10(4) unit x L(-1), set with P added 38.5 x 10(4) uni x L(-1)). Inhibitor restrained the microorganism from using some nutrition which was important to alga's growth. At the beginning, the addition of P had no remarkable effect on the alga growth, but along with the experiment, the alga of the P addition set adapted to the environment and algae biomass exceed that of the control set. The increase of biological bioavailable phosphorus of sediment in biosidal treatment set and addition of inhibitor sets were caused by the increase of algae biomass and thus the increase of liable organic phosphorus.

  4. The effects of Hurricane Hugo on suspended-sediment loads, Lago Loiza Basin, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the two main tributaries that enter Lago Loiza, Rio Grande de Loiza and Rio Gurabo, 99 600 tonnes of suspended sediment was transported by 58.2??106 m3 of runoff in a 48 h period. The storm-average suspended-sediment concentration in the Rio Grande de Loiza for Hurricane Hugo was 2290 mgl-1, the second lowest for the 12 storms that have been monitored at this site. In Rio Gurabo the storm-average suspended-sediment concentration was 1420 mg l -1, the sixth lowest recorded out of 15 monitored storms. In Quebrada Salvatierra, a small tributary to Rio Grande de Loiza, suspended-sediment concentrations were as low as 33 mg l-1 during peak runoff of 20m3s-1. Normally the suspended-sediment concentrations at this discharge are 300 mg l-1. Hurricane force winds seem to be the most important factor contributing to the lower than expected suspended-sediment loads. High winds caused vegetation and debris to be dislodged and displaced. Debris accumulated on hillslopes and in small channels, blocked bridges and formed debris dams. These dams caused local backwater effects that reduced stream velocities and decreased suspended-sediment loads. -from Author

  5. Improved Method for the Quantification of Methane Concentrations in Unconsolidated Lake Sediments.

    PubMed

    Tyroller, Lina; Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Ndayisaba, Cyprien; Naeher, Sebastian; Schubert, Carsten; North, Ryan P; Kipfer, Rolf

    2016-07-05

    There is conclusive evidence that the methods most commonly used to sample methane (CH4) dissolved in the pore water of lake sediments produce results that are likely to be affected by gas loss or gas exchange with the atmosphere. To determine the in situ amount of CH4 per unit mass of pore water in sediments, we developed and validated a new method that combines techniques developed for noble-gas analysis in pore waters with a standard headspace technique to quantify the CH4 present in the pore space in dissolved and gaseous form. The method was tested at two sites: Lake Lungern, where CH4 concentrations were close to saturation; and Lake Rotsee, where CH4 concentrations are known to exceed saturation and where CH4 bubble formation and gas ebullition are commonly observed. We demonstrate that the new method, in contrast to the available methods, more reliably captures the total amount of CH4 per unit mass of pore water consisting of both dissolved and free CH4 (i.e., gas bubbles) in the pore space of the sediment.

  6. Real-time measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size using five techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    Fine sediments are important in the design and operation of hydropower plants (HPPs), in particular with respect to sediment management and hydro-abrasive erosion in hydraulic machines. Therefore, there is a need for reliable real-time measurements of suspended sediment mass concentration (SSC) and particle size distribution (PSD). The following instruments for SSC measurements were investigated in a field study during several years at the HPP Fieschertal in the Swiss Alps: (1) turbidimeters, (2) a Laser In-Situ Scattering and Trans- missometry instrument (LISST), (3) a Coriolis Flow and Density Meter (CFDM), (4) acoustic transducers, and (5) pressure sensors. LISST provided PSDs in addition to concentrations. Reference SSCs were obtained by gravimetrical analysis of automatically taken water samples. In contrast to widely used turbidimeters and the single-frequency acoustic method, SSCs obtained from LISST, the CFDM or the pressure sensors were less or not affected by particle size variations. The CFDM and the pressure sensors allowed measuring higher SSC than the optical or the acoustic techniques (without dilution). The CFDM and the pressure sensors were found to be suitable to measure SSC ≥ 2 g/l. In this paper, the measuring techniques, instruments, setup, methods for data treatment, and selected results are presented and discussed.

  7. Remote Sensing Analysis of Temperature and Suspended Sediment Concentration in Ayeyarwady River in Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanda Ko, Nyein; Rutten, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Detailed spatial coverage of water quality parameters are crucial to better manage rivers. However, collection of water quality parameters is both time consuming and costly for large rivers. This study demonstrates that Operational Land Image (OLI) Sensor on board of Landsat 8 can be successfully applied for the detection of spatial patterns of water temperature as well as suspended sediment concentration (SSC) using the Ayeyarwady river, Myanmar as a case study. Water temperature estimation was obtained from the brightness thermal Band 10 by using the Split-Window algorithm. The study finds that there is a close agreement between the remote sensing temperature and in-situ temperature with relative error in the range from 4.5% to 8.2%. The sediment load of Ayeyarwady river is ranked as the third-largest sediment load among the world's rivers but there is very little known about this important parameter, due to a lack of adequate gauge data. The single band reflectance of Landsat image (Band 5) seems a good indicator for the estimation of SSC with relative error in the range of less than 10% but the developed empirical formula by the power relation with the only seven ground reference points is uncertain to apply for the entire river basin. It is to note that an important constraint for the sediment analysis is the availability of spatial and temporal ground reference data. Future studies should also focus on the improvement of ground reference data points to become more reliable, because most of the river in Asia, especially in Myanmar, don't have readily available continuous ground sediment data points due to lack of measurement gauge stations through the river.

  8. Effects of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the chemistry of bottom sediments in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Horowitz, A.J.; Mahler, B.J.; Foreman, W.T.; Fuller, C.C.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Elrick, K.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Skrobialowski, S.C.; Smith, J.J.; Wilson, J.T.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent unwatering of New Orleans, Louisiana, on the sediment chemistry of Lake Pontchartrain were evaluated by chemical analysis of samples of street mud and suspended and bottom sediments. The highest concentrations of urban-related elements and compounds (e.g., Pb, Zn, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlordane) in bottom sediments exceeded median concentrations in U.S. urban lakes and sediment-quality guidelines. The extent of the elevated concentrations was limited, however, to within a few hundred meters of the mouth of the 17th Street Canal, similar to results of historical assessments. Chemical and radionuclide analysis of pre- and post-Hurricane Rita samples indicates that remobilization of near-shore sediment by lake currents and storms is an ongoing process. The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the sediment chemistry of Lake Pontchartrain are limited spatially and are most likely transitory. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  9. Effects of algae growth on cadmium remobilization and ecological risk in sediments of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Dandan; Su, Lili; Xu, Jiajun; Li, Shiyin; Ye, Xiang; Geng, Hong; Wang, Peifang; Li, Yi; Li, Yiping; Acharya, Kumud

    2016-05-01

    Indoor simulation experiment with 2.76 L microcosms using sediment from Taihu Lake were conducted to investigate the relationship between algae bloom and heavy metals release into a lake aquatic environment. The results showed that Microcystic aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) growth can enhance cadmium (Cd) mobilization from sediments to overlying water due to increasing pH and DO content of overlying water and changing the redox condition of surface sediment (0-2 cm) from weak oxidation to weak reduction. The dissolved Cd concentration in overlying water can be decreased during algal growth process. The remobilization of Cd from sediment can effectively reduce the ecological risk of total Cd in sediments. The results of this study showed that both Igeo and Er(i) can be used to effectively evaluate the ecological risk of heavy metal Cd in different fractions.

  10. A new correlation for sedimentation of concentrated suspensions in shear-thinning fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.

    1994-12-31

    An experimental investigation has been made of the settling behavior of concentrated suspensions in viscoelastic polymer solutions, as a function of the fluid rheological properties. The sedimentation experiments examined a wide range of shear-thinning and viscoelastic behavior (power-law index n range 0.2--1.0 and relaxation time {lambda} range 0.1--100 sec), using model suspensions of closely-sized glass beads. The experimental results were compared with four available theoretical models which are based on the fluid rheological properties. A new relationship is proposed, based on the single particle settling velocity, a critical solids volume fraction c* and the fluid rheological properties. The new relationship predicts two different settling regimes: fast-setting for low solids loading c {le} c*, and slow-settling for high solids loading c {ge} c*. The new relationship simplifies to the well-established Richardson-Zaki correlation for sedimentation in Newtonian fluids.

  11. Equilibrium concentration profiles and sedimentation kinetics of colloidal gels under gravitational stress.

    PubMed

    Buzzaccaro, S; Secchi, E; Brambilla, G; Piazza, R; Cipelletti, L

    2012-07-18

    We study the sedimentation of colloidal gels by using a combination of light scattering, polarimetry and video imaging. The asymptotic concentration profiles (z,t → ∞) exhibit remarkable scaling properties: profiles for gels prepared at different initial volume fractions and particle interactions can be superimposed onto a single master curve by using suitable reduced variables. We show theoretically that this behavior stems from a power law dependence of the compressive elastic modulus versus , which we directly test experimentally. The sedimentation kinetics comprises an initial latency stage, followed by a rapid collapse where the gel height h decreases at constant velocity and a final compaction stage characterized by a stretched exponential relaxation of h toward a plateau. Analogies and differences with previous works are briefly discussed.

  12. Separation and concentration of murine hematopoietic stem cells (CFUS) using a combination of density gradient sedimentation and counterflow centrifugal elutriation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Carsten, A L; Cronkite, E P; Kelley, J E

    1981-07-01

    To obtain concentrated suspensions of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells *CFUS) from murine bone marrow, density gradient centrifugal sedimentation (DGCS) was combined with counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CE). This combination provided a 7.6 fold enrichment of the CFUS concentration. For DGCS, Percoll a suspension of silica particles coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone was used. For fractionation by the CE an elutriator rotor (JE-6, Beckman) was used for further concentration of the cells harvested from the DGCS. Bone marrow erythropoiesis was suppressed by transfusion plethora initiated 5-6 days before the bone marrow was harvested. These two physical separation procedures combined with transfusion plethora to suppress erythropoiesis are effective in producing an enriched fraction of CFUS without change in distribution of the histologic type of colonies.

  13. Trace metal concentrations and their transfer from sediment to leaves of four common aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Łojko, Renata; Polechońska, Ludmiła; Klink, Agnieszka; Kosiba, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of trace and alkali metals in leaves of four common helophytes, Sparganium erectum, Glyceria maxima, Phalaris arundinacea, and Phragmites australis, as well as in corresponding water and bottom sediments were investigated to ascertain plant bioaccumulation ability. Results showed that Mn and Fe were the most abundant trace metals in all plant species, while Co and Pb contents were the lowest. Leaves of species studied differed significantly in respect of element concentrations. The highest concentrations of Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Ni were noted in S. erectum while the highest contents of Co, Ca, Zn, and Cr in Phalaris arundinacea. Phragmites australis contained the lowest amounts of most elements. Concentrations of Co, Cr, Fe, and Mn in all species studied and Ni in all except for Phragmites australis were higher than natural for hydrophytes. The leaves/sediment ratio was more than unity for all alkali metals as well as for Cu and Mn in Phragmites australis; Cr, Co, and Zn in Phalaris arundinacea; Cr and Mn in S. erectum; and Cr in G. maxima. High enrichment factors and high levels of toxic metals in the species studied indicated a special ability of these plants to absorb and store certain non-essential metals and, consequently, their potential for phytoremediation of contaminated aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Mercury concentrations in amphipods and fish of the Saint Lawrence River (Canada) are unrelated to concentrations of legacy mercury in sediments.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Peter V; Norris, Kristin; Berquist, Michelle; Campbell, Linda M; Ridal, Jeffrey J

    2014-10-01

    Past industrial activity at Cornwall, Ontario, Canada has contaminated Lake Saint Francis, a fluvial lake on the Saint Lawrence River, with mercury (Hg). A spatial survey of Hg concentrations in sediments, amphipods, and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in 2008 inferred current sources of Hg to the lake and spatial variations in risks to human consumers. Patterns of total and methyl Hg concentrations in sediment reflected upstream inputs, declining concentrations downstream, and highest concentrations at north shore sites near industrial sources; concentrations were lowest on the south shore because river currents limit north-south advective exchange. Surprisingly, concentrations of total or methyl Hg in sediments and pore water were unrelated to concentrations in amphipods and yellow perch. Concentrations in biota, and risks to consumers of fish, were highest at north shore sites near tributaries, and not at the most contaminated industrial sites. These results suggest that 'legacy' Hg in surficial sediments is not bioavailable to aquatic biota; tributaries and atmospheric deposition are possible sources of bioavailable Hg; and that sediment remediation would not resolve issues of Hg in fish. Fish consumption advisories for the entire lake based on single samples of fish could over- or under-protect consumers, depending on sampling location. To understand the actual risk to fish consumers for a large and complex lake system with multiple sources of Hg, more intensive sampling is needed to assess the spatial distribution of risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration from turbidity measurements using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Adem; Kankal, Murat; Onsoy, Hizir

    2012-07-01

    Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is generally determined from the direct measurement of sediment concentration of river or from sediment transport equations. Direct measurement is very costly and cannot be conducted for all river gauge stations. Therefore, correct estimation of suspended sediment amount carried by a river is very important in terms of water pollution, channel navigability, reservoir filling, fish habitat, river aesthetics and scientific interests. This study investigates the feasibility of using turbidity as a surrogate for SSC as in situ turbidity meters are being increasingly used to generate continuous records of SSC in rivers. For this reason, regression analysis (RA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were employed to estimate SSC based on in situ turbidity measurements. The SSC was firstly experimentally determined for the surface water samples collected from the six monitoring stations along the main branch of the stream Harsit, Eastern Black Sea Basin, Turkey. There were 144 data for each variable obtained on a fortnightly basis during March 2009 and February 2010. In the ANN method, the used data for training, testing and validation sets are 108, 24 and 12 of total 144 data, respectively. As the results of analyses, the smallest mean absolute error (MAE) and root mean square error (RMSE) values for validation set were obtained from the ANN method with 11.40 and 17.87, respectively. However these were 19.12 and 25.09 for RA. It was concluded that turbidity could be a surrogate for SSC in the streams, and the ANNs method used for the estimation of SSC provided acceptable results.

  16. Effect of self-stratification on sediment diffusivity in channel flows and boundary layers: a study using direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Cantero, M. I.; Garcia, M. H.

    2014-08-01

    Sediment transport in nature comprises of bedload and suspended load, and precise modelling of these processes is essential for accurate sediment flux estimation. Traditionally, non-cohesive suspended sediment has been modelled using the advection-diffusion equation (Garcia, 2008), where the success of the model is largely dependent on accurate approximation of the sediment diffusion coefficients. The current study explores the effect of self-stratification on sediment diffusivity using suspended sediment concentration data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flows subjected to different levels of stratification, where the level of stratification is dependent on the particle size (parameterized using particle fall velocity Ṽ and volume-averaged sediment concentration (parameterized using shear Richardson number Riτ. Two distinct configurations were explored, first the channel flow configuration (similar to flow in a pipe or a duct) and second, a boundary-layer configuration (similar to open-channel flow). Self-stratification was found to modulate the turbulence intensity (Cantero et al., 2009b), which in turn was found to reduce vertical sediment diffusivity in portions of the domain exposed to turbulence damping. The effect of particle size on vertical sediment diffusivity has been studied in the past by several authors (Rouse, 1937; Coleman, 1970; Nielsen and Teakle, 2004); so in addition to the effect of particle size, the current study also explores the effect of sediment concentration on vertical sediment diffusivity. The results from the DNS simulations were compared with experiments (Ismail, 1952; Coleman, 1986) and field measurements (Coleman, 1970), and were found to agree qualitatively, especially for the case of channel flows. The aim of the study is to understand the effect of stratification due to suspended sediment on vertical sediment diffusivity for different flow configurations, in order to gain insight of the underlying physics, which

  17. The effect of resuspending sediment contaminated with antifouling paint particles containing Irgarol 1051 on the marine macrophyte Ulva intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Tolhurst, Laura E; Barry, John; Dyer, Robert A; Thomas, Kevin V

    2007-07-01

    The effect of resuspending sediment contaminated with Irgarol 1051 based antifouling paint particles on the green macroalga Ulva intestinalis was examined. U. intestinalis was also exposed to sediment spiked with Irgarol 1051. The macroalga were exposed over 21 days to the resuspension of sediments containing 61.2 mg kg(-1) of antifouling paint particles containing Irgarol 1051 that provided aqueous Irgarol 1051 concentrations of approximately 0.3 microg l(-1), Irgarol 1051 and appropriate controls. The growth response was compared with that for 'clean' sediment. Resuspension of sediment was associated with reduced growth when compared to seawater alone. Resuspension of sediment spiked with Irgarol 1051 was associated with a greater reduction in growth, with growth being significantly reduced when sediment containing antifouling paint particles was resuspended. The data suggest that the prolonged disturbance of sediments containing antifouling paint particles in marinas represents a potential and as yet unquantified hazard to photosynthetic organisms.

  18. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear.A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not.The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  19. Comparison of vapor concentrations of volatile organic compounds with ground-water concentrations of selected contaminants in sediments beneath the Sudbury River, Ashland, Massachusetts, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, J.P.; Lyford, F.P.; Willey, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    A mixed plume of contaminants in ground water, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals, near the former Nyanza property in Ashland, Massachusetts, discharges to the Sudbury River upstream and downstream of Mill Pond and a former mill raceway. Polyethylene-membrane vapor-diffusion (PVD) samplers were installed in river-bottom sediments to determine if PVD samplers provide an alternative to ground-water sampling from well points for identifying areas of detectable concentrations of contaminants in sediment pore water near the ground-water and surface-water interface. In August and September 2000, the PVD samplers were installed near well points at depths of 8 to 12 inches in both fine and coarse sediments, whereas the well points were installed at depths of 1 to 5 feet in coarse sediments only. Comparison between vapor and water samples at 29 locations upstream from Mill Pond show that VOC vapor concentrations from PVD samplers in coarse river-bottom sediments are more likely to correspond to ground-water concentrations from well points than PVD samplers installed in fine sediments. Significant correlations based on Kendall's Tau were shown between vapor and ground-water concentrations for trichloroethylene and chlorobenzene for PVD samplers installed in coarse sediments where the fine organic layer that separated the two sampling depths was 1 foot or less in thickness. VOC concentrations from vapor samples also were compared to VOC, SVOC, and metals concentrations from ground-water samples at 10 well points installed upstream and downstream from Mill Pond, and in the former mill raceway. Chlorobenzene vapor concentrations correlated significantly with ground-water concentrations for 5 VOCs, 2 SVOCs, and 10 metals. Trichloroethylene vapor concentrations did not correlate with any of the other ground-water constituents analyzed at the 10 well points. Chlorobenzene detected by use of PVD samplers appears to be a

  20. Sedimentation

    Treesearch

    Cliff R. Hupp; Michael R. Schening

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentation is arguably the most important water-quality concern in the United States. Sediment trapping is cited frequently as a major function of riverine-forested wetlands, yet little is known about sedimcntation rates at the landscape scale in relation to site parameters, including woody vegetation type, elevation, velocity, and hydraulic connection to the river...

  1. Effects of humic acids on phytoextraction of Cu and Cd from sediment by Elodea nuttallii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Li, Zhu; Cheng, Shuiping; Wu, Zhenbin

    2010-01-01

    Growth and metal-accumulation of Elodea nuttallii exposed to Cu and Cd-contaminated sediment were examined and the effects of humic acids on phytoextraction of Cu and Cd were also investigated. The growth of plants were promoted with the increasing concentration of Cu in sediment, while inhibited by Cd during the 21d exposure. The concentrations of Cu in roots and shoots of E. nuttallii ranged 25-99mgkg(-1) dry weight (DW) and 23-83mgkg(-1)DW under different concentration of Cu treatments in sediment at the end of exposure, and they were 0-6.5mgkg(-1)DW and 0-7.9mgkg(-1)DW for Cd, respectively. With addition of humic acids from 3.0 to 7.8gkg(-1)DW, the bioavailability of heavy metals in the sediment were reduced significantly, therefore, the accumulation of Cd was inhibited and the Cd concentrations in roots and shoots of plants decreased. However, as the result of release Cu from sediment into water column with addition of humic acids, and E. nuttallii could uptake Cu from water directly, the Cu concentrations in roots and shoots in plant increased 26-69% and 40-78%, respectively. In conclusion, E. nuttallii could be suitable for remedying Cu and Cd-contaminated sediment in situ as a pioneer species, but for phytoextraction of Cd, the application of humic acids should be careful. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Redox dynamics in the Chesapeake Bay: The effect on sediment/water uranium exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, T.J.; Sholkovitz, E.R.; Klinkhammer, G. )

    1994-07-01

    The effect of seasonal variations in productivity and redox dynamics on the sediment/water exchange of uranium was investigated on a twelve cruise time series in the Chesapeake Bay. The deep waters of the bay undergo seasonal anoxia in response to high primary productivity and water column stratification from late spring to early fall. Dissolved oxygen was used to monitor sediment redox conditions. Dissolved [sup 238]U was measured in the water column and sediment porewaters to monitor water column/sediment exchange. Uranium incorporation in bay sediments results from two distinct processes: productivity-dependent scavenging from the water column and redox-dependent cycling of uranium between sediments and bottomwater. Uranium is removed from surface waters of the bay by scavenging with biodetritus during periods of high primary productivity. Bottomwater and sediment redox conditions determine whether this particle-bound uranium is buried or released to overlying water. Particulate uranium is released to bottomwaters and porewaters during the degradation of biodetritus and oxidation of authigenic uranium. Low oxygen in bottomwaters in the summer results in minimal exchange of uranium between the sediments and bottomwater, due to the stability of reduced U(IV). High bottomwater oxygen concentrations associated with bay turnover in the fall results in release of authigenic uranium by oxidation to the soluble (VI) form. Enrichment of uranium in fall bottomwater suggests that authigenic uranium is very labile when exposed to oxic environmental conditions. This process is enhanced by physical mixing when anoxic sediments are resuspended into the oxic bottomwaters.

  3. The impact of increased oxygen conditions on metal-contaminated sediments part I: effects on redox status, sediment geochemistry and metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    De Jonge, M; Teuchies, J; Meire, P; Blust, R; Bervoets, L

    2012-05-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of improved oxygen concentrations in overlying surface water on the redox status, sediment geochemistry and metal bioavailability in metal-polluted sediments a 54 days lab experiment with two different experimental treatments was conducted (90% and 40% O(2)). Changes in redox potential (Eh) in the sediment were monitored over time. At 6 different time points (after 0, 2, 5, 12, 32 and 54 days) and at 4 sediment depths (0-1, 1-4, 4-8 and 8-15 cm), acid volatile sulfides (AVS), simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured and metal release to overlying surface water was determined. Labile metal species in both water and sediment were measured using Diffusive Gradients in Thin films (DGT). Our results showed that elevated oxygen levels in overlying surface water led to an Eh increase in the sediment of the 90% O(2) treatment from 0 to ± 200 mV while AVS concentrations in the upper sediment layer decreased by 70%. Following AVS oxidation metal availability in the pore water was highly elevated after 54 days. However, Cu remained strongly bound to the sediment during the whole experiment. Only a limited metal release to the overlying surface water was noticed, which was due to the fact that SEM(tot) concentrations in the sediment did not yet exceeded AVS levels ([SEM(tot) - AVS]/f(OC) = 0) after 54 days. Additionally, adsorption on Fe and Mn hydroxides and particulate organic carbon also slowed down any potential metal release. Our results indicated that increasing oxygen concentrations due to general water quality improvements can enhance the mobility of trace metals which may result in the leaching of sediment-bound metals to overlying surface water, even in undisturbed watercourses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. METAL-COLLOID PARTITIONING IN ARTIFICIAL INTERSTITIAL WATERS OF MARINE SEDIMENTS: INFLUENCES OF SALINITY, PH AND COLLOIDAL ORGANIC CARBON CONCENTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    For decades, heavy metals have been deposited into marine sediments as a result of anthropogenic activities. Depending on their bioavailability, these metals may represent a risk to benthic organisms. Dissolved interstitial water metal concentrations have been shown to be better ...

  5. Suspended sediment concentration and optical property observations of mixed-turbidity, coastal waters through multispectral ocean color inversion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multispectral satellite ocean color data from high-turbidity areas of the coastal ocean contain information about the surface concentrations and optical properties of suspended sediments and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Empirical and semi-analytical inversion algorit...

  6. Suspended sediment concentration and optical property observations of mixed-turbidity, coastal waters through multispectral ocean color inversion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multispectral satellite ocean color data from high-turbidity areas of the coastal ocean contain information about the surface concentrations and optical properties of suspended sediments and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Empirical and semi-analytical inversion algorit...

  7. Effect of burrowing by the crab Helice crassa on chemistry of intertidal muddy sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, R.B.; Wilcock, R.J.; Wise, B.E.; Pickmere, S.E.

    1999-09-01

    The chemical environment was measured in vertical and horizontal profiles of cores taken from intertidal sediments that are extensively burrowed by the mud crab Helice crassa. The crab burrows folded the thin (2--5 mm) oxic layer into the sediment, and the burrows appeared to have a strong influence on the concentrations of acid volatile sulfide (AVS), acid-extractable Fe{sup II} (probably FeCO{sub 3} and FeS), Fe{sup III} (probably predominantly hydrous ferric oxide FeOOH), and Mn{sup II,III,IV} and a modest effect on FeS{sub 2} but no effect on total organic carbon, total organic nitrogen, or acid-extractable zinc concentrations. The oxic layer was thinner in the burrows than on the sediment surface and showed some minor differences in solid-state chemistry, with higher FeOOH and lower FeS{sub 2} concentrations in the burrow walls. Acid volatile sulfide, FeCO{sub 3} were found in the oxic layers, presumably because of deposits from crab excavations of deeper anoxic sediments. The chemistry of the bioturbated profile was highly variable, not only because of existing burrows but also because of infilled abandoned burrows. The colors of the sediment profile were strongly related to the concentrations of Fe{sup II}, AVS, FE{sup III}, Mn, and FeS{sub 2}. The implications of the observed sediment chemistry to the fate and bioavailability of contaminants is discussed.

  8. Response of Benthic Foraminiferal Size to Oxygen Concentration in Antarctic Sediment Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, D.; Keating-Bitonti, C.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen availability is important for biological reactions and the demand of oxygen is determined by the size of the organism. Few marine organisms can tolerate low oxygen conditions, but benthic foraminifera, a group of amoeboid protists that are highly sensitive to environmental factors, are known to live in these conditions. Benthic foraminifera may be able to live in oxygen stressed environments by changing the size and shape of their test. Low oxygen concentrations should favor smaller, thinner-shelled, flattened test morphologies. We hypothesize that the volume-to-surface area ratio of benthic foraminifera will decrease with decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations. To test this hypothesis, we picked two calcareous species (Epistominella exigua and Cassulinoides porrectus) and one agglutinated species (Portatrochammina antarctica) from three sediment cores collected from Explorer's Cove, Antarctica. Starting at the sediment-water interface, each core spans approximately 5-8 cm of depth. Profiles of dissolved oxygen concentrations were measured at the time of collection. At specific depths within the cores, we measured the three dimensions of picked foraminiferal tests using NIS-Elements. We calculated the volume and surface area of the tests assuming the shape of the foraminifers was an ellipsoid. The size trends of E. exigua confirm our hypothesis that the test volume-to-surface area ratios correlate positively with dissolved oxygen concentrations (p-value < 0.001). However, the size trends of the other species refute our hypothesis: P. antarctica shows no correlation and C. porrectus shows a negative correlation (p-value < 0.001) to dissolved oxygen concentrations. Thus, our results show that the change in size in response to variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations is species dependent. Moreover, we find that calcareous species are more sensitive to oxygen fluctuations than agglutinated species.

  9. Estimation of Biota Sediment Accumulation Factor (BSAF) from Paired Observations of Chemical Concentrations in Biota and Sediment (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was written in response to a March 2004 request from EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Forum (ERAF) for information about estimating Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAFs). BSAF is a parameter describing bioaccumulation of sediment-associated organic compounds or...

  10. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and corresponding loads during the historic June 2008 flooding in eastern Iowa.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, L; Kolpin, D W; Kalkhoff, S J; Robertson, D M

    2011-01-01

    A combination of above-normal precipitation during the winter and spring of 2007-2008 and extensive rainfall during June 2008 led to severe flooding in many parts of the midwestern United States. This resulted in transport of substantial amounts of nutrients and sediment from Iowa basins into the Mississippi River. Water samples were collected from 31 sites on six large Iowa tributaries to the Mississippi River to characterize water quality and to quantify nutrient and sediment loads during this extreme discharge event. Each sample was analyzed for total nitrogen, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen, dissolved ammonia as nitrogen, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and suspended sediment. Concentrations measured near peak flow in June 2008 were compared with the corresponding mean concentrations from June 1979 to 2007 using a paired t test. While there was no consistent pattern in concentrations between historical samples and those from the 2008 flood, increased flow during the flood resulted in near-peak June 2008 flood daily loads that were statistically greater (p < 0.05) than the median June 1979 to 2007 daily loads for all constituents. Estimates of loads for the 16-d period during the flood were calculated for four major tributaries and totaled 4.95 x 10(7) kg of nitrogen (N) and 2.9 x 10(6) kg of phosphorus (P) leaving Iowa, which accounted for about 22 and 46% of the total average annual nutrient yield, respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of large flood events to the total annual nutrient load in both small streams and large rivers.

  11. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and corresponding loads during the historic June 2008 flooding in eastern Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, L.; Kolpin, D.W.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of above-normal precipitation during the winter and spring of 2007-2008 and extensive rainfall during June 2008 led to severe flooding in many parts of the midwestern United States. This resulted in transport of substantial amounts of nutrients and sediment from Iowa basins into the Mississippi River. Water samples were collected from 31 sites on six large Iowa tributaries to the Mississippi River to characterize water quality and to quantify nutrient and sediment loads during this extreme discharge event. Each sample was analyzed for total nitrogen, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen, dissolved ammonia as nitrogen, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and suspended sediment. Concentrations measured near peak flow in June 2008 were compared with the corresponding mean concentrations from June 1979 to 2007 using a paired t test. While there was no consistent pattern in concentrations between historical samples and those from the 2008 flood, increased flow during the flood resulted in near-peak June 2008 flood daily loads that were statistically greater (p < 0.05) than the median June 1979 to 2007 daily loads for all constituents. Estimates of loads for the 16-d period during the flood were calculated for four major tributaries and totaled 4.95 x 10(7) kg of nitrogen (N) and 2.9 x 10(6) kg of phosphorus (P) leaving Iowa, which accounted for about 22 and 46% of the total average annual nutrient yield, respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of large flood events to the total annual nutrient load in both small streams and large rivers.

  12. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  13. Exploring the uncertainty in attributing sediment contributions in fingerprinting studies due to uncertainty in determining element concentrations in source areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Owens, Phillip N.; Koiter, Alex J.; Lobb, David

    2016-04-01

    One of the major sources of uncertainty in attributing sediment sources in fingerprinting studies is the uncertainty in determining the concentrations of the elements used in the mixing model due to the variability of the concentrations of these elements in the source materials (e.g., Kraushaar et al., 2015). The uncertainty in determining the "true" concentration of a given element in each one of the source areas depends on several factors, among them the spatial variability of that element, the sampling procedure and sampling density. Researchers have limited control over these factors, and usually sampling density tends to be sparse, limited by time and the resources available. Monte Carlo analysis has been used regularly in fingerprinting studies to explore the probable solutions within the measured variability of the elements in the source areas, providing an appraisal of the probability of the different solutions (e.g., Collins et al., 2012). This problem can be considered analogous to the propagation of uncertainty in hydrologic models due to uncertainty in the determination of the values of the model parameters, and there are many examples of Monte Carlo analysis of this uncertainty (e.g., Freeze, 1980; Gómez et al., 2001). Some of these model analyses rely on the simulation of "virtual" situations that were calibrated from parameter values found in the literature, with the purpose of providing insight about the response of the model to different configurations of input parameters. This approach - evaluating the answer for a "virtual" problem whose solution could be known in advance - might be useful in evaluating the propagation of uncertainty in mixing models in sediment fingerprinting studies. In this communication, we present the preliminary results of an on-going study evaluating the effect of variability of element concentrations in source materials, sampling density, and the number of elements included in the mixing models. For this study a virtual

  14. New Insights into Phosphorus Mobilisation from Sulphur-Rich Sediments: Time-Dependent Effects of Salinisation

    PubMed Central

    van Diggelen, Josepha M. H.; Lamers, Leon P. M.; van Dijk, Gijs; Schaafsma, Maarten J.; Roelofs, Jan G. M.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Internal phosphorus (P) mobilisation from aquatic sediments is an important process adding to eutrophication problems in wetlands. Salinisation, a fast growing global problem, is thought to affect P behaviour. Although several studies have addressed the effects of salinisation, interactions between salinity changes and nutrient cycling in freshwater systems are not fully understood. To tackle eutrophication, a clear understanding of the interacting effects of sediment characteristics and surface water quality is vital. In the present study, P release from two eutrophic sediments, both characterized by high pore water P and very low pore water iron (Fe2+) concentrations, was studied in a long-term aquarium experiment, using three salinity levels. Sediment P release was expected to be mainly driven by diffusion, due to the eutrophic conditions and low iron availability. Unexpectedly, this only seemed to be the driving mechanism in the short term (0–10 weeks). In the long term (>80 weeks), P mobilisation was absent in most treatments. This can most likely be explained by the oxidation of the sediment-water interface where Fe2+ immobilises P, even though it is commonly assumed that free Fe2+ concentrations need to be higher for this. Therefore, a controlling mechanism is suggested in which the partial oxidation of iron-sulphides in the sediment plays a key role, releasing extra Fe2+ at the sediment-water interface. Although salinisation was shown to lower short-term P mobilisation as a result of increased calcium concentrations, it may increase long-term P mobilisation by the interactions between sulphate reduction and oxygen availability. Our study showed time-dependent responses of sediment P mobilisation in relation to salinity, suggesting that sulphur plays an important role in the release of P from FeSx-rich sediments, its biogeochemical effect depending on the availability of Fe2+ and O2. PMID:25369128

  15. New insights into phosphorus mobilisation from sulphur-rich sediments: time-dependent effects of salinisation.

    PubMed

    van Diggelen, Josepha M H; Lamers, Leon P M; van Dijk, Gijs; Schaafsma, Maarten J; Roelofs, Jan G M; Smolders, Alfons J P

    2014-01-01

    Internal phosphorus (P) mobilisation from aquatic sediments is an important process adding to eutrophication problems in wetlands. Salinisation, a fast growing global problem, is thought to affect P behaviour. Although several studies have addressed the effects of salinisation, interactions between salinity changes and nutrient cycling in freshwater systems are not fully understood. To tackle eutrophication, a clear understanding of the interacting effects of sediment characteristics and surface water quality is vital. In the present study, P release from two eutrophic sediments, both characterized by high pore water P and very low pore water iron (Fe(2+)) concentrations, was studied in a long-term aquarium experiment, using three salinity levels. Sediment P release was expected to be mainly driven by diffusion, due to the eutrophic conditions and low iron availability. Unexpectedly, this only seemed to be the driving mechanism in the short term (0-10 weeks). In the long term (>80 weeks), P mobilisation was absent in most treatments. This can most likely be explained by the oxidation of the sediment-water interface where Fe(2+) immobilises P, even though it is commonly assumed that free Fe(2+) concentrations need to be higher for this. Therefore, a controlling mechanism is suggested in which the partial oxidation of iron-sulphides in the sediment plays a key role, releasing extra Fe(2+) at the sediment-water interface. Although salinisation was shown to lower short-term P mobilisation as a result of increased calcium concentrations, it may increase long-term P mobilisation by the interactions between sulphate reduction and oxygen availability. Our study showed time-dependent responses of sediment P mobilisation in relation to salinity, suggesting that sulphur plays an important role in the release of P from FeSx-rich sediments, its biogeochemical effect depending on the availability of Fe(2+) and O2.

  16. Predicting the toxicity of metal-contaminated field sediments using interstitial concentration of metals and acid-volatile sulfide normalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Berry, W.J.; Mahony, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    The authors investigated the utility of interstitial water concentrations of metals and simultaneously extracted metal/acid-volatile sulfide (SEM/AVS) ratios to explain the biological availability of sediment-associated divalent metals to benthic organisms exposed in the laboratory to sediments from five saltwater and four freshwater locations in the US, Canada, and China. The amphipod Ampelisca abdita or the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata were exposed to 70 sediments from the five saltwater locations, and the amphipod Hyalella azteca or the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to 55 sediments from four freshwater locations in 10-d lethality tests. Almost complete absence of toxicity in spiked sediments and field sediments where metals were the only known source of contamination and where interstitial water toxic units (IWTUs) were < 0.5 indicates that toxicity associated with sediments having SEM/AVS ratios < 1.0 from two saltwater locations in industrial harbors was not metals-related as these sediments contained <0.5 IWTU. Metals-associated toxicity was absent in 100% of sediments from the remaining three saltwater field locations, where metals were the only known source of contamination and SEM/AVS ratios were {le} 1.0. Two-thirds of 45 sediments from seven saltwater and freshwater field locations having both IWTUs > 0.5 (55%) were used alone. The difference between the molar concentrations of SEM and AVS (SEM-AVS) can provide important insight into the extent of additional available binding capacity, the magnitude by which AVS binding has been exceeded, and, when organism response is considered, the potential magnitude of importance of other metal binding phases. SEM-AVS should be used instead of SEM/AVS ratios as a measure of metals availability. In published experiments with both metal-spiked and field sediments, SEM-AVS and IWTUs accurately identified absence of sediment toxicity and with less accuracy identified the presence of toxicity.

  17. Novel approach for simultaneous sediment classification and concentration determination of water turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Daniel P.; Prats, Sergio; Keizer, J. J.; Georgieva, Petia; Nogueira, Rogério; Bilro, Lúcia

    2015-09-01

    A new approach for data analysis and classification for datasets obtained by a multiparameter optical turbidity sensor is proposed. This approach is based on the combination of statistical or machine learning methods such as linear regressions and clustering analysis. A case study is presented using a 6 dimensional fiber optic sensor to simultaneously classify types of sediments and concentration. Results show a 79% of success for the used training data sets. The methodology proposed is flexible because can be easily adapted to other physical scenarios.

  18. Effects of mud sedimentation on lugworm ecosystem engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montserrat, F.; Suykerbuyk, W.; Al-Busaidi, R.; Bouma, T. J.; van der Wal, D.; Herman, P. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Benthic ecosystem engineering organisms attenuate hydrodynamic or biogeochemical stress to ameliorate living conditions. Bioturbating infauna, like the lugworm Arenicola marina, determine intertidal process dynamics by maintaining the sediment oxygenated and sandy. Maintaining the permeability of the surrounding sediment enables them to pump water through the interstitial spaces, greatly increasing the oxygen availability. In a field experiment, both lugworm presence and siltation regime were manipulated to investigate to what extent lugworms are able to cope with sedimentation of increasing mud percentage and how this would affect its ecosystem engineering. Fluorescent tracers were added to experimentally deposited mud to visualise bioturbation effects on fine sediment fractions. Lugworm densities were not affected by an increasing mud percentage in experimentally deposited sediment. Negative effects are expected to occur under deposition with significantly higher mud percentages. Surface chlorophyll a content was a function of experimental mud percentage, with no effect of lugworm bioturbation. Surface roughness and sediment permeability clearly increased by lugworm presence, whereas sediment erosion threshold was not significantly affected by lugworms. The general idea that A. marina removes fine sediment fractions from the bed could not be confirmed. Rather, the main ecosystem engineering effect of A. marina is hydraulic destabilisation of the sediment matrix.

  19. Suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment-laden rivers and streams pose substantial environmental and economic challenges. Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control