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Sample records for seebeck effect

  1. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  2. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. PMID:27073108

  3. Theory of the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroto; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2013-03-01

    The spin Seebeck effect refers to the generation of a spin voltage caused by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnet, which enables the thermal injection of spin currents from the ferromagnet into an attached nonmagnetic metal over a macroscopic scale of several millimeters. The inverse spin Hall effect converts the injected spin current into a transverse charge voltage, thereby producing electromotive force as in the conventional charge Seebeck device. Recent theoretical and experimental efforts have shown that the magnon and phonon degrees of freedom play crucial roles in the spin Seebeck effect. In this paper, we present the theoretical basis for understanding the spin Seebeck effect and briefly discuss other thermal spin effects.

  4. Current heating induced spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Schreier, Michael Roschewsky, Niklas; Dobler, Erich; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2013-12-09

    A measurement technique for the spin Seebeck effect is presented, wherein the normal metal layer used for its detection is exploited simultaneously as a resistive heater and thermometer. We show how the various contributions to the measured total signal can be disentangled, allowing to extract the voltage signal solely caused by the spin Seebeck effect. To this end, we performed measurements as a function of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation. We find that the effect scales linearly with the induced rise in temperature, as expected for the spin Seebeck effect.

  5. Current heating induced spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Roschewsky, Niklas; Dobler, Erich; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-12-01

    A measurement technique for the spin Seebeck effect is presented, wherein the normal metal layer used for its detection is exploited simultaneously as a resistive heater and thermometer. We show how the various contributions to the measured total signal can be disentangled, allowing to extract the voltage signal solely caused by the spin Seebeck effect. To this end, we performed measurements as a function of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation. We find that the effect scales linearly with the induced rise in temperature, as expected for the spin Seebeck effect.

  6. Exciton Seebeck effect in molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yun-An; Cai, Shaohong

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the exciton dynamics under temperature difference with the hierarchical equations of motion. Through a nonperturbative simulation of the transient absorption of a heterogeneous trimer model, we show that the temperature difference causes exciton population redistribution and affects the exciton transfer time. It is found that one can reproduce not only the exciton population redistribution but also the change of the exciton transfer time induced by the temperature difference with a proper tuning of the site energies of the aggregate. In this sense, there exists a site energy shift equivalence for any temperature difference in a broad range. This phenomenon is similar to the Seebeck effect as well as spin Seebeck effect and can be named as exciton Seebeck effect.

  7. Time resolved spin Seebeck effect experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschewsky, Niklas; Schreier, Michael; Kamra, Akashdeep; Schade, Felix; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2014-05-01

    In this Letter, we present the results of transient thermopower experiments, performed at room temperature on yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. Upon application of a time-varying thermal gradient, we observe a characteristic low-pass frequency response of the ensuing thermopower voltage with cutoff frequencies of up to 37 MHz. We interpret our results in terms of the spin Seebeck effect, and argue that small wavevector magnons are of minor importance for the spin Seebeck effect in our thin film hybrid structures.

  8. Time resolved spin Seebeck effect experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Roschewsky, Niklas Schreier, Michael; Schade, Felix; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Meyer, Sibylle; Geprägs, Stephan; Kamra, Akashdeep; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-05-19

    In this Letter, we present the results of transient thermopower experiments, performed at room temperature on yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. Upon application of a time-varying thermal gradient, we observe a characteristic low-pass frequency response of the ensuing thermopower voltage with cutoff frequencies of up to 37 MHz. We interpret our results in terms of the spin Seebeck effect, and argue that small wavevector magnons are of minor importance for the spin Seebeck effect in our thin film hybrid structures.

  9. Seebeck effect at the atomic scale.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Sup; Cho, Sanghee; Lyeo, Ho-Ki; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    The atomic variations of electronic wave functions at the surface and electron scattering near a defect have been detected unprecedentedly by tracing thermoelectric voltages given a temperature bias [Cho et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 913 (2013)]. Because thermoelectricity, or the Seebeck effect, is associated with heat-induced electron diffusion, how the thermoelectric signal is related to the atomic-scale wave functions and what the role of the temperature is at such a length scale remain very unclear. Here we show that coherent electron and heat transport through a pointlike contact produces an atomic Seebeck effect, which is described by the mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient multiplied by an effective temperature drop at the interface. The mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient is approximately proportional to the logarithmic energy derivative of local density of states at the Fermi energy. We deduced that the effective temperature drop at the tip-sample junction could vary at a subangstrom scale depending on atom-to-atom interaction at the interface. A computer-based simulation method of thermoelectric images is proposed, and a point defect in graphene was identified by comparing experiment and the simulation of thermoelectric imaging. PMID:24745445

  10. Simple Demonstration of the Seebeck Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molki, Arman

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose a simple and low-cost experimental set-up through which science educators can demonstrate the Seebeck effect using a thermocouple and an instrumentation amplifier. The experiment can be set up and conducted during a 1-hour laboratory session. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  11. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arboleda, Juan David; Arnache Olmos, Oscar; Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ramos, Rafael; Anadon, Alberto; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  12. Seebeck Effect at the Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eui-Sup; Cho, Sanghee; Lyeo, Ho-Ki; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    The atomic variations of electronic wave functions at the surface and electron scattering near a defect have been detected unprecedentedly by tracing thermoelectric voltages given a temperature bias [Cho et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 913 (2013)]. Because thermoelectricity, or the Seebeck effect, is associated with heat-induced electron diffusion, how the thermoelectric signal is related to the atomic-scale wave functions and what the role of the temperature is at such a length scale remain very unclear. Here we show that coherent electron and heat transport through a pointlike contact produces an atomic Seebeck effect, which is described by the mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient multiplied by an effective temperature drop at the interface. The mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient is approximately proportional to the logarithmic energy derivative of local density of states at the Fermi energy. We deduced that the effective temperature drop at the tip-sample junction could vary at a subangstrom scale depending on atom-to-atom interaction at the interface. A computer-based simulation method of thermoelectric images is proposed, and a point defect in graphene was identified by comparing experiment and the simulation of thermoelectric imaging.

  13. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  14. Magnetic equivalent of the Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Sylvain

    Spin caloritonics seeks to investigate the effect of a thermal gradient on the electronic charge and spin degrees of freedom. In a conductor, a thermal gradient leads a transport of the conduction electrons that in turn generate an electric field along the temperature gradient, which is the well-known Seebeck effect. In an insulator, there are no conduction electrons. Thus no electronic charge transport takes place. However, the electronic spins can reorient themselves in the presence of a temperature gradient as they precess around an external field oriented along the temperature gradient. In fact, the temperature gradient generates a magnetic induction field in the plane orthogonal to the temperature gradient. The effect is the magnetic analog of the Seebeck effect and is thus refered to as the magnetic Seebeck effect. It has been observed for the propagation of spin waves along and against a temperature gradient in a YIG slab. The propagation of spin waves against the temperature gradient lead to a positive thermal damping and the propagation along the temperature gradient leads to the opposite effect, namely a negative thermal damping. Thus, the magnetic Seebeck effect generate of heat driven spin torque that can generate a positive or a negative thermal damping. The magnetic Seebeck effect has been recently established using a fundamental variational approach. In many experimental situations, the system can be treated as a classical continuum with magnetisation on the scale of interest where the quantum fluctuations average out and the underlying microscopic structure is smoothed out. For the propagation of magnetisation waves in a stationary state, the system is slightly out of equilibrium but the magnetic kinetic energy is constant. In such a case, the action of the system is a functional of the magnetisation and the magnetisation current. Since the magnetisation is a function of the temperature, the action variation yields an explicit expression for the

  15. Spin Seebeck effect at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Kramer, Franz; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Noack, Timo; Langner, Thomas; Serga, Alexander A.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally study the transient voltage response of yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayer samples subject to periodic heating up to gigahertz frequencies. We observe an intrinsic cutoff frequency of the induced thermopower voltage, which characteristically depends on the thickness of the yttrium iron garnet film. The cutoff frequency reaches values of up to 350 MHz in a 50-nm-thick yttrium iron garnet film, but drops to below 1 MHz for several-micrometer-thick films. These data corroborate the notion that the magnon spectrum responsible for the spin current emission in the spin Seebeck effect can be shaped by tuning the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer.

  16. Surface sensitivity of the spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Aqeel, A.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Wees, B. J. van; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2014-10-21

    We have investigated the influence of the interface quality on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) of the bilayer system yttrium iron garnet (YIG)–platinum (Pt). The magnitude and shape of the SSE is strongly influenced by mechanical treatment of the YIG single crystal surface. We observe that the saturation magnetic field (H{sub sat}{sup SSE}) for the SSE signal increases from 55.3 mT to 72.8 mT with mechanical treatment. The change in the magnitude of H{sub sat}{sup SSE} can be attributed to the presence of a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to the treatment induced surface strain or shape anisotropy in the Pt/YIG system. Our results show that the SSE is a powerful tool to investigate magnetic anisotropy at the interface.

  17. Large Seebeck effect by charge-mobility engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peijie; Wei, Beipei; Zhang, Jiahao; Tomczak, Jan M.; Strydom, A.M.; Søndergaard, M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Steglich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The Seebeck effect describes the generation of an electric potential in a conducting solid exposed to a temperature gradient. In most cases, it is dominated by an energy-dependent electronic density of states at the Fermi level, in line with the prevalent efforts towards superior thermoelectrics through the engineering of electronic structure. Here we demonstrate an alternative source for the Seebeck effect based on charge-carrier relaxation: a charge mobility that changes rapidly with temperature can result in a sizeable addition to the Seebeck coefficient. This new Seebeck source is demonstrated explicitly for Ni-doped CoSb3, where a marked mobility change occurs due to the crossover between two different charge-relaxation regimes. Our findings unveil the origin of pronounced features in the Seebeck coefficient of many other elusive materials characterized by a significant mobility mismatch. When utilized appropriately, this effect can also provide a novel route to the design of improved thermoelectric materials. PMID:26108283

  18. An analytical solution for quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabetoglu, S.; Sisman, A.; Ozturk, Z. F.

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous experimental and numerical studies about quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient. In contrast, in this study, we obtain analytical expressions for Seebeck coefficient under quantum size effects. Seebeck coefficient of a Fermi gas confined in a rectangular domain is considered. Analytical expressions, which represent the size dependency of Seebeck coefficient explicitly, are derived in terms of confinement parameters. A fundamental form of Seebeck coefficient based on infinite summations is used under relaxation time approximation. To obtain analytical results, summations are calculated using the first two terms of Poisson summation formula. It is shown that they are in good agreement with the exact results based on direct calculation of summations as long as confinement parameters are less than unity. The analytical results are also in good agreement with experimental and numerical ones in literature. Maximum relative errors of analytical expressions are less than 3% and 4% for 2D and 1D cases, respectively. Dimensional transitions of Seebeck coefficient are also examined. Furthermore, a detailed physical explanation for the oscillations in Seebeck coefficient is proposed by considering the relative standard deviation of total variance of particle number in Fermi shell.

  19. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect contribution in transverse spin Seebeck effect experiments in Pt/YIG and Pt/NFO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Daniel; Reinhardt, Daniel; van Straaten, Michael; Klewe, Christoph; Althammer, Matthias; Schreier, Michael; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gupta, Arunava; Schmid, Maximilian; Back, Christian H.; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Kuschel, Timo; Reiss, Günter

    2015-09-01

    The spin Seebeck effect, the generation of a spin current by a temperature gradient, has attracted great attention, but the interplay over a millimetre range along a thin ferromagnetic film as well as unintended side effects which hinder an unambiguous detection have evoked controversial discussions. Here, we investigate the inverse spin Hall voltage of a 10 nm thin Pt strip deposited on the magnetic insulators Y3Fe5O12 and NiFe2O4 with a temperature gradient in the film plane. We show characteristics typical of the spin Seebeck effect, although we do not observe the most striking features of the transverse spin Seebeck effect. Instead, we attribute the observed voltages to the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect generated by a contact tip induced parasitic out-of-plane temperature gradient, which depends on material, diameter and temperature of the tip.

  20. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect contribution in transverse spin Seebeck effect experiments in Pt/YIG and Pt/NFO

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Daniel; Reinhardt, Daniel; van Straaten, Michael; Klewe, Christoph; Althammer, Matthias; Schreier, Michael; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gupta, Arunava; Schmid, Maximilian; Back, Christian H.; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Kuschel, Timo; Reiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The spin Seebeck effect, the generation of a spin current by a temperature gradient, has attracted great attention, but the interplay over a millimetre range along a thin ferromagnetic film as well as unintended side effects which hinder an unambiguous detection have evoked controversial discussions. Here, we investigate the inverse spin Hall voltage of a 10 nm thin Pt strip deposited on the magnetic insulators Y3Fe5O12 and NiFe2O4 with a temperature gradient in the film plane. We show characteristics typical of the spin Seebeck effect, although we do not observe the most striking features of the transverse spin Seebeck effect. Instead, we attribute the observed voltages to the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect generated by a contact tip induced parasitic out-of-plane temperature gradient, which depends on material, diameter and temperature of the tip. PMID:26394541

  1. Seebeck effects in two-dimensional spin transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomar, M. I.; Serra, Llorenç; Sánchez, David

    2015-02-01

    We consider a spin-orbit-coupled two-dimensional electron system under the influence of a thermal gradient externally applied to two attached reservoirs. We discuss the generated voltage bias (charge Seebeck effect), spin bias (spin Seebeck effect), and magnetization-dependent thermopower (magneto-Seebeck effect) in the ballistic regime of transport at linear response. We find that the charge thermopower is an oscillating function of both the spin-orbit strength and the quantum well width. We also observe that it is always negative for normal leads. We carefully compare the exact results for the linear response coefficients and a Sommerfeld approximation. When the contacts are ferromagnetic, we calculate the spin-resolved Seebeck coefficient for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configuration. Remarkably, the thermopower can change its sign by tuning the Fermi energy. This effect disappears when the Rashba coupling is absent. Additionally, we determine the magneto-Seebeck ratio, which shows dramatic changes in the presence of a the Rashba potential.

  2. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect: from fundamentals to applications.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Ishida, M; Kikkawa, T; Kirihara, A; Murakami, T; Saitoh, E

    2014-08-27

    The spin Seebeck effect refers to the generation of spin voltage as a result of a temperature gradient in ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic materials. When a conductor is attached to a magnet under a temperature gradient, the thermally generated spin voltage in the magnet injects a spin current into the conductor, which in turn produces electric voltage owing to the spin-orbit interaction. The spin Seebeck effect is of increasing importance in spintronics, since it enables direct generation of a spin current from heat and appears in a variety of magnets ranging from metals and semiconductors to insulators. Recent studies on the spin Seebeck effect have been conducted mainly in paramagnetic metal/ferrimagnetic insulator junction systems in the longitudinal configuration in which a spin current flowing parallel to the temperature gradient is measured. This 'longitudinal spin Seebeck effect' (LSSE) has been observed in various sample systems and exclusively established by separating the spin-current contribution from extrinsic artefacts, such as conventional thermoelectric and magnetic proximity effects. The LSSE in insulators also provides a novel and versatile pathway to thermoelectric generation in combination of the inverse spin-Hall effects. In this paper, we review basic experiments on the LSSE and discuss its potential thermoelectric applications with several demonstrations.

  3. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect: from fundamentals to applications.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Ishida, M; Kikkawa, T; Kirihara, A; Murakami, T; Saitoh, E

    2014-08-27

    The spin Seebeck effect refers to the generation of spin voltage as a result of a temperature gradient in ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic materials. When a conductor is attached to a magnet under a temperature gradient, the thermally generated spin voltage in the magnet injects a spin current into the conductor, which in turn produces electric voltage owing to the spin-orbit interaction. The spin Seebeck effect is of increasing importance in spintronics, since it enables direct generation of a spin current from heat and appears in a variety of magnets ranging from metals and semiconductors to insulators. Recent studies on the spin Seebeck effect have been conducted mainly in paramagnetic metal/ferrimagnetic insulator junction systems in the longitudinal configuration in which a spin current flowing parallel to the temperature gradient is measured. This 'longitudinal spin Seebeck effect' (LSSE) has been observed in various sample systems and exclusively established by separating the spin-current contribution from extrinsic artefacts, such as conventional thermoelectric and magnetic proximity effects. The LSSE in insulators also provides a novel and versatile pathway to thermoelectric generation in combination of the inverse spin-Hall effects. In this paper, we review basic experiments on the LSSE and discuss its potential thermoelectric applications with several demonstrations. PMID:25105889

  4. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect: from fundamentals to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, K.; Ishida, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Kirihara, A.; Murakami, T.; Saitoh, E.

    2014-08-01

    The spin Seebeck effect refers to the generation of spin voltage as a result of a temperature gradient in ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic materials. When a conductor is attached to a magnet under a temperature gradient, the thermally generated spin voltage in the magnet injects a spin current into the conductor, which in turn produces electric voltage owing to the spin-orbit interaction. The spin Seebeck effect is of increasing importance in spintronics, since it enables direct generation of a spin current from heat and appears in a variety of magnets ranging from metals and semiconductors to insulators. Recent studies on the spin Seebeck effect have been conducted mainly in paramagnetic metal/ferrimagnetic insulator junction systems in the longitudinal configuration in which a spin current flowing parallel to the temperature gradient is measured. This ‘longitudinal spin Seebeck effect’ (LSSE) has been observed in various sample systems and exclusively established by separating the spin-current contribution from extrinsic artefacts, such as conventional thermoelectric and magnetic proximity effects. The LSSE in insulators also provides a novel and versatile pathway to thermoelectric generation in combination of the inverse spin-Hall effects. In this paper, we review basic experiments on the LSSE and discuss its potential thermoelectric applications with several demonstrations.

  5. Magnetic field control of the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Kehlberger, Andreas; Guo, Er-Jia; Kläui, Mathias; Nowak, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    The origin of the suppression of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect by applied magnetic fields is studied. We perform numerical simulations of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion for an atomistic spin model and calculate the magnon accumulation in linear temperature gradients for different strengths of applied magnetic fields and different length scales of the temperature gradient. We observe a decrease of the magnon accumulation with increasing magnetic field and we reveal that the origin of this effect is a field dependent change of the frequency distribution of the propagating magnons. With increasing field the magnonic spin currents are reduced due to a suppression of parts of the frequency spectrum. By comparison with measurements of the magnetic field dependent longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in YIG thin films with various thicknesses, we find qualitative agreement between our model and the experimental data, demonstrating the importance of this effect for experimental systems.

  6. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  7. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of the Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Ferraro, Elena; Sola, Alessandro; Magni, Alessandro; Kuepferling, Michaela; Pasquale, Massimo

    In this paper we employ non equilibrium thermodynamics of fluxes and forces to describe magnetization and heat transport. By the theory we are able to identify the thermodynamic driving force of the magnetization current as the gradient of the effective field ▿H*. This definition permits to define the spin Seebeck coefficient ɛM which relates ▿H* and the temperature gradient ▿T. By applying the theory to the geometry of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect we are able to obtain the optimal conditions for generating large magnetization currents. Furthermore, by using the results of recent experiments, we obtain an order of magnitude for the value of ɛM ∼ 10-2 TK-1 for yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12).

  8. Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance and Anomalous Seebeck Effects in Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Gan, Zhongxue; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Improving the thermoelectric figure of merit zT is one of the greatest challenges in material science. The recent discovery of topological insulators (TIs) offers new promise in this prospect. In this work, we demonstrate theoretically that zT is strongly size dependent in TIs, and the size parameter can be tuned to enhance zT to be significantly greater than 1. Furthermore, we show that the lifetime of the edge states in TIs is strongly energy dependent, leading to large and anomalous Seebeck effects with an opposite sign to the Hall effect. These striking properties make TIs a promising material for thermoelectric science and technology.

  9. Skyrmionic spin Seebeck effect via dissipative thermomagnonic torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2014-06-01

    We derive thermomagnonic torque and its "β-type" dissipative correction from the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The β-type dissipative correction describes viscous coupling between magnetic dynamics and magnonic current and it stems from spin mistracking of the magnetic order. We show that thermomagnonic torque is important for describing temperature gradient induced motion of skyrmions in helical magnets while dissipative correction plays an essential role in generating transverse Magnus force. We propose to detect such skyrmionic motion by employing the transverse spin Seebeck effect geometry.

  10. Spin Seebeck effect in YIG-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Gene; Prestgard, Megan; Teng, Shiang; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the use of magnetic insulators (yttrium iron garnet, YIG) in conjunction with platinum has sparked interest in spintronics research. This is due to the existence of the spin Seebeck effect which could potentially be a source of pure spin current for spintronic devices. Furthermore, these coatings could potentially show the versatility of spintronics by acting as a spin-based thermoelectric generator, thereby providing a new method of transforming heat into power. However, there remain questions regarding the origins and legitimacy of the spin Seebeck effect. Moreover, recent publications claim that the observed effects are a manifestation of magnetic proximity effects in platinum and not a true SSE signal. Because of these concerns, we are providing supporting evidence that the voltages observed in the YIG/Pt films are truly SSE voltages. We are reaffirming claims that magnon transport theory provides an accurate basis for explaining SSE behavior. Finally, we illustrate the advantages of pulsed laser deposition, as these YIG films possess a large SSE voltage compared to those films grown using liquid phase deposition techniques.

  11. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, A. Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  12. Thermal Conductance and Seebeck Effect in Mesoscopic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; El-Gawaad, N. S. Abd

    2015-11-01

    In this work, thermoelectric transport through a saddle-point potential is discussed with an emphasis on the effects of the chemical potential and temperature. In particular, the thermal conductance and the Seebeck coefficient are calculated for two-dimensional systems of a constriction defined by a saddle-point potential. The solution as a function of temperature and chemical potential has been investigated. The Peltier coefficient and thermal transport in a quantum point contact (QPC), under the influence of external fields and different temperatures, are presented. Also, the oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in external fields are obtained. Numerical calculations of the Peltier coefficient are performed at different applied voltages, amplitudes, and temperatures. Moreover, a method is proposed for measuring the sub-band energies and spin-splitting energies in a bottle-neck of the constriction. For weak non-linearities, the charge and entropy currents across a QPC are expanded as a series in powers of the applied bias voltage and the temperature difference. Expansions of the Seebeck voltage in terms of the temperature difference and the Peltier heat in terms of the current are obtained.

  13. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Ferraro, Elena; Magni, Alessandro; Sola, Alessandro; Kuepferling, Michaela; Pasquale, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    We study the problem of magnetization and heat currents and their associated thermodynamic forces in a magnetic system by focusing on the magnetization transport in ferromagnetic insulators like YIG. The resulting theory is applied to the longitudinal spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects. By focusing on the specific geometry with one Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) layer and one Pt layer, we obtain the optimal conditions for generating large magnetization currents into Pt or large temperature effects in YIG. The theoretical predictions are compared with experiments from the literature permitting to derive the values of the thermomagnetic coefficients of YIG: the magnetization diffusion length lM˜0.4 μ m and the absolute thermomagnetic power coefficient ɛM˜10-2TK-1 .

  14. Microscopic origin of subthermal magnons and the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, I.; Costa, A. T.

    2016-05-01

    Recent experimental evidence points to low-energy magnons as the primary contributors to the spin Seebeck effect. This spectral dependence is puzzling since it is not observed on other thermocurrents in the same material. Here, we argue that the physical origin of this behavior is the magnon–magnon scattering mediated by phonons, in a process which conserves the number of magnons. To assess the importance and features of this kind of scattering, we derive the effective magnon–phonon interaction from a microscopic model, including band energy, a screened electron–electron interaction and the electron–phonon interaction. Unlike higher order magnon-only scattering, we find that the coupling with phonons induce a scattering which is very small for low-energy (or subthermal) magnons but increases sharply above a certain energy—rendering magnons above this energy poor spin-current transporters.

  15. Origin of the spin Seebeck effect in compensated ferrimagnets

    PubMed Central

    Geprägs, Stephan; Kehlberger, Andreas; Coletta, Francesco Della; Qiu, Zhiyong; Guo, Er-Jia; Schulz, Tomek; Mix, Christian; Meyer, Sibylle; Kamra, Akashdeep; Althammer, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Jakob, Gerhard; Ohnuma, Yuichi; Adachi, Hiroto; Barker, Joseph; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Saitoh, Eiji; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Magnons are the elementary excitations of a magnetically ordered system. In ferromagnets, only a single band of low-energy magnons needs to be considered, but in ferrimagnets the situation is more complex owing to different magnetic sublattices involved. In this case, low lying optical modes exist that can affect the dynamical response. Here we show that the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) is sensitive to the complexities of the magnon spectrum. The SSE is caused by thermally excited spin dynamics that are converted to a voltage by the inverse spin Hall effect at the interface to a heavy metal contact. By investigating the temperature dependence of the SSE in the ferrimagnet gadolinium iron garnet, with a magnetic compensation point near room temperature, we demonstrate that higher-energy exchange magnons play a key role in the SSE. PMID:26842873

  16. Thermoelectric Seebeck effect in oxide-based resistive switching memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming; Bi, Chong; Li, Ling; Long, Shibing; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Lu, Nianduan; Sun, Pengxiao; Liu, Ming

    2014-08-01

    Reversible resistive switching induced by an electric field in oxide-based resistive switching memory shows a promising application in future information storage and processing. It is believed that there are some local conductive filaments formed and ruptured in the resistive switching process. However, as a fundamental question, how electron transports in the formed conductive filament is still under debate due to the difficulty to directly characterize its physical and electrical properties. Here we investigate the intrinsic electronic transport mechanism in such conductive filament by measuring thermoelectric Seebeck effects. We show that the small-polaron hopping model can well describe the electronic transport process for all resistance states, although the corresponding temperature-dependent resistance behaviours are contrary. Moreover, at low resistance states, we observe a clear semiconductor-metal transition around 150 K. These results provide insight in understanding resistive switching process and establish a basic framework for modelling resistive switching behaviour.

  17. Thermoelectric Seebeck effect in oxide-based resistive switching memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Bi, Chong; Li, Ling; Long, Shibing; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Lu, Nianduan; Sun, Pengxiao; Liu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Reversible resistive switching induced by an electric field in oxide-based resistive switching memory shows a promising application in future information storage and processing. It is believed that there are some local conductive filaments formed and ruptured in the resistive switching process. However, as a fundamental question, how electron transports in the formed conductive filament is still under debate due to the difficulty to directly characterize its physical and electrical properties. Here we investigate the intrinsic electronic transport mechanism in such conductive filament by measuring thermoelectric Seebeck effects. We show that the small-polaron hopping model can well describe the electronic transport process for all resistance states, although the corresponding temperature-dependent resistance behaviours are contrary. Moreover, at low resistance states, we observe a clear semiconductor-metal transition around 150 K. These results provide insight in understanding resistive switching process and establish a basic framework for modelling resistive switching behaviour.

  18. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  19. Magneto-Seebeck effect in spin-valve with in-plane thermal gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S. Bose, A. Palkar, V. R. Tulapurkar, A. A.; Lam, D. D. Suzuki, Y.; Sharma, H. Tomy, C. V.

    2014-12-15

    We present measurements of magneto-Seebeck effect on a spin valve with in-plane thermal gradient. We measured open circuit voltage and short circuit current by applying a temperature gradient across a spin valve stack, where one of the ferromagnetic layers is pinned. We found a clear hysteresis in these two quantities as a function of magnetic field. From these measurements, the magneto-Seebeck effect was found to be same as magneto-resistance effect.

  20. Large spin Seebeck effects in zigzag-edge silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi-Feng; Liu, Yu-Shen; Feng, Jin-Fu; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2014-08-01

    Using the first-principles methods, we investigate the thermospin properties of a two-probe model based on zigzag-edge silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs). Compared with the odd-width ZSiNRs, the spin Seebeck coefficient of the even-width ZSiNRs is obviously enhanced at room temperature. This fact is attributed to a nearly perfect symmetry of the linear conductance gap with the different spin index with respect to the Fermi level induced by the different parity of the wave functions. More interestingly, the corresponding charge Seebeck coefficient is near zero. Therefore, when a thermal bias is presented in the even-width ZSiNRs, a nearly pure spin current is achieved. Meanwhile, the spin polarization of the current approaches infinite.

  1. Large spin Seebeck effects in zigzag-edge silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi-Feng; Liu, Yu-Shen Feng, Jin-Fu; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2014-08-15

    Using the first-principles methods, we investigate the thermospin properties of a two-probe model based on zigzag-edge silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs). Compared with the odd-width ZSiNRs, the spin Seebeck coefficient of the even-width ZSiNRs is obviously enhanced at room temperature. This fact is attributed to a nearly perfect symmetry of the linear conductance gap with the different spin index with respect to the Fermi level induced by the different parity of the wave functions. More interestingly, the corresponding charge Seebeck coefficient is near zero. Therefore, when a thermal bias is presented in the even-width ZSiNRs, a nearly pure spin current is achieved. Meanwhile, the spin polarization of the current approaches infinite.

  2. Spin-dependent Seebeck effects in a graphene nanoribbon coupled to two square lattice ferromagnetic leads

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Benhu Zeng, Yangsu; Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Guanghui; Ouyang, Tao

    2015-03-14

    We theoretically investigate spin-dependent Seebeck effects for a system consisting of a narrow graphene nanoribbon (GNR) contacted to square lattice ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes with noncollinear magnetic moments. Both zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) and armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) were considered. Compared with our previous work with two-dimensional honeycomb-lattice FM leads, a more realistic model of two-dimensional square-lattice FM electrodes is adopted here. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method combining with the tight-binding Hamiltonian, it is demonstrated that both the charge Seebeck coefficient S{sub C} and the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient S{sub S} strongly depend on the geometrical contact between the GNR and the leads. In our previous work, S{sub C} for a semiconducting 15-AGNR system near the Dirac point is two orders of magnitude larger than that of a metallic 17-AGNR system. However, S{sub C} is the same order of magnitude for both metallic 17-AGNR and semiconducting 15-AGNR systems in the present paper because of the lack of a transmission energy gap for the 15-AGNR system. Furthermore, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient S{sub S} for the systems with 20-ZGNR, 17-AGNR, and 15-AGNR is of the same order of magnitude and its maximum absolute value can reach 8 μV/K. The spin-dependent Seebeck effects are not very pronounced because the transmission coefficient weakly depends on spin orientation. Moreover, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient is further suppressed with increasing angle between the relative alignments of magnetization directions of the two leads. Additionally, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient can be strongly suppressed for larger disorder strength. The results obtained here may provide valuable theoretical guidance in the experimental design of heat spintronic devices.

  3. Molecular Dependence of the Large Seebeck Effect in τ-Type Organic Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Hirohito; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Yoshino, Harukazu; Mousdis, George A.; Papavassiliou, George C.; Murata, Keizo

    2014-10-01

    We study the Seebeck effect in the τ-type organic conductors, τ-(EDO-S,S-DMEDT-TTF)2(AuBr2)1+y and τ-(P-S,S-DMEDT-TTF)2(AuBr2)1+y, where EDO-S,S-DMEDT-TTF and P-S,S-DMEDT-TTF are abbreviated as OOSS and NNSS, respectively, both experimentally and theoretically. Theoretically in particular, we perform first-principles band calculation for the two materials and construct a two-orbital model, on the basis of which we calculate the Seebeck coefficient. We show that the calculated temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient S is semi-quantitatively consistent with the experimental observation. In both materials, the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient is maximum at a certain temperature, and this temperature is lower for NNSS than for OOSS. From a band structure viewpoint, we find that this can be traced back to the narrowness of the band gap between the upper and the lower pudding-mold type bands. On the other hand, the Seebeck coefficient of NNSS in the low temperature regime steeply increases with increasing temperature, which is due to the narrowness of the upper band. These differences in thermoelectric properties demonstrate the effectiveness of controlling the band structure through molecular modification.

  4. Spin Seebeck effect through antiferromagnetic NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Arati; Brangham, Jack; Yang, Fengyuan; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2016-07-01

    We report temperature-dependent spin Seebeck measurements on Pt/YIG bilayers and Pt/NiO/YIG trilayers, where YIG (yttrium iron garnet, Y3F e5O12 ) is an insulating ferrimagnet and NiO is an antiferromagnet at low temperatures. The thickness of the NiO layer is varied from 0 to 10 nm. In the Pt/YIG bilayers, the temperature gradient applied to the YIG stimulates dynamic spin injection into the Pt, which generates an inverse spin Hall voltage in the Pt. The presence of a NiO layer dampens the spin injection exponentially with a decay length of 2 ± 0.6 nm at 180 K. The decay length increases with temperature and shows a maximum of 5.5 ± 0.8 nm at 360 K. The temperature dependence of the amplitude of the spin Seebeck signal without NiO shows a broad maximum of 6.5 ± 0.5 μV/K at 20 K. In the presence of NiO, the maximum shifts sharply to higher temperatures, likely correlated to the increase in decay length. This implies that NiO is most transparent to magnon propagation near the paramagnet-antiferromagnet transition. We do not see the enhancement in spin current driven into Pt reported in other papers when 1-2 nm NiO layers are sandwiched between Pt and YIG.

  5. Magneto-Seebeck effect in an ITO/PEDOT:PSS/Au thin-film device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongfeng; Liu, Qing; Tisdale, Jeremy; Xu, Ling; Liu, Yuchun; Hu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    This article reports giant magnetic field effects on the Seebeck coefficient by exerting a Lorentz force on charge diffusion based on vertical multi-layer ITO/PEDOT:PSS/Au thin-film devices. The Lorentz force, induced by an external magnetic field, changes the charge transport and consequently generates angular dependent magnetoresistance. The proposed mechanism of the magneto-Seebeck effect is proved by measuring the magnetoresistance at a parallel, 45o and perpendicular angle to the temperature gradient. The gradual change of the magnetoresistance from a parallel to perpendicular angle indicates that the Lorentz force is a key driving force to develop the magneto-Seebeck effect. Therefore, our experimental results demonstrate a magnetic approach to control the thermoelectric properties in organic materials.

  6. Photo-Seebeck effect in tetragonal PbO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, P. S.; Okazaki, R.; Taniguchi, H.; Terasaki, I.

    2013-11-07

    We report the observation of photo-Seebeck effect in tetragonal PbO crystals. The photo-induced carriers contribute to the transport phenomena, and consequently the electrical conductivity increases and the Seebeck coefficient decreases with increasing photon flux density. A parallel-circuit model is used to evaluate the actual contributions of photo-excited carriers from the measured transport data. The photo-induced carrier concentration estimated from the Seebeck coefficient increases almost linearly with increasing photon flux density, indicating a successful photo-doping effect on the thermoelectric property. The mobility decreases by illumination but the reduction rate strongly depends on the illuminated photon energy. Possible mechanisms of such photon-energy-dependent mobility are discussed.

  7. Giant Seebeck effect in Ge-doped SnSe.

    PubMed

    Gharsallah, M; Serrano-Sánchez, F; Nemes, N M; Mompeán, F J; Martínez, J L; Fernández-Díaz, M T; Elhalouani, F; Alonso, J A

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials may contribute in the near future as new alternative sources of sustainable energy. Unprecedented thermoelectric properties in p-type SnSe single crystals have been recently reported, accompanied by extremely low thermal conductivity in polycrystalline samples. In order to enhance thermoelectric efficiency through proper tuning of this material we report a full structural characterization and evaluation of the thermoelectric properties of novel Ge-doped SnSe prepared by a straightforward arc-melting method, which yields nanostructured polycrystalline samples. Ge does not dope the system in the sense of donating carriers, yet the electrical properties show a semiconductor behavior with resistivity values higher than that of the parent compound, as a consequence of nanostructuration, whereas the Seebeck coefficient is higher and thermal conductivity lower, favorable to a better ZT figure of merit. PMID:27251233

  8. Giant Seebeck effect in Ge-doped SnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharsallah, M.; Serrano-Sánchez, F.; Nemes, N. M.; Mompeán, F. J.; Martínez, J. L.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Elhalouani, F.; Alonso, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials may contribute in the near future as new alternative sources of sustainable energy. Unprecedented thermoelectric properties in p-type SnSe single crystals have been recently reported, accompanied by extremely low thermal conductivity in polycrystalline samples. In order to enhance thermoelectric efficiency through proper tuning of this material we report a full structural characterization and evaluation of the thermoelectric properties of novel Ge-doped SnSe prepared by a straightforward arc-melting method, which yields nanostructured polycrystalline samples. Ge does not dope the system in the sense of donating carriers, yet the electrical properties show a semiconductor behavior with resistivity values higher than that of the parent compound, as a consequence of nanostructuration, whereas the Seebeck coefficient is higher and thermal conductivity lower, favorable to a better ZT figure of merit.

  9. Giant Seebeck effect in Ge-doped SnSe

    PubMed Central

    Gharsallah, M.; Serrano-Sánchez, F.; Nemes, N. M.; Mompeán, F. J.; Martínez, J. L.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Elhalouani, F.; Alonso, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials may contribute in the near future as new alternative sources of sustainable energy. Unprecedented thermoelectric properties in p-type SnSe single crystals have been recently reported, accompanied by extremely low thermal conductivity in polycrystalline samples. In order to enhance thermoelectric efficiency through proper tuning of this material we report a full structural characterization and evaluation of the thermoelectric properties of novel Ge-doped SnSe prepared by a straightforward arc-melting method, which yields nanostructured polycrystalline samples. Ge does not dope the system in the sense of donating carriers, yet the electrical properties show a semiconductor behavior with resistivity values higher than that of the parent compound, as a consequence of nanostructuration, whereas the Seebeck coefficient is higher and thermal conductivity lower, favorable to a better ZT figure of merit. PMID:27251233

  10. Separation of spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect in Co/Cu/YIG

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Dai; Li, Yufan; Qu, D.; Chien, C. L.; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-25

    The spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and Anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) have been observed in Co/Cu/YIG (yttrium iron garnet) multi-layer structure, where the ferromagnetic insulator YIG acts as the pure spin injector and the ferromagnetic metal Co layer acts as the spin current detector. With the insertion of 5 nm Cu layer, the two ferromagnetic layers are decoupled, thus allowing unambiguous separation of the SSE and ANE contributions under the same experimental conditions in the same sample.

  11. Thermoelectric performance of spin Seebeck effect in Fe3O4/Pt-based thin film heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, R.; Anadón, A.; Lucas, I.; Uchida, K.; Algarabel, P. A.; Morellón, L.; Aguirre, M. H.; Saitoh, E.; Ibarra, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    We report a systematic study on the thermoelectric performance of spin Seebeck devices based on Fe3O4/Pt junction systems. We explore two types of device geometries: a spin Hall thermopile and spin Seebeck multilayer structures. The spin Hall thermopile increases the sensitivity of the spin Seebeck effect, while the increase in the sample internal resistance has a detrimental effect on the output power. We found that the spin Seebeck multilayers can overcome this limitation since the multilayers exhibit the enhancement of the thermoelectric voltage and the reduction of the internal resistance simultaneously, therefore resulting in significant power enhancement. This result demonstrates that the multilayer structures are useful for improving the thermoelectric performance of the spin Seebeck effect.

  12. Nernst and Seebeck effects in HgTe/CdTe topological insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuan; Song, Juntao; Li, Yu-Xian

    2015-03-28

    The Seebeck and Nernst effects in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells are studied using the tight-binding Hamiltonian and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The Seebeck coefficient, S{sub c}, and the Nernst coefficient, N{sub c}, oscillate as a function of E{sub F}, where E{sub F} is the Fermi energy. The Seebeck coefficient shows peaks when the Fermi energy crosses the discrete transverse channels, and the height of the nth peak of the S{sub c} is [ln2/(1/2 +|n|)] for E{sub F} > 0. For the case E{sub F} < 0, the values of the peaks are negative, but the absolute values of the first five peaks are the same as those for E{sub F} > 0. The 6th peak of S{sub c} reaches the value [ln2/1.35] due to a higher density of states. When a magnetic field is applied, the Nernst coefficient appears. However, the values of the peaks for N{sub c} are all positive. For a weak magnetic field, the temperature suppresses the oscillation of the Seebeck and Nernst coefficients but increases their magnitude. For a large magnetic field, because of the highly degenerate Landau levels, the peaks of the Seebeck coefficient at position E{sub F}=−12, 10, 28meV, and Nernst coefficient at E{sub F}=−7, 10meV are robust against the temperature.

  13. Magnon, phonon, and electron temperature profiles and the spin Seebeck effect in magnetic insulator/normal metal hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Kamra, Akashdeep; Weiler, Mathias; Xiao, Jiang; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-09-01

    We calculate the phonon, electron, and magnon temperature profiles in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers by diffusive theory with appropriate boundary conditions, in particular taking into account interfacial thermal resistances. Our calculations show that in thin film hybrids, the interface magnetic heat conductance qualitatively affects the magnon temperature. Based on published material parameters we assess the degree of nonequilibrium at the yttrium iron garnet/platinum interface. The magnitude of the spin Seebeck effect derived from this approach compares well with experimental results for the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect. Additionally, we address the temperature profiles in the transverse spin Seebeck effect.

  14. On/off switching of bit readout in bias-enhanced tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, Alexander; Milnikel, Marius; von der Ehe, Marvin; Franz, Christian; Zbarsky, Vladyslav; Czerner, Michael; Rott, Karsten; Thomas, Andy; Heiliger, Christian; Reiss, Günter; Münzenberg, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelectric effects in magnetic tunnel junctions are promising to serve as the basis for logic devices or memories in a ''green'' information technology. However, up to now the readout contrast achieved with Seebeck effects was magnitudes smaller compared to the well-established tunnel magnetoresistance effect. Here, we resolve this problem by demonstrating that the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect (TMS) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB tunnel junctions can be switched on to a logic ``1'' state and off to ``0'' by simply changing the magnetic state of the CoFeB electrodes. This new functionality is achieved by combining a thermal gradient and an electric field. Our results show that the signal crosses zero and can be adjusted by tuning a bias voltage that is applied between the electrodes of the junction; hence, the name of the effect is bias-enhanced tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect (bTMS). Via the spin- and energy-dependent transmission of electrons in the junction, the bTMS effect can be configured using the bias voltage with much higher control than the tunnel magnetoresistance and even completely suppressed for only one magnetic configuration. Moreover, our measurements are a step towards the experimental realization of high TMS ratios without additional bias voltage, which are predicted for specific Co-Fe compositions.

  15. On/off switching of bit readout in bias-enhanced tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Alexander; Milnikel, Marius; von der Ehe, Marvin; Franz, Christian; Zbarsky, Vladyslav; Czerner, Michael; Rott, Karsten; Thomas, Andy; Heiliger, Christian; Reiss, Günter; Münzenberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects in magnetic tunnel junctions are promising to serve as the basis for logic devices or memories in a ”green” information technology. However, up to now the readout contrast achieved with Seebeck effects was magnitudes smaller compared to the well-established tunnel magnetoresistance effect. Here, we resolve this problem by demonstrating that the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect (TMS) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB tunnel junctions can be switched on to a logic “1” state and off to “0” by simply changing the magnetic state of the CoFeB electrodes. This new functionality is achieved by combining a thermal gradient and an electric field. Our results show that the signal crosses zero and can be adjusted by tuning a bias voltage that is applied between the electrodes of the junction; hence, the name of the effect is bias-enhanced tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect (bTMS). Via the spin- and energy-dependent transmission of electrons in the junction, the bTMS effect can be configured using the bias voltage with much higher control than the tunnel magnetoresistance and even completely suppressed for only one magnetic configuration. Moreover, our measurements are a step towards the experimental realization of high TMS ratios without additional bias voltage, which are predicted for specific Co-Fe compositions. PMID:25755010

  16. Comparison of the magneto-Peltier and magneto-Seebeck effects in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, J.; Dejene, F. K.; Leutenantsmeyer, J. C.; Flipse, J.; Münzenberg, M.; van Wees, B. J.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding heat generation and transport processes in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is a significant step towards improving its application in current memory devices. Recent work has experimentally demonstrated the magneto-Seebeck effect in MTJs, where the Seebeck coefficient of the junction varies as the magnetic configuration changes from a parallel (P) to an antiparallel (AP) configuration. Here we report a study on its reciprocal effect, the magneto-Peltier effect, where the heat flow carried by the tunneling electrons is altered by changing the magnetic configuration of the MTJ. The magneto-Peltier signal that reflects the change in the temperature difference across the junction between the P and AP configurations scales linearly with the applied current in the small bias but is greatly enhanced in the large-bias regime, due to higher-order Joule heating mechanisms. By carefully extracting the linear response which reflects the magneto-Peltier effect, and comparing it with the magneto-Seebeck measurements performed on the same device, we observe results consistent with Onsager reciprocity. We estimate a magneto-Peltier coefficient of 13.4 mV in the linear regime using a three-dimensional thermoelectric model. Our result opens up the possibility of programmable thermoelectric devices based on the Peltier effect in MTJs.

  17. Magnon spin-current theory for the longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Cunha, R. O.; Rodrigues, A. R.; Machado, F. L. A.; Fonseca Guerra, G. A.; Lopez Ortiz, J. C.; Azevedo, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect (LSSE) in bilayers made of a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI), such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG), and a normal metal (NM), such as platinum (Pt), that relies on the bulk magnon spin current created by the temperature gradient across the thickness of the FMI. We show that the spin current pumped into the NM layer by the magnon accumulation in the FMI provides continuity of the spin current at the FMI/NM interface and is essential for the existence of the longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect. The results of the theory are in good agreement with experimental data for the variation of the LSSE with the sample temperature and with the FMI layer thickness in YIG/Pt bilayers.

  18. The Third Way of Thermal-Electric Conversion beyond Seebeck and Pyroelectric Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jie

    2014-02-14

    Thermal-electric conversion is crucial for smart energy control and harvesting, such as thermal sensing and waste heat recovering. So far, people are aware of only two ways of direct thermal-electric conversion, Seebeck and pyroelectric effects, each with distinct working conditions and limitations. Here, we report the third way of thermal-electric conversion beyond Seebeck and pyroelectric effects. In contrast to Seebeck effect that requires spatial temperature difference, the-third-way converts the time-dependent ambient temperature fluctuation into electricity, similar to the behavior of pyroelectricity. However, the-third-way is also distinct from pyroelectric effect in the sense that it does not require polar materials but applies to general conducting systems. We demonstrate that the-third-way results from the temperature-fluctuation-induced dynamical charge redistribution. It is a consequence of the fundamental nonequilibrium thermodynamics and has a deep connection to the topological phase in quantum mechanics. Our findings expand our knowledge and provide new means of thermal-electric energy harvesting.

  19. Enhanced Seebeck effect in graphene devices by strain and doping engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M. Chung; Nguyen, V. Hung; Nguyen, Huy-Viet; Saint-Martin, J.; Dollfus, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the possibility of enhancing the thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient) in graphene devices by strain and doping engineering. While a local strain can result in the misalignment of Dirac cones of different graphene sections in the k-space, doping engineering leads to their displacement in energy. By combining these two effects, we demonstrate that a conduction gap as large as a few hundred meV can be achieved and hence the enhanced Seebeck coefficient can reach a value higher than 1.4 mV/K in graphene doped heterojunctions with a locally strained area. Such hetero-channels appear to be very promising for enlarging the applications of graphene devices as in strain and thermal sensors.

  20. Observation of inverse spin Hall effect in ferromagnetic FePt alloys using spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Takeshi Takanashi, Koki; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Kikkawa, Takashi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-08-31

    We experimentally observed the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) of ferromagnetic FePt alloys. Spin Seebeck effect due to the temperature gradient generated the spin current (J{sub s}) in the FePt|Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) structure, and J{sub s} was injected from YIG to FePt and converted to the charge current through ISHE of FePt. The significant difference in magnetization switching fields for FePt and YIG led to the clear separation of the voltage of ISHE from that of anomalous Nernst effect in FePt. We also investigated the effect of ordering of FePt crystal structure on the magnitude of ISHE voltage in FePt.

  1. A spin-Seebeck diode with a negative differential spin-Seebeck effect in a hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Gu, Lei; Wu, Dan-Dan

    2016-05-14

    The spin-Seebeck effect (SSE), the central topic of spin caloritronics, provides a new direction for future low power consumption technology. To realize device applications of SSE, a spin-Seebeck diode (SSD) with a negative differential SSE is very desirable. To this end, we constructed a spin caloritronics device that was composed of a ferromagnetic double-single-hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR-H2-H) and an antiferromagnetic double-double-hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR-H2-H2). By using ab initio calculations combined with nonequilibrium Green's function technique, we found that thermally driven spin current through the heterojunction featured the SSD effect and negative differential SSE. The former originates from the asymmetrical thermal-driven conducting electrons and holes, and the latter ascribes to the thermal spin compensation effect. Their physical mechanisms are much different from the previous ones mainly relying on the spin-wave excitations in the interface between metals and magnetic insulators, supporting our study that puts forward a new route to realize the SSD with a negative differential SSE. PMID:27098900

  2. Low-Temperature Seebeck Coefficients for Polaron-Driven Thermoelectric Effect in Organic Polymers.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Neto, Pedro Henrique; da Silva Filho, Demétrio A; Roncaratti, Luiz F; Acioli, Paulo H; E Silva, Geraldo Magela

    2016-07-14

    We report the results of electronic structure coupled to molecular dynamics simulations on organic polymers subject to a temperature gradient at low-temperature regimes. The temperature gradient is introduced using a Langevin-type dynamics corrected for quantum effects, which are very important in these systems. Under this condition we were able to determine that in these no-impurity systems the Seebeck coefficient is in the range of 1-3 μV/K. These results are in good agreement with reported experimental results under the same low-temperature conditions.

  3. Enhanced spin Seebeck effect in a germanene p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jun; Chi, Feng; Guo, Yong

    2014-12-28

    Spin Seebeck effect in a germanene p-n junction is studied by using the nonequilibrium Green's function method combined with the tight-binding Hamiltonian. We find that the thermal bias ΔT can generate spin thermopower when a local exchange field is applied on one edge of the germanene nano-ribbon. The magnitude of the spin thermopower can be modulated by the potential drop across the two terminals of the p-n junction. When the value of the potential drop is smaller than the spin-orbit interaction strength, the spin thermopower is enhanced by two orders of magnitude larger as compared to the case of zero p-n voltage. Optimal temperature corresponding to maximum spin thermopower is insensitive to the potential drop. In the p-n region, maximum spin thermopower can be obtained at relatively higher temperatures. When the value of the potential drop is larger than that of the spin-orbit interaction, however, the spin Seebeck effect decays rapidly with increasing potential drop or temperature. By optimizing the structure parameters, the magnitude of the spin thermopower can be remarkably enhanced due to the coexistence of the exchange field and the potential drop.

  4. Electric gating induced bandgaps and enhanced Seebeck effect in zigzag bilayer graphene ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Thanh-Tra; Tran, Van-Truong

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of a transverse electric field generated by side gates and a vertical electric field generated by top/back gates on energy bands and transport properties of zigzag bilayer graphene ribbons (Bernal stacking). Using atomistic tight binding calculations and Green’s function formalism we demonstrate that a bandgap is opened when either field is applied and even enlarged under simultaneous influence of the two fields. Interestingly, although vertical electric fields are widely used to control the bandgap in bilayer graphene, here we show that transverse fields exhibit a more positive effect in terms of modulating a larger range of bandgap and retaining good electrical conductance. The Seebeck effect is also demonstrated to be enhanced strongly—by about 13 times for a zigzag bilayer graphene ribbon with 16 chain lines. These results may motivate new designs of devices made of bilayer graphene ribbons using electric gates.

  5. Investigation of the magnetic properties of insulating thin films using the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kehlberger, A. Jakob, G.; Kläui, M.; Onbasli, M. C.; Kim, D. H.; Ross, C. A.

    2014-05-07

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect is used as a detector for the magnetic properties and switching characteristics of magnetic thin insulating films. We use a 300 nm and a 20 nm thick Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG, Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) film prepared by pulsed laser deposition and afterwards coated by platinum for the detection of the thermally excited magnons by the inverse spin Hall effect. The inverse spin Hall signals reveal a magnetic uniaxial anisotropy along the direction of the platinum stripe in the thicker film. For the thin film we find a more isotropic behavior, which is complementarily observed using the magnetoresistance occurring at the platinum/YIG interface. We explain our results on the basis of x-ray diffraction data, which reveal a miscut of the substrate and film surface and an expansion of the YIG lattice. Both findings favor a growth-induced magnetic anisotropy that we observe.

  6. Seebeck effect influence on joule heat evolution in electrically conductive silicate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, Lukáš; Medved, Igor; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In general, silicate building materials are non-conductive matters that are not able to evolve heat when they are subjected to an external voltage. However, the electrical conductivity can be increased by addition of electrically conductive admixtures in appropriate amount which leads to generation of conductive paths in materials matrix. Such enhanced materials can evolve Joule heat and are utilizable as a core of self-heating or snow-melting systems. In this paper, Joule heat evolution together with Seebeck effect in electrically conductive silicate materials was taken into consideration and the model based on heat equation with included influence of DC electric field was proposed. Besides, a modeling example of heating element was carried out on FEM basis and time development of temperature in chosen surface points was expressed in order to declare ability of such system to be applicable.

  7. Hot-Carrier Seebeck Effect: Diffusion and Remote Detection of Hot Carriers in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Juan F; Neumann, Ingmar; Costache, Marius V; Valenzuela, Sergio O

    2015-06-10

    We investigate hot carrier propagation across graphene using an electrical nonlocal injection/detection method. The device consists of a monolayer graphene flake contacted by multiple metal leads. Using two remote leads for electrical heating, we generate a carrier temperature gradient that results in a measurable thermoelectric voltage V(NL) across the remaining (detector) leads. Due to the nonlocal character of the measurement, V(NL) is exclusively due to the Seebeck effect. Remarkably, a departure from the ordinary relationship between Joule power P and V(NL), V(NL) ∼ P, becomes readily apparent at low temperatures, representing a fingerprint of hot-carrier dominated thermoelectricity. By studying V(NL) as a function of bias, we directly determine the carrier temperature and the characteristic cooling length for hot-carrier propagation, which are key parameters for a variety of new applications that rely on hot-carrier transport. PMID:25950746

  8. Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons pumped by the bulk spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Bender, Scott A.; Duine, Rembert A.; Flebus, Benedetta

    2016-03-01

    We propose inducing Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons in a magnetic insulator by a heat flow oriented toward its boundary. At a critical heat flux, the oversaturated thermal gas of magnons accumulated at the boundary precipitates the condensate, which then grows gradually as the thermal bias is dialed up further. The thermal magnons thus pumped by the magnonic bulk (spin) Seebeck effect must generally overcome both the local Gilbert damping associated with the coherent magnetic dynamics as well as the radiative spin-wave losses toward the magnetic bulk, in order to achieve the threshold of condensation. We quantitatively estimate the requisite bias in the case of the ferrimagnetic yttrium iron garnet, discuss different physical regimes of condensation, and contrast it with the competing (so-called Doppler-shift) bulk instability.

  9. High spin-filter efficiency and Seebeck effect through spin-crossover iron-benzene complex.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qiang; Zhou, Liping; Cheng, Jue-Fei; Wen, Zhongqian; Han, Qin; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-04-21

    Electronic structures and coherent quantum transport properties are explored for spin-crossover molecule iron-benzene Fe(Bz)2 using density functional theory combined with non-equilibrium Green's function. High- and low-spin states are investigated for two different lead-molecule junctions. It is found that the asymmetrical T-shaped contact junction in the high-spin state behaves as an efficient spin filter while it has a smaller conductivity than that in the low-spin state. Large spin Seebeck effect is also observed in asymmetrical T-shaped junction. Spin-polarized properties are absent in the symmetrical H-shaped junction. These findings strongly suggest that both the electronic and contact configurations play significant roles in molecular devices and metal-benzene complexes are promising materials for spintronics and thermo-spintronics. PMID:27389217

  10. Fokker-Planck approach to the theory of the magnon-driven spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Toklikishvili, Z.; Dugaev, V. K.; Barnaś, J.; Trimper, S.; Berakdar, J.

    2013-10-01

    Following the theoretical approach by J. Xiao [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.214418 81, 214418 (2010)] to the spin Seebeck effect, we calculate the mean value of the total spin current flowing through a normal metal/ferromagnet interface. The spin current emitted from the ferromagnet to the normal metal is evaluated in the framework of the Fokker-Planck approach for the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We show that the total spin current depends not only on the temperature difference between the electron and the magnon baths, but also on the external magnetic field and magnetic anisotropy. Apart from this, the spin current is shown to saturate with increasing magnon temperature, and the saturation temperature increases with increasing magnetic field and/or magnetic anisotropy.

  11. Robust longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect in Bi-YIG thin films.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Gene; Prestgard, Megan Campbell; Teng, Shiang; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the coupling of magnetic insulators (bismuth-doped yttrium iron garnet, Bi-YIG) with platinum has garnered significant interest in spintronics research due to applicability as spin-current-driven thermoelectric coatings. These coatings bridge the gap between spintronics technologies and thermoelectric materials, providing a novel means of transforming waste heat into electricity. However, there remain questions regarding the origins of the spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) as well as claims that observed effects are a manifestation of magnetic proximity effects, which would induce magnetic behavior in platinum. Herewith we provide support that the voltages observed in the Bi-YIG/Pt films are purely SSE voltages. We reaffirm claims that magnon transport theory provides an ample basis for explaining SSE behavior. Finally, we illustrate the advantages of pulsed-laser deposition, as these Bi-YIG films possess large SSE voltages (even in absence of an external magnetic field), as much as twice those of films fabricated via solution-based methods. PMID:24651124

  12. Robust longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect in Bi-YIG thin films

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Gene; Prestgard, Megan Campbell; Teng, Shiang; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the coupling of magnetic insulators (bismuth-doped yttrium iron garnet, Bi-YIG) with platinum has garnered significant interest in spintronics research due to applicability as spin-current-driven thermoelectric coatings. These coatings bridge the gap between spintronics technologies and thermoelectric materials, providing a novel means of transforming waste heat into electricity. However, there remain questions regarding the origins of the spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) as well as claims that observed effects are a manifestation of magnetic proximity effects, which would induce magnetic behavior in platinum. Herewith we provide support that the voltages observed in the Bi-YIG/Pt films are purely SSE voltages. We reaffirm claims that magnon transport theory provides an ample basis for explaining SSE behavior. Finally, we illustrate the advantages of pulsed-laser deposition, as these Bi-YIG films possess large SSE voltages (even in absence of an external magnetic field), as much as twice those of films fabricated via solution-based methods. PMID:24651124

  13. Robust longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect in Bi-YIG thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Gene; Prestgard, Megan Campbell; Teng, Shiang; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, the coupling of magnetic insulators (bismuth-doped yttrium iron garnet, Bi-YIG) with platinum has garnered significant interest in spintronics research due to applicability as spin-current-driven thermoelectric coatings. These coatings bridge the gap between spintronics technologies and thermoelectric materials, providing a novel means of transforming waste heat into electricity. However, there remain questions regarding the origins of the spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) as well as claims that observed effects are a manifestation of magnetic proximity effects, which would induce magnetic behavior in platinum. Herewith we provide support that the voltages observed in the Bi-YIG/Pt films are purely SSE voltages. We reaffirm claims that magnon transport theory provides an ample basis for explaining SSE behavior. Finally, we illustrate the advantages of pulsed-laser deposition, as these Bi-YIG films possess large SSE voltages (even in absence of an external magnetic field), as much as twice those of films fabricated via solution-based methods.

  14. Complete Suppression of Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect by Frozen Magnetization Dynamics in Y3Fe5O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, Takashi; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Daimon, Shunsuke; Saitoh, Eiji

    2016-06-01

    The spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a Pt-film/Y3Fe5O12 (YIG)-slab junction system has been investigated at low temperatures and under various magnetic fields in the longitudinal configuration. We found that, by increasing applied magnetic fields, the SSE signal gradually decreases and converges to zero without showing sign reversal. The complete field-induced suppression of the SSE is interpreted in terms of the effect of the Zeeman gap in magnon excitation.

  15. Observation of longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect in cobalt-ferrite epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Niizeki, Tomohiko; Kikkawa, Takashi; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Oka, Mineto; Suzuki, Kazuya Z.; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kita, Eiji; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-05-15

    The longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect (LSSE) has been investigated in cobalt ferrite (CFO), an exceptionally hard magnetic spinel ferrite. A bilayer of a polycrystalline Pt and an epitaxially-strained CFO(110) exhibiting an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy was prepared by reactive rf sputtering technique. Thermally generated spin voltage in the CFO layer was measured via the inverse spin-Hall effect in the Pt layer. External-magnetic-field (H) dependence of the LSSE voltage (V{sub LSSE}) in the Pt/CFO(110) sample with H ∥ [001] was found to exhibit a hysteresis loop with a high squareness ratio and high coercivity, while that with H∥[11{sup -}0] shows a nearly closed loop, reflecting the different anisotropies induced by the epitaxial strain. The magnitude of V{sub LSSE} has a linear relationship with the temperature difference (ΔT), giving the relatively large V{sub LSSE} /ΔT of about 3 μV/K for CFO(110) which was kept even at zero external field.

  16. Bulk magnon spin current theory for the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Cunha, R. O.; López Ortiz, J. C.; Azevedo, A.

    2016-02-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) consists in the generation of a spin current parallel to a temperature gradient applied across the thickness of a bilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI), such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG), and a metallic layer (ML) with strong spin orbit coupling, such as platinum. The LSSE is usually detected by a DC voltage generated along the ML due to the conversion of the spin current into a charge current perpendicular to the static magnetic field by means of the inverse spin Hall effect. Here we present a model for the LSSE that relies on the bulk magnon spin current created by the temperature gradient across the thickness of the FMI. We show that the spin current pumped into the metallic layer by the magnon accumulation in the FMI provides continuity of the spin current at the FMI/ML interface and is essential for the existence of the LSSE. The results of the theory are in good agreement with experimental LSSE data in YIG/Pt bilayers on the variation of the DC voltage with the sample temperature, with the FMI layer thickness and with the intensity of high magnetic fields.

  17. Enhanced spin Seebeck effect signal due to spin-momentum locked topological surface states

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zilong; Chang, Cui-Zu; Masir, Massoud Ramezani; Tang, Chi; Xu, Yadong; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Spin-momentum locking in protected surface states enables efficient electrical detection of magnon decay at a magnetic-insulator/topological-insulator heterojunction. Here we demonstrate this property using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), that is, measuring the transverse thermoelectric response to a temperature gradient across a thin film of yttrium iron garnet, an insulating ferrimagnet, and forming a heterojunction with (BixSb1−x)2Te3, a topological insulator. The non-equilibrium magnon population established at the interface can decay in part by interactions of magnons with electrons near the Fermi energy of the topological insulator. When this decay channel is made active by tuning (BixSb1−x)2Te3 into a bulk insulator, a large electromotive force emerges in the direction perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization of yttrium iron garnet. The enhanced, tunable SSE which occurs when the Fermi level lies in the bulk gap offers unique advantages over the usual SSE in metals and therefore opens up exciting possibilities in spintronics. PMID:27142594

  18. Enhanced spin Seebeck effect signal due to spin-momentum locked topological surface states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Zilong; Chang, Cui -Zu; Masir, Massoud Ramezani; Tang, Chi; Xu, Yadong; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shi, Jing

    2016-05-04

    Spin-momentum locking in protected surface states enables efficient electrical detection of magnon decay at a magnetic-insulator/topological-insulator heterojunction. Here we demonstrate this property using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), that is, measuring the transverse thermoelectric response to a temperature gradient across a thin film of yttrium iron garnet, an insulating ferrimagnet, and forming a heterojunction with (BixSb1–x)2Te3, a topological insulator. The non-equilibrium magnon population established at the interface can decay in part by interactions of magnons with electrons near the Fermi energy of the topological insulator. When this decay channel is made active by tuning (BixSb1–x)2Te3 into a bulk insulator, amore » large electromotive force emerges in the direction perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization of yttrium iron garnet. Lastly, the enhanced, tunable SSE which occurs when the Fermi level lies in the bulk gap offers unique advantages over the usual SSE in metals and therefore opens up exciting possibilities in spintronics.« less

  19. Enhanced spin Seebeck effect signal due to spin-momentum locked topological surface states.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zilong; Chang, Cui-Zu; Masir, Massoud Ramezani; Tang, Chi; Xu, Yadong; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; MacDonald, Allan H; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Spin-momentum locking in protected surface states enables efficient electrical detection of magnon decay at a magnetic-insulator/topological-insulator heterojunction. Here we demonstrate this property using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), that is, measuring the transverse thermoelectric response to a temperature gradient across a thin film of yttrium iron garnet, an insulating ferrimagnet, and forming a heterojunction with (BixSb1-x)2Te3, a topological insulator. The non-equilibrium magnon population established at the interface can decay in part by interactions of magnons with electrons near the Fermi energy of the topological insulator. When this decay channel is made active by tuning (BixSb1-x)2Te3 into a bulk insulator, a large electromotive force emerges in the direction perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization of yttrium iron garnet. The enhanced, tunable SSE which occurs when the Fermi level lies in the bulk gap offers unique advantages over the usual SSE in metals and therefore opens up exciting possibilities in spintronics. PMID:27142594

  20. Enhanced spin Seebeck effect signal due to spin-momentum locked topological surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zilong; Chang, Cui-Zu; Masir, Massoud Ramezani; Tang, Chi; Xu, Yadong; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shi, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Spin-momentum locking in protected surface states enables efficient electrical detection of magnon decay at a magnetic-insulator/topological-insulator heterojunction. Here we demonstrate this property using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), that is, measuring the transverse thermoelectric response to a temperature gradient across a thin film of yttrium iron garnet, an insulating ferrimagnet, and forming a heterojunction with (BixSb1-x)2Te3, a topological insulator. The non-equilibrium magnon population established at the interface can decay in part by interactions of magnons with electrons near the Fermi energy of the topological insulator. When this decay channel is made active by tuning (BixSb1-x)2Te3 into a bulk insulator, a large electromotive force emerges in the direction perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization of yttrium iron garnet. The enhanced, tunable SSE which occurs when the Fermi level lies in the bulk gap offers unique advantages over the usual SSE in metals and therefore opens up exciting possibilities in spintronics.

  1. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficientmore » and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.« less

  2. Spin Seebeck effect and spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures for a Pt/yttrium iron garnet hybrid structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuanhu; Zou, Lvkuan; Zhang, Xu; Cai, Jianwang; Wang, Shufang; Shen, Baogen; Sun, Jirong

    2015-11-14

    Based on unique experimental setups, the temperature dependences of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) and spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) of the Pt/yttrium iron garnet (Pt/YIG) hybrid structure are determined in a wide temperature range up to the Curie temperature of YIG. From a theoretical analysis of the experimental relationship between the SMR and temperature, the spin mixing conductance of the Pt/YIG interface is deduced as a function of temperature. Adopting the deduced spin mixing conductance, the temperature dependence of the LSSE is well reproduced based on the magnon spin current theory. Our research sheds new light on the controversy about the theoretical models for the LSSE.

  3. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  4. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  5. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices.

  6. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  7. Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect in Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet on Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Substrate Prepared by MOD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.; Kuwahara, A.; Sueyasu, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Liu, Q.; Lou, G.; Kishimoto, K.; Koyanagi, T.

    Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet (Nd3-xBixFe5O12, Bi:NIG) thin films with the Bi composition x=0-1.0 are prepared on both the (001) and (111) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates by a metal organic decomposition method. Crystalline qualities and magnetic properties of these films are examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs) are investigated by means of the inverse spin Hall effect in a Pt film. The increase of LSSE voltage in Bi:NIG(x=0-1.0)/Pt bilayers on GGG(001) is observed with the increase of Bi composition. In the case of GGG(111), the LSSE voltage for Bi:NIG(x=1.0) is also larger than that for NIG.

  8. Half-metallic properties, single-spin negative differential resistance, and large single-spin Seebeck effects induced by chemical doping in zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi-Feng; Zhou, Wen-Qian; Hong, Xue-Kun; Liu, Yu-Shen Feng, Jin-Fu; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2015-01-14

    Ab initio calculations combining density-functional theory and nonequilibrium Green’s function are performed to investigate the effects of either single B atom or single N atom dopant in zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) with the ferromagnetic state on the spin-dependent transport properties and thermospin performances. A spin-up (spin-down) localized state near the Fermi level can be induced by these dopants, resulting in a half-metallic property with 100% negative (positive) spin polarization at the Fermi level due to the destructive quantum interference effects. In addition, the highly spin-polarized electric current in the low bias-voltage regime and single-spin negative differential resistance in the high bias-voltage regime are also observed in these doped ZGNRs. Moreover, the large spin-up (spin-down) Seebeck coefficient and the very weak spin-down (spin-up) Seebeck effect of the B(N)-doped ZGNRs near the Fermi level are simultaneously achieved, indicating that the spin Seebeck effect is comparable to the corresponding charge Seebeck effect.

  9. Measurement and control of the liquid/solid interface temperature during the directional solidification by using the Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambon, G.; Cadet, G.; Favier, J. J.; Rouzaud, A.; Comera, J.

    The morphological stability and the segregation in the vicinity of the solid/liquid interface moving during the directional solidification of a metallurgical sample are depending on the undercooling phenomena which occurs during the growth. An interesting means to know this undercooling effect is to measure the Seebeck signal produced by the solid/liquid interface moving, with comparison with another static S/L interface of the sample. The in situ measurement techniques developed by CEA/CENG/LES and CNES/GERME gives the possibility to measure this temperature with 0.01 K differential accuracy in the severe mechanical, thermal and electromagnetic environment of the MEPHISTO space instrument on board of the U.S. Space Shuttle. After a brief scientific description of the interest of such undercooling measurement, a technical description of the adequate hardware, with the performance obtained during scientific tests, is presented in this paper.

  10. Thermal properties of magnons and the spin Seebeck effect in yttrium iron garnet/normal metal hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Lopez Ortiz, J. C.; Azevedo, A.

    2014-04-01

    In the study of the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in structures with a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI) in contact with a normal metal it is important to know the distributions of the temperatures of the magnon, phonon, and electron systems. Studies of the SSE in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have relied on the thermal properties of magnons in YIG calculated with expressions valid for low temperatures. Here we present a calculation of the magnon specific heat and thermal conductivity in YIG and show that the values at room temperature are very discrepant from numbers used in the literature. With our values we calculate the temperature profiles of the magnon and phonon systems in a FMI subject to a temperature gradient in the configurations used to study the transverse and longitudinal SSE. In both cases the results are quite different from those obtained in previous studies.

  11. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  12. Influence of Thickness and Interface on the Low-Temperature Enhancement of the Spin Seebeck Effect in YIG Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-Jia; Cramer, Joel; Kehlberger, Andreas; Ferguson, Ciaran A.; MacLaren, Donald A.; Jakob, Gerhard; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    The temperature-dependent longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in heavy metal (HM )/Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) hybrid structures is investigated as a function of YIG film thickness, magnetic field strength, and different HM detection materials. The LSSE signal shows a large enhancement with reductions in temperature, leading to a pronounced peak at low temperatures. We find that the LSSE peak temperature strongly depends on the film thickness as well as on the magnetic field. Our result can be well explained in the framework of magnon-driven LSSE by taking into account the temperature-dependent effective propagation length of thermally excited magnons in the bulk of the material. We further demonstrate that the LSSE peak is significantly shifted by changing the interface coupling to an adjacent detection layer, revealing a more complex behavior beyond the currently discussed bulk effect. By direct microscopic imaging of the interface, we correlate the observed temperature dependence with the interface structure between the YIG and the adjacent metal layer. Our results highlight the role of interface effects on the temperature-dependent LSSE in HM/YIG system, suggesting that the temperature-dependent spin current transparency strikingly relies on the interface conditions.

  13. Colossal Seebeck effect enhanced by quasi-ballistic phonons dragging massive electrons in FeSb2.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Okazaki, R; Ishiwata, S; Taniguchi, H; Okutani, A; Hagiwara, M; Terasaki, I

    2016-09-06

    Phonon transport is an essential property of thermoelectric materials. Although the phonon carries heat, which reduces the thermoelectric efficiency, it contributes positively to the Seebeck coefficient S through the phonon-drag effect, as typified by the high-purity semiconductors, which show fairly large S at cryogenic temperatures. Although such a large S is attractive in terms of Peltier cooling, a clear guiding principle for designing thermoelectric materials enriched by the phonon-drag effect remains to be established. Here we demonstrate that a correlated semiconductor, FeSb2, is a promising thermoelectric material featuring quasi-ballistic phonons dragging d electrons with large effective mass. By changing the sample size within the sub-millimetre order for high-purity single crystals, we succeed in substantially increasing S to as much as -27 mV K(-1) at low temperatures. Our results exemplify a strategy for exploring phonon-drag-based thermoelectric materials, the performance of which can be maximized by combining heavy electrons with ballistic phonons.

  14. Colossal Seebeck effect enhanced by quasi-ballistic phonons dragging massive electrons in FeSb2.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Okazaki, R; Ishiwata, S; Taniguchi, H; Okutani, A; Hagiwara, M; Terasaki, I

    2016-01-01

    Phonon transport is an essential property of thermoelectric materials. Although the phonon carries heat, which reduces the thermoelectric efficiency, it contributes positively to the Seebeck coefficient S through the phonon-drag effect, as typified by the high-purity semiconductors, which show fairly large S at cryogenic temperatures. Although such a large S is attractive in terms of Peltier cooling, a clear guiding principle for designing thermoelectric materials enriched by the phonon-drag effect remains to be established. Here we demonstrate that a correlated semiconductor, FeSb2, is a promising thermoelectric material featuring quasi-ballistic phonons dragging d electrons with large effective mass. By changing the sample size within the sub-millimetre order for high-purity single crystals, we succeed in substantially increasing S to as much as -27 mV K(-1) at low temperatures. Our results exemplify a strategy for exploring phonon-drag-based thermoelectric materials, the performance of which can be maximized by combining heavy electrons with ballistic phonons. PMID:27597055

  15. Enhancement of spin-Seebeck effect by inserting ultra-thin Fe{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, D.; Ishida, M.; Murakami, T.; Uchida, K.; Qiu, Z.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-02-23

    We report the longitudinal spin-Seebeck effects (LSSEs) for Pt/Fe{sub 70}Cu{sub 30}/BiY{sub 2}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (BiYIG) and Pt/BiYIG devices. The LSSE voltage was found to be enhanced by inserting an ultra-thin Fe{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} interlayer. This enhancement decays sharply with increasing the Fe{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} thickness, suggesting that it is not due to bulk phenomena, such as a superposition of conventional thermoelectric effects, but due to interface effects related to the Fe{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} interlayer. Combined with control experiments using Pt/Fe{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} devices, we conclude that the enhancement of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/Fe{sub 70}Cu{sub 30}/BiYIG devices is attributed to the improvement of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/BiYIG interfaces.

  16. Colossal Seebeck effect enhanced by quasi-ballistic phonons dragging massive electrons in FeSb2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Okazaki, R.; Ishiwata, S.; Taniguchi, H.; Okutani, A.; Hagiwara, M.; Terasaki, I.

    2016-09-01

    Phonon transport is an essential property of thermoelectric materials. Although the phonon carries heat, which reduces the thermoelectric efficiency, it contributes positively to the Seebeck coefficient S through the phonon-drag effect, as typified by the high-purity semiconductors, which show fairly large S at cryogenic temperatures. Although such a large S is attractive in terms of Peltier cooling, a clear guiding principle for designing thermoelectric materials enriched by the phonon-drag effect remains to be established. Here we demonstrate that a correlated semiconductor, FeSb2, is a promising thermoelectric material featuring quasi-ballistic phonons dragging d electrons with large effective mass. By changing the sample size within the sub-millimetre order for high-purity single crystals, we succeed in substantially increasing S to as much as -27 mV K-1 at low temperatures. Our results exemplify a strategy for exploring phonon-drag-based thermoelectric materials, the performance of which can be maximized by combining heavy electrons with ballistic phonons.

  17. Colossal Seebeck effect enhanced by quasi-ballistic phonons dragging massive electrons in FeSb2

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, H.; Okazaki, R.; Ishiwata, S.; Taniguchi, H.; Okutani, A.; Hagiwara, M.; Terasaki, I.

    2016-01-01

    Phonon transport is an essential property of thermoelectric materials. Although the phonon carries heat, which reduces the thermoelectric efficiency, it contributes positively to the Seebeck coefficient S through the phonon-drag effect, as typified by the high-purity semiconductors, which show fairly large S at cryogenic temperatures. Although such a large S is attractive in terms of Peltier cooling, a clear guiding principle for designing thermoelectric materials enriched by the phonon-drag effect remains to be established. Here we demonstrate that a correlated semiconductor, FeSb2, is a promising thermoelectric material featuring quasi-ballistic phonons dragging d electrons with large effective mass. By changing the sample size within the sub-millimetre order for high-purity single crystals, we succeed in substantially increasing S to as much as −27 mV K−1 at low temperatures. Our results exemplify a strategy for exploring phonon-drag-based thermoelectric materials, the performance of which can be maximized by combining heavy electrons with ballistic phonons. PMID:27597055

  18. Spin-dependent Seebeck Effect, Thermal Colossal Magnetoresistance and Negative Differential Thermoelectric Resistance in Zigzag Silicene Nanoribbon Heterojunciton

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Zu-Quan; Gu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE) is one of hot topics in spin caloritronics, which examine the relationships between spin and heat transport in materials. Meanwhile, it is still a huge challenge to obtain thermally induced spin current nearly without thermal electron current. Here, we construct a hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon heterojunction, and find that by applying a temperature difference between the source and the drain, spin-up and spin-down currents are generated and flow in opposite directions with nearly equal magnitudes, indicating that the thermal spin current dominates the carrier transport while the thermal electron current is much suppressed. By modulating the temperature, a pure thermal spin current can be achieved. Moreover, a thermoelectric rectifier and a negative differential thermoelectric resistance can be obtained in the thermal electron current. Through the analysis of the spin-dependent transport characteristics, a phase diagram containing various spin caloritronic phenomena is provided. In addition, a thermal magnetoresistance, which can reach infinity, is also obtained. Our results put forward an effective route to obtain a spin caloritronic material which can be applied in future low-power-consumption technology. PMID:26000658

  19. Time-resolved measurement of the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect in a single magnetic tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Alexander; Walter, Marvin; Roschewsky, Niklas; Eggebrecht, Tim; Drewello, Volker; Rott, Karsten; Münzenberg, Markus; Thomas, Andy; Reiss, Günter

    2013-06-01

    Recently, several groups have reported spin-dependent thermoelectric effects in magnetic tunnel junctions. In this paper, we present a setup for time-resolved measurements of thermovoltages and thermocurrents of a single micro- to nanometer-scaled tunnel junction. An electrically modulated diode laser is used to create a temperature gradient across the tunnel junction layer stack. This laser modulation technique enables the recording of time-dependent thermovoltage signals with a temporal resolution only limited by the preamplifier for the thermovoltage. So far, time-dependent thermovoltage could not be interpreted. Now, with the setup presented in this paper, it is possible to distinguish different Seebeck voltage contributions to the overall measured voltage signal in the μs time regime. A model circuit is developed that explains those voltage contributions on different sample types. Further, it will be shown that a voltage signal arising from the magnetic tunnel junction can only be observed when the laser spot is directly centered on top of the magnetic tunnel junction, which allows a lateral separation of the effects.

  20. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S , depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n , and effective mass, m*, as S ˜m*/n2 /3 . The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1 , depends on both n and m* as 1 /T1˜(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1 /T1˜(m*)2n2 /3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study A gxS bxG e50-2xT e50 , well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  1. Separation of the inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Nernst effect in a single ferromagnetic metal using on-chip spin Seebeck devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen; Hoffman, Jason; Pearson, John; Bhattacharya, Anand

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect is measured on the ferromagnetic insulator Fe3O4 with the ferromagnetic metal Co0.2Fe0.6B0.2 (CoFeB) as the spin detector in a micro-patterned device structure using an on-chip heater. By using a non-magnetic spacer material between the two materials (Ti), it is possible to decouple the two ferromagnetic materials and directly observe pure spin flow from Fe3O4 into CoFeB. It is shown, that in a single ferromagnetic metal the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) can occur simultaneously with opposite polarity. Using this and the large difference in the coercive fields between the two magnets, it is possible to unambiguously separate the contributions of the spin Seebeck effect from the ANE and observe the degree to which each effect contributes to the total response within a single experiment. Additionally, by using the spin detector layer as a thermometer, an accurate value for the thermal gradient across the device can be measured. These results match well with thermal simulations of our device structure. All authors acknowledge support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  2. Reference Material for Seebeck Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Lenz, E.; Haupt, S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a measurement method and a measuring system to determine absolute Seebeck coefficients of thermoelectric bulk materials with the aim of establishing reference materials for Seebeck coefficients. Reference materials with known thermoelectric properties are essential to allow a reliable benchmarking of different thermoelectric materials for application in thermoelectric generators to convert thermal into electrical energy or vice versa. A temperature gradient (1 to 8) K is induced across the sample, and the resulting voltage is measured by using two differential Au/Pt thermocouples. On the basis of the known absolute Seebeck coefficients of Au and Pt, the unknown Seebeck coefficient of the sample is calculated. The measurements are performed in inert atmospheres and at low pressure (30 to 60) mbar in the temperature range between 300 K and 860 K. The measurement results of the Seebeck coefficients of metallic and semiconducting samples are presented. Achievable relative measurement uncertainties of the Seebeck coefficient are on the order of a few percent.

  3. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications.

  4. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications. PMID:24856718

  5. Joule heating-induced coexisted spin Seebeck effect and spin Hall magnetoresistance in the platinum/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Wang, S. H.; Zou, L. K.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, J. R. E-mail: sun-zg@whut.edu.cn; Sun, Z. G.

    2014-11-03

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) are observed simultaneously in the Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} hybrid structure when thermal gradient is produced by Joule heating. According to their dependences on applied current, these two effects can be separated. Their dependence on heating power and magnetic field is systematically studied. With the increase of heating power, the SSE enhances linearly, whereas the SMR decreases slowly. The origin of the spin currents is further analyzed. The heating power dependences of the spin currents associated with the SSE and the SMR are found to be different.

  6. Seebeck Effects in N-Type and P-Type Polymers Driven Simultaneously by Surface Polarization and Entropy Differences Based on Conductor/Polymer/Conductor Thin-Film Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehua; Liu, Qing; Tisdale, Jeremy; Lei, Ting; Pei, Jian; Wang, Hsin; Urbas, Augustine; Hu, Bin

    2015-04-15

    This paper reports Seebeck effects driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference by using intramolecular charge-transfer states in n-type and p-type conjugated polymers, namely IIDT and IIDDT, based on vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices. Large Seebeck coefficients of -898 V/K and 1300 V/K from are observed from n-type IIDT p-type IIDDT, respectively, when the charge-transfer states are generated by a white light illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Simultaneously, electrical conductivities are increased from almost insulating states in dark condition to conducting states under photoexcitation in both n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices. We find that the intramolecular charge-transfer states can largely enhance Seebeck effects in the n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference. Furthermore, the Seebeck effects can be shifted between polarization and entropy regimes when electrical conductivities are changed. This reveals a new concept to develop Seebeck effects by controlling polarization and entropy regimes based on charge-transfer states in vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices.

  7. Seebeck Effects in N-Type and P-Type Polymers Driven Simultaneously by Surface Polarization and Entropy Differences Based on Conductor/Polymer/Conductor Thin-Film Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Dehua; Liu, Qing; Tisdale, Jeremy; Lei, Ting; Pei, Jian; Wang, Hsin; Urbas, Augustine; Hu, Bin

    2015-04-15

    This paper reports Seebeck effects driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference by using intramolecular charge-transfer states in n-type and p-type conjugated polymers, namely IIDT and IIDDT, based on vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices. Large Seebeck coefficients of -898 V/K and 1300 V/K from are observed from n-type IIDT p-type IIDDT, respectively, when the charge-transfer states are generated by a white light illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Simultaneously, electrical conductivities are increased from almost insulating states in dark condition to conducting states under photoexcitation in both n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices. We find that the intramolecular charge-transfer states canmore » largely enhance Seebeck effects in the n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference. Furthermore, the Seebeck effects can be shifted between polarization and entropy regimes when electrical conductivities are changed. This reveals a new concept to develop Seebeck effects by controlling polarization and entropy regimes based on charge-transfer states in vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices.« less

  8. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-03-01

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as “ferrite plating”. The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management.

  9. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films.

    PubMed

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-03-15

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as "ferrite plating". The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management.

  10. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films.

    PubMed

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as "ferrite plating". The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management. PMID:26975208

  11. Flexible heat-flow sensing sheets based on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect using one-dimensional spin-current conducting films

    PubMed Central

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Kondo, Koichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Someya, Hiroko; Matsuba, Asuka; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yamamoto, Naoharu; Kohmoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Heat-flow sensing is expected to be an important technological component of smart thermal management in the future. Conventionally, the thermoelectric (TE) conversion technique, which is based on the Seebeck effect, has been used to measure a heat flow by converting the flow into electric voltage. However, for ubiquitous heat-flow visualization, thin and flexible sensors with extremely low thermal resistance are highly desired. Recently, another type of TE effect, the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), has aroused great interest because the LSSE potentially offers favourable features for TE applications such as simple thin-film device structures. Here we demonstrate an LSSE-based flexible TE sheet that is especially suitable for a heat-flow sensing application. This TE sheet contained a Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4 film which was formed on a flexible plastic sheet using a spray-coating method known as “ferrite plating”. The experimental results suggest that the ferrite-plated film, which has a columnar crystal structure aligned perpendicular to the film plane, functions as a unique one-dimensional spin-current conductor suitable for bendable LSSE-based sensors. This newly developed thin TE sheet may be attached to differently shaped heat sources without obstructing an innate heat flux, paving the way to versatile heat-flow measurements and management. PMID:26975208

  12. Spin-Hall magnetoresistance and spin Seebeck effect in spin-spiral and paramagnetic phases of multiferroic CoCr2O4 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqeel, A.; Vlietstra, N.; Heuver, J. A.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Noheda, B.; van Wees, B. J.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the spin-Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in multiferroic CoCr2O4 (CCO) spinel thin films with Pt contacts. We observe a large enhancement of both signals below the spin-spiral (Ts=28 K ) and the spin lock-in (Tlock -in=14 K ) transitions. The SMR and SSE responses in the spin lock-in phase are one order of magnitude larger than those observed at the ferrimagnetic transition temperature (Tc=94 K ), which indicates that the interaction between spins at the Pt |CCO interface is more efficient in the noncollinear magnetic state. At T >Tc , magnetic-field-induced SMR and SSE signals are observed, which can be explained by a high interface susceptibility. Our results show that the spin transport at the Pt |CCO interface is sensitive to the magnetic phases but cannot be explained solely by the bulk magnetization.

  13. Thermal creation of a spin current by Seebeck spin tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, R.; Le Breton, J. C.; Deac, A. M.; Saito, H.; Yuasa, S.

    2013-09-01

    The thermoelectric analog of spin-polarized tunneling, namely Seebeck spin tunneling, is a recently discovered phenomenon that arises from the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of a magnetic tunnel contact. In a tunnel junction with one ferromagnetic electrode and one non-magnetic electrode, a temperature difference between the two electrodes creates a spin current across the contact. Here, the basic principle and the observation of Seebeck spin tunneling are described. It is shown how it can be used to create a spin accumulation in silicon driven by a heat flow across a magnetic tunnel contact, without a charge tunnel current. The sign of the spin current depends on the direction of the heat flow, whereas its magnitude is anisotropic, i.e., dependent on the absolute orientation of the magnetization of the ferromagnet. The connection between Seebeck spin tunneling and the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect, observed in metal magnetic tunnel junctions, is also clarified. Seebeck spin tunneling may be used to convert waste heat into useful thermal spin currents that aid or replace electrical spin current, and thereby improve the energy efficiency of spintronic devices and technologies.

  14. Ultrafast demagnetization, spin-dependent Seebeck effect, and thermal spin transfer torque in Pt/TbFe/Cu and Pt/TbFe/Cu/Fe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimling, Johannes; Hebler, Birgit; Kimling, Judith; Albrecht, Manfred; Cahill, David G.

    We investigate diffusive spin currents in Pt(20nm)/TbFe(10nm)/Cu(100nm) and Pt(20 nm)/TbFe(10nm)/ Cu(100nm)/Fe(3nm) stacks using time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect (TRMOKE) and time-domain thermoreflectance measurements. Our experiments are based on two hypothesis: (1) fast changes of magnetization due to laser excitation are transferred into spin accumulation, e.g., via electron-magnon scattering; the generated spin accumulation drives a diffusive spin current into adjacent normal metal layers; (2) electronic thermal transport through the ferromagnetic layer injects a spin current into adjacent normal metal layers, based on the spin-dependent Seebeck effect. We excite the Pt layer with ps-laser pulses. Resulting diffusive spin currents generate nonequilibrium magnetization in the Cu layer (sample I) and induce a precession of the magnetization of the Fe layer via spin transfer torque (sample II). Both responses are probed using TRMOKE. Prior experiments used [Co(0.2nm)/Pt(0.4nm)]x5/Co(0.2nm) instead of TbFe. The ferrimagnetic TbFe layer with introduces two major modifications: (1) slow demagnetization behavior, and (2) large thermal resistance. Hence, thermal spin transfer torques can be observed on significantly longer time scales. Financial support by the German Research Foundation under DFG-Grant No. KI 1893/1-1 and DFG-Grant No. AL 618/21-1 are kindly acknowledged.

  15. Spin Seebeck devices using local on-chip heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Stephen M. Fradin, Frank Y.; Hoffman, Jason; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-05-07

    A micro-patterned spin Seebeck device is fabricated using an on-chip heater. Current is driven through a Au heater layer electrically isolated from a bilayer consisting of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (insulating ferrimagnet) and a spin detector layer. It is shown that through this method it is possible to measure the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (SSE) for small area magnetic devices, equivalent to traditional macroscopic SSE experiments. Using a lock-in detection technique, it is possible to more sensitively characterize both the SSE and the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE), as well as the inverse spin Hall effect in various spin detector materials. By using the spin detector layer as a thermometer, we can obtain a value for the temperature gradient across the device. These results are well matched to values obtained through electromagnetic/thermal modeling of the device structure and with large area spin Seebeck measurements.

  16. Effects of Ge substitution in GeTe by Ag or Sb on the Seebeck coefficient and carrier concentration derived from 125Te NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    GeTe, a self-doping p -type semiconductor where the high free hole concentration is determined by Ge vacancies is a well-known base for high-efficiency A gxS bxG e50 -2 xT e50 (a tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver series) thermoelectric materials. Here it is shown that the replacement of Ge by Ag in GeTe (a A gxG e50 -xT e50 system) significantly decreases the Seebeck coefficient, whereas the replacement by Sb (S bxG e50 -xT e50 ) increases it. These effects can be attributed to a change in carrier concentration and consistent with 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements and NMR signal position, which is mostly dependent on the Knight shift. Opposite changes in carrier concentration in A gxG e50 -xT e50 and S bxG e50 -xT e50 can be explained by different valence electron configurations of Ag and Sb compared to that of Ge, which results in a different local electron imbalance and/or in a change in Ge vacancy formation energy and affects the total carrier concentration. Comparison of our data for GeTe, A g2G e48T e50 , and S b2G e48T e50 with those for A g2S b2G e46T e50 shows that the effects from Ag and Sb compensate for each other and supports the formation of [Ag +Sb ] atomic pairs suggested earlier based on theoretical calculations.

  17. Spin-Seebeck effect on the surface of a topological insulator due to nonequilibrium spin-polarization parallel to the direction of thermally driven electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Hao; Mahfouzi, Farzad; Nagaosa, Naoto; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2014-05-01

    We study the transverse spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) thin film, such as Bi2Se3, which is sandwiched between two normal metal leads. The temperature bias ΔT applied between the leads generates surface charge current which becomes spin polarized due to strong spin-orbit coupling on the TI surface, with polarization vector acquiring a component Px≃60% parallel to the direction of transport. When the third nonmagnetic voltage probe is attached to the portion of the TI surface across its width Ly, pure spin current will be injected into the probe where the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) converts it into a voltage signal |VISHE|max/ΔT ≃2.5μV/K (assuming the SH angle of the Pt voltage probe and Ly=1 mm). The existence of predicted nonequilibrium spin polarization parallel to the direction of electronic transport and the corresponding electron-driven SSE crucially relies on orienting quintuple layers (QLs) of Bi2Se3 orthogonal to the TI surface and tilted by 45∘ with respect to the direction of transport. Our analysis is based on the Landauer-Büttiker-type formula for spin currents in the leads of a multiterminal quantum-coherent junction, which is constructed by using nonequilibrium Green function formalism within which we show how to take into account arbitrary orientation of QLs via the self-energy describing coupling between semi-infinite normal metal leads and the TI sample.

  18. GMAG PhD Dissertation Research Award: The Planar Nernst and Seebeck Effects in Ferromagnetic Metal Films with In-Plane Thermal Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Azure

    2013-03-01

    Recently, the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) has attracted a great deal of attention as one possible source of pure spin currents. In response to a thermal gradient (∇T), the SSE is thought to produce a pure spin current detectable by measuring a transverse voltage (VT) generated by the inverse spin Hall effect. However, recent work on spin-dependent transport in thin film nanostructures supported by bulk substrates suggests that early SSE experiments may have been strongly affected by unintended ∇T through the supporting substrates. They may also have been affected by thermoelectric effects generated from planar thermal gradients such as transverse thermopower, also known as the planar Nernst effect (PNE), in which a VT develops in response to a ∇T applied in the plane of a film with in-plane magnetization. In this talk, we present the first results from experiments designed to probe the SSE and related effects such as the PNE and longitudinal thermopower in 20 nm thick nickel and permalloy thin films deposited on suspended Si-N platforms. In our experiments, the background thermal conduction of the 500 nm thick platforms is at least 1000x smaller than the bulk substrates used previous experiments, thus confining ∇T to the plane of the film. The results exhibit the sin θ cos θ angular dependence predicted by the PNE, where θ is the angle between film magnetization and thermal gradient, rather than the cos θ dependence expected from SSE predictions. We demonstrate that the magnetic field dependence of the PNE, anisotropic magnetoresistance, and longitudinal thermopower (α) is generated by spin-dependent scattering and present results confirming the Onsager reciprocity between α and the Peltier coefficient. Finally, we present an upper limit for the SSE coefficient in our experiment that is at least an order of magnitude smaller than previously reported by experiments conducted using bulk substrates. I would like to thank my collaborators Barry L. Zink and

  19. The Seebeck coefficient of superionic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2015-01-28

    We present a theory of the anomalous Seebeck coefficient found in the superionic conductor Cu{sub 2}Se. It has a phase transition at T = 400 K where the cations disorder but the anions do not. This disorder gives a temperature-dependent width to the electronic states in the conduction band. This width provides the anomalous Seebeck contribution.

  20. Comparison of laser-induced and intrinsic tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect in CoFeB /MgAl2O4 and CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Torsten; Boehnke, Alexander; Martens, Ulrike; Thomas, Andy; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter; Münzenberg, Markus; Kuschel, Timo

    2016-06-01

    We present a comparison of the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect for laser-induced and intrinsic heating. Therefore, Co40Fe40B20 /MgAl2O4 and Co25Fe55B20 /MgO magnetic tunnel junctions have been prepared. The TMS ratio of 3% in case of the MAO MTJ agrees well with ratios found for other barrier materials, while the TMS ratio of 23% of the MgO MTJ emphasizes the influence of the CoFe composition. We find results using the intrinsic method that differ in sign and magnitude in comparison to the results of the laser heating. The intrinsic contributions can alternatively be explained by the Brinkman model and the given junction properties. Especially, we are able to demonstrate that the symmetric contribution is solely influenced by the barrier asymmetry. Thus, we conclude that the symmetry analysis used for the intrinsic method is not suitable to unambiguously identify an intrinsic tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect.

  1. How to control spin-Seebeck current in a metal-quantum dot-magnetic insulator junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lei; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-09-01

    The control of the spin-Seebeck current is still a challenging task for the development of spin caloritronic devices. Here, we construct a spin-Seebeck device by inserting a quantum dot (QD) between the metal lead and magnetic insulator. Using the slave-particle approach and noncrossing approximation, we find that the spin-Seebeck effect increases significantly when the energy level of the QD locates near the Fermi level of the metal lead due to the enhancement of spin flipping and occurrences of quantum resonance. Since this can be easily realized by applying a gate voltage in experiments, the spin-Seebeck device proposed here can also work as a thermovoltaic transistor. Moreover, the optimal correlation strength and the energy level position of the QD are discussed to maximize the spin-Seebeck current as required for applications in controllable spin caloritronic devices.

  2. First-principles analysis on Seebeck coefficient in zinc oxide nanowires for thermoelectric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.

    2016-03-01

    The Seebeck coefficient of ZnO<0001> nanowires was simulated on the basis of first- principles calculation, to discuss the potential for future application to thermoelectric devices. Simulation procedure by means of the electronic band structure with one-dimensional periodic boundary condition was presented, and dependences of the Seebeck coefficient on temperature and carrier concentration have been investigated for many kinds of n- or p-doped ZnO<0001> nanowire models with 1.00-2.65 nm diameter. For the direct band-gap semiconducting models, a magnitude of the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually as temperature rises in the p-doped state, and a significant effect of miniaturization to nanowire on the Seebeck coefficient has been brought out, such as about 1000 µV/K in the p-doped state and -820 µV/K in the n-doped state for the (ZnO)24 nanowire model with 1 × 1017 cm-3 carrier concentration at room temperature. Similar characteristics of the Seebeck coefficient were observed for some indirect band-gap semiconducting models. At the end of this paper, the simulation was extended to the no band-gap conducting models with some modification.

  3. Gated Seebeck Using Polymerized Ionic Liquid Gate Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Elayne; Popere, Bhooshan; Fang, Haiyu; Chabinyc, Michael; Segalman, Rachel

    Thermoelectric materials have the ability to convert a temperature gradient into usable electrical power via the Seebeck effect. This phenomenon is directly related to the material's Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, which are in turn linked to its electron (or hole) mobility and carrier concentration. Organic semiconductors show promise for thermoelectric applications due to their flexibility and low-temperature manufacturing techniques; however, the role of ionized dopants on charge transport in these materials remains poorly understood. In this work, we use polymerized ionic liquids (PILs) as a gate dielectric in organic field-effect transistors to directly control the concentration of charges in the conducting channel. We report a method to tune the carrier concentration in the transistor channel via electrostatic gate modulation. We observe carrier concentration levels that are comparable to traditional doping methods with the added ability to precisely tune the concentration of charges induced. With this process, we aim to gather new information on the effect of ions on the performance of organic semiconductors in hopes of better understanding charge transport in conducting polymers on a molecular level.

  4. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in Nd{sub 2}BiFe{sub 5−x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12} prepared on gadolinium gallium garnet (001) by metal organic decomposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, H. Kuwahara, A.; Sakata, N.; Ono, T.; Kishimoto, K.; Koyanagi, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Meguro, A.; Hashinaka, T.

    2015-05-07

    Nd{sub 2}BiFe{sub 5−x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12} thin films with the Ga composition x = 0, 0.5, and 1.0 are prepared on (001) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by a metal organic decomposition method. Only (001) peaks are observed in x-ray diffraction patterns for all the films, suggesting that the highly oriented Nd{sub 2}BiFe{sub 5−x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12} thin films were formed. Increasing Ga composition, the saturation magnetization decreases, and the perpendicular easy axis is enhanced due to the decrease of the shape anisotropy. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs) in Nd{sub 2}BiFe{sub 5−x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12} thin films with a Pt layer of 10 nm in thickness were investigated. Magnetic field dependence of the thermoelectric voltage caused by the LSSE in Nd{sub 2}BiFe{sub 5−x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12} films indicates the hysteresis loop with the small coercivity reflecting the magnetization curve. The decrease of LSSE voltage in Nd{sub 2}BiFe{sub 5−x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12} is clearly observed with the decrease of Fe composition.

  5. Scanning measurement of Seebeck coefficient of a heated sample

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Iwanaga, Shiho

    2016-04-19

    A novel scanning Seebeck coefficient measurement technique is disclosed utilizing a cold scanning thermocouple probe tip on heated bulk and thin film samples. The system measures variations in the Seebeck coefficient within the samples. The apparatus may be used for two dimensional mapping of the Seebeck coefficient on the bulk and thin film samples. This technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separations in the sub-mm range of various thermoelectric materials.

  6. Description of a Sensitive Seebeck Calorimeter Used for Cold Fusion Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    A sensitive and stable Seebeck calorimeter is described and used to determine the heat of formation of PdD. This determination can be used to show that such calorimeters are sufficiently accurate to measure the LENR effect and give support to the claims.

  7. High Seebeck Coefficient of Porous Silicon: Study of the Porosity Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valalaki, Katerina; Benech, Philippe; Galiouna Nassiopoulou, Androula

    2016-04-01

    In-plane Seebeck coefficient of porous Si free-standing membranes of different porosities was accurately measured at room temperature. Quasi-steady-state differential Seebeck coefficient method was used for the measurements. A detailed description of our home-built setup is presented. The Seebeck coefficient was proved to increase with increasing porosity up to a maximum of ~1 mV/K for the ~50 % porosity membrane, which is more than a threefold increase compared to the starting highly doped bulk c-Si substrate. By further increasing porosity and after a maximum is reached, the Seebeck coefficient sharply decreases and stabilizes at ~600 μV/K. The possible mechanisms that determine this behaviour are discussed, supported by structural characterization and photoluminescence measurements. The decrease in nanostructure size and increase in carrier depletion with increasing porosity, together with the complex structure and morphology of porous Si, are at the origin of complex energy filtering and phonon drag effects. All the above contribute to the observed anomalous behaviour of thermopower as a function of porosity and will be discussed.

  8. Large Seebeck coefficient in frustrated doped Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, André-Marie

    2011-03-01

    Since calculations based on the standard Kubo formula have proven extremely difficult for electric and thermal transport, Shastry and co-workers suggested two novel approximate ways to obtain the thermopower (S) in interacting systems. One method is based on the high-frequency limit. The other, based on ideas of Kelvin, is purely thermodynamical. With these we study the Hubbard model on a 3d FCC lattice, a frustrated lattice. The high dimensionality of the problem justifies the use of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). CTQMC in the hybridization expansion and the fast IPT are the impurity solver. The Seebeck coefficient is obtained as a function of doping and temperature for different U. Within DMFT, vertex corrections vanish for transports coefficients, hence the bubble suffices. This enables us to further assess how both approximate methods compare with each other and with the DC Kubo approach. At low T, results can be interpreted in terms of effective Fermi temperatures and carrier number.

  9. Microchip for the Measurement of Seebeck Coefficients of Single Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völklein, F.; Schmitt, M.; Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.

    2009-07-01

    Bismuth nanowires were electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Micromachining and microlithography were employed to realize a newly developed microchip for Seebeck coefficient measurements on individual nanowires. By anisotropic etching of a (100) Si wafer, an 800-nm-thick SiO2/Si3N4 membrane was prepared in the chip center. The low thermal conductivity of the membrane is crucial to obtain the required temperature difference Δ T along the nanowire. The wire is electrically contacted to thin metal pads which are patterned by a new method of microscopic exposure of photoresist and a lift-off process. A Δ T between the two pairs of contact pads, located on the membrane, is established by a thin-film heater. Applying the known Seebeck coefficient of a reference film, the temperature difference at this gap is determined. Using Δ T and the measured Seebeck voltage U of the nanowire, its Seebeck coefficient can be calculated.

  10. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  11. Identification of a positive-Seebeck-coefficient exohedral fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almutlaq, Nasser; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Bailey, Steven; Lambert, Colin J.

    2016-07-01

    If fullerene-based thermoelectricity is to become a viable technology, then fullerenes exhibiting both positive and negative Seebeck coefficients are needed. C60 is known to have a negative Seebeck coefficient and therefore in this paper we address the challenge of identifying a positive-Seebeck-coefficient fullerene. We investigated the thermoelectric properties of single-molecule junctions of the exohedral fullerene C50Cl10 connected to gold electrodes and found that it indeed possesses a positive Seebeck coefficient. Furthermore, in common with C60, the Seebeck coefficient can be increased by placing more than one C50Cl10 in series. For a single C50Cl10, we find S = +8 μV K-1 and for two C50Cl10's in series we find S = +30 μV K-1. We also find that the C50Cl10 monomer and dimer have power factors of 0.5 × 10-5 W m-1 K-2 and 6.0 × 10-5 W m-1 K-2 respectively. These results demonstrate that exohedral fullerenes provide a new class of thermoelectric materials with desirable properties, which complement those of all-carbon fullerenes, thereby enabling the boosting of the thermovoltage in all-fullerene tandem structures.If fullerene-based thermoelectricity is to become a viable technology, then fullerenes exhibiting both positive and negative Seebeck coefficients are needed. C60 is known to have a negative Seebeck coefficient and therefore in this paper we address the challenge of identifying a positive-Seebeck-coefficient fullerene. We investigated the thermoelectric properties of single-molecule junctions of the exohedral fullerene C50Cl10 connected to gold electrodes and found that it indeed possesses a positive Seebeck coefficient. Furthermore, in common with C60, the Seebeck coefficient can be increased by placing more than one C50Cl10 in series. For a single C50Cl10, we find S = +8 μV K-1 and for two C50Cl10's in series we find S = +30 μV K-1. We also find that the C50Cl10 monomer and dimer have power factors of 0.5 × 10-5 W m-1 K-2 and 6.0 × 10-5 W m-1

  12. Calculation of Phonon Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient in Cu-Ni Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Yusuke; Asai, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, thermoelectric materials have been attracting a lot of attention because they are expected to be applied for utilization of waste heat. Many kinds of materials are studied for this purpose; semiconductors, alloys, organic materials, etc. In 2010, a giant Peltier effect was observed in a Cu-Ni/Au junction. It is considered that this giant Peltier effect is caused by nano-scale phase separation formed in the sputtering process. Although this material is a great candidate for a thermoelectric material, we need to find the condition for a large thermoelectric coefficient that requires a large Seebeck coefficient, large electric conductivity, and small phonon conductivity. We calculated phonon conductivity in Cu-Ni alloy by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and calculated Seebeck coefficients via ab-initio methods.

  13. Nanoscale Thermoelectrics: A Study of the Absolute Seebeck Coefficient of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Sarah J.

    measure, S, as a function of temperature using a micro-machined thermal isolation platform consisting of a suspended, patterned SiN membrane. By measuring a series of thicknesses of metallic films up to the infinitely thin film limit, in which the electrical resistivity is no longer decreasing with increasing film thickness, but still not at bulk values, along with the effective electron mean free path, we are able to show the contribution of the leads needed to measure this property. Having a comprehensive understanding of the background contribution we are able to determine the absolute Seebeck coefficient of a wide variety of thin films. The nature of the design of the SiN membrane also allows the ability to accurately and directly measure thermal and electrical transport of the thin films yielding a comprehensive measurement of the three quantities that characterize a material's efficiency. This can serve to further the development of thermoelectric materials through precise measurements of the material properties that dictate efficiency.

  14. Spin Seebeck measurements of current-induced switching in YIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartell, Jason; Jermain, Colin; Aradhya, Sriharsha; Wang, Hailong; Buhrman, Robert; Yang, Fengyuan; Ralph, Daniel; Fuchs, Gregory

    Quantifying spin torques generated at the interface between a normal metal (NM) and a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) is an important step in understanding the spin hall effect without charge transport. Measuring magnetization in NM/FI devices is challenging, however, because both magnetoresistive and magneto-optical signals are tiny in thin-film bilayers. We show that a promising alternative measurement approach is the use of picosecond thermal gradients to study spin torques in Pt/Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) bilayers. Recently, we demonstrated the application of heat to stroboscopically transduce a local magnetic moment into an electrical signal via the time resolved anomalous Nernst effect (TRANE) in ferromagnetic metals. Using a similar geometry the spin Seebeck effect of YIG combined with the inverse spin Hall effect of Pt enables measurement of local magnetization. Here we describe our study using this technique to study current-induced switching in Pt/YIG with sub-10 nm thick YIG films We acknowledge support from AFOSR.

  15. Identification of a positive-Seebeck-coefficient exohedral fullerene.

    PubMed

    Almutlaq, Nasser; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Bailey, Steven; Lambert, Colin J

    2016-07-14

    If fullerene-based thermoelectricity is to become a viable technology, then fullerenes exhibiting both positive and negative Seebeck coefficients are needed. C60 is known to have a negative Seebeck coefficient and therefore in this paper we address the challenge of identifying a positive-Seebeck-coefficient fullerene. We investigated the thermoelectric properties of single-molecule junctions of the exohedral fullerene C50Cl10 connected to gold electrodes and found that it indeed possesses a positive Seebeck coefficient. Furthermore, in common with C60, the Seebeck coefficient can be increased by placing more than one C50Cl10 in series. For a single C50Cl10, we find S = +8 μV K(-1) and for two C50Cl10's in series we find S = +30 μV K(-1). We also find that the C50Cl10 monomer and dimer have power factors of 0.5 × 10(-5) W m(-1) K(-2) and 6.0 × 10(-5) W m(-1) K(-2) respectively. These results demonstrate that exohedral fullerenes provide a new class of thermoelectric materials with desirable properties, which complement those of all-carbon fullerenes, thereby enabling the boosting of the thermovoltage in all-fullerene tandem structures. PMID:27357101

  16. Seebeck Coefficient Metrology: Do Contemporary Protocols Measure Up?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Green, Martin L.

    2015-06-01

    Comparative measurements of the Seebeck coefficient are challenging due to the diversity of instrumentation and measurement protocols. With the implementation of standardized measurement protocols and the use of Standard Reference Materials (SRMs®), for example, the recently certified National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SRM® 3451 ``Low Temperature Seebeck Coefficient Standard (10-390 K)'', researchers can reliably analyze and compare data, both intra- and inter-laboratory, thereby accelerating the development of more efficient thermoelectric materials and devices. We present a comparative overview of commonly adopted Seebeck coefficient measurement practices. First, we examine the influence of asynchronous temporal and spatial measurement of electric potential and temperature. Temporal asynchronicity introduces error in the absolute Seebeck coefficient of the order of ≈10%, whereas spatial asynchronicity introduces error of the order of a few percent. Second, we examine the influence of poor thermal contact between the measurement probes and the sample. This is especially critical at high temperature, wherein the prevalent mode of measuring surface temperature is facilitated by pressure contact. Each topic will include the comparison of data measured using different measurement techniques and using different probe arrangements. We demonstrate that the probe arrangement is the primary limit to high accuracy, wherein the Seebeck coefficients measured by the 2-probe arrangement and those measured by the 4-probe arrangement diverge with the increase in temperature, approaching ≈14% at 900 K. Using these analyses, we provide recommended measurement protocols to guide members of the thermoelectric materials community in performing more accurate measurements and in evaluating more comprehensive uncertainty limits.

  17. Iron Disilicide as High-Temperature Reference Material for Traceable Measurements of Seebeck Coefficient Between 300 K and 800 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, Pawel; Stiewe, Christian; de Boor, Johannes; Druschke, Ines; Zabrocki, Knud; Edler, Frank; Haupt, Sebastian; König, Jan; Mueller, Eckhard

    2016-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) convert heat to electrical energy by means of the Seebeck effect. The Seebeck coefficient is a central thermoelectric material property, measuring the magnitude of the thermovoltage generated in response to a temperature difference across a thermoelectric material. Precise determination of the Seebeck coefficient provides the basis for reliable performance assessment in materials development in the field of thermoelectrics. For several reasons, measurement uncertainties of up to 14% can often be observed in interlaboratory comparisons of temperature-dependent Seebeck coefficient or in error analyses on currently employed instruments. This is still too high for an industrial benchmark and insufficient for many scientific investigations and technological developments. The TESt (thermoelectric standardization) project was launched in 2011, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), to reduce measurement uncertainties, engineer traceable and precise thermoelectric measurement techniques for materials and TEGs, and develop reference materials (RMs) for temperature-dependent determination of the Seebeck coefficient. We report herein the successful development and qualification of cobalt-doped β-iron disilicide (β-Fe0.95Co0.05Si2) as a RM for high-temperature thermoelectric metrology. A brief survey on technological processes for manufacturing and machining of samples is presented. Focus is placed on metrological qualification of the iron disilicide, results of an international round-robin test, and final certification as a reference material in accordance with ISO-Guide 35 and the "Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement" by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany.

  18. The Seebeck Coefficient and Phonon Drag in Silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahan, Gerald; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Broido, David

    2014-12-29

    We present a theory of the phonon-drag Seebeck coe cient in nondegenerate semiconductors, and apply it to silicon for temperatures 30 < T < 300K. Our calculation uses only parameters from the literature, and previous calculations of the phonon lifetime. We nd excellent agreement with the measurements of Geballe and Hull [Phys.Rev. 98, 940 (1955)]. The phonon-drag term dominates at low temperature, and shows an important dependence on the dimensions of the experimental sample.

  19. Traceable Thermoelectric Measurements of Seebeck Coefficients in the Temperature Range from 300 K to 900 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Ernst; Edler, Frank; Ziolkowski, Pawel

    2013-10-01

    This work is focused on the characterization of thermoelectric reference materials with traceable Seebeck coefficients in the temperature range from 300 K to 900 K. The presented measurement system will provide a relative uncertainty of the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of about 5 %. The Seebeck coefficient represents an important component of the figure of merit ZT and thus the low uncertainty of the Seebeck coefficient will also lower the uncertainty of the ZT value. We also present data which lead to the launch of the certification process of a NiCu-alloy according to the ISO Guide 35.

  20. Design for a spin-Seebeck diode based on two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Dan-Dan; Gu, Lei; Wu, Menghao; Wu, Ruqian

    2015-07-01

    Studies of the spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) are very important for the development of fundamental science and novel low-power-consumption technologies. The spin-Seebeck diode (SSD), in which the spin current can be driven by a forward temperature gradient but not by a reverse temperature gradient, is a key unit in spin caloritronic devices. Here, we propose a SSD design using two-dimensional (2D) materials such as silicene and phosphorene nanoribbons as the source and drain. Due to their unique band structures and magnetic states, thermally driven spin-up and spin-down currents flow in opposite directions. This mechanism is different from that of the previous one, which uses two permalloy circular disks [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 047203 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.047203], and the SSD in our design can be easily integrated with gate voltage control. Since the concept of this design is rather general and applicable to many 2D materials, it is promising for the realization and exploitation of SSDs in nanodevices.

  1. A self-heating 2ω method for Seebeck coefficient measurement of thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Miao, Tingting; Ma, Weigang; Zhang, Xing; Li, Zhen

    2011-02-01

    A novel and reliable self-heating 2ω method has been developed to measure the Seebeck coefficient of the microscale/nanoscale thermoelectric materials. Based on the analytical solution of the transient heat-conduction equation of the specimen heated by a harmonic current, two measurement modes have been developed: (1) the Seebeck coefficient can be directly extracted from the ratio of experimentally measured 2ω Seebeck voltage to theoretically predicted 2ω temperature drop oscillation; and (2) the Seebeck coefficient can be steadily extracted from the measured 2ω and 3ω voltages. This approach has been applied to a 25.4 μm thick K-type thermocouple and the measured Seebeck coefficient corresponds well with the nominal value.

  2. Seebeck rectification enabled by intrinsic thermoelectrical coupling in magnetic tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z H; Gui, Y S; Fu, L; Fan, X L; Cao, J W; Xue, D S; Freitas, P P; Houssameddine, D; Hemour, S; Wu, K; Hu, C-M

    2012-07-20

    An intrinsic thermoelectric coupling effect in the linear response regime of magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJ) is reported. In the dc response, it leads to a nonlinear correction to Ohm's law. Dynamically, it enables a novel Seebeck rectification and second harmonic generation, which apply for a broad frequency range and can be magnetically controlled. A phenomenological model on the footing of the Onsager reciprocal relation and the principle of energy conservation explains very well the experimental results obtained from both dc and frequency-dependent transport measurements performed up to GHz frequencies. Our work refines previous understanding of magnetotransport and microwave rectification in MTJs. It forms a new foundation for utilizing spin caloritronics in high-frequency applications.

  3. Multifold Seebeck increase in RuO{sub 2} films by quantum-guided lanthanide dilute alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Music, Denis Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Han, Liang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theo; Devender; Gengler, Jamie J.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2014-02-03

    Ab initio predictions indicating that alloying RuO{sub 2} with La, Eu, or Lu can increase the Seebeck coefficient α manifold due to quantum confinement effects are validated in sputter-deposited La-alloyed RuO{sub 2} films showing fourfold α increase. Combinatorial screening reveals that α enhancement correlates with La-induced lattice distortion, which also decreases the thermal conductivity twentyfold, conducive for high thermoelectric figures of merit. These insights should facilitate the rational design of high efficiency oxide-based thermoelectrics through quantum-guided alloying.

  4. Extreme Seebeck anisotropy in the quasi-one-dimensional metal, Li0.9Mo6O17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Joshua; Moshfeghyeganeh, Saeed; Dos Santos, Carlos A. M.; Neumeier, John J.

    2014-03-01

    We present resistivity and thermopower measurements in the range 300 K <= T <= 500 K on single crystals of the quasi-one-dimensional (q1D) metal, Li0.9Mo6O17 (LiPB) transverse to the q1D metallic chains. Direct electron transfer between the chains of this material is sufficiently weak that inter-chain transport above 400 K is predominated by thermal activation of valence-band states (~ 0 . 14 eV below EF), yielding a large, p-type inter-chain Seebeck coefficient that coexists with n-type metallic behavior confined along the q1D chains. A significant Seebeck anisotropy, ΔS ~= 200 μ V/K, along mutually perpendicular directions gives LiPB potential as a transverse thermoelectric. This anisotropy along with a relatively low inter-chain thermal conductivity (κ ~= 2 W/mK) results in a substantial transverse Peltier effect. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DE-FG02-12ER46888, Univ. Miami), the National Science Foundation (DMR-0907036, Mont. St. Univ.), and in Lorena by the CNPq (301334/2007-2) and FAPESP (2009/14524-6).

  5. A Study of the Measurement of Seebeck Coefficient of SiGe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heung, King Yi

    2005-01-01

    In 1821 German Physicist Thomas J. Seebeck discovered that heat could be converted into electricity when a temperature difference was applied across two points on a material. Theoretically, the generated voltage has a directly proportional relationship with the temperature difference. This relationship is the Seebeck coefficient that scientists always referred to when determining the efficiency of a thermoelectricity convention. In our experiments, however, hysteresis loops appeared when we plotted voltage against temperature difference, and the measured Seebeck appeared differently when the measurements were run under vacuum, air, and helium gas. Measurements were done by using a low-frequency AC measuring method. By simulating the experimental setup into a; thermal circuit, we found that the loop and inconsistency in measuring Seebeck coefficient could be explained by studying the behaviors of a RC circuit in a thermal sense. Under vacuum, the gap of the hysteresis loop can be largely eliminated if the time period of the temperature difference increased up to 4800s. The trend of the variations in measuring Seebeck coefficients in different environments can also be predicted by using different thermal circuit models.

  6. Characterization of Lorenz number with Seebeck coefficient measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Tang, Yinglu; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    In analyzing zT improvements due to lattice thermal conductivity (κ{sub L}) reduction, electrical conductivity (σ) and total thermal conductivity (κ{sub Total}) are often used to estimate the electronic component of the thermal conductivity (κ{sub E}) and in turn κ{sub L} from κ{sub L} = ∼ κ{sub Total} − LσT. The Wiedemann-Franz law, κ{sub E} = LσT, where L is Lorenz number, is widely used to estimate κ{sub E} from σ measurements. It is a common practice to treat L as a universal factor with 2.44 × 10{sup −8} WΩK{sup −2} (degenerate limit). However, significant deviations from the degenerate limit (approximately 40% or more for Kane bands) are known to occur for non-degenerate semiconductors where L converges to 1.5 × 10{sup −8} WΩK{sup −2} for acoustic phonon scattering. The decrease in L is correlated with an increase in thermopower (absolute value of Seebeck coefficient (S)). Thus, a first order correction to the degenerate limit of L can be based on the measured thermopower, |S|, independent of temperature or doping. We propose the equation: L=1.5+exp[−(|S|)/(116) ] (where L is in 10{sup −8} WΩK{sup −2} and S in μV/K) as a satisfactory approximation for L. This equation is accurate within 5% for single parabolic band/acoustic phonon scattering assumption and within 20% for PbSe, PbS, PbTe, Si{sub 0.8}Ge{sub 0.2} where more complexity is introduced, such as non-parabolic Kane bands, multiple bands, and/or alternate scattering mechanisms. The use of this equation for L rather than a constant value (when detailed band structure and scattering mechanism is not known) will significantly improve the estimation of lattice thermal conductivity.

  7. Critical evaluation of the colossal Seebeck coefficient of nanostructured rutile MnO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2015-03-01

    We have explored the correlation between the Seebeck coefficient and the electronic structure of nanostructured rutile MnO2 using density functional theory to critically appraise the three orders of magnitude scatter in literature data. Our hypothesis is that the microstructure and morphology on the nanoscale is causing this behaviour, which we have tested by comparing the Seebeck coefficient of bulk MnO2 with two low-energy surfaces: MnO2(1 1 0) and MnO2(0 0 1). From these data, it is evident that variations over two orders of magnitude in the Seebeck coefficient can be attained by affecting domain size and texture on the nanoscale. This may be understood by analysing the electronic structure. Surface hybridized Mn d-O p states fill the band gap of MnO2 and thus substantially alter the transport properties.

  8. Critical evaluation of the colossal Seebeck coefficient of nanostructured rutile MnO2.

    PubMed

    Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M

    2015-03-25

    We have explored the correlation between the Seebeck coefficient and the electronic structure of nanostructured rutile MnO2 using density functional theory to critically appraise the three orders of magnitude scatter in literature data. Our hypothesis is that the microstructure and morphology on the nanoscale is causing this behaviour, which we have tested by comparing the Seebeck coefficient of bulk MnO2 with two low-energy surfaces: MnO2(1 1 0) and MnO2(0 0 1). From these data, it is evident that variations over two orders of magnitude in the Seebeck coefficient can be attained by affecting domain size and texture on the nanoscale. This may be understood by analysing the electronic structure. Surface hybridized Mn d-O p states fill the band gap of MnO2 and thus substantially alter the transport properties.

  9. Profiling the Local Seebeck Coefficient with Nanometer Resolution Using Scanning Thermoelectric Microscopy (SThEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Walrath, Jenna; Goldman, Rachel

    2013-03-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices offer a method of recovering waste heat through solid state conversion of heat to electricity. Nanostructured thermoelectric materials may provide the key to increased efficiencies, which are sensitive to the Seebeck coefficients (S) However, traditional bulk measurement techniques can only provide a spatially averaged measurement of S over the whole sample, which can hardly investigate the effects of nanostructures on S on the nanoscale. A novel technique known as scanning thermoelectric microscopy (SThEM) has recently been developed to measure induced thermal voltages with nanometer resolution In SThEM, an unheated scanning tunneling microscopy tip acts as a high-resolution voltmeter probe to measure the thermally-induced voltage, V, in a heated sample. Here we present a local S measurement using SThEM across an InGaAs P-N junction. The thermovoltage shows an abrupt change of sign within 10 nanometers, which reveals nanometer spatial resolution. We will discuss local S measurements of AlAs/GaAs superlattices (SLs) with various SL periods and compare the local S with scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements, which will reveal how local electronic states influence thermoelectric properties. This material is based upon work primarily supported by DOE under grant No. DE-FG02-06 and ER46339 the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-PI0000012.

  10. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of a Sub-Compact Seebeck Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Francis C.; Peters, Palmer; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Sub-Compact Seebeck Furnace (SCSF) is a third generation furnace designed as an experimental facility to study the phenomena of undercooling associated with directional solidification. It is intended to provide a double peak temperature profile along the axial direction with gradient zones at each end. By keeping the temperature in the central portion above the melting point of the sample, and cooling the ends of the furnace, a solid/liquid (S/L) interface can be maintained in each one of the gradient zones. A motorized motion control provides a motion to one-half of the furnace. The undercooling associated with the interface being directionally solidified can thus be studied. Modeling of the temperature profile is important to help assure that the furnace design provides the correct thermal characteristics. The furnace is designed with two halves that telescope. Results of thermal analysis based on an analytical solution using simple assumptions will be presented. The resulting temperature profile will show the salient features of the desired thermal profile and provide the general directions for thermal design. Experimental results will be used to compare with the analytical profile. Approach for numerical modeling to provide more detailed information such as two-dimensional effects will be discussed.

  11. Seebeck and thermal conductivity analysis in amorphous/crystalline {beta}-K{<_2}Bi{<_8}Se{<_13} nanocomposite materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kyratsi, Th.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Ioannou, M.; Chung, D. Y.; Tsiaoussis, I.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, ball milling is applied on {beta}-K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} compounds in order to explore the potential of the process for the fabrication of nano-based material. Polycrystalline {beta}-K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13}, synthesized from melt, was ball milled under inert atmosphere. Powder x-ray diffraction showed a significantly increased disorder with ball milling time. TEM studies confirmed the presence of nanocrystalline material in an amorphous matrix, suggesting the development of crystalline/amorphous {beta}-K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} nanocomposite material via ball milling process. Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity were analyzed based on the effective medium theory and show a significant contribution of a nanocrystalline phase.

  12. Development and application of an instrument for spatially resolved Seebeck coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakutayev, Andriy; Luciano, Frank J.; Bollinger, Vincent P.; Sigdel, Ajaya K.; Ndione, Paul F.; Perkins, John D.; Berry, Joseph J.; Parilla, Philip A.; Ginley, David S.

    2013-05-01

    The Seebeck coefficient is a key indicator of the majority carrier type (electrons or holes) in a material. The recent trend toward the development of combinatorial materials research methods has necessitated the development of a new high-throughput approach to measuring the Seebeck coefficient at spatially distinct points across any sample. The overall strategy of the high-throughput experiments is to quickly identify the region of interest on the sample at some expense of accuracy, and then study this region by more conventional techniques. The instrument for spatially resolved Seebeck coefficient measurements reported here relies on establishing a temperature difference across the entire compositionally graded thin-film and consecutive mapping of the resulting voltage as a function of position, which facilitates the temperature-dependent measurements up to 400 °C. The results of the designed instrument are verified at ambient temperature to be repeatable over 10 identical samples and accurate to within 10% versus conventional Seebeck coefficient measurements over the -100 to +150 μV/K range using both n-type and p-type conductive oxides as test cases. The developed instrument was used to determine the sign of electrical carriers of compositionally graded Zn-Co-O and Ni-Co-O libraries prepared by combinatorial sputtering. As a result of this study, both cobalt-based materials were determined to have p-type conduction over a broad single-phase region of chemical compositions and small variation of the Seebeck coefficient over the entire investigated range of compositions and temperature.

  13. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibriummore » is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.« less

  14. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.

  15. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Behavior, and Seebeck Coefficient of Conductive Films for Printed Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Menon, Akanksha K.; Iezzi, Brian; Yee, Shannon K.; Losego, Mark D.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2016-11-01

    Printed electronics is being explored as a rapid, facile means for manufacturing thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that can recover useful electrical energy from waste heat. This work examines the relevant electrical conductivity, thermal resistance, thermovoltage, and Seebeck coefficient of printed films for use in such printed flexible TEGs. The thermoelectric performance of TEGs printed using commercially relevant nickel, silver, and carbon inks is evaluated. The microstructure of the printed films is investigated to better understand why the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient are degraded. Thermal conduction is shown to be relatively insensitive to the type of metalized coating and nearly equivalent to that of an uncoated polymer substrate. Of the commercially available conductive ink materials examined, carbon-nickel TEGs are shown to exhibit the highest thermovoltage, with a value of 10.3 μV/K. However, silver-nickel TEGs produced the highest power generation of 14.6 μW [from 31 junctions with temperature difference (Δ T) of 113°C] due to their low electrical resistance. The voltage generated from the silver-nickel TEG was stable under continuous operation at 275°C for 3 h. We have also demonstrated that, after a year of storage in ambient conditions, these devices retain their performance. Notably, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measured for individual materials were consistent with those measured from actual printed TEG device structures, validating the need for further fundamental materials characterization to accelerate flexible TEG device optimization.

  16. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Behavior, and Seebeck Coefficient of Conductive Films for Printed Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Menon, Akanksha K.; Iezzi, Brian; Yee, Shannon K.; Losego, Mark D.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2016-07-01

    Printed electronics is being explored as a rapid, facile means for manufacturing thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that can recover useful electrical energy from waste heat. This work examines the relevant electrical conductivity, thermal resistance, thermovoltage, and Seebeck coefficient of printed films for use in such printed flexible TEGs. The thermoelectric performance of TEGs printed using commercially relevant nickel, silver, and carbon inks is evaluated. The microstructure of the printed films is investigated to better understand why the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient are degraded. Thermal conduction is shown to be relatively insensitive to the type of metalized coating and nearly equivalent to that of an uncoated polymer substrate. Of the commercially available conductive ink materials examined, carbon-nickel TEGs are shown to exhibit the highest thermovoltage, with a value of 10.3 μV/K. However, silver-nickel TEGs produced the highest power generation of 14.6 μW [from 31 junctions with temperature difference (ΔT) of 113°C] due to their low electrical resistance. The voltage generated from the silver-nickel TEG was stable under continuous operation at 275°C for 3 h. We have also demonstrated that, after a year of storage in ambient conditions, these devices retain their performance. Notably, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measured for individual materials were consistent with those measured from actual printed TEG device structures, validating the need for further fundamental materials characterization to accelerate flexible TEG device optimization.

  17. Uncertainty Analysis of Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide a complete description of a materials thermoelectric power factor, in addition to the measured nominal value, an uncertainty interval is required. The uncertainty may contain sources of measurement error including systematic bias error and precision error of a statistical nature. The work focuses specifically on the popular ZEM-3 (Ulvac Technologies) measurement system, but the methods apply to any measurement system. The analysis accounts for sources of systematic error including sample preparation tolerance, measurement probe placement, thermocouple cold-finger effect, and measurement parameters; in addition to including uncertainty of a statistical nature. Complete uncertainty analysis of a measurement system allows for more reliable comparison of measurement data between laboratories.

  18. Density functional theory of the Seebeck coefficient in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kaike; Perfetto, Enrico; Kurth, Stefan; Stefanucci, Gianluca; D'Agosta, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The Seebeck coefficient plays a fundamental role in identifying the efficiency of a thermoelectric device. Its theoretical evaluation for atomistic models is routinely based on density functional theory calculations combined with the Landauer-Büttiker approach to quantum transport. This combination, however, suffers from serious drawbacks for devices in the Coulomb blockade regime. We show how to cure the theory through a simple correction in terms of the temperature derivative of the exchange correlation potential. Our results compare well with both rate equations and experimental findings on carbon nanotubes.

  19. Profiling the Local Seebeck Coefficient of InAs-GaAs Quantum Dots Using Scanning Thermoelectric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Walrath, Jenna; Huang, Simon; Goldman, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices offer a method of recovering waste heat through solid state conversion of heat to electricity. However, the typical efficiencies of TE devices are 5-10% which constitutes a barrier to wide spread use. There have recently been a number of reports of an increase in the bulk thermopower due to nanostructuring. In addition to our recent report of enhanced thermopower for GaAs embedded with indium nanocrystals, a theoretical study by Mahan and Sofo suggested that the best thermoelectric materials have a delta function density of states. Quantum dots fit ideally into such a picture. To date, the influence of nanostructuring on the electronic LDOS and thermopower has been studied using spatially averaged measurements; a nanoscale investigation of the effects of nanostructures on thermopower has yet to be presented. To investigate the link between dimensionality and TE properties, we are examining structures ranging from QDs to bulk-like layers, comparing SThEM measurements of the local Seebeck coefficient, S, with STS measurements of the local density of states (LDOS). STM, STS, and SThEM performed on InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on GaAs. SThEM reveals enhanced S-values near the QD edge; STS reveals band-bending at the QD/GaAs interface, suggesting that the S enhancement is due to interfacial charge accumulation.

  20. A computer-controlled apparatus for Seebeck inhomogeneity testing of sheathed thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) thermocouple assemblies are used throughout industry and research facilities as a method of temperature measurement where requirements for either harsh environmental conditions exist, or where rigidity of the measurement probe is required. Seebeck inhomogeneity is the abnormal variation of the Seebeck coefficient from point to point in a material. It is not disclosed in conventional calibration. A standardized method of measuring thermoelectric inhomogeneity along the thermocouple probe length is not available. Therefore, calibration for sheathed probes normally does not include testing of probe inhomogeneity. The measurement accuracy would be severely impacted if significant inhomogeneity and a temperature gradient were present in the same region of the probe. A computer-controlled system for determining inhomogeneities was designed, fabricated, and tested. This system provides an accurate method for the identification of the location of inhomogeneity along the length of a sheathed thermocouple and for the quantification of the inhomogeneity. This paper will discuss the apparatus and procedure used to perform these tests and will present data showing tests performed on sheathed thermocouple probes.

  1. Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficients of Icosahedral Boron Arsenide Films on Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Y Gong; Y Zhang; M Dudley; Y Zhang; J Edgar; P Heard; M Kuball

    2011-12-31

    The thermal conductivity of icosahedral boron arsenide (B{sub 12}As{sub 2}) films grown on (0001) 6H-SiC substrates by chemical vapor deposition was studied by the 3{omega} technique. The room temperature thermal conductivity decreased from 27.0 to 15.3 W/m K as the growth temperature was decreased from 1450 to 1275 C. This is mainly attributed to the differences in the impurity concentration and microstructure, determined from secondary ion mass spectrometry and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Callaway's theory was applied to calculate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity, and the results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Seebeck coefficients were determined as 107 {micro}V/K and 136 {micro}V/K for samples grown at 1350 C with AsH{sub 3}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow ratio equals to 1:1 and 3:5, respectively.

  2. Scanning Seebeck Coefficient Measurement System for Homogeneity Characterization of Bulk and Thin-Film Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, S; Snyder, GJ

    2012-04-03

    Larger-scale production of thermoelectric materials is necessary when mass-producing thermoelectric devices at industrial level. Certain fabrication techniques can create inhomogeneity in the material through composition and doping fluctuations throughout the sample, causing local variations in thermoelectric properties. Some variations are in the range of sub-millimeter scale or larger but may be difficult to detect by traditional materials characterization techniques such as x-ray diffraction or scanning electron microscopy when the chemical variation is small but the doping variation, which strongly affects thermoelectric performance, is large. In this paper, a scanning apparatus to directly detect local variations of Seebeck coefficient on both bulk and thin-film samples is used. Results have shown that this technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separation in the 100-m range or larger.

  3. Record Seebeck coefficient and extremely low thermal conductivity in nanostructured SnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano-Sánchez, F.; Gharsallah, M.; Nemes, N. M.; Mompean, F. J.; Martínez, J. L.; Alonso, J. A.

    2015-02-23

    SnSe has been prepared by arc-melting, as mechanically robust pellets, consisting of highly oriented polycrystals. This material has been characterized by neutron powder diffraction (NPD), scanning electron microscopy, and transport measurements. A microscopic analysis from NPD data demonstrates a quite perfect stoichiometry SnSe{sub 0.98(2)} and a fair amount of anharmonicity of the chemical bonds. The Seebeck coefficient reaches a record maximum value of 668 μV K{sup −1} at 380 K; simultaneously, this highly oriented sample exhibits an extremely low thermal conductivity lower than 0.1 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} around room temperature, which are two of the main ingredients of good thermoelectric materials. These excellent features exceed the reported values for this semiconducting compound in single crystalline form in the moderate-temperatures region and highlight its possibilities as a potential thermoelectric material.

  4. Size effects on thermoelectric behavior of ultrathin NaxCoO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, Peter; Rijnders, Guus; Huijben, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Size effects in thermoelectric NaxCoO2 thin films are studied, focusing on the electrical resisitivity and Seebeck coefficient. For very thin films below 10 nm, we have observed an increase in resistivity, which is in agreement with theoretical models. In contrast to a predicted simultaneous suppression of the Seebeck coefficient for ultrathin films, we observe a constant Seebeck coefficient as a function of layer thickness due to changes in the structural properties as well as the presence of strong electron correlations. This preserved high Seebeck coefficient opens up new directions for NaxCoO2 ultrathin films as basic building blocks in thermoelectric superlattices with enhanced phonon scattering.

  5. Strain effect on electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of orthorhombic SnSe: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Cuong, Do Duc; Rhim, S. H. Hong, Soon Cheol; Lee, Joo-Hyong

    2015-11-15

    Strain effect on thermoelectricity of orthorhombic SnSe is studied using density function theory. The Seebeck coefficients are obtained by solving Boltzmann Transport equation (BTE) with interpolated band energies. As expected from the crystal structure, calculated Seebeck coefficients are highly anisotropic, and agree well with experiment. Changes in the Seebeck coefficients are presented, when strain is applied along b and c direction with strength from -3% to +3%, where influence by band gaps and band dispersions are significant. Moreover, for compressive strains, the sign change of Seebeck coefficients at particular direction suggests that the bipolar transport is possible for SnSe.

  6. Evaluation of Seebeck coefficients in n- and p-type silicon nanowires fabricated by complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Younghoon; Park, Youngsam; Choi, Wonchul; Kim, Jaehyeon; Zyung, Taehyoung; Jang, Moongyu

    2012-10-12

    Silicon-based thermoelectric nanowires were fabricated by using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. 50 nm width n- and p-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were manufactured using a conventional photolithography method on 8 inch silicon wafer. For the evaluation of the Seebeck coefficients of the silicon nanowires, heater and temperature sensor embedded test patterns were fabricated. Moreover, for the elimination of electrical and thermal contact resistance issues, the SiNWs, heater and temperature sensors were fabricated monolithically using a CMOS process. For validation of the temperature measurement by an electrical method, scanning thermal microscopy analysis was carried out. The highest Seebeck coefficients were - 169.97 μV K(-1) and 152.82 μV K(-1) and the highest power factors were 2.77 mW m(-1) K(-2) and 0.65 mW m(-1) K(-2) for n- and p-type SiNWs, respectively, in the temperature range from 200 to 300 K. The larger power factor value for n-type SiNW was due to the higher electrical conductivity. The total Seebeck coefficient and total power factor for the n- and p-leg unit device were 157.66 μV K(-1) and 9.30 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 300 K, respectively.

  7. Seebeck Coefficient of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles as a Function of Ohmic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Nicholas; Hedden, Morgan; Constantin, Costel

    2013-03-01

    Due to the ever increasing energy demand and growing global concern over the environmental impact of CO2 emissions, there is an urging need to seek solutions to transit from fossil fuels to sustainable energy. Thermoelectric (TE) materials show great promise for converting waste heat energy into electricity. TE systems have many unique advantages such as silent operationality, time reliability, and dimensional scalability. Most recently, researchers Song et al. found that MnO2 nanoparticles show a giant Seebeck coefficient of S = 20 mV/K, which is100 times higher than bismuth telluride, one of the best TE materials. Song et al. concluded the paper claiming that the giant S is related to the surface density of the electronic states (DOS). However, they provided very little information about the S as a function of Ohmic resistance [R] for different nano particle sizes which can give information about the DOS. Our preliminary results show that there is a sudden increase of S from 0.33-0.63 mV/K as R increases from 80-110 Ohms. This transition has never been seen before and it can give clues as to the existence of the Giant S observed in this material. This work was supported in part by U.S. Department of Energy Grant #DE-EE0003100..

  8. Anisotropy of Seebeck coefficient in Si/Ge composite quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsin, Cheng-Lun; Tsai, Yue-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this report, Si5Ge5 alloy and Si/Ge composite quantum dots (CQDs) layers were grown on Si substrates. Seebeck coefficient (S) of Si and Ge wafers, as well as these two samples, were patterned and measured from 60 to 180 °C in [110] and [010] directions. For Si, Ge, and Si5Ge5, the S of each is a constant in this temperature range. However, the S of the CQDs at 60-80 °C is anomalous and much higher than the others. The behavior of the voltage difference is linear to the temperature difference even as large as 50 °C, except for CQDs at 60-80 °C. This result indicates that a narrow distribution of carriers energy with a sharp change in density of state near Fermi-level and selective carrier scattering in the miniband at Si/Ge interface make the discrepancy of charge transport enhanced. The CQDs can be a good candidate for temperature sensing and thermoelectric applications due to their high S and low thermal conductivity near room temperature.

  9. Seebeck Coefficient Measurements on Micron-Size Single-Crystal Zinc Germanium Nitride Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, J. S.; Colvin, J. R.; Quayle, P. C.; Peshek, T. J.; Kash, K.

    2016-06-01

    II-IV-nitride compounds are tetrahedrally bonded, heterovalent ternary semiconductors that have recently garnered attention for their potential technological applications. These materials are derived from the parent III-nitride compounds; ZnGeN2 is the II-IV-nitride analogue to the III-nitride GaN. Very little is known about the transport properties of ZnGeN2. In this work, we present Seebeck coefficient ( S) data on 3-micron-diameter, 70-micron-long, single-crystal ZnGeN2 rods, employing a novel measurement approach. The measurements of S show that the majority free carriers are electrons, and imply that the carrier gas is degenerate. Within a single-band model for the conduction band, a carrier concentration of order 1019 cm-3 was estimated for a measured S = -90 μV/K. Together with electrical transport measurements, a lower limit for the electron mobility is estimated to be ˜20 cm2/V-s. A discussion of this material as a thermoelectric is presented. The background level of free electrons in this unintentionally doped ZnGeN2 is very near the predicted optimum value for maximum thermoelectric performance.

  10. The Seebeck Coefficient in Oxygen Enriched La2NiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Paul; Leboran, Victor; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    Oxide-based devices show promise for themoelectric applications due to their chemical stability and straightforward fabrication. The La2NiO4+δ system has been predicted to show an increased thermopower coupled with an increased electrical conductivity around δ = 0 . 05 [Pardo et al. PRB 86, 165114 (2012)] that could lead to a large thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT). We investigate the suitability of lanthanum nickelate as a candidate material for high-ZT devices through a systematic study of oxygenated thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. We report the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and structural morphology of La2NiO4 grown in a range of oxidizing atmospheres and discuss their implications for controlled engineering of thermoelectric properties. We have explored the possibility of gate-tuning these systems in order to fabricate single-oxide based devices. This work was supported by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (Spain), grant MAT2010-16157, and the European Research Council, grant ERC-2010-StG 259082 2D THERMS.

  11. Vacancy filling effect in thermoelectric NbO.

    PubMed

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W; Bliem, Pascal; Hans, Marcus; Primetzhofer, Daniel

    2015-03-25

    Using density functional theory, we have systematically explored the 1a and 1b vacancy filling in NbO (space group Pm-3m) with Nb and N, respectively, to design compounds with large Seebeck coefficients. The most dominating effect was identified for filling of 1b Wyckoff sites with N giving rise to a fivefold increase in the Seebeck coefficient. This may be understood based on the electronic structure. Nb d-nonmetal p hybridization induces quantum confinement and hence enables the enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. This was validated by measuring the Seebeck coefficient of reactively sputtered thin films. At 800 °C these electrically conductive oxynitrides exhibit the Seebeck coefficient of -70 µV K(-1), which is the largest absolute value ever reported for these compounds.

  12. Vacancy filling effect in thermoelectric NbO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Bliem, Pascal; Hans, Marcus; Primetzhofer, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Using density functional theory, we have systematically explored the 1a and 1b vacancy filling in NbO (space group Pm-3m) with Nb and N, respectively, to design compounds with large Seebeck coefficients. The most dominating effect was identified for filling of 1b Wyckoff sites with N giving rise to a fivefold increase in the Seebeck coefficient. This may be understood based on the electronic structure. Nb d—nonmetal p hybridization induces quantum confinement and hence enables the enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. This was validated by measuring the Seebeck coefficient of reactively sputtered thin films. At 800 °C these electrically conductive oxynitrides exhibit the Seebeck coefficient of -70 µV K-1, which is the largest absolute value ever reported for these compounds.

  13. Thermoelectricity at the molecular scale: a large Seebeck effect in endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, See Kei; Buerkle, Marius; Yamada, Ryo; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tada, Hirokazu

    2015-12-28

    Single molecule devices provide a unique system to study the thermoelectric energy conversion at an atomistic level and can provide valuable information for the design of organic thermoelectric materials. Here we present a comprehensive study of the thermoelectric transport properties of molecular junctions based on C(82), Gd@C(82), and Ce@C(82). We combine precise scanning tunneling microscope break-junction measurements of the thermopower and conductance with quantitatively accurate self-energy-corrected first-principles transport calculations. We find that all three fullerene derivatives give rise to a negative thermopower (n-conducting). The absolute value, however, is much larger for the Gd@C(82) and Ce@C(82) junctions. The conductance, on the other hand, remains comparable for all three systems. The power factor determined for the Gd@C(82) based junction is so far the highest obtained for a single-molecule device. Although the encapsulated metal atom does not directly contribute to the transport, we show that the observed enhancement of the thermopower for Gd@C(82) and Ce@C(82) is elucidated by the substantial changes in the electronic- and geometrical structure of the fullerene molecule induced by the encapsulated metal atom. PMID:26583505

  14. Thermoelectricity at the molecular scale: a large Seebeck effect in endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, See Kei; Buerkle, Marius; Yamada, Ryo; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tada, Hirokazu

    2015-12-28

    Single molecule devices provide a unique system to study the thermoelectric energy conversion at an atomistic level and can provide valuable information for the design of organic thermoelectric materials. Here we present a comprehensive study of the thermoelectric transport properties of molecular junctions based on C(82), Gd@C(82), and Ce@C(82). We combine precise scanning tunneling microscope break-junction measurements of the thermopower and conductance with quantitatively accurate self-energy-corrected first-principles transport calculations. We find that all three fullerene derivatives give rise to a negative thermopower (n-conducting). The absolute value, however, is much larger for the Gd@C(82) and Ce@C(82) junctions. The conductance, on the other hand, remains comparable for all three systems. The power factor determined for the Gd@C(82) based junction is so far the highest obtained for a single-molecule device. Although the encapsulated metal atom does not directly contribute to the transport, we show that the observed enhancement of the thermopower for Gd@C(82) and Ce@C(82) is elucidated by the substantial changes in the electronic- and geometrical structure of the fullerene molecule induced by the encapsulated metal atom.

  15. Spin Seebeck Effect and Thermal Colossal Magnetoresistance in Graphene Nanoribbon Heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yun; Yao, Kailun; Fu, Huahua; Gao, Guoying; Zhu, Sicong; Wang, Shuling

    2013-01-01

    Spin caloritronics devices are very important for future development of low-power-consumption technology. We propose a new spin caloritronics device based on zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR), which is a heterojunction consisting of single-hydrogen-terminated ZGNR (ZGNR-H) and double-hydrogen-terminated ZGNR (ZGNR-H2). We predict that spin-up and spin-down currents flowing in opposite directions can be induced by temperature difference instead of external electrical bias. The thermal spin-up current is considerably large and greatly improved compared with previous work in graphene. Moreover, the thermal colossal magnetoresistance is obtained in our research, which could be used to fabricate highly-efficient spin caloritronics MR devices. PMID:23459307

  16. Thermoelectricity at the molecular scale: a large Seebeck effect in endohedral metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, See Kei; Buerkle, Marius; Yamada, Ryo; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tada, Hirokazu

    2015-12-01

    Single molecule devices provide a unique system to study the thermoelectric energy conversion at an atomistic level and can provide valuable information for the design of organic thermoelectric materials. Here we present a comprehensive study of the thermoelectric transport properties of molecular junctions based on C82, Gd@C82, and Ce@C82. We combine precise scanning tunneling microscope break-junction measurements of the thermopower and conductance with quantitatively accurate self-energy-corrected first-principles transport calculations. We find that all three fullerene derivatives give rise to a negative thermopower (n-conducting). The absolute value, however, is much larger for the Gd@C82 and Ce@C82 junctions. The conductance, on the other hand, remains comparable for all three systems. The power factor determined for the Gd@C82 based junction is so far the highest obtained for a single-molecule device. Although the encapsulated metal atom does not directly contribute to the transport, we show that the observed enhancement of the thermopower for Gd@C82 and Ce@C82 is elucidated by the substantial changes in the electronic- and geometrical structure of the fullerene molecule induced by the encapsulated metal atom.Single molecule devices provide a unique system to study the thermoelectric energy conversion at an atomistic level and can provide valuable information for the design of organic thermoelectric materials. Here we present a comprehensive study of the thermoelectric transport properties of molecular junctions based on C82, Gd@C82, and Ce@C82. We combine precise scanning tunneling microscope break-junction measurements of the thermopower and conductance with quantitatively accurate self-energy-corrected first-principles transport calculations. We find that all three fullerene derivatives give rise to a negative thermopower (n-conducting). The absolute value, however, is much larger for the Gd@C82 and Ce@C82 junctions. The conductance, on the other hand, remains comparable for all three systems. The power factor determined for the Gd@C82 based junction is so far the highest obtained for a single-molecule device. Although the encapsulated metal atom does not directly contribute to the transport, we show that the observed enhancement of the thermopower for Gd@C82 and Ce@C82 is elucidated by the substantial changes in the electronic- and geometrical structure of the fullerene molecule induced by the encapsulated metal atom. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05394c

  17. Band gap estimation from temperature dependent Seebeck measurement—Deviations from the 2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max} relation

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Zachary M.; Kim, Hyun-Sik; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-01-12

    In characterizing thermoelectric materials, electrical and thermal transport measurements are often used to estimate electronic band structure properties such as the effective mass and band gap. The Goldsmid-Sharp band gap, E{sub g} = 2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max}, is a tool widely employed to estimate the band gap from temperature dependent Seebeck coefficient measurements. However, significant deviations of more than a factor of two are now known to occur. We find that this is when either the majority-to-minority weighted mobility ratio (A) becomes very different from 1.0 or as the band gap (E{sub g}) becomes significantly smaller than 10 k{sub B}T. For narrow gaps (E{sub g} ≲ 6 k{sub B}T), the Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics applied by Goldsmid-Sharp break down and Fermi-Dirac statistics are required. We generate a chart that can be used to quickly estimate the expected correction to the Goldsmid-Sharp band gap depending on A and S{sub max}; however, additional errors can occur for S < 150 μV/K due to degenerate behavior.

  18. High temperature setup for measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of thin films using inductive heating.

    PubMed

    Adnane, L; Williams, N; Silva, H; Gokirmak, A

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an automated setup for simultaneous measurement of Seebeck coefficient S(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) of thin film samples from room temperature to ∼650 °C. S and ρ are extracted from current-voltage (I-V) measurements obtained using a semiconductor parameter analyzer and temperature measurements obtained using commercial thermocouples. The slope and the x-axis intercept of the I-V characteristics represent the sample conductance G and the Seebeck voltage, respectively. The measured G(T) can be scaled to ρ(T) by the geometry factor obtained from the room temperature resistivity measurement of the film. The setup uses resistive or inductive heating to control the temperature and temperature gradient on the sample. Inductive heating is achieved with steel plates that surround the test area and a water cooled copper pipe coil underneath that generates an AC magnetic field. The measurements can be performed using resistive heating only or inductive heating only, or a combination of both depending on the desired heating ranges. Inductive heating provides a more uniform heating of the test area, does not require contacts to the sample holder, can be used up to the Curie temperature of the particular magnetic material, and the temperature gradients can be adjusted by the relative positions of the coil and sample. Example results obtained for low doped single-crystal silicon with inductive heating only and with resistive heating only are presented. PMID:26520996

  19. Seebeck coefficient of underdoped LSCO in high magnetic fields : Fermi-surface reconstruction by charge-density-wave order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badoux, Sven; Afshar, Arezoo; Michon, Bastien; Ouellet, Alexandre; Fortier, Simon; Doiron-Leyraud, Nicolas; Taillefer, Louis; Leboeuf, David; Croft, Thomas; Hayden, Stephen; Takagi, Hidenori; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Graf, David

    The Seebeck coefficient S of the hole-doped cuprate La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) was measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, for a range of Sr concentrations x in the underdoped regime. For x = 0 . 12 , 0.125 and 0.13, S / T is seen to drop upon cooling and become negative at low temperature. The same behavior is observed in the Hall coefficient RH (T) . In analogy with other hole-doped cuprates at similar hole concentrations, the sign change in S and RH shows that the Fermi surface of LSCO undergoes a reconstruction caused by the onset of charge-density-wave modulations. Such modulations have indeed been detected in LSCO by X-ray diffraction in precisely the same doping range.

  20. Reliable measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of organic and inorganic materials between 260 K and 460 K

    SciTech Connect

    Beretta, D.; Lanzani, G.; Bruno, P.; Caironi, M.

    2015-07-15

    A new experimental setup for reliable measurement of the in-plane Seebeck coefficient of organic and inorganic thin films and bulk materials is reported. The system is based on the “Quasi-Static” approach and can measure the thermopower in the range of temperature between 260 K and 460 K. The system has been tested on a pure nickel bulk sample and on a thin film of commercially available PEDOT:PSS deposited by spin coating on glass. Repeatability within 1.5% for the nickel sample is demonstrated, while accuracy in the measurement of both organic and inorganic samples is guaranteed by time interpolation of data and by operating with a temperature difference over the sample of less than 1 K.

  1. Seebeck and figure of merit enhancement in nanostructured antimony telluride by antisite defect suppression through sulfur doping.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rutvik J; Zhang, Yanliang; Zhu, Hong; Parker, David S; Belley, Matthew; Singh, David J; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2012-09-12

    Antimony telluride has a low thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT < ∼0.3) because of a low Seebeck coefficient α arising from high degenerate hole concentrations generated by antimony antisite defects. Here, we mitigate this key problem by suppressing antisite defect formation using subatomic percent sulfur doping. The resultant 10-25% higher α in bulk nanocrystalline antimony telluride leads to ZT ∼ 0.95 at 423 K, which is superior to the best non-nanostructured antimony telluride alloys. Density functional theory calculations indicate that sulfur increases the antisite formation activation energy and presage further improvements leading to ZT ∼ 2 through optimized doping. Our findings are promising for designing novel thermoelectric materials for refrigeration, waste heat recovery, and solar thermal applications.

  2. Statistical Analysis of a Round-Robin Measurement Survey of Two Candidate Materials for a Seebeck Coefficient Standard Reference Material

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Z. Q. J.; Lowhorn, N. D.; Wong-Ng, W.; Zhang, W.; Thomas, E. L.; Otani, M.; Green, M. L.; Tran, T. N.; Caylor, C.; Dilley, N. R.; Downey, A.; Edwards, B.; Elsner, N.; Ghamaty, S.; Hogan, T.; Jie, Q.; Li, Q.; Martin, J.; Nolas, G.; Obara, H.; Sharp, J.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Willigan, R.; Yang, J.; Tritt, T.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to develop a Standard Reference Material (SRM™) for Seebeck coefficient, we have conducted a round-robin measurement survey of two candidate materials—undoped Bi2Te3 and Constantan (55 % Cu and 45 % Ni alloy). Measurements were performed in two rounds by twelve laboratories involved in active thermoelectric research using a number of different commercial and custom-built measurement systems and techniques. In this paper we report the detailed statistical analyses on the interlaboratory measurement results and the statistical methodology for analysis of irregularly sampled measurement curves in the interlaboratory study setting. Based on these results, we have selected Bi2Te3 as the prototype standard material. Once available, this SRM will be useful for future interlaboratory data comparison and instrument calibrations. PMID:27504212

  3. Effets Seebeck et Nernst dans les cuprates: Etude de la reconstruction de la surface de Fermi sous champ magnetique intense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laliberte, Francis

    2010-06-01

    Ce memoire presente des mesures de transport thermoelectrique, les effets Seebeck et Nernst, dans une serie d'echantillons de supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique. Des resultats obtenus recemment au Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses a Grenoble sur La1.7Eu0.2Sr0.1 CuO4, La1.675Eu0.2Sr0.125CuO 4, La1.64Eu0.2Sr0.16CuO4, La1.74Eu0.1Sr0.16CuO4 et La 1.4Nd0.4Sr0.2CuO4 sont analyses. Une attention particuliere est accordee aux equations de la theorie semi-classique du transport et leur validite est verifiee. La procedure experimentale et les materiaux utilises pour concevoir les montages de mesures sont expliques en detail. Enfin, un chapitre est dedie a l'explication et l'interpretation des resultats de transport thermoelectrique sur YBa2Cu3O6+delta publies au cours de l'hiver 2010 dans les revues Nature et Physical Review Letters. Les donnees d'effet Seebeck dans les echantillons de La 1.8-x,Eu0.2SrxCuO 4, ou un changement de signe est observe, permettent de conclure a la presence d'une poche d'electrons dans la surface de Fermi qui domine le transport a basse temperature dans la region sous-dopee du diagramme de phase. Cette conclusion est similaire a celle obtenue par des mesures d'effet Hall dans YBa 2Cu3O6+delta et elle cadre bien dans un scenario de reconstruction de la surface de Fermi. Les donnees d'effet Nernst recueillies indiquent que la contribution des fluctuations supraconductrices est limitee a un modeste intervalle de temperature au-dessus de la temperature critique.

  4. Observations of Co4+ in a higher spin state and the increase in the Seebeck coefficient of thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9.

    PubMed

    Klie, R F; Qiao, Q; Paulauskas, T; Gulec, A; Rebola, A; Öğüt, S; Prange, M P; Idrobo, J C; Pantelides, S T; Kolesnik, S; Dabrowski, B; Ozdemir, M; Boyraz, C; Mazumdar, D; Gupta, A

    2012-05-11

    Ca3Co4O9 has a unique structure that leads to exceptionally high thermoelectric transport. Here we report the achievement of a 27% increase in the room-temperature in-plane Seebeck coefficient of Ca3Co4O9 thin films. We combine aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging, atomic-column resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations to show that the increase is caused by stacking faults with Co4+-ions in a higher spin state compared to that of bulk Ca3Co4O9. The higher Seebeck coefficient makes the Ca3Co4O9 system suitable for many high temperature waste-heat-recovery applications.

  5. Observations of Co4+ in a Higher Spin State and the Increase in the Seebeck Coefficient of Thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9

    SciTech Connect

    Klie, Robert F; Qiao, Q.; Paulauskas, T.; Gulec, A.; Rebola, A.; Ogut, Serdar; Prange, Micah P; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Kolesnik, S.; Dabrowski, B.; Ozdemir, M.; Boyraz, C.; Mazumdar, Dipanjan; Gupta, Dr. Arunava

    2012-01-01

    Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} has a unique structure that leads to exceptionally high thermoelectric transport. Here we report the achievement of a 27% increase in the room-temperature in-plane Seebeck coefficient of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films. We combine aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging, atomic-column resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations to show that the increase is caused by stacking faults with Co4+-ions in a higher spin state compared to that of bulk Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The higher Seebeck coefficient makes the Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} system suitable for many high temperature waste-heat-recovery applications.

  6. Hall and Seebeck measurements estimate the thickness of a (buried) carrier system: Identifying interface electrons in In-doped SnO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadogianni, Alexandra; White, Mark E.; Speck, James S.; Galazka, Zbigniew; Bierwagen, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    We propose a simple method based on the combination of Hall and Seebeck measurements to estimate the thickness of a carrier system within a semiconductor film. As an example, this method can distinguish "bulk" carriers, with homogeneous depth distribution, from "sheet" carriers, that are accumulated within a thin layer. The thickness of the carrier system is calculated as the ratio of the integral sheet carrier concentration, extracted from Hall measurements, to the volume carrier concentration, derived from the measured Seebeck coefficient of the same sample. For rutile SnO2, the necessary relation of Seebeck coefficient to volume electron concentration in the range of 3 × 1017 to 3 × 1020 cm-3 has been experimentally obtained from a set of single crystalline thin films doped with varying Sb-doping concentrations and unintentionally doped bulk samples, and is given as a "calibration curve." Using this calibration curve, our method demonstrates the presence of interface electrons in homogeneously deep-acceptor (In) doped SnO2 films on sapphire substrates.

  7. Hall and Seebeck measurements estimate the thickness of a (buried) carrier system: Identifying interface electrons in In-doped SnO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Papadogianni, Alexandra; Bierwagen, Oliver; White, Mark E.; Speck, James S.; Galazka, Zbigniew

    2015-12-21

    We propose a simple method based on the combination of Hall and Seebeck measurements to estimate the thickness of a carrier system within a semiconductor film. As an example, this method can distinguish “bulk” carriers, with homogeneous depth distribution, from “sheet” carriers, that are accumulated within a thin layer. The thickness of the carrier system is calculated as the ratio of the integral sheet carrier concentration, extracted from Hall measurements, to the volume carrier concentration, derived from the measured Seebeck coefficient of the same sample. For rutile SnO{sub 2}, the necessary relation of Seebeck coefficient to volume electron concentration in the range of 3 × 10{sup 17} to 3 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} has been experimentally obtained from a set of single crystalline thin films doped with varying Sb-doping concentrations and unintentionally doped bulk samples, and is given as a “calibration curve.” Using this calibration curve, our method demonstrates the presence of interface electrons in homogeneously deep-acceptor (In) doped SnO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates.

  8. Giant thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient of a two-dimensional electron gas in SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiromichi; Kim, Sungwng; Mune, Yoriko; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Nomura, Kenji; Ohta, Shingo; Nomura, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yuki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2007-02-01

    Enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient (S ) without reducing the electrical conductivity (sigma) is essential to realize practical thermoelectric materials exhibiting a dimensionless figure of merit (ZT=S2 x sigma x T x kappa-1) exceeding 2, where T is the absolute temperature and kappa is the thermal conductivity. Here, we demonstrate that a high-density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined within a unit cell layer thickness in SrTiO(3) yields unusually large |S|, approximately five times larger than that of SrTiO(3) bulks, while maintaining a high sigma2DEG. In the best case, we observe |S|=850 microV K-1 and sigma2DEG=1.4 x 10(3) S cm-1. In addition, by using the kappa of bulk single-crystal SrTiO(3) at room temperature, we estimate ZT approximately 2.4 for the 2DEG, corresponding to ZT approximately 0.24 for a complete device having the 2DEG as the active region. The present approach using a 2DEG provides a new route to realize practical thermoelectric materials without the use of toxic heavy elements.

  9. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research and development of high temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential of converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as an important area for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is Part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main focuses in Part I are on two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  10. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics—An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff W.; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-04-01

    Recent research and development of high-temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential for converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air-conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, still needs to be improved from the current value of 1.0 to 1.5 to above 2.0 to be competitive with other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods, and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as a key component for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the Implementing Agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main foci in part I are the measurement of two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  11. Thermoelectric properties of the unfilled skutterudite FeSb3 from first principles and Seebeck local probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lemal, Sébastien; Nguyen, Ngoc; de Boor, Johannes; Ghosez, Philippe; Varignon, Julien; Klobes, Benedikt; Hermann, Raphaël P.; Verstraete, Matthieu J.

    2015-11-16

    In this paper, using a combination of first-principles calculations and experimental transport measurements, we study the electronic and magnetic structure of the unfilled skutterudite FeSb3. We employ the hybrid functional approach for exchange correlation. The ground state is determined to be antiferromagnetic with an atomic magnetic moment of 1.6μB/Fe. The Néel temperature TN is estimated at 6 K, in agreement with experiments which found a paramagnetic state down to 10 K. The ground state is semiconducting, with a small electronic gap of 33meV, also consistent with previous experiments on films. Charge carrier concentrations are estimated from Hall resistance measurements. Themore » Seebeck coefficient is measured and mapped using a scanning probe at room temperature that yields an average value of 38.6μVK-1, slightly lower than the theoretical result. Finally, the theoretical conductivity is analyzed as a function of temperature and concentration of charge carriers.« less

  12. Thermoelectric properties of the unfilled skutterudite FeSb3 from first principles and Seebeck local probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemal, Sébastien; Nguyen, Ngoc; de Boor, Johannes; Ghosez, Philippe; Varignon, Julien; Klobes, Benedikt; Hermann, Raphaël P.; Verstraete, Matthieu J.

    2015-11-16

    In this paper, using a combination of first-principles calculations and experimental transport measurements, we study the electronic and magnetic structure of the unfilled skutterudite FeSb3. We employ the hybrid functional approach for exchange correlation. The ground state is determined to be antiferromagnetic with an atomic magnetic moment of 1.6μB/Fe. The Néel temperature TN is estimated at 6 K, in agreement with experiments which found a paramagnetic state down to 10 K. The ground state is semiconducting, with a small electronic gap of 33meV, also consistent with previous experiments on films. Charge carrier concentrations are estimated from Hall resistance measurements. The Seebeck coefficient is measured and mapped using a scanning probe at room temperature that yields an average value of 38.6μVK-1, slightly lower than the theoretical result. Finally, the theoretical conductivity is analyzed as a function of temperature and concentration of charge carriers.

  13. Thin film thermoelectric metal-organic framework with high Seebeck coefficient and low thermal conductivity (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Kristopher J.; Leonard, Francois; Stavila, Vitalie N.; Foster, Michael E.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Jones, Reese; Foley, Brian; Hopkins, Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D.; Talin, A. Alec

    2015-08-01

    Inorganic, low bandgap semiconductors such as Bi2Te3 have adequate efficiency for some thermoelectric energy conversion applications, but have not been more widely adopted because they are difficult to deposit over complex and/or high surface area structures, are not eco-friendly, and are too expensive. As an alternative, conducting polymers have recently attracted much attention for thermoelectric applications motivated by their low material cost, ease of processability, non-toxicity, and low thermal conductivity. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are extended, crystalline compounds consisting of metal ions interconnected by organic ligands, share many of the advantages of all-organic polymers including solution processability and low thermal conductivity. Additionally, MOFs and Guest@MOF materials offer higher thermal stability (up to ~300 °C in some cases) and have long-range crystalline order which should improve charge mobility. A potential advantage of MOFs and Guest@MOF materials over all-organic polymers is the opportunity for tuning the electronic structure through appropriate choice of metal and ligand, which could solve the long-standing challenge of finding stable, high ZT n-type organic semiconductors. In our presentation, we report on thermoelectric measurements of electrically conducting TCNQ@Cu3(BTC)2 thin films deposited using a room-temperature, solution-based method, which reveal a large, positive Seebeck coefficient. Furthermore, we use time-dependent thermoreflectance (TDTR) to measure the thermal conductivity of the films, which is found to have a low value due to the presence of disorder, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to establishing the thermoelectric figure of merit, the thermoelectric measurements reveal for the first time that holes are the majority carriers in TCNQ@Cu3(BTC)2.

  14. Colossal enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient in FeSb2 driven by nearly ballistic phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hidefumi; Okazaki, Ryuji; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Terasaki, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    An unusually large S of - 45 mV/K (at 10 K) was discovered in FeSb2 single crystal, which prompted extensive investigations into its physical origin [A. Bentien et al ., EPL 80, 17008 (2007).] This compound has a small energy gap Δ ~ 5 meV, which may be caused by strong correlations of Fe 3d-electrons, as observed with Kondo insulators, and the colossally large S may be attributed to this unique band structure near the Fermi energy. However, the exceptional value of S has not been clearly explained by electron correlations, suggesting an additional contribution such as the non-equilibrium phonon-drag effect [H. Takahashi et al ., JPSJ 80, 054708 (2011)., H. Takahashi et al ., PRB 84, 205215 (2011)., and H. Takahashi et al ., PRB 88, 165205 (2013).]. Here, we report on the direct investigation of this effect by measuring the transport properties of three samples with cross sections ranging from 250 × 245 μm2 to 80 × 160 μm2. S and κ show a significant size effect, indicating that nearly ballistic phonons, which have a long mean free path relative to the sample dimensions, are responsible for the colossal S.

  15. Size effects on thermoelectric behavior of ultrathin Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Brinks, Peter; Rijnders, Guus; Huijben, Mark

    2014-11-10

    Size effects in thermoelectric Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} thin films are studied, focusing on the electrical resisitivity and Seebeck coefficient. For very thin films below 10 nm, we have observed an increase in resistivity, which is in agreement with theoretical models. In contrast to a predicted simultaneous suppression of the Seebeck coefficient for ultrathin films, we observe a constant Seebeck coefficient as a function of layer thickness due to changes in the structural properties as well as the presence of strong electron correlations. This preserved high Seebeck coefficient opens up new directions for Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} ultrathin films as basic building blocks in thermoelectric superlattices with enhanced phonon scattering.

  16. Apparatus for the measurement of electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity of thermoelectric materials between 300 K and 12 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Nolas, George S.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a custom apparatus for the consecutive measurement of the electrical resistivity, the Seebeck coefficient, and the thermal conductivity of materials between 300 K and 12 K. These three transport properties provide for a basic understanding of the thermal and electrical properties of materials. They are of fundamental importance in identifying and optimizing new materials for thermoelectric applications. Thermoelectric applications include waste heat recovery for automobile engines and industrial power generators, solid-state refrigeration, and remote power generation for sensors and space probes. The electrical resistivity is measured using a four-probe bipolar technique, the Seebeck coefficient is measured using the quasi-steady-state condition of the differential method in a 2-probe arrangement, and the thermal conductivity is measured using a longitudinal, multiple gradient steady-state technique. We describe the instrumentation and the measurement uncertainty associated with each transport property, each of which is presented with representative measurement comparisons using round robin samples and/or certified reference materials. Transport properties data from this apparatus have supported the identification, development, and phenomenological understanding of novel thermoelectric materials.

  17. Apparatus for the measurement of electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity of thermoelectric materials between 300 K and 12 K.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joshua; Nolas, George S

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a custom apparatus for the consecutive measurement of the electrical resistivity, the Seebeck coefficient, and the thermal conductivity of materials between 300 K and 12 K. These three transport properties provide for a basic understanding of the thermal and electrical properties of materials. They are of fundamental importance in identifying and optimizing new materials for thermoelectric applications. Thermoelectric applications include waste heat recovery for automobile engines and industrial power generators, solid-state refrigeration, and remote power generation for sensors and space probes. The electrical resistivity is measured using a four-probe bipolar technique, the Seebeck coefficient is measured using the quasi-steady-state condition of the differential method in a 2-probe arrangement, and the thermal conductivity is measured using a longitudinal, multiple gradient steady-state technique. We describe the instrumentation and the measurement uncertainty associated with each transport property, each of which is presented with representative measurement comparisons using round robin samples and/or certified reference materials. Transport properties data from this apparatus have supported the identification, development, and phenomenological understanding of novel thermoelectric materials.

  18. Apparatus for the measurement of electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity of thermoelectric materials between 300 K and 12 K.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joshua; Nolas, George S

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a custom apparatus for the consecutive measurement of the electrical resistivity, the Seebeck coefficient, and the thermal conductivity of materials between 300 K and 12 K. These three transport properties provide for a basic understanding of the thermal and electrical properties of materials. They are of fundamental importance in identifying and optimizing new materials for thermoelectric applications. Thermoelectric applications include waste heat recovery for automobile engines and industrial power generators, solid-state refrigeration, and remote power generation for sensors and space probes. The electrical resistivity is measured using a four-probe bipolar technique, the Seebeck coefficient is measured using the quasi-steady-state condition of the differential method in a 2-probe arrangement, and the thermal conductivity is measured using a longitudinal, multiple gradient steady-state technique. We describe the instrumentation and the measurement uncertainty associated with each transport property, each of which is presented with representative measurement comparisons using round robin samples and/or certified reference materials. Transport properties data from this apparatus have supported the identification, development, and phenomenological understanding of novel thermoelectric materials. PMID:26827351

  19. Control of thermal gradient using thermoelectric coolers for study of thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Gifford, J. A.; Zhao, G. J.; Kim, D. R.; Snider, C. N.; Vargas, N.; Chen, T. Y.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoelectric coolers based on the Peltier effect have been utilized to control temperature gradient to study thermal effects in both bulk and thin film samples. The temperature gradient is controlled by two coolers and the polarity of the thermal gradient can be reversed by reversing an electric driven voltage. With appropriate controlled thermal gradient using this technique, the Nernst and the Seebeck effects can be measured in both bulk and thin film samples free of spurious contributions. In an arbitrary direction of thermal gradient, the Seebeck and the Nernst components can be decomposed from the measured signal based on the symmetry of the effects in a magnetic field.

  20. Anomalous Enhancement of Seebeck Coefficient in Pr-Based 1-2-20 System with Non-Kramers Doublet Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Ikeura, T.; Izawa, K.; Nakama, A.; Higashinaka, R.; Aoki, Y.; Sato, H.; Sakai, A.; Nakatsuji, S.; Nagasawa, N.; Matsumoto, K.; Onimaru, T.; Takabatake, T.

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature Seebeck coefficient S/T measurements have been performed on Pr-based 1-2-20 system, PrTr2X20 (Tr = Ti, Ta, V, Ir, X = Al, Zn) with non-Kramers doublet ground states. For PrTr2X20 with X = Al, we find a large S/T, which amounts to those of heavy fermion metals. By contrast, S/T for PrIr2Zn20 is found to be considerably small as the same order of magnitude as those of ordinary metals, despite the commonly enhanced Sommerfeld coefficient γ throughout the system. A satisfactory of the quasi-universal relation between S/T and γ as well as the Kadowaki-Woods relation demonstrates that the mass enhancement is realized in PrTr2Al20 due to the hybridization between f-electrons and the conduction electrons. We also find that the small S/T of PrIr2Zn20 is enhanced at low temperatures under the fields on the verge of quadrupole ordered phase, and in the same regime, the electrical resistivity follows the quadratic temperature dependence with a steep slope as a characteristic of Fermi liquid. The results imply an emergence of a nontrivial coherent state with sizable mass enhancement associated with the quadrupole degree of freedom.

  1. Proton irradiation effects on the thermoelectric properties in single-crystalline Bi nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Taehoo; Kim, Jeongmin; Song, Min-Jung; Lee, Wooyoung

    2015-05-15

    The effects of proton irradiation on the thermoelectric properties of Bi nanowires (Bi-NWs) were investigated. Single crystalline Bi-NWs were grown by the on-film formation of nanowires method. The devices based on individual Bi-NWs were irradiated with protons at different energies. The total number of displaced atoms was estimated using the Kinchin-Pease displacement model. The electric conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in the Bi-NW devices were investigated before and after proton irradiation at different temperatures. Although the Seebeck coefficient remained stable at various irradiation energies, the electrical conductivity significantly declined with increasing proton energy up to 40 MeV.

  2. Topological Insulator and Thermoelectric Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong

    The recent discovery of topological insulator (TI) offers new opportunities for the development of thermoelectricity, because many TIs (like Bi2Te3) are excellent thermoelectric materials. In this talk, I will first introduce our theoretical predictions of anomalous Seebeck effect and strong size effect in TI [PRL 112, 226801 (2014)]. Then I will report our recent proof experiments, which find in TI thin films that (i) the hole-type Seebeck effect and the electron-type Hall effect coexist in the same TI sample for all the measured temperatures (up to 300 K), and (ii) the thermoelectric properties depend sensitively on the film thickness. The unconventional phenomena are revealed to be closely related to the topological nature of the material. These findings may inspire new ideas for designing TI-based high-efficiency thermoelectric devices.

  3. Magnon-driven longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in F | N and N | F | N structures: Role of asymmetric in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Toklikishvili, Z.; Etesami, S. R.; Dugaev, V. K.; Barnaś, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of an asymmetric in-plane magnetic anisotropy Kx ≠Ky on the thermally activated spin current is studied theoretically for two different systems: (i) the F | N system consisting of a ferromagnetic insulator (F) in a direct contact with a nonmagnetic metal (N) and (ii) the sandwich structure N | F | N consisting of a ferromagnetic insulating part sandwiched between two nonmagnetic metals. It is shown that when the difference between the temperatures of the two nonmagnetic metals in a N | F | N structure is not large, the spin pumping currents from the magnetic part to the nonmagnetic ones are equal in amplitude and have opposite directions, so only the spin torque current contributes to the total spin current. The spin current flows then from the nonmagnetic metal with the higher temperature to the nonmagnetic metal having a lower temperature. Its amplitude varies linearly with the difference in temperatures. In addition, we have found that if the magnetic anisotropy is in the layer plane, then the spin current increases with the magnon temperature, while in the case of an out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy the spin current decreases when the magnon temperature enhances. Enlarging the difference between the temperatures of the nonmagnetic metals, the linear response becomes important, as confirmed by analytical expressions inferred from the Fokker-Planck approach and by the results obtained upon a full numerical integration of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  4. Phenomenological Spin Transport Theory Driven by Anomalous Nernst Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Several experimental efforts such as material investigation and structure improvement have been made recently to find a large anomalous Nernst effect in ferromagnetic metals. Here, we develop a theory of spin transport driven by the anomalous Nernst effect in a diffusive ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic multilayer. Starting from a phenomenological formula of a spin-dependent electric current, the theoretical formulas of electric voltage and spin torque generated by the anomalous Nernst effect are derived. The magnitude of the electric voltage generated from the spin current via the inverse spin Hall effect is on the order of 0.1 µV for currently available experimental parameter values. The temperature gradient necessary to switch the magnetization is quite larger than the typical experimental value. The separation of the contributions of the Seebeck and transverse spin Seebeck effects is also discussed.

  5. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander J. Iwan D. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involves using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, ID models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The latter are to be conducted during the MEPHISTO experiment scheduled for USMP-3 in early 1996. The models will be used to predict the response of the transport conditions and consequent solute segregation in directionally solidifying tin-bismuth melt. Real-time Seebeck voltage variations across a Sn-Bi melt during directional solidification in MEPHISTO on USMP-1 show a distinct variation which can be correlated with thruster firings. The Seebeck voltage measurement is related to the response of the instantaneous average melt composition at the melt-solid interface. This allows a direct comparison of numerical simulations with the Seebeck signals obtained on USMP-1. The effects of such accelerations on composition for a directionally solidifying Sn-Bi alloy have been simulated numerically. USMP-1 acceleration data was used to assist in our choice of acceleration magnitude and orientation. The results show good agreement with experimental observations. The USMP-3 experiments took place earlier this year (February 22 through March 6). There were several differences between the USMP-3 experiments as compared to USMP-1. Firstly a more concentrated alloy was solidified and, secondly, Primary Reaction Control System thruster burns were requested at particular times during four separate growth runs. This allowed us to monitor the response Seebeck response under well-characterized growth conditions. In addition, we carried out simulations during the experiment in order to interpret the Seebeck signal. Preliminary results are described here.

  6. Doping effects on thermoelectric properties of the off-stoichiometric Heusler compounds Fe{sub 2−x}V{sub 1+x}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Y. Tamada, Y.

    2014-03-28

    The thermoelectric properties of Heusler-type Fe{sub 2−x}V{sub 1+x}Al{sub 1−y}Si{sub y} and Fe{sub 2−x}V{sub 1+x−y}Ti{sub y}Al alloys have been investigated to clarify which off-stoichiometric alloy, i.e., V-rich (x > 0) or V-poor (x < 0), is more effective in enhancing the Seebeck coefficient when doped by Si and Ti, while retaining a low electrical resistivity. Large Seebeck coefficients of −182 μV/K and 110 μV/K at 300 K are obtained for n-type Fe{sub 1.95}V{sub 1.05}Al{sub 0.97}Si{sub 0.03} and p-type Fe{sub 2.04}V{sub 0.93}Ti{sub 0.03}Al, respectively. When the Seebeck coefficient is plotted as a function of valence electron concentration (VEC), the VEC dependence for the doped off-stoichiometric alloys falls on characteristic curves depending on the off-stoichiometric composition x. It is concluded that a larger Seebeck coefficient with a negative sign can be obtained for the V-rich alloys rather than the V-poor alloys, whilst good p-type materials are always derived from the V-poor alloys. Substantial enhancements in the Seebeck coefficient for the off-stoichiometric alloys could be achieved by a favorable modification in the electronic structure around the Fermi level through the antisite V or Fe defect formation.

  7. On the Quantum Hall Effect in mono(bi)-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    Based on a thermodynamic approach, we have calculated the specific resistivity of mono(bi)-layer graphene assumed dissipationless in quantizing magnetic field. The resistivity arises from combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects. The current I causes heating (cooling) at the first (second) sample contacts, due to the Peltier effect. The voltage measured across the sample is equal to the Seebeck thermoemf, and thus provides finite resistivity as I→0. The resistivity is a universal function of the magnetic field, e-h plasma density and temperature, expressed in fundamental units h/e2. At fixed magnetic field the magneto-transport problem is resolved in the vicinity of the Dirac point taking into account the splitting of zeroth Landau level. For mono(bi)- layer graphene the B-dependent splitting of zeroth Landau level is recovered from experimental data.

  8. Anomalous Nernst Effect of Perpendicularly Magnetic Anisotropy TbFeCo Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryo; Komine, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) of perpendicularly magnetized TbFeCo thin films with various Tb content, and especially studied the relation between ANE and anomalous Hall effect. As a result, the hysteresis of anomalous Nernst coefficient showed the same behavior as that of anomalous Hall resistivity, and the sign of anomalous Nernst coefficient was consistent with that of anomalous Hall voltage in any Tb content, whereas the Seebeck coefficient and the resistivity were almost constant even if the applied magnetic field was varied. Taking into account of thermoelectric coefficient tensor, it was revealed that the off-diagonal thermopower corresponding to the ANE in TbFeCo thin films is the product of Hall angle and Seebeck coefficient.

  9. Evaluation of Temperature-Dependent Effective Material Properties and Performance of a Thermoelectric Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Heng-Chieh; Chu, En-Ting; Hsieh, Huey-Lin; Huang, Jing-Yi; Wu, Sheng-Tsai; Dai, Ming-Ji; Liu, Chun-Kai; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-07-01

    We devised a novel method to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective properties of a thermoelectric module (TEM): Seebeck coefficient ( S m), internal electrical resistance ( R m), and thermal conductance ( K m). After calculation, the effective properties of the module are converted to the average material properties of a p- n thermoelectric pillar pair inside the module: Seebeck coefficient ( S TE), electrical resistivity ( ρ TE), and thermal conductivity ( k TE). For a commercial thermoelectric module (Altec 1091) chosen to verify the novel method, the measured S TE has a maximum value at bath temperature of 110°C; ρ TE shows a positive linear trend dependent on the bath temperature, and k TE increases slightly with increasing bath temperature. The results show the method to have satisfactory measurement performance in terms of practicability and reliability; the data for tests near 23°C agree with published values.

  10. Spin and charge thermopower effects in the ferromagnetic graphene junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahedi, Javad; Barimani, Fattaneh

    2016-08-01

    Using wave function matching approach and employing the Landauer-Buttiker formula, a ferromagnetic graphene junction with temperature gradient across the system is studied. We calculate the thermally induced charge and spin current as well as the thermoelectric voltage (Seebeck effect) in the linear and nonlinear regimes. Our calculation revealed that due to the electron-hole symmetry, the charge Seebeck coefficient is, for an undoped magnetic graphene, an odd function of chemical potential while the spin Seebeck coefficient is an even function regardless of the temperature gradient and junction length. We have also found with an accurate tuning external parameter, namely, the exchange filed and gate voltage, the temperature gradient across the junction drives a pure spin current without accompanying the charge current. Another important characteristic of thermoelectric transport, thermally induced current in the nonlinear regime, is examined. It would be our main finding that with increasing thermal gradient applied to the junction the spin and charge thermovoltages decrease and even become zero for non zero temperature bias.

  11. Harnessing Topological Band Effects in Bismuth Telluride Selenide for Large Enhancements in Thermoelectric Properties through Isovalent Doping.

    PubMed

    Devender; Gehring, Pascal; Gaul, Andrew; Hoyer, Alexander; Vaklinova, Kristina; Mehta, Rutvik J; Burghard, Marko; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Singh, David J; Kern, Klaus; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2016-08-01

    Dilute isovalent sulfur doping simultaneously increases electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in Bi2 Te2 Se nanoplates, and bulk pellets made from them. This unusual trend at high electron concentrations is underpinned by multifold increases in electron effective mass attributable to sulfur-induced band topology effects, providing a new way for accessing a high thermoelectric figure-of-merit in topological-insulator-based nanomaterials through doping.

  12. Harnessing Topological Band Effects in Bismuth Telluride Selenide for Large Enhancements in Thermoelectric Properties through Isovalent Doping.

    PubMed

    Devender; Gehring, Pascal; Gaul, Andrew; Hoyer, Alexander; Vaklinova, Kristina; Mehta, Rutvik J; Burghard, Marko; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Singh, David J; Kern, Klaus; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2016-08-01

    Dilute isovalent sulfur doping simultaneously increases electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in Bi2 Te2 Se nanoplates, and bulk pellets made from them. This unusual trend at high electron concentrations is underpinned by multifold increases in electron effective mass attributable to sulfur-induced band topology effects, providing a new way for accessing a high thermoelectric figure-of-merit in topological-insulator-based nanomaterials through doping. PMID:27167512

  13. Thermoelectric effects in graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, Philippe; Nguyen, Viet Hung; Saint-Martin, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene and graphene nanostructures have recently attracted significant attention from the physics and engineering communities. In fundamental physics, the analysis of Seebeck and Nernst effects is very useful in elucidating some details of the electronic band structure of graphene that cannot be probed by conductance measurements alone, due in particular to the ambipolar nature of this gapless material. For applications in thermoelectric energy conversion, graphene has two major disadvantages. It is gapless, which leads to a small Seebeck coefficient due to the opposite contributions of electrons and holes, and it is an excellent thermal conductor. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of a two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheet is thus very limited. However, many works have demonstrated recently that appropriate nanostructuring and bandgap engineering of graphene can concomitantly strongly reduce the lattice thermal conductance and enhance the Seebeck coefficient without dramatically degrading the electronic conductance. Hence, in various graphene nanostructures, ZT has been predicted to be high enough to make them attractive for energy conversion. In this article, we review the main results obtained experimentally and theoretically on the thermoelectric properties of graphene and its nanostructures, emphasizing the physical effects that govern these properties. Beyond pure graphene structures, we discuss also the thermoelectric properties of some hybrid graphene structures, as graphane, layered carbon allotropes such as graphynes and graphdiynes, and graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures which offer new opportunities. Finally, we briefly review the recent activities on other atomically thin 2D semiconductors with finite bandgap, i.e. dichalcogenides and phosphorene, which have attracted great attention for various kinds of applications, including thermoelectrics.

  14. Thermoelectric effects in graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Dollfus, Philippe; Hung Nguyen, Viet; Saint-Martin, Jérôme

    2015-04-10

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene and graphene nanostructures have recently attracted significant attention from the physics and engineering communities. In fundamental physics, the analysis of Seebeck and Nernst effects is very useful in elucidating some details of the electronic band structure of graphene that cannot be probed by conductance measurements alone, due in particular to the ambipolar nature of this gapless material. For applications in thermoelectric energy conversion, graphene has two major disadvantages. It is gapless, which leads to a small Seebeck coefficient due to the opposite contributions of electrons and holes, and it is an excellent thermal conductor. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of a two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheet is thus very limited. However, many works have demonstrated recently that appropriate nanostructuring and bandgap engineering of graphene can concomitantly strongly reduce the lattice thermal conductance and enhance the Seebeck coefficient without dramatically degrading the electronic conductance. Hence, in various graphene nanostructures, ZT has been predicted to be high enough to make them attractive for energy conversion. In this article, we review the main results obtained experimentally and theoretically on the thermoelectric properties of graphene and its nanostructures, emphasizing the physical effects that govern these properties. Beyond pure graphene structures, we discuss also the thermoelectric properties of some hybrid graphene structures, as graphane, layered carbon allotropes such as graphynes and graphdiynes, and graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures which offer new opportunities. Finally, we briefly review the recent activities on other atomically thin 2D semiconductors with finite bandgap, i.e. dichalcogenides and phosphorene, which have attracted great attention for various kinds of applications, including thermoelectrics.

  15. Enhancement of thermospin effect in germanene based normal/ferromagnetic stub/normal junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Chi, Feng; Guo, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Spin thermoelectric effects in ferromagnetic (FM) germanene are theoretically investigated by using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the spin Seebeck effect can be generated by temperature bias Δ T when a FM germanene is considered in the central region. However, the obtained spin resolved Seebeck coefficients is quite low with maximum value of S σ ≃ 700 μ V / K . The spin Seebeck effect is shown to increase enormously in different energy states with the assistance of electric field or stub structure. By modulating the geometric parameters of stub, the spin thermopower Ss has distinct peak values in the bulk states. Moreover, varying the Fermi energy within the bulk gap by the gate, Ss can be significantly enhanced by increasing the strength of electric field. The spin thermopower obtained by each method is predicted to be 2500 μ V / K , which is more than 300% larger relative to the case without electric field or stub. In addition, the magnitude and sign of spin thermopower can be manipulated by adjusting the Fermi energy. The results show that such FM germanene stub device exhibits much better thermoelectric performance and may be used as a wide energy range tunable spin thermoelectric generator.

  16. Effective material properties of thermoelectric composites with elliptical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Ze

    2015-06-01

    In the present work, the effective material properties of thermoelectric composites with elliptical fibers are studied. Explicit solutions are derived by the conformal mapping function and Mori-Tanaka method. Numerical simulations are performed to present the behaviors of normalized effective material constants. From the results, it can be observed that both the effective electric and thermal conductivities can be reduced by increasing the filling ratio and a/ b. Such influences can also be found for the effective thermoelectric figure of merit. But they are different from those on the effective Seebeck and Peltier coefficients.

  17. Effect of pressure on electronic and thermoelectric properties of magnesium silicide: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulwinder, Kaur; Ranjan, Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of pressure on electronic and thermoelectric properties of Mg2Si using the density functional theory and Boltzmann transport equations. The variation of lattice constant, band gap, bulk modulus with pressure is also analyzed. Further, the thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, electronic thermal conductivity) have been studied as a function of temperature and pressure up to 1200 K. The results show that Mg2Si is an n-type semiconductor with a band gap of 0.21 eV. The negative value of the Seebeck coefficient at all pressures indicates that the conduction is due to electrons. With the increase in pressure, the Seebeck coefficient decreases and electrical conductivity increases. It is also seen that, there is practically no effect of pressure on the electronic contribution of thermal conductivity. The paper describes the calculation of the lattice thermal conductivity and figure of merit of Mg2Si at zero pressure. The maximum value of figure of merit is attained 1.83×10-3 at 1000 K. The obtained results are in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results. Project supported by the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR), India.

  18. Synthetic conditions and their doping effect on {Beta}-K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13}.

    SciTech Connect

    Kyratsi, Th.; Kika, I.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Chrissafis, K.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2009-04-01

    In this work the synthetic conditions for K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} and their effect on its thermoelectric properties were investigated. K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} was prepared as a single phase using K{sub 2}Se and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} as starting materials in a furnace or via a reaction using direct flame, followed by remelting or annealing. Seebeck coefficient measurements showed that the doping level in the material is sensitive to the synthetic conditions. Higher synthesis temperatures as well as the flame reaction technique followed by annealing gave more homogenous samples with higher Seebeck coefficient. IR optical spectroscopic measurements showed a wide range of doping level achieved among the different synthetic conditions. These findings suggest that synthetic conditions can act as a useful tool for the optimization of the thermoelectric properties of these materials.

  19. Ab initio optimization of phonon drag effect for lower-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liao, Bolin; Qiu, Bo; Huberman, Samuel; Esfarjani, Keivan; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Chen, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Although the thermoelectric figure of merit zT above 300 K has seen significant improvement recently, the progress at lower temperatures has been slow, mainly limited by the relatively low Seebeck coefficient and high thermal conductivity. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, success in first-principles computation of the phonon drag effect--a coupling phenomenon between electrons and nonequilibrium phonons--in heavily doped region and its optimization to enhance the Seebeck coefficient while reducing the phonon thermal conductivity by nanostructuring. Our simulation quantitatively identifies the major phonons contributing to the phonon drag, which are spectrally distinct from those carrying heat, and further reveals that although the phonon drag is reduced in heavily doped samples, a significant contribution to Seebeck coefficient still exists. An ideal phonon filter is proposed to enhance zT of silicon at room temperature by a factor of 20 to ∼ 0.25, and the enhancement can reach 70 times at 100 K. This work opens up a new venue toward better thermoelectrics by harnessing nonequilibrium phonons.

  20. Ab initio optimization of phonon drag effect for lower-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liao, Bolin; Qiu, Bo; Huberman, Samuel; Esfarjani, Keivan; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Chen, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Although the thermoelectric figure of merit zT above 300 K has seen significant improvement recently, the progress at lower temperatures has been slow, mainly limited by the relatively low Seebeck coefficient and high thermal conductivity. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, success in first-principles computation of the phonon drag effect--a coupling phenomenon between electrons and nonequilibrium phonons--in heavily doped region and its optimization to enhance the Seebeck coefficient while reducing the phonon thermal conductivity by nanostructuring. Our simulation quantitatively identifies the major phonons contributing to the phonon drag, which are spectrally distinct from those carrying heat, and further reveals that although the phonon drag is reduced in heavily doped samples, a significant contribution to Seebeck coefficient still exists. An ideal phonon filter is proposed to enhance zT of silicon at room temperature by a factor of 20 to ∼ 0.25, and the enhancement can reach 70 times at 100 K. This work opens up a new venue toward better thermoelectrics by harnessing nonequilibrium phonons. PMID:26627231

  1. Anomalous effect of vanadium boride seeding on thermoelectric properties of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N

    SciTech Connect

    Prytuliak, A.; Maruyama, S.; Mori, T.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We doped YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N; the long awaited n-type counterpart to p-type boron carbide. ► VB{sub 2} seeding of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N showed striking results. ► Thermal treatment effects led to VB{sub 2} being intrinsically doped. ► Large increase of both Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity was obtained. - Abstract: Vanadium boride seeded YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N were synthesized and the thermoelectric properties investigated. YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N is representative of the series of rare earth borocarbonitrides which is the potential long awaited n-type counterpart to p-type boron carbide. VB{sub 2} seeded samples of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N were prepared using VB{sub 2} directly as an initial additive and V{sub 2}O{sub 3} which also results in formation of vanadium diboride in the final product. The resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of samples were measured in the temperature range of 323 K to 1073 K. A dramatic effect of thermal treatment on the Seebeck coefficient of VB{sub 2} seeded samples was observed, and it is indicated that there is possible partial intrinsic doping of vanadium into YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N. VB{sub 2} is revealed to be a promising additive to improve the thermoelectric properties of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N. An enhancement of more than 220% of the maximum absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient was obtained while the resistivity was also reduced considerably.

  2. Composition-dependent charge transport and temperature-dependent density of state effective mass interpreted by temperature-normalized Pisarenko plot in Bi2-xSbxTe3 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tae-Ho; Lim, Young Soo; Park, Mi Jin; Tak, Jang-Yeul; Lee, Soonil; Cho, Hyung Koun; Cho, Jun-Young; Park, Chan; Seo, Won-Seon

    2016-10-01

    Composition-dependent charge transport and temperature-dependent density of state effective mass-dependent Seebeck coefficient were investigated in Bi2-xSbxTe3 (x = 1.56-1.68) compounds. The compounds were prepared by the spark plasma sintering of high-energy ball-milled powder. High-temperature Hall measurements revealed that the charge transport in the compounds was governed dominantly by phonon scattering and influenced additionally by alloy scattering depending on the amount of Sb. Contrary effects of Sb content on the Seebeck coefficient were discussed in terms of carrier concentration and density of state effective mass, and it was elucidated by temperature-normalized Pisarenko plot for the first time.

  3. Improved thermoelectric cooling based on the Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Khanna, Raghav; Toberer, Eric S.; Heinz, Nicholas A.; Seifert, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Traditional thermoelectric cooling relies on the Peltier effect which produces a temperature drop limited by the figure of merit, zT. This cooling limit is not required from classical thermodynamics but can be traced to problems of thermoelectric compatibility. Alternatively, if a thermoelectric cooler can be designed to achieve full thermoelectric compatibility, lower temperature can be achieved even if the zT is low. In such a device the Thomson effect plays an important role. We present the theoretical concept of a "Thomson cooler," for cryogenic cooling which is designed to maintain thermoelectric compatibility and we derive the requirements for the Seebeck coefficient.

  4. Spin-dependent thermoelectric effects in graphene-based spin valves.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Minggang; Huang, Wen; Liang, Gengchiau

    2013-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations combined with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF), we investigate spin-dependent thermoelectric effects in a spin valve which consists of zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) electrodes with different magnetic configurations. We find that electron transport properties in the ZGNR-based spin valve are strongly dependent on the magnetic configurations. As a result, with a temperature bias, thermally-induced currents can be controlled by switching the magnetic configurations, indicating a thermal magnetoresistance (MR) effect. Moreover, based on the linear response assumption, our study shows that the remarkably different Seebeck coefficients in the various magnetic configurations lead to a very large and controllable magneto Seebeck ratio. In addition, we evaluate thermoelectric properties, such as the power factor, electron thermal conductance and figure of merit (ZT), of the ZGNR-based spin valve. Our results indicate that the power factor and the electron thermal conductance are strongly related to the transmission gap and electron-hole symmetry of the transmission spectrum. Moreover, the value of ZT can reach 0.15 at room temperature without considering phonon scattering. In addition, we investigate the thermally-controlled magnetic distributions in the ZGNR-based spin valve and find that the magnetic distribution, especially the local magnetic moment around the Ni atom, is strongly related to the thermal bias. The very large, multi-valued and controllable thermal magnetoresistance and Seebeck effects indicate the strong potential of ZGNR-based spin valves for extremely low-power consuming spin caloritronics applications. The thermally-controlled magnetic moment in the ZGNR-based spin valve indicates its possible applications for information storage. PMID:23151965

  5. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO3) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO3 as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO3 thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W5+ ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (σ) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO3 could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, σ increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO3 after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, σphoto) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, Sphoto)) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO3 thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W5+ state) to the conduction band of WO3. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO3 thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  6. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (σ) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, σ increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, σ{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, σ{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of single-wall carbon nanotube films: Effects of diameter and wet environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Ueda, Tomohiro; Nakai, Yusuke; Kyakuno, Haruka; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Takeshi; Hata, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    The Seebeck coefficient S and the electrical resistivity ρ of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were investigated as a function of the SWCNT diameter and carrier concentration. The S and ρ significantly changed in humid environments through p-type carrier doping. Experiments, combined with theoretical simulations based on the non-equilibrium Green’s function theory, indicated that the power factor P can be increased threefold by the enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs, but the nanotube diameter has little effect. The improvement of the film resistivity strongly enhances the film thermoelectric performance, manifested as increasing the value of P above 1200 µW/(m·K2).

  8. Effect of Ti Substitution on Thermoelectric Properties of W-Doped Heusler Fe2VAl Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, M.; Ozaki, K.; Takazawa, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Terazawa, Y.; Takeuchi, T.

    2013-07-01

    Effects of element substitutions on thermoelectric properties of Heusler Fe2VAl alloys were evaluated. By W substitution at the V site, the thermal conductivity is reduced effectively because of the enhancement of phonon scattering resulting from the introduction of W atoms, which have much greater atomic mass and volume than the constituent elements of Fe2VAl alloy. W substitution is also effective to obtain a large negative Seebeck coefficient and high electrical conductivity through an electron injection effect. To change the conduction type from n-type to p-type, additional Ti substitution at the V site, which reduces the valence electron density, was examined. A positive Seebeck coefficient as high as that of conventional p-type Fe2VAl alloy was obtained using a sufficient amount of Ti substitution. Electrical resistivity was reduced by the hole doping effect of the Ti substitution while maintaining low thermal conductivity. Compared with the conventional solo-Ti-substituted p-type Fe2VAl alloy, the ZT value was improved, reaching 0.13 at 450 K.

  9. Large extrinsic spin Hall effect in Au-Cu alloys by extensive atomic disorder scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. K.; Wang, S. H.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, J. R.; Cai, J. W.; Kang, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Spin Hall angle, which denotes the conversion efficiency between spin and charge current, is a key parameter in the pure spin current phenomenon. The search for materials with large spin Hall angle is indeed important for scientific interest and potential application in spintronics. Here the large enhanced spin Hall effect (SHE) of Au-Cu alloy is reported by investigating the spin Seebeck effect, spin Hall anomalous Hall effect, and spin Hall magnetoresistance of the Y3F e5O12 (YIG)/A uxC u1 -x hybrid structure over the full composition. At the near equiatomic Au-Cu composition with maximum atomic disorder scattering, the spin Hall angle of the Au-Cu alloy increases by two to three times together with a moderate spin diffusion length in comparison with Au. The longitudinal spin Seebeck voltage and the spin Hall magnetoresistance ratio also increase by two to three times. More importantly, no evidence of anomalous Hall effect is observed in all YIG/Au-Cu samples, in contrast to the cases of other giant SHE materials Pt(Pd), Ta, and W. This behavior makes Au-Cu free from any suspicion of the magnetic proximity effect involved in the hybrid structure, and thus the Au-Cu alloy can be an ideal material for pure spin current study.

  10. Effect of microstructure on the thermoelectric performance of La1-xSrxCoO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viskadourakis, Z.; Athanasopoulos, G. I.; Kasotakis, E.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a case where the microstructure has a profound effect on the thermoelectric properties of oxide compounds. Specifically, we have investigated the effect of different sintering treatments on La1-xSrxCoO3 samples synthesized using the Pechini method. We found that the samples, which are dense and consist of inhomogeneously-mixed grains of different size, exhibit both higher Seebeck coefficient and thermoelectric figure of merit than the samples, which are porous and consist of grains with almost identical size. The enhancement of Seebeck coefficient in the dense samples is attributed to the so-called "energy-filtering" mechanism that is related to the energy barrier of the grain boundary. On the other hand, the thermal conductivity for the porous compounds is significantly reduced in comparison to the dense compounds. It is suggested that a fine-manipulation of grain size ratio combined with a fine-tuning of porosity could considerably enhance the thermoelectric performance of oxides.

  11. Thermal Cycling Effects on the Thermoelectric Properties of n-Type In, Ce based Skutterudite Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Krishnendu; Subramanian, Mas A.; Good, Morris S.; Roberts, Kamandi C.; Hendricks, Terry J.

    2012-06-14

    N-type In-filled CoSb3 are known skutterudite compounds that have shown promising thermoelectric (TE) properties resulting in high dimensionless figure of merit values at elevated temperatures. Their use in various waste heat recovery applications will require that they survive and operate after exposure to harsh thermal cycling environments. This research focused on uncovering the thermal cycling effects on thermoelectric properties of n-type In0.2Co4Sb12 and In0.2Ce0.15Co4Sb12 skutterudite compositions as well as quantifying their temperature-dependent structural properties (elastic modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio). It was observed that the Seebeck coefficient and resistivity increased only slightly in the double-filled In,Ce skutterudite materials upon thermal cycling. In the In-filled skutterudites the Seebeck coefficient remained approximately the same on thermal cycling, while electrical resistivity increased significantly after thermal cycling. Results also show that thermal conductivity marginally decreases in the case of In-filled skutterudites, whereas the reduction is more pronounced in In, Ce-based skutterudite compounds. The possible reason for this kind of reduction can be attributed to grain pinning effects due to formation of nano inclusions. High temperature structural property measurements (i.e., Young's modulus and shear modulus) are also reported and the results show that these structural properties decrease slowly as temperature increases and the compounds are structurally stable after numerous thermal cycles.

  12. Enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit in DNA-like systems induced by Fano and Dicke effects.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Gu, Lei; Wu, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Zu-Quan

    2015-04-28

    We report a theoretical study highlighting the thermoelectric properties of biological and synthetic DNA molecules. Based on an effective tight-binding model of duplex DNA and by using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique, the thermal conductance, electrical conductance, Seebeck coefficient and thermoelectric figure of merit in the system are numerically calculated by varying the asymmetries of energies and electronic hoppings in the backbone sites to simulate the environmental complications and fluctuations. We find that due to the multiple transport paths in the DNA molecule, the Fano antiresonance occurs, and enhances the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit. When the energy difference is produced in every opposite backbone site, the Dicke effect appears. This effect gives rise to a semiconducting-metallic transition, and enhances the thermoelectric efficiency of the DNA molecule remarkably. Moreover, as the Fano antiresonance point is close to the Dicke resonance one, a giant enhancement in the thermoelectric figure of merit in the DNA molecule has been found. These results provide a scenario to obtain effective routes to enhance the thermoelectric efficiency in the DNA molecules, and suggest perspectives for future experiments intending to control the thermoelectric transport in DNA-like nanodevices.

  13. Giant spin-dependent thermoelectric effect in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiwei; Hehn, Michel; Chaput, Laurent; Negulescu, Béatrice; Andrieu, Stéphane; Montaigne, François; Mangin, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures and the so-called spin caloritronics are attracting much interest. Indeed it provides a new way to control and manipulate spin currents, which are key elements of spin-based electronics. Here we report on a giant magnetothermoelectric effect in a magnetic tunnel junction. The thermovoltage in this geometry can reach 1 mV. Moreover a magnetothermovoltage effect could be measured with ratio similar to the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio. The Seebeck coefficient can then be tuned by changing the relative magnetization orientation of the two magnetic layers in the tunnel junction. Therefore, our experiments extend the range of spintronic devices application to thermoelectricity and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of thermal spin transport. PMID:22434187

  14. Observation of the spin Peltier effect for magnetic insulators.

    PubMed

    Flipse, J; Dejene, F K; Wagenaar, D; Bauer, G E W; Ben Youssef, J; van Wees, B J

    2014-07-11

    We report the observation of the spin Peltier effect (SPE) in the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG), i.e., a heat current generated by a spin current flowing through a platinum (Pt)|YIG interface. The effect can be explained by the spin transfer torque that transforms the spin current in the Pt into a magnon current in the YIG. Via magnon-phonon interactions the magnetic fluctuations modulate the phonon temperature that is detected by a thermopile close to the interface. By finite-element modeling we verify the reciprocity between the spin Peltier and spin Seebeck effect. The observed strong coupling between thermal magnons and phonons in YIG is attractive for nanoscale cooling techniques. PMID:25062233

  15. Seebeck nanoantennas for the detection and characterization of infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Briones, Edgar; Cuadrado, Alexander; Briones, Joel; Díaz de León, Ramón; Martínez-Antón, Juan Carlos; McMurtry, Stefan; Hehn, Michel; Montaigne, François; Alda, Javier; González, Francisco Javier

    2014-10-20

    Arrays of metallic thermocouples in the shape of spiral nanoantennas are proposed as infrared detectors, which use the thermoelectric properties of the metallic interfaces to generate electrical DC signals. The responsivity of these types of antennas is evaluated from both theoretical and numerical perspectives pointing out its potential as infrared sensors. Moreover, the same structures can be used to characterize the state of polarization of the optical near fields with a spatial resolution comparable to the wavelength.

  16. Giant thermovoltage in single InAs nanowire field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Roddaro, Stefano; Ercolani, Daniele; Safeen, Mian Akif; Suomalainen, Soile; Rossella, Francesco; Giazotto, Francesco; Sorba, Lucia; Beltram, Fabio

    2013-08-14

    Millivolt range thermovoltage is demonstrated in single InAs nanowire based field effect transistors. Thanks to a buried heating scheme, we drive both a large thermal bias ΔT > 10 K and a strong field-effect modulation of electric conductance on the nanostructures. This allows the precise mapping of the evolution of the Seebeck coefficient S as a function of the gate-controlled conductivity σ between room temperature and 100 K. Based on these experimental data a novel estimate of the electron mobility is given. This value is compared with the result of standard field-effect based mobility estimates and discussed in relation to the effect of charge traps in the devices. PMID:23869467

  17. Competing spin pumping effects in magnetic hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, A. Alves Santos, O.; Fonseca Guerra, G. A.; Cunha, R. O.; Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R.

    2014-02-03

    Pure spin current can be detected by its conversion into charge current in nanometer thick nonmagnetic metal layer with large spin-orbit coupling by means of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). Recently, it has been shown that the metallic ferromagnet Permalloy (Py) can also be used as spin current detector in experiments in which an ISHE voltage is created in a Py layer in contact with the insulating ferromagnet yttrium iron garnet (YIG) under a thermal gradient in the longitudinal spin Seebeck configuration. Here, we report experiments with microwave driven spin pumping in heterostructures made with single crystal YIG film and a nanometer thick Py or Pt layer that show that Py behaves differently than nonmagnetic metals as a spin current detector. The results are attributed to the competition between the spin currents generated by the dynamics of the magnetizations in YIG and in Py, which are exchange coupled at the interface.

  18. Quantum Hall effect: The resistivity of a 2D electron gas—a thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2005-09-01

    Based on a thermodynamic approach, we have calculated the resistivity of a 2D electron gas, assumed dissipationless in a strong quantum limit. Standard measurements, with extra current leads, define the resistivity caused by a combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects. The current causes heating (cooling) at the first (second) sample contacts, due to the Peltier effect. The contact temperatures are different. The measured voltage is equal to the Peltier effect-induced thermoemf which is linear in current. As a result, the resistivity is non-zero as I→0. The resistivity is a universal function of magnetic field and temperature, expressed in fundamental units h/e2. The universal features of magnetotransport data observed in the experiment confirm our predictions.

  19. Performance Prediction of Commercial Thermoelectric Cooler Modules using the Effective Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HoSung; Attar, Alaa M.; Weera, Sean L.

    2015-06-01

    This work examines the validity of formulating the effective thermoelectric material properties as a way to predict thermoelectric module performance. The three maximum parameters (temperature difference, current, and cooling power) of a thermoelectric cooler were formulated on the basis of the hot junction temperature. Then, the effective material properties (Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistance, and thermal conductivity) were defined in terms of the three maximum parameters that were taken from either a commercial thermoelectric cooler module or the measurements. It is demonstrated that the simple standard equation with the effective material properties predicts well the performance curves of the four selected commercial products. Normalized parameters over the maximum parameters were also formulated to present the characteristics of the thermoelectric coolers along with the normalized charts. The normalized charts would be universal for a given thermoelectric material.

  20. Reciprocal spin Hall effects in conductors with strong spin-orbit coupling: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Yasuhiro; Otani, YoshiChika

    2015-12-01

    Spin Hall effect and its inverse provide essential means to convert charge to spin currents and vice versa, which serve as a primary function for spintronic phenomena such as the spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance and the spin Seebeck effect. These effects can oscillate magnetization or detect a thermally generated spin splitting in the chemical potential. Importantly this conversion process occurs via the spin-orbit interaction, and requires neither magnetic materials nor external magnetic fields. However, the spin Hall angle, i.e. the conversion yield between the charge and spin currents, depends severely on the experimental methods. Here we discuss the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length for a variety of materials including pure metals such as Pt and Ta, alloys and oxides determined by the spin absorption method in a lateral spin valve structure.

  1. Effects of Thallium Doping on the Transport Properties of Bi2Te3 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, L.; Wu, F.; Wang, X. X.; Cao, R. J.; Li, X. J.; Hu, X.; Song, H. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Thallium-doped Tl x Bi2- x Te3 ( x = 0.0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2) nanopowders were synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The doping effect of thallium on the morphologies of the synthesized nanopowders was investigated. It was found that the doping of thallium can significantly change the morphologies of the synthesized nanopowders. The synthesized nanopowders were hot-pressed into bulk pellets and the doping effects of thallium on the transport properties of these pellets were investigated. The results show that the doping of thallium can enhance the Seebeck coefficient but increase the electrical resistivity. Moreover, the power factors of the thallium-doped samples decrease with the increasing of the thallium doping level as compared with the un-doped sample. This is attributed to the increase of the electrical resistivity and the disappearing of the flower-like morphologies of the doped nanopowders.

  2. Effect of bismuth doping on the physical properties of La-Li-Mn-O manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanapu, Kalyana Lakshmi; Samatham, S. Shanmukharao; Kumar, Devendra; Ganesan, V.; Reddy, P. Venugopal

    2016-03-01

    The effects of bismuth doping at La site on magnetic, electrical and thermopower properties of LaLiMnO3 manganites have been investigated. The substitution of Bi ion leads to the weakening of ferromagnetic ordering at low temperature, and Curie temperature ( T C) decreases with increase in Bi content. Interestingly, a dramatic increase in the magnitude of Seebeck coefficient at low temperature is observed in Bi-doped samples which might find potential application as thermoelectric. The results are attributed to the combined effect of the disorder and antiferromagnetic interaction induced by Bi doping. Both ρ( T) and S( T) data in the high-temperature region are discussed using small polaron hopping model.

  3. Photo- and gas-tuned, reversible thermoelectric properties and anomalous photo-thermoelectric effects of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenta; Watanabe, Takuya; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We report the photo- and gas-controllable properties of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide (Pt/WO3), which is of interest for developing practical applications of WO3 as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a Pt/WO3 thin film generated a thermoelectric power due to the ultraviolet-light-induced band-gap excitation (photochromic (PC) reaction) and/or dark storage in formic acid vapor (gaschromic (GC) reaction) in the absence of O2, resulting from the generation of W5+ ions. After such chromic reactions, the electrical conductivity (σ) is increased, whereas the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient (S) is decreased. The changes in σ and S and their rate of change for consistency increased in the order of: during the PC reaction < during the GC reaction < during simultaneous PC and GC reactions. The opposite behaviors, a decrease in σ and an increase in S, were exhibited by Pt/WO3 in the presence of O2 after dark storage or visible-light irradiation. This reversible cycle could be repeated. Moreover, anomalous, nontrivial photo-thermoelectric effects (a photoconductive effect (photoconductivity, σphoto) and a photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, Sphoto)) were also detected in response to the visible-light irradiation of Pt/WO3 in the absence of O2 after chromic reactions. Under visible-light irradiation, both σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto are increased. After the irradiation, both values were decreased, that is, σ and the absolute value of S were smaller than σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto, respectively. These effects are likely to be due to the photoinduced charge carriers and the accumulated electrons in Pt contributing to the increase in σphoto. In addition, electrons are extracted from the W5+ state, decreasing the number of W5+ in HxWO3 and thus contributing to the increase in Sphoto. After light irradiation, the accumulated electrons in Pt are returned to the energetically favorable W

  4. Effects of oxygen gas pressure on structural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of (ZnO){sub 3}In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Orikasa, Yuki; Hayashi, Naoaki; Muranaka, Shigetoshi

    2008-06-01

    Zinc indium oxide films were deposited by the rf magnetron sputtering method using a (ZnO){sub 3}In{sub 2}O{sub 3} target. The films were prepared at 573 K in various Ar/O{sub 2} sputtering gases (O{sub 2} content: 0%-25%). The effect of the oxygen gas content in the sputtering gas on the structural, optical, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of the films was investigated. The films had a c-axis oriented layer structure. The films deposited at 0%-3% oxygen gas contents exhibited a high electrical conductivity with a high carrier concentration, n{approx_equal}10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, while the conductivity of the films significantly decreased above the 3% oxygen gas content, having a carrier concentration below 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. From the optical transmission measurement, the band gap of the films was estimated to be 3.01 eV. The films deposited at 3%-8% oxygen gas contents showed a high Seebeck coefficient, -300 {mu}V/K, while the maximum power factor, 4.78x10{sup -5} W/m K{sup 2}, was obtained at the 2% oxygen gas content. The Seebeck coefficient and the power factor were calculated on the basis of degenerate semiconductors. These results suggest that zinc indium oxide films have the possibility of being high performance thermoelectric materials.

  5. Interface-Located Photothermoelectric Effect of Organic Thermoelectric Materials in Enabling NIR Detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dazhen; Zou, Ye; Jiao, Fei; Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Di, Chong-an; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-05-01

    Organic photothermoelectric (PTE) materials are promising candidates for various photodetection applications. Herein, we report on poly[Cux(Cu-ett)]:PVDF, which is an excellent polymeric thermoelectric composite, possesses unprecedented PTE properties. The NIR light irradiation on the poly[Cu(x)(Cu-ett)]:PVDF film could induce obvious enhancement in Seebeck coefficient from 52 ± 1.5 to 79 ± 5.0 μV/K. By taking advantage of prominent photothermoelectric effect of poly[Cu(x)(Cu-ett)]:PVDF, an unprecedented voltage of 12 mV was obtained. This excellent performance enables its promising applications in electricity generation from solar energy and NIR detection to a wide range of light intensities ranging from 1.7 mW/cm(2) to 17 W/cm(2). PMID:25875974

  6. Effects of K-Doping on Thermoelectric Properties of Bi1-x K x CuOTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tae-Ho; Lim, Young Soo; Seo, Won-Seon; Park, Cheol-Hee; Yoo, Mi Duk; Park, Chan; Lee, Chang Hoon; Shim, Ji Hoon

    2016-09-01

    The effects of K-doping on the thermoelectric properties of Bi1-x K x CuOTe (x = 0 to 0.08) have been investigated. The compounds were synthesized by a one-step solid-state reaction method and consolidated by a spark plasma sintering process. As the amount of K-doping was increased, the electrical and thermal conductivities increased while the Seebeck coefficient decreased due to increasing hole concentration. A ZT value of 0.69 was obtained for the compound K0.01Bi0.99CuOTe at 700 K, to the best of our knowledge the highest value reported for this material system. The origin of this enhanced ZT is discussed in terms of the density of states effective mass estimated by a single parabolic band model and electronic structures calculated based on density functional theory.

  7. Ultraviolet fast-response photoelectric effect in tilted orientation SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Kun; Jin Kuijuan; Huang Yanhong; Zhao Songqing; Lu Huibin; He Meng; Chen Zhenghao; Zhou Yueliang; Yang Guozhen

    2006-10-23

    Ultraviolet photoelectricity based on the vicinal cut as-supplied SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals has been experimentally studied in the absence of an applied bias at room temperature. An open-circuit photovoltage of 130 ps rise time and 230 ps full width at half maximum was observed under the irradiation of a 355 nm pulsed laser of 25 ps in duration. The dependence of the photoelectric effect on the tilting angles was studied, and the optimum angle is 20.9 deg. . Seebeck effect is proposed to elucidate the tilting angle dependence of laser-induced photovoltage. This work demonstrates the potential of SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals in ultraviolet detection.

  8. Al insertion and additive effects on the thermoelectric properties of yttrium boride

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Satofumi; Prytuliak, Anastasiia; Miyazaki, Yuzuru; Hayashi, Kei; Kajitani, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Takao

    2014-03-28

    The aluminoboride Y{sub x}Al{sub y}B{sub 14} (x ∼ 0.57, 0.41 ≤ y ≤ 0.63) has been found to show striking p-n control of the thermoelectric properties through variations of the y occupancy of the Al site. The effect of Al was investigated in further extremes. Polycrystalline samples of Al-free Y{sub x}B{sub 14}(x ∼ 0.55; “YB{sub 25}”) were successfully synthesized in sufficient amounts for bulk spark plasma sintering (SPS) samples and their thermoelectric properties were investigated. Y{sub 0.56}Al{sub 0.57}B{sub 14} was also prepared in comparison, and further Al was added to the samples through SPS treatment. We observed that Y{sub 0.55}B{sub 14} exhibits large positive Seebeck coefficients, ∼1000 μV K{sup −1}, around room temperature and the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient largely decreases with increase of temperature while that of Y{sub 0.56}Al{sub 0.57}B{sub 14} is proportional to T{sup −1/2}, indicating a strong effect of Al on the electronic structure around the Fermi level. Y{sub 0.55}B{sub 14} was found to be strongly disordered with a relatively low thermal conductivity and short localization length of 0.65 Å which is close to that previously determined for the disordered and thermally glass-like compound YB{sub 66}. Occupancy of Al could not be increased further for the Al-rich sample, although Al was discovered to act as a sintering aid to enhance density and ZT could be significantly improved by 50%.

  9. Ion beam irradiation effect on thermoelectric properties of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Gaosheng; Zuo, Lei; Lian, Jie; Wang, Yongqiang; Chen, Jie; Longtin, Jon; Xiao, Zhigang

    2015-09-01

    Thermoelectric energy harvesting is a very promising application in nuclear power plants for self-maintained wireless sensors. However, the effects of intensive radiation on the performance of thermoelectric materials under relevant reactor environments such as energetic neutrons are not fully understood. In this work, radiation effects of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) thermoelectric thin film samples prepared by E-beam evaporation are investigated using Ne2+ ion irradiations at different fluences of 5 × 1014, 1015, 5 × 1015 and 1016 ions/cm2 with the focus on the transport and structural properties. Electrical conductivities, Seebeck coefficients and power factors are characterized as ion fluence changes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the samples are obtained to assess how phase and microstructure influence the transport properties. Carrier concentration and Hall mobility are obtained from Hall effect measurements, which provide further insight into the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient mechanisms. Positive effects of ion irradiations from Ne2+ on thermoelectric material property are observed to increase the power factor to 208% for Bi2Te3 and 337% for Sb2Te3 materials between fluence of 1 and 5 × 1015 cm2, due to the increasing of the electrical conductivity as a result of ionization radiation-enhanced crystallinity. However, under a higher fluence, 5 × 1015 cm2 in this case, the power factor starts to decrease accordingly, limiting the enhancements of thermoelectric materials properties under intensive radiation environment.

  10. Effect of Element Substitution at V site on Thermoelectric Properties of Aurivillius Phase Bi2VO5.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Hitoshi; Yagasaki, Takayoshi

    2016-10-01

    Thermoelectric oxides are suitable at the high temperature range because of chemical stability. Aurivillius compounds are bismuth layered oxides, and known as oxygen ion conductors. The Aurivillius compounds consist of Perovskite layers and Bi-O layers. It is expected that nano-layered structure shows high Seebeck coefficients due to the quantum confinement of carriers in Perovskite layers. It was reported that the Seebeck coefficient of hot pressed specimens for Aurivillius phase Bi2VO5.5 was a high value of -28.3 mVK-1 at 1010 K, and the electrical resistivity of one was also a high value of 0.033 Ωm at 1010 K. In this paper, the effect of element substitution at the V site on thermoelectric properties of Aurivillius phase Bi2VO5.5 was investigated. Bi2V1- x M x O5.5 (M = Cr, Mo, W x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) were prepared by solid-state reaction. The electrical resistivity of Cr-substituted specimens were indicated at larger values than the ones for unsubstituted specimens over the measurement temperature range. The resistivity above 800 K was reduced by substitution of W or Mo. W as a substituted element was effective for reducing the thermal conductivity of Bi2VO5.5. The maximum value of the dimensionless figure of merit ZT was 0.05 at 799 K for Bi2V0.8Mo0.2O5.5 and at 902 K for Bi2V0.8W0.1O5.5. The maximum ZT of an unsubstituted sample was 0.02 at 993 K. From these results, it was found that tungsten or molybdenum substitution was effective to improve ZT for Aurivillius phase Bi2VO5.5.

  11. Exploring the doping effects of copper on thermoelectric properties of lead selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayner, Chhatrasal; Sharma, Raghunandan; Mallik, Iram; Das, Malay K.; Kar, Kamal K.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we have explored the effect of dopant concentration (copper (Cu)) on the thermoelectric performance of Cu doped lead selenide (Pb1-x Cu x Se (0  ⩽  x  ⩽  0.1)). With increasing the dopant concentration, sign inversion of majority charge carriers takes place for x  ⩾  0.04 due to the donor behaviour of Cu in the P-type pristine PbSe. The room temperature Seebeck coefficients of Pb1-x Cu x Se with x  =  0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08 are observed to be 233, 337, -473.7, -392.5 and  -257.6 μV K-1, respectively as compared to that of 186.4 μV K-1 of the pristine PbSe. This increment in Seebeck coefficient is the result of low carrier concentration and is not related to the resonance states created by Cu dopant. At room temperature, the lattice thermal conductivity of pristine PbSe is 0.52 W m-1 K-1 while for Cu doped PbSe, it varies from 0.8 to 1.1 W m-1 K-1. Finally, with ZT of ~0.59 and power factor of ~700 at 500 K, Pb0.98Cu0.02Se exhibits the highest thermoelectric performance among the studied Pb1-x Cu x Se systems. Owing to the high ZT and power factor, a single thermoelement of Pb0.98Cu0.02Se exhibits thermovoltage of  >100 mV at a temperature gradient of 200 °C.

  12. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at Pt/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} interfaces and texture effects

    SciTech Connect

    Isasa, Miren; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Vélez, Saül; Golmar, Federico; Sánchez, Florencio; Fontcuberta, Josep; Hueso, Luis E.; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-06

    We report magnetoresistance measurements on thin Pt bars grown on epitaxial (001) and (111) CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) ferrimagnetic insulating films. The results can be described in terms of the recently discovered spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR). The magnitude of the SMR depends on the interface preparation conditions, being optimal when the Pt/CFO samples are prepared in situ, in a single process. The spin-mixing interface conductance, the key parameter governing SMR and other relevant spin-dependent phenomena, such as spin pumping or spin Seebeck effect, is found to be different depending on the crystallographic orientation of CFO, highlighting the role of the composition and density of magnetic ions at the interface on spin mixing.

  13. Transverse thermoelectric effect in La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}|SrRuO{sub 3} superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomi, Y.; Handa, Y.; Kikkawa, T.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-06-08

    Transverse thermoelectric effects in response to an out-of-plane heat current have been studied in an external magnetic field for ferromagnetic superlattices consisting of La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} and SrRuO{sub 3} layers. The superlattices were fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. We found that the sign of the transverse thermoelectric voltage for the superlattices is opposite to that for La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} and SrRuO{sub 3} single layers at 200 K, implying an important role of spin Seebeck effects inside the superlattices. At 10 K, the magnetothermoelectric curves shift from the zero field due to an antiferromagnetic coupling between layers in the superlattices.

  14. Effect of annealing temperature on photoelectrochemical properties of nanocrystalline MoBi2(Se0.5Te0.5)5 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salunkhe, Manauti; Pawar, Nita; Patil, P. S.; Bhosale, P. N.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocrystalline MoBi2(Se0.5Te0.5)5 thermoelectric thin films have been deposited on ultrasonically cleaned glass and FTO-coated glass substrates by Arrested Precipitation Technique. The change in properties of MoBi2(Se0.5Te0.5)5 thin films were examined after annealing at the temperature 473 K for 3 h. The structural, morphological, compositional and electrical properties of thin films were characterized by X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, etc. Thermoelectric properties of the thin films have been evaluated by measurements of electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in the temperature range 300-500 K. Our aim is to investigate the effect of annealing on behaviour of MoBi2(Se0.5Te0.5)5 thin films along with photoelectrochemical properties.

  15. Effects of Mn Substitution on the Thermoelectric Properties and Thermal Excitations of the Electron-doped Perovskite Sr1-xLaxTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Hata, Hiroto; Eto, Takahiro; Sobaru, Shogo; Oda, Ryosuke; Kaji, Hiroki; Nishina, Kousuke; Kuwahara, Hideki; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Kajimoto, Ryoichi

    2016-09-01

    We studied how Mn substitution affects the thermoelectric properties and thermal excitations of the electron-doped perovskite Sr1-xLaxTiO3 by measuring its electrical and thermal transport properties, magnetization, specific heat, and inelastic neutron scattering. Slight Mn substitution with the lattice defects enhanced the Seebeck coefficient, perhaps because of coupling between itinerant electrons and localized spins or between itinerant electrons and local lattice distortion around Mn3+ ions, while it enhanced anharmonic lattice vibrations, which effectively suppressed thermal conductivity in a state of high electrical conductivity. Consequently, slight Mn substitution increased the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit for Sr1-xLaxTiO3 near room temperature.

  16. Terahertz ratchet effects in graphene with a lateral superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbrich, P.; Kamann, J.; König, M.; Munzert, J.; Tutsch, L.; Eroms, J.; Weiss, D.; Liu, Ming-Hao; Golub, L. E.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Popov, V. V.; Fateev, D. V.; Mashinsky, K. V.; Fromm, F.; Seyller, Th.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on ratchet effects in graphene with a lateral superlattice excited by alternating electric fields of terahertz frequency range are presented. A lateral superlattice deposited on top of monolayer graphene is formed either by periodically repeated metal stripes having different widths and spacings or by interdigitated comblike dual-grating-gate (DGG) structures. We show that the ratchet photocurrent excited by terahertz radiation and sensitive to the radiation polarization state can be efficiently controlled by the back gate driving the system through the Dirac point as well as by the lateral asymmetry varied by applying unequal voltages to the DGG subgratings. The ratchet photocurrent includes the Seebeck thermoratchet effect as well as the effects of "linear" and "circular" ratchets, sensitive to the corresponding polarization of the driving electromagnetic force. The experimental data are analyzed for the electronic and plasmonic ratchets taking into account the calculated potential profile and the near field acting on carriers in graphene. We show that the photocurrent generation is based on a combined action of a spatially periodic in-plane potential and the spatially modulated light due to the near-field effects of the light diffraction.

  17. Phonon and magnon heat transport and drag effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, Joseph P.

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators and coolers constitute today's solid-state energy converters. The two goals in thermoelectrics research are to enhance the thermopower while simultaneously maintaining a high electrical conductivity of the same material, and to minimize its lattice thermal conductivity without affecting its electronic properties. Up to now the lattice thermal conductivity has been minimized by using alloy scattering and, more recently, nanostructuring. In the first part of the talk, a new approach to minimize the lattice thermal conductivity is described that affects phonon scattering much more than electron scattering. This can be done by selecting potential thermoelectric materials that have a very high anharmonicity, because this property governs phonon-phonon interaction probability. Several possible types of chemical bonds will be described that exhibit such high anharmonicity, and particular emphasis will be put on solids with highly-polarizable lone-pair electrons, such as the rock salt I-V-VI2 compounds (e.g. NaSbSe2). The second part of the talk will give an introduction to a completely new class of solid-state thermal energy converters based on spin transport. One configuration for such energy converters is based on the recently discovered spin-Seebeck effect (SSE). This quantity is expressed in the same units as the conventional thermopower, and we have recently shown that it can be of the same order of magnitude. The main advantage of SSE converters is that the problem of optimization is now distributed over two different materials, a ferromagnet in which a flux of magnetization is generated by a thermal gradient, and a normal metal where the flux of magnetization is converted into electrical power. The talk will focus on the basic physics behind the spin-Seebeck effect. Recent developments will then be described based on phonon-drag of spin polarized electrons. This mechanism has made it possible to reach magnitudes of SSE that are comparable

  18. The Shubnikov-de Haas effect and thermoelectric properties of Tl-doped Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kulbachinskii, V. A. Kudryashov, A. A.; Kytin, V. G.

    2015-06-15

    The influence of doping with Tl on the Shubnikov-de Haas effect at T = 4.2 K in magnetic fields up to 38 T in p-Sb{sub 2−x}Tl{sub x}Te{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.005, 0.015, and 0.05) and n-Bi{sub 2−x}Tl{sub x}Se{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06) single crystals is investigated. Extreme cross-sections of the Fermi surface in both materials decrease upon doping with Tl: the hole concentration decreases in Sb{sub 2−x}Tl{sub x}Te{sub 3} due to the donor effect of Tl and the electron concentration in n-Bi{sub 2−x}Tl{sub x}Se{sub 3} decreases due to the acceptor effect of Tl. The temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit in a temperature range of 77–300 K are measured. The thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity decrease upon doping with Tl both in p-Sb{sub 2−x}Tl{sub x}Te{sub 3} and in n-Bi{sub 2−x}Tl{sub x}Se{sub 3}. The Seebeck coefficient increases in all compositions upon an increase in doping over the entire measured temperature range. The thermoelectric figure of merit increases upon doping with Tl.

  19. A- and B-site doping effect on physicochemical properties of Sr2-xBaxMMoO6 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe) double perovskites — candidate anode materials for SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Kun; Świerczek, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we evaluate the physicochemical properties of Sr2-xBaxMMoO6 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe) double perovskites as alternative anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells, for which the effect of substitution of strontium by barium in a full range of compositions is studied. The crystal structure, microstructure, characterization of transport properties (electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient) and oxygen content as a function of temperature, as well as chemical stability in oxidizing and reducing conditions are discussed. Fe- and Mo-containing Sr2-xBaxFeMoO6 oxides show very high total conductivities with values of 100-1000 Sṡcm-1, while Sr2-xBaxMgMoO6 present good redox stability.

  20. A- and B-site doping effect on physicochemical properties of Sr2‑xBaxMMoO6 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe) double perovskites — candidate anode materials for SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Kun; Świerczek, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we evaluate the physicochemical properties of Sr2‑xBaxMMoO6 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe) double perovskites as alternative anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells, for which the effect of substitution of strontium by barium in a full range of compositions is studied. The crystal structure, microstructure, characterization of transport properties (electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient) and oxygen content as a function of temperature, as well as chemical stability in oxidizing and reducing conditions are discussed. Fe- and Mo-containing Sr2‑xBaxFeMoO6 oxides show very high total conductivities with values of 100-1000 Sṡcm‑1, while Sr2‑xBaxMgMoO6 present good redox stability.

  1. Thermomagnonic spin transfer and Peltier effects in insulating magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2012-02-01

    The recent discovery of the spin Seebeck effect [1] in metals, insulators and semiconductors stimulated development of spincaloritronics [2]. The possibility of measuring the Onsager reciprocal spin Peltier effect has been investigated recently as well. In our theoretical work [3], we study the fictitious electromagnetic fields induced by magnetic textures which may offer an alternative route for observing the spin Peltier effect. Particularly, in an insulating ferromagnet a moving magnetic texture should effectively drive the spin (wave) current which in turn should lead to the heat current by the spin Peltier effect. We further study the coupled magnon energy transport and collective magnetization dynamics in ferromagnets with magnetic textures. We conclude that the analogy between the fictitious electromagnetic fields and real fields should lead to magnonic counterparts of such effects as the Hall effect, the Ettingshausen effect, the Nernst effect, and the Righi-Leduc effect. By constructing a phenomenological theory based on irreversible thermodynamics, we describe motion of domain walls by thermal gradients and generation of heat flows by magnetization dynamics. From microscopic description based on magnon kinetics, we estimate the transport coefficients and analyze the feasibility of energy-related applications (e.g. nanoscale heat pumps [4]) in insulating ferromagnets, such as yttrium iron garnet and europium oxide. Our estimates show that the viscous coupling effects between magnetization dynamics and magnon flows can be strong in materials with low spin densities (e.g. dilute magnetic systems) and narrow domain walls, which can allow the magnonic manipulation of magnetization dynamics and heat pumping.[4pt] [1] K. Uchida et al. Nature 455, 778 (2008).[0pt] [2] G. E. W. Bauer, A. H. MacDonald, S. Maekawa, Solid State Commun. 150, 459 (2010).[0pt] [3] A. A. Kovalev and Y. Tserkovnayk, arXiv:1106.3135.[0pt] [4] A. A. Kovalev and Y. Tserkovnyak, Solid State

  2. Effects of preferred orientation and crystal size on thermoelectric properties of sodium cobalt oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yin; Wang, Jun; Yaer, Xinba; Miao, Lei; Zhang, Boyu; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effect of crystal size and orientation effect on ZT, polycrystalline NaxCo2O4 materials were prepared by pressing layered crystals obtained in sol-gel (SG) synthesis, molten salt synthesis (MSS) with and without additional ball milling (BM) treatment and 1:1 molar ratio mixture (Mixture) of BM powder and MSS powders. We found that the orientation effect and crystal size for four samples follow Mixture < SG < BM < MSS and BM < Mixture < SG < MSS, respectively. Electrical conductivity was obviously enhanced in the highly orientated BM and MSS samples when compared with SG and Mixture. It appears that the crystal size plays a dominant role in thermal conductivity rather than Seebeck coefficient by controlling the phonon scattering at grain boundaries. Thermal conductivity for BM was significantly decreased in comparison to MSS, although both BM and MSS show comparable orientation effect. The maximum ZT value is developed to near 0.51 at 814K upon increasing the electrical resistivity and decreasing the thermal conductivity, which are mainly governed by the condition of crystal size and orientation effect.

  3. Giant Nernst effect in CeCoIn5.

    PubMed

    Bel, R; Behnia, K; Nakajima, Y; Izawa, K; Matsuda, Y; Shishido, H; Settai, R; Onuki, Y

    2004-05-28

    We present a study of Nernst and Seebeck coefficients of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5. Below 18 K, concomitant with a field-dependent Seebeck coefficient, a large sublinear Nernst signal emerges with a magnitude drastically exceeding what is expected for a multiband Fermi-liquid metal. In the mixed state, in contrast with all other superconductors studied before, this signal overwhelms the one associated with the motion of superconducting vortices. The results point to a hitherto unknown source of transverse thermoelectricity in strongly interacting electrons. PMID:15245310

  4. Density-of-states effective mass and scattering parameter measurements by transport phenomena in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. L.; Coutts, T. J.; Kaydanov, V. I.

    2000-02-01

    A novel machine has been developed to measure transport coefficients in the temperature range of 50-350 K of thin films deposited on electrically insulating substrates. The measured coefficients—resistivity, Hall, Seebeck, and Nernst—are applied to solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation to give information about the film's density-of-states effective mass, the Fermi energy level, and an energy-dependent scattering parameter. The machine is designed to eliminate or compensate for simultaneously occurring transport phenomena that would interfere with the desired measured quantity, while allowing for all four coefficients to be measured on the same sample. An average density-of-states effective mass value of 0.29±0.04me was measured on the transparent conductive oxide, cadmium stannate (CTO), over a carrier concentration range of 2-7×1020cm-3. This effective mass value matched previous results obtained by optical and thermoelectric modeling. The measured scattering parameter indicates that neutral impurities or a mixture of scattering mechanisms may inhibit the transport of carriers in CTO.

  5. On transverse effects in transport in semi- and superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Konstantin Sergeevich

    In this dissertation, the results obtained during my PhD work are presented. As an introduction, the brief review of the theory of superconducting fluctuations and a short discussion of experimental situation in the field of spin caloritronics are presented. Next, the original study of two important transport transverse effects is reported. The first one is the Hall effect in metallic films, enhanced by super-conducting fluctuations. We develop an appropriate technique, based on solution of Usadel equation in the presence of classical and quantum noise and including leading contributions due to electron-hole asymmetry. This allows us to extend the previously known results for Cooper interaction-dominated transverse conductivity to a broader range of temperatures and magnetic fields, including the vicinity of the magnetic field induced quantum critical point. The second effect under study is Transverse Spin Seebeck Effect (TSSE). The TSSE remains one of the most puzzling of the recently discovered spin-dependent thermoelectric effects merging spin, charge, and thermal physics. We build a theory, which allows to quantitatively interpret the recent experimental results in terms of magnetized electrons, dragged but low-energy out-of-equilibrium phonons. The theory explains the manifestly non-local nature of the TSSE from the fact that phonons that store the energy (thermal) and the phonons that transfer it (subthermal) are located in different parts of the spectrum and have different kinetics. This gives rise to a spectral phonon distribution that deviates from local equilibrium along the substrate and is sensitive to boundary conditions. The theory also predicts a non-magnon origin of the effect in ferromagnetic metals in agreement with observations in recent experiments.

  6. Photothermoelectric and photovoltaic effects both present in MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youwei; Li, Hui; Wang, Lu; Wang, Haomin; Xie, Xiaomin; Zhang, Shi-Li; Liu, Ran; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    As a finite-energy-bandgap alternative to graphene, semiconducting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently attracted extensive interest for energy and sensor applications. In particular for broad-spectral photodetectors, multilayer MoS2 is more appealing than its monolayer counterpart. However, little is understood regarding the physics underlying the photoresponse of multilayer MoS2. Here, we employ scanning photocurrent microscopy to identify the nature of photocurrent generated in multilayer MoS2 transistors. The generation and transport of photocurrent in multilayer MoS2 are found to differ from those in other low-dimensional materials that only contribute with either photovoltaic effect (PVE) or photothermoelectric effect (PTE). In multilayer MoS2, the PVE at the MoS2-metal interface dominates in the accumulation regime whereas the hot-carrier-assisted PTE prevails in the depletion regime. Besides, the anomalously large Seebeck coefficient observed in multilayer MoS2, which has also been reported by others, is caused by hot photo-excited carriers that are not in thermal equilibrium with the MoS2 lattice.

  7. Effects of doping on transport properties in Cu-Bi-Se-based thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Mun, Hyeon A; Kim, Sang Il; Lee, Ki Moon; Kim, Jungeun; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Sung Wng

    2014-12-15

    The thermoelectric properties of Zn-, In-, and I-doped Cu1.7Bi4.7Se8 pavonite homologues were investigated in the temperature range from 300 to 560 K. On the basis of the comprehensive structural analysis using Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation diffraction for Cu(x+y)Bi(5-y)Se8 compounds with the inherently disordered crystallographic sites, we demonstrate a doping strategy that provides a simultaneous control for enhanced electronic transport properties by the optimization of carrier concentration and exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivity by the formation of point defects. Substituted Zn or In ions on Cu site was found to be an effective phonon scattering center as well as an electron donor, while doping on Bi site showed a moderate effect for phonon scattering. In addition, we achieved largely enhanced power factor in small amount of In doping on Cu site by increased electrical conductivity and moderately decreased Seebeck coefficient. Coupled with a low lattice thermal conductivity originated from intensified point defect phonon scattering by substituted In ions with host Cu ions, a thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of 0.24 at 560 K for Cu1.6915In0.0085Bi4.7Se8 was achieved, yielding 30% enhancement compared with that of a pristine Cu1.7Bi4.7Se8 at the same temperature.

  8. A hybrid superconducting quantum dot acting as an efficient charge and spin Seebeck diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sun-Yong; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2016-09-01

    We propose a highly efficient thermoelectric diode device built from the coupling of a quantum dot with a normal or ferromagnetic electrode and a superconducting reservoir. The current shows a strongly nonlinear behavior in the forward direction (positive thermal gradients) while it almost vanishes in the backward direction (negative thermal gradients). Our discussion is supported by a gauge-invariant current-conserving transport theory accounting for electron-electron interactions inside the dot. We find that the diode behavior is greatly tuned with external gate potentials, Zeeman splittings or lead magnetizations. Our results are thus relevant for the search of novel thermoelectric devices with enhanced functionalities.

  9. Effect of Thermoelectric Modules' Topological Connection on Automotive Exhaust Heat Recovery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. D.; Zheng, S. J.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.; Yu, C. G.; Wang, Y. P.

    2016-03-01

    In automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generators (AETEGs), a certain number of thermoelectric modules are connected in series and/or parallel to recover energy from exhaust gas, which provides a way to improve fuel efficiency of the vehicle. Because of the temperature distribution on the surfaces of heat exchanger, several types of modules are planned for use in an AETEG; however, property disparities among modules exist and wire resistance cannot be neglected in practical application, so experiments have been carried out to research effects of the two factors on the maximum output power of series and parallel connection. The performance of series and parallel connections have been characterized, and mathematic models have been built to analyze and predict the performance of each connection. Experiments and theoretical analysis reveal that parallel connection shows a better performance than series connection when large differences of Seebeck coefficient and resistivity exist. However, wire resistance will cause more significant power dissipation in parallel connection. The authors believe the research presented in this paper is the first to carry out an examination of the impact of module property disparity and wire resistance on the output power of an array of thermoelectric modules connected in series and parallel, which provides a reference for choosing module connection in AETEGs.

  10. Spin caloritronics with superconductors: Enhanced thermoelectric effects, generalized Onsager response-matrix, and thermal spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Jacob; Bathen, Marianne Etzelmüller

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been proposed and experimentally demonstrated that it is possible to generate large thermoelectric effects in ferromagnet/superconductor structures due to a spin-dependent particle-hole asymmetry. Here, we show theoretically that quasiparticle tunneling between two spin-split superconductors enhances the thermoelectric response manyfold compared to when only one such superconductor is used, generating Seebeck coefficients (S >1 mV/K) and figures of merit (Z T ≃40 ) far exceeding the best bulk thermoelectric materials, and it also becomes more resilient toward inelastic-scattering processes. We present a generalized Onsager response-matrix that takes into account spin-dependent voltage and temperature gradients. Moreover, we show that thermally induced spin currents created in such junctions, even in the absence of a polarized tunneling barrier, also become largest in the case in which spin-dependent particle-hole asymmetry exists on both sides of the barrier. We determine how these thermal spin-currents can be tuned both in magnitude and sign by several parameters, including the external field, the temperature, and the superconducting phase difference.

  11. Unravelling Doping Effects on PEDOT at the Molecular Level: From Geometry to Thermoelectric Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen; Zhao, Tianqi; Xi, Jinyang; Wang, Dong; Shuai, Zhigang

    2015-10-14

    Tuning carrier concentration via chemical doping is the most successful strategy to optimize the thermoelectric figure of merit. Nevertheless, how the dopants affect charge transport is not completely understood. Here we unravel the doping effects by explicitly including the scattering of charge carriers with dopants on thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), PEDOT, which is a p-type thermoelectric material with the highest figure of merit reported. We corroborate that the PEDOT exhibits a distinct transition from the aromatic to quinoid-like structure of backbone, and a semiconductor-to-metal transition with an increase in the level of doping. We identify a close-to-unity charge transfer from PEDOT to the dopant, and find that the ionized impurity scattering dominates over the acoustic phonon scattering in the doped PEDOT. By incorporating both scattering mechanisms, the doped PEDOT exhibits mobility, Seebeck coefficient and power factors in very good agreement with the experimental data, and the lightly doped PEDOT exhibits thermoelectric properties superior to the heavily doped one. We reveal that the thermoelectric transport is highly anisotropic in ordered crystals, and suggest to utilize large power factors in the direction of polymer backbone and low lattice thermal conductivity in the stacking and lamellar directions, which is viable in chain-oriented amorphous nanofibers.

  12. Thermopower and Nernst effect in the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tian; Gibson, Quinn; Ali, Mazhar; Liu, Minhao; Cava, Robert; Ong, Nai Phuan

    2015-03-01

    Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals are 3D analogues of graphene in which crystalline symmetry protects the nodes against gap formation. Cd3As2 was predicted to be Dirac semimetal, and recently confirmed to be so by photoemission. Here we report an interesting property in Cd3As2 that was unpredicted, namely a remarkable protection mechanism that strongly suppresses backscattering in zero H. In single crystals, the protection results in ultrahigh mobility ~ 9 ×106 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 5 K. Suppression of backscattering results in a transport lifetime 104 times longer than the quantum lifetime. The lifting of this protection by H leads to a very large magnetoresistance. Quantum oscillations in resistivity, Seebeck and Nernst, show beating effect.We discuss how this may relate to changes to the Fermi surface induced by H. Supported by MURI Grant (ARO W911NF-12-1-0461), Army Research Office (ARO W911NF-11-1-0379) and NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR 0819860.

  13. Poole-Frenkel effect in sputter-deposited CuAlO(2+x) nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arghya Narayan; Joo, Sang Woo

    2013-04-26

    Field-assisted thermionic emission within a sputter-deposited, nanocrystalline thin film of CuAlO2.06 is observed for the first time, and explained in terms of the Poole-Frenkel model. The presence of adsorbed oxygen ions as trap-states at the grain boundary regions of the nanostructured thin film is considered to manifest this phenomenon. Under an applied field, the barrier of the trap potential is lowered and thermal emission of charge carriers takes place at different sample temperatures to induce nonlinearity in the current (I)-voltage (V) characteristics of the nanomaterial. Fitting of the Poole-Frenkel model with the I-V data shows that the nonlinearity is effective above 50 V under the operating conditions. Calculations of the energy of the trap level, acceptor level and Fermi level reveal the existence of deep level trap-states and a shallow acceptor level with acceptor concentration considerably higher than the trap-states. Hall measurements confirm the p-type semiconductivity of the film, with a hole concentration around 10(18) cm(-3). Thermopower measurements give a room-temperature Seebeck coefficient around 130 μV K(-1). This temperature-dependent conductivity enhancement within CuAlO2 nanomaterial may find interesting applications in transparent electronics and high-voltage applications for power supply networks. PMID:23535666

  14. Poole-Frenkel effect in sputter-deposited CuAlO2+x nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang Woo

    2013-04-01

    Field-assisted thermionic emission within a sputter-deposited, nanocrystalline thin film of CuAlO2.06 is observed for the first time, and explained in terms of the Poole-Frenkel model. The presence of adsorbed oxygen ions as trap-states at the grain boundary regions of the nanostructured thin film is considered to manifest this phenomenon. Under an applied field, the barrier of the trap potential is lowered and thermal emission of charge carriers takes place at different sample temperatures to induce nonlinearity in the current (I)-voltage (V) characteristics of the nanomaterial. Fitting of the Poole-Frenkel model with the I-V data shows that the nonlinearity is effective above 50 V under the operating conditions. Calculations of the energy of the trap level, acceptor level and Fermi level reveal the existence of deep level trap-states and a shallow acceptor level with acceptor concentration considerably higher than the trap-states. Hall measurements confirm the p-type semiconductivity of the film, with a hole concentration around 1018 cm-3. Thermopower measurements give a room-temperature Seebeck coefficient around 130 μV K-1. This temperature-dependent conductivity enhancement within CuAlO2 nanomaterial may find interesting applications in transparent electronics and high-voltage applications for power supply networks.

  15. Effect of pressure on the magnetic, transport, and thermal-transport properties of the electron-doped manganite CaMn1-xSbxO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murano, Yuh; Matsukawa, Michiaki; Ohuchi, Syuya; Kobayashi, Satoru; Nimori, Shigeki; Suryanarayanan, Ramanathan; Koyama, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Norio

    2011-02-01

    We have demonstrated the effect of hydrostatic pressure on magnetic and transport properties, and thermal-transport properties in the electron-doped manganite CaMn1-xSbxO3. The substitution of Sb5+ ion for Mn 4+ site of the parent matrix causes one-electron doping with the chemical formula CaMn1-2x4+Mnx3+Sbx5+O3 accompanied by a monotonous increase in unit-cell volume as a function of x. Upon increasing the doping level of Sb, the magnitudes of both electrical resistivity and negative Seebeck coefficient are suppressed at high temperatures, indicating the electron doping. Anomalous diamagnetic behaviors at x=0.05 and 0.08 are clearly observed in the field cooled dc magnetization. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on dc magnetization is in contrast to the chemical pressure effect due to Sb doping. The dynamical effect of ac magnetic susceptibility measurement points to the formation of the magnetically frustrated clusters such as FM clusters embedded in canted AFM matrix.

  16. Effect of Off-Stoichiometry on the Thermoelectric Properties of Heusler-Type Fe2VAl Sintered Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, M.; Inukai, M.; Miyazaki, H.; Nishino, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Heusler-type Fe2V1- x Al1+ x sintered alloys with micrometer-sized grains were fabricated by the powder metallurgical process using mechanical alloying and pulse-current sintering. Both positive (˜90 μV/K) and negative (˜-140 μV/K) Seebeck coefficients were obtained for the composition ranges of x > 0 and x < 0, respectively, resulting from a Fermi level shift caused by the change in the valence electron concentration. The electrical resistivity was reduced by the carrier doping effect, especially at lower temperatures, resulting in an increased thermoelectric power factor of 2.8 mW/m-K2 for the p-type alloy with x = 0.06 and 5.0 mW/m-K2 for the n-type alloy with x = -0.06. In addition, the lattice thermal conductivity decreased with | x| because of phonon scattering at crystal lattice defects induced by the off-stoichiometry. Consequently, the thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, was enhanced and reached 0.07 for p-type alloys with 0.06 < x < 0.15 and 0.18 for n-type alloys with -0.15 < x < -0.10 around 500 K. The ZT value was especially enhanced at higher temperatures by the off-stoichiometric composition control, which could extend the range of heat source temperatures for thermoelectric power generation applications using this alloy.

  17. The effect of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of (Cu₂Te){sub 1–x}(Ga₂Te₃)x

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zuxin; Young Cho, Jung; Tessema, Misle M.; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard A.; Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the effects of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of the ternary compounds (Cu₂Te)1–x(Ga₂Te₃)x (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75), which are solid solutions found in the pseudo-binary phase diagram for Cu₂Te and Ga₂Te₃, and possesses tunable structural vacancy concentrations. This materials system is not suitable due to the cost and scarcity of the constituent elements, but the vacancy behavior is well understood and will provide a valuable test case for other systems more suitable from the standpoint of cost and abundance of raw materials, which also possesses these vacancy features, but whose structural characterization is lacking at this stage. We find that the nominally defect free phase CuGaTe₂ possess the highest ZT (ZT=S²T/ρκ, where S is the Seebeck coefficient and ρ is the electrical resistivity κ is the thermal conductivity and T is the absolute temperature) which approaches 1 at 840 K and seems to continuously increase above this temperature. This result is due to the unexpectedly low thermal conductivity found for this material at high temperature. The low thermal conductivity was caused by strong Umklapp (thermally resistive scattering processes involving three phonons) phonon scattering. We find that due to the coincidentally strong scattering of carriers by the structural defects that higher concentrations of these features lead to poor electrical transport properties and decreased ZT. - Graphical abstract: Thermal conductivity and zT as a function of temperature for a series of compounds of the type (Cu₂Te)1–x(Ga₂Te₃)x (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75). Highlights: • All the samples show p-type semiconducting behavior in the temperature dependence of the Seebeck and Hall coefficients. • The increased carrier concentration and the introduction of vacancies diminish the carrier mobility and power factor. • The low

  18. Effects of Pd substitution on the thermoelectric and electronic properties of delafossite Cu{sub 1−x}Pd{sub x}FeO{sub 2} (x=0.01, 0.03 and 0.05)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttanapun, Chesta

    2014-07-01

    Cu{sub (1−x)}Pd{sub (x)}FeO{sub 2} (x=0.01, 0.03 and 005) delafossite was prepared by solid state reactions and was calcined/sintered at 1050 °C. The effect of Pd{sup 2+} substitution for the Cu{sup 1+} sites on the thermoelectric and electronic properties of Cu{sub (1−x)}Pd{sub (x)}FeO{sub 2} were investigated. The crystal structure, oxygen decomposition, thermoelectric and electronic properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity measurements. The characterization showed that Cu{sub (1−x)}Pd{sub (x)}FeO{sub 2} formed a hexagonal delafossite structure with R3−m symmetry. The existence of Pd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 1+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 4+} and O was revealed from the XPS results. Confirmation of Pd{sup 2+} substitution for the Cu{sup 1+} sites occurred by increasing the c-axis in the lattice parameter with a Pd content. The O content intercalated at the center of the triangular Cu acted as a support to produce Cu{sup 2+} ions and was reduced with an increasing Pd content. The mixed valencies of Cu{sup 1+}/Cu{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 1+}/Pd{sup 2+} in the Cu layer changed the electrical conductivity and the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 4+} mixed valencies in the FeO{sub 6} layer caused the Seebeck coefficient to increase. Both the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient for Pd contents of x=0.01 and 0.03 were higher than that of non-doped CuFeO{sub 2}. The low thermal conductivity of Cu{sub (1−x)}Pd{sub (x)}FeO{sub 2} resulted from the substitution of Pd, which has a large atomic mass, into structure. The Jonker plot indicated that the electronic properties displayed a degenerate density of states and that Cu{sub (1−x)}Pd{sub (x)}FeO{sub 2} was a semiconductor. A high ZT value of 0.055 was obtained for a Pd content of 0.03 at 950 K. The Pd{sup 2+} substitution for the Cu{sup 1+} sites influenced the thermoelectric

  19. In-situ Observation of Size and Irradiation Effects on Thermoelectric Properties of Bi-Sb-Te Nanowire in FIB Trimming

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chia-Hua; Lee, Ping-Chung; Tsai, Wei-Han; Lin, Chien-Hung; Lee, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this report, the thermoelectric properties of a Bi0.8Sb1.2Te2.9 nanowire (NW) were in-situ studied as it was trimmed from 750 down to 490 and 285 nm in diameter by a focused ion beam. While electrical and thermal conductivities both indubitably decrease with the diameter reduction, the two physical properties clearly exhibit different diameter dependent behaviors. For 750 and 490 nm NWs, much lower thermal conductivities (0.72 and 0.69 W/m-K respectively) were observed as compared with the theoretical prediction of Callaway model. The consequence indicates that in addition to the size effect, extra phonon scattering of defects created by Ga ion irradiation was attributed to the reduction of thermal conductivities. As the NW was further trimmed down to 285 nm, both the electrical and thermal conductivities exhibited a dramatic reduction which was ascribed to the formation of amorphous structure due to Ga ion irradiation. The size dependence of Seebeck coefficient and figure of merit (ZT) show the maximum at 750 nm, then decrease linearly with size decrease. The study not only provides the thoroughly understanding of the size and defect effects on the thermoelectric properties but also proposes a possible method to manipulate the thermal conductivity of NWs via ion irradiation. PMID:27030206

  20. Spin Hall effect and Landau spectrum of Dirac electrons in bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuseya, Yuki

    2015-03-01

    Bismuth has played an important role in solid-state physics. Many key phenomena were first discovered in bismuth, such as diamagnetism, Seebeck, Nernst, Shubnikov-de Haas, and de Haas-van Alphen effects. These phenomena result from particular electronic states of bismuth. The strong spin-orbit interaction (~ 1.5eV) causes strong spin-dependent interband couplings resulting in an anomalous spin magnetic moment. We investigate the spin Hall effect and the angular dependent Landau spectrum of bismuth paying special attention to the effect of the anomalous spin magnetic moment. It is shown that the spin Hall insulator is possible and there is a fundamental relationship between the spin Hall conductivity and orbital diamagnetism in the insulating state of the Dirac electrons. Based on this theoretical finding, the magnitude of spin Hall conductivity is estimated for bismuth by that of orbital susceptibility. The magnitude of spin Hall conductivity turns out to be as large as 104Ω-1 cm-1, which is about 100 times larger than that of Pt. It is also shown that the ratio of the Zeeman splitting to the cyclotron energy, which reflects the effect of crystalline spin-orbit interaction, for holes at the T-point can be larger than 1.0 (the maximum of previous theories) and exhibit strong angular dependence, which gives a possible solution to the long-standing mystery of holes at the T-point. In collaboration with Masao Ogata, Hidetoshi Fukuyama, Zengwei Zhu, Benoît Fauqué, Woun Kang, and Kamran Behnia. Supported by JSPS (KAKENHI 24244053, 25870231, and 13428660).

  1. Microwave-induced spin currents in ferromagnetic-insulator|normal-metal bilayer system

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Milan; Serga, Alexander A.; Lauer, Viktor; Papaioannou, Evangelos Th.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.

    2014-09-01

    A microwave technique is employed to simultaneously examine the spin pumping and the spin Seebeck effect processes in a YIG|Pt bilayer system. The experimental results show that for these two processes, the spin current flows in opposite directions. The temporal dynamics of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect exhibits that the effect depends on the diffusion of bulk thermal-magnons in the thermal gradient in the ferromagnetic-insulator|normal-metal system.

  2. Effects of Sb Content (x) on (Bi(1-x)Sb(x))2Te3 Thermoelectric Thin Film Deposited by Effusion Cell Evaporator.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ho; Na, Sekwon; Gang, Jun-Gu; Jeon, Seong-Jae; Hyun, Seungmin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the effects of the Sb content (x) on (Bi(1-x)Sb(x))2Te3 thermoelectric films with x changing widely from 0 (Sb2Te3) to 1 (Bi2Te3). First, the XRD analysis discloses that with the Sb content (x) increasing, the phase changed gradually from Bi2Te3 to Sb2Te3 as Sb atoms replaced substitutionally Bi atoms. Further microstructure analysis reveals that an extensive grain growth occurred during post-annealing for the samples with high Sb contents. According to the measurement of electrical and thermoelectric properties, the polarity of the charge carrier and Seebeck coefficient switched n-type to p-type in the range of x = 0.45~0.63. For the n-type samples, the power factor is highest when x = 0.18 around 46.01 μW/K(2) whereas Sb2Te3, for the p-type samples, shows the highest value, 62.48 μW/K(2)cm.

  3. Effects of Sb Content (x) on (Bi(1-x)Sb(x))2Te3 Thermoelectric Thin Film Deposited by Effusion Cell Evaporator.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ho; Na, Sekwon; Gang, Jun-Gu; Jeon, Seong-Jae; Hyun, Seungmin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the effects of the Sb content (x) on (Bi(1-x)Sb(x))2Te3 thermoelectric films with x changing widely from 0 (Sb2Te3) to 1 (Bi2Te3). First, the XRD analysis discloses that with the Sb content (x) increasing, the phase changed gradually from Bi2Te3 to Sb2Te3 as Sb atoms replaced substitutionally Bi atoms. Further microstructure analysis reveals that an extensive grain growth occurred during post-annealing for the samples with high Sb contents. According to the measurement of electrical and thermoelectric properties, the polarity of the charge carrier and Seebeck coefficient switched n-type to p-type in the range of x = 0.45~0.63. For the n-type samples, the power factor is highest when x = 0.18 around 46.01 μW/K(2) whereas Sb2Te3, for the p-type samples, shows the highest value, 62.48 μW/K(2)cm. PMID:26726497

  4. Optical and electrical properties and phonon drag effect in low temperature TEP measurements of AgSbSe2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namitha Asokan, T.; Urmila, K. S.; Jacob, Rajani; Reena Philip, Rachel; Okram, G. S.; Ganesan, V.; Pradeep, B.

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of silver antimony selenide have been deposited using a reactive evaporation technique onto an ultrasonically cleaned glass substrate at a vacuum of 10-5 torr. The preparative parameters, like substrate temperature and incident fluxes, have been properly controlled in order to get stoichiometric, good quality and reproducible thin film samples. The samples are characterized by XRD, SEM, AFM and a UV—vis—NIR spectrophotometer. The prepared sample is found to be polycrystalline in nature. From the XRD pattern, the average particle size and lattice constant are calculated. The dislocation density, strain and number of crystallites per unit area are evaluated using the average particle size. The dependence of the electrical conductivity on the temperature has also been studied and the prepared AgSbSe2 samples are semiconducting in nature. The AgSbSe2 thin films exhibited an indirect allowed optical transition with a band gap of 0.64 eV. The compound exhibits promising thermoelectric properties, a large Seebeck coefficient of 30 mV/K at 48 K due to strong phonon electron interaction. It shows a strong temperature dependence on thermoelectric properties, including the inversion of a dominant carrier type from p to n over a low temperature range 9-300 K, which is explained on the basis of a phonon drag effect.

  5. Large transverse thermoelectric effects in single crystals of the quasi-one-dimensional metal Li0.9Mo6O17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshfeghyeganeh, Saeed; Cohn, Joshua; Dos Santos, Carlos A. M.; Neumeier, John J.

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of transverse thermoelectric (TE) effects in the temperature range 300-500 K for single crystals of the quasi-one-dimensional (q1D) metal Li0.9Mo6O17 (lithium purple bronze). Prior work demonstrates a highly anisotropic Seebeck coefficient (S), with metallic n-type behavior along the q1D chains (crystallographic b axis), p-type semiconductor behavior in the perpendicular, inter-chain direction (c axis), and a difference ΔS ~= 200 μ V/K near T = 450 K. Significant transverse TE voltages, induced by applied temperature differences, and Peltier cooling, induced by applied currents, in specimens with body axes misaligned with the b and c axes will be discussed. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DE-FG02-12ER46888, Univ. Miami), the National Science Foundation (DMR-0907036, Mont. St. Univ.), and in Lorena by the CNPq (301334/2007-2) and FAPESP (2009/14524-6).

  6. Effect of Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles on the Grain Boundary Segregation and Thermoelectric Properties of Bismuth Doped Mg2Si0.7Ge0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Nader; Prabhudev, Sagar; Bugnet, Matthieu; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Salvador, James R.; Kleinke, Holger

    2016-09-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the thermoelectric properties of Mg2Si0.676Ge0.3Bi0.024 was investigated. Increasing the concentration of SiC nanoparticles systematically reduces the electrical conductivity from 431 Ω-1 cm-1 for the pristine sample to 370 Ω-1 cm-1 for the sample with 1.5 wt.% SiC at 773 K, while enhancing the Seebeck coefficient from -202 μV K-1 to -215 μV K-1 at 773 K. In spite of the high thermal conductivity of SiC, its additions could successfully decrease the lattice thermal conductivity from 3.2 W m-1 K-1 to 2.7 W m-1 K-1 at 323 K, presumably by adding more interfaces. The Z contrast transmission electron microscopy imaging (Z = atomic number) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed bismuth segregation at the grain boundary. In summary, the figure of merit reached its maximum value of 0.75 at 773 K for the sample containing 0.5 wt.% SiC.

  7. Isovalent substitutes play in different ways: Effects of isovalent substitution on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Lu, Xu; Morelli, Donald T.

    2016-07-01

    Boron-added CoSi, CoSi0.98B0.02, possesses a very high thermoelectric power factor of 60 μW cm-1 K-2 at room temperature, which is among the highest power factors that have ever been reported for near-room-temperature thermoelectric applications. Since the electrical properties of this material have been tuned properly, isovalent substitution for its host atoms is intentionally employed to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity while maintaining the electronic properties unchanged. In our previous work, the effect of Rh substitution for Co atoms on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02 has been studied. Here, we present a study of the substitution of Ge for Si atoms in this compound. Even though Ge and Rh are isovalent with their corresponding host atoms, they play different roles in determining the electrical and thermal transport properties. Through the evaluation of the lattice thermal conductivity by the Debye approximation and the comparison between the high-temperature Seebeck coefficients, we propose that Rh substitution leads to a further overlapping of the conduction and the valence bands, while Ge substitution only shifts the Fermi level upward into the conduction band. Our results show that the influence of isovalent substitution on the electronic structure cannot be ignored when the alloying method is used to improve thermoelectric properties.

  8. Isovalent substitutes play in different ways: Effects of isovalent substitution on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Hui; Lu, Xu; Morelli, Donald T.

    2016-07-21

    Boron-added CoSi, CoSi0.98B0.02, possesses a very high thermoelectric power factor of 60 μW cm-1 K-2 at room temperature, which is among the highest power factors that have ever been reported for near-room-temperature thermoelectric applications. Since the electrical properties of this material have been tuned properly, isovalent substitution for its host atoms are intentionally employed to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity while maintaining the electronic properties unchanged. In our previous work, the effect of Rh substitution for Co atoms on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi0.98B0.02 has been studied. Here we present a study of the substitution of Ge for Si atomsmore » in this compound. Even though Ge and Rh are isovalent with their corresponding host atoms, they play different roles in determining the electrical and thermal transport properties. Through the evaluation of the lattice thermal conductivity by the Debye approximation and the comparison between the high-temperature Seebeck coefficients, we propose that Rh substitution leads to a further overlapping of the conduction and the valence bands while Ge substitution only shifts the Fermi level upward into the conduction band. Lastly, our results show that the influence of isovalent substitution on the electronic structure cannot be ignored when the alloying method is used to improve thermoelectric properties.« less

  9. Magnon-drag and thermomagnetic transport properties of Ca doped YIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanhua; He, Bin; Chen, Xi; Zhou, Jianshi; Shi, Li; Myers, Roberto; Heremans, Joseph

    Yttrium-iron garnet (YIG) is an insulating ferromagnet commonly used to study various spin transport phenomena: in conjunction with a Pt film, it generates the well-known spin-Seebeck effect. Because of the close relationship between the spin-Seebeck effect and the magnon-drag charge Seebeck effect, we investigate the thermoelectric transport properties of an electrically conducting bulk YIG crystal doped p-type with Ca. A large and sharp change in the thermopower of Ca:YIG near the Curie temperature has been observed, which is potentially explained by the magnon-drag model. We present the temperature dependence of electrical conductivity, magneto-thermopower, and Hall coefficient of Ca:YIG. Photo-excitation of the carriers from the valence band into the Ca level results in photoconductivity and photo-Seebeck effects as well. Acknowledgement: ARO MURI W911NF-14-1-0016.

  10. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cell using Bi2Te3 nanotube/ZnO nanoparticle composite photoanode by the synergistic effect of photovoltaic and thermoelectric conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yuanyao; Wu, Fang; Fang, Liang; Liu, Gaobin; Mao, Caiying; Wan, Kai; Zhou, Miao

    2016-03-01

    Ultralong and highly crystalline rhombohedral Bi2Te3 nanotubes were fabricated by a two-step solution phase reaction. A novel photoanode architecture has been fabricated by embedding 0-2.5 wt.% Bi2Te3 nanotubes into ZnO nanoparticles. The photocurrent density-voltage (J-V) characteristics reveal that the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with Bi2Te3/ZnO composite photoanode exhibit significantly enhanced photovoltaic performance. Notably, the DSSC incorporating 1.5 wt.% Bi2Te3 in the ZnO photoanode demonstrates an energy conversion efficiency (η) of 4.27%, which is 44.3% higher than that of the bare ZnO photoanode. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis shows that the Bi2Te3 nanotubes can provide a direct pathway for electron transportation, prolong the lifetime of electrons, suppress the charge recombination and improve the electron collection efficiency. The thermoelectric effect analysis indicates that with the increase of irradiation time, Bi2Te3/ZnO composite photoanode could convert both heat and photon energies to electrical energy simultaneously and slow down the decline of η. The calculated electron density (ns) further proves that the increment of short-circuit current density (Jsc) is attributed to Seebeck effect in the composite photoanode. These results suggest that compositing 1D thermoelectric nano-materials in photoanode is a promising route to improve the performance of DSSCs.

  11. Spin-orbital coupling effect on the power factor in semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, San-Dong; Wang, Jian-Li

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structures and thermoelectric properties of semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers {{MX}}2 (M = Zr, Hf, Mo, W and Pt; X = S, Se and Te) are investigated by combining first-principles and Boltzmann transport theory, including spin-orbital coupling (SOC). It is found that the gap decrease increases from S to Te in each cation group when the SOC is opened. The spin-orbital splitting has the same trend with the gap reducing. The calculated results show that SOC has a noteworthy detrimental effect on the p-type power factor, while it has a negligible influence in n-type doping except for the W cation group, which can be understood by considering the effects of SOC on the valence and conduction bands. For {{WX}}2 (X = S, Se and Te), SOC leads to an observable enhanced power factor in n-type doping, which can be explained by SOC-induced band degeneracy, namely the bands converge. Among all of the cation groups, the Pt cation group shows the highest Seebeck coefficient, which leads to the best power factor, if we assume that the scattering time is fixed. The calculated results show that {{MS}}2 (M = Zr, Hf, Mo, W and Pt) have the best p-type power factor of all the cation groups, and that {{MSe}}2 (M = Zr and Hf), {{WS}}2 and {{MTe}}2 (M = Mo and Pt) have a more excellent n-type power factor in their respective cation group. Therefore, these results may be useful for further theoretical prediction or experimental research of excellent thermoelectric materials from semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers.

  12. Spin–orbital coupling effect on the power factor in semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, San-Dong; Wang, Jian-Li

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structures and thermoelectric properties of semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers {{MX}}2 (M = Zr, Hf, Mo, W and Pt; X = S, Se and Te) are investigated by combining first-principles and Boltzmann transport theory, including spin–orbital coupling (SOC). It is found that the gap decrease increases from S to Te in each cation group when the SOC is opened. The spin–orbital splitting has the same trend with the gap reducing. The calculated results show that SOC has a noteworthy detrimental effect on the p-type power factor, while it has a negligible influence in n-type doping except for the W cation group, which can be understood by considering the effects of SOC on the valence and conduction bands. For {{WX}}2 (X = S, Se and Te), SOC leads to an observable enhanced power factor in n-type doping, which can be explained by SOC-induced band degeneracy, namely the bands converge. Among all of the cation groups, the Pt cation group shows the highest Seebeck coefficient, which leads to the best power factor, if we assume that the scattering time is fixed. The calculated results show that {{MS}}2 (M = Zr, Hf, Mo, W and Pt) have the best p-type power factor of all the cation groups, and that {{MSe}}2 (M = Zr and Hf), {{WS}}2 and {{MTe}}2 (M = Mo and Pt) have a more excellent n-type power factor in their respective cation group. Therefore, these results may be useful for further theoretical prediction or experimental research of excellent thermoelectric materials from semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers.

  13. Effect of ceramic dispersion on thermoelectric properties of nano-ZrO{sub 2}/CoSb{sub 3} composites

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zeming; Stiewe, Christian; Platzek, Dieter; Karpinski, Gabriele; Mueller, Eckhard; Li, Shanghua; Toprak, Muhammet; Muhammed, Mamoun

    2007-02-15

    In the present work, nano-ZrO{sub 2}/CoSb{sub 3} composites were fabricated by milling ZrO{sub 2} and CoSb{sub 3} powders and hot pressing at different sintering temperatures. For the prepared compacts, the phase purity, microstructure, and temperature-dependent thermoelectric properties were characterized. The effect of nano-ZrO{sub 2} dispersion on composite electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity is strictly clarified by comparing the transport properties of the nondispersed and dispersed CoSb{sub 3} at identical porosity, so that the effect of porosity on thermoelectric parameters could be eliminated. The effect of the insulating inclusion itself on transport properties is also considered and eliminated using effective media theories. It is clearly verified that charge carrier scattering and phonon scattering occur simultaneously to lower the electrical conductivity and the thermal conductivity of CoSb{sub 3} due to the introduction of nano-ZrO{sub 2} inclusions. The investigated composites show higher electrical conductivity due to existence of metallic Sb and lower thermal conductivity because of nanodispersion. At the ranges of high measuring temperature (673-723 K) and low porosity (6%-9%), the ratio of electrical conductivity to thermal conductivity of the dispersed CoSb{sub 3} is higher than that of nondispersed CoSb{sub 3}, and the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the composite could probably be improved at these ranges with the enhanced ratio of electrical conductivity to thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, which is assumed to be increased by a potential barrier scattering.

  14. Field effect controlled ferromagnetism in transition metal doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingeri, E.; Pellegrino, L.; Biasotti, M.; Pallecchi, I.; Canu, G.; Gerbi, A.; Vignolo, M.; Siri, A. S.; Marré, D.; Rusponi, S.; Lehnert, A.; Nolting, F.

    2008-02-01

    The ability to externally control the properties of magnetic materials would be highly desirable both from fundamental and technological point of views. In this respect, dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS), in which a fraction of atoms of the nonmagnetic semiconductor host is replaced by magnetic ions, have recently attracted broad interest for their potential application in spintronics. In this work, we focused on transition metal (TM) (Co, Mn and Cu) doped Zinc oxide (ZnO) because room temperature ferromagnetism was both theoretically predicted and experimentally observed. However, the origin of such ferromagnetism, in particular whether it is a signature of a true DMS behaviour (long range magnetic interaction between the doping ions) or it arises from the formation of secondary phases, segregation or clustering is still under debate. Measuring the dependence of the magnetic properties on the carrier concentration can clarify the underlying physics. The samples were characterized by resistivity, Hall effect, magnetoresistance, Seebeck effect, synchrotron X-ray adsorption spectra (XAS) and magnetic dichroism (XMD) while modulating the carrier density by electric field. The insulating-gate field-effect transistor structures are realized in ZnO/Strontium Titanate (SrTiO 3) heterostructures by pulsed laser deposition. These devices offers the capability to modulate the carrier density of a probe accessible (light, AFM tip, ...) channel, by more than 5 orders of magnitude (from ~10 15 to ~10 20 e -/cm 3, estimated by Hall effect measurements under FE). The Co and Mn films measured by DC SQUID magnetometer result ferromagnetic and anomalous Hall effect was observed at low temperature but nor ferromagnetic nor antiferromagnetic signal was detectable in the XMD spectra. Cu doped films are insulating and nonmagnetic. Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (x-PEEM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) showed that the sample are homogeneus and no clustering of TM were detected

  15. Thermoelectric effects in silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zberecki, K.; Wierzbicki, M.; Barnaś, J.; Swirkowicz, R.

    2013-09-01

    Transport and thermoelectric coefficients (including also spin thermopower) of silicene nanoribbons with zigzag edges are investigated by ab initio numerical methods. Local spin density of such nanoribbons reveals edge magnetism. As in graphene, one finds antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ordering, with spin polarization at one edge antiparallel or parallel to that at the other edge, respectively. Thermoelectric properties, especially the Seebeck coefficient, significantly depend on the electronic band structure and are enhanced when the Fermi level is in the energy gap. However, the thermoelectric efficiency is significantly reduced when the phonon contribution to the heat conductance is included. This phonon contribution has been calculated numerically by two different methods. Transition from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic states leads to a large magnetoresistance as well as to a considerable magnetothermopower. Thermoelectric parameters in the antiparallel configuration, when spin polarization in the left part of the nanoribbon is opposite to that in the right part, are also analyzed.

  16. Effect of partial void filling on the transport properties of NdxCo4Sb12 skutterudites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. L.; Kuznetsova, L. A.; Rowe, D. M.

    2003-07-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the partially filled skutterudites NdxCo4Sb12 have been prepared and characterized by x-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal analysis. The saturation limit of the Nd void filling in CoSb3 was found to be around 13%. All samples decompose incongruently at a temperature of 1149 +/- 6 K. Room temperature Hall measurements show that each Nd atom donates approximately 0.8 electrons, which is significantly less than the Nd oxidation state (3+). The temperature dependence of the electrical and thermal transport properties has been measured over the range of 11-700 K. The electrical resistivity and absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient decrease with increasing Nd content and for samples with x > 0.02 the temperature dependence is typical of heavily doped semiconductors. Filling CoSb3 with Nd causes a rapid initial decrease in the lattice thermal conductivity with a minimum at the composition Nd0.1Co4Sb12. Nd-filled skutterudites exhibit the lowest value of the lattice thermal conductivity in comparison with other partially filled skutterudites at x < 0.1, which could be attributed to a smaller radius of Nd than that of other filling elements. At high temperature the ZT value of the Nd-filled skutterudites is limited due to intrinsic conduction caused by the relatively low carrier concentration. The effect of the partial Nd filling on the transport properties of the filled skutterudite compounds is discussed in the context of potential thermoelectric materials.

  17. Temperature Gradient Measurements by Using Thermoelectric Effect in CNTs-Silicone Adhesive Composite

    PubMed Central

    Chani, Muhammad Tariq Saeed; Karimov, Kh. S.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Ahmed, Nisar; Bashir, Muhammad Mehran; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Rub, Malik Abdul; Azum, Naved

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the fabrication and investigation of thermoelectric cells based on composite of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicone adhesive. The composite contains CNT and silicon adhesive 1∶1 by weight. The current-voltage characteristics and dependences of voltage, current and Seebeck coefficient on the temperature gradient of cell were studied. It was observed that with increase in temperature gradient the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and the Seebeck coefficient of the cells increase. Approximately 7 times increase in temperature gradient increases the open circuit voltage and short circuit current up to 40 and 5 times, respectively. The simulation of experimental results is also carried out; the simulated results are well matched with experimental results. PMID:24748375

  18. Effect of ruthenium substitution in layered sodium cobaltate Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2}: Synthesis, structural and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, Pierre; Muguerra, Herve; Hebert, Sylvie; Pachoud, Elise; Colin, Claire; Julien, Marc-Henri

    2009-07-15

    Solid-state synthesis of Na{sub 0.71}Co{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x}O{sub 2} compositions shows that ruthenium can be substituted for cobalt in the hexagonal Na{sub 0.71}CoO{sub 2} phase up to x=0.5. The cell expands continuously with increasing ruthenium content. All mixed Co-Ru phases show a Curie-Weiss behaviour with no evidence of magnetic ordering down to 2 K. Unlike the parent phase Na{sub 0.71}CoO{sub 2}, ruthenium-substituted phases are all semiconducting. They exhibit high thermoelectric power, with a maximum of 165 muV/K at 300 K for x=0.3. The Curie constant C and Seebeck coefficient S show a non-monotonic evolution as a function of ruthenium content, demonstrating a remarkable interplay between magnetic properties and thermoelectricity. The presence of ruthenium has a detrimental effect on water intercalation and superconductivity in this system. Applying to Ru-substituted phases the oxidative intercalation of water known to lead to superconductivity in the Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} system yields a 2-water layer hydrate only for x=0.1, and this phase is not superconducting down to 2 K. - Graphical Abstract: Effect of ruthenium substitution on thermoelectric power in Na{sub 0.71}Co{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x}O{sub 2} (left) and on low-temperature ac susceptibility in hydrated derivative (right).

  19. Ab initio optimization of phonon drag effect for lower-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liao, Bolin; Qiu, Bo; Huberman, Samuel; Esfarjani, Keivan; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermoelectric figure of merit zT above 300 K has seen significant improvement recently, the progress at lower temperatures has been slow, mainly limited by the relatively low Seebeck coefficient and high thermal conductivity. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, success in first-principles computation of the phonon drag effect—a coupling phenomenon between electrons and nonequilibrium phonons—in heavily doped region and its optimization to enhance the Seebeck coefficient while reducing the phonon thermal conductivity by nanostructuring. Our simulation quantitatively identifies the major phonons contributing to the phonon drag, which are spectrally distinct from those carrying heat, and further reveals that although the phonon drag is reduced in heavily doped samples, a significant contribution to Seebeck coefficient still exists. An ideal phonon filter is proposed to enhance zT of silicon at room temperature by a factor of 20 to ∼0.25, and the enhancement can reach 70 times at 100 K. This work opens up a new venue toward better thermoelectrics by harnessing nonequilibrium phonons. PMID:26627231

  20. Are Effective Properties Effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ru; Ingber, Marc S.; Hsiao, S.-C.

    2008-02-15

    The effective moduli (effective Young's modulus, effective Poisson's ratio, effective shear modulus, and effective bulk modulus) of dispersed-phase-reinforced composite materials are determined at the mesoscopic level using three-dimensional parallel boundary element simulations. By comparing the mesoscopic BEM results and the macroscopic results based on effective properties, limitations in the effective property approach have been examined.

  1. Effects of Se substitution on the thermoelectric performance of n-type Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.3}Te{sub 0.7−x}Se{sub x} skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Bo; Zhai, Pengcheng; Liu, Lisheng; Zhang, Qingjie

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► The simple solid state reaction technique was employed to prepare Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.3}Te{sub 0.7−x}Se{sub x} skutterudites. ► The thermal conductivity decreases gradually with the increasing Se content. ► Doping with moderate Se is an effective way to enhance the thermoelectric performance of Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.3}Te{sub 0.7−x}Se{sub x}. ► The highest ZT of 1.11 at 800 K is obtained for the Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.3}Te{sub 0.58}Se{sub 0.12} sample. -- Abstract: A series of double-substituted Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.3}Te{sub 0.7−x}Se{sub x} skutterudites have been fabricated by combining the solid state reaction and the spark plasma sintering method, and the effects of Se substitution on the thermoelectric properties are characterized by measurements of the electrical conductivity, the Seebeck coefficient and the thermal conductivity in the temperature range of 300–800 K. Doping Se into the Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.3}Te{sub 0.7−x}Se{sub x} matrix suppresses the carrier concentration, and the electrical conductivity actually decreases with the Se content. However, moderate Se doping is effective in enhancing the thermoelectric performance of the n-type Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.3}Te{sub 0.7−x}Se{sub x}, because of the resulted dramatically decreased thermal conductivity. Analyses indicate that the heightened point-defect scattering induced by Se doping together with the electron–phonon scattering induced by Te doping is responsible for the reduction of lattice thermal conductivity of these compounds.

  2. Effect of high-pressure annealing on the normal-state transport of LaO0.5F0.5BiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallecchi, I.; Lamura, G.; Putti, M.; Kajitani, J.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Miura, O.; Demura, S.; Deguchi, K.; Takano, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We study normal state electrical, thermoelectrical, and thermal transport in polycrystalline BiS2-based compounds, which become superconducting by F doping on the O site. In particular, we explore undoped LaOBiS2 and doped LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 samples, prepared either with or without high-pressure annealing, in order to evidence the roles of doping and preparation conditions. The high-pressure annealed sample exhibits room temperature values of resistivity ρ around 5 mΩcm, Seebeck coefficient S around -20μV /K, and thermal conductivity κ around 1.5 W/Km, while the Hall resistance RH is negative at all temperatures and its value is -10-8 m3/C at low temperature. The sample prepared at ambient pressure exhibits RH positive in sign and five times larger in magnitude, and S negative in sign and slightly smaller in magnitude. These results reveal a complex multiband evolution brought about by high-pressure annealing. In particular, the sign inversion and magnitude suppression of RH, indicating increased electron-type carrier density in the high-pressure sample, may be closely related to previous findings about change in lattice parameters and enhancement of superconducting Tc by high-pressure annealing. As for the undoped sample, it exhibits 10 times larger resistivity, 10 times larger |S|, and 10 times larger |RH| than its doped counterpart, consistent with its insulating nature. Our results point out the dramatic effect of preparation conditions in affecting charge carrier density as well as structural, band, and electronic parameters in these systems.

  3. Detailed Uncertainty Analysis of the ZEM-3 Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are critical to the investigation of all thermoelectric systems. Therefore, it stands that the measurement uncertainty must be well understood to report ZT values which are accurate and trustworthy. A detailed uncertainty analysis of the ZEM-3 measurement system has been performed. The uncertainty analysis calculates error in the electrical resistivity measurement as a result of sample geometry tolerance, probe geometry tolerance, statistical error, and multi-meter uncertainty. The uncertainty on Seebeck coefficient includes probe wire correction factors, statistical error, multi-meter uncertainty, and most importantly the cold-finger effect. The cold-finger effect plagues all potentiometric (four-probe) Seebeck measurement systems, as heat parasitically transfers through thermocouple probes. The effect leads to an asymmetric over-estimation of the Seebeck coefficient. A thermal finite element analysis allows for quantification of the phenomenon, and provides an estimate on the uncertainty of the Seebeck coefficient. The thermoelectric power factor has been found to have an uncertainty of +9-14 at high temperature and 9 near room temperature.

  4. Experimental Test of the Spin Mixing Interface Conductivity Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Mathias; Althammer, Matthias; Schreier, Michael; Lotze, Johannes; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Kamra, Akashdeep; Xiao, Jiang; Chen, Yan-Ting; Jiao, HuJun; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-10-01

    We perform a quantitative, comparative study of the spin pumping, spin Seebeck, and spin Hall magnetoresistance effects, all detected via the inverse spin Hall effect in a series of over 20yttriumirongarnet/Pt samples. Our experimental results fully support present, exclusively spin current-based, theoretical models using a single set of plausible parameters for spin mixing conductance, spin Hall angle, and spin diffusion length. Our findings establish the purely spintronic nature of the aforementioned effects and provide a quantitative description, in particular, of the spin Seebeck effect.

  5. A review of carrier thermoelectric-transport theory in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Liu, Ming

    2016-07-20

    Carrier thermoelectric-transport theory has recently become of growing interest and numerous thermoelectric-transport models have been proposed for organic semiconductors, due to pressing current issues involving energy production and the environment. The purpose of this review is to provide a theoretical description of the thermoelectric Seebeck effect in organic semiconductors. Special attention is devoted to the carrier concentration, temperature, polaron effect and dipole effect dependence of the Seebeck effect and its relationship to hopping transport theory. Furthermore, various theoretical methods are used to discuss carrier thermoelectric transport. Finally, an outlook of the remaining challenges ahead for future theoretical research is provided.

  6. A review of carrier thermoelectric-transport theory in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Liu, Ming

    2016-07-20

    Carrier thermoelectric-transport theory has recently become of growing interest and numerous thermoelectric-transport models have been proposed for organic semiconductors, due to pressing current issues involving energy production and the environment. The purpose of this review is to provide a theoretical description of the thermoelectric Seebeck effect in organic semiconductors. Special attention is devoted to the carrier concentration, temperature, polaron effect and dipole effect dependence of the Seebeck effect and its relationship to hopping transport theory. Furthermore, various theoretical methods are used to discuss carrier thermoelectric transport. Finally, an outlook of the remaining challenges ahead for future theoretical research is provided. PMID:27386952

  7. Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of RuO{sub 2} nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Music, Denis; Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Hassdorf, Ralf

    2010-07-15

    We have explored the effect of the O/Ru ratio on the morphology and the Seebeck coefficient of RuO{sub 2} nanorods (space group P4{sub 2}/mnm) synthesized by reactive sputtering. At an O/Ru ratio of 1.69, a faceted surface is observed, while nanorod formation occurs at O/Ru ratios of 2.03 and 2.24. Using classical molecular dynamics with the potential parameters derived in this work, we show that volatile species enable nanorod formation. Based on ab initio calculations, two effects of the nanorod formation on the Seebeck coefficient are observed: (i) increase due to additional states in the vicinity of the Fermi level and (ii) decrease due to oxygen point defects (volatile species). These two competing effects give rise to a moderate increase in the Seebeck coefficient upon nanorod formation.

  8. Electronic and thermoelectric transport properties for a zigzag graphene-silicene-graphene heterojunction modulated by external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Benliang; Zeng, Yangsu; Zhou, Guanghui; Duan, Manyi

    2016-04-01

    we investigate the electronic and thermoelectric transport properties for a graphene-silicene-graphene (GSG) heterojunction with zigzag-edge nanoribbons under the modulation of the effective spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and potential energy. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, it is demonstrated that both the transmission coefficient T and the charge Seebeck coefficient SC display the oscillatory behavior and can be effectively modulated by effective SOC λSO and the potential energy V0. Furthermore, the even-odd difference in transport and thermoelectric properties disappears in the GSG heterojunction. Additionally, the dependence of the transmission coefficient and the charge Seebeck coefficient on Anderson disorder strength has been studied.

  9. Silicide/Silicon Hetero-Junction Structure for Thermoelectric Applications.

    PubMed

    Jun, Dongsuk; Kim, Soojung; Choi, Wonchul; Kim, Junsoo; Zyung, Taehyoung; Jang, Moongyu

    2015-10-01

    We fabricated silicide/silicon hetero-junction structured thermoelectric device by CMOS process for the reduction of thermal conductivity with the scatterings of phonons at silicide/silicon interfaces. Electrical conductivities, Seebeck coefficients, power factors, and temperature differences are evaluated using the steady state analysis method. Platinum silicide/silicon multilayered structure showed an enhanced Seebeck coefficient and power factor characteristics, which was considered for p-leg element. Also, erbium silicide/silicon structure showed an enhanced Seebeck coefficient, which was considered for an n-leg element. Silicide/silicon multilayered structure is promising for thermoelectric applications by reducing thermal conductivity with an enhanced Seebeck coefficient. However, because of the high thermal conductivity of the silicon packing during thermal gradient is not a problem any temperature difference. Therefore, requires more testing and analysis in order to overcome this problem. Thermoelectric generators are devices that based on the Seebeck effect, convert temperature differences into electrical energy. Although thermoelectric phenomena have been used for heating and cooling applications quite extensively, it is only in recent years that interest has increased in energy generation.

  10. Anomalous enhancement of the thermoelectric power in gallium-doped p-(Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kulbachinskii, V. A. Kytin, V. G.; Tarasov, P. M.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of gallium on the temperature dependences (5 K {<=} T {<=} 300 K) of Seebeck coefficient {alpha}, electrical conductivity {sigma}, thermal conductivity k, and thermoelectric efficiency Z of mixed p-(Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} semiconductor single crystals is studied. The hole concentration decreases upon gallium doping; that is, gallium causes a donor effect. The Seebeck coefficient increases anomalously, i.e., much higher than it should be at the detected decrease in the hole concentration. This leads to an enhancement of the thermoelectric power. The observed changes in the Seebeck coefficient indicate a noticeable gallium-induced change in the density of states in the valence band.

  11. Infrared and thermoelectric power generation in thin atomic layer deposited Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Harkirat S.; Lang, Brian N.; Schwab, Yosyp; Scarel, Giovanna; Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Karppinen, Maarit

    2015-01-15

    Infrared radiation is used to radiatively transfer heat to a nanometric power generator (NPG) device with a thermoelectric Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as the active element, onto a borosilicate glass substrate. The linear rise of the produced voltage with respect to the temperature difference between the “hot” and “cold” junctions, typical of the Seebeck effect, is missing. The discovery of the violation of the Seebeck effect in NPG devices combined with the ability of ALD to tune thermoelectric thin film properties could be exploited to increase the efficiency of these devices for energy harvesting purposes.

  12. Electronic and thermoelectric transport properties for an armchair graphene-silicene-graphene heterojunction modulated by external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Benliang; Zeng, Yangsu; Zhou, Guanghui; Duan, Manyi

    2016-08-01

    We analytically investigate effective spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and potential energy on electronic and thermoelectric transport properties for a graphene-silicene-graphene (GSG) heterojunction with armchair-edge nanoribbons using nonequilibrium Green's function method. The calculation shows that the transmission coefficient T and the charge Seebeck coefficient SC for armchair-edge GSG junctions display the oscillatory behavior and depend sensitively on both effective SOC λSO and the potential energy V0. Compared with zigzag-edge GSG heterojunctions, armchair-edge GSG heterojunctions are found to posses superior thermoelectric performance, their charge Seebeck coefficients can be improved by one order of magnitude.

  13. The effect of M (M=Ti,Cr,V,Nb) on the transport and elastic properties of nanolayered ternary carbides M2AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettinger, J.; Barsoum, M.

    2005-03-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the electronic, magneto-transport, thermal and elastic properties of the family of materials M2AlC where M is Ti, V, Cr or Nb in the temperature range 4 to 300K. The elastic constants were measured for all compounds ultrasonically. The bulk moduli and anisotropic Young's moduli were found to vary in these compounds depending on the transition metal M. The Debye temperatures were in the 640-710 K range for all materials investigated. The Seebeck coefficients for these four materials were small with differing temperature dependences. All but the Nb containing material have Seebeck coefficients that change sign. The electrical conductivity, Hall coefficient and magnetoresistances are analyzed within a two-band framework assuming a temperature-independent charge carrier concentration. We concluded that there is little correlation between the Seebeck voltage and Hall number. As with other MAX-phase materials, all these materials are nearly compensated. Comparisons between these results will be presented. Results will be discussed in relation to theoretical work and recent measurements on related systems.

  14. Thermal spin injection and interface insensitivity in permalloy/aluminum metallic nonlocal spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojem, A.; Wesenberg, D.; Zink, B. L.

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements of thermal and electrical spin injection in nanoscale metallic nonlocal spin valve structures. Informed by measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity of representative films made using a micromachined Si-N thermal isolation platform, we use simple analytical and finite-element thermal models to determine limits on the thermal gradient driving thermal spin injection and calculate the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient to be -0.5 μ V /K >Ss>-1.6 μ V /K . This is comparable in terms of the fraction of the absolute Seebeck coefficient to previous results, despite dramatically smaller electrical spin injection signals. Since the small electrical spin signals are likely caused by interfacial effects, we conclude that thermal spin injection is less sensitive to the ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic interface, and possibly benefits from the presence of oxidized ferromagnets, which further stimulates interest in thermal spin injection for applications in sensors and pure spin current sources.

  15. Dynamical Correction of Thermoelectric Coefficients for Strongly Interacting Electrons in the Coulomb Blockade Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kaike

    FOR MOLECULES WEAKLY COUPLED TO LEADS THE EXACT ZERO-BIAS KOHN-SHAM CONDUCTANCE CAN BE ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE LARGER THAN THE TRUE CONDUCTANCE DUE TO THE LACK OF DYNAMICAL EXCHANGE-CORRELATION (XC) EFFECTS. RECENTLY, IT HAS BEEN SHOWN HOW THESE DYNAMICAL XC CORRECTIONS CAN BE CALCULATED USING ONLY QUANTITIES OBTAINED FROM STATIC DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY. HERE, WE INVESTIGATE THE THERMOELECTRIC TRANSPORT AND DERIVE THE XC CORRECTION TO THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT. WE FIND THAT THE DYNAMICAL CORRECTION TO THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT IS DETERMINANT IN EVALUATING THE THERMOPOWER: THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF THE DYNAMICAL CORRECTION FOR THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT IS, FOR CERTAIN VALUES OF GATE VOLTAGE, MUCH LARGER THAN THAT OF THE KOHN-SHAM TERM. FINALLY, WE COMPARE OUR DENSITY FUNCTIONAL CALCULATIONS TO THE RATE EQUATION AND THE EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

  16. Effect of Nickel Substitution on Defect Chemistry, Electrical Properties, and Dimensional Stability of Calcium-Doped Yttrium Chromite

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Kyung J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Marina, Olga A.

    2011-06-30

    The effect of nickel substitution on defect chemistry, electrical properties, and dimensional stability of calcium-doped yttrium chromite was studied for use as an interconnect material in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The compositions of Y0.8Ca0.2Cr1-xNixO3±δ (x=0-0.15), prepared using the glycine nitrate process, showed single phase orthorhombic perovskite structures over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures (10^-17 atm ≤ pO2 ≤ 0.21 atm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that most of the nickel ions replacing chromium ions are divalent and act as acceptor dopants, leading to a substantial increase in conductivity. In particular, the conductivity at 900 degree C in air increased from 10 S/cm to 34 S/cm with 15% nickel substitution, and an increase in charge carrier density was confirmed by Seebeck measurements. A point defect model was derived, and the relationship between electrical conductivity and oxygen partial pressure was successfully fitted into the proposed model. The defect modeling results indicated that nickel substitution improves the stability of calcium-doped yttrium chromite toward reduction and suppresses the oxygen vacancy formation, which results in significantly increased electrical conductivity in reducing environment. The electrical conductivity of Y0.8Ca0.2Cr0.85Ni0.15O3±δ at 900 degree C in reducing atmosphere (pO2=10^-17 atm) was 5.8 S/cm, which was more than an order of magnitude higher than that of Y0.8Ca0.2CrO3±δ (0.2 S/cm). Improved stability in reducing atmosphere was further confirmed by dilatometry measurements showing reduced isothermal "chemical" expansion, and the isothermal expansion in reducing atmosphere (pO2=10^-17 atm) at 900 degree C decreased from 0.07% for Y0.8Ca0.2CrO3±δ to 0.03% for Y0.8Ca0.2Cr0.85Ni0.15O3±δ. Based on these results, enhanced electrical performance and mechanical integrity is expected with nickel substitution on calcium-doped yttrium chromite in SOFC

  17. High thermoelectric figure of merit in nanocrystalline polyaniline at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Chandrani; Kumar, Ashok; Kuo, Yung-Kang; Okram, Gunadhor Singh

    2014-09-01

    Thermoelectric coolers with figure of merit (ZT) close to unity at low temperatures are the need of the hour with new advances in high temperature superconductors, superconducting microelectronic circuits, quantum computers, and photonics. Here, we demonstrate that the conducting polymer polyaniline (Pani) doped with camphor sulfonic acid synthesized in semi-crystalline nanostructures, possesses a giant Seebeck effect at low temperatures. The resulting enormously large Seebeck coefficient (up to 0.6 V/K) combined with an intrinsically low electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity give rise to a ZT = 0.77 at 45 K and ZT = 2.17 at 17 K.

  18. Thermoelectric conversion efficiency in IV-VI semiconductors with reduced thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akihiro; Thao, Hoang Thi Xuan; Yamamoto, Hidenari; Kinoshita, Yohei; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru

    2015-10-01

    Mid-temperature thermoelectric conversion efficiencies of the IV-VI materials were calculated under the Boltzmann transport theory of carriers, taking the Seebeck, Peltier, and Thomson effects into account. The conversion efficiency was discussed with respect to the lattice thermal conductivity, keeping other parameters such as Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity to the same values. If room temperature lattice thermal conductivity is decreased up to 0.5W/mK, the conversion efficiency of a PbS based material becomes as high as 15% with the temperature difference of 500K between 800K and 300K.

  19. A study of transport properties in Cu and P doped ZnSb

    SciTech Connect

    Valset, K.; Song, X.; Finstad, T. G.

    2015-01-28

    ZnSb samples have been doped with copper and phosphorus and sintered at 798 K. Electronic transport properties are interpreted as being influenced by an impurity band close to the valence band. At low Cu dopant concentrations, this impurity band degrades the thermoelectric properties as the Seebeck coefficient and effective mass are reduced. At carrier concentrations above 1 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}, the Seebeck coefficient in Cu doped samples can be described by a single parabolic band.

  20. High thermoelectric figure of merit in nanocrystalline polyaniline at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Chandrani; Kumar, Ashok E-mail: okram@csr.res.in; Kuo, Yung-Kang; Okram, Gunadhor Singh E-mail: okram@csr.res.in

    2014-09-29

    Thermoelectric coolers with figure of merit (ZT) close to unity at low temperatures are the need of the hour with new advances in high temperature superconductors, superconducting microelectronic circuits, quantum computers, and photonics. Here, we demonstrate that the conducting polymer polyaniline (Pani) doped with camphor sulfonic acid synthesized in semi-crystalline nanostructures, possesses a giant Seebeck effect at low temperatures. The resulting enormously large Seebeck coefficient (up to 0.6 V/K) combined with an intrinsically low electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity give rise to a ZT = 0.77 at 45 K and ZT = 2.17 at 17 K.

  1. Anisotropic Effects on the Thermoelectric Properties of Highly Oriented Electrodeposited Bi2Te3 Films.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Cristina V; Abad, Begoña; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Koh, Yee Rui; Hodson, Stephen L; Lopez Martinez, Antonio M; Xu, Xianfan; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Highly oriented [1 1 0] Bi2Te3 films were obtained by pulsed electrodeposition. The structure, composition, and morphology of these films were characterized. The thermoelectric figure of merit (zT), both parallel and perpendicular to the substrate surface, were determined by measuring the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity in each direction. At 300 K, the in-plane and out-of-plane figure of merits of these Bi2Te3 films were (5.6 ± 1.2)·10(-2) and (10.4 ± 2.6)·10(-2), respectively. PMID:26776726

  2. Anisotropic Effects on the Thermoelectric Properties of Highly Oriented Electrodeposited Bi2Te3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Cristina V.; Abad, Begoña; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Koh, Yee Rui; Hodson, Stephen L.; Lopez Martinez, Antonio M.; Xu, Xianfan; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Highly oriented [1 1 0] Bi2Te3 films were obtained by pulsed electrodeposition. The structure, composition, and morphology of these films were characterized. The thermoelectric figure of merit (zT), both parallel and perpendicular to the substrate surface, were determined by measuring the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity in each direction. At 300 K, the in-plane and out-of-plane figure of merits of these Bi2Te3 films were (5.6 ± 1.2)·10−2 and (10.4 ± 2.6)·10−2, respectively. PMID:26776726

  3. Anisotropic Effects on the Thermoelectric Properties of Highly Oriented Electrodeposited Bi2Te3 Films.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Cristina V; Abad, Begoña; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Koh, Yee Rui; Hodson, Stephen L; Lopez Martinez, Antonio M; Xu, Xianfan; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Highly oriented [1 1 0] Bi2Te3 films were obtained by pulsed electrodeposition. The structure, composition, and morphology of these films were characterized. The thermoelectric figure of merit (zT), both parallel and perpendicular to the substrate surface, were determined by measuring the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity in each direction. At 300 K, the in-plane and out-of-plane figure of merits of these Bi2Te3 films were (5.6 ± 1.2)·10(-2) and (10.4 ± 2.6)·10(-2), respectively.

  4. Modern Thermocouple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, K. N.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thermocouple circuit used to measure Joule heating as well as Peltier heating and cooling for a copper-Constantan metallic junction. Shows how the Seebeck effect from a thermocouple can monitor the temperature condition of a junction with regard to input power and Peltier effect. (Author/GA)

  5. The Effect of Structural Vacancies on the Thermoelectric Properties of (Cu2Te)1-x(Ga2Te3)x

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zuxin; Cho, Jung Y; Tessema, Misle; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard; Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the effects of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of the ternary compounds (Cu2Te)1-x(Ga2Te3)x (x = 0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75), which are solid solutions found in the pseudo-binary phase diagram for Cu2Te and Ga2Te3. This system possesses tunable structural vacancy concentrations. The x= 0.5 phase, CuGaTe2, is nominally devoid of structural vacancies, while the rest of the compounds contain varying amounts of these features, and the volume density of vacancies increases with Ga2Te3 content. The sample with x = 0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625 crystallize in the chalcopyrite structure while the x = 0.667 and 0.75 adopt the Ga2Te3 defect zinc blende structure. Strong scattering of heat carrying phonons by structural defects, leads to the reduction of thermal conductivity, which is beneficial to the thermoelectric performance of materials. On the other hand, these defects also scatter charge carriers and reduce the electrical conductivity. All the samples investigated are p-type semiconductors as inferred by the signs of their respective Hall (RH) and Seebeck (S) coefficients. The structural vacancies were found to scatter phonons strongly, while a combination of increased carrier concentration, and vacancies decreases the Hall mobility ( H), degrading the overall thermoelectric performance. The room temperature H drops from 90 cm2/V s for CuGaTe2 to 13 cm2/V s in Cu9Ga11Te21 and 4.6 cm2/V s in CuGa3Te5. The low temperature thermal conductivity decreases significantly with higher Ga2Te3 concentrations (higher vacancy concentration) due to increased point defect scattering which dominate thermal resistance terms. At high temperatures, the dependence of thermal conductivity on the Ga2Te3 content is less significant. The presence of strong Umklapp scattering leads to low thermal conductivity at high temperatures for all samples investigated. The highest ZT among the samples in this study was found for the defect-free Cu

  6. Study of Interesting Solidification Phenomena on the Ground and in Space (MEPHISTO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Favier, J.-J.; Garandet, J.-P.

    1999-01-01

    Real-time Seebeck voltage variations in a Sn-Bi melt during directional solidification in the MEPHISTO spaceflight experiment flown on the USMP-3 mission, have been correlated with well-characterized thruster firings and an Orbiter Main System (OMS) burn. The Seebeck voltage measurement is related to the response of the instantaneous average melt composition at the melt-crystal interface. This allowed us to make a direct comparison of numerical simulations with the experimentally obtained Seebeck signals. Based on the results of preflight and real-time computations, several well-defined thruster firing events were programmed to occur at specific times during the experiment. In particular, we simulated the effects of the thruster firings on melt and crystal composition in a directionally solidifying Sn-Bi alloy. The relative accelerations produced by the firings were simulated by impulsive accelerations of the same magnitude, duration and orientation as the requested firings. A comparison of the simulation results with the Seebeck signal indicates that there is a good agreement between the two. This unique opportunity allows us to make the first quantitative characterization of actual g-jitter effects on an actual crystal growth experiment and to calibrate our models of g-jitter effects on crystal growth.

  7. Development of Flexible Micro-Thermo-electrochemical Generators Based on Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, Stefanie; Laux, Edith; Journot, Tony; Jeandupeux, Laure; Charmet, Jérôme; Keppner, Herbert

    2014-10-01

    The unfavourable relationship between electrical and thermal conductivity limits the choice of solid-state materials for thermoelectric generators (TEG). Among ionic liquids (IOL), it appears that a large variety of thermoelectric (TE) materials with promising high Seebeck coefficients have potential for development. Furthermore, the novel solid-on-liquid deposition technology (SOLID) allows the encapsulation of liquid TE materials to create new, highly integrated TEG devices. Following this vision, this paper studies a large number of IOLs looking at TE-relevant parameters such as thermal and electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient and temperature-dependent viscosity. We show that positive and negative Seebeck coefficients can be obtained, depending on the molecular structure and the viscosity of the IOL. The properties of single-junction TEGs are presented in terms of I- V characteristics correlated with the IOL properties. We prove that the limiting effect of conversion efficiency is the current density that can be extracted from a device rather than the Seebeck coefficient.

  8. Convergence of valence bands for high thermoelectric performance for p-type InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Zhu; Li, Ruo-Ping; Liu, Jun-Hui; Huang, Ming-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Band engineering to converge the bands to achieve high valley degeneracy is one of effective approaches for designing ideal thermoelectric materials. Convergence of many valleys in the valence band may lead to a high Seebeck coefficient, and induce promising thermoelectric performance of p-type InN. In the current work, we have systematically investigated the electronic structure and thermoelectric performance of wurtzite InN by using the density functional theory combined with semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory. Form the results, it can be found that intrinsic InN has a large Seebeck coefficient (254 μV/K) and the largest value of ZeT is 0.77. The transport properties of p-type InN are better than that of n-type one at the optimum carrier concentration, which mainly due to the large Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN, although the electrical conductivity of n-type InN is larger than that of p-type one. We found that the larger Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN may originate from the large valley degeneracy in the valence band. Moreover, the low minimum lattice thermal conductivity for InN is one key factor to become a good thermoelectric material. Therefore, p-type InN could be a potential material for further applications in the thermoelectric area.

  9. Effect of rare earth radius and concentration on the structural and transport properties of doped Mn Zn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ateia, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; El-Aziz, A. K.

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric constant ( ɛ'), AC conductivity ( σ), and seebeck coefficient ( S) have been measured for the ferrite samples of the general formula Mn 0.5Zn 0.5R yFe 2O 4; where R=Dy, Gd, Sm, Ce, and La prepared by standard ceramic technique and sintered at 1200 °C with a heating rate 4 °C/min. X-ray diffractograms show that all samples posses the spinel structure with the appearance of small peaks representing secondary phases. There is a lowering in the porosity starting after Sm-doped samples due to the presence of the secondary phases, which limits the grain growth. Due to seebeck measurements the manganese-zinc (Mn-Zn) ferrite doped with the rare earth has been classified as P-type semiconductors. It is possible to increase the electrical resistivity by using a small quantity of Dy 3+ ions substitutions owing to the structural heterogeneity generated by the insulating intergranular layers. The isolation of the grains is the most promising approaches for further reduction in the eddy current losses at the operating frequencies.

  10. Gauging Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foord, Kathleen A.; Haar, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Books by education experts and speakers at national professional conferences have inspired many school leaders to initiate professional learning communities (PLCs). Sustaining them effectively to raise student achievement is another matter. How can one know whether a PLC is moving toward a desired outcome? Measuring effectiveness requires an…

  11. Thermal Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmage, Sylvia S.; Coutant, Charles C.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effect of temperature on the biosphere water, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes the effects of temperature on growth, production, and embryonic and larval development. A list of 401 references is also presented. (HM)

  12. High temperature experimental characterization of microscale thermoelectric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favaloro, Tela

    temperature vacuum thermostats are designed and fabricated with optical imaging capability and interchangeable measurement stages for various electrical and thermoelectric characterizations. We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of in-plane electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of thin-film or bulk thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we utilize high-speed circuitry to implement the transient Harman technique and directly determine the cross-plane figure of merit of thin film thermoelectric materials at high temperatures. Transient measurements on thin film devices are subject to complications from the growth substrate, non-ideal contacts and other detrimental thermal and electrical effects. A strategy is presented for optimizing device geometry to mitigate the impact of these parasitics. This design enabled us to determine the cross-plane thermoelectric material properties in a single high temperature measurement of a 25mum InGaAs thin film with embedded ErAs (0.2%) nanoparticles using the bipolar transient Harman technique in conjunction with thermoreflectance thermal imaging. This approach eliminates discrepancies and potential device degradation from the multiple measurements necessary to obtain individual material parameters. Finite element method simulations are used to analyze non-uniform current and temperature distributions over the device area and determine the three dimensional current path for accurate extraction of material properties from the thermal images. Results match with independent measurements of thermoelectric material properties for the same material composition, validating this approach. We apply high magnification thermoreflectance imaging to create temperature maps of vanadium dioxide nanobeams and examine electro-thermal energy conversion along the nanobeam length. The metal to insulator transition of strongly correlated materials is subject to strong lattice coupling which brings about the unique one-dimensional alignment of

  13. Psychopharmaceuticals: effects and side effects

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Nathan S.

    1959-01-01

    Drugs which affect psychological behaviour are being used in vast amounts nowadays, with, in all too many cases, but scant regard for their exact uses or possible side effects. This article contains a clinical classification of these drugs, followed by an account of their principal side effects and the means of obviating them. PMID:14409889

  14. Health Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter . Additional information regarding the health effects of climate change and references to supporting literature can be found ... globalchange.gov/engage/activities-products/NCA3/technical-inputs . Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health ...

  15. Effects and Effectiveness of Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Grigsby, Jim; Kaehny, Margaret M.; Sandberg, Elliot J.; Schlenker, Robert E.; Shaughnessy, Peter W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of telemedicine has recently undergone rapid growth and proliferation. Although the feasibility of many applications has been tested for nearly 30 years, data concerning the costs, effects, and effectiveness of telemedicine are limited. Consequently, the development of a strategy for coverage, payment, and utilization policy has been hindered. Telemedicine continues to expand, and pressure for policy development increases in the context of Federal budget cuts and major changes in health service financing. This article reviews the literature on the effects and medical effectiveness of telemedicine. It concludes with several recommendations for research, followed by a discussion of several specific questions, the answers to which might have a bearing on policy development. PMID:10153466

  16. Plasma Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radio communication with space probes requires sending signals through the Earth's ionosphere and usually the solar wind. During planetary flybys, the signal may also pass through the ionosphere of another planet. These ionized media can perturb the radio signal in a variety of ways. Examples of these perturbations are variations in the electrical length between the spacecraft and the ground station, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized signals, amplitude and phase scintillations, and spectral and angular broadening. These plasma effects can have undesirable influences on telemetry performance and thus need to be understood from a communications engineering viewpoint. The plasma effects are, however, useful from a scientific viewpoint, since the effects on the communications link can often be inverted to estimate the physical conditions in the plasma.

  17. Quenched phonon drag in silicon nanowires reveals significant effect in the bulk at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Jyothi; Tian, Hongxiang; Ma, Jun; Azeredo, Bruno; Kim, Junhwan; Balasundaram, Karthik; Zhang, Chen; Li, Xiuling; Ferreira, P M; Sinha, S

    2015-05-13

    Existing theory and data cannot quantify the contribution of phonon drag to the Seebeck coefficient (S) in semiconductors at room temperature. We show that this is possible through comparative measurements between nanowires and the bulk. Phonon boundary scattering completely quenches phonon drag in silicon nanowires enabling quantification of its contribution to S in bulk silicon in the range 25-500 K. The contribution is surprisingly large (∼34%) at 300 K even at doping of ∼3 × 10(19) cm(-3). Our results contradict the notion that phonon drag is negligible in degenerate semiconductors at temperatures relevant for thermoelectric energy conversion. A revised theory of electron-phonon momentum exchange that accounts for a phonon mean free path spectrum agrees well with the data.

  18. Kondo effect and thermoelectric transport in CePd3Be x.

    PubMed

    Gumeniuk, Roman; Schnelle, Walter; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas

    2016-04-27

    The physical properties of the series CePd3Be(x) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.47) have been studied. Introducing Be into CePd3 results in a drastic reduction of the Seebeck coefficient from 100 μV K(-1) at 300 K to  -2 μV K(-1), respectively. Paramagnetism of Ce(3+) free ions and metallic conduction dominate the physical properties. A structural transition at x  =  0.25 is accompanied by a significant lowering of the Kondo temperature and leads to a successive suppression of the thermoelectric performance of CePd3Be(x) with increasing x. PMID:27009024

  19. Tectonomagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.

    1978-01-01

    We know that earthquakes result from the sudden release of elastic strain, the end product, most likely, of a long period of gradual stress accumulation in the crust. At the U.S Geological Survey, our magnetic fields studies have two main directions. First, a determination of the magnetic behavior accompanying shallow earthquakes (seismomagnetic effects). Second, a long-term monitoring of the magnetic field in the vicinity of an active fault to detect magnetic changes due to general tectonic activity, particularly that which ultimately leads to earthquakes. These magnetic changes are generally termed "tectonomagnetic effects." 

  20. Sleeper Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Daphne; Mondloch, Catherine J.; Lewis, Terri L.

    2007-01-01

    Early experience preserves and refines many capabilities that emerge prenatally. Here we describe another role that it plays--establishing the neural substrate for capabilities that emerge at a much later point in development. The evidence comes from sleeper effects: permanent deficits when early experience was absent in capabilities that normally…

  1. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panyue; Ye, Jie; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2014 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: anaerobic wastewater and sludge treatment, biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, membrane biological treatment, sewage sludge pyrolysis, natural treatment, resource recovery, electrolysis, oxidation and adsorption treatment.

  2. Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  3. Effect of sulfur doping on thermoelectric properties of tin selenide – A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, Aditya; Molli, Muralikrishna Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2015-06-24

    In this work we present the thermoelectric properties of tin selenide (SnSe) and sulfur doped tin selenide(SnSe{sub (1-x)}S{sub x}, x= 0.125 and 0.25) obtained using first principles calculations. We investigated the electronic band structure using the FP-LAPW method within the sphere of the density functional theory. Thermoelectric properties were calculated using BOLTZTRAP code using the constant relaxation time approximation at three different temperatures 300, 600 and 800 K. Seebeck coefficient (S) was found to decrease with increasing temperature, electrical conductivity (σ/τ) was almost constant in the entire temperature range and thermal conductivity (κ/τ) increased with increasing temperature for all samples. Sulfur doped samples showed enhanced seebeck coefficient, decreased thermal conductivity and decreased electrical conductivity at all temperatures. At 300 K, S increased from 1500 µV/K(SnSe) to 1720μV/K(SnSe{sub 0.75}S{sub 0.25}), thermal conductivity decreased from 5 × 10{sup 15} W/mKs(SnSe) to 3 × 10{sup 15} W/mKs(SnSe{sub 0.75}S{sub 0.25}), electrical conductivity decreased from 7 × 10{sup 20}/Ωms(SnSe) to 5 × 10{sup 20} /Ωms(SnSe{sub 0.75}S{sub 0.25}). These calculations show that sulfur doped tin selenide exhibit better thermoelectric properties than undoped tin selenide.

  4. Effect of varying mixture ratio of raw material powders on the thermoelectric properties of AlMgB14-based materials prepared by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Shota; Sasaki, Hikaru; Takagi, Ken-ichi; Fujima, Takuya

    2014-08-01

    Thermoelectric properties of AlMgB14-based materials prepared by spark plasma sintering were investigated. Al, Mg, and B powders were used as raw material powders. The raw powders were mixed using a V-shaped mixer, and then the mixture was sintered at 1673 K or 1773 K. The mixture ratio of raw powders was varied around stoichiometric ratio of AlMgB14. X-ray diffraction patterns of samples showed that all samples consist of AlMgB14 and MgAl2O4. The Seebeck coefficient of the samples exhibited significant change depending on the varying mixture ratio and sintering temperature. One sample exhibited a large negative value for the Seebeck coefficient (approximately -500 μV/K) in the temperature range from 573 K to 1073 K, while others showed positive value (250-450 μV/K). Thus n-type AlMgB14-based material has been realized by varying raw material ratio and sintering temperature.

  5. The effect of M (M=Ti, Cr, V, Nb) on transport and elastic properties of nanolayered ternary carbides M2AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettinger, Jeff; Finkel, Peter; Lofland, Sam; Barsoum, Michel; Gupta, Adrish

    2006-03-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of the electronic, magneto-transport, thermal and elastic properties of the family of materials M2AlC where M is Ti, V, Cr or Nb in the temperature range 4 to 300K. The elastic constants were measured for all compounds ultrasonic technique. The bulk moduli and anisotropic Young's moduli found to be varied in these compounds for various transition metal M. The Debye temperatures were high in the 640-710 K range and quite insensitive to composition. The Seebeck coefficient was a non-monotonic function of a temperature: at the lowest temperatures is small but increases with increasing temperature and saturates at 60-80 K and goes through zero again manifesting change in the dominating charge carrier type. The electrical conductivity, Hall coefficient and magnetoresistances are analyzed within a two-band framework assuming a temperature-independent charge carrier concentration. We concluded that there is little correlation between the Seebeck voltage and Hall number. As with other MAX-phase materials, all these materials are nearly compensated. Comparisons of these results will be presented. Results will be discussed in relation to theoretical work and recent measurements on related systems.

  6. Effects of Mev Si Ions and Thermal Annealing on Thermoelectric and Optical Properties of SiO2/SiO2+Ge Multi-nanolayer thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budak, S.; Alim, M. A.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Muntele, C.

    Thermoelectric generator devices have been prepared from 200 alternating layers of SiO2/SiO2+Ge superlattice films using DC/RF magnetron sputtering. The 5 MeV Si ionsbombardmenthasbeen performed using the AAMU Pelletron ion beam accelerator to formquantum dots and / or quantum clusters in the multi-layer superlattice thin films to decrease the cross-plane thermal conductivity, increase the cross-plane Seebeck coefficient and increase the cross-plane electrical conductivity to increase the figure of merit, ZT. The fabricated devices have been annealed at the different temperatures to tailor the thermoelectric and optical properties of the superlattice thin film systems. While the temperature increased, the Seebeck coefficient continued to increase and reached the maximum value of -25 μV/K at the fluenceof 5x1013 ions/cm2. The decrease in resistivity has been seen between the fluence of 1x1013 ions/cm2 and 5x1013 ions/cm2. Transport properties like Hall coefficient, density and mobility did not change at all fluences. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the multi-junction thermoelectric devices. The loci obtained in the C*-plane for these data indicate non-Debye type relaxation displaying the presence of the depression parameter.

  7. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk

  8. Blazhko Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teays, Terry

    1996-01-01

    The cause of the Blazhko effect, the long-term modulation of the light and radial velocity curves of some RR Lyr stars, is still not understood. The observational characteristics of the Blazhko effect are discussed. Some preliminary results are presented from two recent campaigns to observe RR Lyr, using the International Ultraviolet Explorer along with ground-based spectroscopy and photometry, throughout a pulsation cycle, at a variety of Blazhko phases. A set of ultraviolet light curves have been generated from low dispersion IUE spectra. In addition, the (visual) light curves from IUE's Fine Error Sensor are analyzed using the Fourier decomposition technique. The values of the parameters Psi(sub 21) and R(sub 21) at different Blazhko phases of RR Lyr span the range of values found for non-Blazhko variables of similar period.

  9. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment.

  10. Zeeman Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The splitting of a spectral line into two, three or more components, that occurs when the source of that line lies within a magnetic field. This phenomenon is named after the Dutch physicist, Pieter Zeeman (1865-1943), who discovered the effect in the laboratory, in 1896. The separation of the components of a line is proportional to the strength of the magnetic field and the number of components,...

  11. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment. PMID:27620109

  12. Anisotropic magnetothermopower in ferromagnetic thin films grown on macroscopic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayathilaka, P. B.; Belyea, D. D.; Fawcett, T. J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-05-01

    We report observing the anisotropic magnetothermopower in a variety of ferromagnetic thin films grown on macroscopic substrates. These measurements were enabled by eliminating spurious signals related to the Anomalous Nernst Effect by butt-mounting the sample to the heat source and sink, and appropriate positioning of electrical contacts to avoid unwanted thermal gradients. This protocol enabled detailed measurements of the magnetothermopower in the transverse and longitudinal configurations. This may enable Spin Seebeck Effect studies in the in-plane geometry.

  13. Erosion Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The impact crater in this THEMIS image is a model illustration to the effects of erosion on Mars. The degraded crater rim and several landslides observed in crater walls is evidence to the mass wasting of materials. Layering in crater walls also suggests the presence of materials that erode at varying rates.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 31.6, Longitude 44.3 East (315.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  14. Effective committees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2012-03-01

    A committee is a group of people officially delegated to perform a function, such as investigating, considering, reporting, or acting on a matter. Some committees function like task forces and work on specific, time-limited projects. When the work is finished, the committees are no longer needed. These committees are called ad hoc committees. Other committees are standing committees. They are created by the standing orders, rules, by-laws, or regulations of an organization and exist and function indefinitely (eg, finance, membership, education, nomination). Both types of committees can form subcommittees if the workloads are heavy or complex in nature. Committees can be among the most important working forces of an organization. They serve as work units of the organization, taking work and breaking it into meaningful and manageable chunks. They efficiently carry out the work of the organization. Committee work should be a rewarding experience for both the members and the organization. Committees represent, involve, and serve members, as well as provide an important training ground for future leaders of an organization. New or inexperienced members can gain valuable insight into an organization and develop confidence by serving on committees. There are several key elements of effective committees, including (1) a clear, written purpose; (2) an effective committee chair; (3) thoughtfully appointed members; and (4) well-run meetings.

  15. Longitudinal spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Sukhov, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2014-07-01

    Based on the solution of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation discretized for a ferromagnetic chain subject to a uniform temperature gradient, we present a detailed numerical study of the spin dynamics with a particular focus on finite-size effects. We calculate and analyze the net longitudinal spin current for various temperature gradients, chain lengths, and external static magnetic fields. In addition, we model an interface formed by a nonuniformly magnetized finite-size ferromagnetic insulator and a normal metal and inspect the effects of enhanced Gilbert damping on the formation of the space-dependent spin current within the chain. One aim of this study is the inspection of the spin-Seebeck effect beyond the linear response regime. We find that within our model the microscopic mechanism of the spin-Seebeck current is the magnon accumulation effect quantified in terms of the exchange spin torque. According to our results, this effect drives the spin-Seebeck current even in the absence of a deviation between the magnon and phonon temperature profiles. The influence of the dipole-dipole interaction and domain formation on the spin current is exposed and discussed. Our theoretical findings are in line with the recently observed experimental results by Agrawal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 107204 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.107204].

  16. Peltier cooling and onsager reciprocity in ferromagnetic thin films.

    PubMed

    Avery, A D; Zink, B L

    2013-09-20

    We present direct measurements of the Peltier effect as a function of temperature from 77 to 325 K in Ni, Ni(80)Fe(20), and Fe thin films made using a suspended Si-N membrane structure. Measurement of the Seebeck effect in the same films allows us to directly test predictions of Onsager reciprocity between the Peltier and Seebeck effects. The Peltier coefficient Π is negative for both Ni and Ni(80)Fe(20) films and positive for the Fe film. The Fe film also exhibits a peak associated with the magnon drag Peltier effect. The observation of magnon drag in the Fe film verifies that the coupling between the phonon, magnon, and electron systems in the film is the same whether driven by heat current or charge current. The excellent agreement between Π values predicted using the experimentally determined Seebeck coefficient for these films and measured values offers direct experimental confirmation of the Onsager reciprocity between these thermoelectric effects in ferromagnetic thin films near room temperature.

  17. Heat Transport between Antiferromagnetic Insulators and Normal Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjaerbu, Eirik Lohaugen; Skarsvaag, Hans; Tveten, Erlend G.; Brataas, Arne

    Antiferromagnetic insulators can become active spintronics components by controlling and detecting their dynamics via spin currents in adjacent metals. This cross-talk occurs via spin-transfer and spin-pumping, phenomena that have been predicted to be as strong in antiferromagnets as in ferromagnets. In a recent article, we demonstrate that a temperature gradient drives a significant heat flow from magnons in antiferromagnetic insulators to electrons in adjacent normal metals. The same coefficients as in the spin-transfer and spin-pumping processes also determine the thermal conductance. However, in contrast to ferromagnets, the heat is not transferred via a spin Seebeck effect which is absent in antiferromagnetic insulator-normal metal systems. Instead, the heat is proportional to a large staggered spin Seebeck effect.

  18. Heat transport between antiferromagnetic insulators and normal metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brataas, Arne; Skarsvâg, Hans; Tveten, Erlend G.; Løhaugen Fjærbu, Eirik

    2015-11-01

    Antiferromagnetic insulators can become active spintronics components by controlling and detecting their dynamics via spin currents in adjacent metals. This cross talk occurs via spin transfer and spin pumping, phenomena that have been predicted to be as strong in antiferromagnets as in ferromagnets. Here, we demonstrate that a temperature gradient drives a significant heat flow from magnons in antiferromagnetic insulators to electrons in adjacent normal metals. The same coefficients as in the spin-transfer and spin-pumping processes also determine the thermal conductance. However, in contrast to ferromagnets, the heat is not transferred via a spin Seebeck effect which is absent in antiferromagnetic insulator-normal metal systems. Instead, the heat is proportional to a large staggered spin Seebeck effect.

  19. Lanthanide Contraction Effect In Magnetic Thermoelectric Materials Of Rare Earth-doped Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca2Co2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutjahja, Inge Magdalena; Akbar, Taufik; Nugroho, Agung

    2010-12-01

    We report in this paper the result of synthesis and crystal structure characterization of magnetic thermoelectric materials of rare-earth-doped Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca2Co2O8, namely Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca1.9RE0.1Co2O8 (RE = La, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho). Single phase samples have been prepared by solid state reaction process using precursors of Bi2O3, PbO, CaCO3, RE2O3, and Co3O4. The precursors were pulverized, calcinated, and sintered in air at various temperatures for several hours. Analysis of XRD data shows that Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca1.9RE0.1Co2O8 compound is a layered system consisting of an alternate stack of CoO2 layer and Bi2Sr2O4 block along the c-axis. The misfit structure along b-direction is revealed from the difference of the b-axis length belonging to two sublattices, namely hexagonal CdI2-type CoO2 layer and rock-salt (RS) NaCl-type Bi2Sr2O4 block, while they possess the common a- and c-axis lattice parameters and β angles. The overall crystal structure parameters (a, b, and c) increases with type of doping from La to Ho, namely by decreasing the ionic radii of rare-earth ion. We discuss this phenomenon in terms of the lanthanide contraction, an effect commonly found in the rare-earth compound, results from poor shielding of nuclear charge by 4f electrons. In addition, the values of b-lattice parameters in these rare-earth doped samples are almost the same with those belongs to undoped parent compound (Bi1.5Pb0.5Sr2Co2O8) and its related Y-doped (Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca1.9Y0.1Co2O8) samples, while the c-values reduced significantly in rare-earth doped samples, with opposite trend with those of variation of a-axis length. Morevover, the misfit degree in rare-earth doped compound is higher in compared to parent compound and Y-doped samples. We argue that these structural changes induced by rare-earth doping may provide information for the variation of electronic structure of Co-ions (Co3+ and Co4+), in particular their different spin states of low-spin, intermediate-spin, and high-spin. This, in

  20. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  1. Spincaloric properties of epitaxial Co2MnSi /MgO /Co2MnSi magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Benjamin; Kratzer, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The electronic transport and spincaloric properties of epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions with half-metallic Co2MnSi Heusler electrodes, MgO tunneling barriers, and different interface terminations are investigated by using first-principles calculations. An approach to spincaloric properties is presented that circumvents the linear response approximation inherent in the Seebeck coefficient and compared to the method of Sivan and Imry. This approach supports two different temperatures in the two electrodes and provides the exact current and/or voltage response of the system. Moreover, it accounts for temperature-dependent chemical potentials in the electrodes and finite-bias effects. We find that especially the former are important for obtaining qualitatively correct results, even if the variations of the chemical potentials are small. It is shown how the spincaloric properties can be tailored by the choice of the growth conditions. We find a large effective and spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of -65 μ V /K at room temperature for the purely Co-terminated interface. We suggest to use such interfaces in thermally operated magnetoresistive random access memory modules, which exploit the magneto-Seebeck effect, to maximize the thermally induced readout voltage.

  2. Thermoelectric transport in the layered Ca3Co4-xRhxO9 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yusuke; Saito, Kengo; Okazaki, Ryuji

    2016-06-01

    We have examined an isovalent Rh substitution effect on the transport properties of the thermoelectric oxide Ca3Co4O9 using single-crystalline form. With increasing Rh content x, both the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient change systematically up to x = 0.6 for Ca3Co4-xRhxO9 samples. In the Fermi-liquid regime where the resistivity behaves as ρ = ρ 0 + A T 2 around 120 K, the A value decreases with increasing Rh content, indicating that the correlation effect is weakened by Rh 4d electrons with extended orbitals. We find that, in contrast to such a weak correlation effect observed in the resistivity of Rh-substituted samples, the low-temperature Seebeck coefficient is increased with increasing Rh content, which is explained with a possible enhancement of a pseudogap associated with the short-range order of spin density wave. In high-temperature range above room temperature, we show that the resistivity is largely suppressed by Rh substitution while the Seebeck coefficient becomes almost temperature-independent, leading to a significant improvement of the power factor in Rh-substituted samples. This result is also discussed in terms of the differences in the orbital size and the associated spin state between Co 3d and Rh 4d electrons.

  3. Thermoelectricity of Nanocomposites Containing TiO2–CoO Coaxial Nanocables

    SciTech Connect

    Su, L.; Zhang, L.; Gana, Y.X.

    2011-04-01

    TiO{sub 2}-CoO coaxial nanocables were deposited into anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous templates to form nanocomposite materials. Electron microscopic analysis was conducted to reveal their structures. Seebeck coefficients of the composites were measured. The highest absolute value of Seebeck coefficient is 393 {micro}V K{sup -1} for the TiO{sub 2} nanotube-filled AAO. The TiO{sub 2}-CoO coaxial nanocable-filled AAO has a lower absolute value of 300 {micro}V K{sup -1}. Both composites showed n-type behavior. The effect of Ag nanoparticles addition on the thermoelectric behavior was also examined.

  4. Thin-film growth of the quasi-one-dimensional metal Li0.9Mo6O17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Alexandra; Moshfeghyeganeh, Saeed; Cohn, Joshua L.; Neumeier, John J.

    2015-03-01

    Attempts to grow epitaxial thin films of Li0.9Mo6O17 by pulsed-laser deposition will be discussed. Single crystals of this quasi-one-dimensional (q1D) metal exhibit highly anisotropic Seebeck coefficients with ΔS =Sc -Sb ~ 200 μ V/K near 450 K (the b axis corresponds to the most conducting, q1D chain direction). Suitably oriented thin films could enable possible applications in energy detection using the transverse Seebeck effect. X-ray diffraction results will be presented for films grown from a polycrystalline target on several substrates under a narrow range of temperature and pressure conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-12ER46888 (Univ. Miami) and the National Science Foundation under Grant DMR-0907036 (Mont. St. Univ.)

  5. Measurement of Thermopower and Current-Voltage Characteristics of Molecular Junctions to Identify Orbital Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Aaron; Sadat, Seid; Reddy, Pramod

    2010-01-08

    We report an experimental technique that concurrently measures the Seebeck coefficient and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a molecular junction to determine the identity and the effective energetic separation of the molecular orbital closest to the electrodes’ Fermi level. Junctions created by contacting a gold-coated atomic force microscope tip with a monolayer of molecules assembled on a gold substrate were found to have a Seebeck coefficient of (+16.9±1.4) μV/K. This positive value unambiguously shows that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) dominates charge transport. Further, by analyzing the (I-V) characteristics, the HOMO level is estimated to be ~ 0.69 eV with respect to the Fermi level.

  6. High temperature transport properties of thermoelectric CaMnO{sub 3−δ} — Indication of strongly interacting small polarons

    SciTech Connect

    Schrade, M. Finstad, T. G.; Kabir, R.; Li, S.; Norby, T.

    2014-03-14

    The conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of CaMnO{sub 3−δ} have been studied at temperatures up to 1000 °C and in atmospheres with controlled oxygen partial pressure. Both transport coefficients were varied in situ by the reversible formation of oxygen vacancies up to δ = 0.15. The charge carrier concentration was calculated using a defect chemical model. The Seebeck coefficient could be approximated by Heikes' formula, while the conductivity shows a maximum at a molar charge carrier concentration of 0.25. These results were interpreted as a signature of strong electronic correlation effects, and it was concluded that charge transport in CaMnO{sub 3−δ} occurs via strongly interacting small polarons. General prospects for strongly correlated materials as potential candidates for high temperature thermoelectric power generation were discussed.

  7. Electrical and thermoelectric properties of different compositions of Ge-Se-In thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, K. A.; Dahshan, A.; Abbady, Gh.; Saddeek, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of temperature in the range of 300-450 K and the indium content on the electrical and thermoelectric properties of Ge20Se80-xInx (0.0≤x≤24 at%) chalcogenide glassy thin films have been studied. From dc electrical and thermoelectric measurements, it was observed that the activation energies for electrical conductivity (ΔE) and for thermoelectric (ΔEs) decrease while the conductivity (σ) and Seebeck coefficient (S) increase upon introducing In into the Ge-Se glasses. In contrast to the behavior obtained with Bi or Pb doping, In incorporated in Ge-Se does not lead to a p-to n-type conduction inversion. The power factor (P) which is strongly depends on both of the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity. According to the obtained results, the Ge20Se80-xInx films can be considered potential candidates for incurring high action thermoelectric materials.

  8. Large thermoelectric power and figure of merit in a ferromagnetic-quantum dot-superconducting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sun-Yong; López, Rosa; Sánchez, David

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the thermoelectric properties of a quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic and superconducting electrodes. The combination of spin polarized tunneling at the ferromagnetic-quantum dot interface and the application of an external magnetic field that Zeeman splits the dot energy level leads to large values of the thermopower (Seebeck coefficient). Importantly, the thermopower can be tuned with an external gate voltage connected to the dot. We compute the figure of merit that measures the efficiency of thermoelectric conversion and find that it attains high values. We discuss the different contributions from Andreev reflection processes and quasiparticle tunneling into and out of the superconducting contact. Furthermore, we obtain dramatic variations of both the magnetothermopower and the spin Seebeck effect, which suggest that in our device spin currents can be controlled with temperature gradients only.

  9. Thermomagnetic transport properties of ferromagnetic MnBi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boona, Stephen; Heremans, Joseph

    Spin-dependent transport phenomena such as the spin Seebeck effect and magnon drag offer intriguing new possibilities for tuning the thermoelectric properties of magnetically ordered materials. One particularly interesting approach is to examine magnetic materials that are expected to display large intrinsic spin orbit coupling, such as MnBi. In spite of this material's popularity as a candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnets, no studies have been published so far concerning its Seebeck or Nernst coefficients. This talk will discuss our recent measurements of the thermomagnetic properties of high purity polycrystalline MnBi between 2K and 385K and in magnetic fields up to 7T. Our measurements reveal the existence of a substantial anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) from 382K down to the spin reorientation temperature of 90K, while the other transport phenomena show relatively weak magnetic field dependence at all temperatures. We also observe that the Seebeck and ANE coefficients display strikingly similar temperature dependence, with the former peaking at approximately -10 μV/K and the latter at approximately -2.5 μV/K/T, hinting at the important role of spin-dependent processes in determining the transport properties of this material.

  10. Augmentation of thermoelectric performance of VO2 thin films irradiated by 200 MeV Ag9+-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, G. R.; Kandasami, A.; Bhat, B. A.

    2016-06-01

    Swift Heavy Ion (SHI) irradiation with 200 MeV Ag9+-ion beam at ion fluences of 1E11, 5E11, 1E12, and 5E12 for tuning of electrical transport properties of VO2 thin films fabricated by so-gel technique on alumina substrates has been demonstrated in the present paper. The point defects created by SHI irradiation modulate metal to insulator phase transition temperature, carrier concentration, carrier mobility, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of VO2 thin films. The structural properties of the films were characterized by XRD and Raman spectroscopy and crystallite size was found to decrease upon irradiation. The atomic force microscopy revealed that the surface roughness of specimens first decreased and then increased with increasing fluence. Both resistance as well as Seebeck coefficient measurements demonstrated that all the samples exhibit metal-insulator phase transition and the transition temperatures decreases with increasing fluence. Hall effect measurements exhibited that carrier concentration increased continuously with increasing fluence which resulted in an increase of electrical conductivity by several orders of magnitude in the insulating phase. Seebeck coefficient in insulating phase remained almost constant in spite of an increase in the electrical conductivity by several orders of magnitude making SHI irradiation an alternative stratagem for augmentation of thermoelectric performance of the materials. The carrier mobility at room temperature decreased up to the beam fluence of 5E11 and then started increasing whereas Seebeck coefficient in metallic state first increased with increasing ion beam fluence up to 5E11 and thereafter decreased. Variation of these electrical transport parameters has been explained in detail.

  11. Deposition and investigation of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzanyan, A.S. . E-mail: akuzan@ipr.sci.am; Harutyunyan, S.R.; Vardanyan, V.O.; Badalyan, G.R.; Petrosyan, V.A.; Kuzanyan, V.S.; Petrosyan, S.I.; Karapetyan, V.E.; Wood, K.S.; Wu, H.-D.

    2006-09-15

    Thin films of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride, the promising thermoelectric material for low-temperature applications, are deposited on various substrates by the electron-beam evaporation, pulsed laser deposition and magnetron sputtering. The influence of the deposition conditions on the films X-ray characteristics, composition, microstructure and physical properties, such as the resistivity and Seebeck coefficient, is studied. The preferred (100) orientation of all films is obtained from XRD traces. In the range of 780-800 deg. C deposition temperature the highest intensity of diffractions peaks and the highest degree of the preferred orientation are observed. The temperature dependence of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient of films are investigated in the temperature range of 4-300 K. The features appropriate to Kondo effect in the dependences {rho}(T) and S(T) are detected at temperatures below 20 K. Interplay between the value of the Seebeck coefficient, metallic parameters and Kondo scattering of investigated films is discussed. - Graphical abstract: Kondo scattering in (La,Ce)B{sub 6} films: temperature dependence of the resistivity of (La,Ce)B{sub 6} films on various substrates and the ceramics La{sub 0.99}Ce{sub 0.01}B{sub 6}.

  12. A note on the electrochemical nature of the thermoelectric power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apertet, Y.; Ouerdane, H.; Goupil, C.; Lecoeur, Ph.

    2016-04-01

    While thermoelectric transport theory is well established and widely applied, it is not always clear in the literature whether the Seebeck coefficient, which is a measure of the strength of the mutual interaction between electric charge transport and heat transport, is to be related to the gradient of the system's chemical potential or to the gradient of its electrochemical potential. The present article aims to clarify the thermodynamic definition of the thermoelectric coupling. First, we recall how the Seebeck coefficient is experimentally determined. We then turn to the analysis of the relationship between the thermoelectric power and the relevant potentials in the thermoelectric system: As the definitions of the chemical and electrochemical potentials are clarified, we show that, with a proper consideration of each potential, one may derive the Seebeck coefficient of a non-degenerate semiconductor without the need to introduce a contact potential as seen sometimes in the literature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the phenomenological expression of the electrical current resulting from thermoelectric effects may be directly obtained from the drift-diffusion equation.

  13. Optimization of Dimensionless Figure of Merit in Oxide Thin Film Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Daniel; Huxtable, Scott; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Abiade, Jeremiah

    2010-03-01

    The ability of uniquely functional thermoelectric materials to convert waste heat directly into electricity is critical considering the global energy economy. Profitable, energy-efficient thermoelectrics possess thermoelectric figures of merit ZT >= 1. We examined the effect of metal nanoparticle -- oxide film interfaces on the thermal conductivity κ and Seebeck coefficient S in bilayer and multilayer thin film oxide thermoelectrics in an effort to improve the dimensionless figure of merit ZT. Since a thermoelectric's figure of merit ZT is directly proportional to S/κ, reducing κ and increasing S are key strategies to optimize ZT. We reduced κ by phonon scattering due to the inclusion of metal nanoparticles in the bulk of the thermoelectric thin film, and increased S due to energy-dependent electron scattering at the metal - oxide interfaces. Doped strontium titanate (STO) thin film/Au nanoparticle composites were synthesized by alternate ablation of Au and Nb-doped STO targets during pulsed laser deposition. Characterization of the thermoelectric films involve XRD, XPS, and TEM analyses, Seebeck coefficient measurements, and also measurements of the thermal conductivity via time-domain thermoreflectance. The measured thermal conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of the thin films shows a strong dependence on the nanoscale interfaces of the films.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of P-Type and N-Type Doped Expanded Graphite Polymer Composites for Thermoelectric Applications.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Reza; Choi, Pyung Ho; Park, Hyoung Sun; Choi, Byoung Deog

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that expanded graphite can be sufficiently dispersed in polymer solution to form suspensions. Thin composite films were prepared by casting and drying the suspensions. The thermoelectric properties of expanded graphite (ExG)-polymer composites were easily modified by chemical doping. Electrically and thermally insulating polymers of PC, PS, and PMMA served as matrix materials. ExG composite films in PC, PMMA, and PS were prepared using thionyl chloride as the p-type dopant and PEI as the n-type dopant. By comparing the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient values of the composite films, we observed that use of an electron acceptor material (thionyl chloride) in composites enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced the value of the positive Seebeck coefficient, which are p-type doping effects. In contrast, when the donor material PEI was used, there was an increase in electrical conductivity and changes in the value and sign of the Seebeck coefficient from positive to negative, confirming n-type doping. PMID:26726653

  15. Social Context Effects on School Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Murphy, Joseph

    In this two-part paper, an attempt is made to examine the relationship between social contexts and effective schools and specifically to contribute to the development of a conceptual model for understanding how social contexts influence the operation of effective schools and student learning. In the first part, school effects research is drawn…

  16. The mirror effect and the spacing effect.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Bennet

    2003-09-01

    In the mirror effect, there are fewer false negatives (misses) and false positives (false alarms) for rare (low-frequency) words than for common (high-frequency) words. In the spacing effect, recognition accuracy is positively related to the interval (spacing or lag) between two presentations of an item. These effects are related in that they are both manifestations of a leapfrog effect (a weaker item jumps over a stronger item). They seem to be puzzles for traditional strength theory and at least some current global-matching models. A computational strength-based model (EICL) is proposed that incorporates excitation, inhibition, and a closed-loop learning algorithm. The model consists of three nonlinear coupled stochastic difference equations, one each for excitation (x), inhibition (y), and context (z). Strength is the algebraic sum (i.e., s = x - y + z). These equations are used to form a toy lexicon that serves as a basis for the experimental manipulations. The model can simulate the mirror effect forced-choice inequalities and the spacing effect for single-item recognition, all parameters are random variables, and the same parameter values are used for both the mirror and the spacing effects. No parameter values varied with the independent variables (word frequency for the mirror effect, lag for the spacing effect), so the model, not the parameters, is doing the work. PMID:14620350

  17. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  18. Improving School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John, Ed.; Mortimore, Peter, Ed.

    School effectiveness is an issue that has preoccupied researchers and policymakers for 3 decades. To study how ineffective schools become effective and what constitutes an effective school, the Improving School Effectiveness Project was carried out in Scotland from 1995 to 1997. This project forms the basis of discussion in this book, which has 11…

  19. On effect size.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2012-06-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension, measure/index, and value), outline 10 corollaries that follow from our definition, and review ideal qualities of effect sizes. Our definition of effect size is general and subsumes many existing definitions of effect size. We define effect size as a quantitative reflection of the magnitude of some phenomenon that is used for the purpose of addressing a question of interest. Our definition of effect size is purposely more inclusive than the way many have defined and conceptualized effect size, and it is unique with regard to linking effect size to a question of interest. Additionally, we review some important developments in the effect size literature and discuss the importance of accompanying an effect size with an interval estimate that acknowledges the uncertainty with which the population value of the effect size has been estimated. We hope that this article will facilitate discussion and improve the practice of reporting and interpreting effect sizes. PMID:22545595

  20. Regulation with placebo effects.

    PubMed

    Malani, Anup

    2008-12-01

    A growing scientific literature supports the existence of placebo effects from a wide range of health interventions and for a range of medical conditions. This Article reviews this literature, examines the implications for law and policy, and suggests future areas for research on placebo effects. In particular, it makes the case for altering the drug approval process to account for, if not credit, placebo effects. It recommends that evidence of placebo effects be permitted as a defense in cases alleging violations of informed consent or false advertising. Finally, it finds that tort law already has doctrines such as joint and several liability to account for placebo effects. Future research on placebo effects should focus on whether awareness of placebo effects can disable these effects and whether subjects can control their own placebo effects. PMID:19353835

  1. Electrochemical Treatment for Effectively Tuning Thermoelectric Properties of Free-Standing Poly(3-methylthiophene) Films.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjing; Zhu, Danhua; Zhu, Zhengyou; Liu, Endou; Lu, Baoyang; Xu, Jingkun; Zhao, Feng; Hou, Jian; Liu, Huixuan; Jiang, Fengxing

    2016-07-18

    The degree of oxidation of conducting polymers has great influence on their thermoelectric properties. Free-standing poly(3-methylthiophene) (P3MeT) films were prepared by electrochemical polymerization in boron trifluoride diethyl etherate, and the fresh films were treated electrochemically with a solution of propylene carbonate/lithium perchlorate as mediator. The conductivity of the resultant P3MeT films depends on the doping level, which is controlled by a constant potential from -0.5 to 1.4 V. The optimum electrical conductivity (78.9 S cm(-1) at 0.5 V) and a significant increase in the Seebeck coefficient (64.3 μV K(-1) at -0.5 V) are important for achieving an optimum power factor at an optimal potential. The power factor of electrochemically treated P3MeT films reached its maximum value of 4.03 μW m(-1)  K(-2) at 0.5 V. Moreover, after two months, it still exhibited a value of 3.75 μW m(-1)  K(-2) , and thus was more stable than pristine P3MeT due to exchange of doping ions in films under ambient conditions. This electrochemical treatment is a significant alternative method for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor of conducting polymer films. PMID:27062329

  2. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  3. Effective College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, James E.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses other writings on effective college teaching and then presents his list of necessary characteristics for the effective teacher, stressing the interpersonal dimension of the teaching-learning situation. (MF)

  4. Side Effects (Management)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  5. Stormwater BMP Effectiveness Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA has identified the effectiveness of Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) as a priority research need. Effective protection of biotic integrity requires that processes maintaining the diversity of physical habitats be protected. Methods are needed to evaluate the e...

  6. Effects of spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the effects of spatial resolution on extraction of geologic information are woefully lacking but spatial resolution effects can be examined as they influence two general categories: detection of spatial features per se; and the effects of IFOV on the definition of spectral signatures and on general mapping abilities.

  7. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  8. The Nocebo Effect.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence is emerging for a phenomenon known as the nocebo effect. This is when a person is conditioned to expect a negative response, or to anticipate negative effects from an experience. These findings highlight the importantance of effective communication with patients and the influence that good anxiety and pain management control can have in improving treatment outcomes. The placebo effect has been widely researched, but new studies have shown that nocebo can have a greater effect than placebo The nocebo effect is prevalent in interactions between patients and healthcare workers. Research has demonstrated that if a patient deems a healthcare professional not to understand or believe them, this can cause distress, and the physiological effect can reduce the prognosis of treatment. It has also been demonstrated that patients who are anxious or expect pain during a procedure, feel more pain because of this negative expectation. PMID:27145562

  9. Phylogenetic effective sample size.

    PubMed

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2016-10-21

    In this paper I address the question-how large is a phylogenetic sample? I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes-the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find that the AICc is robust if one corrects for the number of species or effective number of species. Lastly I discuss how the concept of the phylogenetic effective sample size can be useful for biodiversity quantification, identification of interesting clades and deciding on the importance of phylogenetic correlations. PMID:27343033

  10. The butterfly effect of the "butterfly effect".

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin J

    2009-07-01

    The "Butterfly Effect" metaphor states with variance that the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil can cause a tornado in Texas. This metaphor has become part of the common vernacular of Western culture. In this paper I discuss the origins of the metaphor, examine its current usage within popular culture, and present an argument as to why it is popular. I propose that the metaphor is a type of semantic attractor, a narrative device with invariant meaning but audience-specific contextualization. Finally I address whether the Butterfly Effect metaphor is a good example of itself. PMID:19527619

  11. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  12. Effects of Sc and Y substitution on the structure and thermoelectric properties of Yb14MnSb11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkemper, Jason H.; Klemenz, Sebastian; Albert, Barbara; Bux, Sabah K.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2016-10-01

    Yb14MnSb11 is the most efficient bulk p-type thermoelectric material for high temperature applications. Materials with Y and Sc substitutions in Yb14MnSb11 were made both in Sn-flux and by ball milling. These small 3+ rare earth (RE) cations were introduced with the goal of providing chemical pressure on the structure. The RE3+ cation is smaller than Yb2+ and also donates one additional electron to this p-type semiconductor. In Yb14-xRExMnSb11 (RE = Sc, Y) the maximum x was about 0.5. X-ray diffraction experiments on the single crystals obtained from Sn-flux showed that Sc preferentially substitutes for Yb(1) and Yb(3), and decreases the size of the unit cell by about 0.3%. Y substitutes on all Yb sites and increases the size of the unit cell by about 0.2%. Samples with Yb14-xRExMnSb11 (x~0.3) were prepared via powder metallurgy and spark plasma sintering for transport and thermal conductivity measurements. Electron microprobe of the Sc-substituted sample showed small regions (≤1 μ m) containing greater amounts of Sc, and X-ray powder diffraction of the ball milled Sc sample could be fitted as phase pure Yb14-xScxMnSb11. Y-substituted samples showed larger regions of excess Y in electron microprobe, and small amounts of Yb4Sb3 in X-ray powder diffraction. The Sc sample has slightly reduced carrier concentration over optimized Yb14MnSb11, while the Y samples have even lower carrier concentrations. These carrier concentrations lead to comparable resistivity to Yb14MnSb11 in the Sc-substituted material, and higher resistivities in the Y-substituted material. All materials had similar Seebeck coefficients that slightly exceed Yb14MnSb11 at high temperatures, with the Sc-substituted sample having the highest despite having a higher carrier concentration. Sc-substituted samples also had a slightly higher thermal conductivity over the Y-substituted samples, which had comparable thermal conductivity to Yb14MnSb11. The zT values of the Sc and Y substituted samples are

  13. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  14. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency. PMID:25401364

  15. Atomic lighthouse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Kaiser, R.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Bachelard, R.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  16. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  17. Dynamic ground effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Gilbert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A research program is underway at the NASA Langley Research Center to study the effect of rate of descent on ground effects. A series of powered models were tested in the Vortex Research Facility under conditions with rate of descent and in the 14 x 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel under identical conditions but without rate of descent. These results indicate that the rate of descent can have a significant impact on ground effects particularly if vectored or reversed thrust is used.

  18. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  19. Volcanic effects on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions which inject large amounts of sulfur-rich gas into the stratosphere produce dust veils which last years and cool the earth's surface. At the same time, these dust veils absorb enough solar radiation to warm the stratosphere. Since these temperature changes at the earth's surface and in the stratosphere are both in the opposite direction of hypothesized effects from greenhouse gases, they act to delay and mask the detection of greenhouse effects on the climate system. Tantalizing recent research results have suggested regional effects of volcanic eruptions, including effects on El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In addition, a large portion of the global climate change of the past 100 years may be due to the effects of volcanoes, but a definite answer is not yet clear. While effects of several years were demonstrated with both data studies and numerical models, long-term effects, while found in climate model calculations, await confirmation with more realistic models. Extremely large explosive prehistoric eruptions may have produced severe weather and climate effects, sometimes called a 'volcanic winter'. Complete understanding of the above effects of volcanoes is hampered by inadequacies of data sets on volcanic dust veils and on climate change. Space observations can play an increasingly important role in an observing program in the future. The effects of volcanoes are not adequately separated from ENSO events, and climate modeling of the effects of volcanoes is in its infancy. Specific suggestions are made for future work to improve the knowledge of this important component of the climate system.

  20. Primacy Effects in Attributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAndrew, Francis T.

    Previous research has suggested the existence of a primacy effect in the attribution of ability. To test if the primacy effect occurs in situations where specific cues about the person and nature of the test materials are lacking or greatly reduced, college students corrected a multiple-choice test in which a phantom stimulus person correctly…

  1. Behaviours of Effective Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorhead, Roslyn; Nediger, William

    The purpose of this 2-year-long qualitative and quantitative field study was to investigate the behaviors of effective secondary school principals in their respective school districts, to find commonalities in the behavior of principals who were deemed by their peers to preside over effective schools, and to report the interim results. The…

  2. Effective Online Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Brent

    2006-01-01

    Effective online teaching is a popular topic in today's educational technology journals due to the vital role that educators play in the teaching and learning process. The author will provide insights into effective online teachers and highlight training and mentoring practices for online instructors at the University of Phoenix.

  3. Defining Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  4. Organizational Effectiveness of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil

    1982-01-01

    Because organizational effectiveness of schools is difficult to define, a model is needed to explain the complexities of the concept. Two models offer some promise. One is the goal model, which defines effectiveness as the degree to which organizations meet or surpass their goals (either official or operational). The other is the system resource…

  5. JPL Radiation Effects Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorbourn, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Radiation Effects Group investigates the effects of space radiation on present and future microelectronic and optoelectronic technologies, evaluate the risk of using them in specific space missions, and recommend component and design techniques for JPL and NASA programs to reduce reliability risk from space radiation.

  6. Overview of atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rote, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Effluents from the transportation system are the major cause of Satellite Power System related atmospheric effects. These effects are discussed and include inadvertent weather modification, air quality degradation, compositional changes in the stratosphere and mesosphere, formation of noctilucent clouds, plasma density changes, airglow enhancements, and changes in composition and dynamics of the plasmasphere and magnetosphere.

  7. The Chelate Effect Redefined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva, J. J. R. Frausto

    1983-01-01

    Discusses ambiguities of the accepted definition of the chelate effect, suggesting that it be defined in terms of experimental observation rather than mathematical abstraction. Indicates that the effect depends on free energy change in reaction, ligand basicity, pH of medium, type of chelates formed, and concentration of ligands in solution. (JN)

  8. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  9. The Kaye Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, J. M.; Landig, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, "The Kaye effect", as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid…

  10. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  11. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  12. Cardiovascular Effects Of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1992-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents study of effects of weightlessness and simulations upon cardiovascular systems of humans and animals. Reviews research up to year 1987 in United States and Soviet space programs on such topics as physiological changes induced by weightlessness in outer space and by subsequent return to Earth gravity and also reviews deconditioning effects of prolonged bed rest on ground.

  13. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  14. Developing Effective Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T.J.

    In this introductory work, the main principles on which British companies are basing management development programs are presented, and stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial talent are set forth: stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial t"lent are set forth: program planning based on clear objectives and communication;…

  15. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  16. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Phillip A.

    Determining the characteristics of effective teaching has been a problem for more than 50 years. Studies attempting to rate characteristics or to devise a fair evaluation method abound, but one necessary perspective must not be overlooked: that of the student. An effective teacher transmits knowledge with a blend of intensity and empathy that…

  18. Bulk Topological Proximity Effect.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Timothy H; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Balents, Leon; Hughes, Taylor L

    2016-02-26

    Existing proximity effects stem from systems with a local order parameter, such as a local magnetic moment or a local superconducting pairing amplitude. Here, we demonstrate that despite lacking a local order parameter, topological phases also may give rise to a proximity effect of a distinctively inverted nature. We focus on a general construction in which a topological phase is extensively coupled to a second system, and we argue that, in many cases, the inverse topological order will be induced on the second system. To support our arguments, we rigorously establish this "bulk topological proximity effect" for all gapped free-fermion topological phases and representative integrable models of interacting topological phases. We present a terrace construction which illustrates the phenomenological consequences of this proximity effect. Finally, we discuss generalizations beyond our framework, including how intrinsic topological order may also exhibit this effect.

  19. Thermomagnetic phenomena in the mixed state of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meilikhov, E. Z.

    1995-01-01

    Galvano- and thermomagnetic-phenomena in high temperature superconductors, based on kinetic coefficients, are discussed, along with a connection between the electric field and the heat flow in superconductor mixed state. The relationship that determines the transport coefficients of high temperature superconductors in the mixed state based on Seebeck and Nernst effects is developed. It is shown that this relationship is true for a whole transition region of the resistive mixed state of a superconductor. Peltier, Ettingshausen and Righi-Leduc effects associated with heat conductivity as related to high temperature superconductors are also addressed.

  20. Low-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of PtSb2- x Te x for Cryogenic Peltier Cooling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, Spencer; Morelli, Donald

    2015-06-01

    PtSb2 is a potential material for cryogenic Peltier cooling applications because of its semimetal character with a high Seebeck coefficient and low electrical resistivity. To investigate the effects of n-type doping we studied PtSb2- x Te x with x between 0 and 0.04. A clear doping effect was observed, and the power factor was maximized for samples with x = 0.005, 0.02, and 0.04. If thermal conductivity reduction techniques can be used, this material may be a promising candidate for cryogenic Peltier cooling applications.

  1. Spin-related thermoelectric conversion in lateral spin-valve devices with single-crystalline Co2FeSi electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Kento; Oki, Soichiro; Yamada, Shinya; Kanashima, Takeshi; Hamaya, Kohei

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate the conversion between a heat current and a spin current in Cu-based lateral spin valves (LSVs) with single-crystalline Co2FeSi (CFS) electrodes. We can observe the thermally induced spin injection from CFS into Cu resulting from the spin-dependent Seebeck effect, and the heat current generated by the spin-dependent Peltier effect can be detected even in the LSV structures. This study is an important step toward understanding heat-spin conversion in single-crystalline materials with various electronic band structures.

  2. Temperature-controlled spin filter and spin valve based on Fe-doped monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fei; Zhu, Lin; Gao, Gaoying; Wu, Menghao; Yao, Kailun

    2016-02-17

    The thermal transport properties of an iron-doped molybdenum disulfide system were explored theoretically using the density functional theory calculations combined with the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function approach. The results indicate that a perfect spin filtering effect and spin Seebeck effect are induced thermally. Excellently, there exists thermal colossal magnetoresistances, which exhibit a transition between positive and negative that can be tuned using temperature. These features were elucidated using the band structures of the electrodes and the transmission function together with current spectra. Our findings may be helpful in the design of highly efficient spin caloritronic devices.

  3. Spin and charge thermopower of resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, Javier H.; Sánchez, David

    2014-03-17

    We investigate thermoelectric effects in quantum well systems. Using the scattering approach for coherent conductors, we calculate the thermocurrent and thermopower both in the spin-degenerate case and in the presence of giant Zeeman splitting due to magnetic interactions in the quantum well. We find that the thermoelectric current at linear response is maximal when the well level is aligned with the Fermi energy and is robust against thermal variations. Furthermore, our results show a spin voltage generation in response to the applied thermal bias, giving rise to large spin Seebeck effects tunable with external magnetic fields, quantum well tailoring, and background temperature.

  4. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    PubMed

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  5. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    PubMed

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  6. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  7. Cardiovascular Effects of Felypressin

    PubMed Central

    Cecanho, Rodrigo; De Luca, Laurival Antonio; Ranali, José

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of felypressin (FEL) were studied in Wistar rats. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure measurements were taken in awake rats treated with vasopressin (AVP), FEL, or epinephrine (EPI). Each group received either an intravenous (IV) or an intracerebroventricular V1 receptor antagonist, saline, area postrema removal, or sham surgery. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls (P < .05) were applied. Felypressin and AVP induced a pressor effect, and bradycardia was inhibited by IV V1 antagonist. Intracerebroventricular V1 antagonist and area postrema removal enhanced their pressor effects. Epinephrine induced a higher pressor effect and a similar bradycardia that was not affected by the treatments. It was concluded that FEL depends on V1 receptors to induce pressor and bradycardic effects, and that it produces a high relationship between bradycardia and mean arterial pressure variation depending on area postrema and central V1 receptors. These effects are potentially less harmful to the cardiovascular system than the effects of EPI. PMID:17177590

  8. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group. PMID:26980800

  9. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group.

  10. Bustling argon: biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhouheng; Zhang, Rongjia; Sun, Xuejun

    2013-10-03

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option.

  11. Effective Frequency Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, C. Laurence; Weng, Chi Y.

    2002-01-01

    An effective monochromatic frequency technique is described to represent the effects of finite spectral bandwidth for active and passive measurements centered on an absorption line, a trough region, or a slowly varying spectral feature. For Gaussian and rectangular laser line shapes, the effective frequency is shown to have a simple form which depends only on the instrumental line shape and bandwidth and not on the absorption line profile. The technique yields accuracies better than 0.1% for bandwidths less than 0.2 times the atmospheric line width.

  12. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  13. Conditions for Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jeannette T.

    1988-01-01

    The most effective college presidents are those whose leadership styles are dominant, decisive, and when appropriate, autocratic. The president has to believe profoundly in the intrinsic value of the college. (Author/MSE)

  14. Vaccine herd effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  15. Developing Effective Working Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two workshops are described in detail. One explores ways to increase the effectiveness of work groups and includes the workshop leader's personal observations. The second involves training transformational leaders, whose characteristics include idealized influence, individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation, and inspirational…

  16. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented. (ACR)

  17. Effects of New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Transnational implications of technological change and innovation in telecommunications are discussed, including impact on jobs and industrial relations, computer security, access to information, and effects of technological innovation on international economic systems. (SK)

  18. Aerobrake plasmadynamics - Macroscopic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1990-06-01

    The flow around an aerobraking spacecraft (such as the Aeroassist Flight Experiment reentry vehicle) will contain a region of partially ionized gas, that is, a plasma. It is shown here by numerical simulation that macroscopic plasmadynamic effects (which are not included in standard aerothermodynamic simulations) will have a noticeable effect on the reentry flow field. In particular, there are thermoelectric phenomena which can have a major influence in flow dynamics at the front of an ionizing bowshock. These thermoelectric phenomena arise because of the presence of large density and temperature gradients at the front of a reentry bowshock, and they include strong local magnetic fields, electric currents, and ohmic heating. One important result is the dramatic increase in temperature (over the case where plasma effects are neglected) at a reentry shock front; the implication is that macroscopic plasmadynamic effects can no longer be neglected in simulations of hypersonic reentry flow fields.

  19. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions to the different drugs. The doctors, nurses, and pharmacists will describe what to look out for in ... will be monitored very closely by doctors, nurses, and pharmacists to make sure that all side effects are ...

  20. Strategies for Effective Outsourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moneta, Larry; Dillon, William L.

    2001-01-01

    Emphasizes strategies that can be employed for effective outsourcing in higher education settings. Several models of outsourcing are identified and described, and examples of institutions using each model are provided. (GCP)

  1. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  2. Effects of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... you or your family member has ever had heat stroke, or suffered from the condition in a previous surgery, be sure to tell the physician anesthesiologist. Regional Anesthesia The potential side effects of regional anesthesia (such as an epidural or ...

  3. [Genetic effects of radiation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a short review of genetic effect of radiation. This includes methods and results of a large-scale genetic study on specific loci in mice and of various studies in the offspring of atomic-bomb survivors. As for the latter, there is no results obtained which suggest the effect of parental exposure to radiation. Further, in recent years, studies are conducted to the offspring born to parents who were survivors of childhood cancers. In several reports, the mean gonad dose is quite large whereas in most instances, the results do not indicate genetic effect following parental exposure to radiation. Possible reasons for the difficulties in detecting genetic effect of radiation are discussed. PMID:22514926

  4. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  5. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  6. The lisse effect revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Lisse effect is a rarely noted phenomenon occurring when infiltration caused by intense rain seals the surface soil layer to airflow, trapping air in the unsaturated zone. Compression of air by the advancing front results in a pressure increase that produces a water-level rise in an observation well screened below the water table that is several times as large as the distance penetrated by the wetting front. The effect is triggered by intense rains and results in a very rapid water-level rise, followed by a recession lasting a few days. The Lisse effect was first noted and explained by Thal Larsen in 1932 from water-level observations obtained in a shallow well in the village of Lisse, Holland. The original explanation does not account for the increased air pressure pushing up on the bottom of the wetting front. Analysis of the effect of this upward pressure indicates that a negative pressure head at the base of the wetting front, ??f, analogous to that postulated by Green and Ampt (1911) to explain initially rapid infiltration rates into unsaturated soils, is involved in producing the Lisse effect. Analysis of recorded observations of the Lisse effect by Larsen and others indicates that the water-level rise, which typically ranges from 0.10 to 0.55 m, should be only slightly larger than |??f| and that the depth of penetration of the wetting front is no more than several millimeters.

  7. Pressure effect on the electronic transport properties of Fe1+yTe1-xSex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenijević, Stevan; Gaál, Richard; Rønnow, Henrik; Viennois, Romain; Giannini, Enrico; van der Marel, Dirk; Forró, László

    2012-02-01

    We present a systematic study of electronic transport as function of pressure up to 25 kbar of Fe+yTe1-xSex single crystalline samples (with y=0.02, 0.05, and x=0, 0.2, and 0.3). Pressure is demonstrated to be a clean control parameter to drive the system with high Fe-excess through the metal-insulator (MIT) transition, in analogy with increasing the Se-doping or reducing the Fe-excess. The scaling of resistivity ρ(T, p) below 50 K identified a critical pressure of pc=8 kbar which separates non-metallic and metallic temperature dependences. At the pc the low-temperature sheet resistance is in the 6.5 kφ/square range. The Seebeck coefficient (S) at pc changes sign from negative to positive indicating a change in the electronic structure and in the balance between the electron and hole carriers. The S at the highest pressure exhibits low positive values similar to the metallic, superconducting cuprates. The critical MIT behavior, related to a quantum phase transition, indicates a universality of the Fe- and Cu-based high-Tc superconductors.

  8. Effective Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto

    In this chapter we study a particular case of multiphase systems, namely two-phase materials in which one of the phases is randomly dispersed in the other, so that the composite can be viewed on a macroscale as an effective continuum, with well defined properties. In general, the theoretical determination of the parameter for an effective medium requires, as a rule, the solution of a corresponding transport problem at the microscale, which takes into account the morphology of the system and its evolution. As the mathematical problem is well-posed on a microscale, this can be accomplished using, for example, the multiple scale approach shown in Chap. 11 ; however, the task requires massive computations and is therefore difficult to implement from the practical standpoint. Here, instead, we focus on a deterministic approach to the problem, where the geometry and spatial configuration of the particles comprising the included phase are given and the solution to the microscale problem is therefore sought analytically. As examples, we study the effective thermal conductivity of solid reinforced materials (Sect. 10.1), the effective viscosity of non-colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.2), the effective permeability of porous materials (10.3) and the effective self- and gradient diffusivities of colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.4). Then, in Sect. 10.5, an alternative dynamic definition of the transport coefficients is considered, which can also serve as a basis to determine the effective properties of complex systems.

  9. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  10. Pharmacological effects of biotin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    In the last few decades, more vitamin-mediated effects have been discovered at the level of gene expression. Increasing knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of these vitamins has opened new perspectives that form a connection between nutritional signals and the development of new therapeutic agents. Besides its role as a carboxylase prosthetic group, biotin regulates gene expression and has a wide repertoire of effects on systemic processes. The vitamin regulates genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism: Biotin has stimulatory effects on genes whose action favors hypoglycemia (insulin, insulin receptor, pancreatic and hepatic glucokinase); on the contrary, biotin decreases the expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key gluconeogenic enzyme that stimulates glucose production by the liver. The findings that biotin regulates the expression of genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism are in agreement with several observations that indicate that biotin supply is involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Biotin deficiency has been linked to impaired glucose tolerance and decreased utilization of glucose. On the other hand, the diabetic state appears to be ameliorated by pharmacological doses of biotin. Likewise, pharmacological doses of biotin appear to decrease plasma lipid concentrations and modify lipid metabolism. The effects of biotin on carbohydrate metabolism and the lack of toxic effects of the vitamin at pharmacological doses suggest that biotin could be used in the development of new therapeutics in the treatment of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, an area that we are actively investigating. PMID:15992683

  11. The negative repetition effect.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Peterson, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising negative repetition effect, in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and across pairs, the target words were drawn from a small set of categories. In the repetition condition, the pairs were initially presented in a random order and then presented a 2nd time blocked by the category of the target words. In the single presentation condition, the pairs were presented only in the blocked order. Participants in the former condition recalled fewer target words on a free recall test despite having seen the word pairs twice (the negative repetition effect). This phenomenon is explored in a series of 5 experiments assessing 3 theoretical accounts of the effect. The experiments demonstrate that the negative repetition effect generalizes over multiple encoding conditions (reading and generative encoding), over different memory tests (free and cued recall), and over delay (5 min and 2 days). The results argue against a retrieval account and a levels-of-processing account but are consistent with the item-specific-relational account, the account upon which the effect was initially predicated. PMID:23421508

  12. Liner environment effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataramani, K. S.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Liner Environment Effects Study Program is aimed at establishing a broad heat transfer data base under controlled experimental conditions by quantifying the effects of the combustion system conditions on the combustor liner thermal loading and on the flame radiation characteristics. Five liner concepts spanning the spectrum of liner design technology from the very simple to the most advanced concepts are investigated. These concepts comprise an uncooled liner, a conventional film cooled liner, an impingement/film cooled liner, a laser drilled liner approaching the concept of a porous wall, and a siliconized silicon carbide ceramic liner. Effect of fuel type is covered by using fuels containing 11.8, 12.8, and 14% hydrogen. Tests at 100, 200, and 300 psia provide a basis for evaluating the effect of pressure on the heat transfer. The effects of the atomization quality and spray characteristics are examined by varying the fuel spray Sauter mean diameter and the spray angle. Additional varied parameters include reference velocity, a wide range of equivalence ratio, cooling flow rate, coolant temperature and the velocity of the coolant stream on the backside of the liner.

  13. Relativistic effects in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsimirskii, K.B.

    1995-11-01

    Relativistic effects become apparent when the velocity of the electron is arbitrarily close to the speed of light (137 au) without actually attaining it (in heavy atoms of elements at the end of Mendeleev`s Periodic Table). At the orbital level, the relativistic effect is apparent in the radial contraction of penetrating s and p shells, expansion of nonpenetrating d and f shells, and the spin-orbit splitting of p-,d-, and f-shells. The appearance of a relativistic effect is indicated in the variation in the electronic configurations of the atoms in the Periodic Table, the appearance of new types of closed electron shells (6s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 6p{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 7s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 5d{sub 3/2}{sup 4}), the stabilization of unstable oxidation states of heavy elements, the characteristic variation in the ionization enthalpies of heavy atoms, their electron affinity, hydration energies, redox potentials, and optical electronegativities. In the spectra of coordination compounds, a relativistic effect is observed when comparing the position of the charge transfer bands in analogous compounds, the parameters characterizing the ligand field strength (10Dq), the interatomic distances and angles in compounds of heavy elements. A relativistic effect is also apparent in the ability of heavy metals to form clusters and superclusters. Relativistic corrections also affect other properties of heavy metal compounds (force constants, dipole moments, biological activity, etc.).

  14. Features and regularities in behavior of thermoelectric properties of rare-earth, transition, and other metals under high pressure up to 20 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Morozova, Natalia V.; Shchennikov, Vladimir V.; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V. E-mail: sergey2503@gmail.com

    2015-12-14

    We report results of systematic investigations of the thermoelectric properties of a number of rare-earth metals, transition metals, and other metals under high pressure up to 20 GPa at room temperature. We studied an effect of applied pressure on the Seebeck effect of scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), lanthanum (La), europium (Eu), ytterbium (Yb), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), gold (Au), tin (Sn), and CeNi alloy. We found that the high-pressure behavior of the thermopower of three rare-earth metals, namely, Sc, Y, and La, follows a general trend that has been established earlier in lanthanides, and addressed to a s → d electron transfer. Europium and ytterbium, on the contrary, showed a peculiar high-pressure behavior of the thermopower with peaks at near 0.7–1 GPa for Eu and 1.7–2.5 GPa for Yb. Chromium, manganese, and tin demonstrated a gradual and pronounced lowering of the absolute value of the thermopower with pressure. Above 9–11 GPa, the Seebeck coefficients of Mn and Sn were inverted, from n- to p-type for Mn and from p- to n-type for Sn. The Seebeck effect in iron was rather high as ∼16 μV/K and weakly varied with pressure up to ∼11 GPa. Above ∼11 GPa, it started to drop dramatically with pressure to highest pressure achieved 18 GPa. Upon decompression cycle the thermopower of iron returned to the original high values but demonstrated a wide hysteresis loop. We related this behavior in iron to the known bcc (α-Fe) → hcp (ε-Fe) phase transition, and proposed that the thermoelectricity of the α-Fe phase is mainly contributed by the spin Seebeck effect, likewise, the thermoelectricity of the ε-Fe phase—by the conventional diffusion thermopower. We compare the pressure dependencies of the thermopower for different groups of metals and figure out some general trends in the thermoelectricity of metals under applied stress.

  15. Two-Fluid Theory for Spin Superfluidity in Magnetic Insulators.

    PubMed

    Flebus, B; Bender, S A; Tserkovnyak, Y; Duine, R A

    2016-03-18

    We investigate coupled spin and heat transport in easy-plane magnetic insulators. These materials display a continuous phase transition between normal and condensate states that is controlled by an external magnetic field. Using hydrodynamic equations supplemented by Gross-Pitaevski phenomenology and magnetoelectric circuit theory, we derive a two-fluid model to describe the dynamics of thermal and condensed magnons, and the appropriate boundary conditions in a hybrid normal-metal-magnetic-insulator-normal-metal heterostructure. We discuss how the emergent spin superfluidity can be experimentally probed via a spin Seebeck effect measurement. PMID:27035319

  16. Spin caloritronics in graphene with Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Alberto Lima, Matheus P. Fazzio, A.; Silva, Antônio J. R. da

    2014-02-17

    We show that graphene with Mn adatoms trapped at single vacancies features spin-dependent Seebeck effect, thus enabling the use of this material for spin caloritronics. A gate potential can be used to tune its thermoelectric properties in a way it presents either a total spin polarized current, flowing in one given direction, or currents for both spins flowing in opposite directions without net charge transport. Moreover, we show that the thermal magnetoresistance can be tuned between −100% and +100% by varying a gate potential.

  17. Chiral thermoelectrics with quantum Hall edge states.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rafael; Sothmann, Björn; Jordan, Andrew N

    2015-04-10

    The thermoelectric properties of a three-terminal quantum Hall conductor are investigated. We identify a contribution to the thermoelectric response that relies on the chirality of the carrier motion rather than on spatial asymmetries. The Onsager matrix becomes maximally asymmetric with configurations where either the Seebeck or the Peltier coefficients are zero while the other one remains finite. Reversing the magnetic field direction exchanges these effects, which originate from the chiral nature of the quantum Hall edge states. The possibility to generate spin-polarized currents in quantum spin Hall samples is discussed. PMID:25910147

  18. Chiral Thermoelectrics with Quantum Hall Edge States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Rafael; Sothmann, Björn; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2015-04-01

    The thermoelectric properties of a three-terminal quantum Hall conductor are investigated. We identify a contribution to the thermoelectric response that relies on the chirality of the carrier motion rather than on spatial asymmetries. The Onsager matrix becomes maximally asymmetric with configurations where either the Seebeck or the Peltier coefficients are zero while the other one remains finite. Reversing the magnetic field direction exchanges these effects, which originate from the chiral nature of the quantum Hall edge states. The possibility to generate spin-polarized currents in quantum spin Hall samples is discussed.

  19. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  20. HgCdTe superlattices for solid-state cryogenic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2006-03-01

    A tall barrier superlattice structure based on mercury cadmium telluride material system is proposed that can achieve a large effective thermoelectric figure of merit (ZTmax~3) at cryogenic temperatures. Calculations based on the Boltzmann transport equation taking into account the quantum mechanical electron transmission show that the Seebeck coefficient can be increased significantly at low temperatures with the use of nonplanar barriers as the thermal spreading of the electron density is tightened around the Fermi level. This provides a better asymmetric differential conductivity around the Fermi level close to the top of the barrier. Consequently, a high thermoelectric power factor is produced resulting in a large ZT.

  1. Laser-sintered thin films of doped SiGe nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoib, B.; Langmann, T.; Matich, S.; Antesberger, T.; Stein, N.; Angst, S.; Petermann, N.; Schmechel, R.; Schierning, G.; Wolf, D. E.; Wiggers, H.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    We present a study of the morphology and the thermoelectric properties of short-pulse laser-sintered (LS) nanoparticle (NP) thin films, consisting of SiGe alloy NPs or composites of Si and Ge NPs. Laser-sintering of spin-coated NP films in vacuum results in a macroporous percolating network with a typical thickness of 300 nm. The Seebeck coefficient for LS samples is the same as for bulk samples prepared by current-assisted sintering and is typical for degenerate doping. The electrical conductivity of LS films is influenced by two-dimensional percolation effects and rises with increasing temperature, approximately following a power-law.

  2. Electrical and electrothermal transport in InN: The roles of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N.; Ager, J. W.; Jones, R. E.; Smith, H. M.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Hawkridge, M. E.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Schaff, W. J.; Gallinat, C.; Koblmüller, G.; Speck, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    The transport properties of Mg doped and undoped InN films are studied with capacitance-voltage, thermopower, and Hall mobility measurements. A positive Seebeck coefficient is observed for Mg doped InN confirming p-type conductivity, though high doping and structural defect density can lead to n-type films. Transport measurements of undoped films are analyzed employing Rode's iterative Boltzmann equation method. Observed thermopower, Hall mobility, and dislocation density data for undoped films are consistent with calculations including the effects of charged line defect (donor-type dislocation) scattering.

  3. Thermomicrocapillaries as temperature biosensors in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herth, Simone; Giesguth, Miriam; Wedel, Waldemar; Reiss, Günther; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2013-03-01

    Temperature is an important physical parameter in biology and its deviation from optimum can cause damage in biosystems. Thermocouples based on the Seebeck effect can be structured on glass microcapillaries to obtain thermomicrocapillaries (TMCs) usable in a micromanipulation setup. The suitability of the setup was proven by monitoring the temperature increase upon illumination of leaves and single cells following insertion of the TMC. The increase was 1.5 K in green tissue and 0.75 K in white leaf sections due to lower absorption. In single cells of trichomes, the increase was 0.5 K due to heat dissipation to the surrounding air.

  4. Experimental study of the valence band of Bi2Se3

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yi-Bin; He, Bin; Parker, David; Androulakis, Ioannis; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2014-09-26

    The valence band of Bi2Se3 is investigated with Shubnikov - de Haas measurements, galvanomagnetic and thermoelectric transport. At low hole concentration, the hole Fermi surface is closed and box-like, but at higher concentrations it develops tube-like extensions that are open. The experimentally determined density-of-states effective mass is lighter than density-functional theory calculations predict; while we cannot give a definitive explanation for this, we suspect that the theory may lack sufficient precision to compute room-temperature transport properties, such as the Seebeck coefficient, in solids in which there are Van der Waals interlayer bonds.

  5. Thermoelectric properties of n-Type Mg2Si-Mg2Sn solid solutions with different grain sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samunin, A. Yu.; Zaitsev, V. K.; Pshenay-Severin, D. A.; Konstantinov, P. P.; Isachenko, G. N.; Fedorov, M. I.; Novikov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    Influence of the grain sizes on thermoelectric parameters of pressurized solid solutions of the composition Mg2Si0.8Sn0.2 was studied. The Seebeck coefficient, electric conductivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall coefficient were determined. Decreasing the grain size to the nanoscale was found to decrease the mobility at low temperatures and resulted in a peculiar temperature dependence of the electric conductivity, but did not lead to a decrease in the thermo EMF. It was found that the grain size had no effect on the thermoelectric efficiency of the investigated solid solution in the operating temperature range.

  6. BiSb and spin-related thermoelectric phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jin, Hyungyu; Zheng, Yuanhua; Watzman, Sarah J.; Prakash, Arati

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the factors limiting the figure of merit zT of conventional thermoelectrics especially at cryogenic temperatures and then highlights modern approaches used to increase zT below 200 K. Two type of materials are discussed. The first are BiSb alloys, relatively conventional thermoelectrics in which the zT is enhanced by using resonant levels. The second is the spin- Seebeck effect (SSE), a new solid-state energy conversion technology. Classical thermoelectric and SSE physics are combined to provide new concepts, like magnon-drag, in which we hope to increase the performance of solid-state coolers by exploiting the spin degree of freedom.

  7. Anomalous thermoelectricity in strained Bi2Te3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucong; Chen, Jiadong; Deng, Huiyong; Hu, Gujin; Zhu, Daming; Dai, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Bi2Te3-based alloys have been intensively used for thermoelectric coolers and generators due to their high Seebeck coefficient S. So far, efforts to improve the S have been made mostly on changing the structures and components. Herein, we demonstrate an anomalous thermoelectricity in strained Bi2Te3 films, i.e., the value of S is obviously changed after reversing the direction of temperature gradient. Further theoretical and experimental analysis shows that it originates from the coupling of thermoelectric and flexoelectric effects caused by a stress gradient. Our finding provides a new avenue to adjust the S of Bi2Te3-based thermoelectric materials through flexoelectric polarization.

  8. Experimental study of the valence band of Bi2Se3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Yi-Bin; He, Bin; Parker, David; Androulakis, Ioannis; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2014-09-26

    The valence band of Bi2Se3 is investigated with Shubnikov - de Haas measurements, galvanomagnetic and thermoelectric transport. At low hole concentration, the hole Fermi surface is closed and box-like, but at higher concentrations it develops tube-like extensions that are open. The experimentally determined density-of-states effective mass is lighter than density-functional theory calculations predict; while we cannot give a definitive explanation for this, we suspect that the theory may lack sufficient precision to compute room-temperature transport properties, such as the Seebeck coefficient, in solids in which there are Van der Waals interlayer bonds.

  9. Unified Picture for the Colossal Thermopower Compound FeSb2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, M.; Tomczak, J. M.; Zhong, Z.; Held, K.

    2015-06-01

    We identify the driving mechanism of the gigantic Seebeck coefficient in FeSb2 as the phonon-drag effect associated with an in-gap density of states that we demonstrate to derive from excess iron. We accurately model electronic and thermoelectric transport coefficients and explain the so far ill-understood correlation of maxima and inflection points in different response functions. Our scenario has far-reaching consequences for attempts to harvest the spectacular power factor of FeSb2 .

  10. Security effectiveness review (SER)

    SciTech Connect

    Kouprianova, I.; Ek, D.; Showalter, R.; Bergman, M.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the on-going DOE/Russian MPC and A activities at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and in order to provide a basis for planning MPC and A enhancements, an expedient method to review the effectiveness of the MPC and A system has been adopted. These reviews involve the identification of appropriate and cost-effective enhancements of facilities at IPPE. This effort requires a process that is thorough but far less intensive than a traditional vulnerability assessment. The SER results in a quick assessment of current and needed enhancements. The process requires preparation and coordination between US and Russian analysts before, during, and after information gathering at the facilities in order that the analysis is accurate, effective, and mutually agreeable. The goal of this paper is to discuss the SER process, including the objectives, time scale, and lessons learned at IPPE.

  11. Transgenerational genetic effects.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2010-12-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to 'missing heritability'. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans.

  12. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  13. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  14. Cosmological memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  15. Giving effective presentations.

    PubMed

    Englehart, Nadine

    2004-03-01

    Apprehension about oral communication, or public speaking is rated as the number one fear among most individuals. Developing skill in, and comfort with, public speaking is important whether we are presenting oral reports and proposals, responding to questions, or training co-workers. Effective speakers are able to communicate information in a way that stimulates interest, helps the audience to understand and remember, and influences attitudes and behaviours. Many of us think that effective speakers are born rather than made. In truth most successful speakers work hard and invest a great deal of time and effort in to improving their speaking capabilities. Effective public speaking is a learned skill and activity that requires lots of practice. Like other learned skills, having a strategy with clear action steps can help you achieve your goal. PMID:15116467

  16. Effective Documentation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleboda, Claire

    1997-01-01

    Quality assurance programs provide a very effective means to monitor and evaluate medical care. Quality assurance involves: (1) Identify a problem; (2) Determine the source and nature of the problem; (3) Develop policies and methods to effect improvement; (4) Implement those polices; (5) Monitor the methods applied; and (6) Evaluate their effectiveness. Because this definition of quality assurance so closely resembles the Nursing Process, the health unit staff was able to use their knowledge of the nursing process to develop many forms which improve the quality of patient care. These forms include the NASA DFRC Service Report, the occupational injury form (Incident Report), the patient survey (Pre-hospital Evaluation/Care Report), the Laboratory Log Sheet, the 911 Run Sheet, and the Patient Assessment Stamp. Examples and steps which are followed to generate these reports are described.

  17. Quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosky, T.; Tasaki, S.; Prigogine, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 1977, Misra and Sudarshan showed, based on the quantum measurement theory, that an unstable particle will never be found to decay when it is continuously observed. They called it the quantum Zeno effect (or paradox). More generally the quantum Zeno effect is associated to the inhibition of transitions by frequent measurements. This possibility has attracted much interest over the last years. Recently, Itano, Heinzen, Bollinger and Wineland have reported that they succeeded in observing the quantum Zeno effect. This would indeed be an important step towards the understanding of the role of the observer in quantum mechanics. However, in the present paper, we will show that their results can be recovered through conventional quantum mechanics and do not involve a repeated reduction (or collapse) of the wave function.

  18. The quantum sweeper effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grössing, G.; Fussy, S.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2015-07-01

    We show that during stochastic beam attenuation in double slit experiments, there appear unexpected new effects for transmission factors below a ≤ 10-4, which can eventually be observed with the aid of weak measurement techniques. These are denoted as quantum sweeper effects, which are characterized by the bunching together of low counting rate particles within very narrow spatial domains. We employ a “superclassical” modeling procedure which we have previously shown to produce predictions identical with those of standard quantum theory. Thus it is demonstrated that in reaching down to ever weaker channel intensities, the nonlinear nature of the probability density currents becomes ever more important. We finally show that the resulting unexpected effects nevertheless implicitly also exist in standard quantum mechanics.

  19. Transgenerational genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to ‘missing heritability’. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans. PMID:22122083

  20. Relative age effect: implications for effective practice.

    PubMed

    Andronikos, Georgios; Elumaro, Adeboye Israel; Westbury, Tony; Martindale, Russell J J

    2016-01-01

    Physical and psychological differences related to birthdate amongst athletes of the same selection year have been characterised as the "relative age effects" (RAEs). RAEs have been identified in a variety of sports, both at youth and adult level, and are linked with dropout of athletes and a reduction of the talent pool. This study examined the existence, mechanisms and possible solutions to RAEs using qualitative methodology. Seven experts in the field of talent identification and development were interviewed. Inductive analysis of the data showed that, while there was mixed evidence for the existence of RAEs across sports, the eradication of RAEs was attributed to controllable features of the development environment. The factors reported included the structure of "categories" used to group athletes within the sport (e.g. age, weight, size, skills), recognition and prioritisation of long-term development over "short term win focus." Education of relevant parties (e.g. coaches, scouts, clubs) about RAEs and the nature of "talent" within a long-term context was suggested, along with careful consideration of the structure of the development environment (e.g. delayed selection, provision for late developers, focus on skills not results, use of challenge). Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  1. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, David R.; Medina, Douglas J.; Hawk, Larry W.; Fosco, Whitney D.; Richards, Jerry B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral- and neural-based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009; Rankin etal., 2009). We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow) normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect “accelerated-HRE.” Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior. PMID:24409128

  2. A tactile suffix effect.

    PubMed

    Watkins, M J; Watkins, O C

    1974-01-01

    Evidence for a representational tactile memory was obtained from a tactile analogue of the auditory suffix effect. In two experiments, a short sequence of tactile stimuli applied to the fingers was followed by an acoustic (control) or tactile (suffix) recall signal. The serial position curves for the two conditions were compared. They revealed similar and strong primacy effects, but recall of the last few stimuli was higher in the control condition. This terminal control advantage was attributed to the retention of raw tactile information.

  3. Contamination effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The in-situ optical surface measurement system is a facility designed to study the deleterious effects of particulate materials on the surface reflectivities of optical materials in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). This arrangement is designed to simulate the on-orbit effects of contamination and degradation of optical surfaces. This simulation is accomplished through the use of non-coherent VUV sources illuminating optical surfaces located in a high vacuum chamber. Several sources of contamination are employed. The reflectivity is measured both at the specular reflection as well as at two scattered positions, forward and reverse. The system components are described and an operating procedure is given.

  4. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton.

  5. Are diabetes camps effective?

    PubMed

    Barone, Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Vivolo, Marco Antonio; Madden, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    In the present article data about Diabetes Camps (DC) from all continents were reviewed in order to answer the title question "are diabetes camps effective?". Articles from peer reviewed journals and abstracts published in international conferences proceedings were raised. The effectiveness was considered in terms of knowledge acquisition, and psychosocial and physiological changes. Even though expected improvements were not found in all studies, in a deeper and wider analysis the aspects that influence the most toward gains are identified. Among them are: number of participations in a DC, post-camp educational opportunities, staff training, and program oriented toward campers' autonomy. To conclude, practical recommendations are addressed intending to amplify DC's potential.

  6. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed.

  7. Modeling Hofmeister Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  8. Vascular effects of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Almeida Rezende, Bruno; Pereira, Aline Carvalho; Cortes, Steyner F; Lemos, Virginia Soares

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural plant-derived polyphenolic compounds with various biological properties particularly in the cardiovascular system, including antiatherogenic, antioxidant, vasodilation, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet activities. These biological properties have been evaluated in several experimental and clinical studies. In addition, extensive reviews have discussed the antiatherogenic effect of these polyphenols. However, limited studies have investigated the potential therapeutic vascular effects of these compounds. This review brings together some recent studies, to establish the different signaling pathways involved in the molecular mechanisms that underlie the vasodilation induced by flavonoids.

  9. Quantum spin Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bernevig, B Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2006-03-17

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. The existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2(e/4pi). The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  10. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton. PMID:26205852

  11. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  12. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  13. Conducting Effective Simulator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerling, Kenneth D.

    This paper describes the simulator phase of Commonwealth Edison's program for training and licensing operators of nuclear power stations. Topics covered include (1) preparing the students before starting the simulator phase; (2) the simulator schedule and the number of students that can be trained effectively in a class; (3) format and structure…

  14. Contaminant effects on fisheries

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, V.W.; Hodson, P.V.; Nriagu, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the effects of water pollution on fish and fisheries. Topics include: monitoring lead pollution in fish, metallothionein and acclimation to heavy metals in fish, modeling approaches, appraising the status of fisheries, and assessing the health of aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  16. Building Effective Afterschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashola, Olatokunbo S.

    Through a comprehensive review of various afterschool programs across the United States, this resource provides a practical overview of the research and best practices that can be easily adapted and applied in the development of highly effective afterschool programs. chapters focus on: (1) "Why Afterschool Programs?" (benefits, challenges, and…

  17. Is Effective Teaching Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Helen; Mantzicopoulos, Panayota

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the ecological validity of using observation-based scores to evaluate individual teachers' effectiveness, mirroring their use by school administrators. Using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, the authors asked (a) how similar are teachers' emotional support, classroom organization, and instructional support scores from…

  18. Case 26: Somogyi effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This individual has a classic manifestation of the Somogyi effect, which is fasting morning hyperglycemia in response to hypoglycemia in the early morning and late night hours. The danger is that if night-time blood glucose levels are not measured, the physician may interpret the patient as having h...

  19. Creating an Effective Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Ray; Griffis, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Newsletters are an important resource or form of media. They offer a cost-effective way to keep people informed, as well as to promote events and programs. Production of a newsletter makes an excellent project, relevant to real-world communication, for technology students. This article presents an activity on how to create a short newsletter. The…

  20. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products. PMID:23715638