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Sample records for selected reaction monitoring

  1. Selected reaction monitoring applied to quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kiyonami, Reiko; Domon, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is gradually shifting from pure qualitative studies (protein identification) to large-scale quantitative experiments, prompted by the growing need to analyze consistently and precisely a large set of proteins in biological samples. The selected reaction monitoring (SRM) technique is increasingly applied to quantitative proteomics because of its selectivity (two levels of mass selection), its sensitivity (non-scanning mode), and its wide dynamic range. This account describes the different steps in the design and the experimental setup of SRM experiments.

  2. Selected reaction monitoring applied to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Duriez, Elodie; Domon, Bruno

    2011-03-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) performed on triple quadrupole mass spectrometers has been the reference quantitative technique to analyze small molecules for several decades. It is now emerging in proteomics as the ideal tool to complement shotgun qualitative studies; targeted SRM quantitative analysis offers high selectivity, sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. However, SRM applied to proteomics presents singularities that distinguish it from small molecules analysis. This review is an overview of SRM technology and describes the specificities and the technical aspects of proteomics experiments. Ongoing developments aiming at increasing multiplexing capabilities of SRM are discussed; they dramatically improve its throughput and extend its field of application to directed or supervised discovery experiments.

  3. Automated workflow for large-scale selected reaction monitoring experiments.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Rosenberger, George; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-03-02

    Targeted proteomics allows researchers to study proteins of interest without being drowned in data from other, less interesting proteins or from redundant or uninformative peptides. While the technique is mostly used for smaller, focused studies, there are several reasons to conduct larger targeted experiments. Automated, highly robust software becomes more important in such experiments. In addition, larger experiments are carried out over longer periods of time, requiring strategies to handle the sometimes large shift in retention time often observed. We present a complete proof-of-principle software stack that automates most aspects of selected reaction monitoring workflows, a targeted proteomics technology. The software allows experiments to be easily designed and carried out. The steps automated are the generation of assays, generation of mass spectrometry driver files and methods files, and the import and analysis of the data. All data are normalized to a common retention time scale, the data are then scored using a novel score model, and the error is subsequently estimated. We also show that selected reaction monitoring can be used for label-free quantification. All data generated are stored in a relational database, and the growing resource further facilitates the design of new experiments. We apply the technology to a large-scale experiment studying how Streptococcus pyogenes remodels its proteome under stimulation of human plasma.

  4. Free computational resources for designing selected reaction monitoring transitions.

    PubMed

    Cham Mead, Jennifer A; Bianco, Luca; Bessant, Conrad

    2010-03-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a technique for quantifying specific proteins using triple quadrupole MS. Proteins are digested into peptides and fed into MS following HPLC separation. The stream of ionized peptides is filtered by m/z ratio so only specific peptide targets enter the collision cell, where they are fragmented into product ions. A specific product ion is then filtered from the cell and its intensity measured. By spiking an isotopically labeled version of each target peptide into a sample, both native and surrogate peptides enter MS, pass the filters and transition into product ions in tandem; thus the quantity of the native peptide may be calculated by examining the relative intensities of the native and surrogate signals. The choice of precursor-to-product ion transitions is critical for SRM, but predicting the best candidates is challenging and time-consuming. To alleviate this problem, software tools for designing and optimizing transitions have recently emerged, predominantly driven by data from public proteomics repositories, such as the Global Proteome Machine and PeptideAtlas. In this review, we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art in automated SRM transition design tools in the public domain, explaining how the systems work and how to use them.

  5. Evaluation of absolute peptide quantitation strategies using selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James; Rezai, Taha; Prakash, Amol; Krastins, Bryan; Dayon, Loïc; Ward, Malcolm; Robinson, Sarah; Lopez, Mary

    2011-03-01

    The use of internal peptide standards in selected reaction monitoring experiments enables absolute quantitation. Here, we describe three approaches addressing calibration of peptide concentrations in complex matrices and assess their performance in terms of trueness and precision. The simplest approach described is single reference point quantitation where a heavy peptide is spiked into test samples and the endogenous analyte quantified relative to the heavy peptide internal standard. We refer to the second approach as normal curve quantitation. Here, a constant amount of heavy peptide and a varying amount of light peptide are spiked into matrix to construct a calibration curve. This accounts for matrix effects but due to the presence of endogenous analyte, it is usually not possible to determine the lower LOQ. We refer to the third method as reverse curve quantitation. Here, a constant amount of light peptide and a varying amount of heavy peptide are spiked into matrix to construct a calibration curve. Because there is no contribution to the heavy peptide signal from endogenous analyte, it is possible to measure the equivalent of a blank sample and determine LOQ. These approaches are applied to human plasma samples and used to assay peptides of a set of apolipoproteins. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Mann, Jessica M; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-08-17

    Absolute quantification of target proteins within complex biological samples is critical to a wide range of research and clinical applications. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions for the development and application of quantitative assays using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). First, likely quantotypic target peptides are identified based on numerous criteria. This includes identifying proteotypic peptides, avoiding sites of posttranslational modification, and analyzing the uniqueness of the target peptide to the target protein. Next, crude external peptide standards are synthesized and used to develop SRM assays, and the resulting assays are used to perform qualitative analyses of the biological samples. Finally, purified, quantified, heavy isotope labeled internal peptide standards are prepared and used to perform isotope dilution series SRM assays. Analysis of all of the resulting MS data is presented. This protocol was used to accurately assay the absolute abundance of proteins of the chemotaxis signaling pathway within RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line). The quantification of Gi2 (a heterotrimeric G-protein α-subunit) is described in detail.

  7. Considerations on selected reaction monitoring experiments: implications for the selectivity and accuracy of measurements.

    PubMed

    Domon, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Targeted MS analyses based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) has enabled significant achievements in proteomic quantification, such that its application to clinical studies has augured great advancements for life sciences. The approach has been challenged by the complexity of clinical samples that affects the selectivity of measurements, in many cases limiting analytical performances to a larger extent than expected. This Personal Perspective discusses some insight to better comprehend the mismatch between the often underestimated sample complexity and the selectivity of SRM measurements performed on a triple quadrupole instrument. The implications for the design and evaluation of SRM assays are discussed and illustrated with selected examples, providing a baseline for a more critical use of the technique in the context of clinical samples and to evaluate alternative methods.

  8. Comparison of targeted peptide quantification assays for reductive dehalogenases by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) and precursor reaction monitoring (PRM).

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Christian; Hansen, Rasmus; Baumann, Sven; Kublik, Anja; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Adrian, Lorenz; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico; Seifert, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Targeted absolute protein quantification yields valuable information about physiological adaptation of organisms and is thereby of high interest. Especially for this purpose, two proteomic mass spectrometry-based techniques namely selective reaction monitoring (SRM) and precursor reaction monitoring (PRM) are commonly applied. The objective of this study was to establish an optimal quantification assay for proteins with the focus on those involved in housekeeping functions and putative reductive dehalogenase proteins from the strictly anaerobic bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1. This microbe is small and slow-growing; hence, it provides little biomass for comprehensive proteomic analysis. We therefore compared SRM and PRM techniques. Eleven peptides were successfully quantified by both methods. In addition, six peptides were solely quantified by SRM and four by PRM, respectively. Peptides were spiked into a background of Escherichia coli lysate and the majority of peptides were quantifiable down to 500 amol absolute on column by both methods. Peptide quantification in CBDB1 lysate resulted in the detection of 15 peptides using SRM and 14 peptides with the PRM assay. Resulting quantification of five dehalogenases revealed copy numbers of <10 to 115 protein molecules per cell indicating clear differences in abundance of RdhA proteins during growth on hexachlorobenzene. Our results indicated that both methods show comparable sensitivity and that the combination of the mass spectrometry assays resulted in higher peptide coverage and thus more reliable protein quantification.

  9. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Ann Roitsch, Carolyn; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60–80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  10. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)—also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)—has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the pg/mL to low ng/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in the cells or tissues. Herein we review recent advances in methods and technologies, including front-end immunoaffinity depletion, fractionation, selective enrichment of target proteins/peptides or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs), as well as advances in MS instrumentation, which have significantly enhanced the overall sensitivity of SRM assays and enabled the detection of low-abundance proteins at low to sub- ng/mL level in human blood plasma or serum. General perspectives on the potential of achieving sufficient sensitivity for detection of pg/mL level proteins in plasma are also discussed.

  11. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)—also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)—has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the low ng/mL to pg/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in cells or tissues. Herein we review recent advances in methods and technologies, including front-end immunoaffinity depletion, fractionation, selective enrichment of target proteins/peptides including posttranslational modifications (PTMs), as well as advances in MS instrumentation which have significantly enhanced the overall sensitivity of SRM assays and enabled the detection of low-abundance proteins at low to sub- ng/mL level in human blood plasma or serum. General perspectives on the potential of achieving sufficient sensitivity for detection of pg/mL level proteins in plasma are also discussed. PMID:22577010

  12. Method development for quantification of five tear proteins using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Simin; Zhong, Ling; Raftery, Mark J; Stapleton, Fiona J; Willcox, Mark D

    2014-02-10

    To establish the use of selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry for quantification of tear proteins. Tear samples were collected on multiple occasions (7-10 days) from healthy subjects with contact lens wear (CL = 3) and without contact lens wear (NCL = 4). Tear proteins were denatured using 8M urea, reduced with iodoacetamide, precipitated by acetone, and digested using trypsin. Internal standards were included by adding isotopically-labelled standards of known concentrations to the samples. Lactoferrin, lysozyme, prolactin-induced protein, lipocalin 1, and proline-rich protein 4 were quantified using liquid chromatography-triple quadruple mass spectrometry in conjunction with selected reaction monitoring. The limits of quantification for the selected peptides were below 50 pg/μL. The recovery of peptides from spiked digested tears was greater than or equal to 56% and the coefficient of variation values were less than or equal to 16%. The concentration of lactoferrin (1.20 ± 0.77 μg/μL), lysozyme (2.11 ± 1.50 μg/μL), and lipocalin-1 (1.75 ± 0.99 μg/μL) were consistent with previous ELISA studies. Tear levels of prolactin-induced protein (0.09 ± 0.06 μg/μL) and proline-rich 4 (0.80 ± 0.50 μg/μL) are reported here for the first time. The SRM method can be used for simultaneous detection and quantification of selected proteins in low volumes of human tear samples (2.5 μL per sample) without prior purification of each protein component or need for antibodies.

  13. Discordance between protein and transcript levels detected by selected reaction monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Expression levels between transcript and protein are not always correlated. In the present study, the abundance of protein PDR9/ABCG37 in 3 Arabidopsis pdr9/abcg37 mutant alleles was evaluated using selected reaction monitoring analysis. The results showed that protein and mRNA expression levels were similar in 2 mutant alleles. The mRNA expression levels in another mutant, determined by both semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR, were similar to the wild-type, although the abundance of protein was about half the abundance of the wild-type. These results suggested that using only mRNA expression levels to infer protein abundance, compare mutants or responses to various stimuli may lead to incorrect interpretation and conclusions. PMID:26039477

  14. Ultrasensitive Sample Quantitation via Selected Reaction Monitoring Using CITP/CZE-ESI-Triple Quadrupole MS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Lee, Cheng S.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2012-11-10

    We demonstrate the direct coupling of transient capillary isotachophoresis/ capillary zone electrophoresis (CITP/CZE) with a high sensitivity triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode for sample quantitation. The capability of CITP/CZE for in situ sample enrichment and separation has been shown to significantly improve the analytical figures of merit. A linear dynamic range spanning more than 4 orders of magnitude was observed. An average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 49.6 was observed for 50 attomoles of targeted peptide in the presence of a complex and much more abundant bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest products. A correlation of variation (CV) less than 10 % for peak area was measured from triplicate sample analyses at 50 pM peptide concentration, showing good reproducibility of this online CITP/CZE-SRM mass spectrometry (MS) platform, and with limit of quantitation (LOQ) demonstrated to be well below 50 pM.

  15. A Computational Tool to Detect and Avoid Redundancy in Selected Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Röst, Hannes; Malmström, Lars; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM), also called multiple reaction monitoring, has become an invaluable tool for targeted quantitative proteomic analyses, but its application can be compromised by nonoptimal selection of transitions. In particular, complex backgrounds may cause ambiguities in SRM measurement results because peptides with interfering transitions similar to those of the target peptide may be present in the sample. Here, we developed a computer program, the SRMCollider, that calculates nonredundant theoretical SRM assays, also known as unique ion signatures (UIS), for a given proteomic background. We show theoretically that UIS of three transitions suffice to conclusively identify 90% of all yeast peptides and 85% of all human peptides. Using predicted retention times, the SRMCollider also simulates time-scheduled SRM acquisition, which reduces the number of interferences to consider and leads to fewer transitions necessary to construct an assay. By integrating experimental fragment ion intensities from large scale proteome synthesis efforts (SRMAtlas) with the information content-based UIS, we combine two orthogonal approaches to create high quality SRM assays ready to be deployed. We provide a user friendly, open source implementation of an algorithm to calculate UIS of any order that can be accessed online at http://www.srmcollider.org to find interfering transitions. Finally, our tool can also simulate the specificity of novel data-independent MS acquisition methods in Q1–Q3 space. This allows us to predict parameters for these methods that deliver a specificity comparable with that of SRM. Using SRM interference information in addition to other sources of information can increase the confidence in an SRM measurement. We expect that the consideration of information content will become a standard step in SRM assay design and analysis, facilitated by the SRMCollider. PMID:22535207

  16. Estimation of Absolute Protein Quantities of Unlabeled Samples by Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Christina; Claassen, Manfred; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    For many research questions in modern molecular and systems biology, information about absolute protein quantities is imperative. This information includes, for example, kinetic modeling of processes, protein turnover determinations, stoichiometric investigations of protein complexes, or quantitative comparisons of different proteins within one sample or across samples. To date, the vast majority of proteomic studies are limited to providing relative quantitative comparisons of protein levels between limited numbers of samples. Here we describe and demonstrate the utility of a targeting MS technique for the estimation of absolute protein abundance in unlabeled and nonfractionated cell lysates. The method is based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry and the “best flyer” hypothesis, which assumes that the specific MS signal intensity of the most intense tryptic peptides per protein is approximately constant throughout a whole proteome. SRM-targeted best flyer peptides were selected for each protein from the peptide precursor ion signal intensities from directed MS data. The most intense transitions per peptide were selected from full MS/MS scans of crude synthetic analogs. We used Monte Carlo cross-validation to systematically investigate the accuracy of the technique as a function of the number of measured best flyer peptides and the number of SRM transitions per peptide. We found that a linear model based on the two most intense transitions of the three best flying peptides per proteins (TopPep3/TopTra2) generated optimal results with a cross-correlated mean fold error of 1.8 and a squared Pearson coefficient R2 of 0.88. Applying the optimized model to lysates of the microbe Leptospira interrogans, we detected significant protein abundance changes of 39 target proteins upon antibiotic treatment, which correlate well with literature values. The described method is generally applicable and exploits the inherent performance advantages of SRM

  17. Protein turnover measurement using selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS).

    PubMed

    Holman, Stephen W; Hammond, Dean E; Simpson, Deborah M; Waters, John; Hurst, Jane L; Beynon, Robert J

    2016-10-28

    Protein turnover represents an important mechanism in the functioning of cells, with deregulated synthesis and degradation of proteins implicated in many diseased states. Therefore, proteomics strategies to measure turnover rates with high confidence are of vital importance to understanding many biological processes. In this study, the more widely used approach of non-targeted precursor ion signal intensity (MS1) quantification is compared with selected reaction monitoring (SRM), a data acquisition strategy that records data for specific peptides, to determine if improved quantitative data would be obtained using a targeted quantification approach. Using mouse liver as a model system, turnover measurement of four tricarboxylic acid cycle proteins was performed using both MS1 and SRM quantification strategies. SRM outperformed MS1 in terms of sensitivity and selectivity of measurement, allowing more confident determination of protein turnover rates. SRM data are acquired using cheaper and more widely available tandem quadrupole mass spectrometers, making the approach accessible to a larger number of researchers than MS1 quantification, which is best performed on high mass resolution instruments. SRM acquisition is ideally suited to focused studies where the turnover of tens of proteins is measured, making it applicable in determining the dynamics of proteins complexes and complete metabolic pathways.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  18. Protein turnover measurement using selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Stephen W.; Hammond, Dean E.; Simpson, Deborah M.; Waters, John; Hurst, Jane L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein turnover represents an important mechanism in the functioning of cells, with deregulated synthesis and degradation of proteins implicated in many diseased states. Therefore, proteomics strategies to measure turnover rates with high confidence are of vital importance to understanding many biological processes. In this study, the more widely used approach of non-targeted precursor ion signal intensity (MS1) quantification is compared with selected reaction monitoring (SRM), a data acquisition strategy that records data for specific peptides, to determine if improved quantitative data would be obtained using a targeted quantification approach. Using mouse liver as a model system, turnover measurement of four tricarboxylic acid cycle proteins was performed using both MS1 and SRM quantification strategies. SRM outperformed MS1 in terms of sensitivity and selectivity of measurement, allowing more confident determination of protein turnover rates. SRM data are acquired using cheaper and more widely available tandem quadrupole mass spectrometers, making the approach accessible to a larger number of researchers than MS1 quantification, which is best performed on high mass resolution instruments. SRM acquisition is ideally suited to focused studies where the turnover of tens of proteins is measured, making it applicable in determining the dynamics of proteins complexes and complete metabolic pathways. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644981

  19. Automated selected reaction monitoring software for accurate label-free protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Teleman, Johan; Karlsson, Christofer; Waldemarson, Sofia; Hansson, Karin; James, Peter; Malmström, Johan; Levander, Fredrik

    2012-07-06

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry method with documented ability to quantify proteins accurately and reproducibly using labeled reference peptides. However, the use of labeled reference peptides becomes impractical if large numbers of peptides are targeted and when high flexibility is desired when selecting peptides. We have developed a label-free quantitative SRM workflow that relies on a new automated algorithm, Anubis, for accurate peak detection. Anubis efficiently removes interfering signals from contaminating peptides to estimate the true signal of the targeted peptides. We evaluated the algorithm on a published multisite data set and achieved results in line with manual data analysis. In complex peptide mixtures from whole proteome digests of Streptococcus pyogenes we achieved a technical variability across the entire proteome abundance range of 6.5-19.2%, which was considerably below the total variation across biological samples. Our results show that the label-free SRM workflow with automated data analysis is feasible for large-scale biological studies, opening up new possibilities for quantitative proteomics and systems biology.

  20. Quantification of milk fat globule membrane proteins using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fong, Bertram Y; Norris, Carmen S

    2009-07-22

    Although some of the physiological roles of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins are still unclear, there is increasing evidence that the consumption of bovine MFGM proteins has significant nutritional health benefits for humans; therefore, it may be important to be able to estimate the MFGM proteins in complex ingredients. In this study, the absolute quantification (AQUA) technique, which is typically used for the quantification of proteins in proteomic studies, was applied for the quantification of bovine MFGM proteins in butter milk protein concentrate. Six MFGM proteins (fatty acid binding protein, butyrophilin, PAS 6/7, adipophilin, xanthine oxidase, and mucin 1) were simultaneously quantified using high-resolution selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Samples were rehydrated in 6.7 M urea buffer prior to dilution to 2.2 M before tryspin digestion. Direct rehydration in 2.2 M urea buffer or 2.2 M urea/20% acetonitilrile buffer reduced peptide yield digestion. Isotopically labeled peptides were used as internal standards. The coefficient of variation ranged from 5 to 15%, with a recovery of 84-105%. The limit of detection was in the range of 20-40 pg.

  1. Oxidized fatty acid analysis by charge-switch derivatization, selected reaction monitoring, and accurate mass quantitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinping; Moon, Sung Ho; Mancuso, David J; Jenkins, Christopher M; Guan, Shaoping; Sims, Harold F; Gross, Richard W

    2013-11-01

    A highly sensitive, specific, and robust method for the analysis of oxidized metabolites of linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was developed using charge-switch derivatization, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and quantitation by high mass accuracy analysis of product ions, thereby minimizing interferences from contaminating ions. Charge-switch derivatization of LA, AA, and DHA metabolites with N-(4-aminomethylphenyl)-pyridinium resulted in a 10- to 30-fold increase in ionization efficiency. Improved quantitation was accompanied by decreased false positive interferences through accurate mass measurements of diagnostic product ions during SRM transitions by ratiometric comparisons with stable isotope internal standards. The limits of quantitation were between 0.05 and 6.0pg, with a dynamic range of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude (correlation coefficient r(2)>0.99). This approach was used to quantitate the levels of representative fatty acid metabolites from wild-type (WT) and iPLA2γ(-/-) mouse liver identifying the role of iPLA2γ in hepatic lipid second messenger production. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of high mass accuracy product ion analysis in conjunction with charge-switch derivatization for the highly specific quantitation of diminutive amounts of LA, AA, and DHA metabolites in biologic systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Profiling Cys34 Adducts of Human Serum Albumin by Fixed-Step Selected Reaction Monitoring*

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Funk, William E.; Lu, Sixin Samantha; Rose, Sherri; Williams, Evan R.; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described for profiling putative adducts (or other unknown covalent modifications) at the Cys34 locus of human serum albumin (HSA), which represents the preferred reaction site for small electrophilic species in human serum. By comparing profiles of putative HSA-Cys34 adducts across populations of interest it is theoretically possible to explore environmental causes of degenerative diseases and cancer caused by both exogenous and endogenous chemicals. We report a novel application of selected-reaction-monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, termed fixed-step SRM (FS-SRM), that allows detection of essentially all HSA-Cys34 modifications over a specified range of mass increases (added masses). After tryptic digestion, HSA-Cys34 adducts are contained in the third largest peptide (T3), which contains 21 amino acids and an average mass of 2433.87 Da. The FS-SRM method does not require that exact masses of T3 adducts be known in advance but rather uses a theoretical list of T3-adduct m/z values separated by a fixed increment of 1.5. In terms of added masses, each triply charged parent ion represents a bin of ±2.3 Da between 9.1 Da and 351.1 Da. Synthetic T3 adducts were used to optimize FS-SRM and to establish screening rules based upon selected b- and y-series fragment ions. An isotopically labeled T3 adduct is added to protein digests to facilitate quantification of putative adducts. We used FS-SRM to generate putative adduct profiles from six archived specimens of HSA that had been pooled by gender, race, and smoking status. An average of 66 putative adduct hits (out of a possible 77) were detected in these samples. Putative adducts covered a wide range of concentrations, were most abundant in the mass range below 100 Da, and were more abundant in smokers than in nonsmokers. With minor modifications, the FS-SRM methodology can be applied to other nucleophilic sites and proteins. PMID:21193536

  3. Interlaboratory reproducibility of selective reaction monitoring assays using multiple upfront analyte enrichment strategies.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Amol; Rezai, Taha; Krastins, Bryan; Sarracino, David; Athanas, Michael; Russo, Paul; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Li, Yan; Kulasingam, Vathany; Drabovich, Andrei; Smith, Christopher R; Batruch, Ihor; Oran, Paul E; Fredolini, Claudia; Luchini, Alessandra; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Chan, Daniel W; Nelson, Randall; Lopez, Mary F

    2012-08-03

    Over the past few years, mass spectrometry has emerged as a technology to complement and potentially replace standard immunoassays in routine clinical core laboratories. Application of mass spectrometry to protein and peptide measurement can provide advantages including high sensitivity, the ability to multiplex analytes, and high specificity at the amino acid sequence level. In our previous study, we demonstrated excellent reproducibility of mass spectrometry-selective reaction monitoring (MS-SRM) assays when applying standardized standard operating procedures (SOPs) to measure synthetic peptides in a complex sample, as lack of reproducibility has been a frequent criticism leveled at the use of mass spectrometers in the clinical laboratory compared to immunoassays. Furthermore, an important caveat of SRM-based assays for proteins is that many low-abundance analytes require some type of enrichment before detection with MS. This adds a level of complexity to the procedure and the potential for irreproducibility increases, especially across different laboratories with different operators. The purpose of this study was to test the interlaboratory reproducibility of SRM assays with various upfront enrichment strategies and different types of clinical samples (representing real-world body fluids commonly encountered in routine clinical laboratories). Three different, previously published enrichment strategies for low-abundance analytes and a no-enrichment strategy for high-abundance analytes were tested across four different laboratories using different liquid chromatography-SRM (LC-SRM) platforms and previously developed SOPs. The results demonstrated that these assays were indeed reproducible with coefficients of variation of less than 30% for the measurement of important clinical proteins across all four laboratories in real world samples.

  4. Interlaboratory Reproducibility of Selective Reaction Monitoring Assays Using Multiple Upfront Analyte Enrichment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Amol; Rezai, Taha; Krastins, Bryan; Sarracino, David; Athanas, Michael; Russo, Paul; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Li, Yan; Kulasingam, Vathany; Drabovich, Andrei; Smith, Christopher R.; Batruch, Ihor; Oran, Paul E.; Fredolini, Claudia; Luchini, Alessandra; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Chan, Daniel W.; Nelson, Randall; Lopez, Mary F.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few years, mass spectrometry has emerged as a technology to complement and potentially replace standard immunoassays in routine clinical core laboratories. Application of mass spectrometry to protein and peptide measurement can provide advantages including high sensitivity, the ability to multiplex analytes, and high specificity at the amino acid sequence level. In our previous study, we demonstrated excellent reproducibility of mass spectrometry-selective reaction monitoring (MS-SRM) assays when applying standardized standard operating procedures (SOPs) to measure synthetic peptides in a complex sample, as lack of reproducibility has been a frequent criticism leveled at the use of mass spectrometers in the clinical laboratory compared to immunoassays. Furthermore, an important caveat of SRM-based assays for proteins is that many low-abundance analytes require some type of enrichment before detection with MS. This adds a level of complexity to the procedure and the potential for irreproducibility increases, especially across different laboratories with different operators. The purpose of this study was to test the interlaboratory reproducibility of SRM assays with various upfront enrichment strategies and different types of clinical samples (representing real-world body fluids commonly encountered in routine clinical laboratories). Three different, previously published enrichment strategies for low-abundance analytes and a no-enrichment strategy for high-abundance analytes were tested across four different laboratories using different liquid chromatography-SRM (LC-SRM) platforms and previously developed SOPs. The results demonstrated that these assays were indeed reproducible with coefficients of variation of less than 30% for the measurement of important clinical proteins across all four laboratories in real world samples. PMID:22639787

  5. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in Formalin Fixed Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of key therapeutic targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in clinical tissue samples is typically done by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and is only subjectively quantitative through a narrow dynamic range. The development of a standardized, highly-sensitive, linear, and quantitative assay for EGFR for use in patient tumor tissue carries high potential for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from EGFR-targeted therapies. Methods A mass spectrometry-based Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) assay for the EGFR protein (EGFR-SRM) was developed utilizing the Liquid Tissue®-SRM technology platform. Tissue culture cells (n = 4) were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to establish quantitative EGFR levels. Matching formalin fixed cultures were analyzed by the EGFR-SRM assay and benchmarked against immunoassay of the non-fixed cultured cells. Xenograft human tumor tissue (n = 10) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) origin and NSCLC patient tumor tissue samples (n = 23) were microdissected and the EGFR-SRM assay performed on Liquid Tissue lysates prepared from microdissected tissue. Quantitative curves and linear regression curves for correlation between immunoassay and SRM methodology were developed in Excel. Results The assay was developed for quantitation of a single EGFR tryptic peptide for use in FFPE patient tissue with absolute specificity to uniquely distinguish EGFR from all other proteins including the receptor tyrosine kinases, IGF-1R, cMet, Her2, Her3, and Her4. The assay was analytically validated against a collection of tissue culture cell lines where SRM analysis of the formalin fixed cells accurately reflects EGFR protein levels in matching non-formalin fixed cultures as established by ELISA sandwich immunoassay (R2 = 0.9991). The SRM assay was applied to a collection of FFPE NSCLC xenograft tumors where SRM data range from 305amol/μg to 12,860amol/μg and are consistent

  6. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in Formalin Fixed Tumor Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hembrough, Todd; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Liao, Wei-Li; Darfler, Marlene M; Abdo, Joseph; Bengali, Kathleen M; Taylor, Paul; Tong, Jiefei; Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Waddell, Thomas K; Moran, Michael F; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Krizman, David B; Burrows, Jon

    2012-05-03

    Analysis of key therapeutic targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in clinical tissue samples is typically done by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and is only subjectively quantitative through a narrow dynamic range. The development of a standardized, highly-sensitive, linear, and quantitative assay for EGFR for use in patient tumor tissue carries high potential for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from EGFR-targeted therapies. A mass spectrometry-based Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) assay for the EGFR protein (EGFR-SRM) was developed utilizing the Liquid Tissue®-SRM technology platform. Tissue culture cells (n = 4) were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to establish quantitative EGFR levels. Matching formalin fixed cultures were analyzed by the EGFR-SRM assay and benchmarked against immunoassay of the non-fixed cultured cells. Xenograft human tumor tissue (n = 10) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) origin and NSCLC patient tumor tissue samples (n = 23) were microdissected and the EGFR-SRM assay performed on Liquid Tissue lysates prepared from microdissected tissue. Quantitative curves and linear regression curves for correlation between immunoassay and SRM methodology were developed in Excel. The assay was developed for quantitation of a single EGFR tryptic peptide for use in FFPE patient tissue with absolute specificity to uniquely distinguish EGFR from all other proteins including the receptor tyrosine kinases, IGF-1R, cMet, Her2, Her3, and Her4. The assay was analytically validated against a collection of tissue culture cell lines where SRM analysis of the formalin fixed cells accurately reflects EGFR protein levels in matching non-formalin fixed cultures as established by ELISA sandwich immunoassay (R2 = 0.9991). The SRM assay was applied to a collection of FFPE NSCLC xenograft tumors where SRM data range from 305amol/μg to 12,860amol/μg and are consistent with EGFR protein levels in

  7. Quantitative and Selective Analysis of Feline Growth Related Proteins Using Parallel Reaction Monitoring High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Mårten; Strage, Emma M.; Bergquist, Jonas; Holst, Bodil S.

    2016-01-01

    Today immunoassays are widely used in veterinary medicine, but lack of species specific assays often necessitates the use of assays developed for human applications. Mass spectrometry (MS) is an attractive alternative due to high specificity and versatility, allowing for species-independent analysis. Targeted MS-based quantification methods are valuable complements to large scale shotgun analysis. A method referred to as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), implemented on Orbitrap MS, has lately been presented as an excellent alternative to more traditional selected reaction monitoring/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methods. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-system is not well described in the cat but there are indications of important differences between cats and humans. In feline medicine IGF–I is mainly analyzed for diagnosis of growth hormone disorders but also for research, while the other proteins in the IGF-system are not routinely analyzed within clinical practice. Here, a PRM method for quantification of IGF–I, IGF–II, IGF binding protein (BP) –3 and IGFBP–5 in feline serum is presented. Selective quantification was supported by the use of a newly launched internal standard named QPrEST™. Homology searches demonstrated the possibility to use this standard of human origin for quantification of the targeted feline proteins. Excellent quantitative sensitivity at the attomol/μL (pM) level and selectivity were obtained. As the presented approach is very generic we show that high resolution mass spectrometry in combination with PRM and QPrEST™ internal standards is a versatile tool for protein quantitation across multispecies. PMID:27907059

  8. Effect of Collision Energy Optimization on the Measurement of Peptides by Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Brendan; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Abbatiello, Susan E.; Zhang, Shucha; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Carr, Steven A.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics experiments based on Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM, also referred to as Multiple Reaction Monitoring or MRM) are being used to target large numbers of protein candidates in complex mixtures. At present, instrument parameters are often optimized for each peptide, a time and resource intensive process. Large SRM experiments are greatly facilitated by having the ability to predict MS instrument parameters that work well with the broad diversity of peptides they target. For this reason, we investigated the impact of using simple linear equations to predict the collision energy (CE) on peptide signal intensity and compared it with the empirical optimization of the CE for each peptide and transition individually. Using optimized linear equations, the difference between predicted and empirically derived CE values was found to be an average gain of only 7.8% of total peak area. We also found that existing commonly used linear equations fall short of their potential, and should be recalculated for each charge state and when introducing new instrument platforms. We provide a fully automated pipeline for calculating these equations and individually optimizing CE of each transition on SRM instruments from Agilent, Applied Biosystems, Thermo-Scientific and Waters in the open source Skyline software tool (http://proteome.gs.washington.edu/software/skyline). PMID:21090646

  9. Development of a selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry-based assay to detect asparaginyl endopeptidase activity in biological fluids

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Michael J.; Gray, Oliver J.; Parker, Catriona; Holland, Mark; Williamson, Andrew J.K.; Pierce, Andrew; Unwin, Richard D.; Krishnan, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Cancer Biomarkers have the capability to improve patient outcomes. They have potential applications in diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of disease progression and measuring response to treatment. This type of information is particularly useful in the individualisation of treatment regimens. Biomarkers may take many forms but considerable effort has been made to identify and quantify proteins in biological fluids. However, a major challenge in measuring protein in biological fluids, such as plasma, is the sensitivity of the assay and the complex matrix of proteins present. Furthermore, determining the effect of proteases in disease requires measurement of their activity in biological fluids as quantification of the protein itself may not provide sufficient information. To date little progress has been made towards monitoring activity of proteases in plasma. The protease asparaginyl endopeptidase has been implicated in diseases such as breast cancer, leukaemia and dementia. Here we describe a new approach to sensitively and in a targeted fashion quantify asparaginyl endopeptidase activity in plasma using a synthetic substrate peptide protected from nonspecific hydrolysis using D-amino acids within the structure. Our selected reaction monitoring approach enabled asparaginyl endopeptidase activity to be measured in human plasma with both a high dynamic range and sensitivity. This manuscript describes a paradigm for future development of assays to measure protease activities in biological fluids as biomarkers of disease. PMID:27683124

  10. Selected Reaction Monitoring to Determine Protein Abundance in Arabidopsis Using the Arabidopsis Proteotypic Predictor1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Nicolas L.; Fenske, Ricarda; Castleden, Ian; Tomaz, Tiago; Nelson, Clark J.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    In reverse genetic knockout (KO) studies that aim to assign function to specific genes, confirming the reduction in abundance of the encoded protein will often aid the link between genotype and phenotype. However, measuring specific protein abundance is particularly difficult in plant research, where only a limited number of antibodies are available. This problem is enhanced when studying gene families or different proteins derived from the same gene (isoforms), as many antibodies cross react with more than one protein. We show that utilizing selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry allows researchers to confirm protein abundance in mutant lines, even when discrimination between very similar proteins is needed. Selecting the best peptides for SRM analysis to ensure that protein- or gene-specific information can be obtained requires a series of steps, aids, and interpretation. To enable this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we have built a Web-based tool, the Arabidopsis Proteotypic Predictor, to select candidate SRM transitions when no previous mass spectrometry evidence exists. We also provide an in-depth analysis of the theoretical Arabidopsis proteome and its use in selecting candidate SRM peptides to establish assays for use in determining protein abundance. To test the effectiveness of SRM mass spectrometry in determining protein abundance in mutant lines, we selected two enzymes with multiple isoforms, aconitase and malate dehydrogenase. Selected peptides were quantified to estimate the abundance of each of the two mitochondrial isoforms in wild-type, KO, double KO, and complemented plant lines. We show that SRM protein analysis is a sensitive and rapid approach to quantify protein abundance differences in Arabidopsis for specific and highly related enzyme isoforms. PMID:24296071

  11. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  12. Accurate Quantification of Cardiovascular Biomarkers in Serum Using Protein Standard Absolute Quantification (PSAQ™) and Selected Reaction Monitoring*

    PubMed Central

    Huillet, Céline; Adrait, Annie; Lebert, Dorothée; Picard, Guillaume; Trauchessec, Mathieu; Louwagie, Mathilde; Dupuis, Alain; Hittinger, Luc; Ghaleh, Bijan; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Jaquinod, Michel; Garin, Jérôme; Bruley, Christophe; Brun, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    Development of new biomarkers needs to be significantly accelerated to improve diagnostic, prognostic, and toxicity monitoring as well as therapeutic follow-up. Biomarker evaluation is the main bottleneck in this development process. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) combined with stable isotope dilution has emerged as a promising option to speed this step, particularly because of its multiplexing capacities. However, analytical variabilities because of upstream sample handling or incomplete trypsin digestion still need to be resolved. In 2007, we developed the PSAQ™ method (Protein Standard Absolute Quantification), which uses full-length isotope-labeled protein standards to quantify target proteins. In the present study we used clinically validated cardiovascular biomarkers (LDH-B, CKMB, myoglobin, and troponin I) to demonstrate that the combination of PSAQ and SRM (PSAQ-SRM) allows highly accurate biomarker quantification in serum samples. A multiplex PSAQ-SRM assay was used to quantify these biomarkers in clinical samples from myocardial infarction patients. Good correlation between PSAQ-SRM and ELISA assay results was found and demonstrated the consistency between these analytical approaches. Thus, PSAQ-SRM has the capacity to improve both accuracy and reproducibility in protein analysis. This will be a major contribution to efficient biomarker development strategies. PMID:22080464

  13. Rapid determination of parabens in personal care products by stable isotope GC-MS/MS with dynamic selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Perry G; Zhou, Wanlong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a rapid and sensitive analytical method for the determination of methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, and butyl esters of para-hydroxy benzoic acid (parabens) in personal care products was developed and fully validated. Test portions were extracted with methanol followed by vortexing, sonication, centrifugation, and filtration without derivatization. The four parabens were quantified by GC-MS/MS in the electron ionization mode. Four corresponding isotopically labeled parabens were selected as internal standards, which were added at the beginning of the sample preparation and used to correct for recovery and matrix effects. Sensitivity, extraction efficiency, and recovery of the respective analytes were evaluated. The coefficients of determination (r(2)) were all greater than 0.995 for the four parabens investigated. The recoveries ranged from 97 to 107% at three spiked levels and a one-time (single) extraction efficiency greater than 97% was obtained. This method has been applied to screen 26 personal care products. This is the first time that a unique GC-MS/MS method with dynamic selected reaction monitoring and confirmation of analytes has been used to determine these parabens in cosmetic personal care products.

  14. Orthogonal Injection Ion Funnel Interface Providing Enhanced Performance for Selected Reaction Monitoring-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Prost, Spencer A.; ...

    2015-06-24

    The electrodynamic ion funnel facilitates efficient focusing and transfer of charged particles in the higher pressure regions (e.g. ion source interfaces) of mass spectrometers, and thus providing increased sensitivity. An “off-axis” ion funnel design has been developed to reduce the source contamination and interferences from, e.g. ESI droplet residue and other poorly focused neutral or charged particles with very high mass-to charge ratios. In this study a dual ion funnel interface consisting of an orthogonal higher pressure electrodynamic ion funnel (HPIF) and an ion funnel trap combined with a triple quadruple mass spectrometer was developed and characterized. An orthogonal ionmore » injection inlet and a repeller plate electrode was used to direct ions to an ion funnel HPIF at 9-10 Torr pressure. Several critical factors for the HPIF were characterized, including the effects of RF amplitude, DC gradient and operating pressure. Compared to the triple quadrupole standard interface more than 4-fold improvement in the limit of detection for the direct quantitative MS analysis of low abundance peptides was observed. Lastly, the sensitivity enhancement in liquid chromatography selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analyses of low abundance peptides spiked into a highly complex mixture was also compared with that obtained using a both commercial s-lens interface and a in-line dual ion funnel interface.« less

  15. Identification of a seven glycopeptide signature for malignant pleural mesothelioma in human serum by selected reaction monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum biomarkers can improve diagnosis and treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). However, the evaluation of potential new serum biomarker candidates is hampered by a lack of assay technologies for their clinical evaluation. Here we followed a hypothesis-driven targeted proteomics strategy for the identification and clinical evaluation of MPM candidate biomarkers in serum of patient cohorts. Results Based on the hypothesis that cell surface exposed glycoproteins are prone to be released from tumor-cells to the circulatory system, we screened the surfaceome of model cell lines for potential MPM candidate biomarkers. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) assay technology allowed for the direct evaluation of the newly identified candidates in serum. Our evaluation of 51 candidate biomarkers in the context of a training and an independent validation set revealed a reproducible glycopeptide signature of MPM in serum which complemented the MPM biomarker mesothelin. Conclusions Our study shows that SRM assay technology enables the direct clinical evaluation of protein-derived candidate biomarker panels for which clinically reliable ELISA’s currently do not exist. PMID:24207061

  16. Simultaneous determination of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) and ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) in foods by selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dimartino, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) and ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) were determined simultaneously by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry for different food matrixes. A small amount of starting sample was saponified and extracted before injection into a linear ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. Dihydrotachysterol, which is absent from food and has a structure similar to that of vitamins D3 and D2, was used as an internal standard. Calibration curves for the 2 vitamins showed linearity with R2 values of 0.9999 and 0.9989 for vitamins D3 and D2, respectively. Limits of detection for vitamins D3 and D2 were 0.5 ng/g (1.3 pmol/g) and 1.75 ng/g (4.4 pmol/g) and limits of quantitation were 1.25 ng/g (3.24 pmol/g), and 3.75 ng/g (9.45 pmol/g), respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method were tested with the infant formula reference standard of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, which showed a relative standard deviation of 6%. Recoveries ranged from 95 to 105%. Several food products were tested with AOAC Method 982.29, which is currently in use for vitamins D3 and D2, and results were comparable within 6%.

  17. Orthogonal Injection Ion Funnel Interface Providing Enhanced Performance for Selected Reaction Monitoring-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Prost, Spencer A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-24

    The electrodynamic ion funnel facilitates efficient focusing and transfer of charged particles in the higher pressure regions (e.g. ion source interfaces) of mass spectrometers, and thus providing increased sensitivity. An “off-axis” ion funnel design has been developed to reduce the source contamination and interferences from, e.g. ESI droplet residue and other poorly focused neutral or charged particles with very high mass-to charge ratios. In this study a dual ion funnel interface consisting of an orthogonal higher pressure electrodynamic ion funnel (HPIF) and an ion funnel trap combined with a triple quadruple mass spectrometer was developed and characterized. An orthogonal ion injection inlet and a repeller plate electrode was used to direct ions to an ion funnel HPIF at 9-10 Torr pressure. Several critical factors for the HPIF were characterized, including the effects of RF amplitude, DC gradient and operating pressure. Compared to the triple quadrupole standard interface more than 4-fold improvement in the limit of detection for the direct quantitative MS analysis of low abundance peptides was observed. Lastly, the sensitivity enhancement in liquid chromatography selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analyses of low abundance peptides spiked into a highly complex mixture was also compared with that obtained using a both commercial s-lens interface and a in-line dual ion funnel interface.

  18. Quantitative analysis of energy metabolic pathways in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by selected reaction monitoring assay.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Pavlou, Maria P; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the quantitative response of energy metabolic pathways in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells to hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and estradiol stimulation, we developed a targeted proteomics assay for accurate quantification of protein expression in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, and pentose phosphate pathways. Cell growth conditions were selected to roughly mimic the exposure of cells in the cancer tissue to the intermittent hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and hormonal stimulation. Targeted proteomics assay allowed for reproducible quantification of 76 proteins in four different growth conditions after 24 and 48 h of perturbation. Differential expression of a number of control and metabolic pathway proteins in response to the change of growth conditions was found. Elevated expression of the majority of glycolytic enzymes was observed in hypoxia. Cancer cells, as opposed to near-normal MCF-10A cells, exhibited significantly increased expression of key energy metabolic pathway enzymes (FBP1, IDH2, and G6PD) that are known to redirect cellular metabolism and increase carbon flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. Our quantitative proteomic protocol is based on a mass spectrometry-compatible acid-labile detergent and is described in detail. Optimized parameters of a multiplex selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay for 76 proteins, 134 proteotypic peptides, and 401 transitions are included and can be downloaded and used with any SRM-compatible mass spectrometer. The presented workflow is an integrated tool for hypothesis-driven studies of mammalian cells as well as functional studies of proteins, and can greatly complement experimental methods in systems biology, metabolic engineering, and metabolic transformation of cancer cells.

  19. Optimized precursor ion selection for labile ions in a linear ion trap mass spectrometer and its impact on quantification using selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Jo, Sung-Chan; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2014-12-01

    The fragmentation of fragile ions during the application of an isolation waveform for precursor ion selection and the resulting loss of isolated ion intensity is well-known in ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). To obtain adequate ion intensity in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) of fragile precursor ions, a wider ion isolation width is required. However, the increased isolation width significantly diminishes the selectivity of the channels chosen for SRM, which is a serious problem for samples with complex matrices. The sensitive and selective quantification of many lipid molecules, including ceramides from real biological samples, using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer is also hindered by the same problem because of the ease of water loss from protonated ceramide ions. In this study, a method for the reliable quantification of ceramides using SRM with near unity precursor ion isolation has been developed for ITMS by utilizing alternative precursor ions generated by in-source dissociation. The selected precursor ions allow the isolation of ions with unit mass width and the selective analysis of ceramides using SRM with negligible loss of sensitivity. The quantification of C18:0-, C24:0- and C24:1-ceramides using the present method shows excellent linearity over the concentration ranges from 6 to 100, 25 to 1000 and 25 to 1000 nM, respectively. The limits of detection of C18:0-, C24:0- and C24:1-ceramides were 0.25, 0.25 and 5 fmol, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to quantify ceramides in fetal bovine serum.

  20. Fast liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (highly selective selected reaction monitoring) for the determination of toltrazuril and its metabolites in food.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Villalba, Anna; Moyano, Encarnación; Martins, Claudia P B; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2010-08-01

    In this work a fast liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method was developed for the analysis of toltrazuril, a coccidiostatic drug, and its metabolites in meat food products. The applicability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and heated electrospray ionization in both positive and negative modes was studied. APCI in negative mode provided the best results and the base peak originated from the loss of CF(3) (toltrazuril and toltrazuril sulfone) and CHF(3)* (toltrazuril sulfoxide) was used as the precursor ion in MS/MS. A fast LC separation on a C(18) Fused-Core column was used together with the APCI-MS/MS method developed using enhanced mass resolution mode (highly selective selected reaction monitoring, H-SRM) to improve the sensitivity and selectivity for the analysis of these compounds in food samples. A simple sample treatment based on an extraction with acetonitrile and a cleanup with a C(18) cartridge was used. The LC-MS/MS (H-SRM) method showed good precision (relative standard deviation lower than 10%), accuracy, and linearity and allowed the determination of these compounds in food samples down to the parts per billion level (limits of detection between 0.5 and 5 microg kg(-1)).

  1. 18O-labeled proteome reference as global internal standards for targeted quantification by selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L; Moore, Ronald J; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2011-12-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the application of stable isotope-labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards can be prohibitive for screening a large number of candidate proteins as often required in the preverification phase of discovery studies. Herein we present a proof of concept study using an (18)O-labeled proteome reference as global internal standards (GIS) for SRM-based relative quantification. The (18)O-labeled proteome reference (or GIS) can be readily prepared and contains a heavy isotope ((18)O)-labeled internal standard for every possible tryptic peptide. Our results showed that the percentage of heavy isotope ((18)O) incorporation applying an improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into the labeled mouse plasma reference. Reliable quantification was observed with high reproducibility (i.e. coefficient of variance <10%) for analyte concentrations that were set at 100-fold higher or lower than those of the GIS based on the light ((16)O)/heavy ((18)O) peak area ratios. The utility of (18)O-labeled GIS was further illustrated by accurate relative quantification of 45 major human plasma proteins. Moreover, quantification of the concentrations of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen was illustrated by coupling the GIS with standard additions of purified protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of (18)O-labeled proteome reference as GIS provides a convenient, low cost, and effective strategy for relative quantification of a large number of candidate proteins in biological or clinical samples using SRM.

  2. 18O-Labeled Proteome Reference as Global Internal Standards for Targeted Quantification by Selected Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol W.; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-10-11

    Selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biological and biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the use of stable isotope labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards is prohibitive for quantitatively screening large numbers of candidate proteins as often required in the pre-verification phase of biomarker discovery. Herein we present the proof-of-concept experiments of using an 18O-labeled 'universal' reference as comprehensive internal standards for quantitative SRM-MS analysis. With an 18O-labeled whole proteome sample as reference, every peptide of interest will have its own corresponding heavy isotope labeled internal standard, thus providing an ideal approach for quantitative screening of a large number of candidates using SRM-MS. Our results showed that the 18O incorporation efficiency using a recently improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated, a level comparable to 13C/15N labeled synthetic peptides in terms of heavy isotope incorporation. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into mouse plasma with an 18O-labeled mouse plasma reference. A dynamic range of four orders of magnitude in relative concentration was obtained with high reproducibility (i.e., coefficient of variance <10%) based on the 16O/18O peak area ratios. Absolute and relative quantification of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen were demonstrated by coupling an 18O-labeled reference with standard additions of protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of 18O-labeled reference provides a convenient and effective strategy for quantitative SRM screening of large number of candidate proteins.

  3. 18O-Labeled Proteome Reference as Global Internal Standards for Targeted Quantification by Selected Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the application of stable isotope-labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards can be prohibitive for screening a large number of candidate proteins as often required in the preverification phase of discovery studies. Herein we present a proof of concept study using an 18O-labeled proteome reference as global internal standards (GIS) for SRM-based relative quantification. The 18O-labeled proteome reference (or GIS) can be readily prepared and contains a heavy isotope (18O)-labeled internal standard for every possible tryptic peptide. Our results showed that the percentage of heavy isotope (18O) incorporation applying an improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into the labeled mouse plasma reference. Reliable quantification was observed with high reproducibility (i.e. coefficient of variance <10%) for analyte concentrations that were set at 100-fold higher or lower than those of the GIS based on the light (16O)/heavy (18O) peak area ratios. The utility of 18O-labeled GIS was further illustrated by accurate relative quantification of 45 major human plasma proteins. Moreover, quantification of the concentrations of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen was illustrated by coupling the GIS with standard additions of purified protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of 18O-labeled proteome reference as GIS provides a convenient, low cost, and effective strategy for relative quantification of a large number of candidate proteins in biological or clinical samples using SRM. PMID:21988777

  4. Mass spectrometric discovery and selective reaction monitoring (SRM) of putative protein biomarker candidates in first trimester Trisomy 21 maternal serum.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Mary F; Kuppusamy, Ramesh; Sarracino, David A; Prakash, Amol; Athanas, Michael; Krastins, Bryan; Rezai, Taha; Sutton, Jennifer N; Peterman, Scott; Nicolaides, Kypros

    2011-01-07

    The accurate diagnosis of Trisomy 21 requires invasive procedures that carry a risk of miscarriage. The current state-of-the-art maternal serum screening tests measure levels of PAPP-A, free bhCG, AFP, and uE3 in various combinations with a maximum sensitivity of 60-75% and a false positive rate of 5%. There is currently an unmet need for noninvasive screening tests with high selectivity that can detect pregnancies at risk, preferably within the first trimester. The aim of this study was to apply proteomics and mass spectrometry techniques for the discovery of new putative biomarkers for Trisomy 21 in first trimester maternal serum coupled with the immediate development of quantitative selective reaction monitoring (SRM) assays. The results of the novel workflow were 2-fold: (1) we identified a list of differentially expressed proteins in Trisomy 21 vs Normal samples, including PAPP-A, and (2) we developed a multiplexed, high-throughput SRM assay for verification of 12 new putative markers identified in the discovery experiments. To narrow down the initial large list of differentially expressed candidates resulting from the discovery experiments, we incorporated receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve algorithms early in the data analysis process. We believe this approach provides a substantial advantage in sifting through the large and complex data typically obtained from discovery experiments. The workflow efficiently mined information derived from high-resolution LC-MS/MS discovery data for the seamless construction of rapid, targeted assays that were performed on unfractionated serum digests. The SRM assay lower limit of detection (LLOD) for the target peptides in a background of digested serum matrix was approximately 250-500 attomoles on column and the limit of accurate quantitation (LOQ) was approximately 1-5 femtomoles on column. The assay error as determined by coefficient of variation at LOQ and above ranged from 0 to 16%. The workflow developed in

  5. The application of selected radionuclides for monitoring of the D-D reactions produced by dense plasma-focus device.

    PubMed

    Jednorog, S; Szydlowski, A; Bienkowska, B; Prokopowicz, R

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) device-DPF-1000U which is operated at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion is the largest that type plasma experiment in the world. The plasma that is formed in large plasma experiments is characterized by vast numbers of parameters. All of them need to be monitored. A neutron activation method occupies a high position among others plasma diagnostic methods. The above method is off-line, remote, and an integrated one. The plasma which has enough temperature to bring about nuclear fusion reactions is always a strong source of neutrons that leave the reactions area and take along energy and important information on plasma parameters and properties as well. Silver as activated material is used as an effective way of neutrons measurement, especially when they are emitted in the form of short pulses like as it happens from the plasma produced in Dense Plasma-Focus devices. Other elements such as beryllium and yttrium are newly introduced and currently tested at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion to use them in suitable activation neutron detectors. Some specially designed massive indium samples have been recently adopted for angular neutrons distribution measurements (vertical and horizontal) and have been used in the recent plasma experiment conducted on the DPF-1000U device. This choice was substantiated by relatively long half-lives of the neutron induced isotopes and the threshold character of the (115)In(n,n')(115m)In nuclear reaction.

  6. Monitoring selected arthropods

    Treesearch

    R. Chris Stanton; David J. Horn; Foster F. Purrington; John W. Peacock; Eric H. Metzler

    2003-01-01

    Arthropod populations were sampled in four study areas in southern Ohio in 1995 to document patterns of arthropod diversity and establish a baseline dataset for long-term monitoring in mixed-oak forests. Pitfall, Malaise, and blacklight traps were operated in 12 treatment units from May through September. Several insect groups were selected for detailed study due to...

  7. Absolute quantification of myosin heavy chain isoforms by selected reaction monitoring can underscore skeletal muscle changes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peggion, Caterina; Massimino, Maria Lina; Biancotto, Giancarlo; Angeletti, Roberto; Reggiani, Carlo; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro; Stella, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers contain different isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) that define distinctive contractile properties. In light of the muscle capacity to adapt MyHC expression to pathophysiological conditions, a rapid and quantitative assessment of MyHC isoforms in small muscle tissue quantities would represent a valuable diagnostic tool for (neuro)muscular diseases. As past protocols did not meet these requirements, in the present study we applied a targeted proteomic approach based on selected reaction monitoring that allowed the absolute quantification of slow and fast MyHC isoforms in different mouse skeletal muscles with high reproducibility. This mass-spectrometry-based method was validated also in a pathological specimen, by comparison of the MyHC expression profiles in different muscles from healthy mice and a genetic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) expressing the SOD1(G93A) mutant. This analysis showed that terminally ill ALS mice have a fast-to-slow shift in the fiber type composition of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles, as previously reported. These results will likely open the way to accurate and rapid diagnoses of human (neuro)muscular diseases by the proposed method. Graphical Abstract Methods for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) quantification: a comparison of classical methods and selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry approaches.

  8. NMR reaction monitoring in flow synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, M Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the use of flow chemistry with in-line and on-line analysis by NMR are presented. The use of macro- and microreactors, coupled with standard and custom made NMR probes involving microcoils, incorporated into high resolution and benchtop NMR instruments is reviewed. Some recent selected applications have been collected, including synthetic applications, the determination of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters and reaction optimization, even in single experiments and on the μL scale. Finally, software that allows automatic reaction monitoring and optimization is discussed. PMID:28326137

  9. Selective Reaction Times and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between psychometric intelligence and 2 selective reaction time (RT) tasks was determined for 81 university students (27 males and 54 females). Results generally support the paradigm of W. E. Hick (1952). Some surprising findings are discussed with respect to the specific demands of selective RT tasks. (SLD)

  10. A Label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring Workflow Identifies a Subset of Pregnancy Specific Glycoproteins as Potential Predictive Markers of Early-onset Pre-eclampsia*

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Richard T.; Fisher, Christal; Westwood, Melissa; North, Robyn; Baker, Philip N.; Walker, Michael J.; Williamson, Andrew; Whetton, Anthony D.; Lin, Wanchang; McCowan, Lesley; Roberts, Claire T.; Cooper, Garth J. S.; Unwin, Richard D.; Myers, Jenny E.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious complication of pregnancy with potentially life threatening consequences for both mother and baby. Presently there is no test with the required performance to predict which healthy first-time mothers will go on to develop PE. The high specificity, sensitivity, and multiplexed nature of selected reaction monitoring holds great potential as a tool for the verification and validation of putative candidate biomarkersfor disease states. Realization of this potential involves establishing a high throughput, cost effective, reproducible sample preparation workflow. We have developed a semi-automated HPLC-based sample preparation workflow before a label-free selected reaction monitoring approach. This workflow has been applied to the search for novel predictive biomarkers for PE. To discover novel candidate biomarkers for PE, we used isobaric tagging to identify several potential biomarker proteins in plasma obtained at 15 weeks gestation from nulliparous women who later developed PE compared with pregnant women who remained healthy. Such a study generates a number of “candidate” biomarkers that require further testing in larger patient cohorts. As proof-of-principle, two of these proteins were taken forward for verification in a 100 women (58 PE, 42 controls) using label-free SRM. We obtained reproducible protein quantitation across the 100 samples and demonstrated significant changes in protein levels, even with as little as 20% change in protein concentration. The SRM data correlated with a commercial ELISA, suggesting that this is a robust workflow suitable for rapid, affordable, label-free verification of which candidate biomarkers should be taken forward for thorough investigation. A subset of pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) had value as novel predictive markers for PE. PMID:23897580

  11. Immunoaffinity enrichment and liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for quantitation of carbonic anhydrase 12 in cultured renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafalko, Agnes; Iliopoulos, Othon; Fusaro, Vincent A.; Hancock, William; Hincapie, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) is a highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) technique that is widely being applied to selectively qualify and validate candidate markers within complex biological samples. However, in order for LC-SRM methods to take on these attributes, target-specific optimization of sample processing is required, in order to reduce analyte complexity, prior to LC-SRM. In this study, we have developed a targeted platform consisting of protein immunoaffinity enrichment on magnetic beads and LC-SRM for measuring carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12) protein in a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line (PRC3), a candidate biomarker for RCC whose expression at the protein level has not been previously reported. Sample processing and LC-SRM assay were optimized for signature peptides selected as surrogate markers of CA12 protein. Using LC-SRM coupled with stable isotope dilution, we achieved limits of quantitation in the low fmol range sufficient for measuring clinically relevant biomarkers with good intra- and inter-assay accuracy and precision (≤17%). Our results show that using a quantitative immunoaffinity capture approach provides specific, accurate, and robust assays amenable to high-throughput verification of potential biomarkers. PMID:20936840

  12. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  13. Multi-mycotoxin analysis of animal feed and animal-derived food using LC-MS/MS system with timed and highly selective reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiyong; Liu, Na; Yang, Lingchen; Deng, Yifeng; Wang, Jianhua; Song, Suquan; Lin, Shanhai; Wu, Aibo; Zhou, Zhenlei; Hou, Jiafa

    2015-09-01

    Mycotoxins have the potential to enter the human food chain through carry-over of contaminants from feed into animal-derived products. The objective of the study was to develop a reliable and sensitive method for the analysis of 30 mycotoxins in animal feed and animal-derived food (meat, edible animal tissues, and milk) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In the study, three extraction procedures, as well as various cleanup procedures, were evaluated to select the most suitable sample preparation procedure for different sample matrices. In addition, timed and highly selective reaction monitoring on LC-MS/MS was used to filter out isobaric matrix interferences. The performance characteristics (linearity, sensitivity, recovery, precision, and specificity) of the method were determined according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and 401/2006/EC. The established method was successfully applied to screening of mycotoxins in animal feed and animal-derived food. The results indicated that mycotoxin contamination in feed directly influenced the presence of mycotoxin in animal-derived food. Graphical abstract Multi-mycotoxin analysis of animal feed and animal-derived food using LC-MS/MS.

  14. Dilute and shoot: analysis of drugs of abuse using selected reaction monitoring for quantification and full scan product ion spectra for identification.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert L; Griffin, Terrance L; Yun, Yeo-Min; Godfrey, Richard A; West, Robert; Pesce, Amadeo J; Herold, David A

    2012-03-01

    Our objective was to develop a "dilute and shoot" liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirmatory procedure that uses full scan product ion spectra to identify drugs that are present above cutoff values as determined by isotope dilution relative to a deuterium-labeled internal standard. Deuterium-labeled internal standards are added to urine which is then diluted prior to analysis. Full scan product ion spectra were obtained in the data-dependent mode using a linear ion trap (ABI 4000 Qtrap). Identification was based on a purity fit of greater than 70. Ninety-seven urine specimens were analyzed by the method described, and results were compared to values obtained from a reference laboratory using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The ion trap provided about 30-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio as compared with the same instrument operated in a traditional full scan product ion mode. The assays were linear to at least 10 times the cutoff. Selecting appropriate triggers for obtaining full scan product ion spectra minimized space charging for specimens that contained high concentrations of drugs. There was 100% concordance between the full scan identification and the SRM results for identification of amphetamine, methamphetamine, benzoylecgonine, morphine, codeine, hydrocodone, and hydromorphone. The ability to "dilute and shoot" reduces the turnaround time for results. The data acquired with SRM and full scan product ion spectra provide accurate quantification and a high degree of specificity.

  15. Determination of the enantiomer fraction of PBB 149 by gas chromatography/electron capture negative ionization tandem mass spectrometry in the selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    von der Recke, Roland; Mariussen, Espen; Berger, Urs; Götsch, Arntraut; Herzke, Dorte; Vetter, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Enantioselective determination of the atropisomers of 2,2',3,4',5',6-hexabromobiphenyl (PBB 149) in a purified sample from a bird egg was attempted in this work. By application of the classic method for PBB determination, i.e. gas chromatography coupled to electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS) using the bromide ions, the enantiomers interfered with another brominated compound. Subsequent measurements clarified that this interference did not occur in the mass chromatogram of the molecular ion of PBB 149. Therefore, a GC/ECNI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method was developed, based on the fragmentation of [M]-. A suitable precursor-product ion transition was found for m/z 627.5 --> 80 +/- 1.5, representing the most abundant ion trace of the molecular ion and the bromide ions. Optimization of the ion source temperature, the methane gas pressure, and the collision voltages resulted in a robust method that could solve the problem. Subsequent injections of a technical PBB product (Firemaster BP-6) resulted in the anticipated racemic proportion (enantiomer fraction (EF) = 0.50 +/- 0.02 (n = 8)). By contrast, the EF in the purified extract of a bird egg was found to be 0.42 +/- 0.02 (n = 10), indicative of a significant enantioenrichment of the second eluting atropisomer. Additional measurements were performed on a non-chiral column. These measurements allowed for the detection of 16 hexabromobiphenyls (hexa-BBs) in Firemaster BP-6. These comparisons verified that PBB 149 enantiomers did not interfere with an isomer that could falsify the enantiomer fraction in the sample. The novel method using GC/ECNI-MS/MS in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode was eight times more sensitive than application of conventional GC/ECNI-MS selected ion monitoring (SIM) analysis of the molecular ion.

  16. Multiple reaction monitoring with multistage fragmentation (MRM3) detection enhances selectivity for LC-MS/MS analysis of plasma free metanephrines.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michael J; Thomas, Rebecca L; Stanford, Phoebe E; Horvath, Andrea R

    2015-03-01

    LC-MS/MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is a powerful tool for quantifying target analytes in complex matrices. However, the technique lacks selectivity when plasma free metanephrines are measured. We propose the use of multistage fragmentation (MRM(3)) to improve the analytical selectivity of plasma free metanephrine measurement. Metanephrines were extracted from plasma with weak cation exchange solid-phase extraction before separation by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. We quantified normetanephrine and metanephrine by either MRM or MRM(3) transitions m/z 166→134→79 and m/z 180→149→121, respectively. Over a 6-month period, approximately 1% (n = 21) of patient samples showed uncharacterized coeluting substances that interfered with the routine assay, resulting in an inability to report results. Quantification with MRM(3) removed these interferences and enabled measurement of the target compounds. For patient samples unaffected by interferences, Deming regression analysis demonstrated a correlation between MRM(3) and MRM methods of y = 1.00x - 0.00 nmol/L for normetanephrine and y = 0.99x + 0.03 nmol/L for metanephrine. Between the MRM(3) method and the median of all LC-MS/MS laboratories enrolled in a quality assurance program, the correlations were y = 0.97x + 0.03 nmol/L for normetanephrine and y = 1.03x - 0.04 nmol/L for metanephrine. Imprecision for the MRM(3) method was 6.2%-7.0% for normetanephrine and 6.1%-9.9% for metanephrine (n = 10). The lower limits of quantification for the MRM(3) method were 0.20 nmol/L for normetanephrine and 0.16 nmol/L for metanephrine. The use of MRM(3) technology improves the analytical selectivity of plasma free metanephrine quantification by LC-MS/MS while demonstrating sufficient analytical sensitivity and imprecision. © 2014 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  17. Measuring long-chain acyl-coenzyme A concentrations and enrichment using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U; Koutsari, Christina; Jensen, Michael D

    2011-08-15

    Long-chain acyl-coenzymes A (acyl-CoAs) (LCACoA) are the activated forms of long-chain fatty acids and serve as key lipid metabolites. Excess accumulation of intracellular LCACoA, diacylglycerols (DAGs) and ceramides may create insulin resistance with respect to glucose metabolism. We present a new method to measure LCACoA concentrations and isotopic enrichment of palmitoyl-CoA ([U-(13) C]16-CoA) and oleoyl-CoA ([U-(13) C]18:1-CoA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to quantitate seven different LCACoA (C14-CoA, C16-CoA, C16:1-CoA, C18-CoA, C18:1-CoA, C18:2-CoA, C20-CoA). The molecules are separated on a reversed-phase UPLC column using a binary gradient with ammonium hydroxide (NH(4) OH) in water and NH(4) OH in acetonitrile (ACN). The LCACoA are quantified using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. All LCACoA ions except enriched palmitate enrichment of palmitoyl-CoA ([U(-13)C]16-CoA) and oleoyl-CoA ([U(-13)C]18:1-CoA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to quantitate seven different LCACoA (C14-CoA, C16-CoA, C16:1-CoA, C18-CoA, C18:1-CoA, C18:2-CoA, C20-CoA). The molecules are separated on a reversed-phase UPLC column using a binary gradient with ammonium hydroxide (NH(4) OH) in water and NH(4) OH in acetonitrile. The LCACoA are quantified using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupolemass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. All LCACoA ions except enriched palmitate and oleate were monitored as [M+2+H](+) and [U(13)C]16-CoA and [U(13)C]18:1-CoA were monitored as [M+16+H](+) and [M+18+H](+), respectively. The method is simple, sensitive and efficient (run time as short as 5 min) and allowed us to measure the concentration and detect enrichment in intramyocellular [U(13) C]16-CoA and [U(13) C]18:1-CoA during a low dose intravenous infusion of [U(13

  18. A Quantitative Proteomic Profile of the Nrf2-Mediated Antioxidant Response of Macrophages to Oxidized LDL Determined by Multiplexed Selected Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kinter, Caroline S.; Lundie, Jillian M.; Patel, Halee; Rindler, Paul M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The loading of macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key part of the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Oxidized LDL contains a wide ranging set of toxic species, yet the molecular events that allow macrophages to withstand loading with these toxic species are not completely characterized. The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of the cellular stress response. However, the specific parts of the Nrf2-dependent stress response are diverse, with both tissue- and treatment-dependent components. The goal of these experiments was to develop and use a quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the Nrf2-dependent response in macrophages to oxidized LDL. Cultured mouse macrophages, the J774 macrophage-like cell line, were treated with a combination of oxidized LDL, the Nrf2-stabilizing reagent tert- butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), and/or Nrf2 siRNA. Protein expression was determined using a quantitative proteomics assay based on selected reaction monitoring. The assay was multiplexed to monitor a set of 28 antioxidant and stress response proteins, 6 housekeeping proteins, and 1 non-endogenous standard protein. The results have two components. The first component is the validation of the multiplexed, quantitative proteomics assay. The assay is shown to be fundamentally quantitative, precise, and accurate. The second component is the characterization of the Nrf2-mediated stress response. Treatment with tBHQ and/or Nrf2 siRNA gave statistically significant changes in the expression of a subset of 11 proteins. Treatment with oxidized LDL gave statistically significant increases in the expression of 7 of those 11 proteins plus one additional protein. All of the oxLDL-mediated increases were attenuated by Nrf2 siRNA. These results reveal a specific, multifaceted response of the foam cells to the incoming toxic oxidized LDL. PMID:23166812

  19. Liquid Chromatography-Selected Reaction Monitoring (LC-SRM) Approach for the Separation and Quantitation of Sialylated N-Glycans Linkage Isomers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The study of N-linked glycans is among the most challenging bioanalytical tasks because of their complexity and variety. The presence of glycoform families that differ only in branching and/or linkage position makes the identification and quantitation of individual glycans exceedingly difficult. Quantitation of these individual glycans is important because changes in the abundance of these isomers are often associated with significant biomedical events. For instance, previous studies have shown that the ratio of α2-3 to α2-6 linked sialic acid (SA) plays an important role in cancer biology. Consequently, quantitative methods to detect alterations in the ratios of glycans based on their SA linkages could serve as a diagnostic tool in oncology, yet traditional glycomic profiling cannot readily differentiate between these linkage isomers. Here, we present a liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) approach that we demonstrate is capable of quantitating the individual SA linkage isomers. The LC method is capable of separating sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages using a novel superficially porous particle (Fused-Core) Penta-HILIC (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) column. SRM detection provides the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer, and minimizes interferences from coeluting glycans that are problematic for UV/Fluorescence based quantitation. With our approach, the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer is obtained from a straightforward liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiment. PMID:25299151

  20. Targeted proteomics using selected reaction monitoring reveals the induction of specific terpene synthases in a multi-level study of methyl jasmonate-treated Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Zulak, Katherine G; Lippert, Dustin N; Kuzyk, Michael A; Domanski, Dominik; Chou, Tina; Borchers, Christoph H; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2009-12-01

    Induction of terpene synthase (TPS) gene expression and enzyme activity is known to occur in response to various chemical and biological stimuli in several species of spruce (genus Picea). However, high sequence identity between TPS family members has made it difficult to determine the induction patterns of individual TPS at the protein and transcript levels and whether specific TPS enzymes respond differentially to treatment. In the present study we used a multi-level approach to measure the induction and activity of TPS enzymes in protein extracts of Norway spruce (Picea abies) bark tissue following treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Measurements were made on the transcript, protein, enzyme activity and metabolite levels. Using a relatively new proteomics application, selective reaction monitoring (SRM), it was possible to differentiate and quantitatively measure the abundance of several known TPS proteins and three 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) isoforms in Norway spruce. Protein levels of individual TPS and DXS enzymes were differentially induced upon MeJA treatment and good correlation was generally observed between induction of transcripts, proteins, and enzyme activities. Most of the mono- and diterpenoid metabolites accumulated with similar temporal patterns of induction as part of the coordinated multi-compound chemical defense response. Protein and enzyme activity levels of the monoTPS (+)-3-carene synthase and the corresponding accumulation of (+)-3-carene was induced to a higher fold change than any other TPS or metabolite measured, indicating an important role in the induced terpenoid defense response in Norway spruce.

  1. Multiresidue analysis of multiclass pesticides in lavandin essential oil by LC/MS/MS using the scheduled selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Fillâtre, Yoann; Rondeau, David; Bonnet, Brice; Daguin, Antoine; Jadas-Hécart, Alain; Communal, Pierre-Yves

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of the first multiclass pesticide residue method applied to essential oils. A total of 70 pesticides covering a wide range of polarity and currently used on essential oil crops have been included in the method. The procedure consists of a 10-fold dilution of lavandin essential oil followed by a direct injection analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The system used is an API 4000 QTrap equipped with an electrospray ionization interface and operating in scheduled selected reaction monitoring acquisition mode. Matrix effects were evaluated by comparing the slopes of matrix-matched and solvent-based calibration curves. Weak signal suppression or enhancement (<20%) was observed for most of the compounds. Method sensitivity was determined statistically by the injection of five matrix-matched calibration curves with the distribution's normality and the variance's homogeneity checked before establishment of a suitable regression model. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were then determined using the blank standard's deviation and the slope of the mean curve. The analytical method has been validated for 67 of the 70 pesticides and meets the following LOQs: ≤1 μg/L for 9 pesticides, ≤5 μg/L for 44, ≤10 μg/L for 9, and ≤20 μg/L for 5.

  2. Application of selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to field-grown crop plants to allow dissection of the molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Richard P.; Millar, A. Harvey; Taylor, Nicolas L.

    2013-01-01

    One major constraint upon the application of molecular crop breeding approaches is the small number of genes linked to agronomically desirable traits through defined biochemical mechanisms. Proteomic investigations of crop plants under abiotic stress treatments have identified many proteins that differ in control versus stress comparisons, however, this broad profiling of cell physiology is poorly suited to ranking the effects and identifying the specific proteins that are causative in agronomically relevant traits. Here we will reason that insights into a protein’s function, its biochemical process and links to stress tolerance are more likely to arise through approaches that evaluate these differential abundances of proteins and include varietal comparisons, precise discrimination of protein isoforms, enrichment of functionally related proteins, and integration of proteomic datasets with physiological measurements of both lab and field-grown plants. We will briefly explain how applying the emerging proteomic technology of multiplexed selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry with its accuracy and throughput can facilitate and enhance these approaches and provide a clear means to rank the growing cohort of stress responsive proteins. We will also highlight the benefit of integrating proteomic analyses with cultivar-specific genetic databases and physiological assessments of cultivar performance in relevant field environments for revealing deeper insights into molecular crop improvement. PMID:23407798

  3. Long-Gradient Separations Coupled with Selected Reaction Monitoring for Highly Sensitive, Large Scale Targeted Protein Quantification in a Single Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Chaochao; Chambers, Justin L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Liu, Alvin Y.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-10-01

    Long-gradient separations coupled to tandem MS were recently demonstrated to provide a deep proteome coverage for global proteomics; however, such long-gradient separations have not been explored for targeted proteomics. Herein, we investigate the potential performance of the long-gradient separations coupled with selected reaction monitoring (LG-SRM) for targeted protein quantification. Direct comparison of LG-SRM (5 h gradient) and conventional LC-SRM (45 min gradient) showed that the long-gradient separations significantly reduced background interference levels and provided an 8- to 100-fold improvement in LOQ for target proteins in human female serum. Based on at least one surrogate peptide per protein, an LOQ of 10 ng/mL was achieved for the two spiked proteins in non-depleted human serum. The LG-SRM detection of seven out of eight endogenous plasma proteins expressed at ng/mL or sub-ng/mL levels in clinical patient sera was also demonstrated. A correlation coefficient of >0.99 was observed for the results of LG-SRM and ELISA measurements for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in selected patient sera. Further enhancement of LG-SRM sensitivity was achieved by applying front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion. Besides improved sensitivity, LG-SRM offers at least 3 times higher multiplexing capacity than conventional LC-SRM due to ~3-fold increase in average peak widths for a 300-min gradient compared to a 45-min gradient. Therefore, LG-SRM holds great potential for bridging the gap between global and targeted proteomics due to its advantages in both sensitivity and multiplexing capacity.

  4. Global and Targeted Proteomics of Prostate Cancer Cell Secretome: Combination of 2-Dimensional Image-Converted Analysis of Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry and In Silico Selection Selected Reaction Monitoring Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nurdin, Armania; Hoshi, Yutaro; Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Miyauchi, Eisuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Watanabe, Michitoshi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-11-01

    Prostate-specific antigen is currently the only protein biomarker routinely used as a diagnostic tool for early detection and treatment monitoring of prostate cancer. However, it remains questionable whether prostate-specific antigen-based screening can sensitively and selectively identify the presence and progression status of primary and metastatic prostate cancers. Hence, the purpose of this study was to identify potential biomarker candidates in the secretome of primary and metastatic prostate cancer cells by using a combination of global and targeted proteomics. Quantitative comparisons among secretome proteins derived from androgen-responsive primary cancer cells (P-22Rv1), androgen-irresponsive bone metastatic cancer cells (M-PC-3), and noncancerous prostate cells (N-PNT2) were performed using 2-dimensional image-converted analysis of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry followed by in silico selection selected reaction monitoring analysis. Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 13-like, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2, and hepatocyte growth factor were identified as highly secreted proteins from P-22Rv1 cells compared with N-PNT2 cells. Prostate-associated microseminoprotein, proactivator polypeptide, collagen-α-1 (VI) chain, and neuropilin-1 were identified as predominantly secreted proteins in M-PC-3 cells compared with N-PNT2 cells. These proteins in biological fluids are considered to be candidate biomarkers of primary and/or metastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Selected reaction monitoring LC-MS determination of idoxifene and its pyrrolidinone metabolite in human plasma using robotic high-throughput, sequential sample injection.

    PubMed

    Onorato, J M; Henion, J D; Lefebvre, P M; Kiplinger, J P

    2001-01-01

    The generation of large numbers of samples during early drug discovery has increased the demand for rapid and selective methods of analysis. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), because of its sensitivity, selectivity, and robustness, has emerged as a powerful tool in the pharmaceutical industry for many analytical needs. This work presents a high-throughput selected reaction monitoring LC-MS bioanalytical method for the determination of idoxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, and its pyrrolidinone metabolite in clinical human plasma samples. The described method uses short, small-bore columns, high flow rates, and elevated HPLC column temperatures to perform LC separations of idoxifene and its metabolite within 10 s/sample. Sequential injections were accomplished with a 215/889 multiple probe liquid handler (Gilson, Inc.), which aspirates eight samples simultaneously and performs its rinse cycle parallel to sample injection, resulting in minimum lag time between injections. This high-throughput method was applied to the determination of idoxifene and its metabolite in clinical human plasma samples. Sample preparation employed liquid/liquid extraction in the 96-well format. Method validation included determination of intra- and interassay accuracy and precision values, recovery studies, autosampler stability, and freeze-thaw stability. The LOQ obtained was 10 ng/mL for idoxifene and 30 ng/mL for the metabolite. Using idoxifene-d5 as an internal standard, idoxifene showed acceptable accuracy and precision values at QC level 1 (QC1, 15 ng/mL), level 2 (QC2, 100 ng/mL), and level 3 (QC3, 180 ng/mL) (85.0% accuracy +/- 12.0% precision, 95.1 +/- 4.9%, and 90.3 +/- 4.7%, respectively). The pyrrolidinone metabolite also showed acceptable accuracy and precision values (using no internal standard for quantitation) at QC1 (60 ng/mL), QC2 (100 ng/mL), and QC3 (180 ng/mL) (104.9 +/- 14.4%, 91.1 +/- 13.0%, and 90.8 +/- 12.2%, respectively). The

  6. Comprehensive analysis of neurotransmitters from regenerating planarian extract using an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/selected reaction monitoring method.

    PubMed

    Rangiah, Kannan; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2013-11-15

    Absolute quantification of neurotransmitters (NTs) from biological systems is imperative to track how changes in concentration of active neurochemicals may affect biological behavior. A sensitive method for the absolute quantification of multiple NTs in a single method is highly needed. A stable-isotope dilution ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/selected reaction monitoring (UHPLC/MS/SRM) assay has been developed for a sensitive and quantitative assessment of NTs in planaria. We used this method for the simultaneous quantification of 16 NTs. All analytes showed a linear relationship between concentrations (0.78-50 ng/mL), regression coefficients higher than 0.97, accuracy (91-109%) and low coefficients of variation (CVs). The inter-day CVs for the lowest quality controls (1.56 ng/mL) were in the range between 2-11%. The levels of most of the NTs were similar in both sexual and asexual planarians except for glutamic acid, which was about two-fold higher in asexual compared to sexual planarians. We identified high levels of serotonin and failed to detect tryptamine suggesting that the pathway essential for the conversion of tryptophan into tryptamine is absent in planarians. Interestingly, we also found high levels of dopamine and L-DOPA in regenerating planarians suggesting their possible role in regeneration. For the first time, we developed novel methodology based on UHPLC/MS/SRM and quantified 16 NTs with high sensitivity and specificity from sexual and asexual strains of planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. This method will also have great application in quantifying various NTs with great precision in different model systems. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Application of selected reaction monitoring for multiplex quantification of clinically validated biomarkers in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Hembrough, Todd; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Liao, Wei-Li; Darfler, Marlene M; Abdo, Joseph; Bengali, Kathleen M; Hewitt, Stephen M; Bender, Richard A; Krizman, David B; Burrows, Jon

    2013-07-01

    One of the critical gaps in the clinical diagnostic space is the lack of quantitative proteomic methods for use on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Herein, we describe the development of a quantitative, multiplexed, mass spectrometry-based selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay for four therapeutically important targets: epidermal growth factor receptor, human EGF receptor (HER)-2, HER3, and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor. These assays were developed using the Liquid Tissue-SRM technology platform, in which FFPE tumor tissues were microdissected, completely solubilized, and then subjected to multiplexed quantitation by SRM mass spectrometry. The assays were preclinically validated by comparing Liquid Tissue-SRM quantitation of FFPE cell lines with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay/electrochemiluminescence quantitation of fresh cells (R(2) > 0.95). Clinical performance was assessed on two cohorts of breast cancer tissue: one cohort of 10 samples with a wide range of HER2 expression and a second cohort of 19 HER2 IHC 3+ tissues. These clinical data demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative, multiplexed clinical analysis of proteomic markers in FFPE tissue. Our findings represent a significant advancement in cancer tissue analysis because multiplexed, quantitative analysis of protein targets in FFPE tumor tissue can be tailored to specific oncological indications to provide the following: i) complementary support for anatomical pathological diagnoses, ii) patient stratification to optimize treatment outcomes and identify drug resistance, and iii) support for the clinical development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selected Reaction Monitoring to Differentiate and Relatively Quantitate Isomers of Sulfated and Unsulfated Core 1 O-Glycans from Salivary MUC7 Protein in Rheumatoid Arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Sarah A.; Ali, Liaqat; Lane, Catherine S.; Olin, Magnus; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common and debilitating systemic inflammatory condition affecting up to 1% of the world's population. This study aimed to investigate the immunological significance of O-glycans in chronic arthritis at a local and systemic level. O-Glycans released from synovial glycoproteins during acute and chronic arthritic conditions were compared and immune-reactive glycans identified. The sulfated core 1 O-glycan (Galβ1–3GalNAcol) was immune reactive, showing a different isomeric profile in the two conditions. From acute reactive arthritis, three isomers could be sequenced, but in patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis, only a single 3-Gal sulfate-linked isomer could be identified. The systemic significance of this glycan epitope was investigated using the salivary mucin MUC7 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal controls. To analyze this low abundance glycan, a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method was developed to differentiate and relatively quantitate the core 1 O-glycan and the sulfated core 1 O-glycan Gal- and GalNAc-linked isomers. The acquisition of highly sensitive full scan linear ion trap MS/MS spectra in addition to quantitative SRM data allowed the 3- and 6-linked Gal isomers to be differentiated. The method was used to relatively quantitate the core 1 glycans from MUC7 to identify any systemic changes in this carbohydrate epitope. A statistically significant increase in sulfation was identified in salivary MUC7 from rheumatoid arthritis patients. This suggests a potential role for this epitope in chronic inflammation. This study was able to develop an SRM approach to specifically identify and relatively quantitate sulfated core 1 isomers and the unsulfated structure. The expansion of this method may afford an avenue for the high throughput investigation of O-glycans. PMID:23457413

  9. A critical assessment of the performance criteria in confirmatory analysis for veterinary drug residue analysis using mass spectrometric detection in selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Bjorn J A; Meijer, Thijs; Wegh, Robin; Mol, Hans G J; Smyth, Wesley G; Armstrong Hewitt, S; van Ginkel, Leen; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-05-01

    Besides the identification point system to assure adequate set-up of instrumentation, European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC includes performance criteria regarding relative ion abundances in mass spectrometry and chromatographic retention time. In confirmatory analysis, the relative abundance of two product ions, acquired in selected reaction monitoring mode, the ion ratio should be within certain ranges for confirmation of the identity of a substance. The acceptable tolerance of the ion ratio varies with the relative abundance of the two product ions and for retention time, CD 2002/657/EC allows a tolerance of 5%. Because of rapid technical advances in analytical instruments and new approaches applied in the field of contaminant testing in food products (multi-compound and multi-class methods) a critical assessment of these criteria is justified. In this study a large number of representative, though challenging sample extracts were prepared, including muscle, urine, milk and liver, spiked with 100 registered and banned veterinary drugs at levels ranging from 0.5 to 100 µg/kg. These extracts were analysed using SRM mode using different chromatographic conditions and mass spectrometers from different vendors. In the initial study, robust data was collected using four different instrumental set-ups. Based on a unique and highly relevant data set, consisting of over 39 000 data points, the ion ratio and retention time criteria for applicability in confirmatory analysis were assessed. The outcomes were verified based on a collaborative trial including laboratories from all over the world. It was concluded that the ion ratio deviation is not related to the value of the ion ratio, but rather to the intensity of the lowest product ion. Therefore a fixed ion ratio deviation tolerance of 50% (relative) is proposed, which also is applicable for compounds present at sub-ppb levels or having poor ionisation efficiency. Furthermore, it was observed that retention time

  10. Comparison between liquid chromatography-time of-flight mass spectrometry and selected reaction monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for quantitative determination of idoxifene in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Henion, J

    2001-06-05

    This study compares HPLC electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) LC-MS for high throughput quantitative determination of a small molecule drug in biological samples. A high throughput LC-MS method was developed for quantitatative determination of idoxifene in human plasma and the evaluation was accomplished with the cross-validation of the developed LC-MS method between the time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in the SRM mode. A simple one-step semi-automated 96-well liquid-liquid extraction procedure was used to prepare 96 samples in approximately 30 min and a rapid gradient was used to shorten the LC run time. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry provides acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and extracted ion current chromatograms, which may be extracted from the total ion current chromatogram for peak area determination. The limit of quantitation for idoxifene in human plasma obtained with the time-of-flight mass spectrometer was 5 ng/ml based on 100-microl aliquots of human plasma, and the linear dynamic range was from 5 ng/ml to 2000 ng/ml. The quantitative LC-MS results from the time-of-flight mass spectrometer demonstrated that precision did not exceed 7.1% and accuracy did not exceed 1.7% with reference to quality control samples at three concentration levels in replicates of six. In contrast, the limit of quantitation for idoxifene in human plasma using a tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was 0.5 ng/ml with a linear dynamic range to 1000 ng/ml. The results from the triple quadrupole instrument show that the precision did not exceed 2.2% and accuracy did not exceed 2.9%. The overall results suggest time-of-flight mass spectrometry may be a viable technique for high throughput bioanalytical work for the quantitative determination of a representative small molecule drug in the low ng/ml range in human plasma.

  11. Discovery of colorectal cancer biomarker candidates by membrane proteomic analysis and subsequent verification using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and tissue microarray (TMA) analysis.

    PubMed

    Kume, Hideaki; Muraoka, Satoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Watanabe, Shio; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Kodera, Yoshio; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Masuda, Takeshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Nomura, Fumio; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in quantitative proteomic technology have enabled the large-scale validation of biomarkers. We here performed a quantitative proteomic analysis of membrane fractions from colorectal cancer tissue to discover biomarker candidates, and then extensively validated the candidate proteins identified. A total of 5566 proteins were identified in six tissue samples, each of which was obtained from polyps and cancer with and without metastasis. GO cellular component analysis predicted that 3087 of these proteins were membrane proteins, whereas TMHMM algorithm predicted that 1567 proteins had a transmembrane domain. Differences were observed in the expression of 159 membrane proteins and 55 extracellular proteins between polyps and cancer without metastasis, while the expression of 32 membrane proteins and 17 extracellular proteins differed between cancer with and without metastasis. A total of 105 of these biomarker candidates were quantitated using selected (or multiple) reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) with stable synthetic isotope-labeled peptides as an internal control. The results obtained revealed differences in the expression of 69 of these proteins, and this was subsequently verified in an independent set of patient samples (polyps (n = 10), cancer without metastasis (n = 10), cancer with metastasis (n = 10)). Significant differences were observed in the expression of 44 of these proteins, including ITGA5, GPRC5A, PDGFRB, and TFRC, which have already been shown to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer, as well as proteins with unknown function, such as C8orf55. The expression of C8orf55 was also shown to be high not only in colorectal cancer, but also in several cancer tissues using a multicancer tissue microarray, which included 1150 cores from 14 cancer tissues. This is the largest verification study of biomarker candidate membrane proteins to date; our methods for biomarker discovery and subsequent validation using SRM/MRM will contribute to the

  12. A semi-automated mass spectrometric immunoassay coupled to selected reaction monitoring (MSIA-SRM) reveals novel relationships between circulating PCSK9 and metabolic phenotypes in patient cohorts.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Pérusse, Joëlle R; Awan, Zuhier; Bouchard, Annie; Tessier, Sylvain; Champagne, Josée; Krastins, Bryan; Byram, Gregory; Chabot, Katherine; Garneau, Pierre; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Faubert, Denis; Lopez, Mary F; Seidah, Nabil G; Coulombe, Benoit

    2015-06-15

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a key regulator of circulating low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Besides its full-length mature form, multiple variants of PCSK9 have been reported such as forms that are truncated, mutated and/or with posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Previous studies have demonstrated that most of these variants affect PCSK9's function and thereby LDL-C levels. Commercial ELISA kits are available for quantification of PCSK9, but do not allow discrimination between the various forms and PTMs of the protein. To address this issue and given the complexity and wide dynamic range of the plasma proteome, we have developed a mass spectrometric immunoassay coupled to selected reaction monitoring (MSIA-SRM) for the multiplexed quantification of several forms of circulating PCSK9 in human plasma. Our MSIA-SRM assay quantifies peptides spanning the various protein domains and the S688 phosphorylation site. The assay was applied in two distinct cohorts of obese patients and healthy pregnant women stratified by their circulating LDL-C levels. Seven PCSK9 peptides were monitored in plasma samples: one in the prodomain prior to the autocleavage site at Q152, one in the catalytic domain prior to the furin cleavage site at R218, two in the catalytic domain following R218, one in the cysteine and histidine rich domain (CHRD) and the C-terminal peptide phosphorylated at S688 and unmodified. The latter was not detectable in sufficient amounts to be quantified in human plasma. All peptides were measured with high reproducibility and with LLOQ and LOD below the clinical range. The abundance of 5 of the 6 detectable PCSK9 peptides was higher in obese patients stratified with high circulating LDL-C levels as compared to those with low LDL-C (p < 0.05). The same 5 peptides showed good and statistically significant correlations with LDL-C levels (0.55 < r < 0.65; 0.0002 ⩽ p ⩽ 0.002), but not the S688 phosphorylated

  13. Selective immediate hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Canto, Maria Gabriela; Andreu, Isabel; Fernandez, Javier; Blanca, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs imply that patients develop a urticarial/anaphylactic response to a single drug with good tolerance to other compounds. No systematic review of these reactions has yet been made. With the increase in consumption of NSAIDs, these have become one of the most common drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. Although cross-intolerance reactions are the most common, a significant proportion is selective responses. As specific IgE antibodies are not always found, there is only indirect evidence supporting an IgE-mediated mechanism in selective NSAID reactors. Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs must be considered when a patient develops urticaria or anaphylaxis after intake of one drug with good tolerance to drugs from other groups or even a drug from the same group with a slightly different chemical structure. Further research is required to identify the antigenic determinant structures recognized.

  14. Comparing Multiple Reaction Monitoring and Sequential Window Acquisition of All Theoretical Mass Spectra for the Relative Quantification of Barley Gluten in Selectively Bred Barley Lines.

    PubMed

    Colgrave, Michelle L; Byrne, Keren; Blundell, Malcolm; Heidelberger, Sibylle; Lane, Catherine S; Tanner, Gregory J; Howitt, Crispin A

    2016-09-20

    Celiac disease (CD) is a disease of the small intestine that occurs in genetically susceptible subjects triggered by the ingestion of cereal gluten proteins for which the only treatment is strict adherence to a life-long gluten-free diet. Barley contains four gluten protein families, and the existence of barley genotypes that do not accumulate the B-, C-, and D-hordeins paved the way for the development of an ultralow gluten phenotype. Using conventional breeding strategies, three null mutations behaving as recessive alleles were combined to create a hordein triple-null barley variety. Proteomics has become an invaluable tool for characterization and quantification of the protein complement of cereal grains. In this study multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, viewed as the gold standard for peptide quantification, was compared to the data-independent acquisition strategy known as SWATH-MS (sequential window acquisition of all theoretical mass spectra). SWATH-MS was comparable (p < 0.001) to MRM-MS for 32/33 peptides assessed across the four families of hordeins (gluten) in eight barley lines. The results of SWATH-MS analysis further confirmed the absence of the B-, C-, and D-hordeins in the triple-null barley line and showed significantly reduced levels ranging from <1% to 16% relative to wild-type (WT) cv Sloop for the minor γ-hordein class. SWATH-MS represents a valuable tool for quantitative proteomics based on its ability to generate reproducible data comparable with MRM-MS, but has the added benefits of allowing reinterrogation of data to improve analytical performance, ask new questions, and in this case perform quantification of trypsin-resistant proteins (C-hordeins) through analysis of their semi- or nontryptic fragments.

  15. Selective and sensitive quantification of the cytochrome P450 3A4 protein in human liver homogenates through multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cieślak, Anna; Kelly, Isabelle; Trottier, Jocelyn; Verreault, Mélanie; Wunsch, Ewa; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Poirier, Guy; Droit, Arnaud; Barbier, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at establishing a sensitive multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) method for the quantification of the drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 enzyme in human liver homogenates. Liver samples were subjected to trypsin digestion. MRM-MS analyses were performed using three transitions optimized on one purified synthetic peptide unique to CYP3A4 and the standardizing protein, calnexin. Coefficient of variations for the precision and reproducibility of the MRM-MS measurement were also determined. The method was applied to liver samples from ten non-cholestatic donors and 34 cholestatic patients with primary biliary cholangitis (n = 12; PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (n = 10; PSC) or alcoholic liver disease (n = 12; ALD). The established method presented high sensitivity with limit of detection lower than 5 fmol, and was successfully applied for the absolute and relative quantification of CYP3A4 in both whole liver homogenate and microsomal fractions. When all groups were analyzed together, a significant correlation was observed for the MRM-based CYP3A4 protein quantification in homogenates and microsomes (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was detected between CYP3A4 levels in PSC, PBC, ALD and control samples. Finally, the MRM-MS quantification of CYP3A4 in homogenates also correlated (r = 0.44; p < 0.05) with the level of enzyme activity in the same samples, as determined by measuring the chenodeoxycholic to hyocholic acid conversion. The established method provides a sensitive tool to evaluate the CYP3A4 protein in human liver homogenates from patients with normal or chronic/severe hepatic injury.

  16. Novel tubing microreactor for monitoring chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Charles A; Chrisman, Ray W; LaPointe, Robert E; Miller, Theodore E

    2002-07-01

    There is an expanding interest in small-scale methods to evaluate catalysts and chemical reactions at a variety of conditions, ranging up to 6.9 MPa (1000 psig) and 300 degrees C. Multiwell parallel batch techniques are most commonly applied in high-throughput screening systems. In contrast, we describe here a rapid, serial, highly controllable method based on LC-type steel tubing rated for high pressures. The tube, containing a variety of flowing ingredients, such as carrier solvents, catalyst formulations, and reactants, is self-heated ohmically using electrical current from a power supply monitored and regulated with a precision of 0.01%. An array of voltage taps arranged along its length serves to sense the real-time temperature profile of the tube. Reactions are seen as temperature pulses progressing through the reactor, in zones of 200 microL each, and tracked with a temperature precision of 0.1 degrees C. A unique pressure controller was devised to maintain constant reactor pressures despite effluent viscosity fluctuations due to polymerization. Several chemical reaction systems have been characterized to date, including decomposition reactions of di-tert-butyl peroxide, polymerizations of styrene, formation of polyethylene from ethylene, and copolymerization of ethylene with 1-octene. For ethylene polymerization, the amount of mass of polymer formed is proportional to the responses observed.

  17. Development, validation and application of a stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization/selected reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry (SID-LC/ESI/SRM/MS) method for quantification of keto-androgens in human serum.

    PubMed

    Tamae, Daniel; Byrns, Michael; Marck, Brett; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Nelson, Peter S; Lange, Paul; Lin, Daniel; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Balk, Steven; Ellis, William; True, Larry; Vessella, Robert; Montgomery, Bruce; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2013-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed form of cancer in males in the United States. The disease is androgen driven and the use of orchiectomy or chemical castration, known as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been employed for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer for over 70 years. Agents such as GnRH agonists and non-steroidal androgen receptor antagonists are routinely used in the clinic, but eventually relapse occurs due to the emergence of castration-resistant prostate cancer. With the appreciation that androgen signaling still persists in these patients and the development of new therapies such as abiraterone and enzalutamide that further suppresses androgen synthesis or signaling, there is a renewed need for sensitive and specific methods to quantify androgen precursor and metabolite levels to assess drug efficacy. We describe the development, validation and application of a stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SID-LC/ESI/SRM/MS) method for quantification of serum keto-androgens and their sulfate and glucuronide conjugates using Girard-T oxime derivatives. The method is robust down to 0.2-4pg on column, depending on the androgen metabolite quantified, and can also quantify dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) in only 1μL of serum. The clinical utility of this method was demonstrated by analyzing serum androgens from patients enrolled in a clinical trial assessing combinations of pharmacological agents to maximally suppress gonadal and adrenal androgens (Targeted Androgen Pathway Suppression, TAPS clinical trial). The method was validated by correlating the results obtained with a hydroxylamine derivatization procedure coupled with tandem mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring that was conducted in an independent laboratory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development, validation and application of a stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization/selected reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry (SID-LC/ESI/SRM/MS) method for quantification of keto-androgens in human serum✩, ✩✩

    PubMed Central

    Tamae, Daniel; Byrns, Michael; Marck, Brett; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Lange, Paul; Lin, Daniel; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Balk, Steven; Ellis, William; True, Larry; Vessella, Robert; Montgomery, Bruce; Blair, Ian A.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed form of cancer in males in the United States. The disease is androgen driven and the use of orchiectomy or chemical castration, known as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been employed for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer for over 70 years. Agents such as GnRH agonists and non-steroidal androgen receptor antagonists are routinely used in the clinic, but eventually relapse occurs due to the emergence of castration-resistant prostate cancer. With the appreciation that androgen signaling still persists in these patients and the development of new therapies such as abiraterone and enzalutamide that further suppresses androgen synthesis or signaling, there is a renewed need for sensitive and specific methods to quantify androgen precursor and metabolite levels to assess drug efficacy. We describe the development, validation and application of a stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SID-LC/ESI/SRM/MS) method for quantification of serum keto-androgens and their sulfate and glucuronide conjugates using Girard-T oxime derivatives. The method is robust down to 0.2–4 pg on column, depending on the androgen metabolite quantified, and can also quantify dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) in only 1 μL of serum. The clinical utility of this method was demonstrated by analyzing serum androgens from patients enrolled in a clinical trial assessing combinations of pharmacological agents to maximally suppress gonadal and adrenal androgens (Targeted Androgen Pathway Suppression, TAPS clinical trial). The method was validated by correlating the results obtained with a hydroxylamine derivatization procedure coupled with tandem mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring that was conducted in an independent laboratory. PMID:23851165

  19. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantification of trastuzumab in human serum by selective monitoring of a specific peptide marker from the antibody complementarity-determining regions.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Rega, C; Caporale, A; Tonon, G; Scaramuzza, S; Selis, F; Ruvo, M; Chambery, A

    2017-07-30

    Because of the large molecular weight, the structural complexity and the similarity with endogenous immunoglobulins present in high concentrations, in vivo quantitative studies with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are particularly challenging. In this work, an UPLC/MRM MS-based methodology is described for the quantification of trastuzumab in human serum by monitoring a novel specific peptide marker located within its heavy chain Complementarity-Determining Region (CDR). For maximum sensitivity and selectivity, specific transitions of this diagnostic proteotypic peptide were optimized and monitored at m/z 364.1 → 437.3 (quantitation ion) and m/z 364.1 → 358.0 (confirmation ion). As a proof-of-concept, the methodology was applied to the determination of trastuzumab in human serum over a clinically relevant range from 0.02 to 200 μg/mL. The methodology has been evaluated in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, detection and quantitation limits. An excellent linear response has been obtained in the range from 0.036 to 3.6 fmol/μL for the standard peptide and from 0.03 to 285 fmol/μL for the trastuzumab in human serum with typical R(2) values of 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are 0.005 fmol/μL and 0.05 fmol/μL, respectively, with mean bias and RSD values of 18% and 1%, respectively, for quality control samples. The strategy used to set up the UPLC/MRM MS methodology based on monitoring specific peptide markers within CDRs can be potentially applied to the detection and quantification of other humanized or human mAbs in biological fluids. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Selective simulation and selective sensor interpretation in monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.; Berleant, Daniel; Falcone, Loretta P.; Fayyad, Usama M.

    1989-01-01

    An approach to selective processing in monitoring is described. The approach is designed to provide informative feedback on whether a system is performing nominally in the current operating context without exceeding available resources for prediction and interpretation. At the center of the approach to selective sensor interpretation and simulation is a causal model of the system being monitored. The architecture of the monitoring system, called PREMON, is described as well as how causal models of physical systems are represented and simulated.

  1. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with in situ sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ian T.; Iordanov, V.; Kroon, Arthur; Dietrich, Heidi R. C.; Moerman, R.; van den Doel, L. R.; van Dedem, G. W. K.; Bossche, Andre; Gray, Bonnie L.; Sarro, Lina; Verbeek, Piet W.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2003-07-01

    In previous publications and presentations we have described our construction of a laboratory-on-a-chip based on nanoliter capacity wells etched in silicon. We have described methods for dispensing reagents as well as samples, for preventing evaporation, for embedding electronics in each well to measure fluid volume per well in real-time, and for monitoring the production or consumption of NADH in enzyme-catalyzed reactions such as those found in the glycolytic pathway of yeast. In this paper we describe the use of light sensors (photodiodes) in each well to measure both fluorescence (such as that evidenced in NADH) as well as bioluminescence (such as evidenced in ATP assays). We show that our detection limit for NADH fluorescence in 100 μM and for ATP/luciferase bioluminescence is 2.4 μM.

  2. Capillary Electrophoresis-nanoelectrospray Ionization-selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Via A True Sheathless Metal-coated Emitter Interface For Robust And High Sensitivity Sample Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xuejiang; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Tang, Keqi

    2016-03-30

    A new sheathless CITP/CZE-MS interface, based on a commercially available capillary with an integrated metal coated ESI emitter, was developed in this study aiming at overcoming the reproducibility and ruggedness problems, suffered to a certain degree by almost all the available CE-MS interfaces, and pushing the CE-MS technology suitable for routine sample analysis with high sensitivity. The new CITP/CZE-MS interface allows the electric contact between ESI voltage power supply and the CE separation liquid by using a conductive liquid that comes in contact with the metal coated surface of the ESI emitter, making it a true sheathless CE-MS interface. Stable electrospray was established by avoiding the formation of gas bubbles from electro chemical reaction at the emitter tip or inside of the CE capillary. Crucial operating parameters, such as sample loading volume, flow rate, and separation voltage, were systematically evaluated for their effects on both CITP/CZE separation efficiency and MS detection sensitivity. Around one hundred CITP/CZE-MS analyses can be easily achieved by using the new sheathless CITP/CZE interface without a noticeable loss of metal coating on the ESI emitter surface, or degrading of the ESI emitter performance. The reproducibility in analyte migration time and quantitative performance of the new interface was experimentally evaluated to demonstrate a LOQ bellow 5 attomole.

  3. Highly sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography/selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry method for the determination of cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in urine of health care workers exposed to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Sottani, Cristina; Tranfo, Giovanna; Faranda, Paolo; Minoia, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the potential for exposure of health care workers to antineoplastic agents has led to the establishment of more restrictive government and professional standards and procedures for handling cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the detection of low exposure levels is a new and important aim of biological monitoring. In the present paper we report an assay for the simultaneous determination of cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) in urine, using electrospray ionization liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with selective reaction monitoring (HPLC/SRM-MS). A rapid sample preparation procedure uses a solid-phase extraction stage with C18 columns. The urine assay is linear over the range 0.02 to 0.4 microg/L, with lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) of 0.02 and 0.04 microg/L for CP and IF. The accuracy and precision have been carried out through the validation study. The intra-day precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), is found to be always less than 14.7% for both analytes. The overall precision, assessed on three different days, is less than 15.0%. The recovery of ozaxaphosphorines ranges from 83.5% (CP) to 88.5% (IF) with a RSD always less than 14.6%. The uncertainty of the overall method was also evaluated, to identify possible sources of error. The combined uncertainty was less than 25% over all the days of the validation study. This method is selective and sensitive enough to determine trace levels of CP and IF in a range of urine concentrations relevant to performing low exposure assessment.

  4. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  5. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  6. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-02-03

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  7. Simultaneous qualitative and quantitative method using liquid chromatography selected reaction monitoring-triggered quantitation-enhanced data-dependent tandem mass spectrometry for the identification and classification of amphetamine-type stimulant abusers in human urine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Kyu; Kim, So-Hee; Kim, Ho Jun; Yoo, Hye Hyun; Kwon, Oh Seung; In, Moon Kyo; Jin, Changbae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jaeick

    2010-11-15

    Amphetamine (AP) and amphetamine-type stimulants, methamphetamine (MA) and N,N-dimethylamphetamine (DMA), are known as central nervous system stimulants, and their abuse throughout the world has recently increased. Since it is difficult to physically distinguish among AP, MA and DMA, analysts may not be aware of what abusers have administered. In this study, following the detection of specific metabolites of AP, MA and DMA as biomarkers in abuser urines, a rapid and sensitive method was developed for the identification and classification of AP-type stimulants abusers. After the simple filtration of the urine samples, the samples were directly analyzed using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry system with selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-triggered quantitation-enhanced data-dependent MS/MS (QED-MS/MS) for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of p-hydroxy AP, p-hydroxy MA, p-hydroxy DMA, AP, MA, DMA and DMA N-oxide. The determination of p-hydroxy AP, p-hydroxy MA, AP, MA, DMA and DMA N-oxide was accurate and reproducible, with the limits of quantitation of 5 ng/mL in urine. When applied to the urine samples of suspected AP-type stimulants abusers, the abused drugs were precisely identified between MA and DMA abusers.

  8. High-throughput method development for sensitive, accurate, and reproducible quantification of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in tissues using orthogonal array optimization and nano liquid chromatography/selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaotao; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Dai, Lipeng; Balthasar, Joseph P; Qu, Jun

    2012-05-15

    Although liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring (LC/SRM-MS) holds great promise for targeted protein analysis, quantification of therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) in tissues represents a daunting challenge due to the extremely low tissue levels, complexity of tissue matrixes, and the absence of an efficient strategy to develop an optimal LC/SRM-MS method. Here we describe a high-throughput, streamlined strategy for the development of sensitive, selective, and reliable quantitative methods of mAb in tissue matrixes. A sensitive nano-LC/nanospray-MS method was employed to achieve a low lower limit of quantification (LOQ). For selection of signature peptides (SP), the SP candidates were identified by a high-resolution Orbitrap and then optimal SRM conditions for each candidate were obtained using a high-throughput, on-the-fly orthogonal array optimization (OAO) strategy, which is capable of optimizing a large set of SP candidates within a single nano-LC/SRM-MS run. Using the optimized conditions, the candidates were experimentally evaluated for both sensitivity and stability in the target matrixes, and SP selection was based on the results of the evaluation. Two unique SP, respectively from the light and heavy chain, were chosen for quantification of each mAb. The use of two SP improves the quantitative reliability by gauging possible degradation/modification of the mAb. Standard mAb proteins with verified purities were utilized for calibration curves, to prevent the quantitative biases that may otherwise occur when synthesized peptides were used as calibrators. We showed a proof of concept by rapidly developing sensitive nano-LC/SRM-MS methods for quantifying two mAb (8c2 and cT84.66) in multiple preclinical tissues. High sensitivity was achieved for both mAb with LOQ ranged from 0.156 to 0.312 μg/g across different tissues, and the overall procedure showed a wide dynamic range (≥500-fold) and good accuracy [relative error

  9. Quantitative analysis of UV-A shock and short term stress using iTRAQ, pseudo selective reaction monitoring (pSRM) and GC-MS based metabolite analysis of the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    PubMed

    Wase, Nishikant; Pham, Trong Khoa; Ow, Saw Yen; Wright, Phillip C

    2014-09-23

    A quantitative proteomics and metabolomics analysis was performed using iTRAQ, HPLC and GC-MS in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 to understand the effect of short and long term UV-A exposure. Changes in the proteome were measured for short-term stress (4-24h) using iTRAQ. Changes in the photosynthetic pigments and intracellular metabolites were observed at exposures of up to 7days (pigments) and up to 11days (intracellular metabolites). To assess iTRAQ measurement quality, pseudo selected reaction monitoring (pSRM) was used, with this confirming underestimation of protein abundance levels by iTRAQ. Our results suggest that short term UV-A radiation lowers the abundance of PS-I and PS-II proteins. We also observed an increase in abundance of intracellular redox homeostasis proteins and plastocyanin. Additionally, we observed statistically significant changes in scytonemin, Chlorophyll A, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene. Assessment of intracellular metabolites showed significant changes in several, suggesting their potential role in the Nostoc's stress mitigation strategy. Cyanobacteria under UV-A radiation have reduced growth due to intensive damage to essential functions, but the organism shows a defense response by remodeling bioenergetics pathway, induction of the UV protection compound scytonemin and increased levels of proline and tyrosine as a mitigation response. The effect of UV-A radiation on the proteome and intracellular metabolites of N. punctiforme ATCC 29133 including photosynthetic pigments has been described. We also verify the expression of 13 iTRAQ quantified protein using LC-pSRM. Overall we observed that UV-A radiation has a drastic effect on the photosynthetic machinery, photosynthetic pigments and intracellular amino acids. As a mitigation strategy against UV-A radiation, proline, glycine, and tyrosine were accumulated. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Diagnostic reasoning techniques for selective monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homem-De-mello, L. S.; Doyle, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An architecture for using diagnostic reasoning techniques in selective monitoring is presented. Given the sensor readings and a model of the physical system, a number of assertions are generated and expressed as Boolean equations. The resulting system of Boolean equations is solved symbolically. Using a priori probabilities of component failure and Bayes' rule, revised probabilities of failure can be computed. These will indicate what components have failed or are the most likely to have failed. This approach is suitable for systems that are well understood and for which the correctness of the assertions can be guaranteed. Also, the system must be such that changes are slow enough to allow the computation.

  11. COPD Exacerbation Biomarkers Validated Using Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Janice M.; Chen, Virginia; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Dai, Darlene; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Vandemheen, Kathy L.; Rennard, Stephen I.; FitzGerald, J. Mark; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Connett, John E.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Miller, Bruce; Borchers, Christoph; McManus, Bruce M.; Ng, Raymond T.; Sin, Don D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) result in considerable morbidity and mortality. However, there are no objective biomarkers to diagnose AECOPD. Methods We used multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to quantify 129 distinct proteins in plasma samples from patients with COPD. This analytical approach was first performed in a biomarker cohort of patients hospitalized with AECOPD (Cohort A, n = 72). Proteins differentially expressed between AECOPD and convalescent states were chosen using a false discovery rate <0.01 and fold change >1.2. Protein selection and classifier building were performed using an elastic net logistic regression model. The performance of the biomarker panel was then tested in two independent AECOPD cohorts (Cohort B, n = 37, and Cohort C, n = 109) using leave-pair-out cross-validation methods. Results Five proteins were identified distinguishing AECOPD and convalescent states in Cohort A. Biomarker scores derived from this model were significantly higher during AECOPD than in the convalescent state in the discovery cohort (p<0.001). The receiver operating characteristic cross-validation area under the curve (CV-AUC) statistic was 0.73 in Cohort A, while in the replication cohorts the CV-AUC was 0.77 for Cohort B and 0.79 for Cohort C. Conclusions A panel of five biomarkers shows promise in distinguishing AECOPD from convalescence and may provide the basis for a clinical blood test to diagnose AECOPD. Further validation in larger cohorts is necessary for future clinical translation. PMID:27525416

  12. Psychological Reactions Associated With Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Susana R.; Clements, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Glucose monitoring is prerequisite to all other diabetes self-care behaviors and helps patients to reduce their risk for diabetes-related complications due to elevated glycemia. Because of the amount of information available and the ability to deliver glucose results in real-time, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has the ability to improve on self-monitoring blood glucose. However, epidemiologic data demonstrate slow uptake of CGM by patients, especially among youth. Several new diabetes therapies rely on CGM for feedback on patients’ glucose levels to optimize treatment (eg, the low-glucose suspend insulin pump) and there are new technologies currently in development that will also need this information to work (eg, the artificial pancreas). To help patients to realize the potential benefits of these new treatments, it is essential to explore patients’ psychological and behavioral reactions to CGM and then target device enhancements and/or the development of behavioral therapies to minimize negative reactions and to improve patients’ CGM adoption rates. Limited research is available examining the psychological and behavioral reactions of CGM use in youth exclusively, but there are more studies examining these reactions in mixed samples of youth, parents, and adults. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature examining psychological and behavioral reactions to CGM use in young people with diabetes and to highlight how the results of past and future studies can inform device updates and/or behavioral intervention development to minimize barriers. PMID:26969141

  13. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined.

  14. Chemical tailoring of teicoplanin with site-selective reactions.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Tejas P; Miller, Scott J

    2013-06-05

    Semisynthesis of natural product derivatives combines the power of fermentation with orthogonal chemical reactions. Yet, chemical modification of complex structures represents an unmet challenge, as poor selectivity often undermines efficiency. The complex antibiotic teicoplanin eradicates bacterial infections. However, as resistance emerges, the demand for improved analogues grows. We have discovered chemical reactions that achieve site-selective alteration of teicoplanin. Utilizing peptide-based additives that alter reaction selectivities, certain bromo-teicoplanins are accessible. These new compounds are also scaffolds for selective cross-coupling reactions, enabling further molecular diversification. These studies enable two-step access to glycopeptide analogues not available through either biosynthesis or rapid total chemical synthesis alone. The new compounds exhibit a spectrum of activities, revealing that selective chemical alteration of teicoplanin may lead to analogues with attenuated or enhanced antibacterial properties, in particular against vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant strains.

  15. Selectivity in the carbon-oxygen reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokova, Kristina A.

    The dependence of the carbon-oxygen reaction rate and the CO/COsb2 ratio on temperature, oxygen pressure, carbon crystallite size, concentration of surface C(O) complexes, and content of heteroatoms was studied. It was shown that the temperature dependence of the CO/COsb2 ratio obeys an Arrhenius-type relationship, but the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy depend on oxygen pressure and carbon nature. The Arrhenius parameters were found to be directly proportional to each other. This confirmed the importance of the compensation effect in carbon oxidation. It was explained by active site heterogeneity in carbon materials. For all experimental conditions, the CO/COsb2 ratio was lower for carbons with more ordered graphitic structure. It was shown that the CO/COsb2 ratio is inversely proportional to the surface coverage with reactive C(O) complexes. More ordered carbons were revealed to possess lower concentrations of stable complexes, higher surface coverages with reactive complexes and thus lower CO/COsb2 ratios. The influence of B and N heteroatoms on carbon reactivity and the CO/COsb2 ratio was studied. It was confirmed that B acts as an inhibitor of carbon oxidation due to the formation of a protective Bsb2Osb3 coating. The N presence in the carbon structure increases its rate of oxidation, maybe due to decreasing carbon crystallite dimensions. The CO/COsb2 ratio did not correlate with the N content in the carbon, but depended on the concentration of surface carbon-oxygen complexes. A new reaction mechanism is proposed. A key feature of the mechanism is that it takes into account the presence and mobility of oxygen atoms on the basal plane. It was shown with the aid of theoretical molecular orbital calculations that chemisorption on a pair of adjacent edge and basal sites is thermodynamically favorable as a parallel process to the generally accepted path of chemisorption on two edge carbon atoms. The former process can lead to the formation of a

  16. Quencher-free multiplexed monitoring of DNA reaction circuits.

    PubMed

    Padirac, Adrien; Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

    2012-08-01

    We present a simple yet efficient technique to monitor the dynamics of DNA-based reaction circuits. This technique relies on the labeling of DNA oligonucleotides with a single fluorescent modification. In this quencher-free setup, the signal is modulated by the interaction of the 3'-terminus fluorophore with the nucleobases themselves. Depending on the nature of the fluorophore's nearest base pair, fluorescence intensity is decreased or increased upon hybridization. By tuning the 3'-terminal nucleotides, it is possible to obtain opposite changes in fluorescence intensity for oligonucleotides whose hybridization site is shifted by a single base. Quenching by nucleobases provides a highly sequence-specific monitoring technique, which presents a high sensitivity even for small oligonucleotides. Compared with other sequence-specific detection methods, it is relatively non-invasive and compatible with the complex dynamics of DNA reaction circuits. As an application, we show the implementation of nucleobase quenching to monitor a DNA-based chemical oscillator, allowing us to follow in real time and quantitatively the dephased oscillations of the components of the network. This cost-effective monitoring technique should be widely implementable to other DNA-based reaction systems.

  17. Site-selective covalent reactions on proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Ho; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Wei; Wong, Clarence T T; Sun, Hongyan; Xia, Jiang

    2017-07-05

    To achieve precise control of the signaling events or to achieve unmistakable synthesis of biomolecules, nature has evolved organic reactions involving proteinogenic amino acids with unparalleled site selectivity. For example, dedicated enzymes accurately dictate the site of post-translational modifications in signaling proteins, and ribosomes precisely link the C-terminal carboxylic acid of one unprotected amino acid with the N-terminal amino group of the other amino acid through spatially confined proximity. For many years, chemists have been striving to achieve site selectivity on biomolecules by mimicking nature. Driven by the development of chemoselective protein conjugation reactions, enzymology and protein-protein interactions, the past decade has witnessed a boom in site-selective protein conjugation reactions. (In this review, a site-selective protein conjugation reaction is defined as an organic reaction that targets a single amino acid instead of a kind of amino acids in a protein or a proteome under physiological conditions, for example, a single cysteine residue among all of the cysteines.) In this review, we summarize the recent advancements of bioconjugation reactions that demonstrate this feature of precise site selectivity, focusing on the reactions of the proteinogenic amino acids (excluding those at non-coded or non-proteinogenic amino acids that are introduced to proteins through genetic manipulations). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of the stress reaction during anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.; Faizov, I. I.; Shchegolev, A. V.

    2013-10-01

    Clinical testing data for a mass-spectrometric method of estimating the patient's stress reaction to an injury done during anesthesia are presented. The essence of the method is monitoring the respiratory coefficient, which is defined as ratio N of the expiratory mass concentration of CO2 to the inspiratory mass concentration of O2 at each breathing cycle. For on-line monitoring of N, an electron ionization mass spectrometer connected to the breathing circuit of an inhalational anesthesia machine is used. Estimates of the anesthesia adequacy obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the method that analyzes induced acoustic encephalographic potentials. It is shown that the method suggested is more sensitive to the level of the patient's stress reaction during anesthesia than the induced potential method.

  19. System and process for pulsed multiple reaction monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E

    2013-05-17

    A new pulsed multiple reaction monitoring process and system are disclosed that uses a pulsed ion injection mode for use in conjunction with triple-quadrupole instruments. The pulsed injection mode approach reduces background ion noise at the detector, increases amplitude of the ion signal, and includes a unity duty cycle that provides a significant sensitivity increase for reliable quantitation of proteins/peptides present at attomole levels in highly complex biological mixtures.

  20. On-line reaction monitoring by extractive electrospray ionisation.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Bryan J; Bristow, Tony; O'Connor, Gavin; Hopley, Chris

    2011-05-30

    The design and development of a novel extractive electrospray ionisation (EESI) device for on-line reaction monitoring is described. The EESI apparatus uses a secondary, grounded nebuliser to produce an analyte aerosol and a Venturi pump is then used to transfer a sample of the aerosol to an electrospray source where it is ionised. The EESI apparatus was then tested with a variety of small, organic molecules to assess sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range. The performance of the technique will depend on the mass spectrometer used for the experiments; in the configurations used here it has a usable dynamic range of around 3.5 orders of magnitude with a linear range of around 2.5 orders of magnitude and is capable of analysing species present down to low µg/mL with signal-to-noise ratio greater than 2.5. The use of EESI for reaction monitoring was validated using a series of mock reaction mixtures and then used to monitor the base hydrolysis of ethyl salicylate to salicylic acid. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Monitoring solid phase synthesis reactions with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

    PubMed

    Hutton, Roger S; Adams, Joseph P; Trivedi, Harish S

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a means to monitor solid phase synthesis on resin beads. EIS was used to track changes during the swelling of beads in various solvents, during three typical reactions and throughout cleavage of the final product from the bead. The impedance response was investigated in a chemical reactor and was found to be faintly sensitive to the resin swelling and solvent flow. The position of the electrode within the reactor was found to be critical as polystyrene based beads float or sink dependent upon the solvent used. However, by choosing electrode position it was possible to monitor reaction progress on beads or within the bulk reactant/product mixture. Of the three typical chemical reactions studied impedance spectroscopy successfully followed two. Fitting of the impedance data to an equivalent electrical circuit provided an estimate as to the relative contribution of capacitive and resistive components to the overall response. Kinetic data from two reactions were also modelled, in both cases complex kinetics was observed, in close agreement with other studies.

  2. Spatially resolved chemical reaction monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Feindel, Kirk W

    2016-06-01

    Over the previous three decades, the use of MRI for studying dynamic physical and chemical processes of materials systems has grown significantly. This mini-review provides a brief introduction to relevant principles of MRI, including methods of spatial localization, factors contributing to image contrast, and chemical shift imaging. A few historical examples of (1) H MRI for reaction monitoring will be presented, followed by a review of recent research including (1) H MRI studies of gelation and biofilms, (1) H, (7) Li, and (11) B MRI studies of electrochemical systems, in vivo glucose metabolism monitored with (19) F MRI, and in situ temperature monitoring with (27) Al MRI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Parallel Reaction Monitoring: A Targeted Experiment Performed Using High Resolution and High Mass Accuracy Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rauniyar, Navin

    2015-01-01

    The parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assay has emerged as an alternative method of targeted quantification. The PRM assay is performed in a high resolution and high mass accuracy mode on a mass spectrometer. This review presents the features that make PRM a highly specific and selective method for targeted quantification using quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid instruments. In addition, this review discusses the label-based and label-free methods of quantification that can be performed with the targeted approach. PMID:26633379

  4. Multiple reaction monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring cubed based assays for the quantitation of apolipoprotein F.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinav; Gangadharan, Bevin; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-10-15

    Apolipoprotein F (APO-F) is a novel low abundance liver fibrosis biomarker and its concentration decreases in human serum and plasma across liver fibrosis stages. Current antibody based assays for APO-F suffer from limitations such as unspecific binding, antibody availability and undetectable target if the protein is degraded; and so an antibody-free assay has the potential to be a valuable diagnostic tool. We report an antibody-free, rapid, sensitive, selective and robust LC-MS/MS (MRM and MRM(3)) method for the detection and quantitation of APO-F in healthy human plasma. With further analysis of clinical samples, this LC-MS based method could be established as the first ever antibody-free biomarker assay for liver fibrosis. We explain the use of Skyline software for peptide selection and the creation of a reference library to aid in true peak identification of endogenous APO-F peptides in digests of human plasma without protein or peptide enrichment. Detection of a glycopeptide using MRM-EPI mode and reduction of interferences using MRM3 are explained. The amount of APO-F in human plasma from a healthy volunteer was determined to be 445.2ng/mL, the coefficient of variation (CV) of precision for 20 injections was <12% and the percentage error of each point along the calibration curve was calculated to be <8%, which is in line with the assay requirements for clinical samples.

  5. Chapter 2. Selecting Key Habitat Attributes for Monitoring

    Treesearch

    Gregory D. Hayward; Lowell H. Suring

    2013-01-01

    The success of habitat monitoring programs depends, to a large extent, on carefully selecting key habitat attributes to monitor. The challenge of choosing a limited but sufficient set of attributes will differ depending on the objectives of the monitoring program. In some circumstances, such as managing National Forest System lands for threatened and endangered species...

  6. Evaluating candidate reactions to selection practices using organisational justice theory.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara; Carr, Victoria; Irish, Bill; Gregory, Simon

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to examine candidate reactions to selection practices in postgraduate medical training using organisational justice theory. We carried out three independent cross-sectional studies using samples from three consecutive annual recruitment rounds. Data were gathered from candidates applying for entry into UK general practice (GP) training during 2007, 2008 and 2009. Participants completed an evaluation questionnaire immediately after the short-listing stage and after the selection centre (interview) stage. Participants were doctors applying for GP training in the UK. Main outcome measures were participants' evaluations of the selection methods and perceptions of the overall fairness of each selection stage (short-listing and selection centre). A total of 23,855 evaluation questionnaires were completed (6893 in 2007, 10,497 in 2008 and 6465 in 2009). Absolute levels of perceptions of fairness of all the selection methods at both the short-listing and selection centre stages were consistently high over the 3years. Similarly, all selection methods were considered to be job-related by candidates. However, in general, candidates considered the selection centre stage to be significantly fairer than the short-listing stage. Of all the selection methods, the simulated patient consultation completed at the selection centre stage was rated as the most job-relevant. This is the first study to use a model of organisational justice theory to evaluate candidate reactions during selection into postgraduate specialty training. The high-fidelity selection methods are consistently viewed as more job-relevant and fairer by candidates. This has important implications for the design of recruitment systems for all specialties and, potentially, for medical school admissions. Using this approach, recruiters can systematically compare perceptions of the fairness and job relevance of various selection methods. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  7. Wavelength-selective light-triggered strand exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Morihiro, K; Kodama, T; Mori, S; Tsunoda, S; Obika, S

    2016-02-07

    We prepared an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) bearing two 4-hydroxy-2-mercaptobenzimidazole nucleobase analogues (SB(NV) and SB(NB)) modified with different photolabile groups. This ODN enabled a light-triggered strand exchange reaction in a wavelength-selective manner.

  8. In silico verification and parallel reaction monitoring prevalidation of potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Adeola, Henry A; Calder, Bridget; Soares, Nelson C; Kaestner, Lisa; Blackburn, Jonathan M; Zerbini, Luiz F

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics of potential biomarkers is often challenging. Hence, we developed an intermediate workflow to streamline potential urinary biomarkers of prostate cancer (PCa). Using previously discovered potential PCa biomarkers; we selected proteotypic peptides for targeted validation. Preliminary in silico immunohistochemical and single reaction monitoring (SRM) verification was performed. Successful PTPs were then prevalidated using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) and reconfirmed in 15 publicly available databases. Stringency-based targetable potential biomarkers were shortlisted following in silico screening. PRM reveals top 12 potential biomarkers including the top ranking seven in silico verification-based biomarkers. Database reconfirmation showed differential expression between PCa and benign/normal prostatic urine samples. The pragmatic penultimate screening step, described herein, would immensely improve targeted proteomics validation of potential disease biomarkers.

  9. Crosschecking of alpha particle monitor reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Szűcs, Z.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Saito, M.

    2017-04-01

    Selected reactions with well-defined excitation functions can be used to monitor the parameters of charged particle beams. The frequently used reactions for monitoring alpha particle beams are the 27Al(α,x)22,24Na, natTi(α,x)51Cr, natCu(α,x)66,67Ga and natCu(α,x)65Zn reactions. The excitation functions for these reactions were studied using the activation method and stacked target irradiation technique to crosscheck and to compare the above six reactions. Thin metallic foils with natural isotopic composition and well defined thickness were stacked together in sandwich targets and were irradiated at the AVF cyclotron of RIKEN with an alpha particle beam of 51.2 MeV. The activity of the target foils were assessed by using high-resolution gamma spectrometers of high purity Ge detectors. The data sets of the six processes were crosschecked with each other to provide consistent, cross-linked numerical cross section data.

  10. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of anthracene with selected atmospheric oxidants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Shu, Jinian; Zhang, Yuanxun; Yang, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The reactions of gas-phase anthracene and suspended anthracene particles with O3 and O3-NO were conducted in a 200-L reaction chamber, respectively. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formations from gas-phase reactions of anthracene with O3 and O3-NO were observed. Meanwhile, the size distributions and mass concentrations of SOA were monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) during the formation processes. The rapid exponential growths of SOA reveal that the atmospheric lifetimes of gas-phase anthracene towards O3 and O3-NO are less than 20.5 and 4.34 hr, respectively. The particulate oxidation products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were analyzed with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS). Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of oxidation products of anthracene were carried out for assigning the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra of products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Anthrone, anthraquinone, 9,10-dihydroxyanthracene, and 1,9,10-trihydroxyanthracene were the ozonation products of anthracene, while anthrone, anthraquinone, 9-nitroanthracene, and 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone were the main products of anthracene with O3-NO.

  11. Technical guide for monitoring selected conditions related to wilderness character

    Treesearch

    Peter Landres; Steve Boutcher; Liese Dean; Troy Hall; Tamara Blett; Terry Carlson; Ann Mebane; Carol Hardy; Susan Rinehart; Linda Merigliano; David N. Cole; Andy Leach; Pam Wright; Deb Bumpus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of monitoring wilderness character is to improve wilderness stewardship by providing managers a tool to assess how selected actions and conditions related to wilderness character are changing over time. Wilderness character monitoring provides information to help answer two key questions about wilderness character and wilderness stewardship: 1. How is...

  12. Reaction monitoring using online vs tube NMR spectroscopy: seriously different results.

    PubMed

    Foley, David A; Dunn, Anna L; Zell, Mark T

    2016-06-01

    We report findings from the qualitative evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) reaction monitoring techniques of how each relates to the kinetic profile of a reaction process. The study highlights key reaction rate differences observed between the various NMR reaction monitoring methods investigated: online NMR, static NMR tubes, and periodic inversion of NMR tubes. The analysis of three reaction processes reveals that rates derived from NMR analysis are highly dependent on monitoring method. These findings indicate that users must be aware of the effect of their monitoring method upon the kinetic rate data derived from NMR analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Optimal Sensor Selection for Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. Michael; Sowers, T. Shane; Aguilar, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    Sensor data are the basis for performance and health assessment of most complex systems. Careful selection and implementation of sensors is critical to enable high fidelity system health assessment. A model-based procedure that systematically selects an optimal sensor suite for overall health assessment of a designated host system is described. This procedure, termed the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4), was developed at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in order to enhance design phase planning and preparations for in-space propulsion health management systems (HMS). Information and capabilities required to utilize the S4 approach in support of design phase development of robust health diagnostics are outlined. A merit metric that quantifies diagnostic performance and overall risk reduction potential of individual sensor suites is introduced. The conceptual foundation for this merit metric is presented and the algorithmic organization of the S4 optimization process is described. Representative results from S4 analyses of a boost stage rocket engine previously under development as part of NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program are presented.

  14. Switchable selectivity in an NHC-catalysed dearomatizing annulation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chang; Fleige, Mirco; Janssen-Müller, Daniel; Daniliuc, Constantin G.; Glorius, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The development of general catalytic methods for the regio- and stereoselective construction of chiral N-heterocycles in a diversity-oriented fashion remains a formidable challenge in organic synthesis. N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis has been shown to produce a variety of outcomes, but control of the reactivity has rarely been demonstrated. Here we report a switchable catalytic activation of enals with aromatic azomethine imines that provides high selectivity using NHC organocatalysts. The original selectivity corresponds to the acidity of the base used in the reaction. The catalytically generated chiral homoenolate or enol intermediate undergoes enantioselective annulation with electrophiles such as N-iminoquinolinium ylides, N-iminoisoquinolinium ylides and β-N-iminocarboline ylides. The good-to-high overall yields, high regioselectivities and excellent enantioselectivities observed are controlled by the catalyst and reaction conditions.

  15. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R; Ecija, David

    2016-03-11

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure.

  16. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-01-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure. PMID:26964764

  17. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-03-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure.

  18. Benchtop monitoring of reaction progress via visual recognition with a handheld UV lamp: in situ monitoring of boronic acids in the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction.

    PubMed

    Barder, Timothy E; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2007-01-04

    [reaction: see text] Although boronic acids are widely used in metal-catalyzed reactions, it is difficult to assay their consumption. As such, we developed a reversible fluorescent sensor that is activated upon binding a boronic acid. The sensor can be used to monitor consumption of a boronic acid in Suzuki-Miyaura reactions. Importantly, only a standard handheld long-wave UV lamp (365 nm) is required and fluorescence is easily detectable with the naked eye without disturbing the reaction mixture.

  19. Molybdenum chloride catalysts for Z-selective olefin metathesis reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ming Joo; Nguyen, Thach T.; Lam, Jonathan K.; Torker, Sebastian; Hyvl, Jakub; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2017-01-01

    The development of catalyst-controlled stereoselective olefin metathesis processes has been a pivotal recent advance in chemistry. The incorporation of appropriate ligands within complexes based on molybdenum, tungsten and ruthenium has led to reactivity and selectivity levels that were previously inaccessible. Here we show that molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes furnish higher-energy (Z) isomers of trifluoromethyl-substituted alkenes through cross-metathesis reactions with the commercially available, inexpensive and typically inert Z-1,1,1,4,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene. Furthermore, otherwise inefficient and non-stereoselective transformations with Z-1,2-dichloroethene and 1,2-dibromoethene can be effected with substantially improved efficiency and Z selectivity. The use of such molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes enables the synthesis of representative biologically active molecules and trifluoromethyl analogues of medicinally relevant compounds. The origins of the activity and selectivity levels observed, which contradict previously proposed principles, are elucidated with the aid of density functional theory calculations.

  20. Molybdenum chloride catalysts for Z-selective olefin metathesis reactions.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Joo; Nguyen, Thach T; Lam, Jonathan K; Torker, Sebastian; Hyvl, Jakub; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2017-02-02

    The development of catalyst-controlled stereoselective olefin metathesis processes has been a pivotal recent advance in chemistry. The incorporation of appropriate ligands within complexes based on molybdenum, tungsten and ruthenium has led to reactivity and selectivity levels that were previously inaccessible. Here we show that molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes furnish higher-energy (Z) isomers of trifluoromethyl-substituted alkenes through cross-metathesis reactions with the commercially available, inexpensive and typically inert Z-1,1,1,4,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene. Furthermore, otherwise inefficient and non-stereoselective transformations with Z-1,2-dichloroethene and 1,2-dibromoethene can be effected with substantially improved efficiency and Z selectivity. The use of such molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes enables the synthesis of representative biologically active molecules and trifluoromethyl analogues of medicinally relevant compounds. The origins of the activity and selectivity levels observed, which contradict previously proposed principles, are elucidated with the aid of density functional theory calculations.

  1. Metal-organic frameworks as selectivity regulators for hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meiting; Yuan, Kuo; Wang, Yun; Li, Guodong; Guo, Jun; Gu, Lin; Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Huijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-11-01

    Owing to the limited availability of natural sources, the widespread demand of the flavouring, perfume and pharmaceutical industries for unsaturated alcohols is met by producing them from α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, through the selective hydrogenation of the carbon-oxygen group (in preference to the carbon-carbon group). However, developing effective catalysts for this transformation is challenging, because hydrogenation of the carbon-carbon group is thermodynamically favoured. This difficulty is particularly relevant for one major category of heterogeneous catalyst: metal nanoparticles supported on metal oxides. These systems are generally incapable of significantly enhancing the selectivity towards thermodynamically unfavoured reactions, because only the edges of nanoparticles that are in direct contact with the metal-oxide support possess selective catalytic properties; most of the exposed nanoparticle surfaces do not. This has inspired the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to encapsulate metal nanoparticles within their layers or inside their channels, to influence the activity of the entire nanoparticle surface while maintaining efficient reactant and product transport owing to the porous nature of the material. Here we show that MOFs can also serve as effective selectivity regulators for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Sandwiching platinum nanoparticles between an inner core and an outer shell composed of an MOF with metal nodes of Fe3+, Cr3+ or both (known as MIL-101; refs 19, 20, 21) results in stable catalysts that convert a range of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with high efficiency and with significantly enhanced selectivity towards unsaturated alcohols. Calculations reveal that preferential interaction of MOF metal sites with the carbon-oxygen rather than the carbon-carbon group renders hydrogenation of the former by the embedded platinum nanoparticles a thermodynamically favoured reaction. We anticipate that our basic design

  2. Deciphering Selectivity in Organic Reactions: A Multifaceted Problem.

    PubMed

    Balcells, David; Clot, Eric; Eisenstein, Odile; Nova, Ainara; Perrin, Lionel

    2016-05-17

    Computational chemistry has made a sustained contribution to the understanding of chemical reactions. In earlier times, half a century ago, the goal was to distinguish allowed from forbidden reactions (e.g., Woodward-Hoffmann rules), that is, reactions with low or high to very high activation barriers. A great achievement of computational chemistry was also to contribute to the determination of structures with the bonus of proposing a rationalization (e.g., anomeric effect, isolobal analogy, Gillespie valence shell pair electron repulsion rules and counter examples, Wade-Mingos rules for molecular clusters). With the development of new methods and the constant increase in computing power, computational chemists move to more challenging problems, close to the daily concerns of the experimental chemists, in determining the factors that make a reaction both efficient and selective: a key issue in organic synthesis. For this purpose, experimental chemists use advanced synthetic and analytical techniques to which computational chemists added other ways of determining reaction pathways. The transition states and intermediates contributing to the transformation of reactants into the desired and undesired products can now be determined, including their geometries, energies, charges, spin densities, spectroscopy properties, etc. Such studies remain challenging due to the large number of chemical species commonly present in the reactive media whose role may have to be determined. Calculating chemical systems as they are in the experiment is not always possible, bringing its own share of complexity through the large number of atoms and the associated large number of conformers to consider. Modeling the chemical species with smaller systems is an alternative that historically led to artifacts. Another important topic is the choice of the computational method. While DFT is widely used, the vast diversity of functionals available is both an opportunity and a challenge. Though

  3. Information-Theoretical Complexity Analysis of Selected Elementary Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Espíritu, M.; Esquivel, R. O.; Dehesa, J. S.

    We investigate the complexity of selected elementary chemical reactions (namely, the hydrogenic-abstraction reaction and the identity SN2 exchange reaction) by means of the following single and composite information-theoretic measures: disequilibrium (D), exponential entropy(L), Fisher information (I), power entropy (J), I-D, D-L and I-J planes and Fisher-Shannon (FS) and Lopez-Mancini-Calbet (LMC) shape complexities. These quantities, which are functionals of the one-particle density, are computed in both position (r) and momentum (p) spaces. The analysis revealed that the chemically significant regions of these reactions can be identified through most of the single information-theoretic measures and the two-component planes, not only the ones which are commonly revealed by the energy, such as the reactant/product (R/P) and the transition state (TS), but also those that are not present in the energy profile such as the bond cleavage energy region (BCER), the bond breaking/forming regions (B-B/F) and the charge transfer process (CT). The analysis of the complexities shows that the energy profile of the abstraction reaction bears the same information-theoretical features of the LMC and FS measures, however for the identity SN2 exchange reaction does not hold a simple behavior with respect to the LMC and FS measures. Most of the chemical features of interest (BCER, B-B/F and CT) are only revealed when particular information-theoretic aspects of localizability (L or J), uniformity (D) and disorder (I) are considered.

  4. Still shimming or already measuring? - Quantitative reaction monitoring for small molecules on the sub minute timescale by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, J.; Thiele, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to enable monitoring of rapidly occurring reactions Wagner et al. recently presented a simple scheme for 1D NMR experiments with continuous data acquisition, without inter-scan delays, using a spatially-selective and frequency-shifted excitation approach (Wagner et al., 2013). This scheme allows acquisition of proton spectra with temporal resolutions on the millisecond timescale. Such high temporal resolutions are desired in the case of reaction monitoring using stopped flow setups. In regular 1H NMR-spectra without spatial selection the line width increases for a given shim setting with changes in sample volume, susceptibility, convection and temperature or concentration gradients due to the disturbance of magnetic field homogeneity. Concerning reaction monitoring this is unfortunate as shimming prior to acquisition becomes necessary to obtain narrow signals after injection of a reactant into an NMR sample. Even automatic shim routines may last up to minutes. Thus fast reactions can hardly be monitored online without large hardware dead times in a single stopped flow experiment. This problem is reduced in the spatially-selective and frequency-shifted continuous NMR experiment as magnetic field inhomogeneties are less pronounced and negative effects on the obtained line shapes are reduced as pointed out by Bax and Freeman (1980) [2] and demonstrated by Wagner et al. (2013). Here we present the utilization of this technique for observation of reactions in small molecule systems in which chemical conversion and longitudinal relaxation occur on the same timescale. By means of the alkaline ethyl acetate hydrolysis, a stoichiometric reaction, we show advantages of spatially-selective excitation on both temporal resolution and line shapes in stopped flow experiments. Results are compared to data obtained by non-selective small angle excitation experiments.

  5. Large-Scale Targeted Proteomics Using Internal Standard Triggered-Parallel Reaction Monitoring (IS-PRM).

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Kim, Sang Yoon; Domon, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Targeted high-resolution and accurate mass analyses performed on fast sequencing mass spectrometers have opened new avenues for quantitative proteomics. More specifically, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) implemented on quadrupole-orbitrap instruments exhibits exquisite selectivity to discriminate interferences from analytes. Furthermore, the instrument trapping capability enhances the sensitivity of the measurements. The PRM technique, applied to the analysis of limited peptide sets (typically 50 peptides or less) in a complex matrix, resulted in an improved detection and quantification performance as compared with the reference method of selected reaction monitoring performed on triple quadrupole instruments. However, the implementation of PRM for the analysis of large peptide numbers requires the adjustment of mass spectrometry acquisition parameters, which affects dramatically the quality of the generated data, and thus the overall output of an experiment. A newly designed data acquisition scheme enabled the analysis of moderate-to-large peptide numbers while retaining a high performance level. This new method, called internal standard triggered-parallel reaction monitoring (IS-PRM), relies on added internal standards and the on-the-fly adjustment of acquisition parameters to drive in real-time measurement of endogenous peptides. The acquisition time management was designed to maximize the effective time devoted to measure the analytes in a time-scheduled targeted experiment. The data acquisition scheme alternates between two PRM modes: a fast low-resolution "watch mode" and a "quantitative mode" using optimized parameters ensuring data quality. The IS-PRM method exhibited a highly effective use of the instrument time. Applied to the analysis of large peptide sets (up to 600) in complex samples, the method showed an unprecedented combination of scale and analytical performance, with limits of quantification in the low amol range. The successful analysis of

  6. Large-Scale Targeted Proteomics Using Internal Standard Triggered-Parallel Reaction Monitoring (IS-PRM)*

    PubMed Central

    Gallien, Sebastien; Kim, Sang Yoon; Domon, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Targeted high-resolution and accurate mass analyses performed on fast sequencing mass spectrometers have opened new avenues for quantitative proteomics. More specifically, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) implemented on quadrupole-orbitrap instruments exhibits exquisite selectivity to discriminate interferences from analytes. Furthermore, the instrument trapping capability enhances the sensitivity of the measurements. The PRM technique, applied to the analysis of limited peptide sets (typically 50 peptides or less) in a complex matrix, resulted in an improved detection and quantification performance as compared with the reference method of selected reaction monitoring performed on triple quadrupole instruments. However, the implementation of PRM for the analysis of large peptide numbers requires the adjustment of mass spectrometry acquisition parameters, which affects dramatically the quality of the generated data, and thus the overall output of an experiment. A newly designed data acquisition scheme enabled the analysis of moderate-to-large peptide numbers while retaining a high performance level. This new method, called internal standard triggered-parallel reaction monitoring (IS-PRM), relies on added internal standards and the on-the-fly adjustment of acquisition parameters to drive in real-time measurement of endogenous peptides. The acquisition time management was designed to maximize the effective time devoted to measure the analytes in a time-scheduled targeted experiment. The data acquisition scheme alternates between two PRM modes: a fast low-resolution “watch mode” and a “quantitative mode” using optimized parameters ensuring data quality. The IS-PRM method exhibited a highly effective use of the instrument time. Applied to the analysis of large peptide sets (up to 600) in complex samples, the method showed an unprecedented combination of scale and analytical performance, with limits of quantification in the low amol range. The successful

  7. Selective Pinacol-Coupling Reaction using a Continuous Flow System.

    PubMed

    Sotto, Nicolas; Cazorla, Clément; Villette, Carole; Billamboz, Muriel; Len, Christophe

    2016-11-18

    The first continuous flow pinacol coupling reaction of carbonyl compounds was successfully achieved within only 2 min during a single pass through a cartridge filled with zinc(0). The optimized method allowed the efficient production of gram-scale value-added compounds with high productivity. The developed methodology is efficient for aromatic or α,β-unsaturated aldehydes but gives moderate results for more stable acetophenone derivatives. Moreover, the flow method displayed better results in terms of yield and selectivity in comparison to the corresponding batch methodology.

  8. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine.

  9. Copper-catalyzed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a longstanding goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective, and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. In this work we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines, and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine, and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  10. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine.

  11. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-01-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts. PMID:26952517

  12. Monitorizing nitinol alloy surface reactions for biofouling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, C. Z.; Dinca, V. C.; Soare, S.; Moldovan, A.; Smarandache, D.; Scarisoareanu, N.; Barbalat, A.; Birjega, R.; Dinescu, M.; DiStefano, V. Ferrari

    2007-07-01

    Growth and deposition of unwanted bacteria on implant metal alloys affect their use as biomedical samples. Monitoring any bacterial biofilm accumulation will provide early countermeasures. For a reliable antifouling strategy we prepared nitinol (NiTi) thin films on Ti-derived substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. As the microstructure of Ti-alloy is dictated by the tensile strength, fatigue and the fracture toughness we tested the use of hydrogen as an alloying element. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigated the crystalline structure, chemical composition and respectively the surface morphology of the nitinol hydrogen and hydrogen-free samples. Moreover, the alloys were integrated and tested using a cellular metric and their responses were systematic evaluated and quantified. Our attractive approach is meant to select the suitable components for an effective and trustworthy anti-fouling strategy. A greater understanding of such processes should lead to novel and effective control methods that would improve in the future implant stability and capabilities.

  13. In Situ FTIR Spectroscopic Monitoring of Electrochemically Controlled Organic Reactions in a Recycle Reactor

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Alexander. G.; Luca, Oana. R.; Baran, Phil. S.

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical cell coupled with a recycle loop through a transmission FTIR cell is employed in studies of two free radical organic reactions, the oxidation of allylic alcohols and the trifluoromethylation of heteroarenes. Rapid mixing through the recycle loop allows continuous monitoring of reaction progress. Electrochemical generation of free radicals allows their controlled mediation into the reaction mixture for more efficient reaction. Kinetic profiles provide mechanistic insight into reactions under electrochemical control. PMID:27069673

  14. In Situ FTIR Spectroscopic Monitoring of Electrochemically Controlled Organic Reactions in a Recycle Reactor.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Alexander G; Luca, Oana R; Baran, Phil S; Blackmond, Donna G

    2016-02-01

    An electrochemical cell coupled with a recycle loop through a transmission FTIR cell is employed in studies of two free radical organic reactions, the oxidation of allylic alcohols and the trifluoromethylation of heteroarenes. Rapid mixing through the recycle loop allows continuous monitoring of reaction progress. Electrochemical generation of free radicals allows their controlled mediation into the reaction mixture for more efficient reaction. Kinetic profiles provide mechanistic insight into reactions under electrochemical control.

  15. Developing a combined strategy for monitoring the progress of aptamer selection.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhaofeng; He, Lei; Wang, Jinjun; Fang, Xiaona; Zhang, Liyun

    2017-08-21

    The development of a simple, low-cost, time-saving and universally applicable method to monitor the progression of aptamer selection is particularly challenging. Herein, a combined strategy dependent on quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification curve (AC) and melting curve analysis (MCA) is developed to monitor the convergence of the aptamer species during selection progress. As a parallel and complementary method to affinity tests and binding analyses, the AC-MCA method can be used to achieve the DNA complexity assay when affinity is undetectable. It is independent of the target properties and SELEX methods. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a universal monitoring tool in different SELEX methods towards different targets (small molecules, proteins, bacteria and cancer cells). The AC-MCA method will facilitate current new aptamer discovery and aptamer-based wide application.

  16. A selection of forest condition indicators for monitoring

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; B.E. Law; R.C. Kucera; A.L. Gallant; R.L. DeVelice; C.J. Palmer

    1992-01-01

    Regional monitoring and assessments of the health of forested ecosystems require indicators of forest conditions and environmental stresses. Indicator selections depend on objectives and the strategy for data collection and analysis. This paper recommends a set of indicators to signal changes in forest ecosystem distribution, productivity, and disturbance. Additional...

  17. 21 CFR 312.53 - Selecting investigators and monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selecting investigators and monitors. 312.53 Section 312.53 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Responsibilities of Sponsors...

  18. Spin-selective recombination reactions of radical pairs: Experimental test of validity of reaction operators

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kiminori; Liddell, Paul; Gust, Devens; Hore, P. J.

    2013-12-21

    Spin-selective reactions of radical pairs are conventionally modelled using an approach that dates back to the 1970s [R. Haberkorn, Mol. Phys. 32, 1491 (1976)]. An alternative approach based on the theory of quantum measurements has recently been suggested [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. We present here the first experimental attempt to discriminate between the two models. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate intramolecular electron transfer in the radical pair form of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene molecular triad. The rate of spin-spin relaxation of the fullerene radical in the triad was found to be inconsistent with the quantum measurement description of the spin-selective kinetics, and in accord with the conventional model when combined with spin-dephasing caused by rotational modulation of the anisotropic g-tensor of the fullerene radical.

  19. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions.

  20. Parallel reaction monitoring using quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer: Principle and applications.

    PubMed

    Bourmaud, Adele; Gallien, Sebastien; Domon, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry-based approaches are nowadays widely used for quantitative proteomics studies and more recently have been implemented on high resolution/accurate mass (HRAM) instruments resulting in a considerable performance improvement. More specifically, the parallel reaction monitoring technique (PRM) performed on quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometers, leveraging the high resolution and trapping capabilities of the instrument, offers a clear advantage over the conventional selected reaction monitoring (SRM) measurements executed on triple quadrupole instruments. Analyses performed in HRAM mode allow for an improved discrimination between signals derived from analytes and those resulting from matrix interferences translating in the reliable quantification of low abundance components. The purpose of the study defines various implementation schemes of PRM, namely: (i) exploratory experiments assessing the detectability of very large sets of peptides (100-1000), (ii) wide-screen analyses using (crude) internal standards to obtain statistically meaningful (relative) quantitative analyses, and (iii) precise/accurate quantification of a limited number of analytes using calibrated internal standards. Each of the three implementation schemes requires specific acquisition methods with defined parameters to appropriately control the acquisition during the actual peptide elution. This tutorial describes the different PRM approaches and discusses their benefits and limitations in terms of quantification performance and confidence in analyte identification.

  1. Determination of ethambutol in plasma using selected ion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ohya, K; Shintani, S; Sano, M

    1980-12-12

    The determination of ethambutol in plasma is described. Using ethambutol-d4 as an internal standard, ethambutol and the internal standard were extracted with chloroform under alkaline conditions, and converted into their trifluoroacetyl derivatives with trifluoroacetic anhydride in benzene-pyridine (4:1). Selected ion monitoring was carried out by monitoring the peaks at m/z 294 and 296 corresponding to the fragment ion [M/2]+ of the derivatives. Ethambutol was determined by use of the peak height ratio of the peak at m/z 294 against that at m/z 296. The method was utilized for studying the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of the drug.

  2. A Database of Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Assays for Elucidating Therapeutic Response in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Liu, Richard Z.; Xiang, Yun; Chen, Yi; Thomas, C. Eric; Rajyaguru, Neal; Kaufman, Laura M.; Ochoa, Joana E.; Hazlehurst, Lori; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Lancet, Jeffrey; Zhang, Guolin; Haura, Eric; Shibata, David; Yeatman, Timothy; Smalley, Keiran S.M.; Dalton, William S.; Huang, Emina; Scott, Ed; Bloom, Gregory C.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Koomen, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Quantitative Assay Database (QuAD), http://proteome.moffitt.org/QUAD/, facilitates widespread implementation of quantitative mass spectrometry in cancer biology and clinical research through sharing of methods and reagents for monitoring protein expression and modification. Experimental Design Liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) assays are developed using SDS-PAGE fractionated lysates from cancer cell lines. Pathway maps created using GeneGO Metacore provide the biological relationships between proteins and illustrate concepts for multiplexed analysis; each protein can be selected to examine assay development at the protein and peptide level. Results The coupling of SDS-PAGE and LC-MRM screening has been used to detect 876 peptides from 218 cancer-related proteins in model systems including colon, lung, melanoma, leukemias, and myeloma, which has led to the development of 95 quantitative assays including stable-isotope labeled peptide standards. Methods are published online and peptide standards are made available to the research community. Protein expression measurements for heat shock proteins, including a comparison with ELISA and monitoring response to the HSP90 inhibitor, 17-DMAG, are used to illustrate the components of the QuAD and its potential utility. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance This resource enables quantitative assessment of protein components of signaling pathways and biological processes and holds promise for systematic investigation of treatment responses in cancer. PMID:21656910

  3. Selective data segment monitoring system. [using shift registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, M. N. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High speed data monitoring apparatus is described for displaying the bit pattern of a selected portion of a block of transmitted data comprising a shift register for receiving the transmitted data and for temporarily containing the consecutive data bits. A programmable sync detector for monitoring the contents of the shift register and for generating a sync signal when the shift register contains a predetermined sync code is included. A counter is described for counting the data bits input to the shift register after the sync signal is generated and for generating a count complete signal when a selected number of data bits have been input to the register. A data storage device is used for storing the contents of the shift register at the time the count complete signal is generated.

  4. [Selection and maintenance of the blood pressure monitor for self-blood pressure monitoring (SBPM)].

    PubMed

    Wiliński, Jerzy; Kusiak, Aleksander; Wiliński, Bogdan; Smolik, Przemysław; Klima, Łukasz; Chmielewska, Jowita; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    The choice of an attested blood pressure (BP) monitor with an adequate arm cuff size and its proper maintenance are crucial for obtaining reliable results in Self-Blood Pressure Monitoring (SBPM) practice. The aim of the study was to assess the factors determining the BP monitor selection, its purchase place and technical use aspects. Two hun. dred consecutive patients with arte. rial hypertension regularly performing SBPM (100 individuals from a munici. pal primary health care centre and 100 from a specialized hypertension office at a university cardiology clinic, aged 57.7 +/-12.4 years, 54.0% female) have undergone an inquiry study based on the European Society of Hyperten. sion (ESH) guidelines for home BP monitoring. Almost half of the re. spondents are utilizing BP monitors that are not routinely recommended for SBPM: wrist devices - 22.0%, aneroid appliances -15.0%, mercury monitors - 7.0% and finger monitors - 1.0%. Only 45.0% of the study participants have checked if the cuff size is ap. propriate, whereas arm circumference in 26.0% of the patients exceeded 34 cm and in 3.5% of the individuals was below 24 cm. As few as 2.5% of SBPM practitioners perform regular techni. cal checkups of their BP monitors. Patients of a specialized hypertension office have significantly more often chosen their BP apparatus according to the doctor's recommendation than primary health care patients (27.0% vs 12.0%, p=0.007, respectively). Sphygmomanometer type and appropriate arm cuff size selections for SBPM is random. The aspects of BP monitor attest and its proper maintenance are neglected. Physicians recommend an adequate BP apparatus choice too rarely.

  5. Nanoreactors for simultaneous remote thermal activation and optical monitoring of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Vázquez, Carmen; Vaz, Belén; Giannini, Vincenzo; Pérez-Lorenzo, Moisés; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A

    2013-09-18

    We report herein the design of plasmonic hollow nanoreactors capable of concentrating light at the nanometer scale for the simultaneous performance and optical monitoring of thermally activated reactions. These reactors feature the encapsulation of plasmonic nanoparticles on the inner walls of a mesoporous silica capsule. A Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction was carried out in the inner cavities of these nanoreactors to evidence their efficacy. Thus, it is demonstrated that reactions can be accomplished in a confined volume without alteration of the temperature of the bulk solvent while allowing real-time monitoring of the reaction progress.

  6. Warmth and legitimacy beliefs contextualize adolescents' negative reactions to parental monitoring.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, Laura K; Zhao, Yinan; Zeringue, Megan M; Laird, Robert D

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to identify conditions under which parents' monitoring behaviors are most strongly linked to adolescents' negative reactions (i.e., feelings of being controlled and invaded). 242 adolescents (49.2% male; M age = 15.4 years) residing in the United States of America reported parental monitoring and warmth, and their own feelings of being controlled and invaded and beliefs in the legitimacy of parental authority. Analyses tested whether warmth and legitimacy beliefs moderate and/or suppress the link between parents' monitoring behaviors and adolescents' negative reactions. Monitoring was associated with more negative reactions, controlling for legitimacy beliefs and warmth. More monitoring was associated with more negative reactions only at weaker levels of legitimacy beliefs, and at lower levels of warmth. The link between monitoring and negative reactions is sensitive to the context within which monitoring occurs with the strongest negative reactions found in contexts characterized by low warmth and weak legitimacy beliefs. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Reversible Nanolamp for Instantaneous Monitoring of Cyanide Based on an Elsner-Like Reaction.

    PubMed

    Qing, Zhihe; Hou, Lina; Yang, Le; Zhu, Lixuan; Yang, Sheng; Zheng, Jing; Yang, Ronghua

    2016-10-04

    It is well-known that cyanide ion (CN(-)) is a hypertoxic anion, which can cause adverse effects in both the environment and living beings; thus, it is highly desirable to develop strategies for detecting CN(-), especially in water and food. However, due to the short half-life of free cyanide, long analysis time and/or interference from other competitive ions are general challenges for accurate monitoring of CN(-). In this work, through the investigation on the sequence-dependent optical interaction of DNA-CuNPs with the fluorophore (e.g., EBMVC-B), we found, for the first time, that DNA-CuNPs were an ideal alternative as fluorescence quencher in constructing a sensor which could be illuminated by CN(-) based on an Elsner-like reaction and that the signal switching was dependent on poly(AT/TA) dsDNA sequence. By virtue of CuNPs' small size and its high chemical reactivity with cyanide, the lighting of fluorescence was ultrarapid and similar to the hairtrigger "turn-on" of a lamp, which is significant for accurately monitoring a target of short half-life (e.g., cyanide). Attributed to the unique Elsner-like reaction between CN(-) and the Cu atoms, high selectivity was achieved for CN(-) monitoring by the nanolamp, with practical applications in real water and food samples. In addition, because of the highly efficient in situ formation of DNA-CuNPs and the approximative stoichiometry between CN(-) and Cu(2+) in the fluorescence switching, the nanolamp could be reversibly turned on and off through the alternate regulation of CN(-) and Cu(2+), displaying potential for developing reusable nanosensors and constructing optical molecular logic circuits.

  8. Monitoring non-immediate allergic reactions to iodine contrast media

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M J; Mayorga, C; Cornejo-Garcia, J A; Lopez, S; Chaves, P; Rondon, C; Fernandez, T; Blanca, M

    2008-01-01

    Non-immediate reactions to iodine contrast media (ICM) affect 2–5% of patients receiving these agents. We studied the immunological mechanisms involved in patients with a confirmed non-immediate reaction, maculopapular exanthema, after administration of ICM. The diagnosis was carried out by skin testing or drug provocation test. The immunological study was performed in sequential peripheral blood mononuclear cells taken from the onset of the reaction by flow cytometry and in skin biopsy by immunohistochemistry, with specific recognition by the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) with different ICM. Flow cytometry showed an increase in the different activation markers [CD69, CD25 and human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR)] and the skin homing receptor [cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA)] in CD4 lymphocytes, whereas perforin was higher in the CD8 lymphocytes. The skin biopsy showed a perivascular mononuclear infiltrate composed of CD4 lymphocytes, expressing CD25, HLA-DR and CLA, with eosinophils. Intradermal skin tests and the LTT were positive to several ICM, including the culprit agent in four and three patients, respectively, with negative results in all 10 tolerant controls. We showed that a specific immunological mechanism was implicated in patients with non-immediate reactions to ICM. Moreover, the positive results in skin tests and lymphocyte proliferation tests indicated that an important cross-reactivity exists. PMID:18341616

  9. Model Selection for Monitoring CO2 Plume during Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-31

    The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly includes four steps: (1) assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, (2) model clustering using multidimensional scaling coupled with k-mean clustering, (3) model selection using the Bayes' rule in the reduced model space, (4) model expansion using iterative resampling of the posterior models. The fourth step expresses one of the advantages of the method: it provides a built-in means of quantifying the uncertainty in predictions made with the selected models. In our application to plume monitoring, by expanding the posterior space of models, the final ensemble of representations of geological model can be used to assess the uncertainty in predicting the future displacement of the CO2 plume. The software implementation of this approach is attached here.

  10. Substrate-Coated Illumination Droplet Spray Ionization: Real-Time Monitoring of Photocatalytic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Na; Zhao, Dandan; Jiang, Jie; You, Hong

    2017-09-01

    Real-time monitoring of photocatalytic reactions facilitates the elucidation of the mechanisms of the reactions. However, suitable tools for real-time monitoring are lacking. Herein, a novel method based on droplet spray ionization named substrate-coated illumination droplet spray ionization (SCI-DSI) for direct analysis of photocatalytic reaction solution is reported. SCI-DSI addresses many of the analytical limitations of electrospray ionization (ESI) for analysis of photocatalytic-reaction intermediates, and has potential for both in situ analysis and real-time monitoring of photocatalytic reactions. In SCI-DSI-mass spectrometry (MS), a photocatalytic reaction occurs by loading sample solutions onto the substrate-coated cover slip and by applying UV light above the modified slip; one corner of this slip adjacent to the inlet of a mass spectrometer is the high-electric-field location for launching a charged-droplet spray. After both testing and optimizing the performance of SCI-DSI, the value of this method for in situ analysis and real-time monitoring of photocatalytic reactions was demonstrated by the removal of cyclophosphamide (CP) in TiO2/UV. Reaction times ranged from seconds to minutes, and the proposed reaction intermediates were captured and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Moreover, the free hydroxyl radical (·OH) was identified as the main radicals for CP removal. These results show that SCI-DSI is suitable for in situ analysis and real-time monitoring of CP removal under TiO2-based photocatalytic reactions. SCI-DSI is also a potential tool for in situ analysis and real-time assessment of the roles of radicals during CP removal under TiO2-based photocatalytic reactions. Graphical Abstract[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Substrate-Coated Illumination Droplet Spray Ionization: Real-Time Monitoring of Photocatalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Na; Zhao, Dandan; Jiang, Jie; You, Hong

    2017-05-17

    Real-time monitoring of photocatalytic reactions facilitates the elucidation of the mechanisms of the reactions. However, suitable tools for real-time monitoring are lacking. Herein, a novel method based on droplet spray ionization named substrate-coated illumination droplet spray ionization (SCI-DSI) for direct analysis of photocatalytic reaction solution is reported. SCI-DSI addresses many of the analytical limitations of electrospray ionization (ESI) for analysis of photocatalytic-reaction intermediates, and has potential for both in situ analysis and real-time monitoring of photocatalytic reactions. In SCI-DSI-mass spectrometry (MS), a photocatalytic reaction occurs by loading sample solutions onto the substrate-coated cover slip and by applying UV light above the modified slip; one corner of this slip adjacent to the inlet of a mass spectrometer is the high-electric-field location for launching a charged-droplet spray. After both testing and optimizing the performance of SCI-DSI, the value of this method for in situ analysis and real-time monitoring of photocatalytic reactions was demonstrated by the removal of cyclophosphamide (CP) in TiO2/UV. Reaction times ranged from seconds to minutes, and the proposed reaction intermediates were captured and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Moreover, the free hydroxyl radical (·OH) was identified as the main radicals for CP removal. These results show that SCI-DSI is suitable for in situ analysis and real-time monitoring of CP removal under TiO2-based photocatalytic reactions. SCI-DSI is also a potential tool for in situ analysis and real-time assessment of the roles of radicals during CP removal under TiO2-based photocatalytic reactions.Graphical Abstract.

  12. Esterification Reaction Utilizing Sense of Smell and Eyesight for Conversion and Catalyst Recovery Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssens, Nikki; Wee, Lik H.; Martens, Johan A.

    2014-01-01

    The esterification reaction of salicylic acid with ethanol is performed in presence of dissolved 12-tungstophosphoric Brønsted-Lowry acid catalyst, a Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM). The monitoring of the reaction with smell and the recovery of the catalyst with sight is presented. Formation of the sweet-scented ester is apparent from the smell.…

  13. Esterification Reaction Utilizing Sense of Smell and Eyesight for Conversion and Catalyst Recovery Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssens, Nikki; Wee, Lik H.; Martens, Johan A.

    2014-01-01

    The esterification reaction of salicylic acid with ethanol is performed in presence of dissolved 12-tungstophosphoric Brønsted-Lowry acid catalyst, a Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM). The monitoring of the reaction with smell and the recovery of the catalyst with sight is presented. Formation of the sweet-scented ester is apparent from the smell.…

  14. Monitoring Of Landslide Hazard In Selected Areas Of Uzbekistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazecky, Milan; Balaha, Pavel; Khasankhanova, Gulchekhra; Minchenko, Venscelas

    2013-12-01

    Republic of Uzbekistan is situated in the heart of Central Asia. Dangerous phenomena such as drought, flooding, mud flows, landslides and others, that are becoming frequent in conditions of climate changes, increase instability of an agricultural production, and threaten rural livelihoods. In connection with weather and climate natural disasters, these phenomena become reasons of declining food production, water contamination, and economical damages. Within the Project granted by NATO: Science for Peace and Security programme, modern advanced remote sensing technologies will be applied to perform large scale monitoring of (early) slope deformations, including Satellite SAR Interferometry (InSAR) techniques, Ground Laser Scanning for in-situ refinement of detected movements or Multibeam Echosounding for monitoring slope deformation advancement into water objects. First results involving InSAR processing of selected sites in Uzbekistan are presented within this contribution.

  15. Data Pre-Processing for Label-Free Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Lisa M.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Zhao, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) conducted on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer allows researchers to quantify the expression levels of a set of target proteins. Each protein is often characterized by several unique peptides that can be detected by monitoring predetermined fragment ions, called transitions, for each peptide. Concatenating large numbers of MRM transitions into a single assay enables simultaneous quantification of hundreds of peptides and proteins. In recognition of the important role that MRM can play in hypothesis-driven research and its increasing impact on clinical proteomics, targeted proteomics such as MRM was recently selected as the Nature Method of the Year. However, there are many challenges in MRM applications, especially data pre‑processing where many steps still rely on manual inspection of each observation in practice. In this paper, we discuss an analysis pipeline to automate MRM data pre‑processing. This pipeline includes data quality assessment across replicated samples, outlier detection, identification of inaccurate transitions, and data normalization. We demonstrate the utility of our pipeline through its applications to several real MRM data sets. PMID:24905083

  16. Site Selection for a Deep Monitor Well, Kualapuu, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2000-01-01

    Management of the ground-water resources near Kualapuu on the island of Molokai, Hawaii, is hindered by the uncertainty in the vertical salinity structure in the aquifer. In the State of Hawaii, vertical profiles of ground-water salinity are commonly obtained from deep monitor wells, and these profiles are used to estimate the thicknesses of the freshwater part of the ground-water flow system and the freshwater-saltwater transition zone. Information from a deep monitor well would improve the understanding of the ground-water flow system and the ability to effectively manage the ground-water resources near Kualapuu; however, as of mid-1999 no deep monitor wells had been drilled on the island of Molokai. Selection of an appropriate site for drilling a deep monitor well in the Kualapuu area depends partly on where future ground-water development may occur. Simulations using an areally two-dimensional, steady-state, sharp-interface ground-water flow model previously developed for the island of Molokai, Hawaii, indicate that the southeastern part of the Kualapuu area is a possible area of future ground-water development because (1) withdrawals from this area have a small effect on water levels at existing wells in the Kualapuu area (relative to effects from withdrawals in other parts of the Kualapuu area that are outside of the dike complex), and (2) model-calculated water levels in this part of the Kualapuu area are high relative to water levels in other parts of the Kualapuu area that are outside of the dike complex. Additional site-selection criteria include (1) ground-water level, (2) ground-surface altitude, (3) land classification, ownership, and accessibility, (4) geology, (5) locations of existing production wells, and (6) historical ground-water quality information. A deep monitor well in the Kualapuu area will likely be most useful for management purposes if it is located (1) in the vicinity of future ground-water development, (2) in an area where water levels

  17. How to select a continuous emission monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Radigan, M.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Selecting a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) involves more than picking an analyzer. Successful CEMS interface sampling and data-management systems to produce accurate, reliable reports required by regulatory agencies. Following objective guidelines removes some of the misery from CEMS shopping. However, prospective CEMS buyers should do their homework and develop well-thought-out, detailed specification for the processes' sampling criteria. Fine tuning the analyzer/data management system can eliminate maintenance costs and keep the facility operating within its permit restrictions.

  18. Adverse Drug Reactions and quality deviations monitored by spontaneous reports

    PubMed Central

    Visacri, Marília Berlofa; de Souza, Cinthia Madeira; Sato, Catarina Miyako Shibata; Granja, Silvia; de Marialva, Mécia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Moriel, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and profile of spontaneous reports of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) and quality deviations in a Brazilian teaching hospital and propose a consistent classification to study quality deviations. Methods This is a descriptive and retrospective study involving the analysis of spontaneous reports of ADRs and quality deviations in 2010. ADRs were classified according to the reaction mechanism, severity, and causality. The drugs were classified according to their therapeutic classes and symptoms according to the affected organ. The quality deviations were classified according to the type of deviation and type of medicine available in the Brazilian market. Results A total of 68 forms were examined; ADRs accounted for 39.7% of the notifications, while quality deviations accounted for 60.3%. ADRs occurred more frequently in men (51.9%) and adults (63.0%). The skin (28.0%) was the most affected organ, while anti-infectives (40.7%) were the therapeutic class that caused the most ADRs. The most common ADRs were type B (74.0%), moderates (37.0%), and probables (55.6%). In relation to quality deviations, the most frequent notifications were breaks, splits and leaks (20.9%) and related to generic drugs (43.9%). Conclusion The classification system to study quality deviations was clear and consistent. This study demonstrated that practices and public policies related to more effective pharmacovigilance need to be implemented so that the number of spontaneous reports increases. PMID:25972731

  19. Strategy Developed for Selecting Optimal Sensors for Monitoring Engine Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Sensor indications during rocket engine operation are the primary means of assessing engine performance and health. Effective selection and location of sensors in the operating engine environment enables accurate real-time condition monitoring and rapid engine controller response to mitigate critical fault conditions. These capabilities are crucial to ensure crew safety and mission success. Effective sensor selection also facilitates postflight condition assessment, which contributes to efficient engine maintenance and reduced operating costs. Under the Next Generation Launch Technology program, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, has developed a model-based procedure for systematically selecting an optimal sensor suite for assessing rocket engine system health. This optimization process is termed the systematic sensor selection strategy. Engine health management (EHM) systems generally employ multiple diagnostic procedures including data validation, anomaly detection, fault-isolation, and information fusion. The effectiveness of each diagnostic component is affected by the quality, availability, and compatibility of sensor data. Therefore systematic sensor selection is an enabling technology for EHM. Information in three categories is required by the systematic sensor selection strategy. The first category consists of targeted engine fault information; including the description and estimated risk-reduction factor for each identified fault. Risk-reduction factors are used to define and rank the potential merit of timely fault diagnoses. The second category is composed of candidate sensor information; including type, location, and estimated variance in normal operation. The final category includes the definition of fault scenarios characteristic of each targeted engine fault. These scenarios are defined in terms of engine model hardware parameters. Values of these parameters define engine simulations that generate

  20. Spectrally matched upconverting luminescent nanoparticles for monitoring enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Stefan; del Barrio, Melisa; Heiland, Josef; Himmelstoß, Sandy F; Galbán, Javier; Wolfbeis, Otto S; Hirsch, Thomas

    2014-09-10

    We report on upconverting luminescent nanoparticles (UCLNPs) that are spectrally tuned such that their emission matches the absorption bands of the two most important species associated with enzymatic redox reactions. The core-shell UCLNPs consist of a β-NaYF4 core doped with Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) ions and a shell of pure β-NaYF4. Upon 980 nm excitation, they display emission bands peaking at 360 and 475 nm, which is a perfect match to the absorption bands of the enzyme cosubstrate NADH and the coenzyme FAD, respectively. By exploiting these spectral overlaps, we have designed fluorescent detection schemes for NADH and FAD that are based on the modulation of the emission intensities of UCLNPs by FAD and NADH via an inner filter effect.

  1. Outpatient desensitization in selected patients with platinum hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, David M; Vetter, Monica Hagan; Cohn, David E; Khan, Ambar; Hays, John L

    2017-06-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapies are a standard treatment for both initial and recurrent gynecologic cancers. Given this widespread use, it is important to be aware of the features of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the subsequent treatment of these reactions. There is also increasing interest in the development of desensitization protocols to allow patients with a history of platinum hypersensitivity to receive further platinum based therapy. In this review, we describe the management of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the desensitization protocols utilized at our institution. We also describe the clinical categorizations utilized to triage patients to appropriate desensitization protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurement of the activation cross section for the (p,xn) reactions in niobium with potential applications as monitor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Wilson, J. S.; Schueller, M. J.; McQuarrie, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    Excitation functions of the 93Nb(p,n) 93mMo, 93Nb(p,pn) 92mNb and 93Nb(p,αn) 89Zr nuclear reactions were measured up to 17.4 MeV by the conventional activation method using the stacked-foil technique. Stacks were irradiated at different incident energies on the TR19/9 cyclotron at the Edmonton PET Centre. The potential of the measured excitation functions for use as monitor reactions was evaluated and tested by measuring activity ratios at a different facility. Single Nb foils were irradiated at incident energies in the range from 12 to 19 MeV on the TR19/9 cyclotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Results are compared with the published data and with theoretical values as determined by the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE.

  3. Monitoring infection: from blood culture to polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz Eric; Zhang, XiangHong; Stüber, Frank

    2013-06-01

    In patients with sepsis, diagnosis of blood stream infection (BSI) is a key concern to the therapist. Direct verification of pathogens in the blood stream executed by blood cultures (BC) still is regarded as the gold standard up to date. The quickest possible initiation of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy is a cornerstone of an effective therapy. Moreover, in this view BC can also serve to identify antimicrobial agents to target the pathogen. However, when employing BC the time needed until microbiological results are available ranges from 24 up to 72 h. Moreover, infections caused by multiple pathogens often remain undetected and concurrent antibiotic therapy may lower the overall sensitivity. Alternative pathogen characterization can be performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based amplification methods. Results using PCR can be obtained within 6-8 h. Therefore, the time delay until an appropriate therapy can be reduced enormously. Moreover, these methods have the potential to enhance the sensitivity in the diagnosis of blood stream infections. Therefore, PCR based methods might be a valuable adjunct to present procedures of diagnosing bacteraemia.

  4. Zeta potential mediated reaction monitoring on nano and microparticles.

    PubMed

    Thielbeer, Frank; Donaldson, Ken; Bradley, Mark

    2011-02-16

    Nano and microparticles are widely used across the life science interface, with applications ranging from chemical probes of biological function to fluorescent particles for flow cytometry and cellular tracking. Increasingly, particles are modified with a variety of chemistries to boost their functionality and broaden their biological applicability. However, although particle modification has become standard laboratory practice, the ability to determine the extent and efficiency of chemical modification is often very limited and empirical in nature. Herein, we report the use of zeta potential analysis as a simple and rapid "direct-on-particle" approach allowing levels of bead modification and derivatization to be evaluated. As a proof-of-concept, aminomethyl-functionalized nano and microparticles were derivatized to display a variety of surface functionalities and their zeta potentials measured, allowing verification of the applicability of the approach for particle analysis. We demonstrate that zeta potential measurement is a convenient approach which allows multistep reaction sequences to be followed, and show that this method can be used to verify and validate successful particle modification.

  5. Copper-Catalyzed SN2'-Selective Allylic Substitution Reaction of gem-Diborylalkanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Qi; Zhang, Ben; Lu, Xi; Liu, Jing-Hui; Lu, Xiao-Yu; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2016-03-04

    A Cu/(NHC)-catalyzed SN2'-selective substitution reaction of allylic electrophiles with gem-diborylalkanes is reported. Different substituted gem-diborylalkanes and allylic electrophiles can be employed in this reaction, and various synthetic valuable functional groups can be tolerated. The asymmetric version of this reaction was initially researched with chiral N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands.

  6. Language Control in Bilinguals: Monitoring and Response Selection.

    PubMed

    Branzi, Francesca M; Della Rosa, Pasquale A; Canini, Matteo; Costa, Albert; Abutalebi, Jubin

    2016-06-01

    Language control refers to the cognitive mechanism that allows bilinguals to correctly speak in one language avoiding interference from the nontarget language. Bilinguals achieve this feat by engaging brain areas closely related to cognitive control. However, 2 questions still await resolution: whether this network is differently engaged when controlling nonlinguistic representations, and whether this network is differently engaged when control is exerted upon a restricted set of lexical representations that were previously used (i.e., local control) as opposed to control of the entire language system (i.e., global control). In the present event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated these 2 questions by employing linguistic and nonlinguistic blocked switching tasks in the same bilingual participants. We first report that the left prefrontal cortex is driven similarly for control of linguistic and nonlinguistic representations, suggesting its domain-general role in the implementation of response selection. Second, we propose that language control in bilinguals is hierarchically organized with the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex/presupplementary motor area acting as the supervisory attentional system, recruited for increased monitoring demands such as local control in the second language. On the other hand, prefrontal, inferior parietal areas and the caudate would act as the response selection system, tailored for language selection for both local and global control.

  7. Monitoring reaction intermediates in the FeCl3-catalyzed michael reaction by nuclear inelastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Asthalter, T; Rajagopalan, S; Kauf, Th; Rabe, V; Christoffers, J

    2008-11-20

    We present a study of the metal-centered vibrations in the first step of the Fe(III)-catalyzed Michael reaction. Nuclear inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation was carried out on a shock-frozen solution of FeCl3.6H2O in 2-oxocyclopentane ethylcarboxylate (CPEH), as well as on the solid reference compounds FeCl3.6H2O, [N(CH3)4][FeCl 4], and Fe(acac) 3. In addition to the vibrations of the FeCl4(-) anion at 133 and 383 cm(-1), a multitude of modes associated with the complex Fe(CPE)2(H2O)2 could be identified. Normal-mode analysis on different isomers of the simplified model complex Fe(acac)2(H2O)2 as well as that of the full complex carrying two entire CPE ligands was carried out using density functional calculations. Comparison with experiment suggests that the facial bis(diketonato) isomer probably dominates in the reaction mixture. Thus, we have identified for the first time the isomeric structure of an iron-based intermediate of a homogeneous catalytic reaction using nuclear inelastic scattering.

  8. Microporous polyurethane material for size selective heterogeneous catalysis of the Knoevenagel reaction.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sandeep Kumar; de Sousa Amadeu, Nader; Janiak, Christoph

    2016-06-14

    The first polyurethane material which is microporous (BET surface area of 312 m(2) g(-1)) is prepared by solvothermal synthesis and acts as highly efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst in the Knoevenagel condensation showing size selectivity, and in the Henry reaction showing substrate selectivity under mild reaction conditions.

  9. Characterization and application of droplet spray ionization for real-time reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Na; Li, Xiao-di; Jiang, Jie; Zhao, Dan-Dan; You, Hong

    2016-08-01

    The ionization source for real-time reaction monitoring has attracted tremendous interest in recent years. We have previously reported a reliable approach in which droplet spray ionization (DSI) was used for monitoring chemical reactions in real-time. Herein, we systematically investigated the characterization and application of DSI for real-time reaction monitoring. Analyte ions are generated by loading a sample solution onto a corner of a microscope cover glass positioned in front of the MS inlet and applying a high voltage to the sample. The tolerance to positioning, solvent effect, spray angle and spray time were investigated. Extension to real-time monitoring of macromolecule reactions was also demonstrated by the charge state change of cytochrome c in the presence of acetic acid. The corner could be positioned within an area of approximately 10 × 6 × 5 mm (x, y, z) in front of the MS inlet. The broad polarities of solvents from methanol to PhF were suitable for DSI. It featured monitoring real-time changes in reactions on the time scale of seconds to minutes. A real-time charge state change of cytochrome c was captured. DSI-MS features ease of use, durability of the spray platform and reusability of the ion source. Eliminating the need for a sample transport capillary, DSI opens a new avenue for the in situ analysis and real-time monitoring of short-lived key reaction intermediates even at subsecond dead times. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Spectroscopic on-line monitoring of reactions in dispersed medium: chemometric challenges.

    PubMed

    Reis, Marlon M; Araújo, Pedro H H; Sayer, Claudia; Giudici, Reinaldo

    2007-07-09

    Emulsion and suspension polymerizations are important industrial processes for polymer production. The end-user properties of polymers depend strongly on how the polymerization reactions proceed in time (i.e. a batch or semicontinuous, rate of reagents feeding, etc.). In other words, these reactions are process dependent, which makes the successful process control a key point to ensure high-quality products. In several process control strategies the on-line monitoring of reaction performance is required. Due to the multiphase nature of the emulsion and suspension processes, there is a lack of sensors to perform successful on-line monitoring. Near infrared and Raman spectroscopies have been pointed out as useful approaches for monitoring emulsion and suspension polymerizations and several applications have been described. In such instance, the chemometric approach on relating near infrared and Raman spectra to polymer properties is widely used and has proven to be useful. Nevertheless, the multiphase nature of emulsion and suspension polymerizations also represents a challenge for the chemometric approach based on multivariate calibration models and demands the development of new methods. In this work, a set novel results is presented from the monitoring of 15 batch emulsion reactions that show the chemometric challenge to be faced on development of new methods for successful monitoring of processes taken under dispersed medium. In order to discuss these results, several chemometric approaches were revised. It is shown that Raman and NIR spectroscopic techniques are suitable for on-line monitoring of monomer concentration and polymer content during the polymerizations, as well as medium heterogeneity properties, i.e. average particle size. It is also shown that Hotteling and Q statistics, widely used in chemometrics, might fail in monitoring these reactions, while an approach based on principal curves is able to overcome such restriction.

  11. Intrinsic selectivity in some prebiotic reactions of urazole with sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Colloton, Patricia A.

    2004-02-01

    Urazole (1,2,4-triazolidine-3,5-dione) (1), 4-methylurazole (12), and its carbon analog, 4,4-dimethylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione (18), react with 2-deoxy-D-ribose (2-deoxy-D-erythro-pentose; 6) in an aqueous solution at room temperature in a regioselective manner (a single substitution on a hydrazidic nitrogen, no reaction on the imide nitrogen) to give a mixture of four nucleosides. These are α and β pyranosides (p) and α and β furanosides (f). The α p forms in a stereoselective manner. A crystalline precipitate is formed in each of the above reactions, which is an exclusive enantiospecific product, 1R, 2R α p. 1 with 2-deoxy-L-ribose (10) gives a precipitate with the exclusive 1S, 2S α p stereochemistry. With 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-deoxy-D-arabino-hexose; 7) the reaction with 1 is stereospecific, since only one isomer, β p, forms in the solution. Causes of enhanced reactivity of 1 with sugars were also studied. It was found that cyclic hydrazide analogs of 1, such as 12 and 18, are reactive, but open-chain analogs, 1,2,-diacetylhydrazine (21) and 1,2-dicarbethoxyhydrazine (22), are not. Although this reactivity assessment was done qualitatively and under restrictive reaction conditions, it still may be valuable for understanding α -effect of hydrazide nucleophiles. The prebiotic significance of our results is discussed.

  12. Use of electrophysiological monitoring in selective rhizotomy treating glossopharyngeal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhao; Chen, Minjie; Zhang, Weijie; Chai, Ying

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of electrophysiological monitoring on selective rhizotomy of the glossopharyngeal nerve (SRGN) in treatment of glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN). From December, 2009 to May, 2012, SRGN was carried out on 8 patients with GPN, through a suboccipital sigmoid sinus posterior approach. The electrodes were placed on the cricothyroid muscle (vagus nerve). Two groups of amplitudes (A1 and A2) were recorded. A1 was recorded when the mixed nerve root was stimulated, and A2 when the part of the vagus nerve was stimulated. The glossopharyngeal nerve was sectioned and the vagus nerve was preserved. If A1/A2 < 50%, the mixed nerve root should be sectioned, otherwise the mixed nerve root should be retained. As the representation of vagus nerve, the averages of A1 and A2 were 22 and 36 μV respectively. The 8 patients were followed up for 9-39 months. Seven patients (87.5%) obtained complete pain relief (excellent) without complications such as hoarseness, dysphagia, and cough. One case (12.5%) obtained moderate relief (good), and was under control with carbamazepine at a dosage of 600 mg/d. Cough was occurred in this patient, but relieved in two months. Electrophysiological monitoring in SRGN can improve the efficiency of pain relief and reduce the incidence of complications. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Layerwise Monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting Process by Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Harald; Zeugner, Thomas; Zaeh, Michael F.

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build parts directly from CAD data. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector, the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. This enables the identification of hot spots in an early stage during the solidification process and helps to avoid process interrupts. Potential quality indicators are derived from spatially resolved measurement data and are correlated to the resulting part properties. A model of heat dissipation is presented based on the measurement of the material response for varying heat input. Current results show the feasibility of process surveillance by thermography for a limited section of the building platform in a commercial system.

  14. Monitoring biodiesel reactions of soybean oil and sunflower oil using ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, M. K. K.; Silva, C. E. R.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel is an innovation that attempts to substitute diesel oil with biomass. The aim of this paper is to show the development of a real-time method to monitor transesterification reactions by using low-power ultrasound and pulse/echo techniques. The results showed that it is possible to identify different events during the transesterification process by using the proposed parameters, showing that the proposed method is a feasible way to monitor the reactions of biodiesel during its fabrication, in real time, and with relatively low- cost equipment.

  15. Workflow development for targeted lipidomic quantification using parallel reaction monitoring on a quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juntuo; Liu, Chunlei; Si, Dandan; Jia, Bing; Zhong, Lijun; Yin, Yuxin

    2017-06-15

    Advances in high-resolution mass spectrometers with faster scanning capabilities and higher sensitivities have expanded these instruments' functionality beyond traditional data-dependent acquisition in targeted metabolomics. Apart from the traditional multiple reaction monitoring strategy, the parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) strategy is also used for targeted metabolomics quantification. The high resolution and mass accuracy of full-scan (MS1) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) scan result in sufficient selectivity by monitoring all MS/MS fragment ions for each target precursor and simultaneously providing flexibility in assay method construction and post-acquisition data analysis. In this study, using an orthogonal quadrupole-time of flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system (QTOF LC-MS), we investigated the applicability of a large-scale targeted lipidomic assay using scheduled PRM. This method monitored 222 lipids belonging to 15 lipid species in serum. Robustness, reproducibility, and quantitative performance were assessed using chemical standards and serum samples. Finally, we demonstrated the application of this PRM-based targeted metabolomic workflow to systemic lupus erythematosus, a severe autoimmunological disease. Results showed that 63 lipids belonging to 11 lipid species were significantly changed. In summary, at the first time, a robust targeted lipidomic workflow was established using PRM acquisition strategy on a Q-TOF platform, providing another powerful tool for targeted metabolomic analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Postmarketing surveillance of adverse drug reactions in general practice. II: Prescription-event monitoring at the University of Southampton.

    PubMed

    Inman, W H

    1981-04-11

    An independent, non-regulatory drug surveillance research unit has been established at the University of Southampton. Its first task will be to set up a prescription-event monitoring scheme in general practice to enable the pattern of adverse events, as distinct from suspected adverse reactions associated with new drugs to be compared with that of older medicines. Prescriptions for selected drugs will identify patients and a simple questionnaire, designed to be completed in under five minutes, will be used to obtain the required information. Medical opinions about causation need not be given, and the scheme will not interfere with normal prescribing practice.

  17. Cold state-selected molecular collisions and reactions.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Ye, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, and particularly the past five years, a quiet revolution has been building at the border between atomic physics and experimental quantum chemistry. The rapid development of techniques for producing cold and even ultracold molecules without a perturbing rare-gas cluster shell is now enabling the study of chemical reactions and scattering at the quantum scattering limit with only a few partial waves contributing to the incident channel. Moreover, the ability to perform these experiments with nonthermal distributions comprising one or a few specific states enables the observation and even full control of state-to-state collision rates in this computation-friendly regime: This is perhaps the most elementary study possible of scattering and reaction dynamics.

  18. Ambient monitoring of asbestos in selected Italian living areas.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Mangano, Dario; Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Ricchi, Anna; Foresti, Elisabetta; Lesci, Giorgio; Roveri, Norberto; Mariotti, Mauro; Pecchini, Giovanni

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an intensive monitoring activity of the particulate, fall-out and soil of selected living areas in Italy with the aim to detect the asbestos concentration in air and subsequent risk of exposure for the population in ambient living environments, and to assess the nature of the other mineral phases composing the particulate matrix. Some areas were sorted out because of the presence of asbestos containing materials on site whereas others were used as blank spots in the attempt to detect the background environmental concentration of asbestos in air. Because the concentration of asbestos in ambient environments is presumably very low, and it is well known that conventional low-medium flow sampling systems with filters of small diameter (25mm) may collect only a very small fraction of particulate over a short period, for the first time here, an intense monitoring activity was conducted with a high flow sampling system. The high flow system requires the use of large cellulose filters with the advantage that, increasing the amount of collected dust, the probability to collect asbestos fibers increases. Both the protocol of monitoring and analysis are novel and prompted by the need to increase the sensitivity towards the small number of expected fibers. With this goal, the collection of fall-out samples (the particulate falling into a collector filled with distilled water during the monitoring shift) and soil samples was also accomplished. The analytical protocol of the matrix particulate included preliminary X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), optical microscopy and quantitative electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Correlations with climatic trends and PM10 concentration data were also attempted. The surprising outcome of this work is that, despite the nature of the investigated site, the amount of dispersed asbestos fibers is very low and invariably lower than the theoretical method detection limits of the SEM and TEM techniques for

  19. Polyhedral Interpolation for Optimal Reaction Control System Jet Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefert, Leon P.; Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is described for interpolating optimal values for spacecraft Reaction Control System jet firing duty cycles. The algorithm uses the symmetrical geometry of the optimal solution to reduce the number of calculations and data storage requirements to a level that enables implementation on the small real time flight control systems used in spacecraft. The process minimizes acceleration direction errors, maximizes control authority, and minimizes fuel consumption.

  20. Quantification of Glycopeptides by Multiple Reaction Monitoring LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ehwang; Pyreddy, Swetha; Mechref, Yehia

    2013-01-01

    Protein glycosylation has a major influence on functions of proteins. Studies have shown that aberrations in glycosylation are indicative of disease conditions. This has prompted major research activities for comparative studies of glycoproteins in biological samples. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is a highly sensitive technique which has been recently explored for quantitative proteomics. In this work, MRM was adopted for quantification of glycopeptides derived from both model glycoproteins and depleted human blood serum using glycan oxonium ions as transitions. The utilization of oxonium ions aids in identifying the different types of glycans bound to peptide backbones. MRM experiments were optimized by evaluating different parameters that have a major influence on quantification of glycopeptides, which include MRM time segments, number of transitions, and normalized collision energies. The results indicate that oxonium ions could be adopted for the characterization and quantification of glycopeptides in general, eliminating the need to select specific transitions for individual precursor ions. Also, the specificity increased with the number of transitions and a more sensitive analysis can be obtained by providing specific time segments. This approach can be applied to comparative and quantitative studies of glycopeptides in biological samples as illustrated for the case of depleted blood serum sample. PMID:22847692

  1. Investigating the mechanism of the selective hydrogenation reaction of cinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Laicai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CAL) belongs to the group of aromatic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes; the selective hydrogenation of CAL plays an important role in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Using Ptn clusters as catalytic models, we studied the selective hydrogenation reaction mechanism for CAL catalyzed by Ptn (n = 6, 10, 14, 18) clusters by means of B3LYP in density functional theory at the 6-31+ G(d) level (the LanL2DZ extra basis set was used for the Pt atom). The rationality of the transition state was proved by vibration frequency analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinate computation. Moreover, atoms in molecules theory and nature bond orbital theory were applied to discuss the interaction among orbitals and the bonding characteristics. The results indicate that three kinds of products, namely 3-phenylpropyl aldehyde, 3-phenyl allyl alcohol and cinnamyl alcohol, are produced in the selective hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by Ptn clusters; each pathway possesses two reaction channels. Ptn clusters are more likely to catalyze the activation and hydrogenation of the C = O bond in CAL molecules, eventually producing cinnamic alcohol, which proves that Ptn clusters have a strong reaction selectivity to catalyze CAL. The reaction selectivity of the catalyzer cluster is closely related to the size of the Ptn cluster, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity. Graphical Abstract The reaction mechanism for the selective hydrogenation reaction ofcinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters was studied by densityfunctional theory. The reactionselectivity of cluster catalyzer was concluded to be closely related to the size of Ptn clusters, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity.

  2. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  3. Deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid: Monitoring the reaction kinetics via low-temperature optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Corval, A.; Casalegno, R.; Astilean, S.; Trommsdorff, H.P.

    1992-06-25

    In the deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid, this reaction is monitored via low-temperature optical spectroscopy to observe the proton-deuterium rate of exchange between the solvent and solute molecules. Of the 14 pentacene protons, 6 have an exchange rate 2 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining 8. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  5. RAPID MONITORING BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR PATHOGENIC ASPERGILLUS DURING CARPET REMOVAL FROM A HOSPITAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring for pathogenic Aspergillus species using a rapid, highly sensitive, quantitative polumerase chain reaction technique during carpet removal in a burn unit provided data which allowed the patients to be safely returned to the re-floored area sooner than if only conventio...

  6. RAPID MONITORING BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR PATHOGENIC ASPERGILLUS DURING CARPET REMOVAL FROM A HOSPITAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring for pathogenic Aspergillus species using a rapid, highly sensitive, quantitative polumerase chain reaction technique during carpet removal in a burn unit provided data which allowed the patients to be safely returned to the re-floored area sooner than if only conventio...

  7. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  8. On-line reaction monitoring by mass spectrometry, modern approaches for the analysis of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Ray, Andrew; Bristow, Tony; Whitmore, Chris; Mosely, Jackie

    2017-06-19

    The application of on-line mass spectrometry for direct analysis of chemical and other types of process continues to grow in importance and impact. The ability of the technique to characterize many aspects of a chemical reaction such as product and impurity formation, along with reactant consumption in a single experiment is key to its adoption and development. Innovations in ionization techniques and mass spectrometry instrumentation are enabling this adoption. An increasing range of ambient ionization techniques make on-line mass spectrometry applicable to a large range of chemistries. The academic development and commercialization of small footprint portable/transportable mass spectrometers is providing technology that can be positioned with any process under investigation. These developments, coupled with research into new ways of sampling representatively from both the condensed and gaseous phases, are positioning mass spectrometry as an essential technology for on-line process optimization, understanding and intelligent control. It is recognized that quantitative capability of mass spectrometry in this application can cause some resistance to its adoption, but research activities to tackle this limitation are on-going. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. MRMaid, the web-based tool for designing multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions.

    PubMed

    Mead, Jennifer A; Bianco, Luca; Ottone, Vanessa; Barton, Chris; Kay, Richard G; Lilley, Kathryn S; Bond, Nicholas J; Bessant, Conrad

    2009-04-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of peptides uses tandem mass spectrometry to quantify selected proteins of interest, such as those previously identified in differential studies. Using this technique, the specificity of precursor to product transitions is harnessed for quantitative analysis of multiple proteins in a single sample. The design of transitions is critical for the success of MRM experiments, but predicting signal intensity of peptides and fragmentation patterns ab initio is challenging given existing methods. The tool presented here, MRMaid (pronounced "mermaid") offers a novel alternative for rapid design of MRM transitions for the proteomics researcher. The program uses a combination of knowledge of the properties of optimal MRM transitions taken from expert practitioners and literature with MS/MS evidence derived from interrogation of a database of peptide identifications and their associated mass spectra. The tool also predicts retention time using a published model, allowing ordering of transition candidates. By exploiting available knowledge and resources to generate the most reliable transitions, this approach negates the need for theoretical prediction of fragmentation and the need to undertake prior "discovery" MS studies. MRMaid is a modular tool built around the Genome Annotating Proteomic Pipeline framework, providing a web-based solution with both descriptive and graphical visualizations of transitions. Predicted transition candidates are ranked based on a novel transition scoring system, and users may filter the results by selecting optional stringency criteria, such as omitting frequently modified residues, constraining the length of peptides, or omitting missed cleavages. Comparison with published transitions showed that MRMaid successfully predicted the peptide and product ion pairs in the majority of cases with appropriate retention time estimates. As the data content of the Genome Annotating Proteomic Pipeline repository increases

  10. The Psychophysiological Reactions of Film Viewers While Viewing Selected Cinemagraphic Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeltzer, Dennis K.

    This study focused on the psychophysiological reactions of viewers seeing such selected cinemagraphic elements as varying camera distances, tracking shots, panning shots, and zooming shots. Subjects (N=29), randomly selected from introductory speech courses, viewed five films that varied in the presence or absence of the selected filmic elements.…

  11. Exact probability distributions of selected species in stochastic chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    López-Caamal, Fernando; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T

    2014-09-01

    Chemical reactions are discrete, stochastic events. As such, the species' molecular numbers can be described by an associated master equation. However, handling such an equation may become difficult due to the large size of reaction networks. A commonly used approach to forecast the behaviour of reaction networks is to perform computational simulations of such systems and analyse their outcome statistically. This approach, however, might require high computational costs to provide accurate results. In this paper we opt for an analytical approach to obtain the time-dependent solution of the Chemical Master Equation for selected species in a general reaction network. When the reaction networks are composed exclusively of zeroth and first-order reactions, this analytical approach significantly alleviates the computational burden required by simulation-based methods. By building upon these analytical solutions, we analyse a general monomolecular reaction network with an arbitrary number of species to obtain the exact marginal probability distribution for selected species. Additionally, we study two particular topologies of monomolecular reaction networks, namely (i) an unbranched chain of monomolecular reactions with and without synthesis and degradation reactions and (ii) a circular chain of monomolecular reactions. We illustrate our methodology and alternative ways to use it for non-linear systems by analysing a protein autoactivation mechanism. Later, we compare the computational load required for the implementation of our results and a pure computational approach to analyse an unbranched chain of monomolecular reactions. Finally, we study calcium ions gates in the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum mediated by ryanodine receptors.

  12. Reaction monitoring of tocopherols with active nitrogen oxides by ultra high-speed liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yoshiko; Nishio, Tadashi; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2011-05-15

    Ultra high-speed liquid chromatography (LC) has become increasingly popular in analytical research fields. This analytical system provides fast and efficient chromatographic separation over a wide range of flow rate and pressure. In this study, we applied an ultra high-speed LC system to monitor the reaction of α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherols with active nitrogen species. By using an ultra high-speed LC system equipped with a photo-diode array detector, short time analysis and detection of a wide range of reaction products were accomplished efficiently. The analysis time of tocopherol and its major oxidation products were greatly shortened compared to conventional HPLC methods (more than 10 times). The ultra reversed-phase LC was demonstrated to be as a powerful tool for monitoring rapid oxidation reactions of tocopherols with active nitrogen species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  14. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  15. Usefulness of Post-Transplant Hematopoietic Chimera Monitoring by Use of the Quantitative Fluorescence Polymerase Chain Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Lejman, M; Drabko, K; Styka, B; Winnicka, D; Babicz, M; Jaszczuk, I; Kowalczyk, J R

    2017-10-01

    In the light of an increasing number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations and more frequent use of reduced-intensity conditioning as preparative regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, post-transplant cell chimera monitoring is considered a necessity. The quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction method, along with the commercial AmpFSTR SGMPlus kit, was applied in research on hematopoietic chimeras. The total of 102 patients who had undergone allogenic transplantations were investigated. Chimerism monitoring was commenced on the seventh day after transplantation and lasted up to 12 years in some cases, according to the instituted schedule. The kit has been shown to be fully sufficient for determining genetic profiles of recipients and donors and selecting informative markers. The method has been proven effective and satisfactory for assessing quantitative chimeras. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective nitrogen functionalization of graphene by Bucherer-type reaction.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdeněk; Luxa, Jan; Pumera, Martin

    2015-05-26

    Nitrogen functionalization of graphene offers new hybrid materials with improved performance for important technological applications. Despite studies highlighting the dependence of the performance of nitrogen-functionalized graphene on the types of nitrogen functional groups that are present, precise synthetic control over their ratio is challenging. Herein, the synthesis of nitrogen-functionalized graphene rich in amino groups by a Bucherer-type reaction under hydrothermal conditions is reported. The efficiency of the synthetic method under two hydrothermal conditions was examined for graphite oxide produced by Hummers and Hofmann oxidation routes. The morphological and structural properties of the amino-functionalized graphene were fully characterized. The use of a synthetic method with a well-known mechanism for derivatization of graphene will open new avenues for highly reproducible functionalization of graphene materials.

  17. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

    PubMed

    Brächer, A; Hoch, S; Albert, K; Kost, H J; Werner, B; von Harbou, E; Hasse, H

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monitoring of water quality of selected wells in Brno district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marková, Jana; Harbuľáková, Vlasta Ondrejka

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with two wells in the country of Brno-district (Brčálka well and Well Olšová). The aim of work was monitoring of elementary parameters of water at regular monthly intervals to measure: water temperature, pH values, solubility oxygen and spring yield. According to the client's requirements (Lesy města Brno) laboratory analyzes of selected parameters were done twice a year and their results were compared with Ministry of Health Decree no. 252/2004 Coll.. These parameters: nitrate, chemical oxygen demand (COD), calcium and magnesium and its values are presented in graphs, for ammonium ions and nitrite in the table. Graphical interpretation of spring yields dependence on the monthly total rainfall and dependence of water temperature on ambient temperature was utilized. The most important features of wells include a water source, a landmark in the landscape, aesthetic element or resting and relaxing place. Maintaining wells is important in terms of future generations.

  19. A schizophrenia relevant 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task for mice assessing broad monitoring, distractibility and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiping; Guadagna, Simone; Mereu, Maddalena; Ciampoli, Mariasole; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Ballard, Theresa; Papaleo, Francesco

    2017-04-05

    The 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT) is an automated test for rodents allowing the assessment of multiple cognitive measures. Originally designed to assess cognitive deficits relevant to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, it has been widely used in the investigation of neural systems of attention. In the current study, we have set up a modified version, which reduced the training phase to only 8-9 days with minimal food deprivation and without single-housing. Furthermore, based on evidence that patients with schizophrenia are more impaired in broad monitoring abilities than in sustained attention, we successfully developed a protocol replicating the Spatial Attentional Resource Allocation Task (SARAT), used in humans to assess broad monitoring. During this task, when the target appeared at a single pre-cued location, mice selectively responded faster. Instead, increasing the number of validly cued locations proportionately decreased accuracy. We then validated a protocol which is relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders in which additional irrelevant pre-cue lights selectively disrupted attention (distractibility). Finally, we improved previously used protocols changing inter-trial intervals from 5 to 7 s by randomly presenting this shift only in 20% of the trials. This resulted in a selective effect on premature responses (impulsivity), with important implications for schizophrenia as well as for other mental disorders. Therefore, this revised 5-CSRTT reduced training and stress on the animals while selectively measuring different cognitive functions with translational validity to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.

  20. Mode specificity in bond selective reactions F + HOD → HF + OD and DF + OH

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The influence of vibrational excitations in the partially deuterated water (HOD) reactant on its bond selective reactions with F is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method on an accurate global potential energy surface. Despite the decidedly early barrier of the F + H{sub 2}O reaction, reactant vibrational excitation in each local stretching mode of HOD is found to significantly enhance the reaction which breaks the excited bond. In the mean time, excitation of the HOD bending mode also enhances the reaction, but with much lower efficacy and weaker bond selectivity. Except for low collision energies, all vibrational modes are more effective in promoting the bond selective reactions than the translational energy. These results are compared with the predictions of the recently proposed sudden vector projection model.

  1. Potential of vis-NIR spectroscopy to monitor the silica precipitation reaction.

    PubMed

    Rey-Bayle, Maud; Bendoula, Ryad; Henrot, Serge; Lamiri, Kilani; Baco-Antoniali, Franck; Caillol, Noémie; Gobrecht, Alexia; Roger, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Controlling production online is an important issue for chemical companies. Visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy offers a number of important advantages for process monitoring, and has been used since the 1980s. For complex media such as silica precipitation samples, it is interesting to be able to study independently the scattering and absorption effects. From the scattering coefficient it is possible to extract information on the physical structure of the medium. In this work, the physical changes were monitored during a silica precipitation reaction by simple measurement of collimated transmittance NIR spectra. It is shown that it is possible to differentiate samples before and after the gel point, which is a key parameter for monitoring the process. From these NIR spectra the scattering coefficients were simply extracted, allowing a global vision of the physical changes in the medium. Then principal component analysis of the spectra allowed refinement of the understanding of the scattering effects, in combination with particle size monitoring.

  2. Chiral Polymerization in Open Systems From Chiral-Selective Reaction Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Nelson, Bradley J.; Walker, Sara Imari

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the possibility that prebiotic homochirality can be achieved exclusively through chiral-selective reaction rate parameters without any other explicit mechanism for chiral bias. Specifically, we examine an open network of polymerization reactions, where the reaction rates can have chiral-selective values. The reactions are neither autocatalytic nor do they contain explicit enantiomeric cross-inhibition terms. We are thus investigating how rare a set of chiral-selective reaction rates needs to be in order to generate a reasonable amount of chiral bias. We quantify our results adopting a statistical approach: varying both the mean value and the rms dispersion of the relevant reaction rates, we show that moderate to high levels of chiral excess can be achieved with fairly small chiral bias, below 10%. Considering the various unknowns related to prebiotic chemical networks in early Earth and the dependence of reaction rates to environmental properties such as temperature and pressure variations, we argue that homochirality could have been achieved from moderate amounts of chiral selectivity in the reaction rates.

  3. Chiral polymerization in open systems from chiral-selective reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Nelson, Bradley J; Walker, Sara Imari

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the possibility that prebiotic homochirality can be achieved exclusively through chiral-selective reaction rate parameters without any other explicit mechanism for chiral bias. Specifically, we examine an open network of polymerization reactions, where the reaction rates can have chiral-selective values. The reactions are neither autocatalytic nor do they contain explicit enantiomeric cross-inhibition terms. We are thus investigating how rare a set of chiral-selective reaction rates needs to be in order to generate a reasonable amount of chiral bias. We quantify our results adopting a statistical approach: varying both the mean value and the rms dispersion of the relevant reaction rates, we show that moderate to high levels of chiral excess can be achieved with fairly small chiral bias, below 10%. Considering the various unknowns related to prebiotic chemical networks in early Earth and the dependence of reaction rates to environmental properties such as temperature and pressure variations, we argue that homochirality could have been achieved from moderate amounts of chiral selectivity in the reaction rates.

  4. Influence of composition of reaction mixture on selectivity in oxidation of aromatic compounds on oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Belokopytov, Yu.V.; Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Tatarinova, T.A.; Strashnenko, A.V.

    1985-07-01

    A general outline is given of a kinetic model of oxidation of a hydrocarbon under the conditions of coexistence on the catalyst surface of sections of different oxidation levels. An analytical dependence has been obtained of the selectivity of the process and conversion on the composition of the reaction mixture. A qualitative agreement has been established between the theoretical and experimental dependences of selectivity and conversion on the ratio of the benzene and oxygen concentrations in the reaction mixture.

  5. Laser scanning confocal microscopy for in situ monitoring of alkali-silica reaction.

    PubMed

    Collins, C L; Ideker, J H; Kurtis, K E

    2004-02-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) occurs in concrete between reactive siliceous components in the aggregate and the strongly alkaline pore solution, resulting in the formation of a potentially expansive gel product. Lithium additives have been shown to reduce expansion associated with ASR, but the mechanism(s) by which lithium reduces expansion have not been understood. Therefore, development of an in situ method to observe reactions associated with ASR is highly desirable, as it will allow for non-destructive observation of the reaction product formation and damage evolution over time, as the reaction progresses. A technique to image into mortar through glass aggregate by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), producing three-dimensional representations of the sample was developed. This LSCM technique was utilized to monitor the progress of alkali-silica reaction in mortar samples prepared with alkali-reactive glass aggregate both in the presence and in the absence of lithium additives: LiNO3, LiCl or LiOH. The method proved to be effective in qualitatively monitoring crack formation and growth and product formation, within cracks and at the paste/aggregate interface. In particular, dendritic products were observed at the paste/aggregate interface only in those samples containing lithium, suggesting that these products may play a role in ASR mitigation.

  6. Performance monitoring and response conflict resolution associated with choice stepping reaction tasks.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Tsutou, Kotaro; Saito, Kotaro; Ishida, Kazuto; Tanabe, Shigeo; Nojima, Ippei

    2016-11-01

    Choice reaction requires response conflict resolution, and the resolution processes that occur during a choice stepping reaction task undertaken in a standing position, which requires maintenance of balance, may be different to those processes occurring during a choice reaction task performed in a seated position. The study purpose was to investigate the resolution processes during a choice stepping reaction task at the cortical level using electroencephalography and compare the results with a control task involving ankle dorsiflexion responses. Twelve young adults either stepped forward or dorsiflexed the ankle in response to a visual imperative stimulus presented on a computer screen. We used the Simon task and examined the error-related negativity (ERN) that follows an incorrect response and the correct-response negativity (CRN) that follows a correct response. Error was defined as an incorrect initial weight transfer for the stepping task and as an incorrect initial tibialis anterior activation for the control task. Results revealed that ERN and CRN amplitudes were similar in size for the stepping task, whereas the amplitude of ERN was larger than that of CRN for the control task. The ERN amplitude was also larger in the stepping task than the control task. These observations suggest that a choice stepping reaction task involves a strategy emphasizing post-response conflict and general performance monitoring of actual and required responses and also requires greater cognitive load than a choice dorsiflexion reaction. The response conflict resolution processes appear to be different for stepping tasks and reaction tasks performed in a seated position.

  7. Online Monitoring of Enzymatic Reactions Using Time-Resolved Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Si; Wu, Qiuhua; Xiao, He; Chen, Hao

    2017-02-21

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is powerful for determining enzymatic reaction kinetics because of its soft ionization nature. However, it is limited to use ESI-favored solvents containing volatile buffers (e.g., ammonium acetate). In addition, lack of a quenching step for online ESI-MS reaction monitoring might introduce inaccuracy, due to the possible acceleration of reaction in the sprayed microdroplets. To overcome these issues, this study presents a new approach for online measuring enzymatic reaction kinetics using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). By using DESI-MS, enzymatic reaction products in a buffered aqueous media (e.g., a solution containing Tris buffer or high concentration of inorganic salts) could be directly detected. Furthermore, by adjusting the pH and solvent composition of the DESI spray, reaction can be online quenched to avoid the postionization reaction event, leading to fast and accurate measurement of kinetic constants. Reaction time control can be obtained simply by adjusting the injection flow rates of enzyme and substrate solutions. Enzymatic reactions examined in this study include hydrolysis of 2-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside by β-galactosidase and hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase. Derived Michaelis-Menten constants Km for these two reactions were determined to be 214 μM and 172 μM, respectively, which are in good agreement with the values of 300 μM and 230 μM reported in literature, validating the DESI-MS approach. Furthermore, this time-resolved DESI-MS also allowed us to determine Km and turnover number kcat for trypsin digestion of angiotensin II (Km and kcat are determined to be 6.4 mM and 1.3 s(-1), respectively).

  8. Weighted next reaction method and parameter selection for efficient simulation of rare events in biochemical reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhouyi; Cai, Xiaodong

    2011-07-25

    The weighted stochastic simulation algorithm (wSSA) recently developed by Kuwahara and Mura and the refined wSSA proposed by Gillespie et al. based on the importance sampling technique open the door for efficient estimation of the probability of rare events in biochemical reaction systems. In this paper, we first apply the importance sampling technique to the next reaction method (NRM) of the stochastic simulation algorithm and develop a weighted NRM (wNRM). We then develop a systematic method for selecting the values of importance sampling parameters, which can be applied to both the wSSA and the wNRM. Numerical results demonstrate that our parameter selection method can substantially improve the performance of the wSSA and the wNRM in terms of simulation efficiency and accuracy.

  9. Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

  10. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  11. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; ...

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  12. FutureGen 2.0 Monitoring Program: An Overview of the Monitoring Approach and Technologies Selected for Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Strickland, Chris E.; Thorne, Paul D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Kelly, Mark E.; Sullivan, Charlotte; Williams, Mark D.; Amonette, James E.; Downs, Janelle L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to 1) evaluate CO2 mass balance and 2) detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the injection stream and reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. It will also implement an adaptive monitoring strategy whereby monitoring results are continually evaluated and the monitoring network is modified as required, including the option to drill additional wells in out-years. Wells will be monitored for changes in CO2 concentration and formation pressure, and other geochemical/isotopic signatures that provide indication of CO2 or brine leakage. Indirect geophysical monitoring technologies that were selected for implementation include passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture logging. Near-surface monitoring approaches that have been initiated include surficial aquifer and surface- water monitoring, soil-gas monitoring, atmospheric monitoring, and hyperspectral data acquisition for assessment of vegetation conditions. Initially, only the collection of baseline data sets is planned; the need for additional near- surface monitoring will be continually evaluated throughout the design and operational phases of the project, and selected approaches may be reinstituted if conditions warrant. Given the current conceptual understanding of the subsurface environment, early and appreciable impacts to near-surface environments are not expected.

  13. Precision of Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We compared the reproducibility of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry-based peptide quantitation in tryptic digests from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and frozen clear cell renal cell carcinoma tissues. The analyses targeted a candidate set of 114 peptides previously identified in shotgun proteomic analyses, of which 104 were detectable in FFPE and frozen tissue. Although signal intensities for MRM of peptides from FFPE tissue were on average 66% of those in frozen tissue, median coefficients of variation (CV) for measurements in FFPE and frozen tissues were nearly identical (18–20%). Measurements of lysine C-terminal peptides and arginine C-terminal peptides from FFPE tissue were similarly reproducible (19.5% and 18.3% median CV, respectively). We further evaluated the precision of MRM-based quantitation by analysis of peptides from the Her2 receptor in FFPE and frozen tissues from a Her2 overexpressing mouse xenograft model of breast cancer and in human FFPE breast cancer specimens. We obtained equivalent MRM measurements of HER2 receptor levels in FFPE and frozen mouse xenografts derived from HER2-overexpressing BT474 cells and HER2-negative Sum159 cells. MRM analyses of 5 HER2-positive and 5 HER-negative human FFPE breast tumors confirmed the results of immunohistochemical analyses, thus demonstrating the feasibility of HER2 protein quantification in FFPE tissue specimens. The data demonstrate that MRM analyses can be performed with equal precision on FFPE and frozen tissues and that lysine-containing peptides can be selected for quantitative comparisons, despite the greater impact of formalin fixation on lysine residues. The data further illustrate the feasibility of applying MRM to quantify clinically important tissue biomarkers in FFPE specimens. PMID:22530795

  14. Sugar nucleotide quantification using multiple reaction monitoring liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Aldo D; Chavez, Jorge L; Mechref, Yehia

    2013-08-15

    Glycosylation of proteins and lipids is reliant on the availability of monosaccharide-activated donors known as sugar nucleotides. They are responsible for glycosylation in cells. Reliable quantification of these sugar nucleotides might provide an insight into their biological roles and attributes. Herein, a method is described for the quantification of sugar nucleotides using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) tandem mass spectrometry, allowing selective detection of sugar nucleotides in a biological sample. Seven model sugar nucleotide standards commonly associated with lipid and protein glycosylation were separated on a porous graphitic carbon column using an UHPLC system coupled to a triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometer utilizing a multiple reaction monitoring approach. Successful baseline separation of these metabolites was attained in 6 min using an ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile, circumventing the use of MS-unfriendly pairing reagents. The linear dynamic range of this procedure was established over almost three orders of magnitude from 20 pg to 1 ng (40 pg to 2 ng for the isomers UDP-GlcNAc/GalNAc). The limit of detection ranged from 15 pg to 30 pg while the limit of quantification ranged from 50 pg to 100 pg. Furthermore, viability of this method was tested using three different breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-231-BR, and MDA-MB-361) with the successful identification and quantification of all seven targeted sugar nucleotides. The described method permitted the quantitative analysis of sugar nucleotides in 10 min, thus allowing the practical use of this approach in high-throughput settings. The method was also very effective for the quantification of sugar nucleotides derived from three different breast cancer cell lines. The distribution of sugar nucleotides was different among the different cell lines and unique for each cell line. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Cavitands as Reaction Vessels and Blocking Groups for Selective Reactions in Water.

    PubMed

    Masseroni, Daniele; Mosca, Simone; Mower, Matthew P; Blackmond, Donna G; Rebek, Julius

    2016-07-11

    The majority of reactions currently performed in the chemical industry take place in organic solvents, compounds that are generally derived from petrochemicals. To promote chemical processes in water, we examined the use of synthetic, deep water-soluble cavitands in the Staudinger reduction of long-chain aliphatic diazides (C8 , C10 , and C12 ). The diazide substrates are taken up by the cavitand in D2 O in folded, dynamic conformations. The reduction of one azide group to an amine gives a complex in which the substrate is fixed in an unsymmetrical conformation, with the amine terminal exposed and the azide terminal deep and inaccessible within the cavitand. Accordingly, the reduction of the second azide group is inhibited, even with excess phosphine, and good yields of the monofunctionalized products are obtained. In contrast, the reduction of the free diazides in bulk solution yields diamine products. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Reaction-driven surface restructuring and selectivity control in allylic alcohol catalytic aerobic oxidation over Pd.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam F; Ellis, Christine V; Naughton, James N; Newton, Mark A; Parlett, Christopher M A; Wilson, Karen

    2011-04-20

    Synchronous, time-resolved DRIFTS/MS/XAS cycling studies of the vapor-phase selective aerobic oxidation of crotyl alcohol over nanoparticulate Pd have revealed surface oxide as the desired catalytically active phase, with dynamic, reaction-induced Pd redox processes controlling selective versus combustion pathways.

  17. [Emission of electromagnetic radiation from selected computer monitors].

    PubMed

    Zyss, T

    1995-01-01

    The emission of electromagnetic fields from computer monitors was analysed. The data were compared with the permissible exposure level. EM radiation of chromatic monitors is higher than that of monochromatic ones. The radiation of magnetic fraction is insignificant. Both electric and magnetic fractions of EM radiation, 50 cm away from the monitor, are very low and do not exceed permissible values. It was observed that screen filters were effective in suppressing EM emission only at a short (up to 30 cm) distance from the monitor. At a distance of 50 cm they proved to be ineffective. Metallic-net filters were more effective than glass filters in suppressing EM radiation. It seems that EM fields generated by computer monitors are not harmful to computer operators if the distance is kept in safe limits.

  18. FutureGen 2.0 Monitoring Program: An Overview of the Monitoring Approach and Technologies Selected for Implementation

    DOE PAGES

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Strickland, Chris E.; Thorne, Paul D.; ...

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to 1) evaluate CO2 mass balance and 2) detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the injection stream and reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. It will also implement an adaptive monitoringmore » strategy whereby monitoring results are continually evaluated and the monitoring network is modified as required, including the option to drill additional wells in out-years. Wells will be monitored for changes in CO2 concentration and formation pressure, and other geochemical/isotopic signatures that provide indication of CO2 or brine leakage. Indirect geophysical monitoring technologies that were selected for implementation include passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture logging. Near-surface monitoring approaches that have been initiated include surficial aquifer and surface- water monitoring, soil-gas monitoring, atmospheric monitoring, and hyperspectral data acquisition for assessment of vegetation conditions. Initially, only the collection of baseline data sets is planned; the need for additional near- surface monitoring will be continually evaluated throughout the design and operational phases of the project, and selected approaches may be reinstituted if conditions warrant. Given the current conceptual understanding of the subsurface environment, early and appreciable impacts to near-surface environments are not expected.« less

  19. Optofluidic UV-Vis spectrophotometer for online monitoring of photocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Tan, Furui; Zhao, Yu; Tsoi, Chi Chung; Fan, Xudong; Yu, Weixing; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-06-29

    On-chip integration of optical detection units into the microfluidic systems for online monitoring is highly desirable for many applications and is also well in line with the spirit of optofluidics technology-fusion of optics and microfluidics for advanced functionalities. This paper reports the construction of a UV-Vis spectrophotometer on a microreactor, and demonstrates the online monitoring of the photocatalytic degradations of methylene blue and methyl orange under different flow rates and different pH values by detecting the intensity change and/or the peak shift. The integrated device consists of a TiO2-coated glass substrate, a PDMS micro-sized reaction chamber and two flow cells. By comparing with the results of commercial equipment, we have found that the measuring range and the sensitivity are acceptable, especially when the transmittance is in the range of 0.01-0.9. This integrated optofluidic device can significantly cut down the test time and the sample volume, and would provide a versatile platform for real-time characterization of photochemical performance. Moreover, its online monitoring capability may enable to access the usually hidden information in biochemical reactions like intermediate products, time-dependent processes and reaction kinetics.

  20. Optofluidic UV-Vis spectrophotometer for online monitoring of photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Tan, Furui; Zhao, Yu; Tsoi, Chi Chung; Fan, Xudong; Yu, Weixing; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    On-chip integration of optical detection units into the microfluidic systems for online monitoring is highly desirable for many applications and is also well in line with the spirit of optofluidics technology–fusion of optics and microfluidics for advanced functionalities. This paper reports the construction of a UV-Vis spectrophotometer on a microreactor, and demonstrates the online monitoring of the photocatalytic degradations of methylene blue and methyl orange under different flow rates and different pH values by detecting the intensity change and/or the peak shift. The integrated device consists of a TiO2-coated glass substrate, a PDMS micro-sized reaction chamber and two flow cells. By comparing with the results of commercial equipment, we have found that the measuring range and the sensitivity are acceptable, especially when the transmittance is in the range of 0.01–0.9. This integrated optofluidic device can significantly cut down the test time and the sample volume, and would provide a versatile platform for real-time characterization of photochemical performance. Moreover, its online monitoring capability may enable to access the usually hidden information in biochemical reactions like intermediate products, time-dependent processes and reaction kinetics. PMID:27352840

  1. Optofluidic UV-Vis spectrophotometer for online monitoring of photocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Tan, Furui; Zhao, Yu; Tsoi, Chi Chung; Fan, Xudong; Yu, Weixing; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-06-01

    On-chip integration of optical detection units into the microfluidic systems for online monitoring is highly desirable for many applications and is also well in line with the spirit of optofluidics technology–fusion of optics and microfluidics for advanced functionalities. This paper reports the construction of a UV-Vis spectrophotometer on a microreactor, and demonstrates the online monitoring of the photocatalytic degradations of methylene blue and methyl orange under different flow rates and different pH values by detecting the intensity change and/or the peak shift. The integrated device consists of a TiO2-coated glass substrate, a PDMS micro-sized reaction chamber and two flow cells. By comparing with the results of commercial equipment, we have found that the measuring range and the sensitivity are acceptable, especially when the transmittance is in the range of 0.01–0.9. This integrated optofluidic device can significantly cut down the test time and the sample volume, and would provide a versatile platform for real-time characterization of photochemical performance. Moreover, its online monitoring capability may enable to access the usually hidden information in biochemical reactions like intermediate products, time-dependent processes and reaction kinetics.

  2. Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Reproducible Quantification of Phospho-signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jacob J.; Yan, Ping; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Moore, Heather D.; Lin, Chenwei; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Reding, Kerryn W.; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    A major goal in cell signaling research is the quantification of phosphorylation pharmacodynamics following perturbations. Traditional methods of studying cellular phospho-signaling measure one analyte at a time with poor standardization, rendering them inadequate for interrogating network biology and contributing to the irreproducibility of preclinical research. In this study, we test the feasibility of circumventing these issues by coupling immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based enrichment of phosphopeptides with targeted, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to achieve precise, specific, standardized, multiplex quantification of phospho-signaling responses. A multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay targeting phospho-analytes responsive to DNA damage was configured, analytically characterized, and deployed to generate phospho-pharmacodynamic curves from primary and immortalized human cells experiencing genotoxic stress. The multiplexed assays demonstrated linear ranges of ≥3 orders of magnitude, median lower limit of quantification of 0.64 fmol on column, median intra-assay variability of 9.3%, median inter-assay variability of 12.7%, and median total CV of 16.0%. The multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay enabled robust quantification of 107 DNA damage-responsive phosphosites from human cells following DNA damage. The assays have been made publicly available as a resource to the community. The approach is generally applicable, enabling wide interrogation of signaling networks. PMID:26621847

  3. Perspective: Chemical reactions in ionic liquids monitored through the gas (vacuum)/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, F.; Niedermaier, I.; Steinrück, H.-P.

    2017-05-01

    This perspective analyzes the potential of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions to follow chemical reactions in ionic liquids in situ. Traditionally, only reactions occurring on solid surfaces were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in situ. This was due to the high vapor pressures of common liquids or solvents, which are not compatible with the required UHV conditions. It was only recently realized that the situation is very different when studying reactions in Ionic Liquids (ILs), which have an inherently low vapor pressure, and first studies have been performed within the last years. Compared to classical spectroscopy techniques used to monitor chemical reactions, the advantage of XPS is that through the analysis of their core levels all relevant elements can be quantified and their chemical state can be analyzed under well-defined (ultraclean) conditions. In this perspective, we cover six very different reactions which occur in the IL, with the IL, or at an IL/support interface, demonstrating the outstanding potential of in situ XPS to gain insights into liquid phase reactions in the near-surface region.

  4. Perspective: Chemical reactions in ionic liquids monitored through the gas (vacuum)/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Maier, F; Niedermaier, I; Steinrück, H-P

    2017-05-07

    This perspective analyzes the potential of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions to follow chemical reactions in ionic liquids in situ. Traditionally, only reactions occurring on solid surfaces were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in situ. This was due to the high vapor pressures of common liquids or solvents, which are not compatible with the required UHV conditions. It was only recently realized that the situation is very different when studying reactions in Ionic Liquids (ILs), which have an inherently low vapor pressure, and first studies have been performed within the last years. Compared to classical spectroscopy techniques used to monitor chemical reactions, the advantage of XPS is that through the analysis of their core levels all relevant elements can be quantified and their chemical state can be analyzed under well-defined (ultraclean) conditions. In this perspective, we cover six very different reactions which occur in the IL, with the IL, or at an IL/support interface, demonstrating the outstanding potential of in situ XPS to gain insights into liquid phase reactions in the near-surface region.

  5. When big brother is watching: goal orientation shapes reactions to electronic monitoring during online training.

    PubMed

    Watson, Aaron M; Foster Thompson, Lori; Rudolph, Jane V; Whelan, Thomas J; Behrend, Tara S; Gissel, Amanda L

    2013-07-01

    Web-based training is frequently used by organizations as a convenient and low-cost way to teach employees new knowledge and skills. As web-based training is typically unproctored, employees may be held accountable to the organization by computer software that monitors their behaviors. The current study examines how the introduction of electronic performance monitoring may provoke negative emotional reactions and decrease learning among certain types of e-learners. Through motivated action theory and trait activation theory, we examine the role of performance goal orientation when e-learners are exposed to asynchronous and synchronous monitoring. We show that some e-learners are more susceptible than others to evaluation apprehension when they perceive their activities are being monitored electronically. Specifically, e-learners higher in avoid performance goal orientation exhibited increased evaluation apprehension if they believed asynchronous monitoring was present, and they showed decreased skill attainment as a result. E-learners higher on prove performance goal orientation showed greater evaluation apprehension if they believed real-time monitoring was occurring, resulting in decreased skill attainment.

  6. Aryl Transfer Selectivity in Metal-Free Reactions of Unsymmetrical Diaryliodonium Salts.

    PubMed

    Stuart, David R

    2017-08-09

    Aromatic rings are found in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and functional materials. Diaryliodonium salts are new reagents used to transfer aryl groups under both metal-free and metal-catalyzed reactions and thereby synthesize arene-containing compounds. This minireview focuses on recent studies in selective aryl transfer reactions from unsymmetrical diaryliodonium salts under metal-free conditions. Reactions reported from 2007 to 2017, which represents a period of significant growth in diaryliodonium salt chemistry, are presented and organized by the type of reactive intermediate formed in the reaction. Specifically, reactions involving λ(3) -iodane, λ(3) -iodane radical anions, aryl radicals, and arynes are discussed. Chemoselectivity trends in aryl transfer are compared and contrasted across reaction intermediates and translation to potential auxiliaries are posited. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Implications of sterically constrained n-butane oxidation reactions on the reaction mechanism and selectivity to 1-butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Sean T.; Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Getman, Rachel B.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to analyze the reaction network in n-butane oxidation to 1-butanol over a Ag/Pd alloy catalyst under steric constraints, and the implications on the ability to produce 1-butanol selectively using MOF-encapsulated catalysts are discussed. MOFs are porous crystalline solids comprised of metal nodes linked by organic molecules. Recently, they have been successfully grown around metal nanoparticle catalysts. The resulting porous networks have been shown to promote regioselective chemistry, i.e., hydrogenation of trans-1,3-hexadiene to 3-hexene, presumably by forcing the linear alkene to stand "upright" on the catalyst surface and allowing only the terminal C-H bonds to be activated. In this work, we extend this concept to alkane oxidation. Our goal is to determine if a MOF-encapsulated catalyst could be used to selectively produce 1-butanol. Reaction energies and activation barriers are presented for more than 40 reactions in the pathway for n-butane oxidation. We find that C-H bond activation proceeds through an oxygen-assisted pathway and that butanal and 1-butanol are some of the possible products.

  8. Selecting optimum groundwater monitoring stations for earthquake observation and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Woo, N. C.

    2011-12-01

    In Korea, the National Groundwater Monitoring Network (NGMN), consisted of a total of 327 stations around the country up to date, has been established and operated to monitor the background level and quality of ground water since 1995. From some of the monitoring wells, we identified abnormal changes in groundwater due to earthquakes. Then, this project was initiated with the following objectives: a) to identify and characterize groundwater changes due to earthquakes from the NGMN wells, and b) to suggest groundwater monitoring wells that can be used as supplementary monitoring stations for present seismic network. To accomplish the objectives, we need to identify previous responding history of each well to the other earthquakes, and the well's hydrogeological setting. Groundwater responses to earthquake events are identified as the direction of water-level movement (rise/fall), the amount of absolute changes, and the time for recovery to the previous level. Then, the distribution of responded wells is analyzed for their locations with GIS tools. Finally, statistical analyses perform to identify the optimum monitoring stations, considering geological features and hydrogeological settings of the stations and the earthquake epicenters. In this presentation, we report the results of up-to-date study as a part of the above-mentioned program.

  9. [Methods Used for Monitoring Cure Reactions in Real-time in an Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John B.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the research was to investigate methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time in an autoclave. This is of particular importance to NASA Langley Research Center because polyimides were proposed for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program. Understanding the cure chemistry behind the polyimides would allow for intelligent processing of the composites made from their use. This work has led to two publications in peer-reviewed journals and a patent. The journal articles are listed as Appendix A which is on the instrument design of the research and Appendix B which is on the cure chemistry. Also, a patent has been awarded for the instrumental design developed under this grant which is given as Appendix C. There has been a significant amount of research directed at developing methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time within the autoclave. The various research efforts can be categorized as methods providing either direct chemical bonding information or methods that provide indirect chemical bonding information. Methods falling into the latter category are fluorescence, dielectric loss, ultrasonic and similar type methods. Correlation of such measurements with the underlying chemistry is often quite difficult since these techniques do not allow monitoring of the curing chemistry which is ultimately responsible for material properties. Direct methods such as vibrational spectroscopy, however, can often be easily correlated with the underlying chemistry of a reaction. Such methods include Raman spectroscopy, mid-IR absorbance, and near-IR absorbance. With the recent advances in fiber-optics, these spectroscopic techniques can be applied to remote on-line monitoring.

  10. Recognition-then-Reaction Enables Site-Selective Bioconjugation to Proteins on Live-Cell Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Ruowen; Cansiz, Sena; Pan, Xiaoshu; Wan, Shuo; Hou, Weijia; Li, Long; Chen, Meiwan; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xigao; Liu, Qiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2017-09-18

    Site-selective protein modification is a key step in facilitating protein functionalization and manipulation. To accomplish this, genetically engineered proteins were previously required, but the procedure was laborious, complex, and technically challenging. Herein we report the development of aptamer-based recognition-then-reaction to guide site-selective protein/DNA conjugation in a single step with outstanding selectivity and efficiency. As models, several proteins, including human thrombin, PDGF-BB, Avidin, and His-tagged recombinant protein, were studied, and the results showed excellent selectivity under mild reaction conditions. Taking advantage of aptamers as recognition elements with extraordinary selectivity and affinity, this simple preparation method can tag a protein in a complex milieu. Thus, with the aptamer obtained from cell-SELEX, real-time modification of live-cell membrane proteins can be achieved in one step without any pre-treatment. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Harnessing the Versatility of Continuous-Flow Processes: Selective and Efficient Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mándity, István M; Ötvös, Sándor B; Szőlősi, György; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    There is a great need for effective transformations and a broad range of novel chemical entities. Continuous-flow (CF) approaches are of considerable current interest: highly efficient and selective reactions can be performed in CF reactors. The reaction setup of CF reactors offers a wide variety of possible points where versatility can be introduced. This article presents a number of selective and highly efficient gas-liquid-solid and liquid-solid reactions involving a range of reagents and immobilized catalysts. Enantioselective transformations through catalytic hydrogenation and organocatalytic reactions are included, and isotopically labelled compounds and pharmaceutically relevant 1,2,3-triazoles are synthesized in CF reactors. Importantly, the catalyst bed can be changed to a solid-phase peptide synthesis resin, with which peptide synthesis can be performed with the utilization of only 1.5 equivalents of the amino acid. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The role of the transition state in polyatomic reactions: initial state-selected reaction probabilities of the H + CH₄ → H₂ + CH₃ reaction.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Ralph; Manthe, Uwe

    2014-11-07

    Full-dimensional calculations of initial state-selected reaction probabilities on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) have been communicated recently [R. Welsch and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 051102 (2014)]. These calculations use the quantum transition state concept, the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach, and graphics processing units to speed up the potential evaluation. Here further results of these calculations and an extended analysis are presented. State-selected reaction probabilities are given for many initial ro-vibrational states. The role of the vibrational states of the activated complex is analyzed in detail. It is found that rotationally cold methane mainly reacts via the ground state of the activated complex while rotationally excited methane mostly reacts via H-H-CH3-bending excited states of the activated complex. Analyzing the different contributions to the reactivity of the vibrationally states of methane, a complex pattern is found. Comparison with initial state-selected reaction probabilities computed on the semi-empirical Jordan-Gilbert PES reveals the dependence of the results on the specific PES.

  13. The role of the transition state in polyatomic reactions: Initial state-selected reaction probabilities of the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Ralph; Manthe, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Full-dimensional calculations of initial state-selected reaction probabilities on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) have been communicated recently [R. Welsch and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 051102 (2014)]. These calculations use the quantum transition state concept, the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach, and graphics processing units to speed up the potential evaluation. Here further results of these calculations and an extended analysis are presented. State-selected reaction probabilities are given for many initial ro-vibrational states. The role of the vibrational states of the activated complex is analyzed in detail. It is found that rotationally cold methane mainly reacts via the ground state of the activated complex while rotationally excited methane mostly reacts via H-H-CH3-bending excited states of the activated complex. Analyzing the different contributions to the reactivity of the vibrationally states of methane, a complex pattern is found. Comparison with initial state-selected reaction probabilities computed on the semi-empirical Jordan-Gilbert PES reveals the dependence of the results on the specific PES.

  14. Condensation reaction between carbohydrazide and salicylaldehyde: in-line vibrational spectroscopy monitoring and characterization of the reaction products in solution and solid state.

    PubMed

    Jednačak, Tomislav; Novak, Predrag; Hodzic, Aden; Scheibelhofer, Otto; Khinast, Johannes G; Plavec, Janez; Sket, Primož; Parlov, Vuković Jelena

    2014-01-01

    The condensation reaction between carbohydrazide and salicylaldehyde was monitored in-line by using vibrational NIR and Raman spectroscopies and statistical methods. Prior to in-line data analysis the reaction products were fully characterized in solution and solid state in order to check the potential of the in-line approach as a tool for in-process Schiff bases reaction control. It was demonstrated that a combination of vibrational spectroscopy and principal component analysis made it possible to detect and identify the reaction products, e.g. mono(salicylidene)carbohydrazide (1) and bis(salicylidene)carbohydrazide (2) in different solvents, and to determine the reaction end points in real time. Owing to complexity of the reaction mixtures and band overlapping, it was not possible to determine the relative ratio of the reaction products in-line. The off-line analysis showed that 1 was predominant in methanol while the highest portion of 2 was obtained in ethanol.

  15. Metamorphosis of palladium and its relation to selectivity in the Rosenmund reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, W.F.; Chettle, S.J.; Rai, R.S.; Thomas, G.

    1986-05-14

    Drastic changes in morphology and particle sizes of the Pd particles were detected during the classical catalyst pretreatment. These changes are connected to the increase in selectivity as well as to the problems encountered in the Rosenmund reaction. A major action of the poison in Rosenmund reactions was found to be the acceleration of the initial reconstruction of the surface of fresh catalysts to prevent overreduction. The instability of the Pd under reaction conditions appears to be responsible for typical problems encountered with the Rosenmund reaction such as irreproducibility and catalyst deactivation during the reaction. With the use of Pd single crystals stepped and kinked surfaces were found to be active for hydrogenolysis of acid chlorides to aldehydes. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction have been employed to characterize the change in dispersion and structure of Pd particles on carbon supports after various pretreatments.

  16. Optical fiber sensor for an on-line monitoring of epoxy resin/amine reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchal, F.; Knight, J. A. G.; Garrington, N.; Cope, B.

    2002-05-01

    An optical fiber sensor is described; it permits a rapid determination of the state of chemical reaction in epoxy resin diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), and Triethylenetetramine stoichiometric reaction. Mid infrared Fourier transform technique was used to analyze the mixture via a pair of embedded optical fibers connected to an FTIR spectrometer, which operates in the region 4000-700 cm-1 of the electromagnetic waves. An accurate monitoring of the concentration changes over time of epoxy, amine and hydroxyl groups gave a good estimate of extent of reaction and description of physical state of the produced matrix. The chemical group peaks 1130 cm-1 and 3300-3400 cm-1 where used to follow the disappearance of the epoxy, and the amine respectively, while the peak 2970 cm-1 was used as reference peak. A review of a number of other techniques used to study the curing of epoxy resins together with on-line monitoring methods applied in processing thermoset resin is referred to.

  17. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Erik T; Dulay, Maria T; Zare, Richard N

    2016-06-21

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected.

  18. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected. PMID:27249533

  19. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  20. Selective and Serial Suzuki–Miyaura Reactions of Polychlorinated Aromatics with Alkyl Pinacol Boronic Esters

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Among cross-coupling reactions, the Suzuki–Miyaura transformation stands out because of its practical advantages, including the commercial availability and low toxicity of the required reagents, mild reaction conditions, and functional group compatibility. Nevertheless, few conditions can be used to cross-couple alkyl boronic acids or esters with aryl halides, especially 2-pyridyl halides. Herein, we describe two novel Suzuki–Miyaura protocols that enable selective conversion of polychlorinated aromatics, with a focus on reactions to convert 2,6-dichloropyridines to 2-chloro-6-alkylpyridines or 2-aryl-6-alkylpyridines. PMID:27537216

  1. Microelectrode arrays: a general strategy for using oxidation reactions to site selectively modify electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Kesselring, David; Tesfu, Eden; Moeller, Kevin D

    2014-03-04

    Oxidation reactions are powerful tools for synthesis because they allow for the functionalization of molecules. Here, we present a general method for conducting these reactions on a microelectrode array in a site-selective fashion. The reactions are run as a competition between generation of a chemical oxidant at the electrodes in the array and reduction of the oxidant by a "confining agent" in the solution above the array. The "confining agent" does not need to be more reactive than the substrate fixed to the surface of the array. In many cases, the same substrate placed on the surface of the array can also be used in solution as the confining agent.

  2. Interfacing supercritical fluid reaction apparatus with on-line liquid chromatography: monitoring the progress of a synthetic organic reaction performed in supercritical fluid solution.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Edward D; Li, Ben; Guo, Wei; Liu, Jing Y

    2015-04-03

    An interface has been developed that connects a supercritical fluid reaction (SFR) vessel directly on-line to a liquid chromatograph. The combined SFR-LC system has enabled the progress of the esterification reaction between phenol and benzoyl chloride to synthesize phenyl benzoate in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solution to be dynamically monitored. This was achieved by the periodic SFR-LC analysis of samples directly withdrawn from the esterification reaction mixture. Using the series of SFR-LC analysis results obtained for individual esterification reactions, the reaction progress profile for each esterification reaction was obtained by expressing the measured yield of phenyl benzoate as a function of reaction time. With reaction temperature fixed at 75°C, four sets (n=3) of SFR-LC reaction progress profiles were obtained at four different SFR pressures ranging from 13.79 to 27.58 MPa. The maximum SFR yield obtained for phenyl benzoate using a standard set of reactant concentrations was 85.2% (R.S.D. 4.2%) when the reaction was performed at 13.79 MPa for 90 min. In comparison, a phenyl benzoate yield of less than 0.3% was obtained using the same standard reactant concentrations after 90 min reaction time at 75°C using either: heptane, ethyl acetate or acetonitrile as conventional organic reaction solvents.

  3. The selection reaction of homogeneous catalyst in soy-epoxide hydroxylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvistia Firdaus, Flora

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxylation reaction of soy-epoxide has resulted soy-polyol; a prepolymeric material for polyurethane. The conversion and selectivity of soy-epoxide butanol based to hydroxylation was found higher than soy-ethylene glycol (EG) based. These reactions were performed by sulfur acid which commonly known as homogeneous catalyst. Conversion and selectivity of homogeneous catalyst compared to bentonite; a heteregeneous catalyst was lower as in fact the mixtures were more viscous. The catalysis were significantly effected to cell morphology. Foams were conducted by heterogeneous catalyst resulted an irregular form of windows while homogeneous catalyst are more ordered.

  4. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  5. A Demonstration of Concrete Structural Health Monitoring Framework for Degradation due to Alkali-Silica Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Neal, Kyle; Nath, Paromita; Bao, Yanqing; Cai, Guowei; Orme, Peter; Adams, Douglas; Kosson, David

    2016-04-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This ongoing research project is seeking to develop a probabilistic framework for health diagnosis and prognosis of aging concrete structures in a nuclear power plant that is subjected to physical, chemical, environment, and mechanical degradation. The proposed framework consists of four elements: monitoring, data analytics, uncertainty quantification and prognosis. This report focuses on degradation caused by ASR (alkali-silica reaction). Controlled specimens were prepared to develop accelerated ASR degradation. Different monitoring techniques – thermography, digital image correlation (DIC), mechanical deformation measurements, nonlinear impact resonance acoustic spectroscopy (NIRAS), and vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) -- were used to detect the damage caused by ASR. Heterogeneous data from the multiple techniques was used for damage diagnosis and prognosis, and quantification of the associated uncertainty using a Bayesian network approach. Additionally, MapReduce technique has been demonstrated with synthetic data. This technique can be used in future to handle large amounts of observation data obtained from the online monitoring of realistic structures.

  6. On-line monitoring of the transesterification reaction between triglycerides and ethanol using near infrared spectroscopy combined with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Richard, Romain; Li, Ying; Dubreuil, Brigitte; Thiebaud-Roux, Sophie; Prat, Laurent

    2011-06-01

    Many analytical procedures have been developed to determine the composition of reaction mixtures during transesterification of vegetable oils with alcohols. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are time consuming and cannot be easily used for on-line monitoring. In this work, a fast analytical method was developed to on-line monitor the transesterification reaction of high oleic sunflower oil with ethanol using Near InfraRed spectroscopy and a multivariate approach. The reactions were monitored through sequential scans of the reaction medium with a probe in a one-liter batch reactor without collecting and preparing samples. To calibrate the NIR analytical method, gas chromatography-flame ionization detection was used as a reference method. The method was validated by studying the kinetics of the EtONa-catalyzed transesterification reaction. Activation energy (51.0 kJ/mol) was also determined by considering a pseudo second order kinetics model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Selection bias in an inpatient outcomes monitoring project.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M R; Stoyva, J; Rosenberg, S A; Kassner, C; Fryer, G E; Giese, A A; Dubovsky, S L

    1997-01-01

    Managed care organizations increasingly tout clinical outcomes assessment as the mechanism by which we will ensure quality and compare providers. The authors report on their experience with a multisite inpatient outcomes monitoring project by comparing patients who accepted (N = 51), refused (N = 36), or were not asked (N = 110) to participate in the project. The patients who were asked to participate had significantly longer inpatient stays compared with the unasked group (11.2 vs 6.9 days). Patients who agreed to participate in the project were more likely to have a bipolar (43.1% vs 19.2%) or any affective disorder (94.1% vs 79.5%), and less likely to have a schizophrenic disorder (2.0% vs 11.6%) than the refused and unasked groups. The project participants also had higher 90-day readmit rates (27.5% vs 9.6%), more readmissions (0.51 vs 0.16), and more education (14.59 vs 13.51 years) than nonparticipating patients. In this preliminary study, patient-related variables were found to influence who the staff asked and who consented to participate in this clinical outcomes monitoring project. The authors distinguish clinical outcomes monitoring from treatment effectiveness research and discuss the need to develop methodologies that deal with nonrepresentative patient sampling and intersite variability in recruitment practices.

  8. Bond selectivity in electron-induced reaction due to directed recoil on an anisotropic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggara, Kelvin; Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Chatterjee, Avisek; Cheng, Fang; Polanyi, John C.

    2016-12-01

    Bond-selective reaction is central to heterogeneous catalysis. In heterogeneous catalysis, selectivity is found to depend on the chemical nature and morphology of the substrate. Here, however, we show a high degree of bond selectivity dependent only on adsorbate bond alignment. The system studied is the electron-induced reaction of meta-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). Of the adsorbate's C-I bonds, C-I aligned `Along' the copper row dissociates in 99.3% of the cases giving surface reaction, whereas C-I bond aligned `Across' the rows dissociates in only 0.7% of the cases. A two-electronic-state molecular dynamics model attributes reaction to an initial transition to a repulsive state of an Along C-I, followed by directed recoil of C towards a Cu atom of the same row, forming C-Cu. A similar impulse on an Across C-I gives directed C that, moving across rows, does not encounter a Cu atom and hence exhibits markedly less reaction.

  9. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.

  10. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Selective Reactions of Donor-Acceptor Cyclopropanes with 2-Naphthols.

    PubMed

    Kaicharla, Trinadh; Roy, Tony; Thangaraj, Manikandan; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-08-16

    Lewis acid-catalyzed reactions of 2-substituted cyclopropane 1,1-dicarboxylates with 2-naphthols is reported. The reaction exhibits tunable selectivity depending on the nature of Lewis acid employed and proceed as a dearomatization/rearomatization sequence. With Bi(OTf)3 as the Lewis acid, a highly selective dehydrative [3+2] cyclopentannulation takes place leading to the formation of naphthalene-fused cyclopentanes. Interestingly, engaging Sc(OTf)3 as the Lewis acid, a Friedel-Crafts-type addition of 2-naphthols to cyclopropanes takes place, thus affording functionalized 2-naphthols. Both reactions furnished the target products in high regioselectivity and moderate to high yields. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  12. Model-based sensor location selection for helicopter gearbox monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jammu, Vinay B.; Wang, Keming; Danai, Kourosh; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    A new methodology is introduced to quantify the significance of accelerometer locations for fault diagnosis of helicopter gearboxes. The basis for this methodology is an influence model which represents the effect of various component faults on accelerometer readings. Based on this model, a set of selection indices are defined to characterize the diagnosability of each component, the coverage of each accelerometer, and the relative redundancy between the accelerometers. The effectiveness of these indices is evaluated experimentally by measurement-fault data obtained from an OH-58A main rotor gearbox. These data are used to obtain a ranking of individual accelerometers according to their significance in diagnosis. Comparison between the experimentally obtained rankings and those obtained from the selection indices indicates that the proposed methodology offers a systematic means for accelerometer location selection.

  13. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, Stephan Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  14. Issues in the Optimal Selection of a Cranial Nerve Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Goldsmith, Daniel F.

    1993-01-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) is a safe technique that is of clear clinical value in the preservation of cranial nerves in skull base surgery and is rapidly becoming the standard of care. Available nerve monitoring systems vary widely in capabilities and costs. A well-informed surgeon may best decide on monitoring needs based on surgical case selection, experience, operating room space, availability of monitoring personnel, and cost. Key system characteristics that should be reviewed in the decision-making process include the monitoring technique (electromyography, pressure transducer, direct nerve monitoring, brainstem auditory evoked potential) and the stimulus technique (stimulating parameters, probe selection). In the past, IONM has been primarily employed in posterior fossa and temporal bone surgery, but the value of IONM is being recognized in more skull base and head and neck surgeries. Suggested IONM strategies for specific surgeries are presented. PMID:17170916

  15. An anti-galvanic replacement reaction of DNA templated silver nanoclusters monitored by the light-scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoliang; Feng, Da-Qian; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng; Li, Dan

    2013-09-18

    An anti-galvanic replacement reaction (AGRR) of copper(II) ions reduced by ultra-small ssDNA-templated silver nanoclusters forming Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles was observed. The reaction is against the classic galvanic theory and was monitored sensitively by the light-scattering technique.

  16. 21 CFR 812.43 - Selecting investigators and monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... are met. (5) Sufficient accurate financial disclosure information to allow the sponsor to submit a complete and accurate certification or disclosure statement as required under part 54 of this chapter. The... application, but shall be submitted in any marketing application involving the device. (d) Selecting...

  17. 21 CFR 812.43 - Selecting investigators and monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... are met. (5) Sufficient accurate financial disclosure information to allow the sponsor to submit a complete and accurate certification or disclosure statement as required under part 54 of this chapter. The... application, but shall be submitted in any marketing application involving the device. (d) Selecting...

  18. Monitoring selective logging in western Amazonia with repeat lidar flights

    Treesearch

    H.E. Andersen; S.E. Reutebuch; R.J. McGaughey; M.V.N. d' Oliveira; M. Keller

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the use of repeat flight, airborne laser scanning data (lidar) for estimating changes associated with low-impact selective logging (approx. 10-15 m3 ha−1 = 5-7% of total standing volume harvested) in natural tropical forests in the Western Brazilian Amazon. Specifically, we investigated change in area...

  19. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Cai, Guowei; Gribok, Andrei V.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  20. Real-time and in situ monitoring of mechanochemical milling reactions.

    PubMed

    Friščić, Tomislav; Halasz, Ivan; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Kimber, Simon A J; Honkimäki, Veijo; Dinnebier, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and structural transformations have long been carried out by milling. Such mechanochemical steps are now ubiquitous in a number of industries (such as the pharmaceutical, chemical and metallurgical industries), and are emerging as excellent environmentally friendly alternatives to solution-based syntheses. However, mechanochemical transformations are typically difficult to monitor in real time, which leaves a large gap in the mechanistic understanding required for their development. We now report the real-time study of mechanochemical transformations in a ball mill by means of in situ diffraction of high-energy synchrotron X-rays. Focusing on the mechanosynthesis of metal-organic frameworks, we have directly monitored reaction profiles, the formation of intermediates, and interconversions of framework topologies. Our results reveal that mechanochemistry is highly dynamic, with reaction rates comparable to or greater than those in solution. The technique also enabled us to probe directly how catalytic additives recently introduced in the mechanosynthesis of metal-organic frameworks, such as organic liquids or ionic species, change the reactivity pathways and kinetics.

  1. Assessment of the use of selected rodents in ecological monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Richard J.

    1989-05-01

    Rodents can be useful in detecting environmental impacts because they are easy to study (easy to capture and handle), they can occur in densities adequate for statistical analysis, and they are ecologically important. In this study the usefulness of rodent populations for ecological monitoring was investigated by examining the effect of variation on the possibility of detecting differences among populations of rodents on 10 trapping grids. The effects of sampling frequencies and dispersal on detecting differences in population parameters among grids was also investigated, as was the possibility of inferring population parameters from correlations with habitat data. Statistically significant differences as small as 4.3 Peromyscus maniculatus/ha were detected between grids. Of 10 populations, this comprised 12% of the highest-density population and 44% of the lowest-density population. Smaller and more differences among grids were found by examining only animals surviving from previous months. Dispersal confounds detection of direct impacts to populations, especially during the breeding season. Infrequent sampling fails to detect impacts that occur between sampling periods and will indicate impacts when observed changes result from natural variation. Correlations between population parameters and habitat variables exist but should only be used in predicting, not measuring, impacts. It is concluded that some rodent populations can be used in ecological monitoring. However, intensive sampling is required to account for variation and dispersal.

  2. [Active drug monitoring of adverse drug reactions in pediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Planchamp, F; Nguyen, K-A; Vial, T; Nasri, S; Javouhey, E; Gillet, Y; Ranchin, B; Villard, F; Floret, D; Cochat, P; Gueyffier, F; Kassaï, B

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children consulting at the pediatric emergency unit during a 6-month period. The regional pharmacovigilance center (CRPV) and the department of clinical pharmacology prospectively and systematically recorded all potential ADRs among patients younger than 18 years of age in the pediatric emergency unit reported at the daily staff meetings. All cases were then screened and validated by the CRPV. For validated cases, preventability, seriousness, and off-label use were evaluated. During the study period, from 1 March to 1 September 2005, 90 children presented potential adverse drug events. ADRs were confirmed in 43 patients, 19 females and 24 males. Thirty-four patients (79%) were under the age of 5. According to the European definition, 14 patients (33%) had serious ADRs. One anaphylactic shock after amoxicillin injection; antimalarial prophylaxis misuse leading to convulsive status epilepticus, convulsion, and coma after hepatitis B and MMR vaccines were deemed life-threatening. Three ADRs were considered avoidable. Antibiotics and vaccines were the most common possible cause of ADRs (76%). Skin reactions (n=27), fever (n=8), and gastric disorders (n=5) were the most common clinical manifestations. Because ADRs were reported by clinicians on a voluntary basis, serious ADRs were probably reported more systematically. Compared to a similar period without active monitoring, active drug monitoring of ADRs doubled the number of confirmed cases 43 vs 17, p<0.001. Close collaboration between the pharmacovigilance center, pharmacologists, and clinicians is necessary and seems feasible for improving the monitoring of ADRs in children.

  3. Reaction monitoring of toluenediisocyanate (TDI) polymerization on a non-mixable aqueous surface by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Ji Seok; Kim, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    The polymerization reaction of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and hydroxyl compounds has been widely used for the production of polyurea resins. Since the composition and molecular-weight distribution of polymer adducts greatly influence the final properties of the resuting polymer, the development of analytical tools capable of monitoring the polyaddition reactions is important to control them as well as the properties of the resuting polymer. Here we report that matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) is useful to precisely monitor time-dependent dynamic events occurring in the polymerization reaction of TDI with water. For this purpose, the polymerization reactions were conducted in two different reaction systems, continuously supplying sufficient water and depleting water after an initial exposure of water to provide an anhydrous storage condition of prepolymer adducts. Samples prepared in a time course from the two different reaction systems were analyzed by a MALDI TOF mass spectrometer. The polymerization adducts of TDI and water were monitored and showed to consist of three structural types of polymer adduct series, including diisocyanate, monoamino, and diamino series. These MALDI mass data efficiently reflected changes in the reaction conditions of each TDI polymerization reaction, thereby providing precise information at the molecular level for time-dependent events occurring during the polymerization reaction. These events included changes between the polymer adduct series and in the molecular-weight distribution of each polymer adduct series. The results obtained in this study suggest that high-throughput MALDI MS-based dynamic monitoring of polymerization can be used to precisely control the polymerization reaction as well as to rapidly monitor the state of prepolymers in storage.

  4. Monitoring Chemical and Biological Electron Transfer Reactions with a Fluorogenic Vitamin K Analogue Probe.

    PubMed

    Belzile, Mei-Ni; Godin, Robert; Durantini, Andrés M; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-12-21

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and characterization of a two-segment fluorogenic analogue of vitamin K, B-VKQ, prepared by coupling vitamin K3, also known as menadione (a quinone redox center), to a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore (a lipophilic reporter segment). Oxidation-reduction reactions, spectroelectrochemical studies, and enzymatic assays conducted in the presence of DT-diaphorase illustrate that the new probe shows reversible redox behavior on par with that of vitamin K, provides a high-sensitivity fluorescence signal, and is compatible with biological conditions, opening the door to monitor remotely (i.e., via imaging) redox processes in real time. In its oxidized form, B-VKQ is non-emissive, while upon reduction to the hydroquinone form, B-VKQH2, BODIPY fluorescence is restored, with emission quantum yield values of ca. 0.54 in toluene. Density functional theory studies validate a photoinduced electron transfer intramolecular switching mechanism, active in the non-emissive quinone form and deactivated upon reduction to the emissive dihydroquinone form. Our results highlight the potential of B-VKQ as a fluorogenic probe to study electron transfer and transport in model systems and biological structures with optimal sensitivity and desirable chemical specificity. Use of such a probe may enable a better understanding of the role that vitamin K plays in biological redox reactions ubiquitous in key cellular processes, and help elucidate the mechanism and pathological significance of these reactions in biological systems.

  5. Online NMR and HPLC as a reaction monitoring platform for pharmaceutical process development.

    PubMed

    Foley, David A; Wang, Jian; Maranzano, Brent; Zell, Mark T; Marquez, Brian L; Xiang, Yanqiao; Reid, George L

    2013-10-01

    Detector response is not always equivalent between detectors or instrument types. Factors that impact detector response include molecular structure and detection wavelength. In liquid chromatography (LC), ultraviolet (UV) is often the primary detector; however, without determination of UV response factors for each analyte, chromatographic results are reported on an area percent rather than a weight percent. In extreme cases, response factors can differ by several orders of magnitude for structurally dissimilar compounds, making the uncalibrated data useless for quantitative applications. While impurity reference standards are normally used to calculate UV relative response factors (RRFs), reference standards of reaction mixture components are typically not available during route scouting or in the early stages of process development. Here, we describe an approach to establish RRFs from a single experiment using both online nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and LC. NMR is used as a mass detector from which a UV response factor can be determined to correct the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) data. Online reaction monitoring using simultaneous NMR and HPLC provides a platform to expedite the development and understanding of pharmaceutical reaction processes. Ultimately, the knowledge provided by a structurally information rich technique such as NMR can be correlated with more prevalent and mobile instrumentation [e.g., LC, mid-infrared spectrometers (MIR)] for additional routine process understanding and optimization.

  6. The quantitative monitoring of mechanochemical reaction between solid L-tartaric acid and sodium carbonate monohydrate by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Guifeng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Zengyang; Wei, Yongbo; Liu, Min; Wen, Wen; Zhou, Xingtai

    2011-11-01

    The solid-state reaction of chiral tartaric acid and alkali carbonate was studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The sodium tartrate dihydrate was synthesized with high efficiency by mechanical grinding in the solid-state without waste that is particularly sustainable and environmentally benign. Distinct THz absorptions were observed for reactants and products. It indicates that THz spectroscopy is sensitive to different materials and crystal structures. The characteristic THz absorption peak at 1.09 THz of L (+)-Tartaric acid was selected for quantitative analysis. The reaction kinetics could be expressed by the Second-order equation and the Jander equation, which is consistent with a three-dimensional diffusion mechanism. The combination of multi-techniques including synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (SRXRPD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the grinding process and presented supporting evidences. The results demonstrate that THz spectroscopy technique has great potential applications in process monitoring and analysis in pharmaceutical and chemical synthesis industry.

  7. Multiple-reaction monitoring for multiplex detection of three bacterial toxins using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alam, S I; Uppal, A; Gupta, P; Kamboj, D V

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B and shiga toxin are implicated in a number of diseases and food-borne intoxications and are considered potential agents for bioterrorism and warfare. Artificially generated aerosol is the likely mode of delivery of these for nefarious uses, potentially capable of causing mass destruction to human and animal health by inhalation of toxic bioaerosol. Multiplex and unambiguous detection of these agents is of paramount importance for emergency response in a biothreat scenario and for food safety. Multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) assay for simultaneous monitoring of the three toxins is reported here using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Three different peptides with two fragment ions each were considered for quantification and confirmation. One of the three MRM transitions from each toxin, which exhibited the best sensitivity, was selected for multiplexing of the assay. Simulating a biothreat scenario wherein the bioaerosol is collected in 10 ml of buffer, the multiplex assay was tested with blind samples with one or more of the three toxins even in the presence of interfering Escherichia coli lysate proteins. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. The growing use of herbal medicines: issues relating to adverse reactions and challenges in monitoring safety

    PubMed Central

    Ekor, Martins

    2014-01-01

    The use of herbal medicinal products and supplements has increased tremendously over the past three decades with not less than 80% of people worldwide relying on them for some part of primary healthcare. Although therapies involving these agents have shown promising potential with the efficacy of a good number of herbal products clearly established, many of them remain untested and their use are either poorly monitored or not even monitored at all. The consequence of this is an inadequate knowledge of their mode of action, potential adverse reactions, contraindications, and interactions with existing orthodox pharmaceuticals and functional foods to promote both safe and rational use of these agents. Since safety continues to be a major issue with the use of herbal remedies, it becomes imperative, therefore, that relevant regulatory authorities put in place appropriate measures to protect public health by ensuring that all herbal medicines are safe and of suitable quality. This review discusses toxicity-related issues and major safety concerns arising from the use of herbal medicinal products and also highlights some important challenges associated with effective monitoring of their safety. PMID:24454289

  9. A transition state view on reactive scattering: Initial state-selected reaction probabilities for the H+CH4-->H2+CH3 reaction studied in full dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffel, Gerd; Manthe, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    Initial state-selected reaction probabilities for the H+CH4→H2+CH3 reaction are computed for vanishing total angular momentum by full-dimensional calculations employing the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree approach. An ensemble of wave packets completely describing reactivity for total energies up to 0.58 eV is constructed in the transition state region by diagonalization of the thermal flux operator. These wave packets are then propagated into the reactant asymptotic region to obtain the initial state-selected reaction probabilities. Reaction probabilities for reactants in all rotational states of the vibrational 1A1, 1F2, and 1E levels of methane are presented. Vibrational excitation is found to decrease reactivity when reaction probabilities at equivalent total energies are compared but to increase reaction probabilities when the comparison is done at the basis of equivalent collision energies. Only a fraction of the initial vibrational energy can be utilized to promote the reaction. The effect of rotational excitation on the reactivity differs depending on the initial vibrational state of methane. For the 1A1 and 1F2 vibrational states of methane, rotational excitation decreases the reaction probability even when comparing reaction probabilities at equivalent collision energies. In contrast, rotational energy is even more efficient than translational energy in increasing the reaction probability when the reaction starts from the 1E vibrational state of methane. All findings can be explained employing a transition state based interpretation of the reaction process.

  10. Reactions of Propylene Oxide on Supported Silver Catalysts: Insights into Pathways Limiting Epoxidation Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Apoorva; Bedolla-Pantoja, Marco; Singh, Suyash; Lobo, Raul F.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Barteau, Mark A.

    2012-02-04

    The reactions of propylene oxide (PO) on silver catalysts were studied to understand the network of parallel and sequential reactions that may limit the selectivity of propylene epoxidation by these catalysts. The products of the anaerobic reaction of PO on Ag/a-Al2O3 were propanal, acetone and allyl alcohol for PO conversions below 2–3%. As the conversion of PO was increased either by increasing the temperature or the contact time, acrolein was formed at the expense of propanal, indicating that acrolein is a secondary reaction product in PO decomposition. With addition of oxygen to the feedstream the conversion of PO increased moderately. In contrast to the experiments in absence of oxygen, CO2 was a significant product while the selectivity to propanal decreased as soon as oxygen was introduced in the system. Allyl alcohol disappeared completely from the product stream in the presence of oxygen, reacting to form acrolein and CO2. The product distribution may be explained by a network of reactions involving two types of oxametallacycles formed by ring opening of PO: one with the oxygen bonded to C1 (OMC1, linear) and the other with oxygen bonded to C2 (OMC2, branched). OMC1 reacts to form PO, propanal, and allyl alcohol.

  11. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Selective hydroformylation-hydrogenation tandem reaction of isoprene to 3-methylpentanal.

    PubMed

    Behr, Arno; Reyer, Sebastian; Tenhumberg, Nils

    2011-11-28

    The hydroformylation of isoprene catalysed by rhodium phosphine complexes usually yields a broad mixture of the monoaldehydes, the isomeric methylpentenals, as well as the dialdehyde 3-methyl-1,6-hexandial. Under usual reaction conditions the products of a consecutive hydrogenation are only formed as minor by-products. Surprisingly we discovered now a selective auto-tandem reaction consisting of a hydroformylation and a hydrogenation step if a rhodium complex with the chelate ligand bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane is used as catalyst. If branched aromatic solvents like cumene are applied the conversion of isoprene is nearly quantitatively and the yield of the tandem product 3-methylpentanal amounts to 85%.

  13. Continuous flow reaction monitoring using an on-line miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Browne, Duncan L; Wright, Steven; Deadman, Benjamin J; Dunnage, Samantha; Baxendale, Ian R; Turner, Richard M; Ley, Steven V

    2012-09-15

    A recently developed miniature electrospray ionisation mass spectrometer has been coupled to a preparative flow chemistry system in order to monitor reactive intermediates and competing reaction paths, screen starting materials, and optimise reaction conditions. Although ideally suited to the application, mass spectrometers have rarely been used in this way, as traditional instruments are too bulky to be conveniently coupled to flow chemistry platforms. A six-port switching valve fitted with a 5 μL loop was used to periodically sample the flow stream leaving the reactor coil. Mass spectra corresponding to the sample loop contents were observed approximately 10 s after activating the valve. High fluidic pressure was maintained throughout to ensure that gaseous products remained in solution. As an illustrative example of how this apparatus can be employed, the generation of benzyne and its subsequent reaction with furan were investigated. Benzyne was prepared via diazotisation of anthranilic acid using tert-butyl nitrite. Unexpectedly, the explosive diazotised intermediate was detected by the mass spectrometer at low coil temperatures or short residence times. The optimum reactor temperature and residence time for production of the desired Diels-Alder product are 50 °C and 3-5 min, respectively. There are competing reaction pathways leading to the formation of acridone and several other by-products. On-line mass spectrometry allowed the flow conditions to be quickly tuned for safe operation and optimal generation of the desired product. The validity of this approach was corroborated by off-line liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of flow samples. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Rangeland assessment and monitoring methods guide - an interactive tool for selecting methods for assessment and monitoring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A common concern expressed by land managers and biologists is that they do not know enough about the strengths and weaknesses of different field and remote-sensing methods for rangeland assessment and monitoring. The Methods Guide is a web-based tool and resource that provides researchers and manage...

  15. Adverse drug reaction monitoring: support for pharmacovigilance at a tertiary care hospital in Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are recognised as a common cause of hospital admissions, and they constitute a significant economic burden for hospitals. Hospital-based ADR monitoring and reporting programmes aim to identify and quantify the risks associated with the use of drugs provided in a hospital setting. This information may be useful for identifying and minimising preventable ADRs and may enhance the ability of prescribers to manage ADRs more effectively. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate ADRs that occurred during inpatient stays at the Hospital Geral de Palmas (HGP) in Tocantins, Brazil, and to facilitate the development of a pharmacovigilance service. Methods A prospective study was conducted at HGP over a period of 8 months, from January 2009 to August 2009. This observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study was based on an analysis of medical records. Several parameters were utilised in the data evaluation, including patient demographics, drug and reaction characteristics, and reaction outcomes. The reaction severity and predisposing factors were also assessed. Results The overall incidence of ADRs in the patient population was 3.1%, and gender was not found to be a risk factor. The highest ADR rate (75.8%) was found in the adult age group 15 to 50 years, and the lowest ADR rate was found in children aged 3 to 13 years (7.4%). Because of the high frequency of ADRs in orthopaedic (25%), general medicine (22%), and oncology (16%) patients, improved control of the drugs used in these specialties is required. Additionally, the nurse team (52.7%) registered the most ADRs in medical records, most likely due to the job responsibilities of nurses. As expected, the most noticeable ADRs occurred in skin tissues, with such ADRs are more obvious to medical staff, with rashes being the most common reactions. Metamizole, tramadol, and vancomycin were responsible for 21, 11.6, and 8.4% of ADRs, respectively. The majority of ADRs had

  16. Blood coagulation kinetics: high throughput method for real-time reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ken; Diamond, Scott L

    2004-10-01

    A high throughput 384-well plate assay of blood function in 60 microl reactions with the fluorogenic thrombin substrate, boc-VPR-MCA, allowed for real-time monitoring of coagulation under a diverse set of reaction conditions. Using recalcified, citrated whole blood diluted 3-fold with corn trypsin inhibitor (to block Factor XIIa), addition of 0 to 13.8 pM of tissue factor (TF) reduced the time of maximal rate of thrombin production T(max) from 45 min to 11 min. Over this range of TF,T(max) was reduced from 35 min to 6 min by co-addition of 10 nM convulxin to activate platelets via GPVI. The maximal rate of thrombin production at T(max) was not a function of exogenously-added TF,Va, or reVIIa, but increased 30% with added convulxin. Addition of 0.07 to 0.7 pM TF along with convulxin produced small, but detectable reductions in T(max). Addition of up to 0.67 nM reVIIa reduced T(max) by up to 53% in the range of 0.7 to 7 pM TF. Interestingly, platelet factor 4 (2.7 microM) caused a prolongation of T(max) from 45 min to 78 min at 0 TF, while protamine (1.8 microM) reduced T(max) to 30 min at 0 TF. Finally, combinatorial reaction studies with exogenously-added ADP, histamine, fMLP, indomethacin, anti-CD18, and fibrinogen revealed no unusual synergies amongst the agents, but demonstrated a striking procoagulant activity of added fibrinogen, due to protease contaminants in the "purified" fibrinogen. This high throughput approach allowed automated profiling of blood (50 reactions/ml of blood) to generate large data sets for testing cellular-proteomic kinetic models, screening drug interactions, and potentially monitoring subtle changes in the functional phenotype of a patient blood sample.

  17. Use of Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry to Deduce Selectivity of Reaction in Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kai; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Chemically synthesized nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) probes derivatized with tetrasaccharides were used to study the reactivity of representative Clostridium thermocellum β-glucosidase, endoglucanases, and cellobiohydrolase. Diagnostic patterns for reactions of these different classes of enzymes were observed. Results show sequential removal of glucose by the β-glucosidase and a progressive increase in specificity of reaction from endoglucanases to cellobiohydrolase. Time-dependent reactions of these polysaccharide-selective enzymes were modeled by numerical integration, which provides a quantitative basis to make functional distinctions among a continuum of naturally evolved catalytic properties. Consequently, our method, which combines automated protein translation with high-sensitivity and time-dependent detection of multiple products, provides a new approach to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic trees with functional measurements. PMID:26579511

  18. A study of ethanol reactions on O2-treated Au/TiO2. Effect of support and metal loading on reaction selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, M. A.; Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Idriss, H.

    2016-08-01

    The reactions of ethanol have been studied on bare and Au supported TiO2 polymorphs (anatase and rutile) in order to understand the effect of Au loading and prior O2 treatment on the reaction selectivity and conversion using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Although O2 treatment has negligible effect on the reaction selectivity of ethanol on TiO2 alone it considerably affects the reaction on Au/TiO2. Au/TiO2 had three main effects on the reaction when compared to TiO2 alone. First, it switches the reaction selectivity of the dehydration (to ethylene) in favor of dehydrogenation (to acetaldehyde) on both polymorphs. Second, it decreases the desorption temperature of the main reaction products. Third, it increases secondary reaction products (mainly C4 (crotonaldehyde, butene, furan) reaching ca. 78% of the overall carbon selectivity for the 8 wt.% Au/TiO2 anatase. These effects are more pronounced on the anatase phase when compared to that on the rutile phase. Reasons for these are discussed.

  19. Asymmetric anti-selective Michael reaction of imidazole-modified ketones with trans-β-nitroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongxu; Wang, Linqing; Li, Dan; Han, Fengxia; Zhao, Depeng; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-19

    The successful application of imidazole-modified ketones in asymmetric anti-selective Michael reactions with trans-β-nitroalkenes is presented by employing a newly developed 3-bromothiophene-modified chiral diamine ligand. The corresponding conjugate adduct was submitted to further transformations with Grignard reagents to solve the problem of α-site selectivity of simple linear ketones. Additionally, the syn-selective product was obtained by treating the anti-selective adduct with a simple base. In this way, the site-specific products for both diastereomers in the asymmetric conjugate addition of simple ketones to nitroalkenes can be obtained. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  1. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

  2. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity.

  3. Boron-selective reactions as powerful tools for modular synthesis of diverse complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Pengfei

    2015-12-21

    In the context of modular and rapid construction of molecular diversity and complexity for applications in organic synthesis, biomedical and materials sciences, a generally useful strategy has emerged based on boron-selective chemical transformations. In the last decade, these types of reactions have evolved from proof-of-concept to some advanced applications in the efficient preparation of complex natural products and even automated precise manufacturing on the molecular level. These advances have shown the great potential of boron-selective reactions in simplifying synthetic design and experimental operations, and should inspire new developments in related chemical and technological areas. This tutorial review will highlight the original contributions and representative advances in this emerging field.

  4. Fabrication of Ultrafine Soft-Matter Arrays by Selective Contact Thermochemical Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cai, X.; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xiaowei; Ji, Junhui; Hong, Jian; Pan, Feng; Chen, Jitao; Xue, Mianqi

    2013-01-01

    Patterning of functional soft matters at different length scales is important for diverse research fields including cell biology, tissue engineering and medicinal science and the development of optics and electronics. Here we have further improved a simple but very efficient method, selective contact thermochemical reaction (SCTR), for patterning soft matters over large area with a sub-100 nm resolution. By selecting contact between different precursors through a topographically patterned PDMS stamp and subsequently any heating way for thermalchemical reaction, thermal-related soft matters can be patterned to form controllable micro or nano structures, even three-dimensional structures. The fine tunability and controllability of as-prepared micro and nano structures demonstrate this versatile approach a far wide range of uses than the merely academic.

  5. The Pressure Dependency of Stabilized Criegee Intermediate Yields of Selected Ozone-Alkene Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, J. P.; Donahue, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) play an important role as an oxidizing species in atmospheric reactions. The ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere, i.e. the mechanism by which the SCIs are produced, is a major pathway to the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Just how much SCIs contribute to the SOA formation is not well known and fundamental research in the kinetics of SCI formation need to be performed to shed light on this mystery. The alkene ozonolysis is highly exothermic reaction, so a third body is needed for stabilizing the SCI, thus making the SCI yield pressure dependent. We studied the production of SCIs at different pressures by studying their ability to oxidize sulfur dioxide in a pressure controlled flow reactor. We used a mixture of ultra-high purity nitrogen, oxygen, and a selective scavenger for hydroxyl radical (OH) as a carrier gas, and injected a mixture of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and selected alkene to the center of the flow for ozonolysis to take place. With the OH radical scavenged, the SCI yield of the reaction was measured by measuring the amount of sulfuric acid formed in the reaction between SCI and sulfur dioxide with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). This work was supported by NASA/ROSES grant NNX12AE54G to CMU and Academy of Finland Center of Excellence project 1118615.

  6. The parallel reaction monitoring method contributes to a highly sensitive polyubiquitin chain quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •The parallel reaction monitoring method was applied to ubiquitin quantification. •The ubiquitin PRM method is highly sensitive even in biological samples. •Using the method, we revealed that Ufd4 assembles the K29-linked ubiquitin chain. -- Abstract: Ubiquitylation is an essential posttranslational protein modification that is implicated in a diverse array of cellular functions. Although cells contain eight structurally distinct types of polyubiquitin chains, detailed function of several chain types including K29-linked chains has remained largely unclear. Current mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantification methods are highly inefficient for low abundant atypical chains, such as K29- and M1-linked chains, in complex mixtures that typically contain highly abundant proteins. In this study, we applied parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), a quantitative, high-resolution MS method, to quantify ubiquitin chains. The ubiquitin PRM method allows us to quantify 100 attomole amounts of all possible ubiquitin chains in cell extracts. Furthermore, we quantified ubiquitylation levels of ubiquitin-proline-β-galactosidase (Ub-P-βgal), a historically known model substrate of the ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. In wild-type cells, Ub-P-βgal is modified with ubiquitin chains consisting of 21% K29- and 78% K48-linked chains. In contrast, K29-linked chains are not detected in UFD4 knockout cells, suggesting that Ufd4 assembles the K29-linked ubiquitin chain(s) on Ub-P-βgal in vivo. Thus, the ubiquitin PRM is a novel, useful, quantitative method for analyzing the highly complicated ubiquitin system.

  7. The proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer and its use in medical science: applications to drug assays and the monitoring of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critchley, A.; Elliott, T. S.; Harrison, G.; Mayhew, C. A.; Thompson, J. M.; Worthington, T.

    2004-12-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) enables monitoring of trace gases in air with high sensitivity without major gases interfering. In this paper, we present the potential use of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer for two medical applications; the monitoring of drugs and bacterial infection. The first study illustrates a feasibility trial to monitor the intravenous anaesthetic agent 2,6-di-isopropyl phenol (propofol), and two of its metabolites, on the breath of patients in real-time during surgery. Propofol is a commonly used intravenous anaesthetic. However, there is no method of instantaneously monitoring the plasma concentration of the agent during surgery, and therefore determining whether or not the plasma level is of such a value to ensure that the patient is correctly anaesthetized. That propofol and its metabolites were monitored in real-time using the PTR-MS suggests possibilities for routine intravenous anaesthesia monitoring analogous to that for volatile anaesthetic agents. In addition to the above work we also investigated proton transfer to another anaesthetic, sevoflurane. Comparisons between PTR-MS and selected ion flow tube (SIFT) investigations are presented. The second study presented in this paper investigated the volatile organic compounds emitted by microbial cell cultures. The objective was to show that different microbial cultures could be readily distinguished from the resulting mass spectra recorded using the PTR-MS. The initial results are encouraging, which taken together with the real-time analysis and high sensitivity of the PTR-MS, means that proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry has the potential to characterise bacterial infection rapidly.

  8. Cyanobacterial phycobilisomes: Selective dissociation monitored by fluorescence and circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Rigbi, Meir; Rosinski, Joanne; Siegelman, Harold W.; Sutherland, John Clark

    1980-01-01

    Phycobilisomes are supramolecular assemblies of phycobiliproteins responsible for photosynthetic light collection in red algae and cyanobacteria. They can be selectively dissociated by reduction of temperature and buffer concentration. Phycobilisomes isolated from Fremyella diplosiphon transfer energy collected by C-phycoerythrin and C-phycocyanin to allophycocyanin. The energy transfer to allophycocyanin is nearly abolished at 2°C, as indicated by a blue shift in fluorescence emission, and is accompanied by a decrease in the circular dichroism in the region of allophycocyanin absorbance. Further dissociation of the phycobilisomes can be attained by reduction of buffer concentration and holding at 2°C. Energy transfer to C-phycocyanin is nearly abolished, and decreases occur in the circular dichroism in the region of C-phycocyanin and C-phycoerythrin absorbance. Complete dissociation of the phycobilisomes at low buffer concentration and 2°C requires extended time. Energy transfer to C-phycocyanin is further reduced and the circular dichroism maximum of C-phycoerythrin at 575 nm is lost. Circular dichroism provides information on the hexamer-monomer transitions of the phycobiliproteins, whereas fluorescence is indicative of hexamer-hexamer interactions. We consider that hydrophobic interactions are fundamental to the maintenance of the structure and function of phycobilisomes. PMID:16592802

  9. Cyanobacterial phycobilisomes: selective dissociation monitored by fluorescence and circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Rigbi, M.; Rosinski, J.; Siegelman, H.W.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1980-04-01

    Phycobilisomes are supramolecular assemblies of phycobiliproteins responsible for photosynthetic light collection in red algae and cyanobacteria. They can be selectively dissociated by reduction of temperature and buffer concentration. Phycobilisomes isolated from Fremyella diplosiphon transfer energy collected by C-phycoerythrin and C-phycocyanin to allophycocyanin. The energy transfer to allophycocyanin is nearly abolished at 2/sup 0/C, as indicated by a blue shift in fluorescence emission, and is accompanied by a decrease in the circular dichroism in the region of allophycocyanin absorbance. Further dissociation of the phycobilisomes can be attained by reduction of buffer concentration and holding at 2/sup 0/C. Energy transfer to C-phycocyanin is nearly abolished, and decreases occur in the circular dichroism in the region of C-phycocyanin and C-phycoerythrin absorbance. Complete dissociation of the phycobilisomes at low buffer concentration and 2/sup 0/C requires extended time. Energy transfer to C-phycocyanin is further reduced and the circular dichroism maximum of C-phycoerythrin at 575 nm is lost. Circular dichroism provides information on the hexamer-monomer transitions of the phycobiliproteins, whereas fluorescence is indicative of hexamer-hexamer interactions. We consider that hydrophobic interactions are fundamental to the maintenance of the structure and function of phycobilisomes.

  10. Direct site-selective arylation of enamides via a decarboxylative cross-coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Gigant, Nicolas; Chausset-Boissarie, Laëtitia; Gillaizeau, Isabelle

    2013-02-15

    An efficient Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling reaction of simple enamides was achieved. Depending on the choice of the nitrogen-protecting group, a site-selective synthesis of mono- or diarylated framework(s) was performed under mild conditions. This unprecedented reactivity could be applied to the synthesis of a range of 2- or 2,4-diarylated nitrogen-containing bioactive derivatives.

  11. Unconventional application of the Mitsunobu reaction: Selective flavonolignan dehydration yielding hydnocarpins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guozheng; Schramm, Simon; Heilmann, Jörg; Biedermann, David; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Summary Various Mitsunobu conditions were investigated for a series of flavonolignans (silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, and silychristin A) to achieve either selective esterification in position C-23 or dehydration in a one-pot reaction yielding the biologically important enantiomers of hydnocarpin D, hydnocarpin and isohydnocarpin, respectively. This represents the only one-pot semi-synthetic method to access these flavonolignans in high yields. PMID:27340458

  12. In-situ nanoelectrospray for high-throughput screening of enzymes and real-time monitoring of reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhan; Han, Feifei; Ouyang, Jin; Zhao, Yunling; Han, Juan; Na, Na

    2016-01-01

    The in-situ and high-throughput evaluation of enzymes and real-time monitoring of enzyme catalyzed reactions in liquid phase is quite significant in the catalysis industry. In-situ nanoelectrospray, the direct sampling and ionization method for mass spectrometry, has been applied for high-throughput evaluation of enzymes, as well as the on-line monitoring of reactions. Simply inserting a capillary into a liquid system with high-voltage applied, analytes in liquid reaction system can be directly ionized at the capillary tip with small volume consumption. With no sample pre-treatment or injection procedure, different analytes such as saccharides, amino acids, alkaloids, peptides and proteins can be rapidly and directly extracted from liquid phase and ionized at the capillary tip. Taking irreversible transesterification reaction of vinyl acetate and ethanol as an example, this technique has been used for the high-throughput evaluation of enzymes, fast optimizations, as well as real-time monitoring of reaction catalyzed by different enzymes. In addition, it is even softer than traditional electrospray ionization. The present method can also be used for the monitoring of other homogenous and heterogeneous reactions in liquid phases, which will show potentials in the catalysis industry.

  13. Noncovalent Bonding Controls Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Coupling Reactions on Gold.

    PubMed

    Karakalos, Stavros; Xu, Yunfei; Cheenicode Kabeer, Fairoja; Chen, Wei; Rodríguez-Reyes, Juan Carlos F; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2016-11-23

    Enhancing the selectivity of catalytic processes has potential for substantially increasing the sustainability of chemical production. Herein, we establish relationships between reaction selectivity and molecular structure for a homologous series of key intermediates for oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold using a combination of experiment and theory. We establish a scale of binding for molecules with different alkyl structures and chain lengths and thereby demonstrate the critical nature of noncovalent van der Waals interactions in determining the selectivity by modulating the stability of key reaction intermediates bound to the surface. The binding hierarchy is the same for Au(111) and Au(110), which demonstrates a relative lack of sensitivity to the surface structure. The hierarchy of binding established in this work provides guiding principles for predicting how molecular structure affects the competition for binding sites more broadly. Besides the nature of the primary surface-molecule bonding, three additional factors that affect the stabilities of the reactive intermediates are clearly established: (1) the number of C atoms in the alkyl chain, (2) the presence of C-C bond unsaturation, and (3) the degree of branching of the alkyl group of the adsorbed molecules. We suggest that this is a fundamental principle that is generally applicable to a broad range of reactions on metal catalysts.

  14. Monitoring transcranial direct current stimulation induced changes in cortical excitability during the serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Chaieb, Leila; Stilling, Roman; Rothkegel, Holger; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-03-11

    The measurement of the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a common method to observe changes in motor cortical excitability. The level of cortical excitability has been shown to change during motor learning. Conversely, motor learning can be improved by using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In the present study, we aimed to monitor cortical excitability changes during an implicit motor learning paradigm, a version of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Responses from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and forearm flexor (FLEX) muscles were recorded before, during and after the performance of the SRTT. Online measurements were combined with anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS for the duration of the SRTT. Negative correlations between the amplitude of online FDI MEPs and SRTT reaction times (RTs) were observed across the learning blocks in the cathodal condition (higher average MEP amplitudes associated with lower RTs) but no significant differences in the anodal and sham conditions. tDCS did not have an impact on SRTT performance, as would be predicted based on previous studies. The offline before-after SRTT MEP amplitudes showed an increase after anodal and a tendency to decrease after cathodal stimulation, but these changes were not significant. The combination of different interventions during tDCS might result in reduced efficacy of the stimulation that in future studies need further attention.

  15. Parametric fate and transport profiling for selective groundwater monitoring at closed landfills: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sizirici, Banu; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring contaminant concentrations in groundwater near closed municipal solid waste landfills requires long term monitoring program which can require significant investment for monitoring efforts. The groundwater monitoring data from a closed landfill in Florida was analyzed to reduce the monitoring efforts. The available groundwater monitoring data (collected over 20 years) were analyzed (i.e., type, concentration and detection level) to identify the trends in concentrations of contaminants and spatial mobility characteristics of groundwater (i.e., groundwater direction, retardation characteristics of contaminants, groundwater well depth, subsoil characteristics), to identify critical monitoring locations. Among the 7 groundwater monitoring well clusters (totaling 22 wells) in landfill, the data from two monitoring well clusters (totaling 7 wells) located along direction of groundwater flow showed similarities (the highest concentrations and same contaminants). These wells were used to assess the transport characteristics of the contaminants. Some parameters (e.g., iron, sodium, ammonia as N, chlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene) showed decreasing trends in the groundwater due to soil absorption and retardation. Metals were retarded by ion exchange and their concentration increased by depth indicating soil reached breakthrough over time. Soil depth did not have a significant effect on the concentrations of volatile organic contaminants. Based on the analyses, selective groundwater monitoring modifications were developed for effective monitoring to acquire data from the most critical locations which may be impacted by leachate mobility. The adjustments in the sampling strategy reduced the amount of data collected by as much as 97.7% (i.e., total number of parameters monitored). Effective groundwater sampling strategies can save time, effort and monitoring costs while improving the quality of sample handling and data analyses for better utilization of post closure

  16. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize

  17. Advanced online monitoring of cell culture off-gas using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Timo; Gutmann, Rene; Bayer, Karl; Kronthaler, Jennifer; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been frequently applied to monitor the O₂ and CO₂ content in the off-gas of animal cell culture fermentations. In contrast to classical mass spectrometry the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) provides additional information of volatile organic compounds by application of a soft ionization technology. Hence, the spectra show less fragments and can more accurately assigned to particular compounds. In order to discriminate between compounds of non-metabolic and metabolic origin cell free experiments and fed-batch cultivations with a recombinant CHO cell line were conducted. As a result, in total eight volatiles showing high relevance to individual cultivation or cultivation conditions could be identified. Among the detected compounds methanethiol, with a mass-to-charge ratio of 49, qualifies as a key candidate in process monitoring due to its strong connectivity to lactate formation. Moreover, the versatile and complex data sets acquired by PTR MS provide a valuable resource for statistical modeling to predict non direct measurable parameters. Hence, partial least square regression was applied to the complete spectra of volatiles measured and important cell culture parameters such as viable cell density estimated (R²  = 0.86). As a whole, the results of this study clearly show that PTR-MS provides a powerful tool to improve bioprocess-monitoring for mammalian cell culture. Thus, specific volatiles emitted by cells and measured online by the PTR-MS and complex variables gained through statistical modeling will contribute to a deeper process understanding in the future and open promising perspectives to bioprocess control. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Spectrophotometric assays for monitoring tRNA aminoacylation and aminoacyl-tRNA hydrolysis reactions.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A; Richardson, Charles J

    2017-01-15

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a central role in protein synthesis, catalyzing the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. Here, we describe a spectrophotometric assay for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in which the Tyr-tRNA product is cleaved, regenerating the tRNA substrate. As tRNA is the limiting substrate in the assay, recycling it substantially increases the sensitivity of the assay while simultaneously reducing its cost. The tRNA aminoacylation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by coupling the production of AMP to the conversion of NAD(+) to NADH. We have adapted the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay to monitor: (1) aminoacylation of tRNA by l- or d-tyrosine, (2) cyclodipeptide formation by cyclodipeptide synthases, (3) hydrolysis of d-aminoacyl-tRNAs by d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and (4) post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. All of these assays are continuous and homogenous, making them amenable for use in high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. In the case of the cyclodipeptide synthase, d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and post-transfer editing assays, the aminoacyl-tRNAs are generated in situ, avoiding the need to synthesize and purify aminoacyl-tRNA substrates prior to performing the assays. Lastly, we describe how the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay can be adapted to monitor the activity of other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and how the approach to regenerating the tRNA substrate can be used to increase the sensitivity and decrease the cost of commercially available aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase assays.

  19. Global detection and semi-quantification of Fritillaria alkaloids in Fritillariae Ussuriensis Bulbus by a non-targeted multiple reaction monitoring approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yao, Zhong Ping; Li, Ping; Chen, Si-Bao; So, Pui-Kin; Shi, Zi-Qi; Hu, Bin; Liu, Li-Fang; Xin, Gui-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Methods based on triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry have been widely used and reported as highly selective and sensitive methods for quantifying substances of herbal medicines. However, most of them were limited to targeted components, due to the difficulties to optimize the multiple reaction monitoring transitions without authentic standards. This study proposed a novel strategy for non-targeted optimization of multiple reaction monitoring method based on the diagnostic ion guided family classifications, tandem mass spectrometry database establishment, and transitions and collision energy screening. Applying this strategy, 59 Fritillaria alkaloids in Fritillariae Ussuriensis Bulbus have been classified, and 51 of these Fritillaria alkaloids were successfully detected by the optimal multiple reaction monitoring method. For semi-quantification, the easy-to-obtain Fritillaria alkaloids of each type, such as verticinone for cevanine type and peimisine for jervine type, were used as the reference standards to calibrate the other Fritillaria alkaloids in the same type. The method was demonstrated a good linearity (R(2) > 0.998) with satisfactory accuracy and precision, and the lower limits of quantification of verticinone and peimisine were estimated to be 0.076 and 0.216 pg, respectively. In addition, the results suggested that the proposed strategy might obtained high quality metabolomics data in discrimination of Fritillaria unibracteata and Fritillaria ussuriensis.

  20. Surface chemistry on small ruthenium nanoparticles: evidence for site selective reactions and influence of ligands.

    PubMed

    Novio, Fernando; Monahan, Daniele; Coppel, Yannick; Antorrena, Guillermo; Lecante, Pierre; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno

    2014-01-27

    The reactivity of two classes of ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) of small size, either sterically stabilized by a polymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP) or electronically stabilized by a ligand (bisdiphenylphosphinobutane, dppb) was tested towards standard reactions, namely CO oxidation, CO2 reduction and styrene hydrogenation. The aim of the work was to identify the sites of reactivity on the nanoparticles and to study how the presence of ancillary ligands can influence the course of these catalytic reactions by using NMR and IR spectroscopies. It was found that CO oxidation proceeds at room temperature (RT) on Ru NPs but that the system deactivates rapidly in the absence of ligands because of the formation of RuO2. In the presence of ligands, the reaction involves exclusively the bridging CO groups and no bulk oxidation is observed at RT under catalytic conditions. The reverse reaction, CO2 reduction, is achieved at 120 °C in the presence of H2 and leads to CO, which coordinates exclusively in a bridging mode, hence evidencing the competition between hydrides and CO for coordination on Ru NPs. The effect of ligands localized on the surface is also evidenced in catalytic reactions. Thus, styrene is slowly hydrogenated at RT by the two systems Ru/PVP and Ru/dppb, first into ethylbenzene and then into ethylcyclohexane. Selectively poisoning the nanoparticles with bridging CO groups leads to catalysts that are only able to reduce the vinyl group of styrene whereas a full poisoning with both terminal and bridging CO groups leads to inactive catalysts. These results are interpreted in terms of location of the ligands on the particles surface, and evidence site selectivity for both CO oxidation and arene hydrogenation.

  1. Spontaneous monitoring of adverse reactions to drugs by Italian dermatologists: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studi Epidemiologici in Dermatologia.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    During 1988, the Gruppo Italiano Studi Epidemiologici in Dermatologia (GISED) coordinated a pilot study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of a system for spontaneous monitoring of adverse drug reactions in dermatological practice in Italy. Approximately 400 dermatologists were asked to collaborate, and 141 agreed to the study. Procedures similar to those well established in other surveillance programs (including the use of standard forms and standardized assessment procedure) were adopted. In a 2-month period 775 reports were collected, of which 711 were maintained after careful evaluation. The general profile of the adverse reactions reported was in accordance with the experience derived by other spontaneous surveillance programs. The main purpose of spontaneous reporting systems is the identification of new reactions, and a model analysis was proposed, in our study, with reference to skin reactions to bamifylline. The demonstration of the feasibility of a drug-monitoring program in Italy, where little tradition exists in the area, is the most important result of our study.

  2. A multimodal optical and electrochemical device for monitoring surface reactions: redox active surfaces in porous silicon Rugate filters.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Simone; Guan, Bin; Darwish, Nadim A; Zhu, Ying; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2012-12-21

    Herein, mesoporous silicon (PSi) is configured as a single sensing device that has dual readouts; as a photonic crystal sensor in a Rugate filter configuration, and as a high surface area porous electrode. The as-prepared PSi is chemically modified to provide it with stability in aqueous media and to allow for the subsequent coupling of chemical species, such as via Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions between 1-alkynes and azides ("click" reactions). The utility of the bimodal capabilities of the PSi sensor for monitoring surface coupling procedures is demonstrated by the covalent coupling of a ferrocene derivative, as well as by demonstrating ligand-exchange reactions (LER) at the PSi surface. Both types of reactions were monitored through optical reflectivity measurements, as well as electrochemically via the oxidation/reduction of the surface tethered redox species.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-Assisted Transformation-Efficient Reaction (CRATER) for Near-Perfect Selective Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Greenberg, Daniel T.; Takahashi, Jack R.; Thompson, Kirsten A.; Maheshwari, Akshay J.; Kent, Ryan E.; McCutcheon, Griffin; Shih, Joseph D.; Calvet, Charles; Devlin, Tyler D.; Ju, Tina; Kunin, Daniel; Lieberman, Erica; Nguyen, Thai; Tran, Forrest; Xiang, Daniel; Fujishima, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 system has revolutionized genome editing by providing unprecedented DNA-targeting specificity. Here we demonstrate that this system can be also applied in vitro to fundamental cloning steps to facilitate efficient plasmid selection for transformation and selective gene insertion into plasmid vectors by cleaving unwanted plasmid byproducts with a single-guide RNA (sgRNA)-Cas9 nuclease complex. Using fluorescent and chromogenic proteins as reporters, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage excludes multiple plasmids as well as unwanted ligation byproducts resulting in an unprecedented increase in the transformation success rate from approximately 20% to nearly 100%. Thus, this CRISPR/Cas9-Assisted Transformation-Efficient Reaction (CRATER) protocol is a novel, inexpensive, and convenient application to conventional molecular cloning to achieve near-perfect selective transformation.

  4. Analyzing site selectivity in Rh2(esp)2-catalyzed intermolecular C-H amination reactions.

    PubMed

    Bess, Elizabeth N; DeLuca, Ryan J; Tindall, Daniel J; Oderinde, Martins S; Roizen, Jennifer L; Du Bois, J; Sigman, Matthew S

    2014-04-16

    Predicting site selectivity in C-H bond oxidation reactions involving heteroatom transfer is challenged by the small energetic differences between disparate bond types and the subtle interplay of steric and electronic effects that influence reactivity. Herein, the factors governing selective Rh2(esp)2-catalyzed C-H amination of isoamylbenzene derivatives are investigated, where modification to both the nitrogen source, a sulfamate ester, and substrate are shown to impact isomeric product ratios. Linear regression mathematical modeling is used to define a relationship that equates both IR stretching parameters and Hammett σ(+) values to the differential free energy of benzylic versus tertiary C-H amination. This model has informed the development of a novel sulfamate ester, which affords the highest benzylic-to-tertiary site selectivity (9.5:1) observed for this system.

  5. Noncovalent chirality sensing ensembles for the detection and reaction monitoring of amino acids, peptides, proteins, and aromatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Frank; Nau, Werner M

    2014-05-26

    Ternary complexes between the macrocyclic host cucurbit[8]uril, dicationic dyes, and chiral aromatic analytes afford strong induced circular dichroism (ICD) signals in the near-UV and visible regions. This allows for chirality sensing and peptide-sequence recognition in water at low micromolar analyte concentrations. The reversible and noncovalent mode of binding ensures an immediate response to concentration changes, which allows the real-time monitoring of chemical reactions. The introduced supramolecular method is likely to find applications in bioanalytical chemistry, especially enzyme assays, for drug-related analytical applications, and for continuous monitoring of enantioselective reactions, particularly asymmetric catalysis.

  6. Design of an Optical system for the In Situ Process Monitoring of Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, Philipp; Schleifenbaum, Henrich; Meiners, Wilhelm; Wissenbach, Konrad; Hinke, Christian; Bültmann, Jan

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an Additive Manufacturing technology that enables the production of complex shaped individual parts with series identical mechanical properties. Areas of improvement are up to now quality and reproducibility of parts made by SLM due to different kinds of errors. Therefore the integration of a monitoring and control module into a SLM-machine is aspired. The design of such an optical system capable of monitoring high scanning velocities and melt pool dynamics is introduced as a first step.

  7. [Monitoring programs realized by the State Sanitary Inspection concerning the contamination of selected foodstuffs by mycotoxins].

    PubMed

    Rybińska, Krystyna; Postupolski, Jacek; Ledzion, Ewa; Kurpińska-Jaworska, Jolanta; Szczesna, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    National monitoring plans, concerning mycotoxins levels in foodstuffs of plant origin in Poland are showed. The official control program for contaminates in food, including mycotoxins, is created by Chief Sanitary Inspectorate, on the basis of the draft prepared in National Institute of Hygiene and approved by Chief Sanitary Inspector. Results of monitoring programme for domestic market: aflatoxins in selected foodstuffs, mycotoxins in baby food and Fusarium toxin in baby food and maize-based foodstuffs, in years 2004-2006 were presented.

  8. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  9. Indicators for Monitoring Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene: A Systematic Review of Indicator Selection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Schwemlein, Stefanie; Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) is important to track progress, improve accountability, and demonstrate impacts of efforts to improve conditions and services, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Indicator selection methods enable robust monitoring of WaSH projects and conditions. However, selection methods are not always used and there are no commonly-used methods for selecting WaSH indicators. To address this gap, we conducted a systematic review of indicator selection methods used in WaSH-related fields. We present a summary of indicator selection methods for environment, international development, and water. We identified six methodological stages for selecting indicators for WaSH: define the purpose and scope; select a conceptual framework; search for candidate indicators; determine selection criteria; score indicators against criteria; and select a final suite of indicators. This summary of indicator selection methods provides a foundation for the critical assessment of existing methods. It can be used to inform future efforts to construct indicator sets in WaSH and related fields. PMID:26999180

  10. Indicators for Monitoring Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene: A Systematic Review of Indicator Selection Methods.

    PubMed

    Schwemlein, Stefanie; Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-03-17

    Monitoring water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) is important to track progress, improve accountability, and demonstrate impacts of efforts to improve conditions and services, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Indicator selection methods enable robust monitoring of WaSH projects and conditions. However, selection methods are not always used and there are no commonly-used methods for selecting WaSH indicators. To address this gap, we conducted a systematic review of indicator selection methods used in WaSH-related fields. We present a summary of indicator selection methods for environment, international development, and water. We identified six methodological stages for selecting indicators for WaSH: define the purpose and scope; select a conceptual framework; search for candidate indicators; determine selection criteria; score indicators against criteria; and select a final suite of indicators. This summary of indicator selection methods provides a foundation for the critical assessment of existing methods. It can be used to inform future efforts to construct indicator sets in WaSH and related fields.

  11. Identification of a suitable and selective inhibitor towards aldehyde oxidase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Palacharla, Raghava Choudary; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Kanamarlapudi, Vijaya Bhargava; Ponnamaneni, Ranjith Kumar; Manoharan, Arun Kumar

    2014-03-01

    1. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a liver cytosolic molybdoflavoprotein enzyme whose importance in drug metabolism is gaining in the recent. The objective of this work is to find a potent and selective inhibitor for AO activity using phthalazine oxidation as a marker reaction. 2. Among organic solvents tested, it was identified that methanol was not a suitable choice for AO activity even at concentrations less than 0.2% v/v. Acetonitrile and DMSO did not show any effect till 0.5% v/v but thereafter activites tend to decrease. 3. For selectivity, 23 compounds were selected and evaluated for their effects on AO and nine CYP450 enzymes. Among the tested compounds chlorpromazine, estradiol, hydralazine, quetiapine and raloxifene were selected based on their potency of inhibition towards AO activity. 4. Raloxifene was found to be a non-specific inhibitor of all major tested CYP450 enzymes and was excluded as a selective inhibitor for AO. Quetiapine also showed a degree of inhibition towards the major CYP450 tested. Hydralazine used as a specific inhibitor during the past for AO activity demonstrated a stimulation of AO activity at high and low concentrations respectively and the inhibition noted to be time dependent while inhibiting other enzymes like monoamine oxidase. 5. Estradiol showed no inhibition towards the tested CYP450 enzymes and thus proved to be a selective and specific inhibitor for AO activity with an uncompetitive mode of inhibition.

  12. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction. PMID:27731360

  13. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-10-12

    The Diels-Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction.

  14. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction.

  15. Monitoring mass transport in heterogeneously catalyzed reactions by field-gradient NMR for assessing reaction efficiency in a single pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljubasich, L.; Blümich, B.; Stapf, S.

    2011-09-01

    An important aspect in assessing the performance of a catalytically active reactor is the accessibility of the reactive sites inside the individual pellets, and the mass transfer of reactants and products to and from these sites. Optimal design often requires a suitable combination of micro- and macropores in order to facilitate mass transport inside the pellet. In an exothermic reaction, fluid exchange between the pellet and the surrounding medium is enhanced by convection, and often by the occurrence of gas bubbles. Determining mass flow in the vicinity of a pellet thus represents a parameter for quantifying the reaction efficiency and its dependence on time or external reaction conditions. Field gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods are suggested as a tool for providing parameters sensitive to this mass flow in a contact-free and non-invasive way. For the example of bubble-forming hydrogen peroxide decomposition in an alumina pellet, the dependence of the mean-squared displacement of fluid molecules on spatial direction, observation time and reaction time is presented, and multi-pulse techniques are employed in order to separate molecular displacements from coherent and incoherent motion on the timescale of the experiment. The reaction progress is followed until the complete decomposition of H 2O 2.

  16. Monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: A case of Fe³⁺ to Fe²⁺ conversion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Suhua; Meng, Juan; Tang, Xianghu; Yang, Liangbao

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the process of organic chemical reactions to study the kinetics by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is currently of immense interest. However, monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction is still an extremely difficulty for researchers. This study exactly focused on the monitor of inorganic chemical reaction. Capillary coated with silver nanoparticles was introduced, which was an efficient platform for monitoring reactions with SERS due to the advantages of sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. The photoreduction of [Fe(phen)3](3+) to [Fe(phen)3](2+) was used as model reaction to demonstrated the feasibility of SERS monitoring inorganic chemical reaction by involving in metal-organic complexes. Moreover, the preliminary implementation demonstrated that the kinetics of photoreduction can be real-time monitored by in situ using the SERS technique on a single constructed capillary, which may be useful for the practical application of SERS technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of interspecimen trypsin digestion efficiency prior to multiple reaction monitoring-based absolute protein quantification with native protein calibrators.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Irene; Smit, Nico P M; Romijn, Fred P H T M; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Deelder, André M; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Cobbaert, Christa M

    2013-12-06

    Implementation of quantitative clinical chemistry proteomics (qCCP) requires targeted proteomics approaches, usually involving bottom-up multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) with stable-isotope labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to move toward more accurate measurements. Two aspects of qCCP that deserve special attention are (1) proper calibration and (2) the assurance of consistent digestion. Here, we describe the evaluation of tryptic digestion efficiency by monitoring various signature peptides, missed cleavages, and modifications during proteolysis of apolipoprotein A-I and B in normo- and hypertriglyceridemic specimens. Absolute quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B was performed by LC-MRM-MS with SIS peptide internal standards at two time points (4 and 20 h), using three native protein calibrators. Comparison with an immunoturbidimetric assay revealed recoveries of 99.4 ± 6.5% for apolipoprotein A-I and 102.6 ± 7.2% for apolipoprotein B after 4 h of trypsin digestion. Protein recoveries after 20 h trypsin incubation equaled 95.9 ± 6.9% and 106.0 ± 10.0% for apolipoproteins A-I and B, respectively. In conclusion, the use of metrologically traceable, native protein calibrators looks promising for accurate quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B. Selection of rapidly formed peptides, that is, with no or minor missed cleavages, and the use of short trypsin incubation times for these efficiently cleaved peptides are likely to further reduce the variability introduced by trypsin digestion and to improve the traceability of test results to reach the desirable analytical performance for clinical chemistry application.

  18. Hydrothermal reactions of pyruvic acid: synthesis, selection, and self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Robert M; Deamer, David W

    2007-04-01

    Selection and self-assembly of organic compounds in aqueous phases must have been a primary process leading to emergent molecular complexity and ultimately to the origin of life. Facile reactions of pyruvic acid under hydrothermal conditions produce a complex mixture of larger organic molecules, some of which are amphiphiles that readily self-assemble into cell-sized vesicular structures. Chemical characterization of major components of this mixture reveals similarities to the suite of organic compounds present in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite, some of whose molecules also self-assemble into membranous vesicles. Physical properties of the products are thus relevant to understanding the prebiotic emergence of molecular complexity. These results suggest that a robust family of prebiotic reaction pathways produces similar products over a range of geochemical and astrochemical environments.

  19. Reactions of Ions with Ionic Liquid Vapors by Selected-Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chambreau, Steven D; Boatz, Jerry A; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Eyet, Nicole; Viggiano, A A

    2011-04-21

    Room-temperature ionic liquids exert vanishingly small vapor pressures under ambient conditions. Under reduced pressure, certain ionic liquids have demonstrated volatility, and they are thought to vaporize as intact cation-anion ion pairs. However, ion pair vapors are difficult to detect because their concentration is extremely low under these conditions. In this Letter, we report the products of reacting ions such as NO(+), NH4(+), NO3(-), and O2(-) with vaporized aprotic ionic liquids in their intact ion pair form. Ion pair fragmentation to the cation or anion as well as ion exchange and ion addition processes are observed by selected-ion flow tube mass spectrometry. Free energies of the reactions involving 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-trifluoromethylsulfonylimide determined by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations indicate that ion exchange or ion addition are energetically more favorable than charge-transfer processes, whereas charge-transfer processes can be important in reactions involving 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide.

  20. Selective covalent bond formation in polypeptide ions via gas-phase ion/ion reaction chemistry.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongling; McLuckey, Scott A

    2009-09-16

    Primary amines present in protonated polypeptides can be covalently modified via gas-phase ion/ion reactions using bifunctional reagent ions. The use of reagent anions with a charge-bearing site that leads to strong interactions with the polypeptide, such as sulfonic acid, gives rise to the formation of a long-lived adduct. A distinct reactive functional group, an aldehyde in the present case, can then undergo reaction with the peptide. Collisional activation of the adduct ion formed from a reagent with an aldehyde group and a peptide ion with a primary amine gives rise to water loss in conjunction with imine (Schiff base) formation. The covalently bound modification is retained upon subsequent collisional activation. This work demonstrates the ability to selectively modify polypeptide ions in the gas phase within the context of a multistage mass spectrometry experiment.

  1. A Reaction-Diffusion Model to Capture Disparity Selectivity in Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mohammed Sultan Mohiuddin; Bhaumik, Basabi

    2011-01-01

    Decades of experimental studies are available on disparity selective cells in visual cortex of macaque and cat. Recently, local disparity map for iso-orientation sites for near-vertical edge preference is reported in area 18 of cat visual cortex. No experiment is yet reported on complete disparity map in V1. Disparity map for layer IV in V1 can provide insight into how disparity selective complex cell receptive field is organized from simple cell subunits. Though substantial amounts of experimental data on disparity selective cells is available, no model on receptive field development of such cells or disparity map development exists in literature. We model disparity selectivity in layer IV of cat V1 using a reaction-diffusion two-eye paradigm. In this model, the wiring between LGN and cortical layer IV is determined by resource an LGN cell has for supporting connections to cortical cells and competition for target space in layer IV. While competing for target space, the same type of LGN cells, irrespective of whether it belongs to left-eye-specific or right-eye-specific LGN layer, cooperate with each other while trying to push off the other type. Our model captures realistic 2D disparity selective simple cell receptive fields, their response properties and disparity map along with orientation and ocular dominance maps. There is lack of correlation between ocular dominance and disparity selectivity at the cell population level. At the map level, disparity selectivity topography is not random but weakly clustered for similar preferred disparities. This is similar to the experimental result reported for macaque. The details of weakly clustered disparity selectivity map in V1 indicate two types of complex cell receptive field organization. PMID:22022370

  2. Enantiomer-Selective Photo-Induced Reaction of Protonated Tryptophan with Disaccharides in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thuc N; Fujihara, Akimasa

    2017-07-08

    In order to investigate chemical evolution in interstellar molecular clouds, enantiomer-selective photo-induced chemical reactions between an amino acid and disaccharides in the gas phase were examined using a tandem mass spectrometer containing an electrospray ionization source and a cold ion trap. Ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectra of cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes of protonated tryptophan (Trp) enantiomers with disaccharides consisting of two D-glucose units, such as D-maltose or D-cellobiose, were obtained by photoexcitation of the indole ring of Trp. NH2CHCOOH loss via cleavage of the Cα-Cβ bond in Trp induced by hydrogen atom transfer from the NH3(+) group of a protonated Trp was observed in a noncovalent heterochiral H(+)(L-Trp)(D-maltose) complex. In contrast, a photo-induced chemical reaction forming the product ion with m/z 282 occurs in homochiral H(+)(D-Trp)(D-maltose). For D-cellobiose, both NH2CHCOOH elimination and the m/z 282 product ion were observed, and no enantiomer-selective phenomena occurred. The m/z 282 product ion indicates that the photo-induced C-glycosylation, which links D-glucose residues to the indole moiety of Trp via a C-C bond, can occur in cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes, and its enantiomer-selectivity depends on the structure of the disaccharide.

  3. Enantiomer-Selective Photo-Induced Reaction of Protonated Tryptophan with Disaccharides in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Thuc N.; Fujihara, Akimasa

    2017-07-01

    In order to investigate chemical evolution in interstellar molecular clouds, enantiomer-selective photo-induced chemical reactions between an amino acid and disaccharides in the gas phase were examined using a tandem mass spectrometer containing an electrospray ionization source and a cold ion trap. Ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectra of cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes of protonated tryptophan (Trp) enantiomers with disaccharides consisting of two uc(d)-glucose units, such as uc(d)-maltose or uc(d)-cellobiose, were obtained by photoexcitation of the indole ring of Trp. NH2CHCOOH loss via cleavage of the Cα-Cβ bond in Trp induced by hydrogen atom transfer from the NH3 + group of a protonated Trp was observed in a noncovalent heterochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(d)-maltose) complex. In contrast, a photo-induced chemical reaction forming the product ion with m/z 282 occurs in homochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(d)-maltose). For uc(d)-cellobiose, both NH2CHCOOH elimination and the m/z 282 product ion were observed, and no enantiomer-selective phenomena occurred. The m/z 282 product ion indicates that the photo-induced C-glycosylation, which links uc(d)-glucose residues to the indole moiety of Trp via a C-C bond, can occur in cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes, and its enantiomer-selectivity depends on the structure of the disaccharide.

  4. Estimating Youth Locomotion Ground Reaction Forces Using an Accelerometer-Based Activity Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M.; Hawkins, David A.; Beckett, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    To address a variety of questions pertaining to the interactions between physical activity, musculoskeletal loading and musculoskeletal health/injury/adaptation, simple methods are needed to quantify, outside a laboratory setting, the forces acting on the human body during daily activities. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistically based model to estimate peak vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF) during youth gait. 20 girls (10.9±0.9 years) and 15 boys (12.5±0.6 years) wore a Biotrainer AM over their right hip. Six walking and six running trials were completed after a standard warm-up. Average AM intensity (g) and pVGRF (N) during stance were determined. Repeated measures mixed effects regression models to estimate pVGRF from Biotrainer activity monitor acceleration in youth (girls 10–12, boys 12–14 years) while walking and running were developed. Log transformed pVGRF had a statistically significant relationship with activity monitor acceleration, centered mass, sex (girl), type of locomotion (run), and locomotion type-acceleration interaction controlling for subject as a random effect. A generalized regression model without subject specific random effects was also developed. The average absolute differences between the actual and predicted pVGRF were 5.2% (1.6% standard deviation) and 9% (4.2% standard deviation) using the mixed and generalized models, respectively. The results of this study support the use of estimating pVGRF from hip acceleration using a mixed model regression equation. PMID:23133564

  5. Estimating youth locomotion ground reaction forces using an accelerometer-based activity monitor.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M; Hawkins, David A; Beckett, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    To address a variety of questions pertaining to the interactions between physical activity, musculoskeletal loading and musculoskeletal health/injury/adaptation, simple methods are needed to quantify, outside a laboratory setting, the forces acting on the human body during daily activities. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistically based model to estimate peak vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF) during youth gait. 20 girls (10.9 ± 0.9 years) and 15 boys (12.5 ± 0.6 years) wore a Biotrainer AM over their right hip. Six walking and six running trials were completed after a standard warm-up. Average AM intensity (g) and pVGRF (N) during stance were determined. Repeated measures mixed effects regression models to estimate pVGRF from Biotrainer activity monitor acceleration in youth (girls 10-12, boys 12-14 years) while walking and running were developed. Log transformed pVGRF had a statistically significant relationship with activity monitor acceleration, centered mass, sex (girl), type of locomotion (run), and locomotion type-acceleration interaction controlling for subject as a random effect. A generalized regression model without subject specific random effects was also developed. The average absolute differences between the actual and predicted pVGRF were 5.2% (1.6% standard deviation) and 9% (4.2% standard deviation) using the mixed and generalized models, respectively. The results of this study support the use of estimating pVGRF from hip acceleration using a mixed model regression equation.

  6. Automatic identification approach for high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring fatty acid global profiling.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2015-08-18

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a group of lipid molecules that are essential to organisms. As potential biomarkers for different diseases, FAs have attracted increasing attention from both biological researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. A sensitive and accurate method for globally profiling and identifying FAs is required for biomarker discovery. The high selectivity and sensitivity of high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) gives it great potential to fulfill the need to identify FAs from complicated matrices. This paper developed a new approach for global FA profiling and identification for HPLC-MRM FA data mining. Mathematical models for identifying FAs were simulated using the isotope-induced retention time (RT) shift (IRS) and peak area ratios between parallel isotope peaks for a series of FA standards. The FA structures were predicated using another model based on the RT and molecular weight. Fully automated FA identification software was coded using the Qt platform based on these mathematical models. Different samples were used to verify the software. A high identification efficiency (greater than 75%) was observed when 96 FA species were identified in plasma. This FAs identification strategy promises to accelerate FA research and applications.

  7. Deciphering chemical interactions between Glycyrrhizae Radix and Coptidis Rhizoma by liquid chromatography with transformed multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhao; Liu, Ting; Liao, Jie; Ai, Ni; Fan, Xiaohui; Cheng, Yiyu

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we propose an integrated strategy for the efficient identification and quantification of herbal constituents using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. First, liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was employed for the chemical profiling of herbs, where a targeted following nontargeted approach was developed to detect trace constituents by using structural correlations and extracted ion chromatograms. Next, ion pairs and parameters of MS(2) of quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry were selected to design multiple reaction monitoring transitions for the identified compounds on liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The relative concentration of each constituent was then calculated using a semiquantitative calibration curve. The proposed strategy was applied in a study of chemical interactions between Glycyrrhizae Radix and Coptidis Rhizoma. A total of 140 compounds were identified or tentatively characterized from the herbs, 132 of which were relatively quantified. The visualized quantitative results clearly showed codecoction produced significant constituent concentration variations especially for those with a low polarity. The case study also indicated that the present methodology could provide a reliable, accurate, and labor-saving solution for chemical studies of herbal medicines. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Selectivity of montmorillonite catalyzed prebiotic reactions of D, L-nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash C.; Pitsch, Stefan; Ferris, James P.

    2007-02-01

    The montmorillonite-catalyzed reactions of the 5‧-phosphorimidazolides of D, L-adenosine (D, L-ImpA) (Figure 1a. N = A, R = H) and D, L-uridine (Figure 1a., N = U, R = H) yields oligomers that were as long as 7 mers and 6 mers, respectively. The reactions of dilute solutions of D-ImpA and D-ImpU under the same conditions gave oligomers as long as 9 and 8 mers respectively. This demonstrated that oligomer formation is only partially inhibited by incorporation of both the D- and L-enantiomers. The structures of the dimers, trimers and tetramer fractions formed from D, L-ImpA was investigated by selective enzymatic hydrolysis, comparison with authentic samples and mass spectrometry. Homochiral products were present in greater amounts than would be expected if theoretical amounts of each were formed. The ratio of the proportion of homochiral products to that of the amount of each expected for the dimers (cyclic and linear), trimers and tetramers, was 1.3, 1.6, and 2.1, respectively. In the D, L-ImpU reaction homochiral products did not predominate with ratios of dimers (cyclic and linear), trimers and tetramers 0.8, 0.44, and 1.4, respectively. The proportions of cyclic dimers in the dimer fraction were 52 66% with D, L-ImpA and 44 69% with D, L-ImpU. No cyclic dimers were formed in the absence of montmorillonite. The differences in the reaction products of D, L-ImpA and D, L-ImpU are likely to be due to the difference in the orientations of the activated monomers when bound to the catalytic sites on montmorillonite. The consequences of the selectivity of montmorillonite as a prebiotic catalyst are discussed.

  9. Determination of free fatty acids and triglycerides by gas chromatography using selective esterification reactions.

    PubMed

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-01-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  10. Determination of Free Fatty Acids and Triglycerides by Gas Chromatography Using Selective Esterification Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-11-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  11. In situ and real-time monitoring of mechanochemical milling reactions using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Ivan; Kimber, Simon A J; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Honkimäki, Veijo; Nightingale, Richard C; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2013-09-01

    We describe the only currently available protocol for in situ, real-time monitoring of mechanochemical reactions and intermediates by X-ray powder diffraction. Although mechanochemical reactions (inducing transformations by mechanical forces such as grinding and milling) are normally performed in commercially available milling assemblies, such equipment does not permit direct reaction monitoring. We now describe the design and in-house modification of milling equipment that allows the reaction jars of the operating mill to be placed in the path of a high-energy (∼90 keV) synchrotron X-ray beam while the reaction is taking place. Resulting data are analyzed using conventional software, such as TOPAS. Reaction intermediates and products are identified using the Cambridge Structural Database or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. Reactions are analyzed by fitting the time-resolved diffractograms using structureless Pawley refinement for crystalline phases that are not fully structurally characterized (such as porous frameworks with disordered guests), or the Rietveld method for solids with fully determined crystal structures (metal oxides, coordination polymers).

  12. Impact of Probe Substrate Selection on Cytochrome P450 Reaction Phenotyping Using the Relative Activity Factor.

    PubMed

    Siu, Y Amy; Lai, W George

    2017-02-01

    Accurately assessing the contribution of cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms to overall metabolic clearance is important for prediction of clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The relative activity factor (RAF) approach in P450 reaction phenotyping assumes that the interaction between P450-selective probes and testing systems is the same as the interaction of drug candidate with those systems. To test this assumption, an intersystem clearance ratio (ICR) was created to evaluate the difference in values between RAF-scaled intrinsic clearance (CLint) and measured CLint in human liver microsomes (HLMs). The RAF value for CYP3A4 or CYP2C9 derived from a particular P450-selective probe reaction was applied to calculate RAF-scaled CLint for other probe reactions of the same P450 isoform in a crossover manner and compared with the measured HLM CLint When RAF derived from midazolam or nifedipine was used for CYP3A4, the ICR for testosterone 6β-hydroxylation was 31 and 25, respectively, suggesting significantly diverse interactions of CYP3A4 probes with the testing systems. Such ICR differences were less profound among probes for CYP2C9. In addition, these RAF values were applied to losartan and meloxicam, whose metabolism is mostly CYP2C9 mediated. Only using the RAF derived from testosterone for CYP3A4 produced the expected CYP2C9 contribution of 72%-87% and 47%-69% for metabolism of losartan and meloxicam, respectively. RAF derived from other CYP3A4 probes would have attributed predominantly to CYP3A4 and led to incorrect prediction of DDIs. Our study demonstrates a significant impact of probe substrate selection on P450 phenotyping using the RAF approach, and the ICR may provide a potential solution. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Positron emission tomography probe to monitor selected sugar metabolism in vivo

    DOEpatents

    Witte, Owen; Clark, Peter M.; Castillo, Blanca Graciela Flores; Jung, Michael E.; Evdokimov, Nikolai M.

    2017-03-14

    The invention disclosed herein discloses selected ribose isomers that are useful as PET probes (e.g. [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-arabinose). These PET probes are useful, for example, in methods designed to monitor physiological processes including ribose metabolism and/or to selectively observe certain tissue/organs in vivo. The invention disclosed herein further provides methods for making and using such probes.

  14. Tuning the selectivity of Gd3N cluster endohedral metallofullerene reactions with Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Steven; Rottinger, Khristina A; Fahim, Muska; Field, Jessica S; Martin, Benjamin R; Arvola, Kristine D

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate the manipulation of the Lewis acid strength to selectively fractionate different types of Gd3N metallofullerenes that are present in complex mixtures. Carbon disulfide is used for all Lewis acid studies. CaCl2 exhibits the lowest reactivity but the highest selectivity by precipitating only those gadolinium metallofullerenes with the lowest first oxidation potentials. ZnCl2 selectively complexes Gd3N@C88 during the first 4 h of reaction. Reaction with ZnCl2 for an additional 7 days permits a selective precipitation of Gd3N@C84 as the dominant endohedral isolated. A third fraction is the filtrate, which possesses Gd3N@C86 and Gd3N@C80 as the two dominant metallofullerenes. The order of increasing reactivity and decreasing selectivity (left to right) is as follows: CaCl2 < ZnCl2 < NiCl2 < MgCl2 < MnCl2 < CuCl2 < WCl4 ≪ WCl6 < ZrCl4 < AlCl3 < FeCl3. As a group, CaCl2, ZnCl2, and NiCl2 are the weakest Lewis acids and have the highest selectivity because of their very low precipitation onsets, which are below +0.19 V (i.e., endohedrals with first oxidation potentials below +0.19 V are precipitated). For CaCl2, the precipitation threshold is estimated at a remarkably low value of +0.06 V. Because most endohedrals possess first oxidation potentials significantly higher than +0.06 V, CaCl2 is especially useful in its ability to precipitate only a select group of gadolinium metallofullerenes. The Lewis acids of intermediate reactivity (i.e., precipitation onsets estimated between +0.19 and +0.4 V) are MgCl2, MnCl2, CuCl2, and WCl4. The strongest Lewis acids (WCl6, ZrCl4, AlCl3, and FeCl3) are the least selective and tend to precipitate the entire family of gadolinium metallofullerenes. Tuning the Lewis acid for a specific type of endohedral should be useful in a nonchromatographic purification method. The ability to control which metallofullerenes are permitted to precipitate and which endohedrals would remain in solution is a key outcome of this work.

  15. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    PubMed

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  16. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES

    PubMed Central

    CORREIA, RION BRATTIG; LI, LANG; ROCHA, LUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this “Bibliome”, the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products—including cannabis—which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015. We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that

  17. Highly selective room-temperature copper-catalyzed C-N coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Shafir, Alexandr; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2006-07-12

    Through the use of cyclic beta-diketones as supporting ligands, the copper-catalyzed coupling of aryl iodides with aliphatic amines occurs at room temperature in as little as 1 h. These high reaction rates allow for the coupling of a wide range of aryl and heteroaryl iodides at room temperature. This method is highly tolerant of a number of reactive functional groups, including -Br and aromatic -NH2 as well as phenolic and aliphatic -OH. The high selectivity of the CuI-beta-diketone catalyst for aliphatic amines represents a useful complement to the palladium-based methods.

  18. High Frequency Impedance Measurement as a Relevant Tool to Monitor Apatitic Cement Setting Reaction.

    PubMed

    Despas, Christelle; Schnitzler, Verena; Janvier, Pascal; Fayon, Franck; Massiot, Dominique; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Bujoli, Bruno; Walcarius, Alain

    2013-10-25

    This work reports the development of a relevant and general method based on high frequency impedance measurements, for the in situ monitoring of the alpha-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDA) transformation which is the driving force of the hardening processes of some calcium phosphate cements (CPC) used as bone substitutes. The three main steps of the setting reaction are identified in a non invasive way through the variation of dielectric permittivity and dielectric losses. The method is also likely to characterize the effect of the incorporation of additives (i.e, antiosteoporotic bisphosphonate drugs such as Alendronate) in the CPC formulation on the hydration process. It allows not only to confirm the retarding effect of bisphosphonate by an accurate determination of setting times, but also to assess the phenomena taking place whether alendronate is added in the liquid phase or combined to the solid phase of the cement composition. Compared to the conventional Gillmore needle test, the present method offers the advantage of accurate, user-independent, in situ and real-time determination of the initial and final times of the chemical hardening process, which are important parameters when considering surgical applications.

  19. Rapid verification of candidate serological biomarkers using gel-based, label-free multiple reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hsin-Yao; Beer, Lynn A; Barnhart, Kurt T; Speicher, David W

    2011-09-02

    Stable isotope dilution-multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SID-MRM-MS) has emerged as a promising platform for verification of serological candidate biomarkers. However, cost and time needed to synthesize and evaluate stable isotope peptides, optimize spike-in assays, and generate standard curves quickly becomes unattractive when testing many candidate biomarkers. In this study, we demonstrate that label-free multiplexed MRM-MS coupled with major protein depletion and 1D gel separation is a time-efficient, cost-effective initial biomarker verification strategy requiring less than 100 μL of serum. Furthermore, SDS gel fractionation can resolve different molecular weight forms of targeted proteins with potential diagnostic value. Because fractionation is at the protein level, consistency of peptide quantitation profiles across fractions permits rapid detection of quantitation problems for specific peptides from a given protein. Despite the lack of internal standards, the entire workflow can be highly reproducible, and long-term reproducibility of relative protein abundance can be obtained using different mass spectrometers and LC methods with external reference standards. Quantitation down to ~200 pg/mL could be achieved using this workflow. Hence, the label-free GeLC-MRM workflow enables rapid, sensitive, and economical initial screening of large numbers of candidate biomarkers prior to setting up SID-MRM assays or immunoassays for the most promising candidate biomarkers.

  20. Towards continuous and real-time attention monitoring at work: reaction time versus brain response.

    PubMed

    Mijović, Pavle; Ković, Vanja; De Vos, Maarten; Mačužić, Ivan; Todorović, Petar; Jeremić, Branislav; Gligorijević, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Continuous and objective measurement of the user attention state still represents a major challenge in the ergonomics research. Recently available wearable electroencephalography (EEG) opens new opportunities for objective and continuous evaluation of operators' attention, which may provide a new paradigm in ergonomics. In this study, wearable EEG was recorded during simulated assembly operation, with the aim to analyse P300 event-related potential component, which provides reliable information on attention processing. In parallel, reaction times (RTs) were recorded and the correlation between these two attention-related modalities was investigated. Negative correlation between P300 amplitudes and RTs has been observed on the group level (p < .001). However, on the individual level, the obtained correlations were not consistent. As a result, we propose the P300 amplitude for accurate attention monitoring in ergonomics research. On the other hand, no significant correlation between RTs and P300 latency was found on group, neither on individual level. Practitioner Summary: Ergonomic studies of assembly operations mainly investigated physical aspects, while mental states of the assemblers were not sufficiently addressed. Presented study aims at attention tracking, using realistic workplace replica. It is shown that drops in attention could be successfully traced only by direct brainwave observation, using wireless electroencephalographic measurements.

  1. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  2. Quantification of histone modifications by parallel-reaction monitoring: a method validation.

    PubMed

    Sowers, James L; Mirfattah, Barsam; Xu, Pei; Tang, Hui; Park, In Young; Walker, Cheryl; Wu, Ping; Laezza, Fernanda; Sowers, Lawrence C; Zhang, Kangling

    2015-10-06

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming is one of the major causes leading to irregular gene expression and regulatory pathway perturbations, in the cells, resulting in unhealthy cell development or diseases. Accurate measurements of these changes of epigenetic modifications, especially the complex histone modifications, are very important, and the methods for these measurements are not trivial. By following our previous introduction of PRM to targeting histone modifications (Tang, H.; Fang, H.; Yin, E.; Brasier, A. R.; Sowers, L. C.; Zhang, K. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring targeting histone modifications on the QExactive mass spectrometer. Anal. Chem. 2014, 86 (11), 5526-34), herein we validated this method by varying the protein/trypsin ratios via serial dilutions. Our data demonstrated that PRM with SILAC histones as the internal standards allowed reproducible measurements of histone H3/H4 acetylation and methylation in the samples whose histone contents differ at least one-order of magnitude. The method was further validated by histones isolated from histone H3 K36 trimethyltransferase SETD2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) cells. Furthermore, histone acetylation and methylation in human neural stem cells (hNSC) treated with ascorbic acid phosphate (AAP) were measured by this method, revealing that H3 K36 trimethylation was significantly down-regulated by 6 days of treatment with vitamin C.

  3. NeuCode labels with parallel reaction monitoring for multiplexed, absolute protein quantification

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Gregory K.; Voigt, Emily A.; Bailey, Derek J.; Westphall, Michael S.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Yin, John; Coon, Joshua J.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new method to multiplex the throughput of samples for targeted mass spectrometry analysis. The current paradigm for obtaining absolute quantification from biological samples requires spiking isotopically heavy peptide standards into light biological lysates. Because each lysate must be run individually, this method places limitations on sample throughput and high demands on instrument time. When cell lines are first metabolically labeled with various neutron-encoded (NeuCode) lysine isotopologues possessing mDa mass differences from each other, heavy cell lysates may be mixed and spiked with an additional heavy peptide as an internal standard. We demonstrate that these NeuCode lysate peptides may be co-isolated with their internal standards, fragmented, and analyzed together using high resolving power parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). Instead of running each sample individually, these methods allow samples to be multiplexed to obtain absolute concentrations of target peptides in 5, 15, and even 25 biological samples at a time during single mass spectrometry experiments. PMID:26882330

  4. Mass spectrometric quantification of MIF-1 in mouse brain by multiple reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kheterpal, Indu; Kastin, Abba J; Mollah, Sahana; Yu, Chuanhui; Hsuchou, Hung; Pan, Weihong

    2009-07-01

    MIF-1 (Pro-Leu-Gly-NH(2)) has potent therapeutic effects in depression and Parkinson's disease, but its CNS sites of production are not yet clear. In this study, the concentration of MIF-1 in different brain regions was measured by the multiple reaction monitoring technique on a 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer. The limit of quantification was 300 fg of MIF-1, and limit of detection was 60 fg. The low molecular weight fractions of tissue homogenates from different regions of mouse brain were analyzed. The concentration of MIF-1 ranged from 22+/-3 fg/microg protein in cerebral cortex to 930+/-60 fg/microg protein in the hypothalamus. Moderate concentrations were also detected in all other regions tested, including the striatum, thalamus, and hippocampus. By incubation of stable isotope-labeled oxytocin with tissue preparations, it was also confirmed that oxytocin at least partially contributed to the production of MIF-1 in the hypothalamus by action of peptidases. Regional differences were also found. The results are the first to show the ultrasensitive quantification of MIF-1 in different brain regions, and support the neuromodulatory actions of MIF-1 in the striatum.

  5. Mass spectrometric quantification of MIF-1 in mouse brain by multiple reaction monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kheterpal, Indu; Kastin, Abba J.; Mollah, Sahana; Yu, Chuanhui; Hsuchou, Hung; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    MIF-1 (Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2) has potent therapeutic effects in depression and Parkinson’s disease, but its CNS sites of production are not yet clear. In this study, the concentration of MIF-1 in different brain regions was measured by the multiple reaction monitoring technique on a 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer. The limit of quantification was 300 fg of MIF-1, and limit of detection was 60 fg. The low molecular weight fractions of tissue homogenates from different regions of mouse brain were analyzed. The concentration of MIF-1 ranged from 22 ± 3 fg/μg protein in cerebral cortex to 930 ± 60 fg/μg protein in the hypothalamus. Moderate concentrations were also detected in all other regions tested, including the striatum, thalamus, and hippocampus. By incubation of stable isotope-labeled oxytocin with tissue preparations, it was also confirmed that oxytocin at least partially contributed to the production of MIF-1 in the hypothalamus by action of peptidases. Regional differences were also found. The results are the first to show the ultrasensitive quantification of MIF-1 in different brain regions, and support the neuromodulatory actions of MIF-1 in the striatum. PMID:19540426

  6. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  7. Label-Free Absolute Quantitation of Oligosaccharides Using Multiple Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An absolute quantitation method for measuring free human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in milk samples was developed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). To obtain the best sensitivity, the instrument conditions were optimized to reduce the source and postsource fragmentation prior to the quadrupole transmission. Fragmentation spectra of HMOs using collision-induced dissociation were studied to obtain the best characteristic fragments. At least two MRM transitions were used to quantify and identify each structure in the same run. The fragment ions corresponded to the production of singly charged mono-, di-, and trisaccharide fragments. The sensitivity and accuracy of the quantitation using MRM were determined, with the detection limit in the femtomole level and the calibration range spanning over 5 orders of magnitude. Seven commercial HMO standards were used to create calibration curves and were used to determine a universal response for all HMOs. The universal response factor was used to estimate absolute amounts of other structures and the total oligosaccharide content in milk. The quantitation method was applied to 20 human milk samples to determine the variations in HMO concentrations from women classified as secretors and nonsecretors, a phenotype that can be identified by the concentration of 2′-fucosylation in their milk. PMID:24502421

  8. Elucidation of Mechanisms and Selectivities of Metal-Catalyzed Reactions using Quantum Chemical Methodology.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Stefano; Kalek, Marcin; Huang, Genping; Himo, Fahmi

    2016-05-17

    Quantum chemical techniques today are indispensable for the detailed mechanistic understanding of catalytic reactions. The development of modern density functional theory approaches combined with the enormous growth in computer power have made it possible to treat quite large systems at a reasonable level of accuracy. Accordingly, quantum chemistry has been applied extensively to a wide variety of catalytic systems. A huge number of problems have been solved successfully, and vast amounts of chemical insights have been gained. In this Account, we summarize some of our recent work in this field. A number of examples concerned with transition metal-catalyzed reactions are selected, with emphasis on reactions with various kinds of selectivities. The discussed cases are (1) copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation of indoles, (2) iridium-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H borylation of chlorosilanes, (3) vanadium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement and its combination with aldol- and Mannich-type additions, (4) palladium-catalyzed propargylic substitution with phosphorus nucleophiles, (5) rhodium-catalyzed 1:2 coupling of aldehydes and allenes, and finally (6) copper-catalyzed coupling of nitrones and alkynes to produce β-lactams (Kinugasa reaction). First, the methodology adopted in these studies is presented briefly. The electronic structure method in the great majority of these kinds of mechanistic investigations has for the last two decades been based on density functional theory. In the cases discussed here, mainly the B3LYP functional has been employed in conjunction with Grimme's empirical dispersion correction, which has been shown to improve the calculated energies significantly. The effect of the surrounding solvent is described by implicit solvation techniques, and the thermochemical corrections are included using the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. The reviewed examples are chosen to illustrate the usefulness and versatility of the adopted methodology in

  9. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    DOEpatents

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  10. Generic HPLC platform for automated enzyme reaction monitoring: Advancing the assay toolbox for transaminases and other PLP-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Börner, Tim; Grey, Carl; Adlercreutz, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Methods for rapid and direct quantification of enzyme kinetics independent of the substrate stand in high demand for both fundamental research and bioprocess development. This study addresses the need for a generic method by developing an automated, standardizable HPLC platform monitoring reaction progress in near real-time. The method was applied to amine transaminase (ATA) catalyzed reactions intensifying process development for chiral amine synthesis. Autosampler-assisted pipetting facilitates integrated mixing and sampling under controlled temperature. Crude enzyme formulations in high and low substrate concentrations can be employed. Sequential, small (1 µL) sample injections and immediate detection after separation permits fast reaction monitoring with excellent sensitivity, accuracy and reproducibility. Due to its modular design, different chromatographic techniques, e.g. reverse phase and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) can be employed. A novel assay for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes is presented using SEC for direct monitoring of enzyme-bound and free reaction intermediates. Time-resolved changes of the different cofactor states, e.g. pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate and the internal aldimine were traced in both half reactions. The combination of the automated HPLC platform with SEC offers a method for substrate-independent screening, which renders a missing piece in the assay and screening toolbox for ATAs and other PLP-dependent enzymes.

  11. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced

  12. Survivability and Abiotic Reactions of Selected Amino Acids in Different Hydrothermal System Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandru, Kuhan; Imai, Eiichi; Kaneko, Takeo; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2013-04-01

    We tested the stability and reaction of several amino acids using hydrothermal system simulators: an autoclave and two kinds of flow reactors at 200-250 °C. This study generally showed that there is a variation in the individual amino acids survivability in the simulators. This is mainly attributed to the following factors; heat time, cold quenching exposure, metal ions and also silica. We observed that, in a rapid heating flow reactor, high aggregation and/or condensation of amino acids could occur even during a heat exposure of 2 min. We also monitored their stability in a reflow-type of simulator for 120 min at 20 min intervals. The non-hydrolyzed and hydrolyzed samples for this system showed a similar degradation only in the absence of metal ions.

  13. A Highly Active Catalyst for Pd-Catalyzed Amination Reactions: Cross-Coupling Reactions Using Aryl Mesylates and the Highly Selective Monoarylation of Primary Amines Using Aryl Chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Fors, Brett P.; Watson, Donald A.; Biscoe, Mark R.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    A catalyst system based on a new biarylmonophosphine ligand (BrettPhos) that shows excellent reactivity for C–N cross-coupling reactions is reported. This catalyst system enables the use of aryl mesylates as a coupling partner in C–N bond-forming reactions. Additionally, the use of BrettPhos permits the highly selective monoarylation of an array of primary aliphatic amines and anilines at low catalyst loadings and with fast reaction times, including the first monoarylation of methylamine. Lastly, oxidative addition complexes of BrettPhos are included, which provide insight into the origin of reactivity for this system. PMID:18798626

  14. Kinetic and Product Studies of the Reaction Between Oxidized Mercury Species and Selected Thiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, L.; Ariya, P.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant with severe potential toxicity. The reduction of oxidized mercury species (Hg(II)) to elemental mercury (Hg(0)) affects the global distribution of mercury and competes for methylation processes of mercury in aquatic environment. This study focused on the reduction of Hg(II) by several selected thiols using a suite of complementary mass spectrometry and cold vapor fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS). Previous studies showed that irradiation of benzene solution of six mercury dimercaptides (benzyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, cyclopentyl, t-butyl and phenyl sulfide) at part-per-million level by a mercury arc lamp under a nitrogen atmosphere caused the formation of Hg(0) to occur. The reaction kinetics was studied using CVAFS, and the products of the reaction were analyzed using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and Gas Chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The kinetic data were obtained for 1-butanethiol, and 1-pentanethiol, 1-hexanethiol at environmental relevant conditions. The effects of light, pH, dissolved oxygen and chloride ion on reaction rates were also investigated. We will present our results and discuss their potential environmental implications on mercury cycling.

  15. Model selection and change detection for a time-varying mean in process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Tom; Hamada, Michael S.; Ticknor, Larry; Weaver, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Process monitoring (PM) for nuclear safeguards sometimes requires estimation of thresholds corresponding to small false alarm rates. Threshold estimation is an old topic; however, because possible new roles for PM are being evaluated in nuclear safeguards, it is timely to consider modern model selection options in the context of alarm threshold estimation. One of the possible new PM roles involves PM residuals, where a residual is defined as residual=data-prediction. This paper briefly reviews alarm threshold estimation, introduces model selection options, and considers several assumptions regarding the data-generating mechanism for PM residuals. Four PM examples from nuclear safeguards are included. One example involves frequent by-batch material balance closures where a dissolution vessel has time-varying efficiency, leading to time-varying material holdup. Another example involves periodic partial cleanout of in-process inventory, leading to challenging structure in the time series of PM residuals. Our main focus is model selection to select a defensible model for normal behavior with a time-varying mean in a PM residual stream. We use approximate Bayesian computation to perform the model selection and parameter estimation for normal behavior. We then describe a simple lag-one-differencing option similar to that used to monitor non-stationary times series to monitor for off-normal behavior.

  16. Nucleic acid templated reactions: consequences of probe reactivity and readout strategy for amplified signaling and sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Tom N; Seitz, Oliver

    2009-07-06

    DNA- and RNA-templated chemical reactions can serve as a diagnostic means for the detection of nucleic acids. Reaction schemes that allow amplified detection are of high interest for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free DNA and RNA diagnosis. These reactions typically draw upon the catalytic activity of the template, which is able to trigger the conversion of many signaling molecules per template molecule. However, the design of reactive probes that allow both sensitive and selective nucleic acid detection is a challenge and requires insight into three major parameters: a) reactivity of functional groups involved, b) affinity of probes for the template, and c) the readout system. In this study we used peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based probes to investigate in detail the signaling power and the selectivity of a transfer reaction derived from a native chemical ligation. We show that subtle variations of the thioesters involved had a tremendous impact on the sensitivity and selectivity of the reaction system. The results suggest that reactions at turnover conditions require low rates of non-templated reaction pathways to provide high target selectivity and sensitivity. On the other hand, very high rates of templated reactions should be avoided to allow mismatched probe-template complexes to dissociate prior to bond formation. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the DNA-catalyzed transfer reaction was studied and provided insight into crucial strand-exchange processes. Further improvements of selective signaling were achieved through a new readout based on pyrene-transfer reactions. This method reduces background signals and enables significant increases in the signaling rates compared with previous fluorescence-based methods.

  17. Precise Spatially Selective Photothermolysis Using Modulated Femtosecond Lasers and Real-time Multimodal Microscopy Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yimei; Lui, Harvey; Zhao, Jianhua; Wu, Zhenguo; Zeng, Haishan

    2017-01-01

    The successful application of lasers in the treatment of skin diseases and cosmetic surgery is largely based on the principle of conventional selective photothermolysis which relies strongly on the difference in the absorption between the therapeutic target and its surroundings. However, when the differentiation in absorption is not sufficient, collateral damage would occur due to indiscriminate and nonspecific tissue heating. To deal with such cases, we introduce a novel spatially selective photothermolysis method based on multiphoton absorption in which the radiant energy of a tightly focused near-infrared femtosecond laser beam can be directed spatially by aiming the laser focal point to the target of interest. We construct a multimodal optical microscope to perform and monitor the spatially selective photothermolysis. We demonstrate that precise alteration of the targeted tissue is achieved while leaving surrounding tissue intact by choosing appropriate femtosecond laser exposure with multimodal optical microscopy monitoring in real time. PMID:28255346

  18. A vaccine study design selection framework for the postlicensure rapid immunization safety monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Baker, Meghan A; Lieu, Tracy A; Li, Lingling; Hua, Wei; Qiang, Yandong; Kawai, Alison Tse; Fireman, Bruce H; Martin, David B; Nguyen, Michael D

    2015-04-15

    The Postlicensure Rapid Immunization Safety Monitoring Program, the vaccination safety monitoring component of the US Food and Drug Administration's Mini-Sentinel project, is currently the largest cohort in the US general population for vaccine safety surveillance. We developed a study design selection framework to provide a roadmap and description of methods that may be utilized to evaluate potential associations between vaccines and health outcomes of interest in the Postlicensure Rapid Immunization Safety Monitoring Program and other systems using administrative data. The strengths and weaknesses of designs for vaccine safety monitoring, including the cohort design, the case-centered design, the risk interval design, the case-control design, the self-controlled risk interval design, the self-controlled case series method, and the case-crossover design, are described and summarized in tabular form. A structured decision table is provided to aid in planning of future vaccine safety monitoring activities, and the data components comprising the structured decision table are delineated. The study design selection framework provides a starting point for planning vaccine safety evaluations using claims-based data sources.

  19. Development of biomarkers for screening hepatocellular carcinoma using global data mining and multiple reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Kyunggon; Yu, Su Jong; Jang, Eun Sun; Yu, Jiyoung; Cho, Geunhee; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Youngsoo

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and aggressive cancers and is associated with a poor survival rate. Clinically, the level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of HCC. The discovery of useful biomarkers for HCC, focused solely on the proteome, has been difficult; thus, wide-ranging global data mining of genomic and proteomic databases from previous reports would be valuable in screening biomarker candidates. Further, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), based on triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, has been effective with regard to high-throughput verification, complementing antibody-based verification pipelines. In this study, global data mining was performed using 5 types of HCC data to screen for candidate biomarker proteins: cDNA microarray, copy number variation, somatic mutation, epigenetic, and quantitative proteomics data. Next, we applied MRM to verify HCC candidate biomarkers in individual serum samples from 3 groups: a healthy control group, patients who have been diagnosed with HCC (Before HCC treatment group), and HCC patients who underwent locoregional therapy (After HCC treatment group). After determining the relative quantities of the candidate proteins by MRM, we compared their expression levels between the 3 groups, identifying 4 potential biomarkers: the actin-binding protein anillin (ANLN), filamin-B (FLNB), complementary C4-A (C4A), and AFP. The combination of 2 markers (ANLN, FLNB) improved the discrimination of the before HCC treatment group from the healthy control group compared with AFP. We conclude that the combination of global data mining and MRM verification enhances the screening and verification of potential HCC biomarkers. This efficacious integrative strategy is applicable to the development of markers for cancer and other diseases.

  20. Quantitation of Permethylated N-Glycans through Multiple-Reaction Monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; DeSantos-Garcia, Janie L.; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-04-01

    The important biological roles of glycans and their implications in disease development and progression have created a demand for the development of sensitive quantitative glycomics methods. Quantitation of glycans existing at low abundance is still analytically challenging. In this study, an N-linked glycans quantitation method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole instrument was developed. Optimum normalized collision energy (CE) for both sialylated and fucosylated N-glycan was determined to be 30%, whereas it was found to be 35% for either fucosylated or sialylated N-glycans. The optimum CE for mannose and complex type N-glycan was determined to be 35%. Additionally, the use of three transitions was shown to facilitate reliable quantitation. A total of 88 N-glycan compositions in human blood serum were quantified using this MRM approach. Reliable detection and quantitation of these glycans was achieved when the equivalence of 0.005 μL of blood serum was analyzed. Accordingly, N-glycans down to the 100th of a μL level can be reliably quantified in pooled human blood serum, spanning a dynamic concentration range of three orders of magnitude. MRM was also effectively utilized to quantitatively compare the expression of N-glycans derived from brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231BR) and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Thus, the described MRM method of permethylated N-glycan enables a rapid and reliable identification and quantitation of glycans derived from glycoproteins purified or present in complex biological samples.

  1. Development of Biomarkers for Screening Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Global Data Mining and Multiple Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Su Jong; Jang, Eun Sun; Yu, Jiyoung; Cho, Geunhee; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Youngsoo

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and aggressive cancers and is associated with a poor survival rate. Clinically, the level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of HCC. The discovery of useful biomarkers for HCC, focused solely on the proteome, has been difficult; thus, wide-ranging global data mining of genomic and proteomic databases from previous reports would be valuable in screening biomarker candidates. Further, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), based on triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, has been effective with regard to high-throughput verification, complementing antibody-based verification pipelines. In this study, global data mining was performed using 5 types of HCC data to screen for candidate biomarker proteins: cDNA microarray, copy number variation, somatic mutation, epigenetic, and quantitative proteomics data. Next, we applied MRM to verify HCC candidate biomarkers in individual serum samples from 3 groups: a healthy control group, patients who have been diagnosed with HCC (Before HCC treatment group), and HCC patients who underwent locoregional therapy (After HCC treatment group). After determining the relative quantities of the candidate proteins by MRM, we compared their expression levels between the 3 groups, identifying 4 potential biomarkers: the actin-binding protein anillin (ANLN), filamin-B (FLNB), complementary C4-A (C4A), and AFP. The combination of 2 markers (ANLN, FLNB) improved the discrimination of the before HCC treatment group from the healthy control group compared with AFP. We conclude that the combination of global data mining and MRM verification enhances the screening and verification of potential HCC biomarkers. This efficacious integrative strategy is applicable to the development of markers for cancer and other diseases. PMID:23717429

  2. Absolute quantification of human tear lactoferrin using multiple reaction monitoring technique with stable-isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    You, Jingjing; Willcox, Mark; Fitzgerald, Anna; Schiller, Belinda; Cozzi, Paul J; Russell, Pamela J; Walsh, Bradley J; Wasinger, Valerie C; Graham, Peter H; Li, Yong

    2016-03-01

    The mass spectrometry technique of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was used to quantify and compare the expression level of lactoferrin in tear films among control, prostate cancer (CaP), and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) groups. Tear samples from 14 men with CaP, 15 men with BPH, and 14 controls were analyzed in the study. Collected tears (2 μl) of each sample were digested with trypsin overnight at 37 °C without any pretreatment, and tear lactoferrin was quantified using a lactoferrin-specific peptide, VPSHAVVAR, both using natural/light and isotopic-labeled/heavy peptides with MRM. The average tear lactoferrin concentration was 1.01 ± 0.07 μg/μl in control samples, 0.96 ± 0.07 μg/μl in the BPH group, and 0.98 ± 0.07 μg/μl in the CaP group. Our study is the first to quantify tear proteins using a total of 43 individual (non-pooled) tear samples and showed that direct digestion of tear samples is suitable for MRM studies. The calculated average lactoferrin concentration in the control group matched that in the published range of human tear lactoferrin concentration measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, the lactoferrin was stably expressed across all of the samples, with no significant differences being observed among the control, BPH, and CaP groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Monitoring adverse drug reactions in children using community pharmacies: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Derek; Helms, Peter; McCaig, Dorothy; Bond, Christine; McLay, James

    2005-06-01

    To determine the feasibility of a community pharmacy-based parental adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting system for children. Prospective study of parent-reported ADRs using a questionnaire issued to the parent or guardians of children 0-11 years of age collecting prescribed medicine for amoxicillin, and/or salbutamol, and collecting prescribed medicine for, or purchasing, paracetamol or ibuprofen suspension. Seven community pharmacies in Grampian, Scotland. During a 4-week period 360 prescriptions or purchases for the study medications occurred. Two hundred and sixty-seven parents (85.5%) agreed to participate in the study. One hundred and six participants (40%) returned a total of 122 questionnaires. The demographics of responders and nonresponders including medication, age of child, and social status as assessed by the Depcat score were similar. There was no evidence of under-representation of any socio-economic group. Possible adverse events were detected using a symptom tick list and perceived ADRs using free text entry. Using the symptom tick list approach the most commonly reported symptoms were diarrhoea (28.9%) and tiredness (31.6%) for amoxicillin. The levels of diarrhoea and tiredness reported for ibuprofen, paracetamol and salbutamol were 15% and 20%, 7.4% and 18.5%, and 20% and 0%, respectively. Using the freehand section of the questionnaire 15 specific ADRs were reported by parents (12.3%). Eight children (21.2%) reported ADRs attributed to amoxicilin [diarrhoea (n = 4), fever (n = 1), anorexia (n = 1), hyperactivity (n = 1) and nonspecific (n = 1)], five to paracetamol [diarrhoea (n = 3), anorexia, irritability, crying and very angry (n = 1) and not stated (n = 1)], two to ibuprofen [diarrhoea (n = 1), not stated (n = )]. Only one off-label prescription was identified and this was for salbutamol syrup prescribed to a child under 2 years of age. The prospective monitoring of paediatric ADRs, using a questionnaire issued to parents or guardians in

  4. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-profiling for biomarker discovery applied to human polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Fernanda B; Ferreira, Christina R; Sobreira, Tiago Jose P; Yannell, Karen E; Jarmusch, Alan K; Cedenho, Agnaldo P; Lo Turco, Edson G; Cooks, R Graham

    2017-09-15

    We describe multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-profiling, which provides accelerated discovery of discriminating molecular features, and its application to human polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis. The discovery phase of the MRM-profiling seeks molecular features based on some prior knowledge of the chemical functional groups likely to be present in the sample. It does this through use of a limited number of pre-chosen and chemically specific neutral loss and/or precursor ion MS/MS scans. The output of the discovery phase is a set of precursor/product transitions. In the screening phase these MRM transitions are used to interrogate multiple samples (hence the name MRM-profiling). MRM-profiling was applied to follicular fluid samples of 22 controls and 29 clinically diagnosed PCOS patients. Representative samples were delivered by flow injection to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer set to perform a number of pre-chosen and chemically specific neutral loss and/or precursor ion MS/MS scans. The output of this discovery phase was a set of 1012 precursor/product transitions. In the screening phase each individual sample was interrogated for these MRM transitions. Principal component analysis (PCA) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used for statistical analysis. To evaluate the method's performance, half the samples were used to build a classification model (testing set) and half were blinded (validation set). Twenty transitions were used for the classification of the blind samples, most of them (N = 19) showed lower abundances in the PCOS group and corresponded to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids. Agreement of 73% with clinical diagnosis was found when classifying the 26 blind samples. MRM-profiling is a supervised method characterized by its simplicity, speed and the absence of chromatographic separation. It can be used to rapidly isolate discriminating molecules in healthy/disease conditions by

  5. The application of multiple reaction monitoring and multi-analyte profiling to HDL proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HDL carries a rich protein cargo and examining HDL protein composition promises to improve our understanding of its functions. Conventional mass spectrometry methods can be lengthy and difficult to extend to large populations. In addition, without prior enrichment of the sample, the ability of these methods to detect low abundance proteins is limited. Our objective was to develop a high-throughput approach to examine HDL protein composition applicable to diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods We optimized two multiplexed assays to examine HDL proteins using a quantitative immunoassay (Multi-Analyte Profiling- MAP) and mass spectrometric-based quantitative proteomics (Multiple Reaction Monitoring-MRM). We screened HDL proteins using human xMAP (90 protein panel) and MRM (56 protein panel). We extended the application of these two methods to HDL isolated from a group of participants with diabetes and prior cardiovascular events and a group of non-diabetic controls. Results We were able to quantitate 69 HDL proteins using MAP and 32 proteins using MRM. For several common proteins, the use of MRM and MAP was highly correlated (p < 0.01). Using MAP, several low abundance proteins implicated in atherosclerosis and inflammation were found on HDL. On the other hand, MRM allowed the examination of several HDL proteins not available by MAP. Conclusions MAP and MRM offer a sensitive and high-throughput approach to examine changes in HDL proteins in diabetes and CVD. This approach can be used to measure the presented HDL proteins in large clinical studies. PMID:24397693

  6. High resolution parallel reaction monitoring with electron transfer dissociation for middle-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Raedle, Matthias; Franco, Catarina; Hess, Sonja

    2015-08-18

    In recent years, middle-down proteomics has emerged as a popular technique for the characterization and quantification of proteins not readily amenable to typical bottom-up approaches. So far, all high resolution middle-down approaches are done in data-dependent acquisition mode, using both collision-induced dissociation or electron capture/transfer dissociation techniques. Here, we explore middle-down proteomics with electron transfer dissociation using a targeted acquisition mode, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), on an Orbitrap Fusion. As an example of a highly modified protein, we used histone H3 fractions from untreated and DMSO-treated Murine ErythroLeukemia (MEL) cells. We first determined optimized instrument parameters to obtain high sequence coverage using a synthetic standard peptide. We then setup a combined method of both MS1 scans and PRM scans of the 20 most abundant combinations of methylation and acetylation of the +10 charge state of the N-terminal tail of H3. Weak cation exchange hydrophilic interaction chromatography was used to separate the N-terminal H3 tail, primarily, by its acetylation and, to a secondary degree, by its methylation status, which aided in the interpretation of the results. After deconvolution of the highly charged ions, peaks were annotated to a minimum set of 254 H3 proteoforms in the untreated and treated samples. Upon DMSO treatment, global quantitation changes from the MS1 level show a relative decrease of 2, 3, 4, and 5 acetylations and an increase of 0 and 1 acetylations. A fragment ion map was developed to visualize specific differences between treated and untreated samples. Taken together, the data presented here show that middle-down proteomics with electron transfer dissociation using PRM is a novel, attractive method for the effective analysis and quantification of large and highly modified peptides.

  7. Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Precise Quantification of 97 Proteins in Dried Blood Spots*

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Yang, Juncong; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2015-01-01

    The dried blood spot (DBS) methodology provides a minimally invasive approach to sample collection and enables room-temperature storage for most analytes. DBS samples have successfully been analyzed by liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC/MRM-MS) to quantify a large range of small molecule biomarkers and drugs; however, this strategy has only recently been explored for MS-based proteomics applications. Here we report the development of a highly multiplexed MRM assay to quantify endogenous proteins in human DBS samples. This assay uses matching stable isotope-labeled standard peptides for precise, relative quantification, and standard curves to characterize the analytical performance. A total of 169 peptides, corresponding to 97 proteins, were quantified in the final assay with an average linear dynamic range of 207-fold and an average R2 value of 0.987. The total range of this assay spanned almost 5 orders of magnitude from serum albumin (P02768) at 18.0 mg/ml down to cholinesterase (P06276) at 190 ng/ml. The average intra-assay and inter-assay precision for 6 biological samples ranged from 6.1–7.5% CV and 9.5–11.0% CV, respectively. The majority of peptide targets were stable after 154 days at storage temperatures from −20 °C to 37 °C. Furthermore, protein concentration ratios between matching DBS and whole blood samples were largely constant (<20% CV) across six biological samples. This assay represents the highest multiplexing yet achieved for targeted protein quantification in DBS samples and is suitable for biomedical research applications. PMID:26342038

  8. Measuring coverage in MNCH: challenges and opportunities in the selection of coverage indicators for global monitoring.

    PubMed

    Requejo, Jennifer Harris; Newby, Holly; Bryce, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Global monitoring of intervention coverage is a cornerstone of international efforts to improve reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health. In this review, we examine the process and implications of selecting a core set of coverage indicators for global monitoring, using as examples the processes used by the Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival and the Commission on Accountability for Women's and Children's Health. We describe how the generation of data for global monitoring involves five iterative steps: development of standard indicator definitions and measurement approaches to ensure comparability across countries; collection of high-quality data at the country level; compilation of country data at the global level; organization of global databases; and rounds of data quality checking. Regular and rigorous technical review processes that involve high-level decision makers and experts familiar with indicator measurement are needed to maximize uptake and to ensure that indicators used for global monitoring are selected on the basis of available evidence of intervention effectiveness, feasibility of measurement, and data availability as well as programmatic relevance. Experience from recent initiatives illustrates the challenges of striking this balance as well as strategies for reducing the tensions inherent in the indicator selection process. We conclude that more attention and continued investment need to be directed to global monitoring, to support both the process of global database development and the selection of sets of coverage indicators to promote accountability. The stakes are high, because these indicators can drive policy and program development at the country and global level, and ultimately impact the health of women and children and the communities where they live.

  9. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Karl A.; Candy, Jim V.; Guss, Gabe; Mathews, M. J.

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  10. Using maximum entropy modeling for optimal selection of sampling sites for monitoring networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Kumar, Sunil; Barnett, David T.; Evangelista, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental monitoring programs must efficiently describe state shifts. We propose using maximum entropy modeling to select dissimilar sampling sites to capture environmental variability at low cost, and demonstrate a specific application: sample site selection for the Central Plains domain (453,490 km2) of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). We relied on four environmental factors: mean annual temperature and precipitation, elevation, and vegetation type. A “sample site” was defined as a 20 km × 20 km area (equal to NEON’s airborne observation platform [AOP] footprint), within which each 1 km2 cell was evaluated for each environmental factor. After each model run, the most environmentally dissimilar site was selected from all potential sample sites. The iterative selection of eight sites captured approximately 80% of the environmental envelope of the domain, an improvement over stratified random sampling and simple random designs for sample site selection. This approach can be widely used for cost-efficient selection of survey and monitoring sites.

  11. Tuning Selectivity of CO2 Hydrogenation Reactions at the Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Kattel, Shyam; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jingguang G

    2017-07-26

    The chemical transformation of CO2 not only mitigates the anthropogenic CO2 emission into the Earth's atmosphere but also produces carbon compounds that can be used as precursors for the production of chemicals and fuels. The activation and conversion of CO2 can be achieved on multifunctional catalytic sites available at the metal/oxide interface by taking advantage of the synergy between the metal nanoparticles and oxide support. Herein, we look at the recent progress in mechanistic studies of CO2 hydrogenation to C1 (CO, CH3OH, and CH4) compounds on metal/oxide catalysts. On this basis, we are able to provide a better understanding of the complex reaction network, grasp the capability of manipulating structure and combination of metal and oxide at the interface in tuning selectivity, and identify the key descriptors to control the activity and, in particular, the selectivity of catalysts. Finally, we also discuss challenges and future research opportunities for tuning the selective conversion of CO2 on metal/oxide catalysts.

  12. Tuning Selectivity of CO2 Hydrogenation Reactions at the Metal/Oxide Interface

    DOE PAGES

    Kattel, Shyam; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2017-06-26

    The chemical transformation of CO2 not only mitigates the anthropogenic CO2 emission into the Earth’s atmosphere but also produces carbon compounds that can be used as precursors for the production of chemicals and fuels. The activation and conversion of CO2 can be achieved on multifunctional catalytic sites available at the metal/oxide interface by taking advantage of the synergy between the metal nanoparticles and oxide support. In this paper, we look at the recent progress in mechanistic studies of CO2 hydrogenation to C1 (CO, CH3OH, and CH4) compounds on metal/oxide catalysts. On this basis, we are able to provide a bettermore » understanding of the complex reaction network, grasp the capability of manipulating structure and combination of metal and oxide at the interface in tuning selectivity, and identify the key descriptors to control the activity and, in particular, the selectivity of catalysts. In conclusion, we also discuss challenges and future research opportunities for tuning the selective conversion of CO2 on metal/oxide catalysts.« less

  13. Monitoring Time-Dependent Formation of Oligomers and Brown Carbon in Reactions of Glycolaldehyde, Methylglyoxal, and Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espelien, B.; Galloway, M. M.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    Authors: Brenna Espelien, Melissa Galloway, and David De Haan The brown carbon components of atmospheric aerosol exhibit strong UV absorbance with a featureless 'tail' that extends into the visible range. Recent work has shown that brown carbon (or HULIS) is formed at least in part by aqueous-phase chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Reactions between aldehydes (such as glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal) and amines create brown products that have similar light-absorbing spectra as HULIS extracted from atmospheric aerosol. However, the structures of these products have not been well-characterized. Bulk-phase reactions were monitored using LCMS and UV-Vis spectroscopy over a period of 2-3 weeks to see what products formed, whether oligomerization is occurring, and how this correlates with the development of absorbance peaks in the visible range. UV-Vis data shows that these reactions generally take several days to reach maximum absorbance in the visible range. For the glycolaldehyde/glycine reaction, the appearance of a strong absorber at about 400 nm correlated with the appearance of high-mass products at m/z 227, 363, 393, and 431. Additional reactions between aldehydes and amines that quickly produce brown products are being studied. We suggest that imine oligomers are major products of these reactions.

  14. Plasmon resonance scattering spectroscopy at the single-nanoparticle level: real-time monitoring of a click reaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Ma, Wei; Li, Da-Wei; Halls, Jonathan E; Marken, Frank; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-06-03

    A method based on plasmon resonance Rayleigh scattering (PRRS) spectroscopy and dark-field microscopy (DFM) was established for the real-time monitoring of a click reaction at the single-nanoparticle level. Click reactions on the surface of single gold nanoparticles (GNPs) result in interparticle coupling, which leads to a red-shift of the λmax (Δλmax =43 nm) in the PRRS spectra and a color change of the single gold nanoparticles in DFM (from green to orange).

  15. Monitoring metal ion flux in reactions of metallothionein and drug-modified metallothionein by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, J.; Fabris, D.; Wei, D.; Karpel, R. L.; Fenselau, C.

    1998-01-01

    The capabilities of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry are demonstrated for monitoring the flux of metal ions out of and into the metalloprotein rabbit liver metallothionein and, in one example, chlorambucil-alkylated metallothionein. Metal ion transfers may be followed as the reactions proceed in situ to provide kinetic information. More uniquely to this technique, metal ion stoichiometries may be determined for reaction intermediates and products. Partners used in these studies include EDTA, carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bound hexamer of insulin, and the core domain of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein, a binding protein for single-stranded DNA. PMID:9828006

  16. Bond and mode selectivity in the OH + NH2D reaction: a quasi-classical trajectory calculation.

    PubMed

    Monge-Palacios, M; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2013-11-28

    A state-to-state dynamics study was performed to analyze the effects of vibrational excitation on the dynamics of the OH + NH2D gas-phase reaction, which are connected to issues such as bond and mode selectivity. This reaction can evolve along two channels: H-abstraction, H2O(ν) + NHD(ν); and D-abstraction, HOD(ν) + NH2(ν). Based on an analytical potential energy surface previously developed by our group, quasi-classical trajectory calculations and subsequent normal mode analysis were performed. While vibrational excitation of the NH-sym mode of NH2D slightly favours H-abstraction over the D-abstraction, vibrational excitation of the ND mode shows that there is no clear preference for the H- or D-abstraction. These results show that this reaction does not exhibit bond selectivity, suggesting a breakdown of the spectator model. For H-abstraction, vibrational excitation of the non-reactive ND mode is partially retained in the NHD product; and for D-abstraction, excitation of the non-reactive NH mode is also partially retained in the products, indicating that this reaction exhibits mode selectivity only partially. In sum, we rule out bond and mode selectivity for this reaction. All these results were interpreted on the basis of strong coupling between modes along the reaction path, a behaviour which seems to be more the general tendency than the exception in polyatomic reactions.

  17. Heterogeneous photocatalysed reaction of three selected pesticide derivatives, propham, propachlor and tebuthiuron in aqueous suspensions of titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Muneer, M; Qamar, M; Saquib, M; Bahnemann, D W

    2005-10-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysed reaction of three selected pesticide derivatives such as propham (1), propachlor (2) and tebuthiuron (3) has been investigated in aqueous suspensions of titanium dioxide by monitoring the change in substrate concentration employing UV Spectroscopic analysis and depletion in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content as a function of irradiation time. The degradation kinetics was studied under different conditions such as pH, catalyst concentration, substrate concentration, different types of TiO(2) and in the presence of electron acceptors such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), potassium bromate (KBrO(3)) and ammonium persulphate (NH(4))(2)S(2)O(8) besides molecular oxygen. The degradation rates were found to be strongly influenced by all the above parameters. The photocatalyst Degussa P25 was found to be more efficient as compared with other photocatalysts. The pesticide derivative propham (1) was found to degrade faster as compared to propachlor (2) and tebuthiuron (3). An attempt has also been made to identify the products formed during the photooxidation process through GC/MS analysis technique. All the model pollutants showed the formation of several intermediate products, which were identified on the basis of molecular ion and mass spectrometric fragmentation pattern. A probable mechanism for the formation of the products has been proposed.

  18. The negative compatibility effect: unconscious inhibition influences reaction time and response selection.

    PubMed

    Klapp, Stuart T; Hinkley, Leighton B

    2002-06-01

    In the negative compatibility effect (NCE) a masked prime arrow, pointing left or right, is followed by an unmasked (visible) target arrow. The task is to press the left or right switch corresponding to the visible arrow. Surprisingly, reaction time is longer (slowed) when the prime and target indicate the same, rather than different, responses. By contrast, the effect of an unmasked prime is positive-opposite to the NCE. This indicates that the NCE is not attributable to incomplete masking; to the extent that the prime is visible, the NCE would be reduced by this positive influence. Thus, the NCE appears to result from unconscious processing of the prime and, in that sense, may be a form of subliminal perception. Additional findings show that the NCE is due to inhibition of a response code, that it is automatic in that it occurs even if the information in the prime and target could be ignored, and that it also influences response selection.

  19. The selective reaction of methoxyamine with cytidine residues in mammalian initiator transfer ribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Peter W.; Clark, Brian F.C.

    1974-01-01

    Methoxyamine reacts selectively with tRNA molecules at certain exposed cytosine residues usually located in non base-paired regions of the two dimensional clover leaf structure. Here methoxyamine is used for the first time in a study of a mammalian tRNA structure. One of the sequence abnormalities of myeloma initiator tRNA is a cytosine instead of the usual uracil immediately preceding the anticodon. A study of the reaction of the cytosine residues with methoxyamine indicates that the accessibility of bases to chemical reagents in the anticodon loop of this mammalian initiator tRNA is very similar to that observed for the bacterial initiator tRNA. Images PMID:10793658

  20. Templated synthesis of peptide nucleic acids via sequence-selective base-filling reactions.

    PubMed

    Heemstra, Jennifer M; Liu, David R

    2009-08-19

    The templated synthesis of nucleic acids has previously been achieved through the backbone ligation of preformed nucleotide monomers or oligomers. In contrast, here we demonstrate templated nucleic acid synthesis using a base-filling approach in which individual bases are added to abasic sites of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Because nucleobase substrates in this approach are not self-reactive, a base-filling approach may reduce the formation of nontemplated reaction products. Using either reductive amination or amine acylation chemistries, we observed efficient and selective addition of each of the four nucleobases to an abasic site in the middle of the PNA strand. We also describe the addition of single nucleobases to the end of a PNA strand through base filling, as well as the tandem addition of two bases to the middle of the PNA strand. These findings represent an experimental foundation for nonenzymatic information transfer through base filling.

  1. A new approach to primer selection in polymerase chain reaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.; Robins, G.; Wrege, D.E.; Zhang, Tongtong

    1995-12-31

    We address the problem of primer selection in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments. We prove that the problem of minimizing the number of primers required to amplify a set of DNA sequences is NP-complete, and show that even approximating solutions to this problem to within a constant factor times optimal is intractable. On the practical side, we give a simple branch-and-bound algorithm that solves the primers minimization problem within reasonable time for typical instances. We present an efficient approximation scheme for this problem, and prove that our heuristic always produces solutions no worse than a logarithmic factor times the optimal, this being the best approximation possible within polynomial time. Finally, we analyze a weighted variant, where both the number of primers as well as the sum of their {open_quotes}costs{close_quotes} is optimized simultaneously. We conclude by presenting the empirical performance of our methods on biological data.

  2. Quantitation of 47 human tear proteins using high resolution multiple reaction monitoring (HR-MRM) based-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tong, Louis; Zhou, Xi Yuan; Jylha, Antti; Aapola, Ulla; Liu, Dan Ning; Koh, Siew Kwan; Tian, Dechao; Quah, Joanne; Uusitalo, Hannu; Beuerman, Roger W; Zhou, Lei

    2015-02-06

    Tear proteins are intimately related to the pathophysiology of the ocular surface. Many recent studies have demonstrated that the tear is an accessible fluid for studying eye diseases and biomarker discovery. This study describes a high resolution multiple reaction monitoring (HR-MRM) approach for developing assays for quantification of biologically important tear proteins. Human tear samples were collected from 1000 subjects with no eye complaints (411 male, 589 female, average age: 55.5±14.5years) after obtaining informed consent. Tear samples were collected using Schirmer's strips and pooled into a single global control sample. Quantification of proteins was carried out by selecting "signature" peptides derived by trypsin digestion. A 1-h nanoLC-MS/MS run was used to quantify the tear proteins in HR-MRM mode. Good reproducibility of signal intensity (using peak areas) was demonstrated for all 47 HR-MRM assays with an average coefficient of variation (CV%) of 4.82% (range: 1.52-10.30%). All assays showed consistent retention time with a CV of less than 0.80% (average: 0.57%). HR-MRM absolute quantitation of eight tear proteins was demonstrated using stable isotope-labeled peptides. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time the technique to quantify 47 human tear proteins in HR-MRM mode using approximately 1μl of human tear sample. These multiplexed HR-MRM-based assays show great promise of further development for biomarker validation in human tear samples. Both discovery-based and targeted quantitative proteomics can be achieved in a single quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer platform (TripleTOF 5600 system). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension.

    PubMed

    Che, Hyeongsu; Lee, Woojin

    2011-02-01

    Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatics by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension was investigated in a closed system. Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was used as a representative target of perchlorinated alkanes and trichloroethylene (TCE) was used as one of highly chlorinated alkenes. Degradation of CT in Fenton reaction was significantly enhanced by pyrite used as an iron source instead of soluble Fe. Pyrite Fenton showed 93% of CT removal in 140 min, while Fenton reaction with soluble Fe(II) showed 52% and that with Fe(III) 15%. Addition of 2-propanol to the pyrite Fenton system significantly inhibited degradation of TCE (99% to 44% of TCE removal), while degradation of CT was slightly improved by the 2-propanol addition (80-91% of CT removal). The result suggests that, unlike oxidative degradation of TCE by hydroxyl radical in pyrite Fenton system, an oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is not a main degradation mechanism for the degradation of CT in pyrite Fenton system but a reductive dechlorination by superoxide can rather be the one for the CT degradation. The degradation kinetics of CT in the pyrite Fenton system was decelerated (0.13-0.03 min(-1)), as initial suspension pH decreased from 3 to 2. The formation of superoxide during the CT degradation in the pyrite Fenton system was observed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The formation at initial pH 3 was greater than that at initial pH 2, which supported that superoxide was a main reductant for degradation of CT in the pyrite Fenton system.

  4. Depurinating acylfulvene-DNA adducts: characterizing cellular chemical reactions of a selective antitumor agent.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiachang; Vaidyanathan, V G; Yu, Xiang; Kensler, Thomas W; Peterson, Lisa A; Sturla, Shana J

    2007-02-21

    Acylfulvenes (AFs) are a class of semisynthetic agents with high toxicity toward certain tumor cells, and for one analogue, hydroxymethylacylfulvene (HMAF), clinical trials are in progress. DNA alkylation by AFs, mediated by bioreductive activation, is believed to contribute to cytotoxicity, but the structures and chemical properties of corresponding DNA adducts are unknown. This study provides the first structural characterization of AF-specific DNA adducts. In the presence of a reductive enzyme, alkenal/one oxidoreductase (AOR), AF selectively alkylates dAdo and dGuo in reactions with a monomeric nucleoside, as well as in reactions with naked or cellular DNA, with 3-alkyl-dAdo as the apparently most abundant AF-DNA adduct. Characterization of this adduct was facilitated by independent chemical synthesis of the corresponding 3-alkyl-Ade adduct. In addition, in naked or cellular DNA, evidence was obtained for the formation of an additional type of adduct resulting from direct conjugate addition of Ade to AF followed by hydrolytic cyclopropane ring-opening, indicating the potential for a competing reaction pathway involving direct DNA alkylation. The major AF-dAdo and AF-dGuo adducts are unstable under physiologically relevant conditions and depurinate to release an alkylated nucleobase in a process that has a half-life of 8.5 h for 3-alkyladenine and less than approximately 2 h for dGuo adducts. DNA alkylation further leads to single-stranded DNA cleavage, occurring exclusively at dGuo and dAdo sites, in a nonsequence-specific manner. In AF-treated cells that were transfected with either AOR or control vectors, the DNA adducts identified match those from in vitro studies. Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between DNA adduct levels and cell sensitivity to AF. The potential contributing roles of AOR-mediated bioactivation and adduct stability to the cytotoxicity of AF are discussed.

  5. Oxidative Heck Reaction as a Tool for Para-selective Olefination of Aniline: A DFT Supported Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Firouz Matloubi; Pourkaveh, Raheleh; Karimi, Ashkan

    2017-09-13

    This study describes the first para-selective palladium-catalyzed alkenylation of tertiary amines. This regioselective C-H activation was conducted without any chelation moieties. A series of olefins were reacted under mild reaction conditions at 60 °C, and the corresponding products were obtained in good yields with high selectivity.

  6. Conformational Substrate Selection Contributes to the Enzymatic Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Pin1.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Dörner, Ciro

    2016-12-15

    Conformational changes in enzymes and their role in their catalytic activity have been thoroughly addressed experimentally and theoretically. There is a vivid discussion in the field of enzyme catalysis on whether conformational changes of the enzyme are coupled to catalysis, or whether transition state stabilization through the preorganized protein and its electrostatic properties govern the catalysis. In this study, an additional contribution to the catalysis of one specific enzyme, Pin1, is proposed, which arises from its conformational selection of the peptide substrate from aqueous solution with the lowest activation barrier. The most stable conformers of the reactant (cis) and product (trans) peptide were identified through molecular dynamics simulations in combination with metadynamics. The cis-trans isomerization reaction was studied with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory together with the mean reaction force, which allows us to separate structural and electronic contributions to the activation barrier. Our results show that enzyme Pin1 binds the trans isomer in the conformation of the peptide with the smallest activation barrier and reduces the barrier further through specific substrate-enzyme interactions, as we have shown previously. The activation barrier of the cis peptide is independent of the conformer and remains unchanged in the enzyme.

  7. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  8. Study on Reaction Products in Plasma-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Hayato; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Uchida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tsuneo

    Since the gas discharge plasma easily converts NO to NO2, which can be reduced more actively in selective catalytic reduction with hydrocarbons (HC-SCR), the plasma-assisted HC-SCR is an effective method for NOx reduction from diesel engine exhaust gases. In this work, the relation between NOx removal and reaction products is investigated in plasma-assisted HC-SCR in simulated flue gas as parameters of gas composition, plasma specific energy and catalyst temperature. C2H4 is used as a hydrocarbon and commercially available Al2O3 is used as a catalyst. After the plasma treatment of simulated flue gas, HCHO and HCOOH were generated as by-products, while NO was effectively converted to NO2. These by-products were confirmed to be reactive at lower catalyst temperature than C2H4 in HC-SCR. The relation between NOx removal and reaction products suggests that HCHO and HCOOH contribute the effective NOx reduction at low catalyst temperature in plasma-assisted HC-SCR.

  9. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  10. Monitoring ion activities in and around cells using ion-selective liquid-membrane microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Ki; Boron, Walter F; Parker, Mark D

    2013-01-15

    Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity) of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study.

  11. Monitoring Ion Activities In and Around Cells Using Ion-Selective Liquid-Membrane Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Ki; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity) of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study. PMID:23322102

  12. The measurement of acetanilide in plasma by spectrophotometric and selected ion monitoring methods.

    PubMed

    Baty, J D; Playfer, J; Evans, D A; Lamb, J

    1977-08-01

    Plasma samples from volunteers who had received an oral dose of acetanilide have been analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry and ultraviolet absorption techniques. The gas chromatography mass spectrometry method involved extraction of the plasma and analysis of the acetanilide using selected ion monitoring with a deuterated internal standard. In the ultraviolet method the plasma was hydrolysed with acid to convert the acetanilide to aniline, and this compound was diazotized and coupled with N-1-naphthylethylene-diamine. The absorbance of the resulting complex was read at 550 nm. Acetanilide levels in plasma determined by the selected ion monitoring method were significantly lower than those measured by spectrophotometry. Pharmacokinetic data calculated from the results obtained using these two assays are very different and illustrate the need for an accurate and specific method of analysis. The major metabolites of acetanilide are shown not to interfere with these assays and the results suggest the possible presence of a new metabolite of acetanilide.

  13. Monitoring chloramines and bromamines in a humid environment using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wan-Ping; Langford, Vaughan S; McEwan, Murray J; Milligan, Daniel B; Storer, Malina K; Dummer, Jack; Epton, Michael J

    2010-06-30

    The selectivity and sensitivity of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) for individual breath analysis of haloamines has been improved by heating the flow tube in a commercial instrument to around 106 degrees C. Data is presented showing the marked reduction in the number density of water clusters of product ions of common breath metabolites that are isobaric with the product ions from monochloramine and monobromamine that are used to monitor the haloamine concentrations. These results have direct relevance to the real-time monitoring of chloramines in drinking water, swimming pools and food processing plants. However, once the isobaric overlaps from water cluster ions are reduced at the higher temperatures, there is no conclusive evidence showing the presence of haloamines on single breath exhalations in the mid parts per trillion range from examination of the breaths of volunteers. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Development of ESI-MS-based continuous enzymatic assay for real-time monitoring of enzymatic reactions of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Jun; Cui, Meng; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2015-05-15

    The continuous enzymatic assay based on ESI-MS was developed to real-time monitoring of enzymatic reactions of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The changes of product concentrations were continuously measured. Calibration curves were established for quantitative calculation. By this method, the Michaelis constant (Km) of acetylcholinesterase was determined to be 70.60±0.93μM and Huperzine A as an effective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase displayed a mixed inhibition with competitive and noncompetitive inhibition behaviors. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and inhibition constant (Ki) value of Huperzine A were also calculated as 48.51±1.16nM and 26.73±0.27nM, respectively. This method provides the rapid and accurate ways to monitor enzyme reactions.

  15. Investigation of the d(γ,n)p reaction for gamma beam monitoring at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, C.; Mueller, J. M.; Sikora, M. H.; Suliman, G.; Ur, C. A.; Weller, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility will deliver brilliant gamma beams with high spectral density and a high degree of polarization starting in 2018 in Bucharest-Magurele, Romania. Several monitoring instruments are proposed for measuring the spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of the gamma beam. The d(γ,n)p reaction has been investigated for its use in determining the gamma beam parameters in a series of measurements carried out at the High Intensity Gamma Source, Durham, U.S.A.. Measurements of the emitted neutrons have been performed using liquid scintillator and 6Li-glass neutron detectors at several incident gamma energies between 2.5 to 20 MeV . The experimental results presented in this paper have shown that an instrument based on the d(γ,n)p reaction can be used to monitor the intensity and polarization of the gamma beam to be produced at ELI-NP.

  16. Simulating future uncertainty to guide the selection of survey designs for long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.; Schweiger, E. William; Manier, Daniel J.; Gitzen, Robert A.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Cooper, Andrew B.; Licht, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    A goal of environmental monitoring is to provide sound information on the status and trends of natural resources (Messer et al. 1991, Theobald et al. 2007, Fancy et al. 2009). When monitoring observations are acquired by measuring a subset of the population of interest, probability sampling as part of a well-constructed survey design provides the most reliable and legally defensible approach to achieve this goal (Cochran 1977, Olsen et al. 1999, Schreuder et al. 2004; see Chapters 2, 5, 6, 7). Previous works have described the fundamentals of sample surveys (e.g. Hansen et al. 1953, Kish 1965). Interest in survey designs and monitoring over the past 15 years has led to extensive evaluations and new developments of sample selection methods (Stevens and Olsen 2004), of strategies for allocating sample units in space and time (Urquhart et al. 1993, Overton and Stehman 1996, Urquhart and Kincaid 1999), and of estimation (Lesser and Overton 1994, Overton and Stehman 1995) and variance properties (Larsen et al. 1995, Stevens and Olsen 2003) of survey designs. Carefully planned, “scientific” (Chapter 5) survey designs have become a standard in contemporary monitoring of natural resources. Based on our experience with the long-term monitoring program of the US National Park Service (NPS; Fancy et al. 2009; Chapters 16, 22), operational survey designs tend to be selected using the following procedures. For a monitoring indicator (i.e. variable or response), a minimum detectable trend requirement is specified, based on the minimum level of change that would result in meaningful change (e.g. degradation). A probability of detecting this trend (statistical power) and an acceptable level of uncertainty (Type I error; see Chapter 2) within a specified time frame (e.g. 10 years) are specified to ensure timely detection. Explicit statements of the minimum detectable trend, the time frame for detecting the minimum trend, power, and acceptable probability of Type I error (

  17. Selective Synthesis of N-Unsubstituted and N-Arylindoles by the Reaction of Arynes with Azirines.

    PubMed

    Thangaraj, Manikandan; Bhojgude, Sachin Suresh; Jain, Shailja; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-09-16

    The transition-metal-free and temperature-dependent highly selective reaction of arynes with 2H-azirines allowing the synthesis of either N-unsubstituted or N-arylindoles has been developed. At 60 °C, arynes generated from 2-(trimethylsilyl)aryl triflates smoothly insert into 2H-azirines to form 2,3-diarylindoles with high selectivity. Interestingly, when the reaction was performed at -10 °C, the selectivity was switched to the formation of 1,2,3-triarylindoles in good yields.

  18. Quantitation of berberine chloride in human urine by use of selected ion monitoring in the field desorption mode.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, H; Shirai, E; Ishibashi, M; Hosoi, K; Shibata, S; Iwanaga, M

    1978-10-01

    A method is described for the microdetermination of berberine chloride in human urine by a field desorption mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring system using a deuterium labelled analogue of berberine chloride as an internal standard. Prior to the quantitation of berberine in human urine, the fundamental problems related to field desorption selected ion monitoring, such as quality of emitters, amounts of sample loading, and the programming rate of the emitter current, were statistically investigated in detail. Berberine chloride can be determined in a concentration of 10 ng ml-1 in human urine by the method described. The analytical results were compared with those from gas chromatography mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring in the chemical ionization mode suggesting that the reliability of field desorption selected ion monitoring may be almost equivalent to that of gas chromatography chemical ionization selected ion monitoring.

  19. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with carbonyl sulfide. [using O(3P) monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The rate parameters for the reaction of O(3P) with carbonyl sulfide, O(3P) + OCS yields CO + SO have been determined directly by monitoring O(3P) using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The value for k sub 1 was measured over a temperature range of 263 - 502 K and the data were fitted to an Arrhenuis expression with good linearity.

  20. Real-time electrochemical monitoring of the polymerase chain reaction by mediated redox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Deféver, Thibaut; Druet, Michel; Rochelet-Dequaire, Murielle; Joannes, Martine; Grossiord, Céline; Limoges, Benoit; Marchal, Damien

    2009-08-19

    We described the proof-of-principle of a nonoptical real-time PCR that uses cyclic voltammetry for indirectly monitoring the amplified DNA product generated in the PCR reaction solution after each PCR cycle. To enable indirect measurement of the amplicon produced throughout PCR, we monitor electrochemically the progressive consumption (i.e., the decrease of concentration) of free electroactive deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) used for DNA synthesis. This is accomplished by exploiting the fast catalytic oxidation of native deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) or its unnatural analogue 7-deaza-dGTP by the one-electron redox catalysts Ru(bpy)(3)(3+) (with bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) or Os(bpy)(3)(3+) generated at an electrode. To demonstrate the feasibility of the method, a disposable array of eight miniaturized self-contained electrochemical cells (working volume of 50 microL) has been developed and implemented in a classical programmable thermal cycler and then tested with the PCR amplification of two illustrated examples of real-world biological target DNA sequences (i.e., a relatively long 2300-bp sequence from the bacterial genome of multidrug-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans and a shorter 283-bp target from the human cytomegalovirus). Although the method works with both mediator/base couples, the catalytic peak current responses recorded with the Ru(bpy)(3)(3+)/dGTP couple under real-time PCR conditions are significantly affected by a continuous current drift and interference with the background solvent discharge, thus leading to poorly reproducible data. Much more reproducible and reliable results are finally obtained with the Os(bpy)(3)(3+)/7-deaza-dGTP, a result that is attributed to the much lower anodic potential at which the catalytic oxidation of 7-deaza-dGTP by Os(bpy)(3)(3+) is detected. Under these conditions, an exponential decrease of the catalytic signal as a function of the number of PCR cycles is obtained, allowing definition of a cycle

  1. Selection of Sampling Pumps Used for Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2001-11-05

    The variable frequency drive centrifugal submersible pump, Redi-Flo2a made by Grundfosa, was selected for universal application for Hanford Site groundwater monitoring. Specifications for the selected pump and five other pumps were evaluated against current and future Hanford groundwater monitoring performance requirements, and the Redi-Flo2 was selected as the most versatile and applicable for the range of monitoring conditions. The Redi-Flo2 pump distinguished itself from the other pumps considered because of its wide range in output flow rate and its comparatively moderate maintenance and low capital costs. The Redi-Flo2 pump is able to purge a well at a high flow rate and then supply water for sampling at a low flow rate. Groundwater sampling using a low-volume-purging technique (e.g., low flow, minimal purge, no purge, or micropurgea) is planned in the future, eliminating the need for the pump to supply a high-output flow rate. Under those conditions, the Well Wizard bladder pump, manufactured by QED Environmental Systems, Inc., may be the preferred pump because of the lower capital cost.

  2. Selection of Sampling Pumps Used for Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D; Smith, Ronald M

    2001-11-05

    The variable frequency drive centrifugal submersible pump, Redi-Flo2a made by Grundfosa, was selected for universal application for Hanford Site groundwater monitoring. Specifications for the selected pump and five other pumps were evaluated against current and future Hanford groundwater monitoring performance requirements, and the Redi-Flo2 was selected as the most versatile and applicable for the range of monitoring conditions. The Redi-Flo2 pump distinguished itself from the other pumps considered because of its wide range in output flow rate and its comparatively moderate maintenance and low capital costs. The Redi-Flo2 pump is able to purge a well at a high flow rate and then supply water for sampling at a low flow rate. Groundwater sampling using a low-volume-purging technique (e.g., low flow, minimal purge, no purge, or micropurges) is planned in the future, eliminating the need for the pump to supply a high-output flow rate. Under those conditions, the Well Wizard bladder pump, manufactured by QED Environmental Systems, Inc., may be the preferred pump because of the lower capital cost.

  3. Monitoring adverse drug reactions in children using community pharmacies: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Derek; Helms, Peter; McCaig, Dorothy; Bond, Christine; McLay, James

    2005-01-01

    Aims To determine the feasibility of a community pharmacy-based parental adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting system for children. Design Prospective study of parent-reported ADRs using a questionnaire issued to the parent or guardians of children 0–11 years of age collecting prescribed medicine for amoxicillin, and/or salbutamol, and collecting prescribed medicine for, or purchasing, paracetamol or ibuprofen suspension. Setting Seven community pharmacies in Grampian, Scotland. Results During a 4-week period 360 prescriptions or purchases for the study medications occurred. Two hundred and sixty-seven parents (85.5%) agreed to participate in the study. One hundred and six participants (40%) returned a total of 122 questionnaires. The demographics of responders and nonresponders including medication, age of child, and social status as assessed by the Depcat score were similar. There was no evidence of under-representation of any socio-economic group. Possible adverse events were detected using a symptom tick list and perceived ADRs using free text entry. Using the symptom tick list approach the most commonly reported symptoms were diarrhoea (28.9%) and tiredness (31.6%) for amoxicillin. The levels of diarrhoea and tiredness reported for ibuprofen, paracetamol and salbutamol were 15% and 20%, 7.4% and 18.5%, and 20% and 0%, respectively. Using the freehand section of the questionnaire 15 specific ADRs were reported by parents (12.3%). Eight children (21.2%) reported ADRs attributed to amoxicilin [diarrhoea (n = 4), fever (n = 1), anorexia (n = 1), hyperactivity (n = 1) and nonspecific (n = 1)], five to paracetamol [diarrhoea (n = 3), anorexia, irritability, crying and very angry (n = 1) and not stated (n = 1)], two to ibuprofen [diarrhoea (n = 1), not stated (n =)]. Only one off-label prescription was identified and this was for salbutamol syrup prescribed to a child under 2 years of age. Conclusions The prospective monitoring of paediatric ADRs, using a

  4. Selectivity descriptors for the Michael addition reaction as obtained from density functional based approaches.

    PubMed

    Madjarova, G; Tadjer, A; Cholakova, Tz P; Dobrev, A A; Mineva, T

    2005-01-20

    Density functional (DF) based numerical approaches for computing orbital and atomic reactivity indices were employed in the study of selectivity descriptors for the 1,4 Michael addition reaction. To this aim, atomic and orbital Fukui indices and atomic softnesses for 2-arylmethylene-1,4-butanolides and N,N-disubstituted phenylacetamides were computed. Further on, these local selectivity descriptors have been rationalized in terms of the Pearson's hard-soft-acid-base principle to explain the observed regioselectivity. It is shown that the methods employed for local (atomic and orbital) reactivity index computations are useful and reliable for prediction of the regioselectivity upon conjugate addition of ambident nucleophiles to 2,3-unsaturated carboxylic esters. All the results reveal similar degree of localization/hardness of the 1,4-butanolides C4 and active alpha-carbon belonging to the N,N-dimethyl-phenylacetamide, while the soft alpha-carbon in LiCH2CN reacts with the soft C2 1,4-butanolide center.

  5. Rice straw modified by click reaction for selective extraction of noble metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Wei, Jun; Li, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Rice straw was modified by azide-alkyne click reaction in order to realize selective extraction of noble metal ions. The ability of the modified straw to adsorb Pd(2+) and Pt(4+) was assessed using a batch adsorption technique. It was found that the sorption equilibrium could be reached within 1h and the adsorption capacity increased with temperature for both Pd(2+) and Pt(4+). The maximum sorption capacities for Pd(2+) and Pt(4+) were respectively attained in 1.0 and 0.1 mol/L HCl. The modified straw showed excellent selectivity for noble metal ions in comparison to the pristine straw. In addition, the modified straw was examined as a column packing material for extraction of noble metal ions. It was indicated that 1.0 mL/min was the best flow rate for Pd(2+) and Pt(4+). The modified straw could be repeatedly used for 10 times without any significant loss in the initial binding affinity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of the 27Al(d,x)24Na nuclear reaction for deuteron beam monitoring purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Otuka, Naohiko; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2017-09-01

    Activation cross-sections for the 27Al(d,x)24Na nuclear reaction was measured by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with high purity germanium (HPGe) γ-ray spectrometry over deuteron energy range of 2-24 MeV. Measured data were critically compared with the available literature data and also with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL data base. Accuracy of the 27Al(d,x)24Na cross-sections were confirmed by the simultaneous measurements of the natTi(d,x)48V monitor reaction cross-sections. Present results reproduced well the IAEA recommended natTi(d,x)48V reaction cross-sections, but provide slight deviation with the IAEA recommended 27Al(d,x)24Na cross-sections. It may be concluded that the use of 27Al(d,x)24Na in deuteron beam monitoring should not be a perfect choice if one has the option to use the natTi(d,x)48V reaction.

  7. Monitoring coping style moderates emotional reactions to genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, S; Koehly, L; Jenkins, J; Martin, J; Hadley, D

    2008-08-01

    The emotional effects of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) provided within a counseling program were assessed among 253 individuals. Assessments were scheduled at baseline before testing, and again after 6 and 12 months post-test. Negative emotional reactions were evaluated using the Revised Impact of Event Scale and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Monitoring coping style was assessed at baseline using the Miller Behavioral Style Scale. Mean reductions were indicated in distress and depression levels within the first 6 months after counseling and testing. High monitors were generally more distressed than low monitors, specifically if they had indeterminate or positive results. Genetic counseling and testing for HNPCC do not result in long-term distress for most people. Of the variables investigated, only time and coping style have main effects on emotional reactions, and the impacts of mutation status are moderated by coping style. Psychological interventions, aimed to alleviate adverse emotional effects, were suggested for certain participants, i.e. recipients of positive or indeterminate results who are high monitors.

  8. Optimization by infusion of multiple reaction monitoring transitions for sensitive quantification of peptides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alghanem, Bandar; Nikitin, Frédéric; Stricker, Thomas; Duchoslav, Eva; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Muller, Markus; Lisacek, Frédérique; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2017-05-15

    In peptide quantification by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), the optimization of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) parameters is essential for sensitive detection. We have compared different approaches to build MRM assays, based either on flow injection analysis (FIA) of isotopically labelled peptides, or on the knowledge and the prediction of the best settings for MRM transitions and collision energies (CE). In this context, we introduce MRMOptimizer, an open-source software tool that processes spectra and assists the user in selecting transitions in the FIA workflow. MS/MS spectral libraries with CE voltages from 10 to 70 V are automatically acquired in FIA mode for isotopically labelled peptides. Then MRMOptimizer determines the optimal MRM settings for each peptide. To assess the quantitative performance of our approach, 155 peptides, representing 84 proteins, were analysed by LC/MRM-MS and the peak areas were compared between: (A) the MRMOptimizer-based workflow, (B1) the SRMAtlas transitions set used 'as-is'; (B2) the same SRMAtlas set with CE parameters optimized by Skyline. 51% of the three most intense transitions per peptide were shown to be common to both A and B1/B2 methods, and displayed similar sensitivity and peak area distributions. The peak areas obtained with MRMOptimizer for transitions sharing either the precursor ion charge state or the fragment ions with the SRMAtlas set at unique transitions were increased 1.8- to 2.3-fold. The gain in sensitivity using MRMOptimizer for transitions with different precursor ion charge state and fragment ions (8% of the total), reaches a ~ 11-fold increase. Isotopically labelled peptides can be used to optimize MRM transitions more efficiently in FIA than by searching databases. The MRMOptimizer software is MS independent and enables the post-acquisition selection of MRM parameters. Coefficients of variation for optimal CE values are lower than those obtained with the SRMAtlas approach (B2

  9. Homochiral Selectivity in RNA Synthesis: Montmorillonite-catalyzed Quaternary Reactions of D, L-Purine with D, L- Pyrimidine Nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash C.; Aldersley, Michael F.; Ferris, James P.

    2011-06-01

    Selective adsorption of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on the platelets of montmorillonite demonstrates an important reaction pathway for the origin of homochirality in RNA synthesis. Our earlier studies have shown that the individual reactions of D, L-ImpA or D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite catalyst produced oligomers which were only partially inhibited by the incorporation of both D- and L-enantiomers. Homochirality in these reactions was largely due to the formation of cyclic dimers that cannot elongate. We investigated the quaternary reactions of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite. The chain length of these oligomers increased from 9-mer to 11-mer as observed by HPLC, with a concominant increase in the yield of linear dimers and higher oligomers in the reactions involving D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU as compared to the similar reactions carried out with D-enantiomers only. The formation of cyclic dimers of U was completely inhibited in the quaternary reactions. The yield of cyclic dimers of A was reduced from 60% to 10% within the dimer fraction. 12 linear dimers and 3 cyclic dimers were isolated and characterized from the quaternary reaction. The homochirality and regioselectivity of dimers were 64.1% and 71.7%, respectively. Their sequence selectivity was shown by the formation of purine-pyrimidine (54-59%) linkages, followed by purine-purine (29-32%) linkages and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (9-13%) linkages. Of the 16 trimers detected, 10 were homochiral with an overall homochirality of 73-76%. In view of the greater homochirality, sequence- and regio- selectivity, the quaternary reactions on montmorillonite demonstrate an unexpectedly favorable route for the prebiotic synthesis of homochiral RNA compared with the separate reactions of enantiomeric activated mononucleotides.

  10. Formal selection of measures for a composite index of NICU quality of care: Baby-MONITOR

    PubMed Central

    Profit, J; Gould, JB; Zupancic, JAF; Stark, AR; Wall, KM; Kowalkowski, MA; Mei, M; Pietz, K; Thomas, EJ; Petersen, LA

    2011-01-01

    Objective To systematically rate measures of care quality for very low birth weight infants for inclusion into Baby-MONITOR, a composite indicator of quality. Study Design Modified Delphi expert panelist process including electronic surveys and telephone conferences. Panelists considered 28 standard neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) quality measures and rated each on a 9-point scale taking into account pre-defined measure characteristics. In addition, panelists grouped measures into six domains of quality. We selected measures by testing for rater agreement using an accepted method. Result Of 28 measures considered, 13 had median ratings in the high range (7 to 9). Of these, 9 met the criteria for inclusion in the composite: antenatal steroids (median (interquartile range)) 9(0), timely retinopathy of prematurity exam 9(0), late onset sepsis 9(1), hypothermia on admission 8(1), pneumothorax 8(2), growth velocity 8(2), oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age 7(2), any human milk feeding at discharge 7(2) and in-hospital mortality 7(2). Among the measures selected for the composite, the domains of quality most frequently represented included effectiveness (40%) and safety (30%). Conclusion A panel of experts selected 9 of 28 routinely reported quality measures for inclusion in a composite indicator. Panelists also set an agenda for future research to close knowledge gaps for quality measures not selected for the Baby-MONITOR. PMID:21350429

  11. Noise Monitoring and Mapping for Some Pre-selected Locations of New Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Nasim; Ahmad, Kafeel; Alam, Pervez

    2016-06-01

    Road traffic is one of the major sources of noise pollution in urban areas. Noise measurements and sound observation surveys, alone or in relationship, can be helpful in understanding the complex problem of noise pollution in urban areas. The main aim of this paper is monitoring and mapping for some pre-selected locations of New Delhi, India. The Leq, noise climate, and noise pollution levels were calculated, this was further represented in the form of cartographic maps for easy understanding. Result of noise monitoring shows that the values of Leq at Ashram ranges from 67.4 dB (A) to 82.3 dB (A) which is maximum of all pre-selected locations. It was found that the noise levels at all pre-selected location has been very high and above the permissible limits. Noise map shows that Ashram is the most affected area, most of the pre-selected locations are severally affected and the areas are in constant exposure of noise up to 80 dB vertically as well as horizontally.

  12. Applicability of fiber-optic-based Raman probes for on-line reaction monitoring of high-pressure catalytic hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Hamminga, Gerben M; Mul, Guido; Moulijn, Jacob A

    2007-05-01

    This study evaluates the applicability of fiber-optic-based Raman probes for on-line reaction monitoring of high-pressure catalytic hydrogenation reactions in batch autoclaves. First, based on trends in the strong intensity of the 945 cm(-1) C-O-C vibration of 1,3-dioxolane, the effect of various experimental parameters on sensitivity was evaluated and can be summarized as follows: (1) above 500 rpm a linear increase in stirring speed induces a linear decrease in Raman intensity; (2) a linear increase in hydrogen pressure also leads to a linear decrease of the Raman signal; (3) linear temperature elevation exponentially decreases the Raman intensity; and (4) increasing the catalyst particle concentration results in a steep nonlinear decrease of the Raman signal. Light scattering by gas bubbles, or combined scattering and absorption by (black) catalyst particles, reducing the amount of light collected by the optical fiber probe, explain the observed experimental trends. Second, the sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy was directly compared with attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy in the analysis of three different hydrogenation reactions over a Cu-ZnO catalyst. From the applied target molecules, diethyl maleate hydrogenation could be very well analyzed by Raman spectroscopy due to the high Raman scattering efficiency of the C=C bond, while for analysis of the hydrogenation of gamma-butyrolactone or 1-butanal, ATR-FT-IR is the technique of choice.

  13. Quantification of β-Catenin Signaling Components in Colon Cancer Cell Lines, Tissue Sections, and Microdissected Tumor Cells using Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Gruidl, Mike; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth; Liu, Richard Z.; Eschrich, Steven; Lloyd, Mark; Nasir, Aejaz; Bui, Marilyn M.; Huang, Emina; Shibata, David; Yeatman, Timothy; Koomen, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction monitoring mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool for targeted detection and quantification of proteins in clinical samples. Here, we report the use of gel electrophoresis for protein fractionation and liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) screening for quantitative analysis of components from the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which contributes to colon tumor formation and progression. In silico tools are used to design LC-MRM screens for each target protein. Following successful peptide detection, stable isotope labeled peptides are synthesized and developed as internal standards. Then, the assays are implemented in colon cancer cell lines to achieve detection in minimal amounts of cells, compatible with direct translation to clinical specimens. Selected assays are compared with qualitative results from immunoblotting (Westerns) and translated to individual frozen colon tissue sections and laser capture microdissected tumor cells. This LC-MRM platform has been translated from in vitro models to clinical specimens, forming the basis for future experiments in patient assessment. PMID:20590165

  14. Large-scale control site selection for population monitoring: an example assessing Sage-grouse trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, Bradley C.; O'Donnell, Michael; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2015-01-01

    Human impacts on wildlife populations are widespread and prolific and understanding wildlife responses to human impacts is a fundamental component of wildlife management. The first step to understanding wildlife responses is the documentation of changes in wildlife population parameters, such as population size. Meaningful assessment of population changes in potentially impacted sites requires the establishment of monitoring at similar, nonimpacted, control sites. However, it is often difficult to identify appropriate control sites in wildlife populations. We demonstrated use of Geographic Information System (GIS) data across large spatial scales to select biologically relevant control sites for population monitoring. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hearafter, sage-grouse) are negatively affected by energy development, and monitoring of sage-grouse population within energy development areas is necessary to detect population-level responses. Weused population data (1995–2012) from an energy development area in Wyoming, USA, the Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA), and GIS data to identify control sites that were not impacted by energy development for population monitoring. Control sites were surrounded by similar habitat and were within similar climate areas to the ARPA. We developed nonlinear trend models for both the ARPA and control sites and compared long-term trends from the 2 areas. We found little difference between the ARPA and control sites trends over time. This research demonstrated an approach for control site selection across large landscapes and can be used as a template for similar impact-monitoring studies. It is important to note that identification of changes in population parameters between control and treatment sites is only the first step in understanding the mechanisms that underlie those changes. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. CO2-water-mineral reactions during CO2 leakage into glauconitic sands: geochemical and isotopic monitoring of batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humez, P.; Lions, J.; Lagneau, V.; Negrel, Ph.

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of environmental impacts of carbon dioxide geological storage requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakages into fresh groundwater reserves. The Albian aquifer of the Paris Basin was chosen as a case of study because i) the Paris Basin contains deep saline Jurassic and Triassic aquifers identified as targets by the French national program of CO2 geological storage and ii) the Albian aquifer is a deep freshwater resource of strategic national importance, above the Jurassic and Triassic formations. An experimental and a geochemical modelling approach were carried out in order to better understand the rock-water-CO2 interactions with two main objectives: to assess the evolution of the chemistry of the formation water and of the mineralogy of the solid phase during the interaction and to design a monitoring program for freshwater resources. The main focus is to select and develop suitable indirect indicators of the presence of CO2 in the aquifer. We present here the experimental results, which combines both major and trace elements and isotopic tools, some of them new in the CCS field. Batch reactors with a liquid/solid ratio of 10 made of appropriate materials (PTFE, stainless steel) were equipped with simultaneous controls on several parameters (pH measurement, gas phase composition, pressure, tightness…) after CO2 injection (PCO2= 2 bar; room temperature). Ten reactors were run simultaneously, over pre-determined durations of CO2-water-rock interaction (1, 7, 15 and 30 days). During the batch experiment, we observed major changes in several chemical parameters due to the CO2 injection. A sharp drop in pH from 6.6 to 4.9 was noticeable, immediately after the injection, due to CO2 dissolution in the water phase. Alkalinity varies from 1.3 mmol.L-1 in the initial water to 2.0 mmol.L-1 at the end of the 1-month experiment. Four types of ion behaviors are observed: (1) calcium, silicon and magnesium concentrations increase during the 1-month

  16. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18–82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  17. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2001-10-16

    This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction.

  18. Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports.

  19. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups.

  20. Are phonological influences on lexical (mis)selection the result of a monitoring bias?

    PubMed Central

    Ratinckx, Elie; Ferreira, Victor S.; Hartsuiker, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    A monitoring bias account is often used to explain speech error patterns that seem to be the result of an interactive language production system, like phonological influences on lexical selection errors. A biased monitor is suggested to detect and covertly correct certain errors more often than others. For instance, this account predicts that errors which are phonologically similar to intended words are harder to detect than ones that are phonologically dissimilar. To test this, we tried to elicit phonological errors under the same conditions that show other kinds of lexical selection errors. In five experiments, we presented participants with high cloze probability sentence fragments followed by a picture that was either semantically related, a homophone of a semantically related word, or phonologically related to the (implicit) last word of the sentence. All experiments elicited semantic completions or homophones of semantic completions, but none elicited phonological completions. This finding is hard to reconcile with a monitoring bias account and is better explained with an interactive production system. Additionally, this finding constrains the amount of bottom-up information flow in interactive models. PMID:18942035

  1. Selective Analysis of Sulfur-Containing Species in a Heavy Crude Oil by Deuterium Labeling Reactions and Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuxiao; Schrader, Wolfgang

    2015-12-17

    A heavy crude oil has been treated with deuterated alkylating reagents (CD₃I and C₂D₅I) and directly analyzed without any prior fractionation and chromatographic separation by high-field Orbitrap Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (FTMS) and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) using electrospray ionization (ESI). The reaction of a polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) dibenzothiophene (DBT), in the presence of silver tetrafluoroborate (AgBF₄) with ethyl iodide (C₂H₅I) in anhydrous dichloroethane (DCE) was optimized as a sample reaction to study heavy crude oil mixtures, and the reaction yield was monitored and determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-NMR). The obtained conditions were then applied to a mixture of standard aromatic CH-, N-, O- and S-containing compounds and then a heavy crude oil, and only sulfur-containing compounds were selectively alkylated. The deuterium labeled alkylating reagents, iodomethane-d₃ (CD₃I) and iodoethane-d₅ (C₂D₅I), were employed to the alkylation of heavy crude oil to selectively differentiate the tagged sulfur species from the original crude oil.

  2. Selective Analysis of Sulfur-Containing Species in a Heavy Crude Oil by Deuterium Labeling Reactions and Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuxiao; Schrader, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A heavy crude oil has been treated with deuterated alkylating reagents (CD3I and C2D5I) and directly analyzed without any prior fractionation and chromatographic separation by high-field Orbitrap Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (FTMS) and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) using electrospray ionization (ESI). The reaction of a polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) dibenzothiophene (DBT), in the presence of silver tetrafluoroborate (AgBF4) with ethyl iodide (C2H5I) in anhydrous dichloroethane (DCE) was optimized as a sample reaction to study heavy crude oil mixtures, and the reaction yield was monitored and determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR). The obtained conditions were then applied to a mixture of standard aromatic CH-, N-, O- and S-containing compounds and then a heavy crude oil, and only sulfur-containing compounds were selectively alkylated. The deuterium labeled alkylating reagents, iodomethane-d3 (CD3I) and iodoethane-d5 (C2D5I), were employed to the alkylation of heavy crude oil to selectively differentiate the tagged sulfur species from the original crude oil. PMID:26694374

  3. Key role of temperature monitoring in interpretation of microwave effect on transesterification and esterification reactions for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Mazubert, Alex; Taylor, Cameron; Aubin, Joelle; Poux, Martine

    2014-06-01

    Microwave effects have been quantified, comparing activation energies and pre-exponential factors to those obtained in a conventionally-heated reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oils via transesterification and esterification reactions. Several publications report an enhancement of biodiesel production using microwaves, however recent reviews highlight poor temperature measurements in microwave reactors give misleading reaction performances. Operating conditions have therefore been carefully chosen to investigate non-thermal microwave effects alone. Temperature is monitored by an optical fiber sensor, which is more accurate than infrared sensors. For the transesterification reaction, the activation energy is 37.1kJ/mol (20.1-54.2kJ/mol) in the microwave-heated reactor compared with 31.6kJ/mol (14.6-48.7kJ/mol) in the conventionally-heated reactor. For the esterification reaction, the activation energy is 45.4kJ/mol (31.8-58.9kJ/mol) for the microwave-heated reactor compared with 56.1kJ/mol (55.7-56.4kJ/mol) for conventionally-heated reactor. The results confirm the absence of non-thermal microwave effects for homogenous-catalyzed reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regiocomplementary cycloaddition reactions of boryl- and silylbenzynes with 1,3-dipoles: selective synthesis of benzo-fused azole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Takashi; Takagi, Akira; Goto, Masahiko; Aoyama, Yuya; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Itoh, Yuji; Fujii, Satoshi; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Akai, Shuji

    2013-04-05

    Benzo-fused nitrogen-containing heterocycles are abundant in biologically active compounds. One of the most important methods for preparing such heterocycles is the (3 + 2) cycloaddition reaction of benzynes with 1,3-dipolar compounds. However, the reactions of unsymmetrically substituted benzynes generally show low selectivity and hence yield mixtures of two regioisomers. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of both regioisomers of multisubstituted benzo-fused azole derivatives such as benzotriazoles, 1H-indazoles, and benzo[d]isoxazoles through the regiocomplementary (3 + 2) cycloaddition reactions of 3-boryl- and 3-silylbenzynes with 1,3-dipoles. The improved generation of 3-borylbenzynes from new precursors was one of the most important results of this work, which produced the successful (3 + 2) cycloaddition reactions with exclusive and proximal selectivities. On the other hand, similar reactions of 3-silylbenzynes selectively afforded distal cycloadducts. Analysis of the reaction pathways of these amazing regioselectivities by density functional theory calculations revealed that the (3 + 2) cycloadditions of borylbenzynes are controlled by the electrostatic effect of the boryl group, while those of silylbenzynes are controlled mainly by the steric effect of the bulky silyl groups that produced electrostatically unfavorable adducts via anomalous transition states.

  5. Computational Explorations of Mechanisms and Ligand-Directed Selectivities of Copper-Catalyzed Ullmann-Type Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gavin O.; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Computational investigations of ligand-directed selectivities in Ullmann-type coupling reactions of methanol and methylamine with iodobenzene by β-diketone- and 1,10-phenanthroline-ligated Cu(I) complexes are reported. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with several functionals were performed on both the nucleophile formation and aryl halide activation steps of these reactions. The origin of ligand-directed selectivities in N- vs. O-arylation reactions as described in a previous publication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 3490–3491) were studied and explained. The selectivities observed experimentally are not derived from initial Cu(I)-nucleophile formation, but from the subsequent steps involving aryl halide activation. The arylation may occur via single-electron transfer (SET) or iodine atom transfer (IAT), depending on the electron-donating ability of the ligand and nucleophile. Mechanisms involving either oxidative addition/reductive elimination or sigma-bond metathesis are disfavored. SET mechanisms are favored in reactions promoted by the β-diketone ligand; N-arylation is predicted to be favored in these cases, in agreement with experimental results. The phenanthroline ligand promotes O-arylation reactions via IAT mechanisms in preference to N-arylation reactions, which occur via SET mechanisms; this result is also in agreement with experimental results. PMID:20387898

  6. Unobtrusive In-Home Monitoring of Cognitive and Physical Health: Reactions and Perceptions of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Katherine; Boise, Linda; Lundell, Jay; Foucek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    While the potential benefits of unobtrusive in-home sensing technologies for maintaining health and independence of older adults have been highlighted in recent research, little is known about their views toward such technology. The aims of this project were to identify monitoring needs and expectations of community-residing elderly and their family members. Focus groups were presented with examples of in-home monitoring devices and data output; participants were asked to consider whether the data showed information that was meaningful to them, and how and to whom they would like to have such data disseminated. Content analysis of transcripts revealed four dominant themes: maintaining independence, detecting cognitive decline, sharing of information, and the tradeoff between privacy and usefulness of monitoring. The acceptance by elderly of unobtrusive in-home monitoring was closely tied to perceived utility of data generated by such systems. Privacy concerns appeared to be less of an issue than anticipated in this sample. PMID:19165352

  7. Bayesian model selection in logistic regression for the detection of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Marbac, Matthieu; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Sedki, Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous adverse event reports have a high potential for detecting adverse drug reactions. However, due to their dimension, the analysis of such databases requires statistical methods. In this context, disproportionality measures can be used. Their main idea is to project the data onto contingency tables in order to measure the strength of associations between drugs and adverse events. However, due to the data projection, these methods are sensitive to the problem of coprescriptions and masking effects. Recently, logistic regressions have been used with a Lasso type penalty to perform the detection of associations between drugs and adverse events. On different examples, this approach limits the drawbacks of the disproportionality methods, but the choice of the penalty value is open to criticism while it strongly influences the results. In this paper, we propose to use a logistic regression whose sparsity is viewed as a model selection challenge. Since the model space is huge, a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm carries out the model selection by maximizing the BIC criterion. Thus, we avoid the calibration of penalty or threshold. During our application on the French pharmacovigilance database, the proposed method is compared to well-established approaches on a reference dataset, and obtains better rates of positive and negative controls. However, many signals (i.e., specific drug-event associations) are not detected by the proposed method. So, we conclude that this method should be used in parallel to existing measures in pharmacovigilance. Code implementing the proposed method is available at the following url: https://github.com/masedki/MHTrajectoryR.

  8. Monitoring of an esterification reaction by on-line direct liquid sampling mass spectrometry and in-line mid infrared spectrometry with an attenuated total reflectance probe.

    PubMed

    Owen, Andrew W; McAulay, Edith A J; Nordon, Alison; Littlejohn, David; Lynch, Thomas P; Lancaster, J Steven; Wright, Robert G

    2014-11-07

    A specially designed thermal vaporiser was used with a process mass spectrometer designed for gas analysis to monitor the esterification of butan-1-ol and acetic anhydride. The reaction was conducted at two scales: in a 150 mL flask and a 1L jacketed batch reactor, with liquid delivery flow rates to the vaporiser of 0.1 and 1.0 mLmin(-1), respectively. Mass spectrometry measurements were made at selected ion masses, and classical least squares multivariate linear regression was used to produce concentration profiles for the reactants, products and catalyst. The extent of reaction was obtained from the butyl acetate profile and found to be 83% and 76% at 40°C and 20°C, respectively, at the 1L scale. Reactions in the 1L reactor were also monitored by in-line mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry; off-line gas chromatography (GC) was used as a reference technique when building partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration models for prediction of butyl acetate concentrations from the MIR spectra. In validation experiments, good agreement was achieved between the concentration of butyl acetate obtained from in-line MIR spectra and off-line GC. In the initial few minutes of the reaction the profiles for butyl acetate derived from on-line direct liquid sampling mass spectrometry (DLSMS) differed from those of in-line MIR spectrometry owing to the 2 min transfer time between the reactor and mass spectrometer. As the reaction proceeded, however, the difference between the concentration profiles became less noticeable. DLSMS had advantages over in-line MIR spectrometry as it was easier to generate concentration profiles for all the components in the reaction. Also, it was possible to detect the presence of a simulated impurity of ethanol (at levels of 2.6 and 9.1% mol/mol) in butan-1-ol, and the resulting production of ethyl acetate, by DLSMS, but not by in-line MIR spectrometry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gas-Phase Ion-Molecule Reactions in Selected Cyclohexanes (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    involving C7H14: all reactions that are exothermic are observed and those reactions that are not observed are all endothermic [2]. In the current...undergo endothermic reactions . Given that the reactant ions have undergone collisional cooling and that the thermochemical data in table 2 support the...discussed in reference [2]. Thermochemical data utilized to evaluate the exothermicity of reactions are from the work of Lias et. al [16] unless otherwise

  10. Transition-metal-catalyzed group transfer reactions for selective C-H bond functionalization of artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yungen; Xiao, Wenbo; Wong, Man-Kin; Che, Chi-Ming

    2007-10-11

    Three types of novel artemisinin derivatives have been synthesized through transition-metal-catalyzed intramolecular carbenoid and nitrenoid C-H bond insertion reactions. With rhodium complexes as catalysts, lactone 11 was synthesized via carbene insertion reaction at the C16 position in 90% yield; oxazolidinone 13 was synthesized via nitrene insertion reaction at the C10 position in 87% yield based on 77% conversion; and sulfamidate 14 was synthesized via nitrene insertion reaction at the C8 position in 87% yield.

  11. Electrochemical Impedance Sensors for Monitoring Trace Amounts of NO3 in Selected Growing Media

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Seyed Alireza; Caron, William-O.; Loubier, Mathilde; Normandeau, Charles-O.; Viens, Jeff; Lamhamedi, Mohammed S.; Gosselin, Benoit; Messaddeq, Younes

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of smart cities and big data, precision agriculture allows the feeding of sensor data into online databases for continuous crop monitoring, production optimization, and data storage. This paper describes a low-cost, compact, and scalable nitrate sensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring trace amounts of NO3− in selected growing media. The nitrate sensor can be integrated to conventional microelectronics to perform online nitrate sensing continuously over a wide concentration range from 0.1 ppm to 100 ppm, with a response time of about 1 min, and feed data into a database for storage and analysis. The paper describes the structural design, the Nyquist impedance response, the measurement sensitivity and accuracy, and the field testing of the nitrate sensor performed within tree nursery settings under ISO/IEC 17025 certifications. PMID:26197322

  12. Tattoo-based potentiometric ion-selective sensors for epidermal pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Hung, Vinci W S; Jia, Wenzhao; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Windmiller, Joshua R; Martinez, Alexandra G; Ramírez, Julian; Chan, Garrett; Kerman, Kagan; Wang, Joseph

    2013-01-07

    This article presents the fabrication and characterization of novel tattoo-based solid-contact ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) for non-invasive potentiometric monitoring of epidermal pH levels. The new fabrication approach combines commercially available temporary transfer tattoo paper with conventional screen printing and solid-contact polymer ISE methodologies. The resulting tattoo-based potentiometric sensors exhibit rapid and sensitive response to a wide range of pH changes with no carry-over effects. Furthermore, the tattoo ISE sensors endure repetitive mechanical deformation, which is a key requirement of wearable and epidermal sensors. The flexible and conformal nature of the tattoo sensors enable them to be mounted on nearly any exposed skin surface for real-time pH monitoring of the human perspiration, as illustrated from the response during a strenuous physical activity. The resulting tattoo-based ISE sensors offer considerable promise as wearable potentiometric sensors suitable for diverse applications.

  13. Sensor Selection to Support Practical Use of Health-Monitoring Smart Environments

    PubMed Central

    HOLDER, Lawrence B.

    2011-01-01

    The data mining and pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track activities that people normally perform as part of their daily routines. One question that frequently arises, however, is how many smart home sensors are needed and where should they be placed in order to accurately recognize activities? We employ data mining techniques to look at the problem of sensor selection for activity recognition in smart homes. We analyze the results based on six data sets collected in five distinct smart home environments. PMID:21760755

  14. Electrochemical Impedance Sensors for Monitoring Trace Amounts of NO3 in Selected Growing Media.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Seyed Alireza; Caron, William-O; Loubier, Mathilde; Normandeau, Charles-O; Viens, Jeff; Lamhamedi, Mohammed S; Gosselin, Benoit; Messaddeq, Younes

    2015-07-21

    With the advent of smart cities and big data, precision agriculture allows the feeding of sensor data into online databases for continuous crop monitoring, production optimization, and data storage. This paper describes a low-cost, compact, and scalable nitrate sensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring trace amounts of NO3- in selected growing media. The nitrate sensor can be integrated to conventional microelectronics to perform online nitrate sensing continuously over a wide concentration range from 0.1 ppm to 100 ppm, with a response time of about 1 min, and feed data into a database for storage and analysis. The paper describes the structural design, the Nyquist impedance response, the measurement sensitivity and accuracy, and the field testing of the nitrate sensor performed within tree nursery settings under ISO/IEC 17025 certifications.

  15. Development of a quantitative basis for selection of spectral features in a vegetation monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D. E.; Smith, J. H.; Trichel, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The development of an objective methodology for evaluation of alternative Landsat data preprocessing options, spectral transform features for monitoring vegetation, and feature summarization algorithms is presented. Based on estimates of spectral separability between a target class and its confusion classes, analysis of variance techniques are used to evaluate potential design options for large scale vegetation monitoring systems. Case studies are presented for early season and through the season spring small grains separation and for barley/other spring small grains separation. It is concluded that a basis for efficient, objective selection among alternative feature extraction approaches has been established for the large scale vegetation mapping/inventory problem. Although the approach has been demonstrated for the unitemporal class separability case, extensions to the multitemporal case are under development.

  16. Gold(III)-catalyzed three-component coupling reaction (TCC) selective toward furans.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Liu, Li; Ding, Dong; Sun, Jiangtao; Ji, Yangxuan; Dong, Jialing

    2013-06-07

    An efficient three-component coupling reaction toward a variety of furan derivatives has been developed. This cascade transformation proceeds via the gold-catalyzed coupling reaction of phenylglyoxal derivatives, secondary amines, and terminal alkynes, under the reaction conditions, that undergoes cyclization into the furan core.

  17. Light-induced hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition: a facile and selective photoclick reaction.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2011-04-13

    2-Napthoquinone-3-methides (oNQMs) generated by efficient photodehydration (Φ=0.2) of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol undergo facile hetero-Diels-Alder addition (k(D-A)∼ 4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to electron-rich polarized olefins in an aqueous solution. The resulting photostable benzo[g]chromans are produced in high to quantitative yield. The unreacted oNQM is rapidly hydrated (k(H2O) ∼145 s(-1)) to regenerate the starting diol. This competition between hydration and cycloaddition makes oNQMs highly selective, since only vinyl ethers and enamines are reactive enough to form the Diels-Alder adduct in an aqueous solution; no cycloaddition was observed with other types of alkenes. To achieve photolabeling or photoligation of two substrates, one is derivatized with a vinyl ether moiety, while 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol is attached to the other via an appropriate linker. The light-induced Diels-Alder "click" strategy permits the formation of either a permanent or hydrolytically labile linkage. Rapid kinetics of this photoclick reaction (k=4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) is useful for time-resolved applications. The short lifetime (τ ∼7 ms in H(2)O) of the active form of the photoclick reagent prevents its migration from the site of irradiation, thus, allowing for spatial control of the ligation or labeling.

  18. Catalytic formation of monosaccharides: from the formose reaction towards selective synthesis.

    PubMed

    Delidovich, Irina V; Simonov, Alexandr N; Taran, Oxana P; Parmon, Valentin N

    2014-07-01

    The formose reaction (FR) has been long the focus of intensive investigations as a simple method for synthesis of complex biologically important monosaccharides and other sugar-like molecules from the simplest organic substrate-formaldehyde. The fundamental importance of the FR is predominantly connected with the ascertainment of plausible scenarios of chemical evolution which could have occurred on the prebiotic Earth to produce the very first molecules of carbohydrates, amino- and nucleic acids, as well as other vitally important substances. The practical importance of studies on the FR is the elaboration of catalytic methods for the synthesis of rare and non-natural monosaccharides and polyols. This Minireview considers the FR from the point of view of chemists working in the field of catalysis with emphasis on the mechanisms of numerous parallel and consequent catalytic transformations that take place during the FR. Based on its kinetics, the FR may be considered as a non-radical chain process with degenerate branching. The Minireview also considers different approaches to the control of selectivity of carbohydrate synthesis from formaldehyde and lower monosaccharides. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Design of heterogeneous photocatalysts based on metal oxides to control the selectivity of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Maldotti, Andrea; Molinari, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalysis is particularly relevant in order to realize chemical transformations of interest in synthesis and, at the same time, to move towards a "sustainable chemistry" with a minimal environmental impact. Heterogeneous systems with well-defined textural characteristics represent a suitable means to tailor the selectivity of photocatalytic processes. Here, we summarize and classify the significant features of photocatalysts consisting of photoactive metal oxides dispersed on high-surface-area solid supports, or constrained inside their porous network. These systems are based on the use of titanium dioxide, highly dispersed oxides of titanium, chromium, vanadium, and polyoxotungstates. They share similar primary photoprocesses: light absorption induces a charge separation process with formation of positive holes able to oxidize organic substrates. A great number of the papers discussed here concern oxidation reactions carried out in the presence of O₂ for inducing partial oxidation of alcohols and monooxygenation of hydrocarbons. We also devote some attention to photocatalysis in the absence of O₂. In these conditions, the photogenerated charge separation offers the possibility to induce the formation of C-C and C-N bonds. We emphasize that the optimal tailoring of photoactive materials for synthetic purposes can be achieved by combining recent advances in the preparation of nanostructured materials with mechanistic knowledge derived from surface science and molecular level investigations.

  20. Determination of molecular weight and other characteristics of co- and terpolymers using automatic continuous online monitoring of polymerization reactions (ACOMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enohnyaket, Pascal E. A.

    The Automatic Continuous Online Monitoring of Polymerization reactions (ACOMP), is a technique developed by the Reed Research Group at Tulane University. By simultaneously monitoring and combining signals from a continuously dilute reactor stream, detectors such as a multi-angle light scattering detector, near infra-red spectrometer, viscometer, differential refractive index, and a full wavelength UV/Visible detector were used in a model-independent fashion to follow the weight-average molecular weight, intrinsic viscosity, the concentrations of each comonomer, and hence the evolution of the average instantaneous and cumulative compositions along the chains as comonomers are consumed. The goal of this dissertation is to make the ACOMP system more useful in very complex polymerization situations by improving it with additional detectors and formalisms (such as a new expression for computing the molecular weight a copolymer of nth degree) and to exploit its robustness in situations where traditional routes fail or are of limited value. By providing a continuum of data, ACOMP allows polymer scientists to better understand and control new reaction schemes. At the pilot plant, it can be used to optimize reaction conditions. Because the ACOMP system is relatively cheap, user friendly, can be environmentally friendly, less bulky and very efficient, it is my desire to use ACOMP to solve some of the problems in the petroleum, plastic and drug manufacturing industries in Cameroon (and Africa).

  1. Micro flow reactor chips with integrated luminescent chemosensors for spatially resolved on-line chemical reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hoera, Christian; Meier, Robert J; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-10-21

    Real-time chemical reaction monitoring in microfluidic environments is demonstrated using luminescent chemical sensors integrated in PDMS/glass-based microscale reactors. A fabrication procedure is presented that allows for straightforward integration of thin polymer layers with optical sensing functionality in microchannels of glass-PDMS chips of only 150 μm width and of 10 to 35 μm height. Sensor layers consisting of polystyrene and an oxygen-sensitive platinum porphyrin probe with film thicknesses of about 0.5 to 4 μm were generated by combining spin coating and abrasion techniques. Optimal coating procedures were developed and evaluated. The chip-integrated sensor layers were calibrated and investigated with respect to stability, reproducibility and response times. These microchips allowed observation of dissolved oxygen concentration in the range of 0 to over 40 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 368 μg L(-1). The sensor layers were then used for observation of a model reaction, the oxidation of sulphite to sulphate in a microfluidic chemical reactor and could observe sulphite concentrations of less than 200 μM. Real-time on-line monitoring of this chemical reaction was realized at a fluorescence microscope setup with 405 nm LED excitation and CCD camera detection.

  2. Raman spectroscopy as a tool for monitoring mesoscale continuous-flow organic synthesis: Equipment interface and assessment in four medicinally-relevant reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Trevor A

    2013-01-01

    Summary An apparatus is reported for real-time Raman monitoring of reactions performed using continuous-flow processing. Its capability is assessed by studying four reactions, all involving formation of products bearing α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moieties; synthesis of 3-acetylcoumarin, Knoevenagel and Claisen–Schmidt condensations, and a Biginelli reaction. In each case it is possible to monitor the reactions and also in one case, by means of a calibration curve, determine product conversion from Raman spectral data as corroborated by data obtained using NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24062851

  3. Effective Sensor Selection and Data Anomaly Detection for Condition Monitoring of Aircraft Engines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liansheng; Liu, Datong; Zhang, Yujie; Peng, Yu

    2016-04-29

    In a complex system, condition monitoring (CM) can collect the system working status. The condition is mainly sensed by the pre-deployed sensors in/on the system. Most existing works study how to utilize the condition information to predict the upcoming anomalies, faults, or failures. There is also some research which focuses on the faults or anomalies of the sensing element (i.e., sensor) to enhance the system reliability. However, existing approaches ignore the correlation between sensor selecting strategy and data anomaly detection, which can also improve the system reliability. To address this issue, we study a new scheme which includes sensor selection strategy and data anomaly detection by utilizing information theory and Gaussian Process Regression (GPR). The sensors that are more appropriate for the system CM are first selected. Then, mutual information is utilized to weight the correlation among different sensors. The anomaly detection is carried out by using the correlation of sensor data. The sensor data sets that are utilized to carry out the evaluation are provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center and have been used as Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) challenge data in 2008. By comparing the two different sensor selection strategies, the effectiveness of selection method on data anomaly detection is proved.

  4. Effective Sensor Selection and Data Anomaly Detection for Condition Monitoring of Aircraft Engines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liansheng; Liu, Datong; Zhang, Yujie; Peng, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In a complex system, condition monitoring (CM) can collect the system working status. The condition is mainly sensed by the pre-deployed sensors in/on the system. Most existing works study how to utilize the condition information to predict the upcoming anomalies, faults, or failures. There is also some research which focuses on the faults or anomalies of the sensing element (i.e., sensor) to enhance the system reliability. However, existing approaches ignore the correlation between sensor selecting strategy and data anomaly detection, which can also improve the system reliability. To address this issue, we study a new scheme which includes sensor selection strategy and data anomaly detection by utilizing information theory and Gaussian Process Regression (GPR). The sensors that are more appropriate for the system CM are first selected. Then, mutual information is utilized to weight the correlation among different sensors. The anomaly detection is carried out by using the correlation of sensor data. The sensor data sets that are utilized to carry out the evaluation are provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center and have been used as Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) challenge data in 2008. By comparing the two different sensor selection strategies, the effectiveness of selection method on data anomaly detection is proved. PMID:27136561

  5. Development of miniaturized potentiometric nitrate- and ammonium selective electrodes for applications in water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, J; Kaden, H; Pausch, G

    2000-06-01

    Mobile analysis with potentiometric sensors is well suited for field measurements. Ion-selective electrodes (ISE) based on polymeric membranes for in-situ determination of nitrate and ammonium contents in ground water, drinking water and surface water have been developed. The ISE are integrated in a multisensor module (MSM) for monitoring these ions over longer time intervals. The receptor is a PVC-membrane with tridodecylammonium nitrate (TDDA) for nitrate- and nonactine for ammonium-electrodes as ionophores. As plasticizer dibutylphthalate (DBT) was used. The main parameters for assessing the efficiency of these ISE are presented.

  6. Analysis of drugs by pyrolysis. I. Selected ion monitoring combined with a pyrolysis method for the determination of carpronium chloride in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ohya, K; Sano, M

    1977-08-01

    In order to establish an analytical method for carpronium chloride, a parasympathomimetic agent, the pyrolysis reaction of carpronium chloride was examined in a g.c.m.s. system, which revealed that gamma-butyrolactone was produced directly from the drug as the main pyrolysis product. In the case of conversion of [2,2,3,3-2H4]carpronium chloride into the deuterated gamma-butyrolactone, 2H/1H scrambling was observed and confirmed to occur during the pyrolysis process of the deuterated compound. The proportion of gamma-[2H4]butyrolactone among the pyrolysis products was almost independent of the operating conditions, so [2,2,3,3-2H4]carpronium chloride was of practical use as an internal standard for selected ion monitoring. By incorporation of the pyrolysis reaction of carpronium chloride with selected ion monitoring and the use of [2,2,3,3-2H4]carpronium chloride as an internal standard, a rapid, sensitive and selective method was devised for the determination of the drug in biological samples. The method was utilized successfully for the biopharmaceutical studies of carpronium chloride in ma.

  7. Quantitative Profiling of Protein Tyrosine Kinases in Human Cancer Cell Lines by Multiplexed Parallel Reaction Monitoring Assays*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Lin, De; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play key roles in cellular signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, cell division, and cell differentiation. Dysregulation of PTK-activated pathways, often by receptor overexpression, gene amplification, or genetic mutation, is a causal factor underlying numerous cancers. In this study, we have developed a parallel reaction monitoring-based assay for quantitative profiling of 83 PTKs. The assay detects 308 proteotypic peptides from 54 receptor tyrosine kinases and 29 nonreceptor tyrosine kinases in a single run. Quantitative comparisons were based on the labeled reference peptide method. We implemented the assay in four cell models: 1) a comparison of proliferating versus epidermal growth factor-stimulated A431 cells, 2) a comparison of SW480Null (mutant APC) and SW480APC (APC restored) colon tumor cell lines, and 3) a comparison of 10 colorectal cancer cell lines with different genomic abnormalities, and 4) lung cancer cell lines with either susceptibility (11–18) or acquired resistance (11–18R) to the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We observed distinct PTK expression changes that were induced by stimuli, genomic features or drug resistance, which were consistent with previous reports. However, most of the measured expression differences were novel observations. For example, acquired resistance to erlotinib in the 11–18 cell model was associated not only with previously reported up-regulation of MET, but also with up-regulation of FLK2 and down-regulation of LYN and PTK7. Immunoblot analyses and shotgun proteomics data were highly consistent with parallel reaction monitoring data. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring assays provide a targeted, systems-level profiling approach to evaluate cancer-related proteotypes and adaptations. Data are available through Proteome eXchange Accession PXD002706. PMID:26631510

  8. Monitoring enzyme-catalyzed reactions in micromachined nanoliter wells using a conventional microscope-based microarray reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Doel, L. Richard; Moerman, R.; van Dedem, G. W. K.; Young, Ian T.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2002-06-01

    Yeast-Saccharomyces cerevisiae - it widely used as a model system for other higher eukaryotes, including man. One of the basic fermentation processes in yeast is the glycolytic pathway, which is the conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide. This pathway consists of 12 enzyme-catalyzed reactions. With the approach of microarray technology we want to explore the metabolic regulation of this pathway in yeast. This paper will focus on the design of a conventional microscope based microarray reader, which is used to monitor these enzymatic reactions in microarrays. These microarrays are fabricated in silicon and have sizes of 300 by 300 micrometers 2. The depth varies from 20 to 50 micrometers . Enzyme activity levels can be derived by monitoring the production or consumption rate of NAD(P)H, which is excited at 360nm and emits around 450nm. This fluorophore is involved in all 12 reactions of the pathway. The microarray reader is equipped with a back-illuminated CCD camera in order to obtain a high quantum efficiency for the lower wavelengths. The dynamic range of our microarray reader varies form 5(mu) Molar to 1mMolar NAD(P)H. With this microarray reader enzyme activity levels down to 0.01 unit per milliliter can be monitored. The acquisition time per well is 0.1s. The total scan cycle time for a 5 X 5 microarray is less than half a minute. The number of cycles for a proper estimation of the enzyme activity is inversely proportional to the enzyme activity: long measurement times are needed to determine low enzyme activity levels.

  9. CO and NO2 Selective Monitoring by ZnO-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hjiri, Mokhtar; El Mir, Lassaad; Leonardi, Salvatore Gianluca; Donato, Nicola; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    ZnO nanomaterials with different shapes were synthesized, characterized and tested in the selective monitoring of low concentration of CO and NO2 in air. ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and nanofibers (NFs) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method in supercritical conditions and electrospinning technique, respectively. CO and NO2 sensing tests have demonstrated that the annealing temperature and shape of zinc oxide nanomaterials are the key factors in modulating the electrical and sensing properties. Specifically, ZnO NPs annealed at high temperature (700 °C) have been found sensitive to CO, while they displayed negligible response to NO2. The opposite behavior has been registered for the one-dimensional ZnO NFs annealed at medium temperature (400 °C). Due to their adaptable sensitivity/selectivity characteristics, the developed sensors show promising applications in dual air quality control systems for closed ambient such as automotive cabin, parking garage and tunnels. PMID:28348340

  10. CO and NO₂ Selective Monitoring by ZnO-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Hjiri, Mokhtar; El Mir, Lassaad; Leonardi, Salvatore Gianluca; Donato, Nicola; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-07-05

    ZnO nanomaterials with different shapes were synthesized, characterized and tested in the selective monitoring of low concentration of CO and NO₂ in air. ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and nanofibers (NFs) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method in supercritical conditions and electrospinning technique, respectively. CO and NO₂ sensing tests have demonstrated that the annealing temperature and shape of zinc oxide nanomaterials are the key factors in modulating the electrical and sensing properties. Specifically, ZnO NPs annealed at high temperature (700 °C) have been found sensitive to CO, while they displayed negligible response to NO₂. The opposite behavior has been registered for the one-dimensional ZnO NFs annealed at medium temperature (400 °C). Due to their adaptable sensitivity/selectivity characteristics, the developed sensors show promising applications in dual air quality control systems for closed ambient such as automotive cabin, parking garage and tunnels.

  11. Dynamics of the electron transfer reaction between an oxazine dye and DNA oligonucleotides monitored on the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, M.; Drexhage, K. H.; Lieberwirth, U.; Müller, R.; Nord, S.; Zander, C.

    1998-02-01

    Single-molecule spectroscopy in water has been investigated by monitoring the dynamical behaviour of the electron transfer reaction between guanosine-containing oligonucleotides and the covalently attached oxazine dye MR121, using diode laser based far-field fluorescence microscopy. In this system, each oligonucleotide molecule exhibits multiexponential electron transfer kinetics. The influence of the guanosine position on the degree of quenching is shown using different oligonucleotide sequences. The dynamical behaviour of conformational transitions between various states with different electron transfer efficiency is monitored by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the μs- and ms-time scales. In addition, guanosine specific on/off blinking of individual labeled oligonucleotide molecules in aqueous solution is shown.

  12. Development of a potassium-selective optode for hydroponic nutrient solution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bamsey, Matthew; Berinstain, Alain; Dixon, Michael

    2012-08-06

    Highly efficient and reliable plant growth such as that required in biological life support systems for future space-based missions can be better achieved with knowledge of ion concentrations within the hydroponic nutrient solution. This paper reports on the development and application of ion-selective bulk optodes to plant growth systems. Membranes for potassium-selective sensing are reported that have been tailored so that their dynamic range is centred on potassium activities within typical nutrient solution recipes. The developed sensors have been shown to exhibit a potassium activity measuring range from 0.134 to 117 mM at pH 6.0. These bulk optodes show full scale response on the order of several minutes. They show minimal interference to other cations and meet worst-case selectivity requirements for potassium monitoring in the considered half strength Hoagland solution. When continuously immersed in nutrient solution, these sensors demonstrated predicable lifetimes on the order of 50h. The developed instrument for absorption-based measurements including light source, mini-spectrometer and optode probe is presented. Custom instrument control and monitoring software including a spectral normalization procedure, use of a dual-wavelength absorbance ratio technique and automatic adjustment for pH variation result in an instrument that is self-calibrating and one that can account for effects such as light source fluctuations, membrane thickness variations and a variety of other factors. The low mass, low volume nature of bulk optode sensing systems, make them a promising technology for future space-based plant production systems. Their low-cost and technology transfer potential suggest that they could provide terrestrial growers a new and reliable mechanism to obtain ion-selective knowledge of their nutrient solution, improving yields, reducing costs and aiding in compliance to continually more stringent environmental regulation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published

  13. IAEA coordinated research project on nuclear data for charged-particle monitor reactions and medical isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, Roberto; Nichols, Alan L.; Nortier, Francois Meiring; Carlson, Brett V.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Hermanne, Alex; Hussain, Mazhar; Ignatyuk, Anatoly V.; Kellett, Mark A.; Kibédi, Tibor; Kim, Guinyun; Kondev, Filip G.; Lebeda, Ondrej; Luca, Aurelian; Naik, Haladhara; Nagai, Yasuki; Spahn, Ingo; Suryanarayana, Saraswatula V.; Tárkányi, Ferenc T.; Verpelli, Marco

    2017-09-01

    An IAEA coordinated research project was launched in December 2012 to establish and improve the nuclear data required to characterise charged-particle monitor reactions and extend data for medical radionuclide production. An international team was assembled to undertake work addressing the requirements for more accurate cross-section data over a wide range of targets and projectiles, undertaken in conjunction with a limited number of measurements and more extensive evaluations of the decay data of specific radionuclides. These studies are nearing completion, and are briefly described below.

  14. Radioactive Phosphorylation of Alcohols to Monitor Biocatalytic Diels-Alder Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nierth, Alexander; Jäschke, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Nature has efficiently adopted phosphorylation for numerous biological key processes, spanning from cell signaling to energy storage and transmission. For the bioorganic chemist the number of possible ways to attach a single phosphate for radioactive labeling is surprisingly small. Here we describe a very simple and fast one-pot synthesis to phosphorylate an alcohol with phosphoric acid using trichloroacetonitrile as activating agent. Using this procedure, we efficiently attached the radioactive phosphorus isotope 32P to an anthracene diene, which is a substrate for the Diels-Alderase ribozyme—an RNA sequence that catalyzes the eponymous reaction. We used the 32P-substrate for the measurement of RNA-catalyzed reaction kinetics of several dye-labeled ribozyme variants for which precise optical activity determination (UV/vis, fluorescence) failed due to interference of the attached dyes. The reaction kinetics were analyzed by thin-layer chromatographic separation of the 32P-labeled reaction components and densitometric analysis of the substrate and product radioactivities, thereby allowing iterative optimization of the dye positions for future single-molecule studies. The phosphorylation strategy with trichloroacetonitrile may be applicable for labeling numerous other compounds that contain alcoholic hydroxyl groups. PMID:21731729

  15. A fluorescence-based coupling reaction for monitoring the activity of recombinant human NAD synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Michael E; Kuhn, Eric; Mallender, William D; Pullen, Lester; Li, Ping; Parsons, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    NAD synthetase is responsible for the conversion of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. This reaction provides a biosynthetic route of the coenzyme and, thus, a source of cellular reducing equivalents. Alterations in the oxidative reductive potential of the cell have been implicated as a contributing factor in many disease states. Thus, this enzyme represents a new class of potential drug targets, and, hence, our efforts were focused upon developing a robust assay for utilization in a high throughput screen. Toward that end, we describe a coupled enzyme assay format for the measurement of recombinant human NAD synthetase by employing lactate dehydrogenase in a cycling/amplification reaction linked ultimately to the fluorescence generation of resorufin from resazurin via diaphorase. We present kinetics of the reaction of NAD synthetase in the coupled assay format, optimization conditions, and inhibition of the reaction by gossypol [1,1',6,6',7,7'-hexahydroxy-3,3'-dimethyl-5,5'-bis(1-methylethyl)-[2,2'- binaphthalene]-8,8'-dicarboxaldehyde] and illustrate the robustness of the assay by demonstrating 384-well microtiter plate uniformity statistics. Collectively, our results show that the assay method is both robust and well suited for this class of enzymes involved in the NAD+ biosynthetic pathway.

  16. Manipulating and Monitoring On-Surface Biological Reactions by Light-Triggered Local pH Alterations.

    PubMed

    Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Pevzner, Alexander; Davidi, Guy; Naddaka, Vladimir; Kwiat, Moria; Huppert, Dan; Patolsky, Fernando

    2015-07-08

    Significant research efforts have been dedicated to the integration of biological species with electronic elements to yield smart bioelectronic devices. The integration of DNA, proteins, and whole living cells and tissues with electronic devices has been developed into numerous intriguing applications. In particular, the quantitative detection of biological species and monitoring of biological processes are both critical to numerous areas of medical and life sciences. Nevertheless, most current approaches merely focus on the "monitoring" of chemical processes taking place on the sensing surfaces, and little efforts have been invested in the conception of sensitive devices that can simultaneously "control" and "monitor" chemical and biological reactions by the application of on-surface reversible stimuli. Here, we demonstrate the light-controlled fine modulation of surface pH by the use of photoactive molecularly modified nanomaterials. Through the use of nanowire-based FET devices, we showed the capability of modulating the on-surface pH, by intensity-controlled light stimulus. This allowed us simultaneously and locally to control and monitor pH-sensitive biological reactions on the nanodevices surfaces, such as the local activation and inhibition of proteolytic enzymatic processes, as well as dissociation of antigen-antibody binding interactions. The demonstrated capability of locally modulating the on-surface effective pH, by a light stimuli, may be further applied in the local control of on-surface DNA hybridization/dehybridization processes, activation or inhibition of living cells processes, local switching of cellular function, local photoactivation of neuronal networks with single cell resolution and so forth.

  17. PULSED ELECTROCHEMICAL TECHNIQUE FOR MONITORING ANTIBODY-ANTIGEN REACTIONS AT INTERFACES. (R825323)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The mechanism of pulsed potential waveform for monitoring antibody¯antigen interactions at immunosensor interfaces is discussed. Some examples of antibody¯antigen interactions at quartz crystal microbalance and polymer-modified ...

  18. Benzoin Condensation: Monitoring a Chemical Reaction by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharya, Apurba; Purohit, Vikram C.; Bellar, Nicholas R.

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the preferred method of separating a variety of materials in complex mixtures such as pharmaceuticals, polymers, soils, food products and biological fluids and is also considered to be a powerful analytical tool in both academia and industry. The use of HPLC analysis as a means of monitoring and…

  19. Benzoin Condensation: Monitoring a Chemical Reaction by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharya, Apurba; Purohit, Vikram C.; Bellar, Nicholas R.

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the preferred method of separating a variety of materials in complex mixtures such as pharmaceuticals, polymers, soils, food products and biological fluids and is also considered to be a powerful analytical tool in both academia and industry. The use of HPLC analysis as a means of monitoring and…

  20. Using magnetic levitation to distinguish atomic-level differences in chemical composition of polymers, and to monitor chemical reactions on solid supports.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Phillips, Scott T; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2008-12-31

    This communication describes a density-based method that uses magnetic levitation for monitoring solid-supported reactions and for distinguishing differences in chemical composition of polymers. The method is simple, rapid, and inexpensive and is similar to thin-layer chromatography (TLC; for solution-phase chemistry) in its potential for monitoring reactions in solid-phase chemistry. The technique involves levitating a sample of beads (taken from a reaction mixture) in a cuvette containing a paramagnetic solution (e.g., GdCl(3) dissolved in H(2)O) positioned between two NdFeB magnets. The vertical position at which the beads levitate corresponds to the density of the beads and correlates with the progress of a chemical reaction on a solid support. The method is particularly useful for monitoring the kinetics of reactions occurring on polymer beads.

  1. A General and Highly Selective Cobalt-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of N-Heteroarenes under Mild Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Adam, Rosa; Cabrero-Antonino, Jose R; Spannenberg, Anke; Junge, Kathrin; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2017-02-14

    Herein, a general and efficient method for the homogeneous cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of N-heterocycles, under mild reaction conditions, is reported. Key to success is the use of the tetradentate ligand tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine). This non-noble metal catalyst system allows the selective hydrogenation of heteroarenes in the presence of a broad range of other sensitive reducible groups.

  2. Regiospecific Epoxidation of Carvone: A Discovery-Oriented Experiment for Understanding the Selectivity and Mechanism of Epoxidation Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.; Lai, Y. M.; Siu, Yuk-Hong

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a discovery-oriented experiment for demonstrating the selectivity of two epoxidation reactions. Peroxy acids and alkaline H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] are two commonly used reagents for alkene epoxidation. The former react preferentially with electron-rich alkenes while the latter works better with alpha,beta-unsaturated…

  3. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  4. [Selection of digital filtering in the escaping ammonia monitoring with TDLAS].

    PubMed

    Zou, De-Bao; Chen, Wen-Liang; Du, Zhen-Hui; Jia, Hao; Qi, Ru-Bin; Li, Hong-Lian; Zhen, Yang; Hou, Yan-Xia; Xu, Ke-Xin

    2012-09-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technology (TDLAS), with its advantages of high selectivity and accuracy, provides a reliable approach to the on-line detection of escaping ammonia. Firstly, the present paper introduces the TDLAS principle, experimental system and the analyses of system noise. Then with the concentration of 90 x 10(-6) and 30 x 10(-6) NH3 for example, we used TDLAS system to collect their second harmonic original spectrum with all kinds of noise interference. To improve the signal spectrum, five types of digital filtering methods were respectively used to filter the original spectrum. Finally we did the NH3 experiments of concentration gradient and the long time monitoring: NH3 experiment of 20 x 10(-6). The analysis indicated that the averaging-wavelet filtering is validated to be more accurate than the other filtering methods in the noise reduction, which can improve the precision of the monitoring system from 10 x 10(-6) to 1.25 x 10(-6) and the SNR also increases by 14 times. It provides an effective pretreatment during the monitoring of escaping ammonia of extremely low concentration.

  5. Speed selection for traveling-wave solutions to the diffusion-reaction equation with cubic reaction term and Burgers nonlinear convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelnikov, V. A.; Lipatnikov, A. N.

    2014-09-01

    The problem of traveling wave (TW) speed selection for solutions to a generalized Murray-Burgers-KPP-Fisher parabolic equation with a strictly positive cubic reaction term is considered theoretically and the initial boundary value problem is numerically solved in order to support obtained analytical results. Depending on the magnitude of a parameter inherent in the reaction term (i) the term is either a concave function or a function with the inflection point and (ii) transition from pulled to pushed TW solution occurs due to interplay of two nonlinear terms; the reaction term and the Burgers convection term. Explicit pushed TW solutions are derived. It is shown that physically observable TW solutions, i.e., solutions obtained by solving the initial boundary value problem with a sufficiently steep initial condition, can be determined by seeking the TW solution characterized by the maximum decay rate at its leading edge. In the Appendix, the developed approach is applied to a non-linear diffusion-reaction equation that is widely used to model premixed turbulent combustion.

  6. Speed selection for traveling-wave solutions to the diffusion-reaction equation with cubic reaction term and Burgers nonlinear convection.

    PubMed

    Sabelnikov, V A; Lipatnikov, A N

    2014-09-01

    The problem of traveling wave (TW) speed selection for solutions to a generalized Murray-Burgers-KPP-Fisher parabolic equation with a strictly positive cubic reaction term is considered theoretically and the initial boundary value problem is numerically solved in order to support obtained analytical results. Depending on the magnitude of a parameter inherent in the reaction term (i) the term is either a concave function or a function with the inflection point and (ii) transition from pulled to pushed TW solution occurs due to interplay of two nonlinear terms; the reaction term and the Burgers convection term. Explicit pushed TW solutions are derived. It is shown that physically observable TW solutions, i.e., solutions obtained by solving the initial boundary value problem with a sufficiently steep initial condition, can be determined by seeking the TW solution characterized by the maximum decay rate at its leading edge. In the Appendix, the developed approach is applied to a non-linear diffusion-reaction equation that is widely used to model premixed turbulent combustion.

  7. The Generation of Dehydroalanine Residues in Protonated Polypeptides: Ion/Ion Reactions for Introducing Selective Cleavages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-09-01

    We examine a gas-phase approach for converting a subset of amino acid residues in polypeptide cations to dehydroalanine (Dha). Subsequent activation of the modified polypeptide ions gives rise to specific cleavage N-terminal to the Dha residue. This process allows for the incorporation of selective cleavages in the structural characterization of polypeptide ions. An ion/ion reaction within the mass spectrometer between a multiply protonated polypeptide and the sulfate radical anion introduces a radical site into the multiply protonated polypeptide reactant. Subsequent collisional activation of the polypeptide radical cation gives rise to radical side chain loss from one of several particular amino acid side chains (e.g., leucine, asparagine, lysine, glutamine, and glutamic acid) to yield a Dha residue. The Dha residues facilitate preferential backbone cleavages to produce signature c- and z-ions, demonstrated with cations derived from melittin, mechano growth factor (MGF), and ubiquitin. The efficiencies for radical side chain loss and for subsequent generation of specific c- and z-ions have been examined as functions of precursor ion charge state and activation conditions using cations of ubiquitin as a model for a small protein. It is noted that these efficiencies are not strongly dependent on ion trap collisional activation conditions but are sensitive to precursor ion charge state. Moderate to low charge states show the greatest overall yields for the specific Dha cleavages, whereas small molecule losses (e.g., water/ammonia) dominate at the lowest charge states and proton catalyzed amide bond cleavages that give rise to b- and y-ions tend to dominate at high charge states. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. The Generation of Dehydroalanine Residues in Protonated Polypeptides: Ion/Ion Reactions for Introducing Selective Cleavages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-05-01

    We examine a gas-phase approach for converting a subset of amino acid residues in polypeptide cations to dehydroalanine (Dha). Subsequent activation of the modified polypeptide ions gives rise to specific cleavage N-terminal to the Dha residue. This process allows for the incorporation of selective cleavages in the structural characterization of polypeptide ions. An ion/ion reaction within the mass spectrometer between a multiply protonated polypeptide and the sulfate radical anion introduces a radical site into the multiply protonated polypeptide reactant. Subsequent collisional activation of the polypeptide radical cation gives rise to radical side chain loss from one of several particular amino acid side chains (e.g., leucine, asparagine, lysine, glutamine, and glutamic acid) to yield a Dha residue. The Dha residues facilitate preferential backbone cleavages to produce signature c- and z-ions, demonstrated with cations derived from melittin, mechano growth factor (MGF), and ubiquitin. The efficiencies for radical side chain loss and for subsequent generation of specific c- and z-ions have been examined as functions of precursor ion charge state and activation conditions using cations of ubiquitin as a model for a small protein. It is noted that these efficiencies are not strongly dependent on ion trap collisional activation conditions but are sensitive to precursor ion charge state. Moderate to low charge states show the greatest overall yields for the specific Dha cleavages, whereas small molecule losses (e.g., water/ammonia) dominate at the lowest charge states and proton catalyzed amide bond cleavages that give rise to b- and y-ions tend to dominate at high charge states.

  9. The Generation of Dehydroalanine Residues in Protonated Polypeptides: Ion/Ion Reactions for Introducing Selective Cleavages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhou; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A

    2017-05-11

    We examine a gas-phase approach for converting a subset of amino acid residues in polypeptide cations to dehydroalanine (Dha). Subsequent activation of the modified polypeptide ions gives rise to specific cleavage N-terminal to the Dha residue. This process allows for the incorporation of selective cleavages in the structural characterization of polypeptide ions. An ion/ion reaction within the mass spectrometer between a multiply protonated polypeptide and the sulfate radical anion introduces a radical site into the multiply protonated polypeptide reactant. Subsequent collisional activation of the polypeptide radical cation gives rise to radical side chain loss from one of several particular amino acid side chains (e.g., leucine, asparagine, lysine, glutamine, and glutamic acid) to yield a Dha residue. The Dha residues facilitate preferential backbone cleavages to produce signature c- and z-ions, demonstrated with cations derived from melittin, mechano growth factor (MGF), and ubiquitin. The efficiencies for radical side chain loss and for subsequent generation of specific c- and z-ions have been examined as functions of precursor ion charge state and activation conditions using cations of ubiquitin as a model for a small protein. It is noted that these efficiencies are not strongly dependent on ion trap collisional activation conditions but are sensitive to precursor ion charge state. Moderate to low charge states show the greatest overall yields for the specific Dha cleavages, whereas small molecule losses (e.g., water/ammonia) dominate at the lowest charge states and proton catalyzed amide bond cleavages that give rise to b- and y-ions tend to dominate at high charge states. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Spoilage of foods monitored by native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    The modern food processing and storage environments require the real-time monitoring and rapid microbiological testing. Optical spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelengths can be the basis of a novel, rapid, reagent less, noncontact and non-destructive technique for monitoring the food spoilage. The native fluorescence spectra of muscle foods stored at 2-4°C (in refrigerator) and 20-24°C (in room temperature) were measured as a function of time with a selective excitation wavelength of 340nm. The contributions of the principal molecular components to the native fluorescence spectra of meat were measured spectra of each fluorophore: collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. The responsible components were extracted using a method namely Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares (MCR-ALS). The native fluorescence combined with MCR-ALS can be used directly on the surface of meat to produce biochemically interpretable "fingerprints", which reflects the microbial spoilage of foods involved with the metabolic processes. The results show that with time elapse, the emission from NADH in meat stored at 24°C increases much faster than that at 4°C. This is because multiplying of microorganisms and catabolism are accompanied by the generation of NADH. This study presents changes of relative content of NADH may be used as criterion for detection of spoilage degree of meat using native fluorescence spectroscopy.

  11. Selective treatment and monitoring of disseminated cancer micrometastases in vivo using dual-function, activatable immunoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Palanisami, Akilan; Rizvi, Imran; Zheng, Xiang; Mai, Zhiming; Anbil, Sriram; Sears, R. Bryan; Mensah, Lawrence B.; Goldschmidt, Ruth; Erdem, S. Sibel; Oliva, Esther; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant micrometastases that escape standard therapies often go undetected until the emergence of lethal recurrent disease. Here, we show that it is possible to treat microscopic tumors selectively using an activatable immunoconjugate. The immunoconjugate is composed of self-quenching, near-infrared chromophores loaded onto a cancer cell-targeting antibody. Chromophore phototoxicity and fluorescence are activated by lysosomal proteolysis, and light, after cancer cell internalization, enabling tumor-confined photocytotoxicity and resolution of individual micrometastases. This unique approach not only introduces a therapeutic strategy to help destroy residual drug-resistant cells but also provides a sensitive imaging method to monitor micrometastatic disease in common sites of recurrence. Using fluorescence microendoscopy to monitor immunoconjugate activation and micrometastatic disease, we demonstrate these concepts of “tumor-targeted, activatable photoimmunotherapy” in a mouse model of peritoneal carcinomatosis. By introducing targeted activation to enhance tumor selectively in complex anatomical sites, this study offers prospects for catching early recurrent micrometastases and for treating occult disease. PMID:24572574

  12. Monitoring and mapping selected riparian habitat along the lower Snake River

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, J. L; Tiller, B. L; Witter, M.; Mazaika, R.

    1996-01-01

    Studies in this document were initiated to establish baseline information on riparian and wetland habitat conditions at the areas studied under the current reservoir