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Sample records for selective brain cooling

  1. Selective Brain Cooling Reduces Water Turnover in Dehydrated Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, W. Maartin; Hetem, Robyn S.; Mitchell, Duncan; Maloney, Shane K.; Meyer, Leith C. R.; Fuller, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In artiodactyls, arterial blood destined for the brain can be cooled through counter-current heat exchange within the cavernous sinus via a process called selective brain cooling. We test the hypothesis that selective brain cooling, which results in lowered hypothalamic temperature, contributes to water conservation in sheep. Nine Dorper sheep, instrumented to provide measurements of carotid blood and brain temperature, were dosed with deuterium oxide (D2O), exposed to heat for 8 days (40◦C for 6-h per day) and deprived of water for the last five days (days 3 to 8). Plasma osmolality increased and the body water fraction decreased over the five days of water deprivation, with the sheep losing 16.7% of their body mass. Following water deprivation, both the mean 24h carotid blood temperature and the mean 24h brain temperature increased, but carotid blood temperature increased more than did brain temperature resulting in increased selective brain cooling. There was considerable inter-individual variation in the degree to which individual sheep used selective brain cooling. In general, sheep spent more time using selective brain cooling, and it was of greater magnitude, when dehydrated compared to when they were euhydrated. We found a significant positive correlation between selective brain cooling magnitude and osmolality (an index of hydration state). Both the magnitude of selective brain cooling and the proportion of time that sheep spent selective brain cooling were negatively correlated with water turnover. Sheep that used selective brain cooling more frequently, and with greater magnitude, lost less water than did conspecifics using selective brain cooling less efficiently. Our results show that a 50kg sheep can save 2.6L of water per day (~60% of daily water intake) when it employs selective brain cooling for 50% of the day during heat exposure. We conclude that selective brain cooling has a water conservation function in artiodactyls. PMID:25675092

  2. Selective Brain Cooling after Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects of Three Different Cooling Methods-Case Report.

    PubMed

    Westermaier, Thomas; Nickl, Robert; Koehler, Stefan; Fricke, Patrick; Stetter, Christian; Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo

    2016-12-30

    Background In experimental models of neuronal damage, therapeutic hypothermia proved to be a powerful neuroprotective method. In clinical studies of traumatic brain injury (TBI), this very distinct effect was not reproducible. Several meta-analyses draw different conclusions about whether therapeutic hypothermia can improve outcome after TBI. Adverse side effects of systemic hypothermia, such as severe pneumonia, have been held responsible by some authors to counteract the neuroprotective effect. Selective brain cooling (SBC) attempts to take advantage of the protective effects of therapeutic hypothermia without the adverse side effects of systemic hypothermia. Methods Three different methods of SBC were applied in a patient who had severe TBI with recurrent increases of intracranial pressure (ICP) refractory to conventional forms of treatment: (1) external cooling of the scalp and neck using ice packs prior to hemicraniectomy, (2) external cooling of the craniectomy defect using ice packs after hemicraniectomy, and (3) cooling by epidural irrigation with cold Ringer solution after hemicraniectomy. Results External scalp cooling before hemicraniectomy, external cooling of the craniectomy defect, and epidural irrigation with cold fluid resulted in temperature differences (brain temperature to body temperature) of - 0.2°, - 0.7°, and - 3.6°C, respectively. ICP declined with decreasing brain temperature. Conclusion Previous external cooling attempts for SBC faced the problem that brain temperature could not be lowered without a simultaneous decrease of systemic temperature. After hemicraniectomy, epidural irrigation with cold fluid may be a simple and effective way to lower ICP and apply one of the most powerful methods of cerebroprotection after severe TBI.

  3. Selective brain cooling and its vascular basis in diving seals.

    PubMed

    Blix, Arnoldus Schytte; Walløe, Lars; Messelt, Edward B; Folkow, Lars P

    2010-08-01

    Brain (T(brain)), intra-aorta (T(aorta)), latissimus dorsi muscle (T(m)) and rectal temperature (T(r)) were measured in harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals during experimental dives in 4 degrees C water. The median brain cooling was about 1 degrees C during 15 min diving, but in some cases it was as much as 2.5 degrees C. Cooling rates were slow for the first couple of minutes, but increased significantly after about 5 min of diving. The onset of cooling sometimes occurred before the start of the dive, confirming that the cooling is under cortical control, like the rest of the diving responses. T(aorta) also fell significantly, and was always lower than T(brain), while T(m) was fairly stable during dives. Detailed studies of the vascular anatomy of front flippers revealed that brachial arterial blood can be routed either through flipper skin capillaries for nutritive purposes and return through sophisticated vascular heat exchangers to avoid heat loss to the environment, or, alternatively, through numerous arterio-venous shunts in the skin and return by way of large superficial veins, which then carry cold blood to the heart. In the latter situation the extent to which the brain is cooled is determined by the ratio of carotid to brachial arterial blood flow, and water temperature, and the cooling is selective in that only those organs that are circulated will be cooled. It is concluded that T(brain) is actively down-regulated during diving, sometimes by as much as 2.5 degrees C, whereby cerebral oxygen requirements may be reduced by as much as 25% during extended dives.

  4. Three African antelope species with varying water dependencies exhibit similar selective brain cooling.

    PubMed

    Strauss, W Maartin; Hetem, Robyn S; Mitchell, Duncan; Maloney, Shane K; Meyer, Leith C R; Fuller, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The use of selective brain cooling, where warm arterial blood destined for the brain is cooled in the carotid rete via counter-current heat exchange when in close proximity to cooler venous blood, contributes to the conservation of body water. We simultaneously measured carotid blood and hypothalamic temperature in four gemsbok, five red hartebeest and six blue wildebeest to assess the extent to which these free-living animals, with varying water dependency, routinely rely on selective brain cooling. We investigated the hypothesis that innate differences in selective brain cooling exist in large, sympatric artiodactyls with varying water dependency. All three species used selective brain cooling, without any discernible differences in three selective brain cooling indices. GLMMs revealed no species differences in the threshold temperature for selective brain cooling (z = 0.79, P = 0.43), the magnitude (z = -0.51, P = 0.61), or the frequency of selective brain cooling use (z = -0.47, P = 0.64), after controlling for carotid blood temperature and black globe temperature. Comparison of anatomical attributes of the carotid retes of the three species revealed that the volume (F 2,9 = 5.54, P = 0.03) and height (F 2,9 = 5.43, P = 0.03) of the carotid rete, per kilogram body mass, were greater in the red hartebeest than in the blue wildebeest. Nevertheless, intraspecific variability in the magnitude, the frequency of use, and the threshold temperature for selective brain cooling exceeded any interspecific variability in the three indices of selective brain cooling. We conclude that the three species have similar underlying ability to make use of selective brain cooling in an environment with freely available water. It remains to be seen to what extent these three species would rely on selective brain cooling, as a water conservation mechanism, when challenged by aridity, a condition likely to become prevalent throughout much of southern Africa under future climate change

  5. Selective brain cooling in Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx): a physiological mechanism for coping with aridity?

    PubMed

    Hetem, Robyn S; Strauss, W Maartin; Fick, Linda G; Maloney, Shane K; Meyer, Leith C R; Fuller, Andrea; Shobrak, Mohammed; Mitchell, Duncan

    2012-11-15

    Selective brain cooling is a thermoregulatory effector proposed to conserve body water and, as such, may help artiodactyls cope with aridity. We measured brain and carotid blood temperature, using implanted data loggers, in five Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) in the desert of Saudi Arabia. On average, brain temperature was 0.24±0.05°C lower than carotid blood temperature for four oryx in April. Selective brain cooling was enhanced in our Arabian oryx compared with another species from the same genus (gemsbok Oryx gazella gazella) exposed to similar ambient temperatures but less aridity. Arabian oryx displayed a lower threshold (37.8±0.1°C vs 39.8±0.4°C), a higher frequency (87±6% vs 15±15%) and a higher maximum magnitude (1.2±0.2°C vs 0.5±0.3°C) of selective brain cooling than did gemsbok. The dominant male oryx displayed less selective brain cooling than did any of the other oryx, but selective brain cooling was enhanced in this oryx as conditions became hotter and drier. Enhanced selective brain cooling in Arabian oryx supports the hypothesis that selective brain cooling would bestow survival advantages for artiodactyl species inhabiting hot hyper-arid environments.

  6. Neuroprotection of Selective Brain Cooling After Penetrating Ballistic-like Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo; Lu, Xi-Chun M; Shear, Deborah A; Yang, Xiaofang; Tortella, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Induced hypothermia has been reported to provide neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury. We recently developed a novel method of selective brain cooling (SBC) and demonstrated its safety and neuroprotection efficacy in a rat model of ischemic brain injury. The primary focus of the current study was to evaluate the potential neuroprotective efficacy of SBC in a rat model of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) with a particular focus on the acute cerebral pathophysiology, neurofunction, and cognition. SBC (34°C) was induced immediately after PBBI, and maintained for 2 hours, followed by a spontaneous re-warming. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and regional cerebral blood flow were monitored continuously for 3 hours, and the ICP was measured again at 24 hours postinjury. Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier permeability, intracerebral hemorrhage, lesion size, and neurological status were assessed at 24 hours postinjury. Cognitive abilities were evaluated in a Morris water maze task at 12-16 days postinjury. Results showed that SBC significantly attenuated PBBI-induced elevation of ICP (PBBI = 33.2 ± 10.4; PBBI + SBC = 18.8 ± 6.7 mmHg) and reduced brain swelling, blood-brain barrier leakage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and lesion volume by 40%-45% for each matrix, and significantly improved neurologic function. However, these acute neuroprotective benefits of SBC did not translate into improved cognitive performance in the Morris water maze task. These results indicate that 34°C SBC is effective in protecting against acute brain damage and related neurological dysfunction. Further studies are required to establish the optimal treatment conditions (i.e., duration of cooling and/or combined therapeutic approaches) needed to achieve significant neurocognitive benefits.

  7. A New Method of Selective, Rapid Cooling of the Brain: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allers, Mats; Boris-Moeller, Fredrik; Lunderquist, Anders; Wieloch, Tadeusz

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To determine whether retrograde perfusion of cooled blood into one internal jugular vein (IJV) in the pig can selectively reduce the brain temperature without affecting the core body temperature (CBT). Methods. In 7 domestic pigs, the left IJV was catheterized on one side and a catheter placed with the tip immediately below the rete mirabile. Thermistors were placed in both brain hemispheres and the brain temperature continuously registered. Thermistors placed in the rectum registered the CBT. From a catheter in the right femoral vein blood was aspirated with the aid of a roller pump, passed through a cooling device, and infused into the catheter in the left IJV at an initial rate of 200 ml/min. Results. Immediately after the start of the infusion of cooled blood (13.8 deg. C) into the IJV, the right brain temperature started to drop from its initial 37.9 deg. C and reached 32 deg. C within 5 min. By increasing the temperature of the perfusate a further drop in the brain temperature was avoided and the brain temperature could be kept around 32 deg. C during the experiment. In 4 of the animals a heating blanket was sufficient to compensate for the slight drop in CBT during the cooling period. Conclusions. We conclude that brain temperature can be reduced in the pig by retrograde perfusion of the internal jugular vein with cooled blood and that the core body temperature can be maintained with the aid of a heating blanket.

  8. The critical limiting temperature and selective brain cooling: neuroprotection during exercise?

    PubMed

    Marino, Frank E

    2011-01-01

    There is wide consensus that long duration exercise in the heat is impaired compared with cooler conditions. A common observation when examining exercise tolerance in the heat in laboratory studies is the critical limiting core temperature (CLT) and the apparent attenuation in central nervous system (CNS) drive leading to premature fatigue. Selective brain cooling (SBC) purportedly confers neuroprotection during exercise heat stress by attenuating the increase in brain temperature. As the CLT is dependent on heating to invoke a reduction in efferent drive, it is thus not compatible with SBC which supposedly attenuates the rise in brain temperature. Therefore, the CLT and SBC hypotheses cannot be complimentary if the goal is to confer neuroprotection from thermal insult as it is counter-intuitive to selectively cool the brain if the purpose of rising brain temperature is to down-regulate skeletal muscle recruitment. This presents a circular model for which there is no apparent end to the ultimate physiological outcome; a 'hot brain' selectively cooled in order to reduce the CNS drive to skeletal muscle. This review will examine the postulates of the CLT and SBC with their relationship to the avoidance of a 'hot brain' which together argue for a theoretical position against neuroprotection as the key physiological strategy in exercise-induced hyperthermia.

  9. Tympanic temperature is not suited to indicate selective brain cooling in humans: a re-evaluation of the thermophysiological basics.

    PubMed

    Simon, Eckhart

    2007-09-01

    Selective brain cooling in humans, with venous blood returning from the head surface as the relevant heat sink, was proposed more than two decades ago as a mechanism protecting the brain against damage in hyperthermic conditions. Brain cooling was inferred from decreases of tympanic temperature under the premise that it reflected brain temperature closely, even in conditions of external head cooling. In mammals with a well-developed carotid rete selective brain cooling and its quantitative relevance are experimentally well established by directly monitoring brain temperature. For humans, however, the dispute about the existence and physiological relevance of selective brain cooling has remained unsettled, especially, as far as arguments have been exchanged on the basis of thermophysiological data and model calculations considering brain metabolism, brain hemodynamics and the anatomical preconditions for arterio-venous heat exchange. In this essay two seminal studies in support of the existence of human selective brain cooling in the condition of exercise hyperthermia, with and without dehydration, are re-examined from two points of view: first the stringency of the working hypotheses underlying data evaluation and their subsequent fate. Second the minimum theoretical requirements for data interpretation. The working hypotheses supporting data interpretation in favor of selective brain cooling in humans were heuristic and/or had become questionable at the dates of their application; today, they may be considered as outdated. Data interpretation becomes most conclusive, if tympanic temperature simply is not taken into account.

  10. A theoretical model of selective cooling using intracarotid cold saline infusion in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Konstas, Angelos-Aristeidis; Neimark, Matthew A; Laine, Andrew F; Pile-Spellman, John

    2007-04-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical model was developed to examine the transient and steady-state temperature distribution in the human brain during selective brain cooling (SBC) by unilateral intracarotid freezing-cold saline infusion. To determine the combined effect of hemodilution and hypothermia from the cold saline infusion, data from studies investigating the effect of these two parameters on cerebral blood flow (CBF) were pooled, and an analytic expression describing the combined effect of the two factors was derived. The Pennes bioheat equation used the thermal properties of the different cranial layers and the effect of cold saline infusion on CBF to propagate the evolution of brain temperature. A healthy brain and a brain with stroke (ischemic core and penumbra) were modeled. CBF and metabolic rate data were reduced to simulate the core and penumbra. Simulations using different saline flow rates were performed. The results suggested that a flow rate of 30 ml/min is sufficient to induce moderate hypothermia within 10 min in the ipsilateral hemisphere. The brain with stroke cooled to lower temperatures than the healthy brain, mainly because the stroke limited the total intracarotid blood flow. Gray matter cooled twice as fast as white matter. The continuously falling hematocrit was the main time-limiting factor, restricting the SBC to a maximum of 3 h. The study demonstrated that SBC by intracarotid saline infusion is feasible in humans and may be the fastest method of hypothermia induction.

  11. Brain thermal inertia, but no evidence for selective brain cooling, in free-ranging western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus).

    PubMed

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Kamerman, Peter R; Mitchell, Graham; Mitchell, Duncan

    2009-04-01

    Marsupials reportedly can implement selective brain cooling despite lacking a carotid rete. We measured brain (hypothalamic) and carotid arterial blood temperatures every 5 min for 5, 17, and 63 days in spring in three free-living western grey kangaroos. Body temperature was highest during the night, and decreased rapidly early in the morning, reaching a nadir at 10:00. The highest body temperatures recorded occurred sporadically in the afternoon, presumably associated with exercise. Hypothalamic temperature consistently exceeded arterial blood temperature, by an average 0.3 degrees C, except during these afternoon events when hypothalamic temperature lagged behind, and was occasionally lower than, the simultaneous arterial blood temperature. The reversal in temperatures resulted from the thermal inertia of the brain; changes in the brain to arterial blood temperature difference were related to the rate of change of arterial blood temperature on both heating and cooling (P < 0.001 for all three kangaroos). We conclude that these data are not evidence for active selective brain cooling in kangaroos. The effect of thermal inertia on brain temperature is larger than might be expected in the grey kangaroo, a discrepancy that we speculate derives from the unique vascular anatomy of the marsupial brain.

  12. In cold blood: intraarteral cold infusions for selective brain cooling in stroke.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Elga; Ebner, Matthias; Ziemann, Ulf; Poli, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Hypothermia is a promising therapeutic option for stroke patients and an established neuroprotective treatment for global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. While whole body cooling is a feasible approach in intubated and sedated patients, its application in awake stroke patients is limited by severe side effects: Strong shivering rewarms the body and potentially worsens ischemic conditions because of increased O2 consumption. Drugs used for shivering control frequently cause sedation that increases the risk of aspiration and pneumonia. Selective brain cooling by intraarterial cold infusions (IACIs) has been proposed as an alternative strategy for patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke. Preclinical studies and early clinical experience indicate that IACI induce a highly selective brain temperature decrease within minutes and reach targeted hypothermia 10 to 30 times faster than conventional cooling methods. At the same time, body core temperature remains largely unaffected, thus systemic side effects are potentially diminished. This review critically discusses the limitations and side effects of current cooling techniques for neuroprotection from ischemic brain damage and summarizes the available evidence regarding advantages and potential risks of IACI.

  13. Brain cooling therapy.

    PubMed

    Gancia, P; Pomero, G

    2010-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (whole body or selective head cooling) is becoming standard of care for brain injury in infants with perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Brain cooling reduces the rate of apoptosis and early necrosis, reduces cerebral metabolic rate and the release of nitric oxide and free radicals. Animal models of perinatal brain injury show histological and functional improvement due to of early hypothermia. The brain protection depends on the temperature and time delay between insult and beginning of treatment (more effective with cooling to 33 +/- 0.5 degrees C, and less than 6 hours after hypoxic-ischemic insult). Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews in human neonates show reduction in mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental disability at 12-24 months of age, with more favourable effects in the less severe forms of HIE. The authors describe their experience in 53 term newborns with moderate-severe HIE treated with whole body cooling between 2001 and 2009, and studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and general movements (GMs) assessment. The creation of a network connecting the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with the level I-II hospitals of the reference area, as part of regional network, is of paramount importance to enroll potential candidates and to start therapeutic hypothermia within optimal time window.

  14. Selective brain cooling seems to be a mechanism leading to human craniofacial diversity observed in different geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Irmak, M K; Korkmaz, A; Erogul, O

    2004-01-01

    Selective brain cooling (SBC) can occur in hyperthermic humans despite the fact that humans have no carotid rete, a vascular structure that facilitates countercurrent heat exchange located at the base of the skull in some mammals. Emissary and angular veins, upper respiratory tract, tympanic cavity and cerebrospinal fluid are major components of SBC system in humans. The efficiency of SBC is increased by evaporation of sweat on the head and by ventilation through the nose, but it is surprising to find out that mammals do not display SBC during exercise hyperthermia. What is the explanation then for the SBC at high body temperatures? Our hypothesis is that selective brain cooling protects the brain from thermal damage in a long-standing manner by allowing adaptive mechanisms to change the craniofacial morphology appropriate for different environmental conditions. Since the brain can only be as big that can cool, it is not surprising to find a lower (below 1300 cm(3)) cranial volume in Australian Aborigines with respect to the one (over 1450 cm(3)) in Eskimos. In addition to lower brain volume, other craniofacial features such as thick everted lips, broader nasal cavity and bigger paranasal sinuses that provide more evaporating surfaces seem to be anatomical variations developed in time for an effective SBC in hot climates. It was reported previously that these biological adaptations result from the tissues of neural crest origin. Among the crest derivatives, leptomeninges (pia and arachnoid mater), skeletal and connective tissues of the face and much of the skull seem to be structures upon which environment operates to produce more convenient craniofacial morphology for an effective SBC. In conclusion, selective brain cooling seems to be a mechanism leading to adaptive craniofacial diversity observed in different geographical regions. Thus, SBC is necessary for long-term biological adaptation, not for protecting the brain from acute thermal damage.

  15. Human paranasal sinuses and selective brain cooling: a ventilation system activated by yawning?

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Hack, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    The function of the paranasal sinuses has been a controversial subject since the time of Galen, with many different theories advanced about their biological significance. For one, the paranasal sinuses have been regarded as warmers of respiratory air, when in actuality these structures appear to function in cooling the blood. In fact, human paranasal sinuses have been shown to have higher volumes in individuals living in warmer climates, and thus may be considered radiators of the brain. The literature suggests that the transfer of cool venous blood from the paranasal sinuses to the dura mater may provide a mechanism for the convection process of cooling produced by the evaporation of mucus within human sinuses. In turn, the dura mater may transmit these temperature changes, initiated by the cool venous blood from the heat-dissipating surfaces of the sinuses, to the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated in cadaveric dissections that the thin bony posterior wall of the maxillary sinus serves as an origin for both medial and lateral pterygoid muscle segments, an anatomic finding that had been previously underappreciated in the literature. The present authors hypothesize that the thin posterior wall of the maxillary sinus may flex during yawning, operating like a bellows pump, actively ventilating the sinus system, and thus facilitating brain cooling. Such a powered ventilation system has not previously been described in humans, although an analogous system has been reported in birds.

  16. Rapid and selective brain cooling method using vortex tube: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel; Keenliside, Lynn; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-05-01

    Vortex tubes are simple mechanical devices to produce cold air from a stream of compressed air without any moving parts. The primary focus of the current study is to investigate the feasibility and efficiency of nasopharyngeal brain cooling method using a vortex tube. Experiments were conducted on 5 juvenile pigs. Nasopharygeal brain cooling was achieved by directing cooled air via a catheter in each nostril into the nasal cavities. A vortex tube was used to generate cold air using various sources of compressed air: (I) hospital medical air outlet (n = 1); (II) medical air cylinders (n = 3); and (III) scuba (diving) cylinders (n = 1). By using compressed air from a hospital medical air outlet at fixed inlet pressure of 50 PSI, maximum brain-rectal temperature gradient of -2°C was reached about 45-60 minutes by setting the flow rate of 25 L/min and temperature of -7°C at the cold air outlet. Similarly, by using medical air cylinders at fill-pressure of 2265 PSI and down regulate the inlet pressure to the vortex tube to 50 PSI, brain temperature could be reduced more rapidly by blowing -22°C ± 2°C air at a flow rate of 50 L/min; brain-body temperature gradient of -8°C was obtained about 30 minutes. Furthermore, we examined scuba cylinders as a portable source of compressed gas supply to the vortex tube. Likewise, by setting up the vortex tube to have an inlet pressure of 25 PSI and 50 L/min and -3°C at the cold air outlet, brain temperature decreased 4.5°C within 10-20 min.

  17. Delayed hypothermia as selective head cooling or whole body cooling does not protect brain or body in newborn pig subjected to hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mathias; Tooley, James R; Satas, Saulius; Hobbs, Catherine E; Chakkarapani, Ela; Stone, Janet; Porter, Helen; Thoresen, Marianne

    2008-07-01

    The neuroprotective efficacy of hypothermia (HT) after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) falls dramatically the longer the delay in initiating HT. Knowledge is scarce regarding protective or adverse effects of HT in organs beyond the brain. In addition, the relative effectiveness of selective head cooling (SHC) and whole body cooling (WBC) has not been studied. We aimed to examine whether 24 h HT, initiated 3 h after global HI is brain- and/or organ-protective using pathology, neurology, and biochemical markers. Fifty, brain injury. Animals were randomized to normothermia (NT), (Trectal) 39.0 degrees C, SHCTrectal 34.5 degrees C, or WBCTrectal 34.5 degrees C for 24 h, all followed by 48 h NT. There was no difference in injury to the brain or organs between groups. There was no gender difference in brain injury but females had significantly more organs injured [2.3 (+/- 1.3) [mean +/- SD] vs. 1.4 +/- (1.0)]. The postinsult decline in lactate was temperature independent. However, HT animals normalized their plasma-calcium, magnesium, and potassium significantly faster than NT. Delayed SHC or WBC, initiated 3 h after HI, does not reduce pathology in the brain nor in organs. Delayed HT improves postinsult recovery of plasma-calcium, magnesium, and potassium. There were no differences in adverse effects across groups.

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation of Neuroprotection Achieved by Extended Selective Brain Cooling Therapy in a Rat Model of Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Shear, Deborah A; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Chen, Zhiyong; Tortella, Frank C

    2016-03-01

    Brain hypothermia has been considered as a promising alternative to whole-body hypothermia in treating acute neurological disease, for example, traumatic brain injury. Previously, we demonstrated that 2-hours selective brain cooling (SBC) effectively mitigated acute (≤24 hours postinjury) neurophysiological dysfunction induced by a penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in rats. This study evaluated neuroprotective effects of extended SBC (4 or 8 hours in duration) on sub-acute secondary injuries between 3 and 21 days postinjury (DPI). SBC (34°C) was achieved via extraluminal cooling of rats' bilateral common carotid arteries (CCA). Depending on the experimental design, SBC was introduced either immediately or with a 2- or 4-hour delay after PBBI and maintained for 4 or 8 hours. Neuroprotective effects of SBC were evaluated by measuring brain lesion volume, axonal injury, neuroinflammation, motor and cognitive functions, and post-traumatic seizures. Compared to untreated PBBI animals, 4 or 8 hours SBC treatment initiated immediately following PBBI produced comparable neuroprotective benefits against PBBI-induced early histopathology at 3 DPI as evidenced by significant reductions in brain lesion volume, axonal pathology (beta-amyloid precursor protein staining), neuroinflammation (glial fibrillary acetic protein stained-activated astrocytes and rat major histocompatibility complex class I stained activated microglial cell), and post-traumatic nonconvulsive seizures. In the later phase of the injury (7-21 DPI), significant improvement on motor function (rotarod test) was observed under most SBC protocols, including the 2-hour delay in SBC initiation. However, SBC treatment failed to improve cognitive performance (Morris water maze test) measured 13-17 DPI. The protective effects of SBC on delayed axonal injury (silver staining) were evident out to 14 DPI. In conclusion, the CCA cooling method of SBC produced neuroprotection measured across multiple

  19. Comprehensive Evaluation of Neuroprotection Achieved by Extended Selective Brain Cooling Therapy in a Rat Model of Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shear, Deborah A.; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Chen, Zhiyong; Tortella, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    Brain hypothermia has been considered as a promising alternative to whole-body hypothermia in treating acute neurological disease, for example, traumatic brain injury. Previously, we demonstrated that 2-hours selective brain cooling (SBC) effectively mitigated acute (≤24 hours postinjury) neurophysiological dysfunction induced by a penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in rats. This study evaluated neuroprotective effects of extended SBC (4 or 8 hours in duration) on sub-acute secondary injuries between 3 and 21 days postinjury (DPI). SBC (34°C) was achieved via extraluminal cooling of rats' bilateral common carotid arteries (CCA). Depending on the experimental design, SBC was introduced either immediately or with a 2- or 4-hour delay after PBBI and maintained for 4 or 8 hours. Neuroprotective effects of SBC were evaluated by measuring brain lesion volume, axonal injury, neuroinflammation, motor and cognitive functions, and post-traumatic seizures. Compared to untreated PBBI animals, 4 or 8 hours SBC treatment initiated immediately following PBBI produced comparable neuroprotective benefits against PBBI-induced early histopathology at 3 DPI as evidenced by significant reductions in brain lesion volume, axonal pathology (beta-amyloid precursor protein staining), neuroinflammation (glial fibrillary acetic protein stained-activated astrocytes and rat major histocompatibility complex class I stained activated microglial cell), and post-traumatic nonconvulsive seizures. In the later phase of the injury (7–21 DPI), significant improvement on motor function (rotarod test) was observed under most SBC protocols, including the 2-hour delay in SBC initiation. However, SBC treatment failed to improve cognitive performance (Morris water maze test) measured 13–17 DPI. The protective effects of SBC on delayed axonal injury (silver staining) were evident out to 14 DPI. In conclusion, the CCA cooling method of SBC produced neuroprotection measured across multiple

  20. Angularis oculi vein blood flow modulates the magnitude but not the control of selective brain cooling in sheep.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Andrea; Hetem, Robyn S; Meyer, Leith C R; Maloney, Shane K

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the role of the angularis oculi vein (AOV) in selective brain cooling (SBC), we measured brain and carotid blood temperatures in six adult female Dorper sheep. Halfway through the study, a section of the AOV, just caudal to its junction with the dorsal nasal vein, was extirpated on both sides. Before and after AOV surgery, the sheep were housed outdoors at 21-22°C and were exposed in a climatic chamber to daytime heat (40°C) and water deprivation for 5 days. In sheep outdoors, SBC was significantly lower after the AOV had been cut, with its 24-h mean reduced from 0.25 to 0.01°C (t(5) = 3.06, P = 0.03). Carotid blood temperature also was lower (by 0.28°C) at all times of day (t(5) = 3.68, P = 0.01), but the pattern of brain temperature was unchanged. The mean threshold temperature for SBC was not different before (38.85 ± 0.28°C) and after (38.85 ± 0.39°C) AOV surgery (t(5) =0.00, P = 1.00), but above the threshold, SBC magnitude was about twofold less after surgery. SBC after AOV surgery also was less during heat exposure and water deprivation. However, SBC increased progressively by the same magnitude (0.4°C) over the period of water deprivation, and return of drinking water led to rapid cessation of SBC in sheep before and after AOV surgery. We conclude that the AOV is not the only conduit for venous drainage contributing to SBC in sheep and that, contrary to widely held opinion, control of SBC does not involve changes in the vasomotor state of the AOV.

  1. Theoretical limits on brain cooling by external head cooling devices

    PubMed Central

    Sukstanskii, A. L.; Yablonskiy, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that mild hypothermia is a rather promising therapy for acute brain injury in neonates. Because measurement of the resultant cooling of human brain in vivo is beyond current technology, an understanding of physical factors limiting the possible brain cooling would be a substantial achievement. Herein brain cooling by external head cooling devices is studied within the framework of an analytical model of temperature distribution in the brain. Theoretical limits on brain hypothermia induced by such devices are established. Analytical expressions are obtained that allow evaluation of changes in brain temperature under the influence of measurable input parameters. We show that a mild hypothermia can be successfully induced in neonates only if two necessary conditions are fulfilled: sufficiently low cerebral blood flow and sufficiently high value of the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat exchange between the head surface and a cooling device. PMID:17429678

  2. Influence of selective brain cooling on the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA and infiltration of PMNLs and monocytes/macrophages in rats suffering from global brain ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianping; Xu, Jianguo; Li, Weiyan; Liu, Jian

    2008-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of selective brain cooling on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) and monocytes/macrophages (MPhi) during global cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R). Global ischemia of the brain was produced by four-vessel occlusion for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 240 min. Thirty-five SD rats were randomly divided into five groups: group I had no ischemia and reperfusion; groups II, III, IV, and V were subjected to ischemia for 30 min at 37 degrees C and reperfusion for 240 min at 37, 35, 32, and 28 degrees C, respectively. Cerebral tissue samples were taken for pathological examination of the infiltration of PMNLs and MPhi and to detect ICAM-1 mRNA expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of ICAM-1 mRNA and infiltration of PMNLs and MPhi increased more markedly in group II than in group I (p < 0.01), suggesting that hypothermia evidently inhibited ICAM-1 mRNA expression and PMNL and MPhi infiltration in the damaged cerebral tissue. In addition, significant differences were also found between group III and group II (p < 0.05) and among groups IV, V, and II (p < 0.01). These results suggest that I/R injury induces ICAM-1 mRNA expression and PMNL and MPhi infiltration in SD rats and that selective brain cooling, and especially moderate hypothermia (28-32 degrees C), may provide better cerebral protection by markedly inhibiting the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA while decreasing the infiltration of PMNLs and MPhi in the brain.

  3. Modelling Brain Temperature and Cerebral Cooling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Direct measurement of cerebral temperature is invasive and impractical meaning treatments for reduction of core brain temperature rely on predictive mathematical models. Current models rely on continuum equations which heavily simplify thermal interactions between blood and tissue. A novel two-phase 3D porous-fluid model is developed to address these limitations. The model solves porous flow equations in 3D along with energy transport equation in both the blood and tissue phases including metabolic generation. By incorporating geometry data extracted from MRI scans, 3D vasculature can be inserted into a porous brain structure to realistically represent blood distribution within the brain. Therefore, thermal transport and convective heat transfer of blood are solved by means of direct numerical simulations. In application, results show that external scalp cooling has a higher impact on both maximum and average core brain temperatures than previously predicted. Additionally, the extent of alternative treatment methods such as pharyngeal cooling and carotid infusion can be investigated using this model. Acknowledgement: EPSRC DTA.

  4. Brain cooling maintenance with cooling cap following induction with intracarotid cold saline infusion: a quantitative model.

    PubMed

    Neimark, Matthew A; Konstas, Angelos-Aristeidis; Choi, Jae H; Laine, Andrew F; Pile-Spellman, John

    2008-07-21

    Intracarotid cold saline infusion (ICSI) is potentially much faster than whole-body cooling and more effective than cooling caps in inducing therapeutic brain cooling. One drawback of ICSI is hemodilution and volume loading. We hypothesized that cooling caps could enhance brain cooling with ICSI and minimize hemodilution and volume loading. Six-hour-long simulations were performed in a 3D mathematical brain model. The Pennes bioheat equation was used to propagate brain temperature. Convective heat transfer through jugular venous return and the circle of Willis was simulated. Hemodilution and volume loading were modeled using a two-compartment saline infusion model. A feedback method of local brain temperature control was developed where ICSI flow rate was varied based on the rate of temperature change and the deviation of temperature to a target (32 degrees C) within a voxel in the treated region of brain. The simulations confirmed the inability of cooling caps alone to induce hypothermia. In the ICSI and the combination models (ICSI and cap), the control algorithm guided ICSI to quickly achieve and maintain the target temperature. The combination model had lower ICSI flow rates than the ICSI model resulting in a 55% reduction of infusion volume over a 6h period and higher hematocrit values compared to the ICSI model. Moreover, in the combination model, the ICSI flow rate decreased to zero after 4h, and hypothermia was subsequently maintained solely by the cooling cap. This is the first study supporting a role of cooling caps in therapeutic hypothermia in adults.

  5. Brain temperature changes during selective cooling with endovascular intracarotid cold saline infusion: simulation using human data fitted with an integrated mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Neimark, Matthew Aaron Harold; Konstas, Angelos Aristeidis; Lee, Leslie; Laine, Andrew Francis; Pile-Spellman, John; Choi, Jae

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of rapid cerebral hypothermia induction in humans with intracarotid cold saline infusion (ICSI) was investigated using a hybrid approach of jugular venous bulb temperature (JVBT) sampling and mathematical modeling of transient and steady state brain temperature distribution. This study utilized both forward mathematical modeling, in which brain temperatures were predicted based on input saline temperatures, and inverse modeling, where brain temperatures were inferred based on JVBT. Changes in ipsilateral anterior circulation territory temperature (IACT) were estimated in eight patients as a result of 10 min of a cold saline infusion of 33 ml/min. During ICSI, the measured JVBT dropped by 0.76±0.18°C while the modeled JVBT decreased by 0.86±0.18°C. The modeled IACT decreased by 2.1±0.23°C. In the inverse model, IACT decreased by 1.9±0.23°C. The results of this study suggest that mild cerebral hypothermia can be induced rapidly and safely with ICSI in the neuroangiographical setting. The JVBT corrected mathematical model can be used as a non-invasive estimate of transient and steady state cerebral temperature changes.

  6. Pharmacological brain cooling with indomethacin in acute hemorrhagic stroke: antiinflammatory cytokines and antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Dohi, K; Jimbo, H; Ikeda, Y; Fujita, S; Ohtaki, H; Shioda, S; Abe, T; Aruga, T

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a novel pharmacological brain cooling (PBC) method with indomethacin (IND), a nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, without the use of cooling blankets in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Forty-six patients with hemorrhagic stroke (subarachnoid hemorrhage; n = 35, intracerebral hemorrhage; n = 11) were enrolled in this study. Brain temperature was measured directly with a temperature sensor. Patients were cooled by administering transrectal IND (100 mg) and a modified nasopharyngeal cooling method (positive selective brain cooling) initially. Brain temperature was controlled with IND 6 mg/kg/day for 14 days. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of interleukin-1beta (CSF IL-1beta) and serum bilirubin levels were measured at 1, 2, 4, and 7 days. The incidence of complicating symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage was lower than in non-PBC patients. CSF IL-1beta and serum bilirubin levels were suppressed in treated patients. IND has several beneficial effects on damaged brain tissues (anticytokine, free radical scavenger, antiprostaglandin effects, etc.) and prevents initial and secondary brain damage. PBC treatment for hemorrhagic stroke in patients appears to yield favorable results by acting as an antiinflammatory cytokine and reducing oxidative stress.

  7. Spatially-selective optical pumping cooling and Two-Isotope Collision-Assisted Zeeman cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rebekah Ferrier

    In this thesis I describe two non-evaporative cooling schemes for cooling Rb atoms. The first is a Sisyphus-like ultracold gas cooling scheme called Spatially-selecTive Optical Pumping (STOP) cooling. In principle, STOP cooling has wide applicability to both atoms and molecules. STOP cooling works by exploiting the fact that atoms or molecules in a confining potential can be optically pumped out of an otherwise dark state in a spatially-selective way. Selecting atoms or molecules for optical pumping out of a dark state in a region of high potential energy and then waiting a fixed time after the optical pumping allows for the creation of a group of high kinetic energy atoms or molecules moving in a known direction. These can then be slowed using external fields (such as the scattering force from a resonant laser beam) and optically pumped back into the dark state, cooling the gas and closing the cooling cycle. I present theoretical modeling of the STOP cooling technique, including predictions of achievable cooling rates. I have conducted an experimental study of the cooling technique for a single cooling cycle, observing one dimensional cooling rates in excess of 100 micro-K per second in an ultracold gas of 87 Rb atoms. I will also comment on the prospects for improving the cooling performance beyond that presented in this work. The second cooling scheme I investigated is called Two-Isotope Collision Assisted Zeeman (2-CAZ) cooling. Through a combination of spin-exchange collisions in a magnetic field and optical pumping, it is possible to cool a gas of atoms without requiring the loss of atoms from the gas. I investigated 2-CAZ cooling using 85Rb and 87Rb. I was able to experimentally confirm that the measured 2-CAZ cooling rate agreed with a cooling rate predicted though a simple analytic model. As part of the measured cooling rate, I quantitatively characterized the heating rates associated with our actual implementation of this cooling technique and found

  8. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  9. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, Joseph C.

    1997-01-01

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  10. Liquid cooled data center design selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-09-13

    Input data, specifying aspects of a thermal design of a liquid cooled data center, is obtained. The input data includes data indicative of ambient outdoor temperature for a location of the data center; and/or data representing workload power dissipation for the data center. The input data is evaluated to obtain performance of the data center thermal design. The performance includes cooling energy usage; and/or one pertinent temperature associated with the data center. The performance of the data center thermal design is output.

  11. Orientation selective deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri J.; Slopsema, Julia P.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Shatillo, Artem; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Mangia, Silvia; Sierra, Alejandra; Low, Walter C.; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Target selectivity of deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is critical, as the precise locus and pattern of the stimulation dictates the degree to which desired treatment responses are achieved and adverse side effects are avoided. There is a clear clinical need to improve DBS technology beyond currently available stimulation steering and shaping approaches. We introduce orientation selective neural stimulation as a concept to increase the specificity of target selection in DBS. Approach. This concept, which involves orienting the electric field along an axonal pathway, was tested in the corpus callosum of the rat brain by freely controlling the direction of the electric field on a plane using a three-electrode bundle, and monitoring the response of the neurons using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Computational models were developed to further analyze axonal excitability for varied electric field orientation. Main results. Our results demonstrated that the strongest fMRI response was observed when the electric field was oriented parallel to the axons, while almost no response was detected with the perpendicular orientation of the electric field relative to the primary fiber tract. These results were confirmed by computational models of the experimental paradigm quantifying the activation of radially distributed axons while varying the primary direction of the electric field. Significance. The described strategies identify a new course for selective neuromodulation paradigms in DBS based on axonal fiber orientation.

  12. An objective method for screening and selecting personal cooling systems based on cooling properties.

    PubMed

    Elson, John; Eckels, Steve

    2015-05-01

    A method is proposed for evaluation and selection of a personal cooling system (PCS) incorporating PCS, subject, and equipment weights; PCS run time; user task time; PCS cooling power; and average metabolic rate. The cooling effectiveness method presented is derived from first principles and allows those who select PCSs for specific applications to compare systems based on their projected use. This can lower testing costs by screening for the most applicable system. Methods to predict cooling power of PCSs are presented and are compared to data taken through standard manikin testing. The cooling effectiveness ranking is presented and validated against human subject test data. The proposed method provides significant insight into the application of PCS on humans. However, the interaction a humans with a PCS is complex, especially considering the range of clothing ensembles, physiological issues, and end use scenarios, and requires additional analysis.

  13. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  14. Natural cooling of the brain during outdoor bicycling?

    PubMed

    Nielsen, B

    1988-04-01

    Tympanic membrane temperature (Ttymp) and deep esophageal temperature (Tes) were measured in 8 subjects during normal outdoor bicycling. Metabolic rate (VO2) was determined by the Douglas bag method. Heart rate was sampled continuously. Skin surface temperatures were measured at the forehead, chest and shoulder, and core temperatures in the deep esophagus and at the tympanic membrane using a radio telemetry system. For each outdoor experiment an indoor experiment in a climatic chamber, adjusted to the same air temperature but in still air, was performed. The subjects exercised at the same VO2 as in the outdoor trial on a stationary bicycle ergometer. Measurements were taken with the same equipment as in the outdoor experiments. O2-consumption (l.min-1) and heart rates (beats.min-1) were similar during outdoor and indoor bicycling, averaging 2.38 +/- 0.018 (SE) and 2.26 +/- 0.07, 141 +/- 7 and 147 +/- 8, respectively. During steady state Tes was the same during outdoor and indoor bicycling (37.95 degrees C), while Ttymp was significantly lower during outdoor bicycling. delta (Tes-Ttymp) was 1.25 degrees C during outdoor and 0.5 degrees C during indoor exercise. It is concluded that, if tympanic temperature is lowered by counter-current cooling of its arterial supply, then cooling of the brain may also take place in humans during physical activity under normal outdoor conditions with convective air movements. But the magnitude of a possible brain cooling cannot be deduced from the fall in tympanic temperature.

  15. A mathematical model of endovascular heat transfer for human brain cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan Carlos; Yon, Steven; Magers, Mike; Dobak, John

    2000-11-01

    Selective cooling of the brain has been shown to exhibit protective effects in cerebral ischemia, trauma, and spinal injury/ischemia. A multi-compartment, unsteady thermal model of the response of the human brain to endovascular cooling is discussed and its results compared to recent experimental data conducted with sheep and other mammals. The model formulation is based on the extension of the bioheat equation, originally proposed by Pennes(1) and later modified by Wissler(2), Stolwijk(3) and Werner and Webb(4). The temporal response of the brain temperature and that of the various body compartments to the cooling of the blood flowing through the common carotid artery is calculated under various scenarios. The effect of the boundary conditions as well as the closure assumptions used in the model, i.e. perfusion rate, metabolism heat production, etc. on the cooling rate of the brain are systematically investigated. (1) Pennes H. H., “Analysis of tissue and arterial blood temperature in the resting forearm.” J. Appl. Physiol. 1: 93-122, 1948. (2) Wissler E. H., “Steady-state temperature distribution in man”, J. Appl. Physiol., 16: 764-740, 1961. (3) Stolwick J. A. J., “Mathematical model of thermoregulation” in “Physiological and behavioral temperature regulation”, edited by J. D. Hardy, A. P. Gagge and A. J. Stolwijk, Charles C. Thomas Publisher, Springfiels, Ill., 703-721, 1971. (4) Werner J., Webb P., “A six-cylinder model of human thermoregulation for general use on personal computers”, Ann. Physiol. Anthrop., 12(3): 123-134, 1993.

  16. On how high performers keep cool brains in situations of cognitive overload.

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, Susanne M; Buschkuehl, Martin; Etienne, Alex; Ozdoba, Christoph; Perrig, Walter J; Nirkko, Arto C

    2007-06-01

    What happens in the brain when we reach or exceed our capacity limits? Are there individual differences for performance at capacity limits? We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the impact of increases in processing demand on selected cortical areas when participants performed a parametrically varied and challenging dual task. Low-performing participants respond with large and load-dependent activation increases in many cortical areas when exposed to excessive task requirements, accompanied by decreasing performance. It seems that these participants recruit additional attentional and strategy-related resources with increasing difficulty, which are either not relevant or even detrimental to performance. In contrast, the brains of the high-performing participants "keep cool" in terms of activation changes, despite continuous correct performance, reflecting different and more efficient processing. These findings shed light on the differential implications of performance on activation patterns and underline the importance of the interindividual-differences approach in neuroimaging research.

  17. Survival Rates for Selected Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Selected Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Survival rates are often ... Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors More In Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children About Brain ...

  18. Epidermal cooling during pulsed laser treatment of selected dermatoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Anvari, Bahman; Tanenbaum, B. S.; Milner, Thomas E.; Kimel, Sol; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The clinical objective in laser treatment of selected dermatoses such as port wine stain (PWS), hemangioma and telangiectasia is to maximize thermal damage to the blood vessels, while at the same time minimizing nonspecific injury to the normal overlying epidermis. 'Dynamic' cooling of skin, whereby a cryogen is sprayed onto the surface for an appropriately short period of time (on the order of tens of milliseconds), may offer an effective method for eliminating epidermal thermal injury during laser treatment. We present theoretical and experimental investigations of the thermal response of skin to dynamic cooling in conjunction with pulsed laser irradiation at 585 nm. Computed temperature distributions indicate that cooling the skin immediately prior to pulsed laser irradiation with a cryogen spurt of tetrafluoroethane is an effective method for eliminating epidermal thermal injury during laser treatment of PWS. Experimental results show rapid reduction of skin surface temperature is obtained when using tetrafluoroethane spurts of 20 - 100 ms duration. Successful blanching of PWS without thermal injury to the overlying epidermis is accomplished.

  19. Cooling treatment transiently increases the permeability of brain capillary endothelial cells through translocation of claudin-5.

    PubMed

    Inamura, Akinori; Adachi, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Takao; He, Yeting; Tokuda, Nobuko; Nawata, Takashi; Shirao, Satoshi; Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujii, Masami; Ikeda, Eiji; Owada, Yuji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2013-08-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is formed by different cell types, of which brain microvascular endothelial cells are major structural constituents. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of cooling on the permeability of the BBB with reference to tight junction formation of brain microendothelial cells. The sensorimotor cortex above the dura mater in adult male Wistar rats was focally cooled to a temperature of 5 °C for 1 h, then immunostaining for immunoglobulin G (IgG) was performed to evaluate the permeability of the BBB. Permeability produced by cooling was also evaluated in cultured murine brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) based on measurement of trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER). Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting of proteins associated with tight junctions in bEnd3 were performed to determine protein distribution before and after cooling. After focal cooling of the rat brain cortex, diffuse immunostaining for IgG was observed primarily around the small vasculature and in the extracellular spaces of parenchyma of the cortex. In cultured bEnd3, TEER significantly decreased during cooling (15 °C) and recovered to normal levels after rewarming to 37 °C. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting showed that claudin-5, a critical regulatory protein for tight junctions, was translocated from the membrane to the cytoplasm after cooling in cultured bEnd3 cells. These results suggest that focal brain cooling may open the BBB transiently through an effect on tight junctions of brain microendothelial cells, and that therapeutically this approach may allow control of BBB function and drug delivery through the BBB.

  20. Influence of cooling rate on activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors in brain slices at hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Mokrushin, Anatoly A; Pavlinova, Larisa I; Borovikov, Sergey E

    2014-08-01

    Hypothermia is a known approach in the treatment of neurological pathologies. Mild hypothermia enhances the therapeutic window for application of medicines, while deep hypothermia is often accompanied by complications, including problems in the recovery of brain functions. The purpose of present study was to investigate the functioning of glutamate ionotropic receptors in brain slices cooled with different rates during mild, moderate and deep hypothermia. Using a system of gradual cooling combined with electrophysiological recordings in slices, we have shown that synaptic activity mediated by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in rat olfactory cortex was strongly dependent on the rate of lowering the temperature. High cooling rate caused a progressive decrease in glutamate receptor activity in brain slices during gradual cooling from mild to deep hypothermia. On the contrary, low cooling rate slightly changed the synaptic responses in deep hypothermia. The short-term potentiation may be induced in slices by electric tetanization at 16 °C in this case. Hence, low cooling rate promoted preservation of neuronal activity and plasticity in the brain tissue.

  1. Evaporative cooling feature selection for genotypic data involving interactions

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, B.A.; Reif, D.M.; White, B.C.; Crowe, J.E.; Moore, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: The development of genome-wide capabilities for genotyping has led to the practical problem of identifying the minimum subset of genetic variants relevant to the classification of a phenotype. This challenge is especially difficult in the presence of attribute interactions, noise and small sample size. Methods: Analogous to the physical mechanism of evaporation, we introduce an evaporative cooling (EC) feature selection algorithm that seeks to obtain a subset of attributes with the optimum information temperature (i.e. the least noise). EC uses an attribute quality measure analogous to thermodynamic free energy that combines Relief-F and mutual information to evaporate (i.e. remove) noise features, leaving behind a subset of attributes that contain DNA sequence variations associated with a given phenotype. Results: EC is able to identify functional sequence variations that involve interactions (epistasis) between other sequence variations that influence their association with the phenotype. This ability is demonstrated on simulated genotypic data with attribute interactions and on real genotypic data from individuals who experienced adverse events following smallpox vaccination. The EC formalism allows us to combine information entropy, energy and temperature into a single information free energy attribute quality measure that balances interaction and main effects. Availability: Open source software, written in Java, is freely available upon request. Contact: brett.mckinney@gmail.com PMID:17586549

  2. The effect of selective head-neck cooling on physiological and cognitive functions in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kevin; Rubin, Rachael; Van Hoeck, Nicole; Hauert, Tommy; Lana, Valentina; Wang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    In general, brain temperatures are elevated during physical sporting activities; therefore, reducing brain temperature shortly after a sports-related concussion (SRC) could be a promising intervention technique. The main objective of this study was to examine the effects of head and neck cooling on physiological and cognitive function in normal healthy volunteers. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent two different sessions of combined head and neck cooling, one session with a cold pack and one session with a room temperature pack. Physiological measurements included: systolic/diastolic blood pressure, pulse oximetry, heart rate, and sublingual and tympanic temperature. Cognitive assessment included: processing speed, executive function, and working memory tasks. Physiological measurements were taken pre-, mid- and post-cooling, while cognitive assessments were done before and after cooling. The order of the sessions was randomized. There was a significant decrease in tympanic temperature across both sessions; however more cooling occurred when the cold pack was in the device. There was no significant decrease in sublingual temperature across either session. The observed heart rates, pulse oximetry, systolic and diastolic blood pressure during the sessions were all within range of a normal healthy adult. Cognitive assessment remained stable across each session for both pre- and post-cooling. We propose that optimizing brain temperature management after brain injury using head and neck cooling technology may represent a sensible, practical, and effective strategy to potentially enhance recovery and perhaps minimize the subsequent short and long term consequences from SRC. PMID:28123796

  3. Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

    The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however

  4. A pilot study to assess the feasibility of prior scalp cooling with palliative whole brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shah, N; Groom, N; Jackson, S; Sibtain, A; Hoskin, P

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this work was to perform a feasibility study on the use of scalp cooling during palliative whole brain radiotherapy. Seven patients (1 male, 6 female) with good performance status underwent scalp cooling prior to and during radiotherapy for cerebral metastases. Five patients were prescribed 12 Gy in two fractions and two patients were prescribed 20 Gy in five fractions. Phantom thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) studies to assess the build-up effect from the scalp cap were performed. Seven out of eight patients that were offered scalp cooling completed treatment uneventfully. One patient reported discomfort on application of the scalp cap and continued treatment without scalp cooling. No patients reported other adverse effects from use of the cap during treatment or at follow-up. TLD studies demonstrated a 55-80% increase in dose to the scalp after application of the scalp cap. All patients experienced hair loss. Scalp cooling caps are well tolerated through a course of palliative whole brain radiotherapy. The scalp dose is significantly increased owing to a bolus effect from the scalp cap.

  5. Sexual selection predicts brain structure in dragon lizards.

    PubMed

    Hoops, D; Ullmann, J F P; Janke, A L; Vidal-Garcia, M; Stait-Gardner, T; Dwihapsari, Y; Merkling, T; Price, W S; Endler, J A; Whiting, M J; Keogh, J S

    2017-02-01

    Phenotypic traits such as ornaments and armaments are generally shaped by sexual selection, which often favours larger and more elaborate males compared to females. But can sexual selection also influence the brain? Previous studies in vertebrates report contradictory results with no consistent pattern between variation in brain structure and the strength of sexual selection. We hypothesize that sexual selection will act in a consistent way on two vertebrate brain regions that directly regulate sexual behaviour: the medial preoptic nucleus (MPON) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). The MPON regulates male reproductive behaviour whereas the VMN regulates female reproductive behaviour and is also involved in male aggression. To test our hypothesis, we used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging combined with traditional histology of brains in 14 dragon lizard species of the genus Ctenophorus that vary in the strength of precopulatory sexual selection. Males belonging to species that experience greater sexual selection had a larger MPON and a smaller VMN. Conversely, females did not show any patterns of variation in these brain regions. As the volumes of both these regions also correlated with brain volume (BV) in our models, we tested whether they show the same pattern of evolution in response to changes in BV and found that the do. Therefore, we show that the primary brain nuclei underlying reproductive behaviour in vertebrates can evolve in a mosaic fashion, differently between males and females, likely in response to sexual selection, and that these same regions are simultaneously evolving in concert in relation to overall brain size.

  6. Active cooling in traumatic brain-injured patients: a questionable therapy?

    PubMed

    Grände, P-O; Reinstrup, P; Romner, B

    2009-11-01

    Hypothermia is shown to be beneficial for the outcome after a transient global brain ischaemia through its neuroprotective effect. Whether this is also the case after focal ischaemia, such as following a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), has been investigated in numerous studies, some of which have shown a tendency towards an improved outcome, whereas others have not been able to demonstrate any beneficial effect. A Cochrane report concluded that the majority of the trials that have already been published have been of low quality, with unclear allocation concealment. If only high-quality trials are considered, TBI patients treated with active cooling were more likely to die, a conclusion supported by a recent high-quality Canadian trial on children. Still, there is a belief that a modified protocol with a shorter time from the accident to the start of active cooling, longer cooling and rewarming time and better control of blood pressure and intracranial pressure would be beneficial for TBI patients. This belief has led to the instigation of new trials in adults and in children, including these types of protocol adjustments. The present review provides a short summary of our present knowledge of the use of active cooling in TBI patients, and presents some tentative explanations as to why active cooling has not been shown to be effective for outcome after TBI. We focus particularly on the compromised circulation of the penumbra zone, which may be further reduced by the stress caused by the difference in thermostat and body temperature and by the hypothermia-induced more frequent use of vasoconstrictors, and by the increased risk of contusional bleedings under hypothermia. We suggest that high fever should be reduced pharmacologically.

  7. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  8. Dramatic neuronal rescue with prolonged selective head cooling after ischemia in fetal lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, A J; Gunn, T R; de Haan, H H; Williams, C E; Gluckman, P D

    1997-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a neuroprotective strategy. However, short-term cooling after hypoxia-ischemia is effective only if started immediately during resuscitation. The aim of this study was to determine whether prolonged head cooling, delayed into the late postinsult period, improves outcome from severe ischemia. Unanesthetized near term fetal sheep were subject to 30 min of cerebral ischemia. 90 min later they were randomized to either cooling (n = 9) or sham cooling (n = 7) for 72 h. Intrauterine cooling was induced by a coil around the fetal head, leading initially to a fall in extradural temperature of 5-10 degrees C, and a fall in esophageal temperature of 1.5-3 degrees C. Cooling was associated with mild transient systemic metabolic effects, but not with hypotension or altered fetal heart rate. Cerebral cooling reduced secondary cortical cytotoxic edema (P < 0.001). After 5 d of recovery there was greater residual electroencephalogram activity (-5.2+/-1.6 vs. -15.5+/-1.5 dB, P < 0.001) and a dramatic reduction in the extent of cortical infarction and neuronal loss in all regions assessed (e.g., 40 vs. 99% in the parasagittal cortex, P < 0.001). Selective head cooling, maintained throughout the secondary phase of injury, is noninvasive and safe and shows potential for improving neonatal outcome after perinatal asphyxia. PMID:9005993

  9. 'Cool and quiet' therapy for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury: A preliminary clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-He; Shang, Zhen-DE; Chen, Chao; Lu, Nan; Liu, Qi-Feng; Liu, Ming; Yan, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Malignant hyperthermia increases mortality and disability in patients with brain trauma. A clinical treatment for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, termed 'cool and quiet' therapy by the authors of the current study, was investigated. Between June 2003 and June 2013, 110 consecutive patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury were treated using mild hypothermia (35-36°C) associated with small doses of sedative and muscle relaxant. Physiological parameters and intracranial pressure were monitored, and the patients slowly rewarmed following the maintenance of mild hypothermia for 3-12 days. Consecutive patients who had undergone normothermia therapy were retrospectively analyzed as the control. In the mild hypothermia group, the recovery rate was 54.5%, the mortality rate was 22.7%, and the severe and mild disability rates were 11.8 and 10.9%, respectively. The mortality rate of the patients, particularly that of patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of between 3 and 5 differed significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (P<0.05). The mortality of patients with a GCS score of between 6 and 8 was not significantly different between the two groups (P> 0.05). The therapy using mild hypothermia with a combination of sedative and muscle relaxant was beneficial in decreasing the mortality of patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, particularly in patients with a GCS score within the range 3-5 on admission. The therapy was found to be safe, effective and convenient. However, rigorous clinical trials are required to provide evidence of the effectiveness of 'cool and quiet' therapy for hyperthermia.

  10. Selection of Cooling Water Treatment at Military Installations to Prevent Scaling and Corrosion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    AD-AO87 266 CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING RESEARCH LAB CARMY) CHAMPAIGN IL F/6 13/1 SELECTION OF COOLING WATER TREATMENT AT MILITARY INSTALLATIONS --ETCCU...States Army nCorps of Engiee r TECHNICAL REPORT M.280-... ,-itheAmy June 1980engineering .ng tJn Na1n research laboratory 2SELECTION OF COOLING WATER ...systems at Army and Air Force installations. These problems are caused by dis- solved minerals in the water and growth of algae or slime within the system

  11. A Novel Approach to Thermal Design of Solar Modules: Selective-Spectral and Radiative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xingshu; Dubey, Rajiv; Chattopadhyay, Shashwata; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Chavali, Raghu Vamsi; Silverman, Timothy J.; Kottantharayil, Anil; Vasi, Juzer; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-11-21

    For commercial solar modules, up to 80% of the incoming sunlight may be dissipated as heat, potentially raising the temperature 20-30 degrees C higher than the ambient. In the long run, extreme self-heating may erode efficiency and shorten lifetime, thereby, dramatically reducing the total energy output by almost ~10% Therefore, it is critically important to develop effective and practical cooling methods to combat PV self-heating. In this paper, we explore two fundamental sources of PV self-heating, namely, sub-bandgap absorption and imperfect thermal radiation. The analysis suggests that we redesign the optical and thermal properties of the solar module to eliminate the parasitic absorption (selective-spectral cooling) and enhance the thermal emission to the cold cosmos (radiative cooling). The proposed technique should cool the module by ~10 degrees C, to be reflected in significant long-term energy gain (~ 3% to 8% over 25 years) for PV systems under different climatic conditions.

  12. Treatments (12 and 48 h) with systemic and brain-selective hypothermia techniques after permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rat.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darren L; Penner, Mark; Wowk, Shannon; Orellana-Jordan, Ian; Colbourne, Frederick

    2009-12-01

    Mild hypothermia lessens brain injury when initiated after the onset of global or focal ischemia. The present study sought to determine whether cooling to approximately 33 degrees C provides enduring benefit when initiated 1 h after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO, via electrocautery) in adult rats and whether protection depends upon treatment duration and cooling technique. In the first experiment, systemic cooling was induced in non-anesthetized rats through a whole-body exposure technique that used fans and water mist. In comparison to normothermic controls, 12- and 48-h bouts of hypothermia significantly lessened functional impairment, such as skilled reaching ability, and lesion volume out to a 1-month survival. In the second experiment, brain-selective cooling was induced in awake rats via a water-cooled metal strip implanted underneath the temporalis muscle overlying the ischemic territory. Use of a 48-h cooling treatment significantly mitigated injury and behavioral impairment whereas a 12-h treatment did not. These findings show that while systemic and focal techniques are effective when initiated after the onset of pMCAO, they differ in efficacy depending upon the treatment duration. A direct and uncomplicated comparison between methods is problematic, however, due to unknown gradients in brain temperature and the use of two separate experiments. In summary, prolonged cooling, even when delayed after onset of pMCAO, provides enduring behavioral and histological protection sufficient to suggest that it will be clinically effective. Nonetheless, further pre-clinical work is needed to improve treatment protocols, such as identifying the optimal depth of cooling, and how these factors interact with cooling method.

  13. Wireless and batteryless biomedical microsystem for neural recording and epilepsy suppression based on brain focal cooling.

    PubMed

    Hou, K-C; Chang, C-W; Chiou, J-C; Huang, Y-H; Shaw, F-Z

    2011-12-01

    This work presents a biomedical microsystem with a wireless radiofrequency (RF)-powered electronics and versatile sensors/actuators for use in nanomedicinal diagnosis and therapy. The cooling of brain tissue has the potential to reduce the frequency and severity of epilepsy. Miniaturised spiral coils as a wireless power module with low-dropout linear regulator circuit convert RF signals into a DC voltage, can be implanted without a battery in monitoring free behaviour. A thermoelectric (TE) cooler is an actuator that is employed to cool down brain tissue to suppress epilepsy. Electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes and TE coolers are integrated to form module that is placed inside the head of a rat and fastened with a bio-compatible material. EEG signals are used to identify waveforms associated with epilepsy and are measured using readout circuits. The wireless part of the presented design achieves a low quiescent current and line/load regulation and high antenna/current efficiency with thermal protection to avoid damage to the implanted tissue. Epilepsy is suppressed by reducing the temperature to reduce the duration of this epileptic episode. Related characterisations demonstrate that the proposed design can be adopted in an effective nanomedicine microsystem.

  14. Guidelines for selecting a solar heating, cooling or hot water design

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Guidelines are presented for the professional who may have to choose between competing solar heating and cooling designs for buildings. The experience of the National Solar Data Network in monitoring over 100 solar installations are drawn upon. Three basic principles and a design selection checklist are developed which will aid in choosing the most cost effective design.

  15. Turbine cooling configuration selection and design optimization for the high-reliability gas turbine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M J; Suo, M

    1981-04-01

    The potential of advanced turbine convectively air-cooled concepts for application to the Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Advanced Liquid/Gas-Fueled Engine Program was investigated. Cooling of turbine airfoils is critical technology and significant advances in cooling technology will permit higher efficiency coal-base-fuel gas turbine energy systems. Two new airfoil construction techniques, bonded and wafer, were the principal designs considered. In the bonded construction, two airfoil sections having intricate internal cooling configurations are bonded together to form a complete blade or vane. In the wafer construction, a larger number (50 or more) of wafers having intricate cooling flow passages are bonded together to form a complete blade or vane. Of these two construction techniques, the bonded airfoil is considered to be lower in risk and closer to production readiness. Bonded airfoils are being used in aircraft engines. A variety of industrial materials were evaluated for the turbine airfoils. A columnar grain nickel alloy was selected on the basis of strength and corrosion resistance. Also, cost of electricity and reliability were considered in the final concept evaluation. The bonded airfoil design yielded a 3.5% reduction in cost-of-electricity relative to a baseline Reliable Engine design. A significant conclusion of this study was that the bonded airfoil convectively air-cooled design offers potential for growth to turbine inlet temperatures above 2600/sup 0/F with reasonable development risk.

  16. Ethnography of Cool Roof Retrofits: The Role of Rebates in the Materials Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur-Stommen, Susan

    2011-02-01

    In the summer of 2010, ethnographic research was conducted with nine households in the Bay Area and Sacramento region. The purpose of this task was to collect methodologically grounded insights into how and why consumers chose the cool roofing material they selected. These nine households comprised fifteen respondents, and their dependents. They were selected from among a pool of respondents to a mail solicitation of all Sacramento Municipal Utility District and Pacific Gas and Electric customers who had received a rebate for their cool roof retrofit. Consumers are uniformly happy with their cool roof retrofits. Consumers typically stayed very close to the aesthetic of the original roof style. Price was not a primary concern, while longevity was paramount. Consumers did not use roofing price, nor energy savings (with one exception), in tracking return on investment through energy savings. The utility rebate had little role to play in terms of incentivizing customers to choose cool materials. Contractors were critical partners in the decision-­making process.

  17. A thermal window for yawning in humans: yawning as a brain cooling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Massen, Jorg J M; Dusch, Kim; Eldakar, Omar Tonsi; Gallup, Andrew C

    2014-05-10

    The thermoregulatory theory of yawning posits that yawns function to cool the brain in part due to counter-current heat exchange with the deep inhalation of ambient air. Consequently, yawning should be constrained to an optimal thermal zone or range of temperature, i.e., a thermal window, in which we should expect a lower frequency at extreme temperatures. Previous research shows that yawn frequency diminishes as ambient temperatures rise and approach body temperature, but a lower bound to the thermal window has not been demonstrated. To test this, a total of 120 pedestrians were sampled for susceptibly to self-reported yawn contagion during distinct temperature ranges and seasons (winter: 1.4°C, n=60; summer: 19.4°C, n=60). As predicted, the proportion of pedestrians reporting yawning was significantly lower during winter than in summer (18.3% vs. 41.7%), with temperature being the only significant predictor of these differences across seasons. The underlying mechanism for yawning in humans, both spontaneous and contagious, appears to be involved in brain thermoregulation.

  18. Spatially selective photocoagulation of biological tissues: feasibility study utilizing cryogen spray cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Anvari, B. |; Tanenbaum, B.S.; Milner, T.E.; Tang, K.; Liaw, L.; Kalafus, K.; Kimel, S.; Nelson, J.S.

    1996-07-01

    Successful laser treatment of selected dermatoses such as hemangiomas requires thermally induced damage to blood vessels while protecting the epidermis. We present and test a procedure in a rabbit liver tissue model that utilizes cryogen spray cooling during continuous Nd:YAG laser irradiation to induce deep photocoagulation necrosis while protecting superficial tissues from thermal injury. Gross and histologic observations are consistent with calculated thicknesses of protected and photocoagulated tissues and demonstrate the feasibility of inducing spatially selective photocoagulation when cryogen spray cooling is used in conjunction with laser irradiation. This procedure may be useful in the thermal treatment of some pathological conditions for which it is desired that deep photocoagulation be induced while protecting superficial tissues. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  19. Spatially selective photocoagulation of biological tissues: feasibility study utilizing cryogen spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvari, Bahman; Tanenbaum, B. Samuel; Milner, Thomas E.; Tang, Kimberly; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Kalafus, Ken; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J. Stuart

    1996-07-01

    Successful laser treatment of selected dermatoses such as hemangiomas requires thermally induced damage to blood vessels while protecting the epidermis. We present and test a procedure in a rabbit liver tissue model that utilizes cryogen spray cooling during continuous Nd:YAG laser irradiation to induce deep photocoagulation necrosis while protecting superficial tissues from thermal injury. Gross and histologic observations are consistent with calculated thicknesses of protected and photocoagulated tissues and demonstrate the feasibility of inducing spatially selective photocoagulation when cryogen spray cooling is used in conjunction with laser irradiation. This procedure may be useful in the thermal treatment of some pathological conditions for which it is desired that deep photocoagulation be induced while protecting superficial tissues. infrared radiometry, laser, microwave, thermal-damage confinement.

  20. Selection of a turbine cooling system applying multi-disciplinary design considerations.

    PubMed

    Glezer, B

    2001-05-01

    The presented paper describes a multi-disciplinary cooling selection approach applied to major gas turbine engine hot section components, including turbine nozzles, blades, discs, combustors and support structures, which maintain blade tip clearances. The paper demonstrates benefits of close interaction between participating disciplines starting from early phases of the hot section development. The approach targets advancements in engine performance and cost by optimizing the design process, often requiring compromises within individual disciplines.

  1. Selective radiative cooling with MgO and/or LiF layers

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1986-01-01

    A material for a wavelength-selective radiative cooling system, the material comprising an infrared-reflective substrate coated with magnesium oxide and/or lithium fluoride in a polycrystalline form. The material is non-absorptive for short wavelengths, absorptive from 8 to 13 microns, and reflective at longer wavelengths. The infrared-reflective substrate inhibits absorption at wavelengths shorter than 8 microns, and the magnesium oxide and/or lithium fluoride layers reflect radiation at wavelengths longer than 13 microns.

  2. Selective Neuronal Vulnerability to Oxidative Stress in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinkun; Michaelis, Elias K.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), caused by the imbalance between the generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), plays an important role in brain aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and other related adverse conditions, such as ischemia. While ROS/RNS serve as signaling molecules at physiological levels, an excessive amount of these molecules leads to oxidative modification and, therefore, dysfunction of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The response of neurons to this pervasive stress, however, is not uniform in the brain. While many brain neurons can cope with a rise in OS, there are select populations of neurons in the brain that are vulnerable. Because of their selective vulnerability, these neurons are usually the first to exhibit functional decline and cell death during normal aging, or in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of selective neuronal vulnerability (SNV) to OS is important in the development of future intervention approaches to protect such vulnerable neurons from the stresses of the aging process and the pathological states that lead to neurodegeneration. In this review, the currently known molecular and cellular factors that contribute to SNV to OS are summarized. Included among the major underlying factors are high intrinsic OS, high demand for ROS/RNS-based signaling, low ATP production, mitochondrial dysfunction, and high inflammatory response in vulnerable neurons. The contribution to the selective vulnerability of neurons to OS by other intrinsic or extrinsic factors, such as deficient DNA damage repair, low calcium-buffering capacity, and glutamate excitotoxicity, are also discussed. PMID:20552050

  3. Brain dynamics of meal size selection in humans.

    PubMed

    Toepel, Ulrike; Bielser, Marie-Laure; Forde, Ciaran; Martin, Nathalie; Voirin, Alexandre; le Coutre, Johannes; Murray, Micah M; Hudry, Julie

    2015-06-01

    Although neuroimaging research has evidenced specific responses to visual food stimuli based on their nutritional quality (e.g., energy density, fat content), brain processes underlying portion size selection remain largely unexplored. We identified spatio-temporal brain dynamics in response to meal images varying in portion size during a task of ideal portion selection for prospective lunch intake and expected satiety. Brain responses to meal portions judged by the participants as 'too small', 'ideal' and 'too big' were measured by means of electro-encephalographic (EEG) recordings in 21 normal-weight women. During an early stage of meal viewing (105-145 ms), data showed an incremental increase of the head-surface global electric field strength (quantified via global field power; GFP) as portion judgments ranged from 'too small' to 'too big'. Estimations of neural source activity revealed that brain regions underlying this effect were located in the insula, middle frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus, and are similar to those reported in previous studies investigating responses to changes in food nutritional content. In contrast, during a later stage (230-270 ms), GFP was maximal for the 'ideal' relative to the 'non-ideal' portion sizes. Greater neural source activity to 'ideal' vs. 'non-ideal' portion sizes was observed in the inferior parietal lobule, superior temporal gyrus and mid-posterior cingulate gyrus. Collectively, our results provide evidence that several brain regions involved in attention and adaptive behavior track 'ideal' meal portion sizes as early as 230 ms during visual encounter. That is, responses do not show an increase paralleling the amount of food viewed (and, in extension, the amount of reward), but are shaped by regulatory mechanisms.

  4. Brain Cooling With Ventilation of Cold Air Over Respiratory Tract in Newborn Piglets: An Experimental and Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel; Moradi, Hadi Vafadar; Stewart, Errol E.; Keenliside, Lynn; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2015-01-01

    We investigate thermal effects of pulmonary cooling which was induced by cold air through an endotracheal tube via a ventilator on newborn piglets. A mathematical model was initially employed to compare the thermal impact of two different gas mixtures, O2-medical air (1:2) and O2-Xe (1:2), across the respiratory tract and within the brain. Following mathematical simulations, we examined the theoretical predictions with O2-medical air condition on nine anesthetized piglets which were randomized to two treatment groups: 1) control group (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$n = 4$ \\end{document}) and 2) pulmonary cooling group (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$n = 5$ \\end{document}). Numerical and experimental results using O2-medical air mixture show that brain temperature fell from 38.5 °C and 38.3 °C ± 0.3 °C to 35.7 °C ± 0.9 °C and 36.5 °C ± 0.6 °C during 3 h cooling which corresponded to a mean cooling rate of 0.9 °C/h ± 0.2 °C/h and 0.6 °C/h ± 0.1 °C/h, respectively. According to the numerical results, decreasing the metabolic rate and increasing air velocity are helpful to maximize the cooling effect. We demonstrated that pulmonary cooling by cooling of inhalation gases immediately before they enter the trachea can slowly reduce brain and core body temperature of newborn piglets. Numerical simulations show no significant differences between two different inhaled conditions, i.e., O2-medical air (1:2) and O2-Xe (1:2) with respect to cooling rate. PMID:27170888

  5. Icehouse Effect: A Selective Arctic Cooling Trend Current Models are Missing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, Peter J.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The icehouse effect is a hypothesized climate feedback mechanism which could result in human-caused surface cooling trends in polar regions. Once understood in detail, it becomes apparent that these trends, which are discernable in the literature, but have been largely dismissed, do not conflict with the consensus assessment of the evidence, which infers century-scale Arctic warming. In fact, confirmation of the hypothesis would substantially strengthen the argument that there is a detectable human influence on today's climate. This apparent enigma is resolved only through careful attention to the detail of the hypothesis and the data supporting it. The posited surface cooling is entirely dependent on the existence of climate warming in layers capping the stable boundary layer. Also, the cooling is not pandemic, but is selective. It is readily revealed in properly sorted data by making use of the principles of micrometeorological similarity. Specifically, the cooling is manifest under a range of favorable turbulence conditions which can develop and disappear locally on time scales of minutes to hours because of the intrinsically intermittent nature of stable boundary layer turbulence. Because of the fine-scale nature of the processes which produce the cooling, modeling it is a difficult proposition. Vertical resolution on the order of 1 meter is required. Adequate models of intermittent surface fluxes coupled with radiation exchange do not currently exist, not as parameterizations for aggregated systems, nor in large eddy simulation (LES) models. This presentation will introduce the theory. An important testable null hypothesis emerges: the icehouse effect produces a unique signature or "fingerprint" which could not be produced by any other known process. The presence of this signature will be demonstrated using nearly all available Arctic temperature observations. Its aggregate effect is clearly found in Arctic monthly surface temperature trends when sorted by

  6. Brain activity associated with selective attention, divided attention and distraction.

    PubMed

    Salo, Emma; Salmela, Viljami; Salmi, Juha; Numminen, Jussi; Alho, Kimmo

    2017-03-28

    Top-down controlled selective or divided attention to sounds and visual objects, as well as bottom-up triggered attention to auditory and visual distractors, has been widely investigated. However, no study has systematically compared brain activations related to all these types of attention. To this end, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity in participants performing a tone pitch or a foveal grating orientation discrimination task, or both, distracted by novel sounds not sharing frequencies with the tones or by extrafoveal visual textures. To force focusing of attention to tones or gratings, or both, task difficulty was kept constantly high with an adaptive staircase method. A whole brain analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed fronto-parietal attention networks for both selective auditory and visual attention. A subsequent conjunction analysis indicated partial overlaps of these networks. However, like some previous studies, the present results also suggest segregation of prefrontal areas involved in the control of auditory and visual attention. The ANOVA also suggested, and another conjunction analysis confirmed, an additional activity enhancement in the left middle frontal gyrus related to divided attention supporting the role of this area in top-down integration of dual task performance. Distractors expectedly disrupted task performance. However, contrary to our expectations, activations specifically related to the distractors were found only in the auditory and visual cortices. This suggests gating of the distractors from further processing perhaps due to strictly focused attention in the current demanding discrimination tasks.

  7. Prediction of Future Epilepsy in Neonates With Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Who Received Selective Head Cooling.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Tiffani L; Paolicchi, Juliann M; Heier, Linda A; Das, Nikkan; Engel, Murray; Perlman, Jeffrey M; Grinspan, Zachary M

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy outcomes after therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are understudied. The authors used multivariable logistic regression to predict epilepsy in neonates after selective head cooling. Sensitivity analyses used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) interpretations by different clinicians. Fifty neonates had 2-year follow-up. Nine developed epilepsy. Predictors included pH ≤6.8 on day of birth (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 19 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1-371]), burst suppression on EEG on day 4 (8.2 [1.3-59]), and MRI deep gray matter injury (OR 33 [2.4-460]). These factors stratify neonates into low (0-1 factors; 3% [0%-14%] risk), medium (2 factors; 56% [21%-86%] risk), and high-risk groups (3 factors; 100% [29%-100%] risk) for epilepsy. The stratification was robust to varying clinical interpretations of the MRI and EEG. Neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy who undergo selective head cooling appear at risk of epilepsy if they have 2 to 3 identified factors. If validated, this rule may help counsel families and identify children for close clinical follow-up.

  8. Quantitative analysis of task selection for brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llera, Alberto; Gómez, Vicenç; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. To assess quantitatively the impact of task selection in the performance of brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Approach. We consider the task-pairs derived from multi-class BCI imagery movement tasks in three different datasets. We analyze for the first time the benefits of task selection on a large-scale basis (109 users) and evaluate the possibility of transferring task-pair information across days for a given subject. Main results. Selecting the subject-dependent optimal task-pair among three different imagery movement tasks results in approximately 20% potential increase in the number of users that can be expected to control a binary BCI. The improvement is observed with respect to the best task-pair fixed across subjects. The best task-pair selected for each subject individually during a first day of recordings is generally a good task-pair in subsequent days. In general, task learning from the user side has a positive influence in the generalization of the optimal task-pair, but special attention should be given to inexperienced subjects. Significance. These results add significant evidence to existing literature that advocates task selection as a necessary step towards usable BCIs. This contribution motivates further research focused on deriving adaptive methods for task selection on larger sets of mental tasks in practical online scenarios.

  9. Brain networks supporting perceptual grouping and contour selection.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor; Greenlee, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The human visual system groups local elements into global objects seemingly without effort. Using a contour integration task and EEG source level analyses, we tested the hypothesis that perceptual grouping requires a top-down selection, rather than a passive pooling, of neural information that codes local elements in the visual image. The participants were presented visual displays with or without a hidden contour. Two tasks were performed: a central luminance-change detection task and a peripheral contour detection task. Only in the contour-detection task could we find differential brain activity between contour and non-contour conditions, within a distributed brain network including parietal, lateral occipital and primary visual areas. Contour processing was associated with an inflow of information from lateral occipital into primary visual regions, as revealed from the slope of phase differences between source level oscillations within these areas. The findings suggest that contour integration results from a selection of neural information from lower visual areas, and that this selection is driven by the lateral occipital cortex.

  10. Sexual selection uncouples the evolution of brain and body size in pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J L; Almbro, M; Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Hamada, S; Pennington, C; Scanlan, J; Kolm, N

    2012-07-01

    The size of the vertebrate brain is shaped by a variety of selective forces. Although larger brains (correcting for body size) are thought to confer fitness advantages, energetic limitations of this costly organ may lead to trade-offs, for example as recently suggested between sexual traits and neural tissue. Here, we examine the patterns of selection on male and female brain size in pinnipeds, a group where the strength of sexual selection differs markedly among species and between the sexes. Relative brain size was negatively associated with the intensity of sexual selection in males but not females. However, analyses of the rates of body and brain size evolution showed that this apparent trade-off between sexual selection and brain mass is driven by selection for increasing body mass rather than by an actual reduction in male brain size. Our results suggest that sexual selection has important effects on the allometric relationships of neural development.

  11. Selective brain penetrable Nurr1 transactivator for treating Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Bi, Weina; Zhao, Wei; Varghese, Merina; Koch, Rick J.; Walker, Ruth H.; Chandraratna, Roshantha A.; Sanders, Martin E.; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Ward, Libby; Ho, Lap; Pasinetti, Giulio M.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common movement disorders, and currently there is no effective treatment that can slow disease progression. Preserving and enhancing DA neuron survival is increasingly regarded as the most promising therapeutic strategy for treating PD. IRX4204 is a second generation retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist that has no cross reactivity with retinoic acid receptors, farnesoid X receptor, liver X receptors or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ. We found that IRX4204 promotes the survival and maintenance of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons in a dose-dependent manner in primary mesencephalic cultures. Brain bioavailability studies demonstrate that IRX4204 can cross the blood brain barrier and reach the brain at nM concentration. Oral administration of IRX4204 can activate nuclear receptor Nurr1 downstream signaling in the substantia nigra (SN) andattenuate neurochemical and motor deficits in a rat model of PD. Our study suggests that IRX4204 represents a novel, potent and selective pharmacological means to activate cellular RXR-Nurr1 signaling and promote SN DA neuron survival in PD prevention and/or treatment. PMID:26862735

  12. Selective brain penetrable Nurr1 transactivator for treating Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Bi, Weina; Zhao, Wei; Varghese, Merina; Koch, Rick J; Walker, Ruth H; Chandraratna, Roshantha A; Sanders, Martin E; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Ward, Libby; Ho, Lap; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2016-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common movement disorders, and currently there is no effective treatment that can slow disease progression. Preserving and enhancing DA neuron survival is increasingly regarded as the most promising therapeutic strategy for treating PD. IRX4204 is a second generation retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist that has no cross reactivity with retinoic acid receptors, farnesoid X receptor, liver X receptors or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ. We found that IRX4204 promotes the survival and maintenance of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons in a dose-dependent manner in primary mesencephalic cultures. Brain bioavailability studies demonstrate that IRX4204 can cross the blood brain barrier and reach the brain at nM concentration. Oral administration of IRX4204 can activate nuclear receptor Nurr1 downstream signaling in the substantia nigra (SN) andattenuate neurochemical and motor deficits in a rat model of PD. Our study suggests that IRX4204 represents a novel, potent and selective pharmacological means to activate cellular RXR-Nurr1 signaling and promote SN DA neuron survival in PD prevention and/or treatment.

  13. Selective radiative cooling with MgO and/or LiF layers

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-14

    A selective radiation cooling material which is absorptive only in the 8 to 13 microns wavelength range is accomplished by placing ceramic magnesium oxide and/or polycrystalline lithium fluoride on an infrared-reflective substrate. The reflecting substrate may be a metallic coating, foil or sheet, such as aluminum, which reflects all atmospheric radiation from 0.3 to 8 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride being nonabsorptive at those wavelengths. <10% of submicron voids in the material is permissible in which case the MgO and/or LiF layer is diffusely scattering, but still nonabsorbing, in the wavelength range of 0.3 to 8 microns. At wavelengths from 8 to 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride radiate power through the ''window'' in the atmosphere, and thus remove heat from the reflecting sheet of material and the attached object to be cooled. At wavelengths longer than 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride reflects the atmospheric radiation back into the atmosphere. This high reflectance is only obtained if the surface is sufficiently smooth: roughness on a scale of 1 micron is permissible but roughness on a scale of 10 microns is not. An infrared-transmitting cover or shield is mounted in spaced relationship to the material to reduce convective heat transfer. If this is utilized in direct sunlight, the infrared transmitting cover or shield should be opaque in the solar spectrum of 0.3 to 3 microns.

  14. Statistical feature selection for enhanced detection of brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Colen, Rivka R.

    2014-09-01

    Feature-based methods are widely used in the brain tumor recognition system. Robust of early cancer detection is one of the most powerful image processing tools. Specifically, statistical features, such as geometric mean, harmonic mean, mean excluding outliers, median, percentiles, skewness and kurtosis, have been extracted from brain tumor glioma to aid in discriminating two levels namely, Level I and Level II using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in the diagnosis of brain tumor. Statistical feature describes the major characteristics of each level from glioma which is an important step to evaluate heterogeneity of cancer area pixels. In this paper, we address the task of feature selection to identify the relevant subset of features in the statistical domain, while discarding those that are either redundant or confusing, thereby improving the performance of feature-based scheme to distinguish between Level I and Level II. We apply a Decision Structure algorithm to find the optimal combination of nonhomogeneity based statistical features for the problem at hand. We employ a Naïve Bayes classifier to evaluate the performance of the optimal statistical feature based scheme in terms of its glioma Level I and Level II discrimination capability and use real-data collected from 17 patients have a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Dataset provided from 3 Tesla MR imaging system by MD Anderson Cancer Center. For the specific data analyzed, it is shown that the identified dominant features yield higher classification accuracy, with lower number of false alarms and missed detections, compared to the full statistical based feature set. This work has been proposed and analyzed specific GBM types which Level I and Level II and the dominant features were considered as feature aid to prognostic indicators. These features were selected automatically to be better able to determine prognosis from classical imaging studies.

  15. The brain's silent messenger: using selective attention to decode human thought for brain-based communication.

    PubMed

    Naci, Lorina; Cusack, Rhodri; Jia, Vivian Z; Owen, Adrian M

    2013-05-29

    The interpretation of human thought from brain activity, without recourse to speech or action, is one of the most provoking and challenging frontiers of modern neuroscience. In particular, patients who are fully conscious and awake, yet, due to brain damage, are unable to show any behavioral responsivity, expose the limits of the neuromuscular system and the necessity for alternate forms of communication. Although it is well established that selective attention can significantly enhance the neural representation of attended sounds, it remains, thus far, untested as a response modality for brain-based communication. We asked whether its effect could be reliably used to decode answers to binary (yes/no) questions. Fifteen healthy volunteers answered questions (e.g., "Do you have brothers or sisters?") in the fMRI scanner, by selectively attending to the appropriate word ("yes" or "no"). Ninety percent of the answers were decoded correctly based on activity changes within the attention network. The majority of volunteers conveyed their answers with less than 3 min of scanning, suggesting that this technique is suited for communication in a reasonable amount of time. Formal comparison with the current best-established fMRI technique for binary communication revealed improved individual success rates and scanning times required to detect responses. This novel fMRI technique is intuitive, easy to use in untrained participants, and reliably robust within brief scanning times. Possible applications include communication with behaviorally nonresponsive patients.

  16. Target coverage and selectivity in field steering brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cubo, Ruben; Åstrom, Mattias; Medvedev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment in Parkinson's Disease. The target area is defined based on the state and brain anatomy of the patient. The stimulation delivered via state-of-the-art DBS leads that are currently in clinical use is difficult to individualize to the patient particularities. Furthermore, the electric field generated by such a lead has a limited selectivity, resulting in stimulation of areas adjacent to the target and thus causing undesirable side effects. The goal of this study is, using actual clinical data, to compare in silico the stimulation performance of a symmetrical generic lead to a more versatile and adaptable one allowing, in particular, for asymmetric stimulation. The fraction of the volume of activated tissue in the target area and the fraction of the stimulation field that spreads beyond it are computed for a clinical data set of patients in order to quantify the lead performance. The obtained results suggest that using more versatile DBS leads might reduce the stimulation area beyond the target and thus lessen side effects for the same achieved therapeutical effect.

  17. Clast Selection and Metallographic Cooling Rates: Initial Results on Type 1A and 2A Mesosiderites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baecker, B.; Cohen, B. A.; Rubin, A. E.; Frasl, B.; Corrigan, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We initiated a comprehensive study on selected clasts and metal of mesosiderites using SEM, electron microprobe and the complete suite of noble gases. Here we report initial results on the petrography of selected clasts and metallographic cooling rates using the central Ni method used in sev-eral publications. We focus on the approach of selecting grains in least recrystallized mesosiderites. Hence, especially (lithic) clasts in type 1A, 1B, 2A and 2B are the first choice. They provide highest primitive-ness and least annealing/metamorphism. All grains selected should be in close proximity to each other. Lithic clasts in mesosiderites are of high interest be-cause of their igneous texture and similarity to eucrites and howardite petrography. We find pyrox-enes (px) and plagioclase (plag) attached to each other which implies a common formation history. It will be interesting to see differences and similarities in their noble gas inventory (CRE ages, trapped components and closure temperature). In addition, we will investi-gate variations of the lithic clasts toward similar grains in the thick sections which are not igneous. Plag grains are the best bases for noble gas measurements con-cerning He to Ar and Ar-Ar dating since it delivers im-portant target elements. We focus on plag grains in close contact to olivine (olv) / px grains to assess weth-er both grains show noble gas patterns being similar or different. Phosphate grains are suitable for Kr and Xe measurements since they yield REE abundances (tar-get elements).

  18. Automated selection of brain regions for real-time fMRI brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lührs, Michael; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) implemented with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) use fMRI time-courses from predefined regions of interest (ROIs). To reach best performances, localizer experiments and on-site expert supervision are required for ROI definition. To automate this step, we developed two unsupervised computational techniques based on the general linear model (GLM) and independent component analysis (ICA) of rt-fMRI data, and compared their performances on a communication BCI. Approach. 3 T fMRI data of six volunteers were re-analyzed in simulated real-time. During a localizer run, participants performed three mental tasks following visual cues. During two communication runs, a letter-spelling display guided the subjects to freely encode letters by performing one of the mental tasks with a specific timing. GLM- and ICA-based procedures were used to decode each letter, respectively using compact ROIs and whole-brain distributed spatio-temporal patterns of fMRI activity, automatically defined from subject-specific or group-level maps. Main results. Letter-decoding performances were comparable to supervised methods. In combination with a similarity-based criterion, GLM- and ICA-based approaches successfully decoded more than 80% (average) of the letters. Subject-specific maps yielded optimal performances. Significance. Automated solutions for ROI selection may help accelerating the translation of rt-fMRI BCIs from research to clinical applications.

  19. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Soo; Kwon, Mi Jung; Lee, Phil Hye; Ju, Young-Su; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Materials and Methods Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Results Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min-1 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min-1, p = 0.661 for Ktrans; 0.30 ± 0.05 min-1 vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min-1, p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. PMID:27587960

  20. FROM SELECTIVE VULNERABILITY TO CONNECTIVITY: INSIGHTS FROM NEWBORN BRAIN IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Steven P.; Ferriero, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    The ability to image the newborn brain during development has provided new information regarding the effects of injury on brain development at different vulnerable time periods. Studies in animal models of brain injury correlate beautifully with what is now observed in the human newborn. We now know that injury at term results in a predilection for gray matter injury while injury in the premature brain results in a white matter predominant pattern although recent evidence suggests a blurring of this distinction. These injuries affect how the brain matures subsequently and again, imaging has led to new insights that allow us to match function and structure. This review will focus on these patterns of injury that are so critically determined by age at insult. In addition, this review will highlight how the brain responds to these insults with changes in connectivity that have profound functional consequences. PMID:19712981

  1. Characterization of selected application of biomass energy technologies and a solar district heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Robert P.

    1980-09-01

    The following systems are discussed: energy self-sufficient farms, wood gasification, energy from high-yield silviculture farms, and solar district heating and cooling. System descriptions and environmental data are included for each one. (MHR)

  2. Artificial selection on relative brain size reveals a positive genetic correlation between brain size and proactive personality in the guppy.

    PubMed

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva J P; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-04-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a "reactive" personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a "proactive" personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration.

  3. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Karol; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Dudek, Krzysztof; Fita, Katarzyna; Parulska, Olga; Rybak, Zbigniew; Skalec, Aleksandra; Szklarz, Magdalena; Janeczek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®). The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm) and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C). In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems) used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling.

  4. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirstein, Karol; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Dudek, Krzysztof; Fita, Katarzyna; Parulska, Olga; Rybak, Zbigniew; Skalec, Aleksandra; Szklarz, Magdalena; Janeczek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®). The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm) and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C). In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems) used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling. PMID:27110558

  5. Regional selection of the brain size regulating gene CASC5 provides new insight into human brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Hu, Enzhi; Wang, Zhenbo; Liu, Jiewei; Li, Jin; Li, Ming; Chen, Hua; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi; Su, Bing

    2017-02-01

    Human evolution is marked by a continued enlargement of the brain. Previous studies on human brain evolution focused on identifying sequence divergences of brain size regulating genes between humans and nonhuman primates. However, the evolutionary pattern of the brain size regulating genes during recent human evolution is largely unknown. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the brain size regulating gene CASC5 and found that in recent human evolution, CASC5 has accumulated many modern human specific amino acid changes, including two fixed changes and six polymorphic changes. Among human populations, 4 of the 6 amino acid polymorphic sites have high frequencies of derived alleles in East Asians, but are rare in Europeans and Africans. We proved that this between-population allelic divergence was caused by regional Darwinian positive selection in East Asians. Further analysis of brain image data of Han Chinese showed significant associations of the amino acid polymorphic sites with gray matter volume. Hence, CASC5 may contribute to the morphological and structural changes of the human brain during recent evolution. The observed between-population divergence of CASC5 variants was driven by natural selection that tends to favor a larger gray matter volume in East Asians.

  6. Functional brain imaging in schizophrenia: selected results and methods.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gregory G; Thompson, Wesley K

    2010-01-01

    Functional brain imaging studies of patients with schizophrenia may be grouped into those that assume that the signs and symptoms of schizophrenia are due to disordered circuitry within a critical brain region and studies that assume that the signs and symptoms are due to disordered connections among brain regions. Studies have investigated the disordered functional brain anatomy of both the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Studies of spontaneous hallucinations find that although hallucinations are associated with abnormal brain activity in primary and secondary sensory areas, disordered brain activation associated with hallucinations is not limited to sensory systems. Disordered activation in non-sensory regions appear to contribute to the emotional strength and valence of hallucinations, to be a factor underlying an inability to distinguish ongoing mental processing from memories, and to reflect the brain's attempt to modulate the intensity of hallucinations and resolve conflicts with other processing demands. Brain activation studies support the view that auditory/verbal hallucinations are associated with an impaired ability of internal speech plans to modulate neural activation in sensory language areas. In early studies, negative symptoms of schizophrenia were hypothesized to be associated with impaired function in frontal brain areas. In support of this hypothesis meta-analytical studies have found that resting blood flow or metabolism in frontal cortex is reduced in schizophrenia, though the magnitude of the effect is only small to moderate. Brain activation studies of working memory (WM) functioning are typically associated with large effect sizes in the frontal cortex, whereas studies of functions other than WM generally reveal smaller effects. Findings from some functional connectivity studies have supported the hypothesis that schizophrenia patients experience impaired functional connections between frontal and temporal cortex, although

  7. Selective feeding in birds depends on combined processing in the left and right brain hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Prior, Helmut; Wilzeck, Christiane

    2008-01-15

    During visually guided foraging birds tend to select certain types of food from a mixed diet. This selectivity is ecologically relevant. During scanning for food birds spot the surroundings mainly with the monocular lateral visual field of the one or other eye and then control pecking with their small binocular frontal visual field. As the visual systems of the avian left and right brain hemisphere are supposed to work largely independently in the short term, the problem arises of how the avian brain handles a task that requires coordinated activity of the left and right brain hemisphere for efficient processing. Here we report that chicks exhibit strong selective feeding when both of the brain hemispheres are involved. With the left or right hemisphere alone selectivity is reduced or completely absent. Our findings reveal a marked qualitative difference between unilateral and bilateral processing. They highlight an important but so far unexplored selection pressure for the evolution of hemispheric cooperation.

  8. Microglia protect against brain injury and their selective elimination dysregulates neuronal network activity after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Gergely; Martinecz, Bernadett; Lénárt, Nikolett; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Orsolits, Barbara; Judák, Linda; Császár, Eszter; Fekete, Rebeka; West, Brian L.; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Dénes, Ádám

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are the main immune cells of the brain and contribute to common brain diseases. However, it is unclear how microglia influence neuronal activity and survival in the injured brain in vivo. Here we develop a precisely controlled model of brain injury induced by cerebral ischaemia combined with fast in vivo two-photon calcium imaging and selective microglial manipulation. We show that selective elimination of microglia leads to a striking, 60% increase in infarct size, which is reversed by microglial repopulation. Microglia-mediated protection includes reduction of excitotoxic injury, since an absence of microglia leads to dysregulated neuronal calcium responses, calcium overload and increased neuronal death. Furthermore, the incidence of spreading depolarization (SD) is markedly reduced in the absence of microglia. Thus, microglia are involved in changes in neuronal network activity and SD after brain injury in vivo that could have important implications for common brain diseases. PMID:27139776

  9. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called 'quorum sensing'. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis.

  10. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called ‘quorum sensing’. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis. PMID:26536593

  11. Effectiveness of an air-cooled vest using selected air temperature and humidity combinations.

    PubMed

    Pimental, N A; Cosimini, H M; Sawka, M N; Wenger, C B

    1987-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an air-cooled vest in reducing thermal strain of subjects exercising in the heat (49 degrees C dry bulb (db), 20 degrees C dew point (dp] in chemical protective clothing. Four male subjects attempted 300-min heat exposures at two metabolic rates (175 and 315 W) with six cooling combinations--control (no vest) and five different db and dp combinations. Air supplied to the vest at 15 scfm ranged from 20-27 degrees C db, 7-18 degrees C dp; theoretical cooling capacities were 498-687 W. Without the vest, endurance times were 118 min (175 W) and 73 min (315 W). Endurance times with the vest were 300 min (175 W) and 242-300 min (315 W). The five cooling combinations were similarly effective in reducing thermal strain and extending endurance time, although there was a trend for the vest to be more effective when supplied with air at the lower dry bulb temperature. At 175 W, subjects maintained a constant body temperature; at 315 W, the vest's ability to extend endurance is limited to about 5 hours.

  12. Long-term environmental trends: selection of sampling locations in a reactor-aquatic cooling system.

    PubMed

    Revsin, B K; Watson, J E

    1993-02-01

    The study objective was to determine whether environmental radionuclide accumulations were occurring in an aquatic system with a 13-y history of supplying a power plant with reactor-cooling water as well as receiving plant discharge. The aquatic system consisted of the following: 1) a reactor-cooling lake; 2) a secondary lake approximately 8 km downstream; and 3) a small stream that interfaced with the two lakes. Gamma-emitting radionuclides were identified and quantified in samples of benthic sediments obtained from representative areas of the aquatic system. This study demonstrated that in a reactor-aquatic cooling system, the component of the aquatic system most likely to experience radionuclide accumulation will not necessarily be the reactor-cooling lake, but will be that component of the aquatic system whose benthic sediments contain the highest concentrations of organic matter. Further, it was shown that the quantity of oxidizable organic matter present in a sediment is a good predictor or marker for potential sites of radionuclide accumulation (i.e., 60Co and 137Cs).

  13. Site selection for MSFC operational tests of solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The criteria, methodology, and sequence aspects of the site selection process are presented. This report organized the logical thought process that should be applied to the site selection process, but final decisions are highly selective.

  14. THE GROWTH OF COOL CORES AND EVOLUTION OF COOLING PROPERTIES IN A SAMPLE OF 83 GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0.3 < z < 1.2 SELECTED FROM THE SPT-SZ SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Bautz, M. W.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Vikhlinin, A.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; De Haan, T.; Lin, H. W.; Aird, K. A.; Bocquet, S.; Desai, S.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare these properties to those for local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner {approx}100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z {approx} 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed ''entropy floor'' at {approx}10 keV cm{sup 2}. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density ({rho}{sub g,0}/{rho}{sub crit}) increasing by an order of magnitude from z {approx} 1 to z {approx} 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, {approx}150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm{sup 2} and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z{sub cool}=1.0{sup +1.0}{sub -0.2}, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. At high redshift (z {approx}> 0.75), galaxy clusters may be classified as ''cooling flows'' (low central entropy, cooling time) but not

  15. The Growth of Cool Cores and Evolution of Cooling Properties in a Sample of 83 Galaxy Clusters at 0.3 < z < 1.2 Selected from the SPT-SZ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Stalder, B.; Bleem, L. E.; de Haan, T.; Lin, H. W.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M. W.; Bayliss, M.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gettings, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Šuhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare these properties to those for local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z ~ 0 to z ~ 1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner ~100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z ~ 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed "entropy floor" at ~10 keV cm2. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density (ρ g, 0/ρcrit) increasing by an order of magnitude from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, ~150 M ⊙ yr-1 cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm2 and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z_{cool}=1.0^{+1.0}_{-0.2}, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. At high redshift (z >~ 0.75), galaxy clusters may be classified as "cooling flows" (low central entropy, cooling time) but not "cool cores" (cuspy surface brightness profile), meaning that care must be taken when classifying these high-z systems

  16. A cooling flow in a high-redshift, X-ray-selected cluster of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Nesci, R.; Perola, G.C.; Gioia, I.M.; Maccacaro, T.; Morris, S.L.; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA; CNR, Istituto di Radioastronomia, Bologna; Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-09-01

    The X-ray cluster of galaxies IE 0839.9 + 2938 was serendipitously discovered with the Einstein Observatory. CCD imaging at R and V wavelengths show that the color of the dominant elliptical galaxy of this cluster is significantly bluer than the colors of the next brightest cluster galaxies. Strong emission lines, typical of cD galaxies with cooling flows, are present in the spectrum of the dominant galaxy, from which a redshift of 0.193 is derived. The emitting line region is spatially resolved with an extension of about 13 kpc. All the collected data suggest that this cluster is one of the most distant cooling flow clusters known to date. 28 refs.

  17. Selection of Cool-Season Grasses for Revegetating Well-Drained Fill Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    most persistent species were Jamestown chewings fescue ( Festuca rubra L. ssp. commutata Gaud.) and Canada bluegrass (Poa compressa L.). Refertilization... Festuca rubra L. ssp. rubra ) and colonial bent- United States. Low-maintenance sites in cool, grass for revegetating sand heaps. humid areas usually...nitrogen, 1.96%; phosphorus, 0.29%; potassium, "* Jamestown chewings fescue ( Festuca rubra L. 2.39%; calcium, 0.41%; magnesium, 0.15%; and sul- ssp

  18. Development and selection of heat-resistant tool steels for water-cooled dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremney, L. S.; Zabezhinskii, A. Ya.

    1980-02-01

    Alloying and heat treatment of tool steels for water-cooled dies to improve the service life in high-speed automatic presses must ensure: 1) The lowest but still sufficient level of hardening during precipitation hardening; 2) the smallest amount of carbide not dissolved during quenching; 3) prevention of the decomposition of martensite in grain boundaries during tempering; 4) a structure of lath martensite.

  19. Methods of association and dissociation for establishing selective brain-behavior relations.

    PubMed

    Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V

    2014-01-01

    Methods for identifying and understanding brain structure-function relations have evolved over the past century, from astute observations of selective impairments associated with focal brain damage to dissociations measured by combining quantitative neuropsychologic assessment and brain imaging. Enhanced spatial and temporal resolution in brain imaging modalities has led to refined visualization and quantification of the brain's substructures, microstructural integrity, and functional connectivity of neural networks. The double dissociation model has been a gold standard used to demonstrate that a particular cognitive, emotional, sensory, or motor process is selectively related to a particular brain region or neural network and not to others. This model has provided a fruitful means for testing hypotheses of functional localization and enabled examination and establishment of component processes contributing to complex cognitive and motor functions, parsing multifactorial behaviors and identifying brain regions, and networks subserving these complex abilities. In this chapter we discuss the evolution of the dissociation model and highlight how the modifications of this model are used presently to establish selective brain-behavior relationships in disorders such as chronic alcoholism with a neuropathologic signature but no localizable, space-occupying lesion.

  20. Selection for brain size impairs innate, but not adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Kolm, Niclas; Penn, Dustin J.

    2016-01-01

    Both the brain and the immune system are energetically demanding organs, and when natural selection favours increased investment into one, then the size or performance of the other should be reduced. While comparative analyses have attempted to test this potential evolutionary trade-off, the results remain inconclusive. To test this hypothesis, we compared the tissue graft rejection (an assay for measuring innate and acquired immune responses) in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) artificially selected for large and small relative brain size. Individual scales were transplanted between pairs of fish, creating reciprocal allografts, and the rejection reaction was scored over 8 days (before acquired immunity develops). Acquired immune responses were tested two weeks later, when the same pairs of fish received a second set of allografts and were scored again. Compared with large-brained animals, small-brained animals of both sexes mounted a significantly stronger rejection response to the first allograft. The rejection response to the second set of allografts did not differ between large- and small-brained fish. Our results show that selection for large brain size reduced innate immune responses to an allograft, which supports the hypothesis that there is a selective trade-off between investing into brain size and innate immunity. PMID:26962144

  1. Radioreceptor assay of opioid peptides in selected canine brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Desiderio, D.M.; Takeshita, H.

    1985-09-01

    A radioreceptor assay using the opioid delta receptor-preferring ligand D-/sup 2/ala, D-/sup 5/leu leucine enkephalin (/sup 3/H-DADL) and the broader-specificity ligand /sup 3/H-etorphine was used to measure five HPLC-purified neuropeptide fractions derived from the peptide-rich fraction of tissue homogenates of nine anatomical regions of the canine brain. The receptoractive peptides studied were methionine enkephalin, alpha-neo-endorphin, dynorphin 1-8, methionine enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and leucine enkephalin. These peptides derive from two larger precursors: proenkephalin A, which contains methionine enkephalin, leucine enkephalin, methionine enkephalin-Arg-Phe; and proenkephalin B, which contains alpha-neo-endorphin and dynorphin 1-8. Receptoractive peptides were measured in the peptide-rich fraction derived from homogenates of canine hypothalamus, pituitary, caudate nucleus, amygdala, hippocampus, mid-brain, thalamus, pons-medulla, and cortex.

  2. Selectivity to Translational Egomotion in Human Brain Motion Areas

    PubMed Central

    Pitzalis, Sabrina; Sdoia, Stefano; Bultrini, Alessandro; Committeri, Giorgia; Di Russo, Francesco; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; Galati, Gaspare

    2013-01-01

    The optic flow generated when a person moves through the environment can be locally decomposed into several basic components, including radial, circular, translational and spiral motion. Since their analysis plays an important part in the visual perception and control of locomotion and posture it is likely that some brain regions in the primate dorsal visual pathway are specialized to distinguish among them. The aim of this study is to explore the sensitivity to different types of egomotion-compatible visual stimulations in the human motion-sensitive regions of the brain. Event-related fMRI experiments, 3D motion and wide-field stimulation, functional localizers and brain mapping methods were used to study the sensitivity of six distinct motion areas (V6, MT, MST+, V3A, CSv and an Intra-Parietal Sulcus motion [IPSmot] region) to different types of optic flow stimuli. Results show that only areas V6, MST+ and IPSmot are specialized in distinguishing among the various types of flow patterns, with a high response for the translational flow which was maximum in V6 and IPSmot and less marked in MST+. Given that during egomotion the translational optic flow conveys differential information about the near and far external objects, areas V6 and IPSmot likely process visual egomotion signals to extract information about the relative distance of objects with respect to the observer. Since area V6 is also involved in distinguishing object-motion from self-motion, it could provide information about location in space of moving and static objects during self-motion, particularly in a dynamically unstable environment. PMID:23577096

  3. Individual brain-frequency responses to self-selected music.

    PubMed

    Höller, Yvonne; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Schmid, Elisabeth Verena; Höller, Peter; Crone, Julia Sophia; Trinka, Eugen

    2012-12-01

    Music is a stimulus which may give rise to a wide range of emotional and cognitive responses. Therefore, brain reactivity to music has become a focus of interest in cognitive neuroscience. It is possible that individual preference moderates the effectof music on the brain. In the present study we examined whether there are common effects of listening to music even if each subject in a sample chooses their own piece of music. We invited 18 subjects to bring along their favorite relaxing music, and their favourite stimulating music. Additionally, a condition with tactile stimulation on the foot and a baseline condition (rest) without stimulation were used. The tactile stimulation was chosen to provide a simple, non-auditory condition which would be identical for all subjects. The electroencephalogram was recorded for each of the 3 conditions and during rest. We found responses in the alpha range mainly on parietal and occipital sites that were significant compared to baseline in 13 subjects during relaxing music, 15 subjects during activating music, and 16 subjects during tactile stimulation. Most subjects showed an alpha desynchronization in a lower alpha range followed by a synchronization in an upper frequency range. However, some subjects showed an increase in this area, whereas others showed a decrease only. In addition, many subjects showed reactivity in the beta range. Beta activity was especially increased while listening to activating music and during tactile stimulation in most subjects. We found interindividual differences in the response patterns even though the stimuli provoked comparable subjective emotions (relaxation, activation), and even if the stimulus was the same for all subjects (somatosensory stimulation). We suggest that brain responsivity to music should be examined individually by considering individual characteristics.

  4. Effect of Cyclosporin A on the Uptake of D3-Selective PET Radiotracers in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Li, Shihong; Xu, Jinbin; Chu, Wenhua; Jones, Lynne A.; Luedtke, Robert R.; Mach, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Four benzamide analogs having a high affinity and selectivity for D3 versus D2 receptors were radiolabeled with 11C or 18F for in vivo evaluation. Methods Precursors were synthesized and the four D3 selective benzamide analogs were radiolabeled. The tissue distribution and brain uptake of the four compounds were evaluated in control rats and rats pretreated with cyclosporin A, a modulator of P-glycoprotein and an inhibitor of other ABC efflux transporters that contribute to the blood brain barrier. MicroPET imaging was carried out for [11C]6 in a control and a cyclosporin A pre-treated rat. Results All four compounds showed low brain uptake in control rats at 5 and 30 min post-injection; despite recently reported rat behavioral studies conducted on analogs 6 (WC-10) and 7 (WC-44). Following administration of cyclosporin A, increased brain uptake was observed with all four PET radiotracers at both 5 and 30 min post-i.v. injection. An increase in brain uptake following modulation/inhibition of the ABC transporters was also observed in the microPET study. Conclusions These data suggest that D3 selective conformationally-flexible benzamide analogs which contain a N-2-methoxyphenylpiperazine moiety are substrates for P-glycoprotein or other ABC transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier, and that PET radiotracers containing this pharmacophore may display low brain uptake in rodents due to the action of these efflux transporters. PMID:21718948

  5. Dietary resistant starch improves selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Pistell, Paul J; Ingram, Donald K; Li, Bing; Raggio, Anne M; Shen, Li; Zhang, Hanjie; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Tulley, Richard T; Blackman, Marc R; Keller, Jeffrey N; Martin, Roy J

    2013-11-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is a dietary fiber that exerts multiple beneficial effects. The current study explored the effects of dietary RS on selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents. Because glucokinase (GK) expression in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and area postrema of the brainstem is important for brain glucose sensing, GK mRNA was measured by brain nuclei microdissection and PCR. Adult RS-fed rats had a higher GK mRNA than controls in both brain nuclei, an indicator of improved brain glucose sensing. Next, we tested whether dietary RS improve selected behaviors in aged mice. RS-fed aged mice exhibited (i) an increased eating responses to fasting, a behavioral indicator of improvement in aged brain glucose sensing; (ii) a longer latency to fall from an accelerating rotarod, a behavioral indicator of improved motor coordination; and (iii) a higher serum active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Then, GLP-1 receptor null (GLP-1RKO) mice were used to test the role of GLP-1 in brain glucose sensing, and they exhibited impaired eating responses to fasting. We conclude that in rodents (i) dietary RS improves two important indicators of brain function: glucose sensing and motor coordination, and (ii) GLP-1 is important in the optimal feeding response to a fast.

  6. Cryogen spray cooling for spatially selective photocoagulation: a feasibility study with potential application for treatment of hemangiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvari, Bahman; Tanenbaum, B. S.; Milner, Thomas E.; Hoffman, Wendy; Said, Samireh; Chang, Cheng-Jen; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J. Stuart

    1996-12-01

    The clinical objective in laser treatment of hemangiomas is to photocoagulate the dilated cutaneous blood vessels, while at the same time minimizing nonspecific thermal injury to the overlying epidermis. We present an in-vivo experimental procedure, using a chicken comb animal model, and an infrared feedback system to deliver repetitive cryogen spurts during continuous Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Gross and histologic observations are consistent with calculated thicknesses of protected and damaged tissues, and demonstrate the feasibility of inducing spatially selective photocoagulation when using cryogen spray cooling in conjunction with laser irradiation. Experimental observation of epidermal protection in the chicken comb model suggests selective photocoagulation of subsurface targeted blood vessels for successful treatment of hemangiomas can be achieved by repetitive applications of a cryogen spurt during continuous Nd:YAG laser irradiation.

  7. [The shrinking brain: result of normal aging or of selection bias in research?].

    PubMed

    Burgmans, S; van Boxtel, M P J

    2012-02-01

    The volume of our brain decreases as we age. This has been demonstrated by several large studies on normal aging. A recent study indicates, however, that the extent of this decline in normal aging probably has been overestimated because these studies have included subjects with preclinical disorders. In this article, an example from science is used to describe what effect selection bias may have on our model of the aging brain.

  8. A SELECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY ON BRAIN-DAMAGED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods School for Exceptional Children, Langhorne, PA.

    THIS SELECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY INCLUDES 317 ANNOTATED REFERENCES DEALING DIRECTLY WITH THE BEHAVIORAL CHARCTERISTICS OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL DYSFUNCTION. REFERENCES HAVE APPEARED IN JOURNALS OR OTHER SOURCES AVAILABLE IN UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES. THE BIBLIOGRAPHY IS CLASSIFIED INTO SIX MAJOR DIVISIONS--(1) THE ENTITY AND ITS DESCRIPTION, (2) CLINICAL…

  9. An opiate binding site in the rat brain is highly selective for 4,5-epoxymorphinans.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Sadée, W

    1983-09-16

    In vitro binding studies have demonstrated the existence of multiple opiate receptor types. An additional site in the rat brain (termed the lambda site) is distinct from the established types by its selectivity for 4,5-epoxymorphinans (such as naloxone and morphine). While the lambda site displays a high affinity for naloxone in vivo and in vitro in fresh brain membrane homogenates, these sites rapidly convert in vitro to a state of low affinity. The regional distribution of the lambda site in the brain is strikingly different from that of the classic opiate receptor types.

  10. A fast atlas pre-selection procedure for multi-atlas based brain segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingbo; Ma, Heather T; Li, Hengtong; Ye, Chenfei; Wu, Dan; Tang, Xiaoying; Miller, Michael; Mori, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Multi-atlas based MR image segmentation has been recognized as a quantitative analysis approach for brain. For such purpose, atlas databases keep increasing to include various anatomical characteristics of human brain. Atlas pre-selection becomes a necessary step for efficient and accurate automated segmentation of human brain images. In this study, we proposed a method of atlas pre-selection for target image segmentation on the MriCloud platform, which is a state-of-the-art multi-atlas based segmentation tool. In the MRIcloud pipeline, segmentation of lateral ventricle (LV) label is generated as an additional input in the segmentation pipeline. Under this circumstance, similarity of the LV label between target image and atlases was adopted as the atlas ranking scheme. Dice overlap coefficient was calculated and taken as the quantitative measure for atlas ranking. Segmentation results based on the proposed method were compared with that based on atlas pre-selection by mutual information (MI) between images. The final segmentation results showed a comparable accuracy of the proposed method with that from MI based atlas pre-selection. However, the computation load for the atlas pre-selection was speeded up by about 20 times compared to MI based pre-selection. The proposed method provides a promising assistance for quantitative analysis of brain images.

  11. Performance of a silicon photovoltaic module under enhanced illumination and selective filtration of incoming radiation with simultaneous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Subarna; Vyas, Kairavi; Ghosh, Pushpito K.

    2010-08-15

    A promising option to reduce the cost of silicon photovoltaic systems is to concentrate the sunlight incident on the solar cells to increase the output power. However, this leads to higher module temperatures which affects performance adversely and may also cause long term damage. Proper cooling is therefore necessary to operate the system under concentrated radiation. The present work was undertaken to circumvent the problem in practical manner. A suitable liquid, connected to a heat exchanger, was placed in the housing of the photovoltaic module and unwanted wavelengths of solar radiation were filtered out to minimise overheating of the cells. The selection of the liquid was based on factors such as boiling point, transparency towards visible radiation, absorption of infrared and ultraviolet radiation, stability, flow characteristics, heat transfer properties, and electrical nonconductivity. Using a square parabolic type reflector, more than two fold increase in output power was realised on a clear sunny day employing a 0.13 m{sup 2} silicon solar module. Without the cooling arrangement the panel temperature rose uncontrollably. (author)

  12. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  13. Brain endogenous liver X receptor ligands selectively promote midbrain neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Wang, Yuqin; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Sacchetti, Paola; Sousa, Kyle M; Bodin, Karl; Kirk, Jayne; Saltó, Carmen; Gustafsson, Magnus; Toledo, Enrique M; Karu, Kersti; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J; Arenas, Ernest

    2013-02-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrα and Lxrβ) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors critical for ventral midbrain neurogenesis in vivo. However, no endogenous midbrain Lxr ligand has so far been identified. Here we used LC/MS and functional assays to identify cholic acid as a new Lxr ligand. Moreover, 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (24,25-EC) was found to be the most potent and abundant Lxr ligand in the developing mouse midbrain. Both Lxr ligands promoted neural development in an Lxr-dependent manner in zebrafish in vivo. Notably, each ligand selectively regulated the development of distinct midbrain neuronal populations. Whereas cholic acid increased survival and neurogenesis of Brn3a-positive red nucleus neurons, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic neurogenesis. These results identify an entirely new class of highly selective and cell type-specific regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Moreover, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells, suggesting that Lxr ligands may thus contribute to the development of cell replacement and regenerative therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  14. A discriminative feature selection approach for shape analysis: Application to fetal brain cortical folding.

    PubMed

    Pontabry, J; Rousseau, F; Studholme, C; Koob, M; Dietemann, J-L

    2017-01-01

    The development of post-processing reconstruction techniques has opened new possibilities for the study of in-utero fetal brain MRI data. Recent cortical surface analysis have led to the computation of quantitative maps characterizing brain folding of the developing brain. In this paper, we describe a novel feature selection-based approach that is used to extract the most discriminative and sparse set of features of a given dataset. The proposed method is used to sparsely characterize cortical folding patterns of an in-utero fetal MR dataset, labeled with heterogeneous gestational age ranging from 26 weeks to 34 weeks. The proposed algorithm is validated on a synthetic dataset with both linear and non-linear dynamics, supporting its ability to capture deformation patterns across the dataset within only a few features. Results on the fetal brain dataset show that the temporal process of cortical folding related to brain maturation can be characterized by a very small set of points, located in anatomical regions changing across time. Quantitative measurements of growth against time are extracted from the set selected features to compare multiple brain regions (e.g. lobes and hemispheres) during the considered period of gestation.

  15. Selective atrophy of left hemisphere and frontal lobe of the brain in old men.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zu Y; Liu, Jing Z; Sahgal, Vinod; Wang, Bin; Yue, Guang H

    2005-02-01

    In this study, volumes of the whole brain, hemispheres, and frontal lobes of young and elderly adults were quantified by an automated method. Effects of age, sex, and side on absolute and relative volumes of the brain structures were evaluated. Compared with the young group, elderly participants showed a 15% volume loss in the whole brain and hemispheres, and a 22% volume loss in the frontal lobes. The relative volume of the left hemisphere in the elderly group decreased more than that of the right hemisphere. Elderly men showed significantly greater left hemisphere and left frontal lobe volume losses than did elderly women, indicating that the larger left hemisphere relative volume reduction is largely contributed to by selective atrophy of the left frontal lobe volume in elderly men. These results may reflect age- and sex-related functional deterioration in the left brain.

  16. [Serotonin receptors in the brain of animals selected for their domesticated type of behavior].

    PubMed

    Maslova, G B; Avgustinovich, D F

    1989-01-01

    Participation was studied of central serotonin receptors of the first and second types in behaviour change of animals selected by the character of defensive reaction to man. Serotonin receptors were determined by radioligand method by binding of the brain preparations 3H-serotonin and 3H-spiperone. An increase of C2 receptors number was found in the frontal brain cortex of the tame brown rats in comparison with the aggressive ones. Differences were not found in specific C1-receptor binding in the frontal brain cortex of tame and aggressive brown rats, silver foxes and American minks in various relatively early selection stages. It is supposed that disappearance of aggressive reaction to man at domestication is connected with an increase of C2 receptors number.

  17. Methylmercury induces the expression of TNF-α selectively in the brain of mice

    PubMed Central

    Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kim, Min-Seok; Fujimura, Masatake; Ito, Hitoyasu; Toyama, Takashi; Naganuma, Akira; Hwang, Gi-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury selectively damages the central nervous system (CNS). The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily includes representative cytokines that participate in the inflammatory response as well as cell survival, and apoptosis. In this study, we found that administration of methylmercury selectively induced TNF-α expression in the brain of mice. Although the accumulated mercury concentration in the liver and kidneys was greater than in the brain, TNF-α expression was induced to a greater extent in brain. Thus, it is possible that there may exist a selective mechanism by which methylmercury induces TNF-α expression in the brain. We also found that TNF-α expression was induced by methylmercury in C17.2 cells (mouse neural stem cells) and NF-κB may participate as a transcription factor in that induction. Further, we showed that the addition of TNF-α antagonist (WP9QY) reduced the toxicity of methylmercury to C17.2 cells. In contrast, the addition of recombinant TNF-α to the culture medium decreased the cell viability. We suggest that TNF-α may play a part in the selective damage of the CNS by methylmercury. Furthermore, our results indicate that the higher TNF-α expression induced by methylmercury maybe the cause of cell death, as TNF-α binds to its receptor after being released extracellularly. PMID:27910896

  18. The identification of a selective dopamine D2 partial agonist, D3 antagonist displaying high levels of brain exposure.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ian P; Blunt, Richard J; Lorthioir, Olivier E; Blowers, Stephen M; Gribble, Andy; Payne, Andrew H; Stansfield, Ian G; Wood, Martyn; Woollard, Patrick M; Reavill, Charlie; Howes, Claire M; Micheli, Fabrizio; Di Fabio, Romano; Donati, Daniele; Terreni, Silvia; Hamprecht, Dieter; Arista, Luca; Worby, Angela; Watson, Steve P

    2010-03-15

    The identification of a highly selective D(2) partial agonist, D(3) antagonist tool molecule which demonstrates high levels of brain exposure and selectivity against an extensive range of dopamine, serotonin, adrenergic, histamine, and muscarinic receptors is described.

  19. Localization of neural efficiency of the mathematically gifted brain through a feature subset selection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Gan, John Q; Wang, Haixian

    2015-10-01

    Based on the neural efficiency hypothesis and task-induced EEG gamma-band response (GBR), this study investigated the brain regions where neural resource could be most efficiently recruited by the math-gifted adolescents in response to varying cognitive demands. In this experiment, various GBR-based mental states were generated with three factors (level of mathematical ability, task complexity, and short-term learning) modulating the level of neural activation. A feature subset selection method based on the sequential forward floating search algorithm was used to identify an "optimal" combination of EEG channel locations, where the corresponding GBR feature subset could obtain the highest accuracy in discriminating pairwise mental states influenced by each experiment factor. The integrative results from multi-factor selections suggest that the right-lateral fronto-parietal system is highly involved in neural efficiency of the math-gifted brain, primarily including the bilateral superior frontal, right inferior frontal, right-lateral central and right temporal regions. By means of the localization method based on single-trial classification of mental states, new GBR features and EEG channel-based brain regions related to mathematical giftedness were identified, which could be useful for the brain function improvement of children/adolescents in mathematical learning through brain-computer interface systems.

  20. CHRONIC FETAL HYPOXIA PRODUCES SELECTIVE BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATED WITH ALTERED NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASES

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Yafeng; YU, Zhiyong; SUN, Yan; ZHOU, Hui; STITES, Josh; NEWELL, Katherine; WEINER, Carl P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The impact of chronic hypoxia on the nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes (NOSs) in specific brain structures is unknown. STUDY DESIGN Time-mated pregnant guinea pigs were exposed to 10.5% O2 for 14d (HPX) or room air (NMX); L-NIL (an iNOS inhibitor, 1mg/kg/day) was administered to HPX animals for 14d (L-NIL+HPX). Fetal brains were harvested at term. Multi-labeled immunofluorescence was used to generate a brain injury map. Laser capture microdissection and quantitative PCR were applied and cell injury markers, apoptosis activation, neuron loss, total NO, and the levels of individual NOSs quantified. RESULTS Chronic hypoxia causes selective fetal brain injury rather than globally. Injury is associated with differentially affected NO synthases in both neurons and glial cells, with iNOS up regulated at all injury sites. L-NIL attenuated the injury despite continued hypoxia. CONCLUSIONS These studies demonstrate chronic hypoxia selectively injures the fetal brain in part by the differential regulation of NOSs in an anatomic and cell specific manner. PMID:21272843

  1. Neuroprotection by selective neuronal deletion of Atg7 in neonatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cuicui; Ginet, Vanessa; Sun, Yanyan; Koike, Masato; Zhou, Kai; Li, Tao; Li, Hongfu; Li, Qian; Wang, Xiaoyang; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Truttmann, Anita C.; Kroemer, Guido; Puyal, Julien; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perinatal asphyxia induces neuronal cell death and brain injury, and is often associated with irreversible neurological deficits in children. There is an urgent need to elucidate the neuronal death mechanisms occurring after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). We here investigated the selective neuronal deletion of the Atg7 (autophagy related 7) gene on neuronal cell death and brain injury in a mouse model of severe neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Neuronal deletion of Atg7 prevented HI-induced autophagy, resulted in 42% decrease of tissue loss compared to wild-type mice after the insult, and reduced cell death in multiple brain regions, including apoptosis, as shown by decreased caspase-dependent and -independent cell death. Moreover, we investigated the lentiform nucleus of human newborns who died after severe perinatal asphyxia and found increased neuronal autophagy after severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy compared to control uninjured brains, as indicated by the numbers of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3)-, LAMP1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1)-, and CTSD (cathepsin D)-positive cells. These findings reveal that selective neuronal deletion of Atg7 is strongly protective against neuronal death and overall brain injury occurring after HI and suggest that inhibition of HI-enhanced autophagy should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of human newborns developing severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:26727396

  2. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, De-guo; Jin, Shi-li; Li, Gong-ying; Li, Qing-qing; Li, Zhi-ruo; Ma, Hong-xia; Zhuo, Chuan-jun; Jiang, Rong-huan; Ye, Min-jie

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress. PMID:27857753

  3. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, De-Guo; Jin, Shi-Li; Li, Gong-Ying; Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Zhi-Ruo; Ma, Hong-Xia; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun; Jiang, Rong-Huan; Ye, Min-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  4. Brain histamine levels in the hamster during the estrous cycle and on selected days of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hine, R J; Orsini, M W; Hegstrand, L R

    1986-01-01

    Brain histamine levels were determined in golden hamster hypothalamus and 'brain minus hypothalamus' on each of the 4 days of the estrous cycle and on selected days of pregnancy. The highest histamine content of the hypothalamus was observed on day 3 of the estrous cycle. The highest histamine content of the hypothalamus was observed on day 3 of the estrous cycle, which is the day prior to recurrence of heat on day 4. Day 4 terminates in ovulation. The histamine level in the remainder of the brain peaked on day 2. During gestation the histamine content of the 'brain minus hypothalamus' was greatest on day 5, while the maximum content of histamine in the hypothalamus was not reached until day 8. After the 8th day of pregnancy, there was an overall decline in brain histamine that continued until parturition. The hypothalamic histamine level in nonpregnant females was not different from that of males. However, in the remainder of the brain, histamine levels in females on days 1 and 2 of the estrous cycle were higher than in males.

  5. Oscillatory multiplexing of population codes for selective communication in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Thomas; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian brains exhibit population oscillations whose structures vary in time and space according to behavioural state. A proposed function of these oscillations is to control the flow of signals among anatomically connected networks. However, the nature of neural coding that may support oscillatory selective communication has received relatively little attention. Here we consider the role of multiplexing, whereby multiple information streams share a common neural substrate. We suggest that multiplexing implemented through periodic modulation of firing rate population codes enables flexible reconfiguration of effective connectivity among brain areas. PMID:24434912

  6. Kainic acid inhibits protein amino acid incorporation in select rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Soriano, M A; Ferrer, I; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1994-11-21

    Regional incorporation of labelled methionine into proteins was studied with quantitative autoradiography in different regions of the rat brain 2.5 h following systemic kainic acid administration. Labelled protein concentration was found reduced to approximately 40% of control values in the pyramidal cell layer of hippocampus, piriform, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices, ventral lateral septum and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. These regions showed increased levels of label not incorporated into proteins, indicating that free labelled methionine was available for protein synthesis. Reduction of protein amino acid incorporation in those brain regions selectively affected by kainic acid may be involved in subsequent tissue damage.

  7. Multi-atlas based segmentation of brain images: atlas selection and its effect on accuracy.

    PubMed

    Aljabar, P; Heckemann, R A; Hammers, A; Hajnal, J V; Rueckert, D

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative research in neuroimaging often relies on anatomical segmentation of human brain MR images. Recent multi-atlas based approaches provide highly accurate structural segmentations of the brain by propagating manual delineations from multiple atlases in a database to a query subject and combining them. The atlas databases which can be used for these purposes are growing steadily. We present a framework to address the consequent problems of scale in multi-atlas segmentation. We show that selecting a custom subset of atlases for each query subject provides more accurate subcortical segmentations than those given by non-selective combination of random atlas subsets. Using a database of 275 atlases, we tested an image-based similarity criterion as well as a demographic criterion (age) in a leave-one-out cross-validation study. Using a custom ranking of the database for each subject, we combined a varying number n of atlases from the top of the ranked list. The resulting segmentations were compared with manual reference segmentations using Dice overlap. Image-based selection provided better segmentations than random subsets (mean Dice overlap 0.854 vs. 0.811 for the estimated optimal subset size, n=20). Age-based selection resulted in a similar marked improvement. We conclude that selecting atlases from large databases for atlas-based brain image segmentation improves the accuracy of the segmentations achieved. We show that image similarity is a suitable selection criterion and give results based on selecting atlases by age that demonstrate the value of meta-information for selection.

  8. Free Language Selection in the Bilingual Brain: An Event-Related fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Peiyu; Li, Dan; Qiu, Jiang; Shen, Tong; Xie, Peng

    2015-07-16

    Bilingual speakers may select between two languages either on demand (forced language selection) or on their own volition (free language selection). However, the neural substrates underlying free and forced language selection may differ. While the neural substrates underlying forced language selection have been well-explored with language switching paradigms, those underlying free language selection have remained unclear. Using a modified digit-naming switching paradigm, we addressed the neural substrates underlying free language selection by contrasting free language switching with forced language switching. For a digit-pair trial, Chinese-English bilinguals named each digit in Chinese or English either on demand under forced language selection condition or on their own volition under free language selection condition. The results revealed activation in the frontoparietal regions that mediate volition of language selection. Furthermore, a comparison of free and forced language switching demonstrated differences in the patterns of brain activation. Additionally, free language switching showed reduced switching costs as compared to forced language switching. These findings suggest differences between the mechanism(s) underlying free and forced language switching. As such, the current study suggests interactivity between control of volition and control of language switching in free language selection, providing insights into a model of bilingual language control.

  9. A Wearable Channel Selection-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Motor Imagery Detection.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Chun; Chien, Tsung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Ho; Fang, Wai-Chi; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2016-02-06

    Motor imagery-based brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication interface between an external machine and the brain. Many kinds of spatial filters are used in BCIs to enhance the electroencephalography (EEG) features related to motor imagery. The approach of channel selection, developed to reserve meaningful EEG channels, is also an important technique for the development of BCIs. However, current BCI systems require a conventional EEG machine and EEG electrodes with conductive gel to acquire multi-channel EEG signals and then transmit these EEG signals to the back-end computer to perform the approach of channel selection. This reduces the convenience of use in daily life and increases the limitations of BCI applications. In order to improve the above issues, a novel wearable channel selection-based brain-computer interface is proposed. Here, retractable comb-shaped active dry electrodes are designed to measure the EEG signals on a hairy site, without conductive gel. By the design of analog CAR spatial filters and the firmware of EEG acquisition module, the function of spatial filters could be performed without any calculation, and channel selection could be performed in the front-end device to improve the practicability of detecting motor imagery in the wearable EEG device directly or in commercial mobile phones or tablets, which may have relatively low system specifications. Finally, the performance of the proposed BCI is investigated, and the experimental results show that the proposed system is a good wearable BCI system prototype.

  10. Discovery of a Highly Selective, Brain-Penetrant Aminopyrazole LRRK2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bryan K; Estrada, Anthony A; Chen, Huifen; Atherall, John; Baker-Glenn, Charles; Beresford, Alan; Burdick, Daniel J; Chambers, Mark; Dominguez, Sara L; Drummond, Jason; Gill, Andrew; Kleinheinz, Tracy; Le Pichon, Claire E; Medhurst, Andrew D; Liu, Xingrong; Moffat, John G; Nash, Kevin; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Sheng, Zejuan; Shore, Daniel G; Van de Poël, Hervé; Zhang, Shuo; Zhu, Haitao; Sweeney, Zachary K

    2013-01-10

    The modulation of LRRK2 kinase activity by a selective small molecule inhibitor has been proposed as a potentially viable treatment for Parkinson's disease. By using aminopyrazoles as aniline bioisosteres, we discovered a novel series of LRRK2 inhibitors. Herein, we describe our optimization effort that resulted in the identification of a highly potent, brain-penetrant aminopyrazole LRRK2 inhibitor (18) that addressed the liabilities (e.g., poor solubility and metabolic soft spots) of our previously disclosed anilino-aminopyrimidine inhibitors. In in vivo rodent PKPD studies, 18 demonstrated good brain exposure and engendered significant reduction in brain pLRRK2 levels post-ip administration. The strategies of bioisosteric substitution of aminopyrazoles for anilines and attenuation of CYP1A2 inhibition described herein have potential applications to other drug discovery programs.

  11. Selective Heart, Brain and Body Perfusion in Open Aortic Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Sven; Kari, Fabian; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Benk, Christoph; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Open aortic arch replacement is a complex and challenging procedure, especially in post dissection aneurysms and in redo procedures after previous surgery of the ascending aorta or aortic root. We report our experience with the simultaneous selective perfusion of heart, brain, and remaining body to ensure optimal perfusion and to minimize perfusion-related risks during these procedures. We used a specially configured heart–lung machine with a centrifugal pump as arterial pump and an additional roller pump for the selective cerebral perfusion. Initial arterial cannulation is achieved via femoral artery or right axillary artery. After lower body circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for the distal arch anastomosis, we started selective lower body perfusion simultaneously to the selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and heart perfusion. Eighteen patients were successfully treated with this perfusion strategy from October 2012 to November 2015. No complications related to the heart–lung machine and the cannulation occurred during the procedures. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 239 ± 33 minutes, the simultaneous selective perfusion of brain, heart, and remaining body lasted 55 ± 23 minutes. One patient suffered temporary neurological deficit that resolved completely during intensive care unit stay. No patient experienced a permanent neurological deficit or end-organ dysfunction. These high-risk procedures require a concept with a special setup of the heart–lung machine. Our perfusion strategy for aortic arch replacement ensures a selective perfusion of heart, brain, and lower body during this complex procedure and we observed excellent outcomes in this small series. This perfusion strategy is also applicable for redo procedures. PMID:27729705

  12. Legionella pneumophila in cooling water systems. Report of a survey of cooling towers in London and a pilot trial of selected biocides.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, J. B.; Bartlett, C. L.; Newton, U. A.; White, R. A.; Jones, N. L.

    1982-01-01

    Fourteen recirculating cooling water systems were surveyed during the summer, 1981, to see what factors might influence the prevalence of Legionella pneumophila. The effect on the organism of three anti-microbials was studied, each in two systems, by intermittent treatment at two week intervals. L. pneumophila was isolated from six of the 14 cooling systems at the beginning of the trial but by the end was present in ten. An association was found between the presence of the organism and the concentration of dissolved solids, and chlorides and the pH. There also appeared to be associations with exclusion of light and higher water temperatures. Repeated tests on eight untreated systems showed that two were consistently infected, three became and remained infected, one was infected on a single occasion and two were never infected with L. pneumophila. Treatment of a contaminated system, either with a 10 p.p.m mixture of a quaternary ammonium compound and tributyltinoxide or slow release chlorine briquettes (maximum recorded free chlorine level 1.2 p.p.m.), did not eliminated legionellae. Treatment of two infected towers with a chlorinated phenol (100 p.p.m.) eliminated legionellae for at least three days, but after 14 days the organism was again found. PMID:7086112

  13. Fabrication of an inexpensive, implantable cooling device for reversible brain deactivation in animals ranging from rodents to primates

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Dylan F.; Goldring, Adam B.; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Tsourkas, Phillippos; Recanzone, Gregg H.; Tiriac, Alex; Pan, Tingrui; Simon, Scott I.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a compact and lightweight microfluidic cooling device to reversibly deactivate one or more areas of the neocortex to examine its functional macrocircuitry as well as behavioral and cortical plasticity. The device, which we term the “cooling chip,” consists of thin silicone tubing (through which chilled ethanol is circulated) embedded in mechanically compliant polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). PDMS is tailored to compact device dimensions (as small as 21 mm3) that precisely accommodate the geometry of the targeted cortical area. The biocompatible design makes it suitable for both acute preparations and chronic implantation for long-term behavioral studies. The cooling chip accommodates an in-cortex microthermocouple measuring local cortical temperature. A microelectrode may be used to record simultaneous neural responses at the same location. Cortex temperature is controlled by computer regulation of the coolant flow, which can achieve a localized cortical temperature drop from 37 to 20°C in less than 3 min and maintain target temperature to within ±0.3°C indefinitely. Here we describe cooling chip fabrication and performance in mediating cessation of neural signaling in acute preparations of rodents, ferrets, and primates. PMID:22402651

  14. Fabrication of an inexpensive, implantable cooling device for reversible brain deactivation in animals ranging from rodents to primates.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Dylan F; Goldring, Adam B; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Tsourkas, Phillippos; Recanzone, Gregg H; Tiriac, Alex; Pan, Tingrui; Simon, Scott I; Krubitzer, Leah

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a compact and lightweight microfluidic cooling device to reversibly deactivate one or more areas of the neocortex to examine its functional macrocircuitry as well as behavioral and cortical plasticity. The device, which we term the "cooling chip," consists of thin silicone tubing (through which chilled ethanol is circulated) embedded in mechanically compliant polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). PDMS is tailored to compact device dimensions (as small as 21 mm(3)) that precisely accommodate the geometry of the targeted cortical area. The biocompatible design makes it suitable for both acute preparations and chronic implantation for long-term behavioral studies. The cooling chip accommodates an in-cortex microthermocouple measuring local cortical temperature. A microelectrode may be used to record simultaneous neural responses at the same location. Cortex temperature is controlled by computer regulation of the coolant flow, which can achieve a localized cortical temperature drop from 37 to 20°C in less than 3 min and maintain target temperature to within ±0.3°C indefinitely. Here we describe cooling chip fabrication and performance in mediating cessation of neural signaling in acute preparations of rodents, ferrets, and primates.

  15. Positive selection on NIN, a gene involved in neurogenesis, and primate brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, S H; Mundy, N I

    2012-11-01

    A long-held dogma in comparative neurobiology has been that the number of neurons under a given area of cortical surface is constant. As such, the attention of those seeking to understand the genetic basis of brain evolution has focused on genes with functions in the lateral expansion of the developing cerebral cortex. However, new data suggest that cortical cytoarchitecture is not constant across primates, raising the possibility that changes in radial cortical development played a role in primate brain evolution. We present the first analysis of a gene with functions relevant to this dimension of brain evolution. We show that NIN, a gene necessary for maintaining asymmetric, neurogenic divisions of radial glial cells (RGCs), evolved adaptively during anthropoid evolution. We explored how this selection relates to neural phenotypes and find a significant association between selection on NIN and neonatal brain size in catarrhines. Our analyses suggest a relationship with prenatal neurogenesis and identify the human data point as an outlier, possibly explained by postnatal changes in development on the human lineage. A similar pattern is found in platyrrhines, but the highly encephalized genus Cebus departs from the general trend. We further show that the evolution of NIN may be associated with variation in neuron number not explained by increases in surface area, a result consistent with NIN's role in neurogenic divisions of RGCs. Our combined results suggest a role for NIN in the evolution of cortical development.

  16. Phosphatidylserine-selective targeting and anticancer effects of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles on brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Víctor M; Chu, Zhengtao; Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Kendler, Ady; Rixe, Olivier; Warnick, Ronald E; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-08-30

    Brain tumors, either primary (e.g., glioblastoma multiforme) or secondary (metastatic), remain among the most intractable and fatal of all cancers. We have shown that nanovesicles consisting of Saposin C (SapC) and dioleylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) are able to effectively target and kill cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These actions are a consequence of the affinity of SapC-DOPS for phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid abundantly present in the outer membrane of a variety of tumor cells and tumor-associated vasculature. In this study, we first characterize SapC-DOPS bioavailability and antitumor effects on human glioblastoma xenografts, and confirm SapC-DOPS specificity towards phosphatidylserine by showing that glioblastoma targeting is abrogated after in vivo exposure to lactadherin, which binds phosphatidylserine with high affinity. Second, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS selectively targets brain metastases-forming cancer cells both in vitro, in co-cultures with human astrocytes, and in vivo, in mouse models of brain metastases derived from human breast or lung cancer cells. Third, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS have cytotoxic activity against metastatic breast cancer cells in vitro, and prolong the survival of mice harboring brain metastases. Taken together, these results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors.

  17. Evaluation of region selective bilirubin-induced brain damage as a basis for a pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dal Ben, Matteo; Bottin, Cristina; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Tiribelli, Claudio; Gazzin, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The neurologic manifestations of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in the central nervous system (CNS) exhibit high variations in the severity and appearance of motor, auditory and cognitive symptoms, which is suggestive of a still unexplained selective topography of bilirubin-induced damage. By applying the organotypic brain culture (OBC: preserving in vitro the cellular complexity, connection and architecture of the in vivo brain) technique to study hyperbilirubinemia, we mapped the regional target of bilirubin-induced damage, demonstrated a multifactorial toxic action of bilirubin, and used this information to evaluate the efficacy of drugs applicable to newborns to protect the brain. OBCs from 8-day-old rat pups showed a 2–13 fold higher sensitivity to bilirubin damage than 2-day-old preparations. The hippocampus, inferior colliculus and cerebral cortex were the only brain regions affected, presenting a mixed inflammatory-oxidative mechanism. Glutamate excitotoxicity was appreciable in only the hippocampus and inferior colliculus. Single drug treatment (indomethacin, curcumin, MgCl2) significantly improved cell viability in all regions, while the combined (cocktail) administration of the three drugs almost completely prevented damage in the most affected area (hippocampus). Our data may supports an innovative (complementary to phototherapy) approach for directly protecting the newborn brain from bilirubin neurotoxicity. PMID:28102362

  18. Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Zareba, Mariusz; Subczynski, Witold Karol

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that a high dietary intake of carotenoids may offer protection against age-related macular degeneration, cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Humans cannot synthesize carotenoids and depend on their dietary intake. Major carotenoids that have been found in human plasma can be divided into two groups, carotenes (nonpolar molecules, such as β-carotene, α-carotene or lycopene) and xanthophylls (polar carotenoids that include an oxygen atom in their structure, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin). Only two dietary carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin (macular xanthophylls), are selectively accumulated in the human retina. A third carotenoid, meso-zeaxanthin, is formed directly in the human retina from lutein. Additionally, xanthophylls account for about 70% of total carotenoids in all brain regions. Some specific properties of these polar carotenoids must explain why they, among other available carotenoids, were selected during evolution to protect the retina and brain. It is also likely that the selective uptake and deposition of macular xanthophylls in the retina and brain are enhanced by specific xanthophyll-binding proteins. We hypothesize that the high membrane solubility and preferential transmembrane orientation of macular xanthophylls distinguish them from other dietary carotenoids, enhance their chemical and physical stability in retina and brain membranes and maximize their protective action in these organs. Most importantly, xanthophylls are selectively concentrated in the most vulnerable regions of lipid bilayer membranes enriched in polyunsaturated lipids. This localization is ideal if macular xanthophylls are to act as lipid-soluble antioxidants, which is the most accepted mechanism through which lutein and zeaxanthin protect neural tissue against degenerative diseases. PMID:27030822

  19. Antidepressant-Like Properties of Novel HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors with Improved Brain Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Jeanine; Boulden, Janette; Lee, Bridgin G; Blendy, Julie A; Jarpe, Matthew; Mazitschek, Ralph; Van Duzer, John H; Jones, Simon; Berton, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors have been reported to produce antidepressant and pro-cognitive effects in animal models, however, poor brain bioavailability or lack of isoform selectivity of current probes has limited our understanding of their mode of action. We report the characterization of novel pyrimidine hydroxyl amide small molecule inhibitors of HDAC6, brain bioavailable upon systemic administration. We show that two compounds in this family, ACY-738 and ACY-775, inhibit HDAC6 with low nanomolar potency and a selectivity of 60- to 1500-fold over class I HDACs. In contrast to tubastatin A, a reference HDAC6 inhibitor with similar potency and peripheral activity, but more limited brain bioavailability, ACY-738 and ACY-775 induce dramatic increases in α-tubulin acetylation in brain and stimulate mouse exploratory behaviors in novel, but not familiar environments. Interestingly, despite a lack of detectable effect on histone acetylation, we show that ACY-738 and ACY-775 share the antidepressant-like properties of other HDAC inhibitors, such as SAHA and MS-275, in the tail suspension test and social defeat paradigm. These effects of ACY-738 and ACY-775 are directly attributable to the inhibition of HDAC6 expressed centrally, as they are fully abrogated in mice with a neural-specific loss of function of HDAC6. Furthermore, administered in combination, a behaviorally inactive dose of ACY-738 markedly potentiates the anti-immobility activity of a subactive dose of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram. Our results validate new isoform-selective probes for in vivo pharmacological studies of HDAC6 in the CNS and reinforce the viability of this HDAC isoform as a potential target for antidepressant development. PMID:23954848

  20. Selection of brain metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells determined by growth on hard agar.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J; Langley, Robert R

    2011-05-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44(+) and CD133(+) and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice.

  1. Measurement of brain glutamate and glutamine by spectrally-selective refocusing at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Choi, Changho; Coupland, Nicholas J; Bhardwaj, Paramjit P; Malykhin, Nikolai; Gheorghiu, Dan; Allen, Peter S

    2006-05-01

    A new single-voxel proton NMR spectrally-selective refocusing method for measuring glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) in the human brain in vivo at 3T is reported. Triple-resonance selective 180 degrees RF pulses with a bandwidth of 12 Hz were implemented within point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) for selective detection of Glu or Gln, and simultaneous acquisition of creatine singlets for use as a reference in phase correction. The carriers of the spectrally-selective 180 degrees pulses and the echo times (TEs) were optimized with both numerical and experimental analyses of the filtering performance, which enabled measurements of the target metabolites with negligible contamination from N-acetylaspartate and glutathione. The concentrations of Glu and Gln in the prefrontal cortex were estimated to be 9.7+/-0.5 and 3.0+/-0.7 mM (mean+/-SD, N=7), with reference to Cr at 8 mM.

  2. The influence of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity and beta-1 receptor selectivity on the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling in normotensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Lenders, J W; Salemans, J; de Boo, T; Lemmens, W A; Thien, T; van't Laar, A

    1986-03-01

    A double-blind randomized study was designed to investigate differences in the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling during dosing with placebo or one of four beta-blockers: propranolol, atenolol, pindolol, and acebutolol. In 11 normotensive nonsmoking subjects, finger skin temperature was measured with a thermocouple before and 20 minutes after immersion of one hand in a water bath at 16 degrees C. This finger cooling test caused no significant changes in systemic hemodynamics such as arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and forearm blood flow. The recovery of finger skin temperature during propranolol dosing was better than that during pindolol and atenolol dosing. There were no differences between the recoveries of skin temperature during pindolol, atenolol, and acebutolol dosing. Thus we could demonstrate no favorable effect of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity or beta 1-selectivity on the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling.

  3. Chronic exposure to aluminum in drinking water increases inflammatory parameters selectively in the brain.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A; Becaria, A; Lahiri, D K; Sharman, K; Bondy, S C

    2004-02-15

    A link between aluminum (Al) exposure and age-related neurological disorders has long been proposed. Although the exact mechanism by which the metal may influence disease processes is unknown, there is evidence that exposure to Al causes an increase in both oxidative stress and inflammatory events. These processes have also been suggested to play a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and exposure to the metal may contribute to the disorder by potentiating these events. Al lactate (0.01, 0.1, and 1 mM) in drinking water for 10 weeks increased inflammatory processes in the brains of mice. The lowest of these levels is in the range found to increase the prevalence of AD in regions where the concentrations of the metal are elevated in residential drinking water (Flaten [2001] Brain Res. Bull. 55:187-196). Nuclear factor-kappaB as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha) levels were increased in the brains of treated animals. The mRNA for TNF-alpha was also up-regulated following treatment. Enhancement of glial fibrillary acidic protein levels and reactive microglia was seen in the striatum of Al-treated animals. The level of amyloid beta (Abeta40) was not significantly altered in the brains of exposed animals. Insofar as no parallel changes were observed in the serum or liver of treated animals, the proinflammatory effects of the metal may be selective to the brain. Al exposure may not be sufficient to cause abnormal production of the principal component of senile plaques directly but does exacerbate underlying events associated with brain aging and thus could contribute to progression of neurodegeneration.

  4. Selection for increased voluntary wheel-running affects behavior and brain monoamines in mice.

    PubMed

    Waters, R Parrish; Pringle, R B; Forster, G L; Renner, K J; Malisch, J L; Garland, T; Swallow, J G

    2013-05-01

    Selective-breeding of house mice for increased voluntary wheel-running has resulted in multiple physiological and behavioral changes. Characterizing these differences may lead to experimental models that can elucidate factors involved in human diseases and disorders associated with physical inactivity, or potentially treated by physical activity, such as diabetes, obesity, and depression. Herein, we present ethological data for adult males from a line of mice that has been selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel-running and from a non-selected control line, housed with or without wheels. Additionally, we present concentrations of central monoamines in limbic, striatal, and midbrain regions. We monitored wheel-running for 8 weeks, and observed home-cage behavior during the last 5 weeks of the study. Mice from the selected line accumulated more revolutions per day than controls due to increased speed and duration of running. Selected mice exhibited more active behaviors than controls, regardless of wheel access, and exhibited less inactivity and grooming than controls. Selective-breeding also influenced the longitudinal patterns of behavior. We found statistically significant differences in monoamine concentrations and associated metabolites in brain regions that influence exercise and motivational state. These results suggest underlying neurochemical differences between selected and control lines that may influence the observed differences in behavior. Our results bolster the argument that selected mice can provide a useful model of human psychological and physiological diseases and disorders.

  5. Selective capture of endothelial and perivascular cells from brain microvessels using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Kinnecom, Katie; Pachter, Joel S

    2005-12-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the major cell types comprising brain microvessels offers a powerful technology to explore the molecular basis of the blood-brain barrier in health and disease. However, the ability to selectively retrieve endothelial or perivascular cells, without cross-contamination from the other, has proven difficult. Additionally, histochemical methods previously described for use with LCM have not allowed for identification of all the different size branches of the microvascular tree. Here, we describe a double immunostaining method, combining bright-field and fluorescence microscopy, and using an extensive dehydration with xylene, to clearly identify and spatially resolve endothelial from perivascular cells within all size microvascular branches in frozen brain sections. LCM of these sections, coupled with RNA analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, revealed that captured endothelial cells show endothelial markers but no detectable markers for astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes. Conversely, captured astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes demonstrate their respective markers, but not those of endothelial cells. This approach has applicability to microarray analysis, thereby enabling global gene profiling of the different cell types along the entirety of the brain microvascular tree.

  6. Toward high performance, weakly invasive brain computer interfaces using selective visual attention.

    PubMed

    Rotermund, David; Ernst, Udo A; Mandon, Sunita; Taylor, Katja; Smiyukha, Yulia; Kreiter, Andreas K; Pawelzik, Klaus R

    2013-04-03

    Brain-computer interfaces have been proposed as a solution for paralyzed persons to communicate and interact with their environment. However, the neural signals used for controlling such prostheses are often noisy and unreliable, resulting in a low performance of real-world applications. Here we propose neural signatures of selective visual attention in epidural recordings as a fast, reliable, and high-performance control signal for brain prostheses. We recorded epidural field potentials with chronically implanted electrode arrays from two macaque monkeys engaged in a shape-tracking task. For single trials, we classified the direction of attention to one of two visual stimuli based on spectral amplitude, coherence, and phase difference in time windows fixed relative to stimulus onset. Classification performances reached up to 99.9%, and the information about attentional states could be transferred at rates exceeding 580 bits/min. Good classification can already be achieved in time windows as short as 200 ms. The classification performance changed dynamically over the trial and modulated with the task's varying demands for attention. For all three signal features, the information about the direction of attention was contained in the γ-band. The most informative feature was spectral amplitude. Together, these findings establish a novel paradigm for constructing brain prostheses as, for example, virtual spelling boards, promising a major gain in performance and robustness for human brain-computer interfaces.

  7. Brain activity during divided and selective attention to auditory and visual sentence comprehension tasks.

    PubMed

    Moisala, Mona; Salmela, Viljami; Salo, Emma; Carlson, Synnöve; Vuontela, Virve; Salonen, Oili; Alho, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we measured brain activity of human participants while they performed a sentence congruence judgment task in either the visual or auditory modality separately, or in both modalities simultaneously. Significant performance decrements were observed when attention was divided between the two modalities compared with when one modality was selectively attended. Compared with selective attention (i.e., single tasking), divided attention (i.e., dual-tasking) did not recruit additional cortical regions, but resulted in increased activity in medial and lateral frontal regions which were also activated by the component tasks when performed separately. Areas involved in semantic language processing were revealed predominantly in the left lateral prefrontal cortex by contrasting incongruent with congruent sentences. These areas also showed significant activity increases during divided attention in relation to selective attention. In the sensory cortices, no crossmodal inhibition was observed during divided attention when compared with selective attention to one modality. Our results suggest that the observed performance decrements during dual-tasking are due to interference of the two tasks because they utilize the same part of the cortex. Moreover, semantic dual-tasking did not appear to recruit additional brain areas in comparison with single tasking, and no crossmodal inhibition was observed during intermodal divided attention.

  8. Effects of selective cooling of the facial area on physiological and metabolic output during graded maximal or prolonged submaximal exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, A.; Boisvert, P.; Brisson, G. R.; Decarufel, D.; Laurencelle, L.; Dulac, S.; Vogelaere, P.; Therminarias, A.

    1989-06-01

    Physiological and metabolic output responses to facial cooling during a graded maximal exercise and a prolonged submaximal exercise lasting 30 min at 65%dot VO_2 max were investigated in five male subjects. Pedalling on a cycle ergometer was performed both with and without facial cooling (10°C, 4.6 m s-1). Facial cooling at the end of graded maximal exercise apparently had no effect on plasma lactate (LA), maximal oxygen consumption (dot VO_2 max), maximal heart rate (HR max), rectal temperature ( T re), work-load, lactate threshold (LT), ventilatory threshold (VT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA). However, the response to facial cooling after prolonged submaximal exercise is significantly different for heart rate and work-load. The results suggest that facial wind stimulation during maximal exercise does not produce a stress high enough to alter the metabolic and physiological responses.

  9. Goal selection versus process control while learning to use a brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Audrey S.; Rose, Minn L.; He, Bin

    2011-06-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) can be used to accomplish a task without requiring motor output. Two major control strategies used by BCIs during task completion are process control and goal selection. In process control, the user exerts continuous control and independently executes the given task. In goal selection, the user communicates their goal to the BCI and then receives assistance executing the task. A previous study has shown that goal selection is more accurate and faster in use. An unanswered question is, which control strategy is easier to learn? This study directly compares goal selection and process control while learning to use a sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI. Twenty young healthy human subjects were randomly assigned either to a goal selection or a process control-based paradigm for eight sessions. At the end of the study, the best user from each paradigm completed two additional sessions using all paradigms randomly mixed. The results of this study were that goal selection required a shorter training period for increased speed, accuracy, and information transfer over process control. These results held for the best subjects as well as in the general subject population. The demonstrated characteristics of goal selection make it a promising option to increase the utility of BCIs intended for both disabled and able-bodied users.

  10. Perinatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure: impact on brain development and neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pawluski, Jodi L

    2012-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications are the most common antidepressant treatment used during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Up to 10% of pregnant women are prescribed SSRIs. Serotonin plays an integral part in neurodevelopment, and questions have been raised about the placental transfer of SSRIs and the effects of preventing reuptake of presynaptic serotonin on fetal neurodevelopment. Preclinical data is beginning to document a role of early exposure to SSRIs in long-term developmental outcomes related to a number of brain regions, such as the hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum. To date, the majority of preclinical work has investigated the developmental effects of SSRIs in the offspring of healthy mothers; however, more research is needed on the effects of these medications in the face of maternal adversity. This minireview will highlight emerging evidence from clinical and preclinical studies investigating the impact of perinatal SSRI exposure on brain development and neural plasticity.

  11. Artificial selection on brain-expressed genes during the domestication of dog.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Vonholdt, Bridgett M; Reynolds, Andy; Boyko, Adam R; Wayne, Robert K; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-08-01

    Domesticated dogs have many unique behaviors not found in gray wolves that have augmented their interaction and communication with humans. The genetic basis of such unique behaviors in dogs remains poorly understood. We found that genes within regions highly differentiated between outbred Chinese native dogs (CNs) and wolves show high bias for expression localized to brain tissues, particularly the prefrontal cortex, a specific region responsible for complex cognitive behaviors. In contrast, candidate genes showing high population differentiation between CNs and German Shepherd dogs (GSs) did not demonstrate significant expression bias. These observations indicate that these candidate genes highly expressed in the brain have rapidly evolved. This rapid evolution was probably driven by artificial selection during the primary transition from wolves to ancient dogs and was consistent with the evolution of dog-specific characteristics, such as behavior transformation, for thousands of years.

  12. Automatic motor task selection via a bandit algorithm for a brain-controlled button

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruitet, Joan; Carpentier, Alexandra; Munos, Rémi; Clerc, Maureen

    2013-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) based on sensorimotor rhythms use a variety of motor tasks, such as imagining moving the right or left hand, the feet or the tongue. Finding the tasks that yield best performance, specifically to each user, is a time-consuming preliminary phase to a BCI experiment. This study presents a new adaptive procedure to automatically select (online) the most promising motor task for an asynchronous brain-controlled button. Approach. We develop for this purpose an adaptive algorithm UCB-classif based on the stochastic bandit theory and design an EEG experiment to test our method. We compare (offline) the adaptive algorithm to a naïve selection strategy which uses uniformly distributed samples from each task. We also run the adaptive algorithm online to fully validate the approach. Main results. By not wasting time on inefficient tasks, and focusing on the most promising ones, this algorithm results in a faster task selection and a more efficient use of the BCI training session. More precisely, the offline analysis reveals that the use of this algorithm can reduce the time needed to select the most appropriate task by almost half without loss in precision, or alternatively, allow us to investigate twice the number of tasks within a similar time span. Online tests confirm that the method leads to an optimal task selection. Significance. This study is the first one to optimize the task selection phase by an adaptive procedure. By increasing the number of tasks that can be tested in a given time span, the proposed method could contribute to reducing ‘BCI illiteracy’.

  13. Fast functional imaging of multiple brain regions in intact zebrafish larvae using selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Panier, Thomas; Romano, Sebastián A; Olive, Raphaël; Pietri, Thomas; Sumbre, Germán; Candelier, Raphaël; Debrégeas, Georges

    2013-01-01

    The optical transparency and the small dimensions of zebrafish at the larval stage make it a vertebrate model of choice for brain-wide in-vivo functional imaging. However, current point-scanning imaging techniques, such as two-photon or confocal microscopy, impose a strong limit on acquisition speed which in turn sets the number of neurons that can be simultaneously recorded. At 5 Hz, this number is of the order of one thousand, i.e., approximately 1-2% of the brain. Here we demonstrate that this limitation can be greatly overcome by using Selective-plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM). Zebrafish larvae expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP3 were illuminated with a scanned laser sheet and imaged with a camera whose optical axis was oriented orthogonally to the illumination plane. This optical sectioning approach was shown to permit functional imaging of a very large fraction of the brain volume of 5-9-day-old larvae with single- or near single-cell resolution. The spontaneous activity of up to 5,000 neurons was recorded at 20 Hz for 20-60 min. By rapidly scanning the specimen in the axial direction, the activity of 25,000 individual neurons from 5 different z-planes (approximately 30% of the entire brain) could be simultaneously monitored at 4 Hz. Compared to point-scanning techniques, this imaging strategy thus yields a ≃20-fold increase in data throughput (number of recorded neurons times acquisition rate) without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The extended field of view offered by the SPIM method allowed us to directly identify large scale ensembles of neurons, spanning several brain regions, that displayed correlated activity and were thus likely to participate in common neural processes. The benefits and limitations of SPIM for functional imaging in zebrafish as well as future developments are briefly discussed.

  14. Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gingras-Hill, Geneviève; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J.; Bernstein, Mark; Jiang, Haiyan; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

  15. New conceptual method for directly cooling the target biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yan; Liu, Jing

    2005-01-01

    Hypothermia is a commonly adopted strategy to decrease the cerebral oxygen demands, which is critical for the patient to sustain longer time when subjected to a hypoxia. However, when circulatory arrest occurs, the traditional approaches such as selective brain cooling (SBC), systemic body cooling or perfusing cool blood are often not very helpful due to their slow cooling rates in preventing the tendency of a slight cerebral temperature increase at the onset of circulatory arrest. To resolve such difficult issue, a new conceptual volumetric cooling method (VCM) through minimally invasive injection of physiological coolant was proposed in this study. A heat and fluid transport model based on porous medium configuration was established to describe the thermal responses of brain tissues during hypothermia resuscitation. Theoretical calculations indicated that VCM could significantly improve the cooling rate in the deep part of the biological tissues within a desired period of time. To further test this approach, a series of either in vitro or in vivo animal experiments were performed, which also strongly supported the theoretical predictions and indicated that VCM was well appropriate for the localized cooling of target tissues. The concept of the present VCM could also possibly be extended to more wide clinical situations, when an instant and highly localized cooling for the specific organs or tissues are urgently requested. It also raised challenging issues such as injury or negative effect for the clinical operation of this VCM, which need to be addressed in the coming study.

  16. Design and in vivo evaluation of more efficient and selective deep brain stimulation electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Bryan; Huynh, Brian; Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders and a promising therapy for treating epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Despite its clinical success, the efficiency and selectivity of DBS can be improved. Our objective was to design electrode geometries that increased the efficiency and selectivity of DBS. Approach We coupled computational models of electrodes in brain tissue with cable models of axons of passage (AOPs), terminating axons (TAs), and local neurons (LNs); we used engineering optimization to design electrodes for stimulating these neural elements; and the model predictions were tested in vivo. Main results Compared with the standard electrode used in the Medtronic Model 3387 and 3389 arrays, model-optimized electrodes consumed 45–84 % less power. Similar gains in selectivity were evident with the optimized electrodes: 50 % of parallel AOPs could be activated while reducing activation of perpendicular AOPs from 44–48 % with the standard electrode to 0–14 % with bipolar designs; 50 % of perpendicular AOPs could be activated while reducing activation of parallel AOPs from 53–55 % with the standard electrode to 1–5 % with an array of cathodes; and, 50 % of TAs could be activated while reducing activation of AOPs from 43–100 % with the standard electrode to 2–15 % with a distal anode. In vivo, both the geometry and polarity of the electrode had a profound impact on the efficiency and selectivity of stimulation. Significance Model-based design is a powerful tool that can be used to improve the efficiency and selectivity of DBS electrodes. PMID:26170244

  17. Design and in vivo evaluation of more efficient and selective deep brain stimulation electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Bryan; Huynh, Brian; Grill, Warren M.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders and a promising therapy for treating epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Despite its clinical success, the efficiency and selectivity of DBS can be improved. Our objective was to design electrode geometries that increased the efficiency and selectivity of DBS. Approach. We coupled computational models of electrodes in brain tissue with cable models of axons of passage (AOPs), terminating axons (TAs), and local neurons (LNs); we used engineering optimization to design electrodes for stimulating these neural elements; and the model predictions were tested in vivo. Main results. Compared with the standard electrode used in the Medtronic Model 3387 and 3389 arrays, model-optimized electrodes consumed 45-84% less power. Similar gains in selectivity were evident with the optimized electrodes: 50% of parallel AOPs could be activated while reducing activation of perpendicular AOPs from 44 to 48% with the standard electrode to 0-14% with bipolar designs; 50% of perpendicular AOPs could be activated while reducing activation of parallel AOPs from 53 to 55% with the standard electrode to 1-5% with an array of cathodes; and, 50% of TAs could be activated while reducing activation of AOPs from 43 to 100% with the standard electrode to 2-15% with a distal anode. In vivo, both the geometry and polarity of the electrode had a profound impact on the efficiency and selectivity of stimulation. Significance. Model-based design is a powerful tool that can be used to improve the efficiency and selectivity of DBS electrodes.

  18. Volumetric and lateralized differences in selected brain regions of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William D; Lyn, Heidi; Cantalupo, Claudio

    2009-12-01

    The two species of Pan, bonobos and common chimpanzees, have been reported to have different social organization, cognitive and linguistic abilities and motor skill, despite their close biological relationship. Here, we examined whether bonobos and chimpanzee differ in selected brain regions that may map to these different social and cognitive abilities. Eight chimpanzees and eight bonobos matched on age, sex and rearing experiences were magnetic resonance images scanned and volumetric measures were obtained for the whole brain, cerebellum, striatum, motor-hand area, hippocampus, inferior frontal gyrus and planum temporale. Chimpanzees had significantly larger cerebellum and borderline significantly larger hippocampus and putamen, after adjusting for brain size, compared with bonobos. Bonobos showed greater leftward asymmetries in the striatum and motor-hand area compared with chimpanzees. No significant differences in either the volume or lateralization for the so-called language homologs were found between species. The results suggest that the two species of Pan are quite similar neurologically, though some volumetric and lateralized differences may reflect inherent differences in social organization, cognition and motor skills.

  19. Possible functional links among brain- and skull-related genes selected in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Boeckx, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes from extinct hominins has revealed that changes in some brain-related genes have been selected after the split between anatomically-modern humans and Neanderthals/Denisovans. To date, no coherent view of these changes has been provided. Following a line of research we initiated in Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco (2014a), we hypothesize functional links among most of these genes and their products, based on the existing literature for each of the gene discussed. The genes we focus on are found mutated in different cognitive disorders affecting modern populations and their products are involved in skull and brain morphology, and neural connectivity. If our hypothesis turns out to be on the right track, it means that the changes affecting most of these proteins resulted in a more globular brain and ultimately brought about modern cognition, with its characteristic generativity and capacity to form and exploit cross-modular concepts, properties most clearly manifested in language. PMID:26136701

  20. Efficient gene delivery and selective transduction of astrocytes in the mammalian brain using viral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merienne, Nicolas; Douce, Juliette Le; Faivre, Emilie; Déglon, Nicole; Bonvento, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are now considered as key players in brain information processing because of their newly discovered roles in synapse formation and plasticity, energy metabolism and blood flow regulation. However, our understanding of astrocyte function is still fragmented compared to other brain cell types. A better appreciation of the biology of astrocytes requires the development of tools to generate animal models in which astrocyte-specific proteins and pathways can be manipulated. In addition, it is becoming increasingly evident that astrocytes are also important players in many neurological disorders. Targeted modulation of protein expression in astrocytes would be critical for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Gene transfer is valuable to target a subpopulation of cells and explore their function in experimental models. In particular, viral-mediated gene transfer provides a rapid, highly flexible and cost-effective, in vivo paradigm to study the impact of genes of interest during central nervous system development or in adult animals. We will review the different strategies that led to the recent development of efficient viral vectors that can be successfully used to selectively transduce astrocytes in the mammalian brain. PMID:23847471

  1. Selective activity of phenylacetate against malignant gliomas: resemblance to fetal brain damage in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Samid, D; Ram, Z; Hudgins, W R; Shack, S; Liu, L; Walbridge, S; Oldfield, E H; Myers, C E

    1994-02-15

    Phenylacetate, a deaminated metabolite of phenylalanine, has been implicated in damage to immature brain in phenylketonuria. Because primary brain tumors are highly reminiscent of the immature central nervous system, these neoplasms should be equally vulnerable. We show here that sodium phenylacetate can induce cytostasis and reversal of malignant properties of cultured human glioblastoma cells, when used at pharmacological concentrations that are well tolerated by children and adults. Treated tumor cells exhibited biochemical alterations similar to those observed in phenylketonuria-like conditions, including selective decline in de novo cholesterol synthesis from mevalonate. Because gliomas, but not mature normal brain cells, are highly dependent on mevalonate for production of sterols and isoprenoids vital for cell growth, sodium phenylacetate would be expected to affect tumor growth in vivo while sparing normal tissues. Systemic treatment of rats bearing intracranial gliomas resulted in significant tumor suppression with no apparent toxicity to the host. The data indicate that phenylacetate, acting through inhibition of protein prenylation and other mechanisms, may offer a safe and effective novel approach to treatment of malignant gliomas and perhaps other neoplasms as well.

  2. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  3. Selective sensation based brain-computer interface via mechanical vibrotactile stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lin; Meng, Jianjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    In this work, mechanical vibrotactile stimulation was applied to subjects' left and right wrist skins with equal intensity, and a selective sensation perception task was performed to achieve two types of selections similar to motor imagery Brain-Computer Interface. The proposed system was based on event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS), which had a correlation with processing of afferent inflow in human somatosensory system, and attentional effect which modulated the ERD/ERS. The experiments were carried out on nine subjects (without experience in selective sensation), and six of them showed a discrimination accuracy above 80%, three of them above 95%. Comparative experiments with motor imagery (with and without presence of stimulation) were also carried out, which further showed the feasibility of selective sensation as an alternative BCI task complementary to motor imagery. Specifically there was significant improvement ([Formula: see text]) from near 65% in motor imagery (with and without presence of stimulation) to above 80% in selective sensation on some subjects. The proposed BCI modality might well cooperate with existing BCI modalities in the literature in enlarging the widespread usage of BCI system.

  4. A four-dimensional virtual hand brain-machine interface using active dimension selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Adam G.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) traditionally rely on a fixed, linear transformation from neural signals to an output state-space. In this study, the assumption that a BMI must control a fixed, orthogonal basis set was challenged and a novel active dimension selection (ADS) decoder was explored. Approach. ADS utilizes a two stage decoder by using neural signals to both (i) select an active dimension being controlled and (ii) control the velocity along the selected dimension. ADS decoding was tested in a monkey using 16 single units from premotor and primary motor cortex to successfully control a virtual hand avatar to move to eight different postures. Main results. Following training with the ADS decoder to control 2, 3, and then 4 dimensions, each emulating a grasp shape of the hand, performance reached 93% correct with a bit rate of 2.4 bits s-1 for eight targets. Selection of eight targets using ADS control was more efficient, as measured by bit rate, than either full four-dimensional control or computer assisted one-dimensional control. Significance. ADS decoding allows a user to quickly and efficiently select different hand postures. This novel decoding scheme represents a potential method to reduce the complexity of high-dimension BMI control of the hand.

  5. Selection of motor programs for suppressing food intake and inducing locomotion in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, Andreas; Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Peters, Marc; Zeymer, Malou; Spieß, Roland; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Pankratz, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitter-expressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and electrophysiological experiments, activation of 20 neurons in the brain expressing the neuropeptide hugin, a homolog of mammalian neuromedin U, simultaneously suppressed the motor program for food intake while inducing the motor program for locomotion. Decreasing hugin neuropeptide levels in the neurons by RNAi prevented this action. Reducing the level of hugin neuronal activity alone did not have any effect on feeding or locomotion motor programs. Furthermore, use of promoter-specific constructs that labeled subsets of hugin neurons demonstrated that initiation of locomotion can be separated from modulation of its motor pattern. These results provide insights into a neural mechanism of how opposing motor programs can be selected in order to coordinate feeding and locomotive behaviors.

  6. Impact of spatial filters during sensor selection in a visual P300 brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Rivet, B; Cecotti, H; Maby, E; Mattout, J

    2012-01-01

    A challenge in designing a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is the choice of the channels, e.g. the most relevant sensors. Although a setup with many sensors can be more efficient for the detection of Event-Related Potential (ERP) like the P300, it is relevant to consider only a low number of sensors for a commercial or clinical BCI application. Indeed, a reduced number of sensors can naturally increase the user comfort by reducing the time required for the installation of the EEG (electroencephalogram) cap and can decrease the price of the device. In this study, the influence of spatial filtering during the process of sensor selection is addressed. Two of them maximize the Signal to Signal-plus-Noise Ratio (SSNR) for the different sensor subsets while the third one maximizes the differences between the averaged P300 waveform and the non P300 waveform. We show that the locations of the most relevant sensors subsets for the detection of the P300 are highly dependent on the use of spatial filtering. Applied on data from 20 healthy subjects, this study proves that subsets obtained where sensors are suppressed in relation to their individual SSNR are less efficient than when sensors are suppressed in relation to their contribution once the different selected sensors are combined for enhancing the signal. In other words, it highlights the difference between estimating the P300 projection on the scalp and evaluating the more efficient sensor subsets for a P300-BCI. Finally, this study explores the issue of channel commonality across subjects. The results support the conclusion that spatial filters during the sensor selection procedure allow selecting better sensors for a visual P300 Brain-Computer Interface.

  7. An independent brain-computer interface using covert non-spatial visual selective attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Maye, Alexander; Gao, Xiaorong; Hong, Bo; Engel, Andreas K.; Gao, Shangkai

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a novel independent brain-computer interface (BCI) system based on covert non-spatial visual selective attention of two superimposed illusory surfaces is described. Perception of two superimposed surfaces was induced by two sets of dots with different colors rotating in opposite directions. The surfaces flickered at different frequencies and elicited distinguishable steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) over parietal and occipital areas of the brain. By selectively attending to one of the two surfaces, the SSVEP amplitude at the corresponding frequency was enhanced. An online BCI system utilizing the attentional modulation of SSVEP was implemented and a 3-day online training program with healthy subjects was carried out. The study was conducted with Chinese subjects at Tsinghua University, and German subjects at University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) using identical stimulation software and equivalent technical setup. A general improvement of control accuracy with training was observed in 8 out of 18 subjects. An averaged online classification accuracy of 72.6 ± 16.1% was achieved on the last training day. The system renders SSVEP-based BCI paradigms possible for paralyzed patients with substantial head or ocular motor impairments by employing covert attention shifts instead of changing gaze direction.

  8. Brain Regional and Cortical Laminar Effects of Selective D3 Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-Kyung; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Chen, Y. Iris; Grundt, Peter; Sarkar, Susanta; Newman, Amy Hauck; Jenkins, Bruce G.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are divided into two families: D1 including D1 and D5 receptors and D2 including D2, D3 and D4 receptors. The role of dopamine D3 receptors in the brain remains controversial. We found that highly selective D3 antagonists induced positive cerebral blood volume (CBV) changes whereas D3 agonism using 7-OH-DPAT induced negative CBV changes in brain regions including nucleus accumbens, antero-medial striatum, cingulate cortex, thalamus, interpeduncular region and hypothalamus. There was pronounced activation in the hippocampus restricted to the subiculum – the output from the infralimbic cortex and dentate gyrus. At higher doses of D3 agonist, functional changes were differentiated across cortical lamina, with layer V–VI yielding positive CBV changes and layer IV yielding negative CBV changes. These results are consistent with differential D1 and D3 innervation in these layers respectively and provide evidence of D1–D3 receptor interactions. Further, the use of MRI provides a new tool for testing the in vivo selectivity of novel dopaminergic ligands where radiolabels are not available - as in the case of D3 receptors. PMID:20628733

  9. Evidence of critical cooling rates in the nonisothermal crystallization of triacylglycerols: a case for the existence and selection of growth modes of a lipid crystal network.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S

    2010-03-16

    The isoconversional method, a model-free analysis of the kinetics of liquid-solid transformations, was used to determine the effective activation energy of the nonisothermal crystallization of melts of pure and complex systems of triacylglycerols (TAGs). The method was applied to data from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the heat of crystallization of purified 1,3-dilauroyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (LSL) and commercially available cocoa butter melts. The method conclusively demonstrated the existence of specific growth modes and critical rates of cooling at specific degrees of conversion. The existence of critical rates suggests that the crystallization mechanism is composed of growth modes that can be effectively treated as mutually exclusive, each being predominant for one range of cooling rates and extent of conversion. Importantly, the data suggests that knowledge of the critical cooling rates at specific rates of conversion can be exploited to select preferred growth modes for lipid networks, with concomitant benefits of structural organization and resultant physical functionality. Differences in transport phenomena induced by different cooling rates suggest the existence of thresholds for particular growth mechanisms and help to explain the overall complexity of lipid crystallization. The results of this model-free analysis may be attributed to the relative importance of nucleation and growth at different stages of crystallization. A mechanistic explanation based on the competing effects of the thermodynamic driving force and limiting heat and transport phenomena is provided to explain the observed behavior. This work, furthermore, offers satisfactory explanations for the noted effect of cooling-rate-induced changes in the physical functionality of lipid networks.

  10. A face-selective ventral occipito-temporal map of the human brain with intracerebral potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Jacques; Jacques, Corentin; Liu-Shuang, Joan; Brissart, Hélène; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Maillard, Louis; Rossion, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Human neuroimaging studies have identified a network of distinct face-selective regions in the ventral occipito-temporal cortex (VOTC), with a right hemispheric dominance. To date, there is no evidence for this hemispheric and regional specialization with direct measures of brain activity. To address this gap in knowledge, we recorded local neurophysiological activity from 1,678 contact electrodes implanted in the VOTC of a large group of epileptic patients (n = 28). They were presented with natural images of objects at a rapid fixed rate (six images per second: 6 Hz), with faces interleaved as every fifth stimulus (i.e., 1.2 Hz). High signal-to-noise ratio face-selective responses were objectively (i.e., exactly at the face stimulation frequency) identified and quantified throughout the whole VOTC. Face-selective responses were widely distributed across the whole VOTC, but also spatially clustered in specific regions. Among these regions, the lateral section of the right middle fusiform gyrus showed the largest face-selective response by far, offering, to our knowledge, the first supporting evidence of two decades of neuroimaging observations with direct neural measures. In addition, three distinct regions with a high proportion of face-selective responses were disclosed in the right ventral anterior temporal lobe, a region that is undersampled in neuroimaging because of magnetic susceptibility artifacts. A high proportion of contacts responding only to faces (i.e., “face-exclusive” responses) were found in these regions, suggesting that they contain populations of neurons involved in dedicated face-processing functions. Overall, these observations provide a comprehensive mapping of visual category selectivity in the whole human VOTC with direct neural measures. PMID:27354526

  11. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  12. Roof aperture system for selective collection and control of solar energy for building heating, cooling and daylighting

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, William J.; Snyder, Marvin K.; Harter, James W.

    1983-01-01

    The amount of building heating, cooling and daylighting is controlled by at least one pair of solar energy passing panels, with each panel of the pair of panels being exposed to a separate direction of sun incidence. A shutter-shade combination is associated with each pair of panels and the shutter is connected to the shade so that rectilinear movement of the shutter causes pivotal movement of the shade.

  13. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  14. Brain Histamine Is Crucial for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors‘ Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Leonardo; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Cassano, Tommaso; Benetti, Fernando; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Backgound: The neurobiological changes underlying depression resistant to treatments remain poorly understood, and failure to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may result from abnormalities of neurotransmitter systems that excite serotonergic neurons, such as histamine. Methods: Using behavioral (tail suspension test) and neurochemical (in vivo microdialysis, Western-blot analysis) approaches, here we report that antidepressant responses to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram or paroxetine) are abolished in mice unable to synthesize histamine due to either targeted disruption of histidine decarboxylase gene (HDC-/-) or injection of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of this enzyme. Results: In the tail suspension test, all classes of antidepressants tested reduced the immobility time of controls. Systemic reboxetine or imipramine reduced the immobility time of histamine-deprived mice as well, whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors did not even though their serotonergic system is functional. In in vivo microdialysis experiments, citalopram significantly increased histamine extraneuronal levels in the cortex of freely moving mice, and methysergide, a serotonin 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, abolished this effect, thus suggesting the involvement of endogenous serotonin. CREB phosphorylation, which is implicated in the molecular mechanisms of antidepressant treatment, was abolished in histamine-deficient mice treated with citalopram. The CREB pathway is not impaired in HDC-/- mice, as administration of 8-bromoadenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate increased CREB phosphorylation, and in the tail suspension test it significantly reduced the time spent immobile by mice of both genotypes. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors selectively require the integrity of the brain histamine system to exert their preclinical responses. PMID:25899065

  15. Inferring Selective Constraint from Population Genomic Data Suggests Recent Regulatory Turnover in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schrider, Daniel R.; Kern, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    The comparative genomics revolution of the past decade has enabled the discovery of functional elements in the human genome via sequence comparison. While that is so, an important class of elements, those specific to humans, is entirely missed by searching for sequence conservation across species. Here we present an analysis based on variation data among human genomes that utilizes a supervised machine learning approach for the identification of human-specific purifying selection in the genome. Using only allele frequency information from the complete low-coverage 1000 Genomes Project data set in conjunction with a support vector machine trained from known functional and nonfunctional portions of the genome, we are able to accurately identify portions of the genome constrained by purifying selection. Our method identifies previously known human-specific gains or losses of function and uncovers many novel candidates. Candidate targets for gain and loss of function along the human lineage include numerous putative regulatory regions of genes essential for normal development of the central nervous system, including a significant enrichment of gain of function events near neurotransmitter receptor genes. These results are consistent with regulatory turnover being a key mechanism in the evolution of human-specific characteristics of brain development. Finally, we show that the majority of the genome is unconstrained by natural selection currently, in agreement with what has been estimated from phylogenetic methods but in sharp contrast to estimates based on transcriptomics or other high-throughput functional methods. PMID:26590212

  16. Tensor-based Multi-view Feature Selection with Applications to Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bokai; He, Lifang; Kong, Xiangnan; Yu, Philip S.; Hao, Zhifeng; Ragin, Ann B.

    2015-01-01

    In the era of big data, we can easily access information from multiple views which may be obtained from different sources or feature subsets. Generally, different views provide complementary information for learning tasks. Thus, multi-view learning can facilitate the learning process and is prevalent in a wide range of application domains. For example, in medical science, measurements from a series of medical examinations are documented for each subject, including clinical, imaging, immunologic, serologic and cognitive measures which are obtained from multiple sources. Specifically, for brain diagnosis, we can have different quantitative analysis which can be seen as different feature subsets of a subject. It is desirable to combine all these features in an effective way for disease diagnosis. However, some measurements from less relevant medical examinations can introduce irrelevant information which can even be exaggerated after view combinations. Feature selection should therefore be incorporated in the process of multi-view learning. In this paper, we explore tensor product to bring different views together in a joint space, and present a dual method of tensor-based multi-view feature selection (dual-Tmfs) based on the idea of support vector machine recursive feature elimination. Experiments conducted on datasets derived from neurological disorder demonstrate the features selected by our proposed method yield better classification performance and are relevant to disease diagnosis. PMID:25937823

  17. Inferring Selective Constraint from Population Genomic Data Suggests Recent Regulatory Turnover in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Schrider, Daniel R; Kern, Andrew D

    2015-11-19

    The comparative genomics revolution of the past decade has enabled the discovery of functional elements in the human genome via sequence comparison. While that is so, an important class of elements, those specific to humans, is entirely missed by searching for sequence conservation across species. Here we present an analysis based on variation data among human genomes that utilizes a supervised machine learning approach for the identification of human-specific purifying selection in the genome. Using only allele frequency information from the complete low-coverage 1000 Genomes Project data set in conjunction with a support vector machine trained from known functional and nonfunctional portions of the genome, we are able to accurately identify portions of the genome constrained by purifying selection. Our method identifies previously known human-specific gains or losses of function and uncovers many novel candidates. Candidate targets for gain and loss of function along the human lineage include numerous putative regulatory regions of genes essential for normal development of the central nervous system, including a significant enrichment of gain of function events near neurotransmitter receptor genes. These results are consistent with regulatory turnover being a key mechanism in the evolution of human-specific characteristics of brain development. Finally, we show that the majority of the genome is unconstrained by natural selection currently, in agreement with what has been estimated from phylogenetic methods but in sharp contrast to estimates based on transcriptomics or other high-throughput functional methods.

  18. Genetic Influences on Brain Gene Expression in Rats Selected for Tameness and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Henrike O.; Lautenschläger, Susann; Nelson, Ronald; Besnier, François; Rotival, Maxime; Cagan, Alexander; Kozhemyakina, Rimma; Plyusnina, Irina Z.; Trut, Lyudmila; Carlborg, Örjan; Petretto, Enrico; Kruglyak, Leonid; Pääbo, Svante; Schöneberg, Torsten; Albert, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual differences in many behaviors are partly due to genetic differences, but the identification of the genes and variants that influence behavior remains challenging. Here, we studied an F2 intercross of two outbred lines of rats selected for tame and aggressive behavior toward humans for >64 generations. By using a mapping approach that is able to identify genetic loci segregating within the lines, we identified four times more loci influencing tameness and aggression than by an approach that assumes fixation of causative alleles, suggesting that many causative loci were not driven to fixation by the selection. We used RNA sequencing in 150 F2 animals to identify hundreds of loci that influence brain gene expression. Several of these loci colocalize with tameness loci and may reflect the same genetic variants. Through analyses of correlations between allele effects on behavior and gene expression, differential expression between the tame and aggressive rat selection lines, and correlations between gene expression and tameness in F2 animals, we identify the genes Gltscr2, Lgi4, Zfp40, and Slc17a7 as candidate contributors to the strikingly different behavior of the tame and aggressive animals. PMID:25189874

  19. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-01

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  20. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-07

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  1. Inducible and Selective Erasure of Memories in the Mouse Brain via Chemical-Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaohua; Wang, Huimin; Mei, Bing; An, Shuming; Yin, Liang; Wang, L. Phillip; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Rapid and selective erasures of certain types of memories in the brain would be desirable under certain clinical circumstances. By employing an inducible and reversible chemical-genetic technique, we find that transient αCaMKII overexpression at the time of recall impairs the retrieval of both newly formed one-hour object recognition memory and fear memories, as well as 1-month-old fear memories. Systematic analyses suggest that excessive αCaMKII activity-induced recall deficits are not caused by disrupting the retrieval access to the stored information but are, rather, due to the active erasure of the stored memories. Further experiments show that the recall-induced erasure of fear memories is highly restricted to the memory being retrieved while leaving other memories intact. Therefore, our study reveals a molecular genetic paradigm through which a given memory, such as new or old fear memory, can be rapidly and specifically erased in a controlled and inducible manner in the brain. PMID:18957226

  2. Firefly Luciferase Mutants Allow Substrate-Selective Bioluminescence Imaging in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Adams, Spencer T; Mofford, David M; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Miller, Stephen C

    2016-04-11

    Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful approach for visualizing specific events occurring inside live mice. Animals can be made to glow in response to the expression of a gene, the activity of an enzyme, or the growth of a tumor. But bioluminescence requires the interaction of a luciferase enzyme with a small-molecule luciferin, and its scope has been limited by the mere handful of natural combinations. Herein, we show that mutants of firefly luciferase can discriminate between natural and synthetic substrates in the brains of live mice. When using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to express luciferases in the brain, we found that mutant luciferases that are inactive or weakly active with d-luciferin can light up brightly when treated with the aminoluciferins CycLuc1 and CycLuc2 or their respective FAAH-sensitive luciferin amides. Further development of selective luciferases promises to expand the power of bioluminescence and allow multiple events to be imaged in the same live animal.

  3. Bilingualism trains specific brain circuits involved in flexible rule selection and application.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Andrea; Prat, Chantel S

    2014-10-01

    Bilingual individuals have been shown to outperform monolinguals on a variety of tasks that measure non-linguistic executive functioning, suggesting that some facets of the bilingual experience give rise to generalized improvements in cognitive performance. The current study investigated the hypothesis that such advantage in executive functioning arises from the need to flexibly select and apply rules when speaking multiple languages. Such flexible behavior may strengthen the functioning of the fronto-striatal loops that direct signals to the prefrontal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we compared behavioral and brain data from proficient bilinguals and monolinguals who performed a Rapid Instructed Task Learning paradigm, which requires behaving according to ever-changing rules. Consistent with our hypothesis, bilinguals were faster than monolinguals when executing novel rules, and this improvement was associated with greater modulation of activity in the basal ganglia. The implications of these findings for language and executive function research are discussed herein.

  4. Quantitative EEG Brain Mapping In Psychotropic Drug Development, Drug Treatment Selection, and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Itil, Kurt Z.

    1995-05-01

    Quantification of standard electroencephalogram (EEG) by digital computers [computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG)] has transformed the subjective analog EEG into an objective scientific method. Until a few years ago, CEEG was only used to assist in the development of psychotropic drugs by means of the quantitative pharmaco EEG. Thanks to the computer revolution and the accompanying reductions in cost of quantification, CEEG can now also be applied in psychiatric practice. CEEG can assist the physician in confirming clinical diagnoses, selecting psychotropic drugs for treatment, and drug treatment monitoring. Advancements in communications technology allow physicians and researchers to reduce the costs of acquiring a high-technology CEEG brain mapping system by utilizing the more economical telephonic services.

  5. Acoustic Noise Alters Selective Attention Processes as Indicated by Direct Current (DC) Brain Potential Changes

    PubMed Central

    Trimmel, Karin; Schätzer, Julia; Trimmel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic environmental noise, even of low to moderate intensity, is known to adversely affect information processing in animals and humans via attention mechanisms. In particular, facilitation and inhibition of information processing are basic functions of selective attention. Such mechanisms can be investigated by analyzing brain potentials under conditions of externally directed attention (intake of environmental information) versus internally directed attention (rejection of environmental stimuli and focusing on memory/planning processes). This study investigated brain direct current (DC) potential shifts—which are discussed to represent different states of cortical activation—of tasks that require intake and rejection of environmental information under noise. It was hypothesized that without background noise rejection tasks would show more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks and that under noise both kinds of tasks would show positive DC shifts as an expression of cortical inhibition caused by noise. DC potential shifts during intake and rejection tasks were analyzed at 16 standard locations in 45 persons during irrelevant speech or white noise vs. control condition. Without noise, rejection tasks were associated with more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks. During background noise, however, this difference disappeared and both kinds of tasks led to positive DC shifts. Results suggest—besides some limitations—that noise modulates selective attention mechanisms by switching to an environmental information processing and noise rejection mode, which could represent a suggested “attention shift”. Implications for fMRI studies as well as for public health in learning and performance environments including susceptible persons are discussed. PMID:25264675

  6. Acoustic noise alters selective attention processes as indicated by direct current (DC) brain potential changes.

    PubMed

    Trimmel, Karin; Schätzer, Julia; Trimmel, Michael

    2014-09-26

    Acoustic environmental noise, even of low to moderate intensity, is known to adversely affect information processing in animals and humans via attention mechanisms. In particular, facilitation and inhibition of information processing are basic functions of selective attention. Such mechanisms can be investigated by analyzing brain potentials under conditions of externally directed attention (intake of environmental information) versus internally directed attention (rejection of environmental stimuli and focusing on memory/planning processes). This study investigated brain direct current (DC) potential shifts-which are discussed to represent different states of cortical activation-of tasks that require intake and rejection of environmental information under noise. It was hypothesized that without background noise rejection tasks would show more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks and that under noise both kinds of tasks would show positive DC shifts as an expression of cortical inhibition caused by noise. DC potential shifts during intake and rejection tasks were analyzed at 16 standard locations in 45 persons during irrelevant speech or white noise vs. control condition. Without noise, rejection tasks were associated with more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks. During background noise, however, this difference disappeared and both kinds of tasks led to positive DC shifts. Results suggest-besides some limitations-that noise modulates selective attention mechanisms by switching to an environmental information processing and noise rejection mode, which could represent a suggested "attention shift". Implications for fMRI studies as well as for public health in learning and performance environments including susceptible persons are discussed.

  7. 18F-labeled FECNT: a selective radioligand for PET imaging of brain dopamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M M; Kilts, C D; Keil, R; Shi, B; Martarello, L; Xing, D; Votaw, J; Ely, T D; Lambert, P; Owens, M J; Camp, V M; Malveaux, E; Hoffman, J M

    2000-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labeled 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-fluoroethyl)nort ropane (FECNT) was synthesized in the development of a dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging ligand for positron emission tomography (PET). The methods of radiolabeling and ligand synthesis of FECNT, and the results of the in vitro characterization and in vivo tissue distribution in rats and in vivo PET imaging in rhesus monkeys of [18F]FECNT are described. Fluorine-18 was introduced into 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-fluoroethyl)nort ropane (4) by preparation of 1-[18F]fluoro-2-tosyloxyethane (2) followed by alkylation of 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)nortropane (3) in 21% radiochemical yield (decay corrected to end of bombardment [EOB]). Competition binding in cells stably expressing the transfected human DAT serotonin transporter (SERT) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) labeled by [3H]WIN 35428, [3H]citalopram, and [3H]nisoxetine, respectively, indicated the following order of DAT affinity: GBR 12909 > CIT > 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(3-fluoropropyl) nortropane (FPCT) > FECNT. The affinity of FECNT for SERT and NET was 25- and 156-fold lower, respectively, than for DAT. Blocking studies were performed in rats with a series of transporter-specific agents and demonstrated that the brain uptake of [18F]FECNT was selective and specific for DAT-rich regions. PET brain imaging studies in monkeys demonstrated high [18F]FECNT uptake in the caudate and putamen that resulted in caudate-to-cerebellum and putamen-to-cerebellum ratios of 10.5 at 60 min. [18F]FECNT uptake in the caudate/putamen peaked in less than 75 min and exhibited higher caudate- and putamen-to-cerebellum ratios at transient equilibrium than reported for 11C-WIN 35,428, [11C]CIT/RTI-55, or [18F]beta-CIT-FP. Analysis of monkey arterial plasma samples using high performance liquid chromatography determined that there was no detectable formation of lipophilic radiolabeled

  8. Evaluation of Interactive Visualization on Mobile Computing Platforms for Selection of Deep Brain Stimulation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Tamm, Georg; Jain, Sanket; Fogal, Thomas; Krüger, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant growth in the use of patient-specific models to predict the effects of neuromodulation therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, translating these models from a research environment to the everyday clinical workflow has been a challenge, primarily due to the complexity of the models and the expertise required in specialized visualization software. In this paper, we deploy the interactive visualization system ImageVis3D Mobile, which has been designed for mobile computing devices such as the iPhone or iPad, in an evaluation environment to visualize models of Parkinson's disease patients who received DBS therapy. Selection of DBS settings is a significant clinical challenge that requires repeated revisions to achieve optimal therapeutic response, and is often performed without any visual representation of the stimulation system in the patient. We used ImageVis3D Mobile to provide models to movement disorders clinicians and asked them to use the software to determine: 1) which of the four DBS electrode contacts they would select for therapy; and 2) what stimulation settings they would choose. We compared the stimulation protocol chosen from the software versus the stimulation protocol that was chosen via clinical practice (independent of the study). Lastly, we compared the amount of time required to reach these settings using the software versus the time required through standard practice. We found that the stimulation settings chosen using ImageVis3D Mobile were similar to those used in standard of care, but were selected in drastically less time. We show how our visualization system, available directly at the point of care on a device familiar to the clinician, can be used to guide clinical decision making for selection of DBS settings. In our view, the positive impact of the system could also translate to areas other than DBS.

  9. Selective plasticity of hippocampal GABAergic interneuron populations following kindling of different brain regions.

    PubMed

    Botterill, J J; Nogovitsyn, N; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2017-02-01

    The vulnerability and plasticity of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons is a topic of broad interest and debate in the field of epilepsy. In this experiment, we used the electrical kindling model of epilepsy to determine whether seizures that originate in different brain regions have differential effects on hippocampal interneuron subpopulations. Long-Evans rats received 99 electrical stimulations of the hippocampus, amygdala, or caudate nucleus, followed by sacrifice and immunohistochemical or western blot analyses. We analyzed markers of dendritic (somatostatin), perisomatic (parvalbumin), and interneuron-selective (calretinin) inhibition, as well as an overall indicator (GAD67) of interneuron distribution across all major hippocampal subfields. Our results indicate that kindling produces selective effects on the number and morphology of different functional classes of GABAergic interneurons. In particular, limbic kindling appears to enhance dendritic inhibition, indicated by a greater number of somatostatin-immunoreactive (-ir) cells in the CA1 pyramidal layer and robust morphological sprouting in the dentate gyrus. We also found a reduction in the number of interneuron-selective calretinin-ir cells in the dentate gyrus of hippocampal-kindled rats, which suggests a possible reduction of synchronized dendritic inhibition. In contrast, perisomatic inhibition indicated by parvalbumin immunoreactivity appears to be largely resilient to the effects of kindling. Finally, we found a significant induction in the number of GAD67-cells in caudate-kindled rats in the dentate gyrus and CA3 hippocampal subfields. Taken together, our results demonstrate that kindling has subfield-selective effects on the different functional classes of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:389-406, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Planning for selective amygdalohippocampectomy involving less neuronal fiber damage based on brain connectivity using tractography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hak; Kim, Mansu; Park, Hyunjin

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe resection is an important treatment option for epilepsy that involves removal of potentially essential brain regions. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy is a widely performed temporal lobe surgery. We suggest starting the incision for selective amygdalohippocampectomy at the inferior temporal gyrus based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography. Diffusion MRI data from 20 normal participants were obtained from Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database (www.ppmi-info.org). A tractography algorithm was applied to extract neuronal fiber information for the temporal lobe, hippocampus, and amygdala. Fiber information was analyzed in terms of the number of fibers and betweenness centrality. Distances between starting incisions and surgical target regions were also considered to explore the length of the surgical path. Middle temporal and superior temporal gyrus regions have higher connectivity values than the inferior temporal gyrus and thus are not good candidates for starting the incision. The distances between inferior temporal gyrus and surgical target regions were shorter than those between middle temporal gyrus and target regions. Thus, the inferior temporal gyrus is a good candidate for starting the incision. Starting the incision from the inferior temporal gyrus would spare the important (in terms of betweenness centrality values) middle region and shorten the distance to the target regions of the hippocampus and amygdala. PMID:26330834

  11. Event-related brain potentials to irrelevant auditory stimuli during selective listening: effects of channel probability.

    PubMed

    Akai, Toshiyuki

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the cognitive process reflected by a positive deflection to irrelevant auditory stimuli (Pdi) during selective listening. Event-related brain potentials were recorded from 9 participants in a two-channel (left/right ears) selective listening task. Relative event probabilities of the relevant/irrelevant channels were 25%/75%, 50%/50%, and 75%/25%. With increasing probability of the relevant channel, behavioral performances (the reaction time and hit rate) for the targets within the relevant channel improved, reflecting development of a more robust attentional trace. At the same time, the amplitude of the early Pdi (200-300 ms after stimulus onset) elicited by the stimuli in the irrelevant channel with a decreased probability was enhanced in the central region. This positive relation between the strength of the attentional trace and the amplitude of the early Pdi suggests that the early Pdi is elicited by a mismatching between an incoming irrelevant stimulus and an attentional trace.

  12. Response of face-selective brain regions to trustworthiness and gender of faces.

    PubMed

    Mattavelli, Giulia; Andrews, Timothy J; Asghar, Aziz U R; Towler, John R; Young, Andrew W

    2012-07-01

    Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have demonstrated a role for the amygdala in processing the perceived trustworthiness of faces, but it remains uncertain whether its responses are linear (with the greatest response to the least trustworthy-looking faces), or quadratic (with increased fMRI signal for the dimension extremes). It is also unclear whether the trustworthiness of the stimuli is crucial or if the same response pattern can be found for faces varying along other dimensions. In addition, the responses to perceived trustworthiness of face-selective regions other than the amygdala are seldom reported. The present study addressed these issues using a novel set of stimuli created through computer image-manipulation both to maximise the presence of naturally occurring cues that underpin trustworthiness judgments and to allow systematic manipulation of these cues. With a block-design fMRI paradigm, we investigated neural responses to computer-manipulated trustworthiness in the amygdala and core face-selective regions in the occipital and temporal lobes. We asked whether the activation pattern is specific for differences in trustworthiness or whether it would also track variation along an orthogonal male-female gender dimension. The main findings were quadratic responses to changes in both trustworthiness and gender in all regions. These results are consistent with the idea that face-responsive brain regions are sensitive to face distinctiveness as well as the social meaning of the face features.

  13. Design and Evaluation of Fusion Approach for Combining Brain and Gaze Inputs for Target Selection

    PubMed Central

    Évain, Andéol; Argelaguet, Ferran; Casiez, Géry; Roussel, Nicolas; Lécuyer, Anatole

    2016-01-01

    Gaze-based interfaces and Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) allow for hands-free human–computer interaction. In this paper, we investigate the combination of gaze and BCIs. We propose a novel selection technique for 2D target acquisition based on input fusion. This new approach combines the probabilistic models for each input, in order to better estimate the intent of the user. We evaluated its performance against the existing gaze and brain–computer interaction techniques. Twelve participants took part in our study, in which they had to search and select 2D targets with each of the evaluated techniques. Our fusion-based hybrid interaction technique was found to be more reliable than the previous gaze and BCI hybrid interaction techniques for 10 participants over 12, while being 29% faster on average. However, similarly to what has been observed in hybrid gaze-and-speech interaction, gaze-only interaction technique still provides the best performance. Our results should encourage the use of input fusion, as opposed to sequential interaction, in order to design better hybrid interfaces. PMID:27774048

  14. Sparsity Is Better with Stability: Combining Accuracy and Stability for Model Selection in Brain Decoding

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Luca; Pontil, Massimiliano; Mourão-Miranda, Janaina

    2017-01-01

    Structured sparse methods have received significant attention in neuroimaging. These methods allow the incorporation of domain knowledge through additional spatial and temporal constraints in the predictive model and carry the promise of being more interpretable than non-structured sparse methods, such as LASSO or Elastic Net methods. However, although sparsity has often been advocated as leading to more interpretable models it can also lead to unstable models under subsampling or slight changes of the experimental conditions. In the present work we investigate the impact of using stability/reproducibility as an additional model selection criterion1 on several different sparse (and structured sparse) methods that have been recently applied for fMRI brain decoding. We compare three different model selection criteria: (i) classification accuracy alone; (ii) classification accuracy and overlap between the solutions; (iii) classification accuracy and correlation between the solutions. The methods we consider include LASSO, Elastic Net, Total Variation, sparse Total Variation, Laplacian and Graph Laplacian Elastic Net (GraphNET). Our results show that explicitly accounting for stability/reproducibility during the model optimization can mitigate some of the instability inherent in sparse methods. In particular, using accuracy and overlap between the solutions as a joint optimization criterion can lead to solutions that are more similar in terms of accuracy, sparsity levels and coefficient maps even when different sparsity methods are considered. PMID:28261042

  15. The selective estrogen receptor modulator, bazedoxifene, reduces ischemic brain damage in male rat.

    PubMed

    Castelló-Ruiz, María; Torregrosa, Germán; Burguete, María C; Miranda, Francisco J; Centeno, José M; López-Morales, Mikahela A; Gasull, Teresa; Alborch, Enrique

    2014-07-11

    While the estrogen treatment of stroke is under debate, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) arise as a promising alternative. We hypothesize that bazedoxifene (acetate, BZA), a third generation SERM approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, reduces ischemic brain damage in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. For comparative purposes, the neuroprotective effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) has also been assessed. Male Wistar rats underwent 60min middle cerebral artery occlusion (intraluminal thread technique), and grouped according to treatment: vehicle-, E2- and BZA-treated rats. Optimal plasma concentrations of E2 (45.6±7.8pg/ml) and BZA (20.7±2.1ng/ml) were achieved 4h after onset of ischemia, and maintained until the end of the procedure (24h). Neurofunctional score and volume of the damaged brain regions were the main end points. At 24h after ischemia-reperfusion, neurofunctional examination of the animals did not show significant differences among the three experimental groups. By contrast, both E2- and BZA-treated groups showed significantly lower total infarct volumes, BZA acting mainly in the cortical region and E2 acting mainly at the subcortical level. Our results demonstrate that: (1) E2 at physiological plasma levels in female rats is neuroprotective in male rats when given at the acute stage of the ischemic challenge and (2) BZA at clinically relevant plasma levels mimics the neuroprotective action of E2 and could be, therefore, a candidate in stroke treatment.

  16. Selective Lifelong Destruction of Brain Monoaminergic Nerves Through Perinatal DSP-4 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) is a highly selective neurotoxin for noradrenergic projections originating from the locus coeruleus (LC). The outcome of the systemic DSP-4 treatment of newborn rats is an alteration in postnatal development of the noradrenergic system, involving the permanent denervation of distal noradrenergic projection areas (neocortex, hippocampus, spinal cord), accompanied by noradrenergic hyperinnervation in regions proximal to the LC cell bodies (cerebellum, pons-medulla). DSP-4 is well tolerated by developing rats and does not increase the mortality rate. Permanent noradrenergic denervation in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord is present at all developmental stages, although this effect is more pronounced in rats treated with DSP-4 at an early age, i.e., up to postnatal day 5 (PND 5). Notably, regional hyperinnervation is a hallmark of neonatal DSP-4 treatment, which is not observed after either prenatal or adult DSP-4 application. In contrast to robust biochemical changes in the brain, DSP-4 treatment of newborn rats has a marginal effect on arousal and cognition functions assessed in adulthood, and these processes are critically influenced by the action of the noradrenergic neurotransmitter, norepinephrine (NE). Conversely, neonatal DSP-4 does not significantly affect 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5-HT), dopamine (DA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and histamine levels in brain. However, as a consequence of altering the functional efficacy of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, DA, and GABA receptors, these neurotransmitter systems are profoundly affected in adulthood. Thus, the noradrenergic lesion obtained with neonatal DSP-4 treatment represents a unique neurobiological technique for exploring the interplay between various neuronal phenotypes and examining the pathomechanism of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  17. Staying cool in a changing landscape: the influence of maximum daily ambient temperature on grizzly bear habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Karine E; Cardinal, Etienne; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Côté, Steeve D

    2016-08-01

    To fulfill their needs, animals are constantly making trade-offs among limiting factors. Although there is growing evidence about the impact of ambient temperature on habitat selection in mammals, the role of environmental conditions and thermoregulation on apex predators is poorly understood. Our objective was to investigate the influence of ambient temperature on habitat selection patterns of grizzly bears in the managed landscape of Alberta, Canada. Grizzly bear habitat selection followed a daily and seasonal pattern that was influenced by ambient temperature, with adult males showing stronger responses than females to warm temperatures. Cutblocks aged 0-20 years provided an abundance of forage but were on average 6 °C warmer than mature conifer stands and 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks. When ambient temperatures increased, the relative change (odds ratio) in the probability of selection for 0- to 20-year-old cutblocks decreased during the hottest part of the day and increased during cooler periods, especially for males. Concurrently, the probability of selection for 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks increased on warmer days. Following plant phenology, the odds of selecting 0- to 20-year-old cutblocks also increased from early to late summer while the odds of selecting 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks decreased. Our results demonstrate that ambient temperatures, and therefore thermal requirements, play a significant role in habitat selection patterns and behaviour of grizzly bears. In a changing climate, large mammals may increasingly need to adjust spatial and temporal selection patterns in response to thermal constraints.

  18. Assessing blood brain barrier dynamics or identifying or measuring selected substances or toxins in a subject by analyzing Raman spectrum signals of selected regions in the eye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A non-invasive method for analyzing the blood-brain barrier includes obtaining a Raman spectrum of a selected portion of the eye and monitoring the Raman spectrum to ascertain a change to the dynamics of the blood brain barrier. Also, non-invasive methods for determining the brain or blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, drugs, alcohol, poisons, and the like, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 600 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor, vitreous humor, or one or more conjunctiva vessels in the eye is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated portion of the eye; and then determining the blood level or brain level (intracranial or cerebral spinal fluid level) of an analyte of interest for the subject from the Raman spectrum. In certain embodiments, the detecting step may be followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level and/or brain level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing methods are also disclosed.

  19. Altered characteristic of brain networks in mild cognitive impairment during a selective attention task: An EEG study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Li, Yingjie; Yang, Xiaoli; Xue, Qing; Wang, Yuping

    2015-10-01

    The present study evaluated the topological properties of whole brain networks using graph theoretical concepts and investigated the time-evolution characteristic of brain network in mild cognitive impairment patients during a selective attention task. Electroencephalography (EEG) activities were recorded in 10 MCI patients and 17 healthy subjects when they performed a color match task. We calculated the phase synchrony index between each possible pairs of EEG channels in alpha and beta frequency bands and analyzed the local interconnectedness, overall connectedness and small-world characteristic of brain network in different degree for two groups. Relative to healthy normal controls, the properties of cortical networks in MCI patients tend to be a shift of randomization. Lower σ of MCI had suggested that patients had a further loss of small-world attribute both during active and resting states. Our results provide evidence for the functional disconnection of brain regions in MCI. Furthermore, we found the properties of cortical networks could reflect the processing of conflict information in the selective attention task. The human brain tends to be a more regular and efficient neural architecture in the late stage of information processing. In addition, the processing of conflict information needs stronger information integration and transfer between cortical areas.

  20. Selective disruption of the blood-brain barrier by photochemical internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Zhang, Michelle J.; Gach, Michael H.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Madsen, Steen J.

    2009-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of photochemical internalization (PCI) to selectively disrupt the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer drugs to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: PCI treatment, coupling a macromolecule therapy of Clostridium perfringens (Cl p) epsilon prototoxin with AlPcS2a-PDT, was performed on non-tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats. T1-weighted post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to evaluate the extent of BBB disruption which can be inferred from the volume contrast enhancement. Results: The synergistic effect of PCI to disrupt the BBB was observed at a fluence level of 1 J with an intraperitoneal injection of Cl p prototoxin. At the fluence level of 2.5J, the extent of BBB opening induced by PCI was similar to the result of PDT suggesting no synergistic effect evoked under these conditions. Conclusion: PCI was found to be highly effective and efficient for inducing selective and localized disruption of the BBB. The extent of BBB opening peaked on day 3 and the BBB was completed restored by day 18 post treatment.

  1. Physiological Exploration of the Long Term Evolutionary Selection against Expression of N-Glycolylneuraminic Acid in the Brain*♦

    PubMed Central

    Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Davies, Leela R. L.; Takematsu, Hiromu; Chou, Hsun-Hua; Tangvoranuntakul, Pam; Carlin, Aaron F.; Verhagen, Andrea; Heyser, Charles J.; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Choudhury, Biswa; Paton, James C.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Varki, Nissi M.; Schnaar, Ronald L.; Varki, Ajit

    2017-01-01

    All vertebrate cell surfaces display a dense glycan layer often terminated with sialic acids, which have multiple functions due to their location and diverse modifications. The major sialic acids in most mammalian tissues are N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), the latter being derived from Neu5Ac via addition of one oxygen atom at the sugar nucleotide level by CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah). Contrasting with other organs that express various ratios of Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc depending on the variable expression of Cmah, Neu5Gc expression in the brain is extremely low in all vertebrates studied to date, suggesting that neural expression is detrimental to animals. However, physiological exploration of the reasons for this long term evolutionary selection has been lacking. To explore the consequences of forced expression of Neu5Gc in the brain, we have established brain-specific Cmah transgenic mice. Such Neu5Gc overexpression in the brain resulted in abnormal locomotor activity, impaired object recognition memory, and abnormal axon myelination. Brain-specific Cmah transgenic mice were also lethally sensitive to a Neu5Gc-preferring bacterial toxin, even though Neu5Gc was overexpressed only in the brain and other organs maintained endogenous Neu5Gc expression, as in wild-type mice. Therefore, the unusually strict evolutionary suppression of Neu5Gc expression in the vertebrate brain may be explained by evasion of negative effects on neural functions and by selection against pathogens. PMID:28049733

  2. Physiological Exploration of the Long Term Evolutionary Selection against Expression of N-Glycolylneuraminic Acid in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Davies, Leela R L; Takematsu, Hiromu; Chou, Hsun-Hua; Tangvoranuntakul, Pam; Carlin, Aaron F; Verhagen, Andrea; Heyser, Charles J; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Choudhury, Biswa; Paton, James C; Paton, Adrienne W; Varki, Nissi M; Schnaar, Ronald L; Varki, Ajit

    2017-02-17

    All vertebrate cell surfaces display a dense glycan layer often terminated with sialic acids, which have multiple functions due to their location and diverse modifications. The major sialic acids in most mammalian tissues are N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), the latter being derived from Neu5Ac via addition of one oxygen atom at the sugar nucleotide level by CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah). Contrasting with other organs that express various ratios of Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc depending on the variable expression of Cmah, Neu5Gc expression in the brain is extremely low in all vertebrates studied to date, suggesting that neural expression is detrimental to animals. However, physiological exploration of the reasons for this long term evolutionary selection has been lacking. To explore the consequences of forced expression of Neu5Gc in the brain, we have established brain-specific Cmah transgenic mice. Such Neu5Gc overexpression in the brain resulted in abnormal locomotor activity, impaired object recognition memory, and abnormal axon myelination. Brain-specific Cmah transgenic mice were also lethally sensitive to a Neu5Gc-preferring bacterial toxin, even though Neu5Gc was overexpressed only in the brain and other organs maintained endogenous Neu5Gc expression, as in wild-type mice. Therefore, the unusually strict evolutionary suppression of Neu5Gc expression in the vertebrate brain may be explained by evasion of negative effects on neural functions and by selection against pathogens.

  3. Selective vulnerability of Rich Club brain regions is an organizational principle of structural connectivity loss in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    McColgan, Peter; Seunarine, Kiran K; Razi, Adeel; Cole, James H; Gregory, Sarah; Durr, Alexandra; Roos, Raymund A C; Stout, Julie C; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Scahill, Rachael I; Clark, Chris A; Rees, Geraint; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease can be predicted many years before symptom onset, and thus makes an ideal model for studying the earliest mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Diffuse patterns of structural connectivity loss occur in the basal ganglia and cortex early in the disease. However, the organizational principles that underlie these changes are unclear. By understanding such principles we can gain insight into the link between the cellular pathology caused by mutant huntingtin and its downstream effect at the macroscopic level. The 'rich club' is a pattern of organization established in healthy human brains, where specific hub 'rich club' brain regions are more highly connected to each other than other brain regions. We hypothesized that selective loss of rich club connectivity might represent an organizing principle underlying the distributed pattern of structural connectivity loss seen in Huntington's disease. To test this hypothesis we performed diffusion tractography and graph theoretical analysis in a pseudo-longitudinal study of 50 premanifest and 38 manifest Huntington's disease participants compared with 47 healthy controls. Consistent with our hypothesis we found that structural connectivity loss selectively affected rich club brain regions in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease participants compared with controls. We found progressive network changes across controls, premanifest Huntington's disease and manifest Huntington's disease characterized by increased network segregation in the premanifest stage and loss of network integration in manifest disease. These regional and whole brain network differences were highly correlated with cognitive and motor deficits suggesting they have pathophysiological relevance. We also observed greater reductions in the connectivity of brain regions that have higher network traffic and lower clustering of neighbouring regions. This provides a potential mechanism that results in a characteristic pattern of structural

  4. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain computer interface (BCI): model order selection for autoregressive spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Dennis J.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2008-06-01

    People can learn to control EEG features consisting of sensorimotor rhythm amplitudes and can use this control to move a cursor in one or two dimensions to a target on a screen. Cursor movement depends on the estimate of the amplitudes of sensorimotor rhythms. Autoregressive models are often used to provide these estimates. The order of the autoregressive model has varied widely among studies. Through analyses of both simulated and actual EEG data, the present study examines the effects of model order on sensorimotor rhythm measurements and BCI performance. The results show that resolution of lower frequency signals requires higher model orders and that this requirement reflects the temporal span of the model coefficients. This is true for both simulated EEG data and actual EEG data during brain-computer interface (BCI) operation. Increasing model order, and decimating the signal were similarly effective in increasing spectral resolution. Furthermore, for BCI control of two-dimensional cursor movement, higher model orders produced better performance in each dimension and greater independence between horizontal and vertical movements. In sum, these results show that autoregressive model order selection is an important determinant of BCI performance and should be based on criteria that reflect system performance.

  5. A vision-free brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigm based on auditory selective attention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Won; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Lim, Jeong-Hwan; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Majority of the recently developed brain computer interface (BCI) systems have been using visual stimuli or visual feedbacks. However, the BCI paradigms based on visual perception might not be applicable to severe locked-in patients who have lost their ability to control their eye movement or even their vision. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of a vision-free BCI paradigm based on auditory selective attention. We used the power difference of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) when the participant modulates his/her attention to the target auditory stimulus. The auditory stimuli were constructed as two pure-tone burst trains with different beat frequencies (37 and 43 Hz) which were generated simultaneously from two speakers located at different positions (left and right). Our experimental results showed high classification accuracies (64.67%, 30 commands/min, information transfer rate (ITR) = 1.89 bits/min; 74.00%, 12 commands/min, ITR = 2.08 bits/min; 82.00%, 6 commands/min, ITR = 1.92 bits/min; 84.33%, 3 commands/min, ITR = 1.12 bits/min; without any artifact rejection, inter-trial interval = 6 sec), enough to be used for a binary decision. Based on the suggested paradigm, we implemented a first online ASSR-based BCI system that demonstrated the possibility of materializing a totally vision-free BCI system.

  6. Achieving a hybrid brain-computer interface with tactile selective attention and motor imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Ahn, Minkyu; Cho, Hohyun; Jun, Sung Chan

    2014-12-01

    Objective. We propose a new hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) system that integrates two different EEG tasks: tactile selective attention (TSA) using a vibro-tactile stimulator on the left/right finger and motor imagery (MI) of left/right hand movement. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) from the MI task and steady-state somatosensory evoked potential (SSSEP) from the TSA task are retrieved and combined into two hybrid senses. Approach. One hybrid approach is to measure two tasks simultaneously; the features of each task are combined for testing. Another hybrid approach is to measure two tasks consecutively (TSA first and MI next) using only MI features. For comparison with the hybrid approaches, the TSA and MI tasks are measured independently. Main results. Using a total of 16 subject datasets, we analyzed the BCI classification performance for MI, TSA and two hybrid approaches in a comparative manner; we found that the consecutive hybrid approach outperformed the others, yielding about a 10% improvement in classification accuracy relative to MI alone. It is understood that TSA may play a crucial role as a prestimulus in that it helps to generate earlier ERD prior to MI and thus sustains ERD longer and to a stronger degree; this ERD may give more discriminative information than ERD in MI alone. Significance. Overall, our proposed consecutive hybrid approach is very promising for the development of advanced BCI systems.

  7. Feature Selection and Blind Source Separation in an EEG-Based Brain-Computer Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David A.; Knight, James N.; Kirby, Michael J.; Anderson, Charles W.; Thaut, Michael H.

    2005-12-01

    Most EEG-based BCI systems make use of well-studied patterns of brain activity. However, those systems involve tasks that indirectly map to simple binary commands such as "yes" or "no" or require many weeks of biofeedback training. We hypothesized that signal processing and machine learning methods can be used to discriminate EEG in a direct "yes"/"no" BCI from a single session. Blind source separation (BSS) and spectral transformations of the EEG produced a 180-dimensional feature space. We used a modified genetic algorithm (GA) wrapped around a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to search the space of feature subsets. The GA-based search found feature subsets that outperform full feature sets and random feature subsets. Also, BSS transformations of the EEG outperformed the original time series, particularly in conjunction with a subset search of both spaces. The results suggest that BSS and feature selection can be used to improve the performance of even a "direct," single-session BCI.

  8. Transcription Factor EB Is Selectively Reduced in the Nuclear Fractions of Alzheimer's and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Brains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that autophagy is strongly dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as evidenced by accumulation of numerous autophagosomes, lysosomes with discontinuous membranes, and aggregated proteins in the patients' brains. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) was recently discovered to be a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis and autophagy. To examine whether aberrant autophagy in AD and ALS is due to alterations in TFEB expression, we systematically quantified the levels of TFEB in these brains by immunoblotting. Interestingly, cytoplasmic fractions of AD brains showed increased levels of normalized (to tubulin) TFEB only at Braak stage IV (61%, p < 0.01). Most importantly, normalized (to lamin) TFEB levels in the nuclear fractions were consistently reduced starting from Braak stage IV (52%, p < 0.01), stage V (67%, p < 0.01), and stage VI (85%, p < 0.01) when compared to normal control (NC) brains. In the ALS brains also, nuclear TFEB levels were reduced by 62% (p < 0.001). These data suggest that nuclear TFEB is selectively lost in ALS as well as AD brains, in which TFEB reduction was Braak-stage-dependent. Taken together, the observed reductions in TFEB protein levels may be responsible for the widely reported autophagy defects in these disorders. PMID:27433468

  9. High-dose fractionated radiation therapy for select patients with brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pezner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.; Archambeau, J.O.; Fine, R.M.; Moss, W.T.

    1981-08-01

    Four patients with metastases to the brain were treated by high-dose fractionated radiation therapy. In all four cases, a complete response and prolonged disease-free survival could be documented. Unlike the standard therapy for such patients (i.e., craniotomy and postoperative irradiation), high-dose fractionated radiation therapy carries no operative risk and can encompass multiple brain metastases and metastases in deep or critical intracranial sites. The risk of radiotherapy side effects in the brain is discussed.

  10. Site-selective nitrogen isotopic ratio measurement of nitrous oxide using a TE-cooled CW-RT-QCL based spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingsong; Zhang, Lizhu; Yu, Benli

    2014-12-10

    The feasibility of laser spectroscopic isotopic composition measurements of atmospheric N2O was demonstrated, although making them useful will require further improvements. The system relies on a thermoelectrically (TE) cooled continuous-wave (CW) room temperature (RT) quantum cascade laser source emitting wavelength of around 4.6μm, where strong fundamental absorption bands occur for the considered specie and its isotopomers. The analysis technique is based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection and the combination of long-path absorption cell. Primary laboratory tests have been performed to estimate the achievable detection limits and the signal reproducibility levels in view of possible measurements of (15)N/(14)N and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratios. The experiment results showed that the site-selective (15)N/(14)N ratio can be measured with a precision of 3‰ with 90s averaging time using natural-abundance N2O sample of 12.7ppm.

  11. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Seiber, Larry E.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  12. Cool & Connected

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Cool & Connected planning assistance program helps communities develop strategies and an action plan for using broadband to promote environmentally and economically sustainable community development.

  13. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  14. Brain Development in Children. Unit for Child Studies Selected Papers Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Charles

    This brief seminar presentation for parents and child minders points out aspects of brain development in human infants and provides answers to questions asked by seminar participants. Basic facts of anatomy, including the development of micro- and macroneurons, nerve cell migration, sprouting synapse formation and the death of brain cells are…

  15. The prodrug DHED selectively delivers 17β-estradiol to the brain for treating estrogen-responsive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Laszlo; Nguyen, Vien; Szarka, Szabolcs; Garg, Puja; Sabnis, Gauri; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.; McLaughlin, Katie J.; Talboom, Joshua S.; Conrad, Cheryl D.; Shughrue, Paul J.; Gould, Todd D.; Brodie, Angela; Merchenthaler, Istvan; Koulen, Peter; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric maladies originate from the deprivation of the human brain from estrogens. However, current hormone therapies cannot be used safely to treat these conditions commonly associated with menopause because of detrimental side-effects in the periphery. The latter also prevents the use of the hormone for neuroprotection. Here we show that a small-molecule bioprecursor prodrug, 10β,17β-dihydroxyestra-1,4-dien-3-one (DHED), converts to 17β-estradiol in the brain after systemic administration, but remains inert in the rest of the body. The localized and rapid formation of estrogen from the prodrug was revealed by a series of in vivo bioanalytical assays and through in vivo imaging in rodents. DHED treatment efficiently alleviated symptoms originated from brain estrogen deficiency in animal models of surgical menopause and provided neuroprotection in a rat stroke model. Concomitantly, we determined that 17β-estradiol formed in the brain from DHED elicited changes in gene expression and neuronal morphology identical to those obtained after direct 17β-estradiol treatment. Altogether, complementary functional and mechanistic data show that our approach is highly relevant therapeutically, because administration of the prodrug selectively produces estrogen in the brain independently from the route of administration and treatment regimen. Therefore, peripheral responses associated with the use of systemic estrogens, such as stimulation of the uterus and estrogen-responsive tumor growth, were absent. Collectively, our brain-selective prodrug approach may safely provide estrogen neuroprotection and medicate neurological and psychiatric symptoms developing from estrogen deficiency, particularly those encountered after surgical menopause, without the adverse side-effects of current hormone therapies. PMID:26203081

  16. A novel lead design enables selective deep brain stimulation of neural populations in the subthalamic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The clinical effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease are sensitive to the location of the DBS lead within the STN. New high density (HD) lead designs have been created which are hypothesized to provide additional degrees of freedom in shaping the stimulating electric field. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of a new HD lead with a conventional cylindrical contact (CC) lead. Approach. A computational model, consisting of a finite element electric field model combined with multi-compartment neuron and axon models representing different neural populations in the subthalamic region, was used to evaluate the two leads. We compared ring-mode and steering-mode stimulation with the HD lead to single contact stimulation with the CC lead. These stimulation modes were tested for the lead: (1) positioned in the centroid of the STN, (2) shifted 1 mm towards the internal capsule (IC), and (3) shifted 2 mm towards the IC. Under these conditions, we quantified the number of STN neurons that were activated without activating IC fibers, which are known to cause side-effects. Main results. The modeling results show that the HD lead is able to mimic the stimulation effect of the CC lead. Additionally, in steering-mode stimulation there was a significant increase of activated STN neurons compared to the CC mode. Significance. From the model simulations we conclude that the HD lead in steering-mode with optimized stimulation parameter selection can stimulate more STN cells. Next, the clinical impact of the increased number of activated STN cells should be tested and balanced across the increased complexity of identifying the optimized stimulation parameter settings for the HD lead.

  17. Learning selectively increases protein kinase C substrate phosphorylation in specific regions of the chick brain.

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, F S; McCabe, B J; Horn, G; Routtenberg, A

    1993-01-01

    The effect of imprinting, an early form of exposure learning, on the phosphorylation state of the protein kinase C substrates myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) and protein F1/43-kDa growth-associated protein (F1/GAP-43) was studied in two regions of the chick forebrain. One region, the intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV), is probably a site of long-term memory; the other, the wulst, contains somatic sensory and visual projection areas. After imprinting, a significant increase in MARCKS protein phosphorylation was observed in the left IMHV but not the right IMHV. No significant alteration in F1/GAP-43 was observed in IMHV. MARCKS was resolved into two acidic components of pI approximately 5.0 and approximately 4.0. Phosphorylation of the pI approximately 5.0 MARCKS but not the pI approximately 4.0 MARCKS was significantly altered by imprinting. The partial correlation between preference score (an index of learning) and phosphorylation, holding constant the effect of approach activity during training, was significant only for the pI approximately 5.0 MARCKS in the left IMHV. A significant negative partial correlation between preference score and F1/GAP-43 phosphorylation in the right wulst was observed. Because the imprinting-induced alteration in MARCKS is selective with respect to phosphoprotein moiety, hemispheric location, and brain region, we propose that these alterations may be central to the learning process. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8464879

  18. Selection and evaluation of reference genes for analysis of mouse (Mus musculus) sex-dimorphic brain development

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Tanya T.; Weston, Mitchell K.

    2017-01-01

    The development of the brain is sex-dimorphic, and as a result so are many neurological disorders. One approach for studying sex-dimorphic brain development is to measure gene expression in biological samples using RT-qPCR. However, the accuracy and consistency of this technique relies on the reference gene(s) selected. We analyzed the expression of ten reference genes in male and female samples over three stages of brain development, using popular algorithms NormFinder, GeNorm and Bestkeeper. The top ranked reference genes at each time point were further used to quantify gene expression of three sex-dimorphic genes (Wnt10b, Xist and CYP7B1). When comparing gene expression between the sexes expression at specific time points the best reference gene combinations are: Sdha/Pgk1 at E11.5, RpL38/Sdha E12.5, and Actb/RpL37 at E15.5. When studying expression across time, the ideal reference gene(s) differs with sex. For XY samples a combination of Actb/Sdha. In contrast, when studying gene expression across developmental stage with XX samples, Sdha/Gapdh were the top reference genes. Our results identify the best combination of two reference genes when studying male and female brain development, and emphasize the importance of selecting the correct reference genes for comparisons between developmental stages. PMID:28133578

  19. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  20. An HPLC tracing of the enhancer regulation in selected discrete brain areas of food-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Miklya, I; Knoll, B; Knoll, J

    2003-05-09

    The recent discovery of the enhancer regulation in the mammalian brain brought a different perspective to the brain-organized realization of goal-oriented behavior, which is the quintessence of plastic behavioral descriptions such as drive or motivation. According to this new approach, 'drive' means that special endogenous enhancer substances enhance the impulse-propagation-mediated release of transmitters in a proper population of enhancer-sensitive neurons, and keep these neurons in the state of enhanced excitability until the goal is reached. However, to reach any goal needs the participation of the catecholaminergic machinery, the engine of the brain. We developed a method to detect the specific enhancer effect of synthetic enhancer substances [(-)-deprenyl, (-)-PPAP, (-)-BPAP] by measuring the release of transmitters from freshly isolated selected discrete brain areas (striatum, substantia nigra, tuberculum olfactorium, locus coeruleus, raphe) by the aid of HPLC with electrochemical detection. To test the validity of the working hypothesis that in any form of goal-seeking behavior the catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons work on a higher activity level, we compared the amount of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin released from selected discrete brain areas isolated from the brain of sated and food-deprived rats. Rats were deprived of food for 48 and 72 hours, respectively, and the state of excitability of their catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in comparison to that of sated rats was measured. We tested the orienting-searching reflex activity of the rats in a special open field, isolated thereafter selected discrete brain areas and measured the release of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin from the proper tissue samples into the organ bath. The orienting-searching reflex activity of the rats increased proportionally to the time elapsed from the last feed and the amount of dopamine released from the striatum, substantia nigra and

  1. Selective attention in an overcrowded auditory scene: implications for auditory-based brain-computer interface design.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Ross K; Cheung, Willy; Lee, Adrian K C

    2012-11-01

    Listeners are good at attending to one auditory stream in a crowded environment. However, is there an upper limit of streams present in an auditory scene at which this selective attention breaks down? Here, participants were asked to attend one stream of spoken letters amidst other letter streams. In half of the trials, an initial primer was played, cueing subjects to the sound configuration. Results indicate that performance increases with token repetitions. Priming provided a performance benefit, suggesting that stream selection, not formation, is the bottleneck associated with attention in an overcrowded scene. Results' implications for brain-computer interfaces are discussed.

  2. A regulatory toolbox of MiniPromoters to drive selective expression in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Swanson, Douglas J.; Liu, Li; de Leeuw, Charles N.; Banks, Kathleen G.; Ho Sui, Shannan J.; Fulton, Debra L.; Ali, Johar; Amirabbasi, Mahsa; Arenillas, David J.; Babyak, Nazar; Black, Sonia F.; Bonaguro, Russell J.; Brauer, Erich; Candido, Tara R.; Castellarin, Mauro; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Jason C. Y.; Chopra, Vik; Docking, T. Roderick; Dreolini, Lisa; D'Souza, Cletus A.; Flynn, Erin K.; Glenn, Randy; Hatakka, Kristi; Hearty, Taryn G.; Imanian, Behzad; Jiang, Steven; Khorasan-zadeh, Shadi; Komljenovic, Ivana; Laprise, Stéphanie; Liao, Nancy Y.; Lim, Jonathan S.; Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Flora; Liu, Jun; Lu, Meifen; McConechy, Melissa; McLeod, Andrea J.; Milisavljevic, Marko; Mis, Jacek; O'Connor, Katie; Palma, Betty; Palmquist, Diana L.; Schmouth, Jean-François; Swanson, Magdalena I.; Tam, Bonny; Ticoll, Amy; Turner, Jenna L.; Varhol, Richard; Vermeulen, Jenny; Watkins, Russell F.; Wilson, Gary; Wong, Bibiana K. Y.; Wong, Siaw H.; Wong, Tony Y. T.; Yang, George S.; Ypsilanti, Athena R.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Holt, Robert A.; Goldowitz, Daniel; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Simpson, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The Pleiades Promoter Project integrates genomewide bioinformatics with large-scale knockin mouse production and histological examination of expression patterns to develop MiniPromoters and related tools designed to study and treat the brain by directed gene expression. Genes with brain expression patterns of interest are subjected to bioinformatic analysis to delineate candidate regulatory regions, which are then incorporated into a panel of compact human MiniPromoters to drive expression to brain regions and cell types of interest. Using single-copy, homologous-recombination “knockins” in embryonic stem cells, each MiniPromoter reporter is integrated immediately 5′ of the Hprt locus in the mouse genome. MiniPromoter expression profiles are characterized in differentiation assays of the transgenic cells or in mouse brains following transgenic mouse production. Histological examination of adult brains, eyes, and spinal cords for reporter gene activity is coupled to costaining with cell-type–specific markers to define expression. The publicly available Pleiades MiniPromoter Project is a key resource to facilitate research on brain development and therapies. PMID:20807748

  3. Electron Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Timothy J. P.

    1991-08-01

    Electron cooling is a method of reducing the 6 -dimensional phase space volume of a stored ion beam. The technique was invented by Budker and first developed by him and his colleagues at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk. Further studies of electron cooling were subsequently performed at CERN and Fermilab. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) an electron cooling system was designed, built, and commissioned in 1988. This was the highest energy system built to date (270 keV for cooling 500 MeV protons) and the first such system to be used as an instrument for performing nuclear and atomic physics experiments. This dissertation summarizes the design principles; measurements of the longitudinal drag rate (cooling force), equilibrium cooled beam properties and effective longitudinal electron beam temperature. These measurements are compared with theory and with the measured performance of other cooling systems. In addition the feasibility of extending this technology to energies an order of magnitude higher are discussed.

  4. Selective Endothelin-B Receptor Stimulation Increases Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Rat Brain during Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M G; Prazad, P; Puppala, B; Gulati, A

    2015-11-01

    Endothelin, vascular endothelial growth factor and nerve growth factor play important roles in development of the central nervous system. ET(B) receptors have been shown to promote neurovascular remodeling in the adult ischemic brain through an increase in VEGF and NGF. It is possible that ET(B) receptors may be involved in postnatal development of the brain through VEGF and NGF. In the present study, the brains of male rat pups on postnatal days 1, 7, 14 and 28 were analyzed for expression of ET(B) receptors, VEGF and NGF. In order to determine the effect of ET(B) receptor stimulation, a separate group of pups were administered saline or ET(B) receptor agonist, IRL-1620, on day 21, and their brains were analyzed on day 28. The intensity of ET(B) receptor and VEGF staining in the vasculature as well as the number of blood vessels of normal pups increased with age and was significantly higher on postnatal day 14 compared to day 1 and day 7. In contrast, both ET(B) and NGF staining intensity in the cortex and subventricular zones decreased (P<0.01) at postnatal day 14 compared to earlier time points. Stimulation of ET(B) receptors resulted in a significant increase in VEGF and ET(B) intensity both in the vasculature and the brain (P<0.05), however, IRL-1620 did not produce any change in NGF expression. Results indicate that ET(B) receptors appear to play a role in the development of the CNS and selective stimulation of ET(B) receptors enhances VEGF but not NGF in the postnatal rat brain.

  5. It's in the eye of the beholder: selective attention to drink properties during tasting influences brain activation in gustatory and reward regions.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Inge; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2017-03-20

    Statements regarding pleasantness, taste intensity or caloric content on a food label may influence the attention consumers pay to such characteristics during consumption. There is little research on the effects of selective attention on taste perception and associated brain activation in regular drinks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of selective attention on hedonics, intensity and caloric content on brain responses during tasting drinks. Using functional MRI brain responses of 27 women were measured while they paid attention to the intensity, pleasantness or caloric content of fruit juice, tomato juice and water. Brain activation during tasting largely overlapped between the three selective attention conditions and was found in the rolandic operculum, insula and overlying frontal operculum, striatum, amygdala, thalamus, anterior cingulate cortex and middle orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Brain activation was higher during selective attention to taste intensity compared to calories in the right middle OFC and during selective attention to pleasantness compared to intensity in the right putamen, right ACC and bilateral middle insula. Intensity ratings correlated with brain activation during selective attention to taste intensity in the anterior insula and lateral OFC. Our data suggest that not only the anterior insula but also the middle and lateral OFC are involved in evaluating taste intensity. Furthermore, selective attention to pleasantness engaged regions associated with food reward. Overall, our results indicate that selective attention to food properties can alter the activation of gustatory and reward regions. This may underlie effects of food labels on the consumption experience of consumers.

  6. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  7. Effect of oseltamivir on catecholamines and select oxidative stress markers in the presence of oligoelements in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, David Calderón; García, Ernestina Hernández; Brizuela, Norma Osnaya; Jiménez, Francisca Trujillo; Mejía, Gerardo Barragán; Olguín, Hugo Juárez; del Ángel, Daniel Santamaría; Elvira, Nuñez A; Aparicio, Liliana Carmona

    2010-10-01

    The effect that osteltamivir has on the metabolism of catecholamines and oxidative damage in the brains of young patients remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of oseltamivir, in the presence of oligoelements, on biogenic amines and select oxidative biomarkers in the brains of uninfected, young rats under normal conditions. The study was conducted using male Wistar rats intraperitoneally treated for three days with either a control dose of 0.9 % NaCl, oseltamivir (50 mg/kg), oligoelements (50 μL/rat), or oseltamivir (50 mg/kg) and oligoelements (50 μL/rat). The brain tissue extracted from the treated rats was used to determine the concentrations of adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine, as well as the levels of GSH, lipid peroxidation, and ATPase activity. An increase in the concentration of adrenaline and noradrenaline and in the level of GSH in the group treated with oligoelements (p < 0.001) was observed, while the group treated with oseltamivir and oligoelements, the levels of dopamine increased (p < 0.001), and in the groups treated with oligoelements alone or combination with oseltamivir a decrease in lipid peroxidation was observed (p < 0.001). The results of this study suggest that the consumption of oseltamivir and oligoelements induce biphasic changes in the metabolism of catecholamines; thereby, inducing a protective mechanism against oxidative damage in the brains of young rats.

  8. Neuroproteomic profiling of human brain tissue using multidimensional separation techniques and selective enrichment of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Musunuri, Sravani; Shevchenko, Ganna; Bergquist, Jonas

    2012-12-01

    Hydrophobic membrane proteins (MPs) occupy a unique niche in the brain proteome research due to their important physiological roles. Therefore, the extraction, separation, and identification of MPs are of great interest in proteomic analysis. We applied various proteomic techniques to enrich, separate, and analyze the human brain proteome, including membrane proteome. Temperature-induced phase fractionation with the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 was used to simultaneously extract, separate, and concentrate low abundant hydrophobic and high abundant hydrophilic proteins from human brain tissue. The extracted and delipidated proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Approximately 600 spots were detected in the gels. In-solution digestion was performed on 3 kDa spin filters. Tryptic peptides were separated using RP nano-LC and analyzed using two different high performance mass spectrometers, linear ion trap-Fourier transform and a linear ion trap-Orbitrap to reveal the low abundant MPs. In total, 837 and 780 unique proteins were identified by using linear ion trap-Fourier transform and linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometers, respectively. More than 29% of the identified proteins were classified as MPs with significant biological functions such as ion channels and transporters. Our study establishes a simple and rapid shotgun approach for the characterization of the brain proteome, and allows comprehensive analysis of brain membrane proteomes.

  9. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  10. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  11. A novel head-neck cooling device for concussion injury in contact sports

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Bonnie; Jackson, Kevin; Miller, Claire M.; Hasadsri, Linda; Llano, Daniel; Rubin, Rachael; Zimmerman, Jarred; Johnson, Curtis; Sutton, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research on the long-term impact of concussions on athletes has allowed public recognition of the potentially devastating effects of these and other mild head injuries. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a multifaceted disease for which management remains a clinical challenge. Recent pre-clinical and clinical data strongly suggest a destructive synergism between brain temperature elevation and mTBI; conversely, brain hypothermia, with its broader, pleiotropic effects, represents the most potent neuro-protectant in laboratory studies to date. Although well-established in selected clinical conditions, a systemic approach to accomplish regional hypothermia has failed to yield an effective treatment strategy in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, although systemic hypothermia remains a potentially valid treatment strategy for moderate to severe TBIs, it is neither practical nor safe for mTBIs. Therefore, selective head-neck cooling may represent an ideal strategy to provide therapeutic benefits to the brain. Optimizing brain temperature management using a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacesuit spinoff head-neck cooling technology before and/or after mTBI in contact sports may represent a sensible, practical, and effective method to potentially enhance recover and minimize post-injury deficits. In this paper, we discuss and summarize the anatomical, physiological, preclinical, and clinical data concerning NASA spinoff head-neck cooling technology as a potential treatment for mTBIs, particularly in the context of contact sports. PMID:28123788

  12. A novel head-neck cooling device for concussion injury in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Bonnie; Jackson, Kevin; Miller, Claire M; Hasadsri, Linda; Llano, Daniel; Rubin, Rachael; Zimmerman, Jarred; Johnson, Curtis; Sutton, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research on the long-term impact of concussions on athletes has allowed public recognition of the potentially devastating effects of these and other mild head injuries. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a multifaceted disease for which management remains a clinical challenge. Recent pre-clinical and clinical data strongly suggest a destructive synergism between brain temperature elevation and mTBI; conversely, brain hypothermia, with its broader, pleiotropic effects, represents the most potent neuro-protectant in laboratory studies to date. Although well-established in selected clinical conditions, a systemic approach to accomplish regional hypothermia has failed to yield an effective treatment strategy in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, although systemic hypothermia remains a potentially valid treatment strategy for moderate to severe TBIs, it is neither practical nor safe for mTBIs. Therefore, selective head-neck cooling may represent an ideal strategy to provide therapeutic benefits to the brain. Optimizing brain temperature management using a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacesuit spinoff head-neck cooling technology before and/or after mTBI in contact sports may represent a sensible, practical, and effective method to potentially enhance recover and minimize post-injury deficits. In this paper, we discuss and summarize the anatomical, physiological, preclinical, and clinical data concerning NASA spinoff head-neck cooling technology as a potential treatment for mTBIs, particularly in the context of contact sports.

  13. Characterisation of element profile changes induced by long-term dietary supplementation of zinc in the brain and cerebellum of 3xTg-AD mice by alternated cool and normal plasma ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ciavardelli, Domenico; Consalvo, Ada; Caldaralo, Valentina; Di Vacri, Maria Laura; Nisi, Stefano; Corona, Carlo; Frazzini, Valerio; Sacchetta, Paolo; Urbani, Andrea; Di Ilio, Carmine; Sensi, Stefano L

    2012-12-01

    Metal dyshomeostasis plays a crucial role in promoting several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition that has been linked to deregulation of brain levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn. Thus, quantitative multi-element profiling of brain tissues from AD models can be of great value in assessing the pathogenic role of metals as well as the value of therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring metal homeostasis in the brain. In this study, we employed low resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to evaluate levels of ultra-trace, trace, and major elements in brains and cerebella of 3xTg-AD mice, a well characterized transgenic (Tg) AD model. This method is based on alternated cool and hot plasma ICP-MS. The essay fulfilled analytical requirements for the quantification of 14 elements in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of our Tg model. Quantification of Li, Al, Cr, and Co, a procedure that requires a pre-concentration step, was validated by high resolution ICP-MS. Changes in element profiles occurring in 3xTg-AD mice were compared to the ones observed in wild type (WT) mice. We also investigated variations in element profiles in 3xTg-AD mice receiving a long-term (17 months) dietary supplementation of Zn. Our data indicate that, compared to WT animals, 3xTg-AD mice displayed signs of altered brain metal homeostasis. We also found that long-term Zn administration promoted decreased brain levels of some metals (K, Ca, and Fe) and restored levels of Al, Cr, and Co to values found in WT mice.

  14. Use of a Peltier chip with a newly devised local brain-cooling system for neocortical seizures in the rat. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Hirochika; Fujii, Masami; Uchiyama, Jouji; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Nakano, Kimihiko; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Nomura, Sadahiro; Saito, Takashi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Local cortical cooling for termination of epileptic discharges (EDs) has recently become a focus of research. The authors report on a newly devised cooling system that uses a thermoelectric (Peltier) chip and examine the system's performance in experimental neocortical seizures. Experiments were performed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after induction of halothane anesthesia. The Peltier chip was attached to a heat sink with a water channel. Two silicon tubes were connected to the heat sink, and water at 37 degrees C was circulated in the channel. The newly designed device was placed on the surface of the cortex. Kainic acid (KA) was injected into the cortex to provoke EDs. In the nonepileptic cortex, the temperature of the cortical surface decreased to 14.8 +/- 1.5 degrees C and that 2 mm below the surface to 27.1 +/- 3.1 degrees C within 30 seconds after the start of cooling. The temperature of the heated side of the chip was maintained at approximately 36.9 degrees C. Without water circulation, the temperature of the cortical surface decreased to 20 degrees C but soon began to increase, peaking at 30 degrees C. The temperature of the heated side of the chip rose to more than 60 degrees C. The EDs, which appeared within 20 minutes after KA injection, began to decrease in amplitude immediately after cooling began and continued to decrease as the temperature of the cortex was lowered. Sufficient miniaturization and good performance of the cooling device was demonstrated. Further efforts to develop implantable cooling systems and improve existing ones should be continued.

  15. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  16. Acute pharmacologically induced shifts in serotonin availability abolish emotion-selective responses to negative face emotions in distinct brain networks.

    PubMed

    Grady, Cheryl L; Siebner, Hartwig R; Hornboll, Bettina; Macoveanu, Julian; Paulson, Olaf B; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin availability can alter the processing of facial expressions of emotion. Using a within-subject design, we measured the effect of serotonin on the brain's response to aversive face emotions with functional MRI while 20 participants judged the gender of neutral, fearful and angry faces. In three separate and counterbalanced sessions, participants received citalopram (CIT) to raise serotonin levels, underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) to lower serotonin, or were studied without pharmacological challenge (Control). An analysis designed to identify distributed brain responses identified two brain networks with modulations of activity related to face emotion and serotonin level. The first network included the left amygdala, bilateral striatum, and fusiform gyri. During the Control session this network responded only to fearful faces; increasing serotonin decreased this response to fear, whereas reducing serotonin enhanced the response of this network to angry faces. The second network involved bilateral amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and these regions also showed increased activity to fear during the Control session. Both drug challenges enhanced the neural response of this set of regions to angry faces, relative to Control, and CIT also enhanced activity for neutral faces. The net effect of these changes in both networks was to abolish the selective response to fearful expressions. These results suggest that a normal level of serotonin is critical for maintaining a differentiated brain response to threatening face emotions. Lower serotonin leads to a broadening of a normally fear-specific response to anger, and higher levels reduce the differentiated brain response to aversive face emotions.

  17. A Discussion of Brain Hemisphere Characteristics and Creative Leadership among Selected Educational Administrators in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cynthia

    Findings from a study of 27 superintendents, 39 principals, and 37 supervisors recognized as effective leaders in Tennessee schools suggest that the highest level of educational leadership is dominated by individuals whose cognitive style is ineffective for conceptualizing the future. Analysis of the subjects' brain dominance patterns using the…

  18. Effects of Blocking GABA Degradation on Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Gene Expression in Selected Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Viet; Hatalski, Carolyn G.; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) degradation blocker γ-vinyl-GABA (VGB) is used clinically to treat seizures in both adult and immature individuals. The mechanism by which VGB controls developmental seizures is not fully understood. Specifically, whether the anticonvulsant properties of VGB arise only from its elevation of brain GABA levels and the resulting activation of GABA receptors, or also from associated mechanisms, remains unresolved. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a neuropeptide present in many brain regions involved in developmental seizures, is a known convulsant in the immature brain and has been implicated in some developmental seizures. In certain brain regions, it has been suggested that CRH synthesis and release may be regulated by GABA. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that VGB decreases CRH gene expression in the immature rat brain, consistent with the notion that VGB may decrease seizures also by reducing the levels of the convulsant molecule, CRH. Methods VGB was administered to immature, 9-day-old rats in clinically relevant doses, whereas littermate controls received vehicle. Results In situ hybridization histochemistry demonstrated a downregulation of CRH mRNA levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus but not in other limbic regions of VGB-treated pups compared with controls. In addition, VGB-treated pups had increased CRH peptide levels in the anterior hypothalamus, as shown by radioimmunoassay. Conclusions These findings are consistent with a reduction of both CRH gene expression and secretion in the hypothalamus, but do not support an indirect anticonvulsant mechanism of VGB via downregulation of CRH levels in limbic structures. However, the data support a region-specific regulation of CRH gene expression by GABA. PMID:10487181

  19. Use of Multichannel Near Infrared Spectroscopy to Study Relationships Between Brain Regions and Neurocognitive Tasks of Selective/Divided Attention and 2-Back Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Nozomi; Imai, Shoji; Kanayama, Yusuke; Kawashima, Issaku; Kumano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    While dichotic listening (DL) was originally intended to measure bottom-up selective attention, it has also become a tool for measuring top-down selective attention. This study investigated the brain regions related to top-down selective and divided attention DL tasks and a 2-back task using alphanumeric and Japanese numeric sounds. Thirty-six healthy participants underwent near-infrared spectroscopy scanning while performing a top-down selective attentional DL task, a top-down divided attentional DL task, and a 2-back task. Pearson's correlations were calculated to show relationships between oxy-Hb concentration in each brain region and the score of each cognitive task. Different brain regions were activated during the DL and 2-back tasks. Brain regions activated in the top-down selective attention DL task were the left inferior prefrontal gyrus and left pars opercularis. The left temporopolar area was activated in the top-down divided attention DL task, and the left frontopolar area and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were activated in the 2-back task. As further evidence for the finding that each task measured different cognitive and brain area functions, neither the percentages of correct answers for the three tasks nor the response times for the selective attentional task and the divided attentional task were correlated to one another. Thus, the DL and 2-back tasks used in this study can assess multiple areas of cognitive, brain-related dysfunction to explore their relationship to different psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. Pattern of Fos expression in the brain induced by selective activation of somatostatin receptor 2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Miriam; Stengel, Andreas; Wang, Lixin; Coskun, Tamer; Alsina-Fernandez, Jorge; Rivier, Jean; Taché, Yvette

    2010-01-01

    Central activation of somatostatin (sst) receptors by oligosomatostatin analogs inhibits growth hormone and stress-related rise in catecholamine plasma levels while stimulating grooming, feeding behaviors, gastric transit and acid secretion, which can be mimicked by selective sst2 receptor agonist. To evaluate the pattern of neuronal activation induced by peptide sst receptor agonists, we assessed Fos-expression in rat brain after intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a newly developed selective sst2 agonist compared to the oligosomatostatin agonist, ODT8-SST, a pan-sst1–5 agonist. Ninety min after injection of vehicle (10µl) or previously established maximal orexigenic dose of peptides (1µg=1nmol/rat), brains were assessed for Fos-immunohistochemistry and doublelabeling. Food and water were removed after injection. The sst2 agonist and ODT8-SST induced a similar Fos distribution pattern except in the arcuate nucleus where only the sst2 agonist increased Fos. Compared to ODT8-SST, the sst2 agonist induced higher Fos-expression by 3.7-fold in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, 1.2-fold in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), 1.6-fold in the magnocellular paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (mPVN), 4.1-fold in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus, and 2.6-fold in both the inferior olivary nucleus and superficial layer of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus. Doublelabeling in the hypothalamus showed that ODT8-SST activates 36% of oxytocin, 63% of vasopressin and 79% of sst2 immunoreactive neurons in the mPVN and 28%, 55% and 25% in the SON, respectively. Selective activation of sst2 receptor results in a more robust neuronal activation than the pan-sst1–5 agonist in various brain regions that may have relevance in sst2 mediated alterations of behavioral, autonomic and endocrine functions. PMID:20637739

  1. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  2. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  3. Role of auditory brain function assessment by SPECT in cochlear implant side selection.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, W; Giannantonio, S; Di Giuda, D; De Corso, E; Schinaia, L; Paludetti, G

    2013-02-01

    Pre-surgery evaluation, indications for cochlear implantation and expectations in terms of post-operative functional results remain challenging topics in pre-lingually deaf adults. Our study has the purpose of determining the benefits of Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) assessment in pre-surgical evaluation of pre-lingually deaf adults who are candidates for cochlear implantation. In 7 pre-lingually profoundly deaf patients, brain SPECT was performed at baseline conditions and in bilateral simultaneous multi-frequency acoustic stimulation. Six sagittal tomograms of both temporal cortices were used for semi-quantitative analysis in each patient. Percentage increases in cortical perfusion resulting from auditory stimulation were calculated. The results showed an inter-hemispherical asymmetry of the activation extension and intensity in the stimulated temporal areas. Consistent with the obtained brain activation data, patients were implanted preferring the side that showed higher activation after acoustic stimulus. Considering the increment in auditory perception performances, it was possible to point out a relationship between cortical brain activity shown by SPECT and hearing performances, and, even more significant, a correlation between post-operative functional performances and the activation of the most medial part of the sagittal temporal tomograms, corresponding to medium-high frequencies. In light of these findings, we believe that brain SPECT could be considered in the evaluation of deaf patients candidate for cochlear implantation, and that it plays a major role in functional assessment of the auditory cortex of pre-lingually deaf subjects, even if further studies are necessary to conclusively establish its utility. Further developments of this technique are possible by using trans-tympanic electrical stimulation of the cochlear promontory, which could give the opportunity to study completely deaf patients, whose evaluation is objectively difficult

  4. Expression of alpha subunit of alpha glucosidase II in adult mouse brain regions and selective organs

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Miller, Hayley; Raman, Chandrasekar; Phillips, Mathew; Ciment, Gary; Kumari, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Alpha glucosidase II (GII), a resident of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and an important enzyme in folding of nascent glycoproteins, is heterodimeric consisting of alpha (GIIα) and beta (GIIβ) subunits. The catalytic GIIα subunit with the help of mannose 6-phosphate receptor homology (MRH) domain of GIIβ sequentially hydrolyzes two α-1-3-linked glucose residues in the 2nd step of N-linked oligosaccharide-mediated protein folding. The soluble GIIα subunit is retained in the ER through its interaction with the HDEL-containing GIIβ subunit. N-glycosylation and correct protein folding is crucial for protein stability, trafficking, and cell surface expression of several proteins in the brain. Alterations in N-glycosylation lead to abnormalities in neuronal migration and mental retardation, various neurodegenerative diseases, and invasion of malignant gliomas. Inhibitors of GII are used to inhibit cell proliferation and migration in a variety of different pathologies such as viral infection, cancer and diabetes. In spite of the widespread usage of GIIα inhibitory drugs and the role of GIIα in brain function little is known about its expression in brain and other tissues. Here, we report generation of a highly specific chicken antibody to GIIα subunit and its characterization by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation using cerebral cortical extracts. Using this antibody we show that the GIIα protein is highly expressed in testis, kidney, and lung, with the least amount in heart. GIIα polypeptide levels in whole brain were comparable to spleen. However, higher expression of GIIα protein was detected in cerebral cortex reflecting its continuous requirement in correct folding of cell surface proteins. PMID:25131991

  5. Selective blockade of the rat brain aqueduct with thermogelling hydrogel nanoparticle dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Phillip R; Guan, Guoqiang; Zhou, Jun; Hu, Zhibing; Bellinger, Larry L

    2008-02-27

    Experimental methods targeting molecules or drugs to specific neuronal tissue(s) can be important in determining function. In this study we focused on blockade of the small channel or aqueduct connecting the third and fourth ventricles of the rat brain. A cannula was placed into the aqueduct between the third and fourth ventricle. A second cannula was placed into the third or fourth ventricle. An aqueous dispersion of hydrogel nanoparticles, that maintains a liquid state at temperatures below 33 degrees C and solidifies near body temperature (35 degrees C), was infused into the aqueduct. Two interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) of hydrogel nanoparticles with polymer concentrations at 2% by weight and 3% by weight were separately infused into the aqueduct to block cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Following infusion of hydrogel CSF was isolated to a particular ventricle as shown by the lack of dye movement between the ventricles. In addition, stress hormone, corticosterone, feeding behavior and blood glucose levels were measured. Results show upon reaching the aqueduct the hydrogel dispersion solidified and restricted the flow of CSF. A higher concentration of dispersion (3% wt.) was more effective in blocking the aqueduct and isolating the third from the fourth ventricle. Over the period of measurement, infusion of the dispersion had no measurable detrimental physiological effects on the animal. We conclude that isolation of ventricles in the brain can be completed for 48-h by using dispersions of hydrogel nanoparticles and the effects of drugs on certain brain tissues can be determined with this method.

  6. Brain-expressed exons under purifying selection are enriched for de novo mutations in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed; Tammimies, Kristiina; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Alipanahi, Babak; Hu, Pingzhao; Wang, Zhuozhi; Pinto, Dalila; Lau, Lynette; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Marshall, Christian R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J; Merico, Daniele; Yuen, Ryan K C; Scherer, Stephen W

    2014-07-01

    A universal challenge in genetic studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is determining whether a given DNA sequence alteration will manifest as disease. Among different population controls, we observed, for specific exons, an inverse correlation between exon expression level in brain and burden of rare missense mutations. For genes that harbor de novo mutations predicted to be deleterious, we found that specific critical exons were significantly enriched in individuals with ASD relative to their siblings without ASD (P < 1.13 × 10(-38); odds ratio (OR) = 2.40). Furthermore, our analysis of genes with high exonic expression in brain and low burden of rare mutations demonstrated enrichment for known ASD-associated genes (P < 3.40 × 10(-11); OR = 6.08) and ASD-relevant fragile-X protein targets (P < 2.91 × 10(-157); OR = 9.52). Our results suggest that brain-expressed exons under purifying selection should be prioritized in genotype-phenotype studies for ASD and related neurodevelopmental conditions.

  7. Self-regulation of circumscribed brain activity modulates spatially selective and frequency specific connectivity of distributed resting state networks.

    PubMed

    Vukelić, Mathias; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of learning involved in brain self-regulation have still to be unveiled to exploit the full potential of this methodology for therapeutic interventions. This skill of volitionally changing brain activity presumably resembles motor skill learning which in turn is accompanied by plastic changes modulating resting state networks. Along these lines, we hypothesized that brain regulation and neurofeedback would similarly modify intrinsic networks at rest while presenting a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High-resolution electroencephalography preceded and followed a single neurofeedback training intervention of modulating circumscribed sensorimotor low β-activity by kinesthetic motor imagery in eleven healthy participants. The participants were kept in the deliberative phase of skill acquisition with high demands for learning self-regulation through stepwise increases of task difficulty. By applying the corrected imaginary part of the coherency function, we observed increased functional connectivity of both the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex with their respective contralateral homologous cortices in the low β-frequency band which was self-regulated during feedback. At the same time, the primary motor cortex-but none of the surrounding cortical areas-showed connectivity to contralateral supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas in the high β-band. Simultaneously, the neurofeedback target displayed a specific increase of functional connectivity with an ipsilateral fronto-parietal network in the α-band while presenting a de-coupling with contralateral primary and secondary sensorimotor areas in the very same frequency band. Brain self-regulation modifies resting state connections spatially selective to the neurofeedback target of the dominant hemisphere. These are anatomically distinct with regard to the cortico-cortical connectivity pattern and are functionally specific with regard to the time domain of coherent activity

  8. Cooling vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, J.; Kane, J.; Coverdale, J.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive vest of heat-sealable urethane material, when strapped to person's body, presents significant uncomplicated cooling system for environments where heavy accumulation of metabolic heat exists. Garment is applicable to occupations where physical exertion is required under heavy protective clothing.

  9. Collimator selection for SPECT brain imaging: the advantage of high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.P.; Polak, J.F.; Kijewski, M.F.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    We compared a prototype long-bore (LB) high-resolution collimator with a low-energy, general-purpose collimator (LEGP) using 99mTc and /sup 123/I. The LB collimator provided a 56% improvement in tomographic resolution (autocorrelation width) over the LEGP for 99mTc; for /sup 123/I, the gain was 79%, providing substantially improved contrast for small structures. The sensitivity of the LB collimator, however, is only 32% of that of the LEGP. The imaging tasks to be performed on (/sup 123/I)IMP brain scans involve localization and discrimination of small, high-contrast brain structures and detection of abnormalities in shape, size, or uptake, rather than simple detection of lesions. Observer performance in such higher-order imaging tasks is known to depend on high spatial resolution, even at the cost of sensitivity. Patient studies confirmed that, for resolution-limited tasks, the increase in resolution outweighs the increased noise due to a loss in sensitivity. When the tomographic resolution of the LB collimator was degraded by smoothing to that of the LEGP, the noise in the LB images was lower than that of the LEGP by a factor of 2.9 for the same imaging time, demonstrating the advantage of high-resolution detectors and a smooth reconstruction filter over low-resolution detectors without smoothing. Therefore, collimators designed for high resolution, even at substantial cost in sensitivity, are expected to yield significant improvements for brain SPECT. Geometric calculations show that commercially available low-energy, high-resolution cast collimators promise to meet these requirements.

  10. Fast periodic presentation of natural images reveals a robust face-selective electrophysiological response in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Rossion, Bruno; Torfs, Katrien; Jacques, Corentin; Liu-Shuang, Joan

    2015-01-16

    We designed a fast periodic visual stimulation approach to identify an objective signature of face categorization incorporating both visual discrimination (from nonface objects) and generalization (across widely variable face exemplars). Scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded in 12 human observers viewing natural images of objects at a rapid frequency of 5.88 images/s for 60 s. Natural images of faces were interleaved every five stimuli, i.e., at 1.18 Hz (5.88/5). Face categorization was indexed by a high signal-to-noise ratio response, specifically at an oddball face stimulation frequency of 1.18 Hz and its harmonics. This face-selective periodic EEG response was highly significant for every participant, even for a single 60-s sequence, and was generally localized over the right occipitotemporal cortex. The periodicity constraint and the large selection of stimuli ensured that this selective response to natural face images was free of low-level visual confounds, as confirmed by the absence of any oddball response for phase-scrambled stimuli. Without any subtraction procedure, time-domain analysis revealed a sequence of differential face-selective EEG components between 120 and 400 ms after oddball face image onset, progressing from medial occipital (P1-faces) to occipitotemporal (N1-faces) and anterior temporal (P2-faces) regions. Overall, this fast periodic visual stimulation approach provides a direct signature of natural face categorization and opens an avenue for efficiently measuring categorization responses of complex visual stimuli in the human brain.

  11. Selective development of anticorrelated networks in the intrinsic functional organization of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiaoqian J; Ofen, Noa; Gabrieli, John D E; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2014-03-01

    We examined the normal development of intrinsic functional connectivity of the default network (brain regions typically deactivated for attention-demanding tasks) as measured by resting-state fMRI in children, adolescents, and young adults ages 8-24 years. We investigated both positive and negative correlations and employed analysis methods that allowed for valid interpretation of negative correlations and that also minimized the influence of motion artifacts that are often confounds in developmental neuroimaging. As age increased, there were robust developmental increases in negative correlations, including those between medial pFC (MPFC) and dorsolateral pFC (DLPFC) and between lateral parietal cortices and brain regions associated with the dorsal attention network. Between multiple regions, these correlations reversed from being positive in children to negative in adults. Age-related changes in positive correlations within the default network were below statistical threshold after controlling for motion. Given evidence in adults that greater negative correlation between MPFC and DLPFC is associated with superior cognitive performance, the development of an intrinsic anticorrelation between MPFC and DLPFC may be a marker of the large growth of working memory and executive functions that occurs from childhood to young adulthood.

  12. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  13. Microglial brain region-dependent diversity and selective regional sensitivities to ageing

    PubMed Central

    Grabert, Kathleen; Michoel, Tom; Karavolos, Michail H; Clohisey, Sara; Baillie, J Kenneth; Stevens, Mark P; Freeman, Tom C; Summers, Kim M; McColl, Barry W

    2015-01-01

    Microglia play critical roles in neural development, homeostasis and neuroinflammation and are increasingly implicated in age-related neurological dysfunction. Neurodegeneration often occurs in disease-specific spatially-restricted patterns, the origins of which are unknown. We performed the first genome-wide analysis of microglia from discrete brain regions across the adult lifespan of the mouse and reveal that microglia have distinct region-dependent transcriptional identities and age in a regionally variable manner. In the young adult brain, differences in bioenergetic and immunoregulatory pathways were the major sources of heterogeneity and suggested that cerebellar and hippocampal microglia exist in a more immune vigilant state. Immune function correlated with regional transcriptional patterns. Augmentation of the distinct cerebellar immunophenotype and a contrasting loss in distinction of the hippocampal phenotype among forebrain regions were key features during ageing. Microglial diversity may enable regionally localised homeostatic functions but could also underlie region-specific sensitivities to microglial dysregulation and involvement in age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:26780511

  14. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  15. G-quadruplex DNAzymes-induced highly selective and sensitive colorimetric sensing of free heme in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruimin; Jiang, Qin; Cheng, Hanjun; Zhang, Guoqiang; Zhen, Mingming; Chen, Daiqin; Ge, Jiechao; Mao, Lanqun; Wang, Chunru; Shu, Chunying

    2014-04-21

    Direct selective determination of free heme in the cerebral system is of great significance due to the crucial roles of free heme in physiological and pathological processes. In this work, a G-quadruplex DNAzymes-induced highly sensitive and selective colorimetric sensing of free heme in rat brain is established. Initially, the conformation of an 18-base G-rich DNA sequence, PS2.M (5'-GTGGGTAGGGCGGGTTGG-3'), in the presence of K(+), changes from a random coil to a "parallel" G-quadruplex structure, which can bind free heme in the cerebral system with high affinity through π-π stacking. The resulted heme/G-quadruplex complex exhibits high peroxidase-like activity, which can be used to catalyze the oxidation of colorless ABTS(2-) to green ABTS˙(-) by H2O2. The concentration of heme can be evaluated by the naked eye and determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The signal output showed a linear relationship for heme within the concentration range from 1 to 120 nM with a detection limit of 0.637 nM. The assay demonstrated here was highly selective and free from the interference of physiologically important species such as dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), ascorbate acid (AA), cysteine, uric acid (UA), glucose and lactate in the cerebral system. The basal dialysate level of free heme in the microdialysate from the striatum of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was determined to be 32.8 ± 19.5 nM (n = 3). The analytic protocol possesses many advantages, including theoretical simplicity, low-cost technical and instrumental demands, and responsible detection of heme in rat brain microdialysate.

  16. Recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling.

    PubMed

    Han, J C; Dutta, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper focuses on turbine blade internal cooling. Internal cooling is achieved by passing the coolant through several rib-enhanced serpentine passages inside the blade and extracting the heat from the outside of the blades. Both jet impingement and pin-fin-cooling are also used as a method of internal cooling. In the past number of years there has been considerable progress in turbine blade internal cooling research and this paper is limited to reviewing a few selected publications to reflect recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling.

  17. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  18. Cooling technique

    DOEpatents

    Salamon, Todd R; Vyas, Brijesh; Kota, Krishna; Simon, Elina

    2017-01-31

    An apparatus and a method are provided. Use is made of a wick structure configured to receive a liquid and generate vapor in when such wick structure is heated by heat transferred from heat sources to be cooled off. A vapor channel is provided configured to receive the vapor generated and direct said vapor away from the wick structure. In some embodiments, heat conductors are used to transfer the heat from the heat sources to the liquid in the wick structure.

  19. Autoradiographic evaluation of [3H]CUMI-101, a novel, selective 5-HT1AR ligand in human and baboon brain

    PubMed Central

    Dileep Kumar, J. S.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Kassir, Suham A.; Majo, Vattoly J.; Milak, Matthew S.; Prabhakaran, Jaya; Underwood, Mark D.; Mann, J. John; Arango, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    [11C]CUMI-101 is the first selective serotonin receptor (5-HT1AR) partial agonist radiotracer for positron emission tomography (PET) tested in vivo in nonhuman primates and humans. We evaluated specific binding of [3H]CUMI-101 by quantitative autoradiography studies in postmortem baboon and human brain sections using the 5- HT1AR antagonist WAY100635 as a displacer. The regional and laminar distributions of [3H]CUMI-101 binding in baboon and human brain sections matched the known distribution of [3H]8-OH-DPAT and [3H]WAY100635. Prazosin did not measurably displace [3H]CUMI-101 binding in baboon or human brain sections, thereby ruling out [3H]CUMI-101 binding to α1-adrenergic receptors. This study demonstrates that [11C]CUMI-101 is a selective 5-HT1AR ligand for in vivo and in vitro studies in baboon and human brain. PMID:23454434

  20. Bipolar electrode selection for a motor imagery based brain computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Bin; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2008-09-01

    A motor imagery based brain-computer interface (BCI) provides a non-muscular communication channel that enables people with paralysis to control external devices using their motor imagination. Reducing the number of electrodes is critical to improving the portability and practicability of the BCI system. A novel method is proposed to reduce the number of electrodes to a total of four by finding the optimal positions of two bipolar electrodes. Independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to find the source components of mu and alpha rhythms, and optimal electrodes are chosen by comparing the projection weights of sources on each channel. The results of eight subjects demonstrate the better classification performance of the optimal layout compared with traditional layouts, and the stability of this optimal layout over a one week interval was further verified.

  1. Natural selection constrains personality and brain gene expression differences in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Thörnqvist, Per-Ove; Höglund, Erik; Winberg, Svante

    2015-04-01

    In stream-spawning salmonid fishes there is a considerable variation in the timing of when fry leave the spawning nests and establish a feeding territory. The timing of emergence from spawning nests appears to be related to behavioural and physiological traits, e.g. early emerging fish are bolder and more aggressive. In the present study, emerging Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) alevins were sorted into three fractions: early, intermediate and late emerging. At the parr stage, behaviour, stress responses, hindbrain monoaminergic activity and forebrain gene expression were explored in fish from the early and late emerging fractions (first and last 25%). The results show that when subjected to confinement stress, fish from the late emerging fraction respond with a larger activation of the brain serotonergic system than fish from the early fraction. Similarly, in late emerging fish, stress resulted in elevated expression of mRNA coding for serotonin 1A receptors (5-HT1A), GABA-A receptor-associated protein and ependymin, effects not observed in fish from the early emerging fraction. Moreover, fish from the early emerging fraction displayed bolder behaviour than their late emerging littermates. Taken together, these results suggest that time of emergence, boldness and aggression are linked to each other, forming a behavioural syndrome in juvenile salmon. Differences in brain gene expression between early and late emerging salmon add further support to a relationship between stress coping style and timing of emergence. However, early and late emerging salmon do not appear to differ in hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis reactivity, another characteristic of divergent stress coping styles.

  2. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  3. Brain bases of language selection: MEG evidence from Arabic-English bilingual language production.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2015-01-01

    Much of the world's population is bilingual, hence, language selection is a core component of language processing in a significant proportion of individuals. Though language selection has been investigated using artificial cues to language choice such as color, little is known about more ecologically valid cues. We examined with MEG the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of two natural cues: script and cultural context, hypothesizing the former to trigger more automatic language selection. Twenty Arabic-English bilinguals performed a number-naming task with a Match condition, where the cue and target language of response matched, and a Mismatch condition, with opposite instruction. The latter addressed the mechanisms responsible for overriding natural cue-language associations. Early visual responses patterned according to predictions from prior object recognition literature, while at 150-300 ms, the anterior cingulate cortex showed robust sensitivity to cue-type, with enhanced amplitudes to culture trials. In contrast, a mismatch effect for both cue-types was observed at 300-400 ms in the left inferior prefrontal cortex. Our findings provide the first characterization of the spatio-temporal profile of naturally cued language selection and demonstrate that natural but less automatic language-choice, elicited by cultural cues, does not engage the same mechanisms as the clearly unnatural language-choice of our mismatch tasks.

  4. Brain bases of language selection: MEG evidence from Arabic-English bilingual language production

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2015-01-01

    Much of the world's population is bilingual, hence, language selection is a core component of language processing in a significant proportion of individuals. Though language selection has been investigated using artificial cues to language choice such as color, little is known about more ecologically valid cues. We examined with MEG the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of two natural cues: script and cultural context, hypothesizing the former to trigger more automatic language selection. Twenty Arabic-English bilinguals performed a number-naming task with a Match condition, where the cue and target language of response matched, and a Mismatch condition, with opposite instruction. The latter addressed the mechanisms responsible for overriding natural cue-language associations. Early visual responses patterned according to predictions from prior object recognition literature, while at 150–300 ms, the anterior cingulate cortex showed robust sensitivity to cue-type, with enhanced amplitudes to culture trials. In contrast, a mismatch effect for both cue-types was observed at 300–400 ms in the left inferior prefrontal cortex. Our findings provide the first characterization of the spatio-temporal profile of naturally cued language selection and demonstrate that natural but less automatic language-choice, elicited by cultural cues, does not engage the same mechanisms as the clearly unnatural language-choice of our mismatch tasks. PMID:25698957

  5. Provisioning cooling elements for chillerless data centers

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-12-13

    Systems and methods for cooling include one or more computing structure, an inter-structure liquid cooling system that includes valves configured to selectively provide liquid coolant to the one or more computing structures; a heat rejection system that includes one or more heat rejection units configured to cool liquid coolant; and one or more liquid-to-liquid heat exchangers that include valves configured to selectively transfer heat from liquid coolant in the inter-structure liquid cooling system to liquid coolant in the heat rejection system. Each computing structure further includes one or more liquid-cooled servers; and an intra-structure liquid cooling system that has valves configured to selectively provide liquid coolant to the one or more liquid-cooled servers.

  6. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator, NEP28, is efficacious in muscle and brain without serious side effects on prostate.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kazumasa; Harada, Koichiro; Ichihara, Junji; Takata, Naoko; Takahashi, Yasuhiko; Saito, Koichi

    2013-11-15

    Age-related androgen depletion is known to be a risk factor for various diseases, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that age-related androgen depletion results in accumulation of β-amyloid protein and thereby acts as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Supplemental androgen therapy has been shown to be efficacious in treating osteoporosis and sarcopenia. In addition, studies in animals have demonstrated that androgens can play a protective role against Alzheimer's disease. However, androgen therapy is not used routinely for these indications, because of side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a new class of compounds. SARMs maintain the beneficial effects of androgens on bone and muscle while reducing unwanted side effects. NEP28 is a new SARM exhibiting high selectivity for androgen receptor. To investigate the pharmacological effects of NEP28, we compared the effects on muscle, prostate, and brain with mice that were androgen depleted by orchidectomy and then treated with either placebo, NEP28, dihydrotestosterone, or methyltestosterone. We demonstrated that NEP28 showed tissue-selective effect equivalent to or higher than existing SARMs. In addition, the administration of NEP28 increased the activity of neprilysin, a known Aβ-degrading enzyme. These results indicate that SARM is efficacious for the treatment of not only osteoporosis and sarcopenia, but also Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Efficient automatic selection and combination of EEG features in least squares classifiers for motor imagery brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bermúdez, German; García-Laencina, Pedro J; Roca-Dorda, Joaquín

    2013-08-01

    Discriminative features have to be properly extracted and selected from the electroencephalographic (EEG) signals of each specific subject in order to achieve an adaptive brain-computer interface (BCI) system. This work presents an efficient wrapper-based methodology for feature selection and least squares discrimination of high-dimensional EEG data with low computational complexity. Features are computed in different time segments using three widely used methods for motor imagery tasks and, then, they are concatenated or averaged in order to take into account the time course variability of the EEG signals. Once EEG features have been extracted, proposed framework comprises two stages. The first stage entails feature ranking and, in this work, two different procedures have been considered, the least angle regression (LARS) and the Wilcoxon rank sum test, to compare the performance of each one. The second stage selects the most relevant features using an efficient leave-one-out (LOO) estimation based on the Allen's PRESS statistic. Experimental comparisons with the state-of-the-art BCI methods shows that this approach gives better results than current state-of-the-art approaches in terms of recognition rates and computational requirements and, also with respect to the first ranking stage, it is confirmed that the LARS algorithm provides better results than the Wilcoxon rank sum test for these experiments.

  8. Frequency-selectivity of a thalamocortical relay neuron during Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Meijer, Hil G E; van Gils, Stephan A; Krupa, Martin; Heida, Tjitske; Rudolph, Michelle; Wadman, Wytse J; Martens, Hubert C F

    2009-10-01

    In this computational study, we investigated (i) the functional importance of correlated basal ganglia (BG) activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms by analysing the effects of globus pallidus internum (GPi) bursting frequency and synchrony on a thalamocortical (TC) relay neuron, which received GABAergic projections from this nucleus; (ii) the effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the response of the TC relay neuron to synchronized GPi oscillations; and (iii) the functional basis of the inverse relationship that has been reported between DBS frequency and stimulus amplitude, required to alleviate PD motor symptoms [A. L. Benabid et al. (1991)Lancet, 337, 403-406]. The TC relay neuron selectively responded to and relayed synchronized GPi inputs bursting at a frequency located in the range 2-25 Hz. Input selectivity of the TC relay neuron is dictated by low-threshold calcium current dynamics and passive membrane properties of the neuron. STN-DBS prevented the TC relay neuron from relaying synchronized GPi oscillations to cortex. Our model indicates that DBS alters BG output and input selectivity of the TC relay neuron, providing an explanation for the clinically observed inverse relationship between DBS frequency and stimulus amplitude.

  9. X-ray fluorescence study of the concentration of selected trace and minor elements in human brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandzilak, Aleksandra; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Radwanska, Edyta; Adamek, Dariusz; Geraki, Kalotina; Lankosz, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Neoplastic and healthy brain tissues were analysed to discern the changes in the spatial distribution and overall concentration of elements using micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. High-resolution distribution maps of minor and trace elements such as P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn made it possible to distinguish between homogeneous cancerous tissue and areas where some structures could be identified, such as blood vessels and calcifications. Concentrations of the elements in the selected homogeneous areas of brain tissue were compared between tumours with various malignancy grades and with the controls. The study showed a decrease in the average concentration of Fe, P, S and Ca in tissues with high grades of malignancy as compared to the control group, whereas the concentration of Zn in these tissues was increased. The changes in the concentration were found to be correlated with the tumour malignancy grade. The efficacy of micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between various types of cancer based on the concentrations of studied elements was confirmed by multivariate discriminant analysis. Our analysis showed that the most important elements for tissue classification are Cu, K, Fe, Ca, and Zn. This method made it possible to correctly classify histopathological types in 99.93% of the cases used to build the model and in as much as 99.16% of new cases.

  10. Selective Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor 7-Nitroindazole Protects against Cocaine-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vitcheva, Vessela; Simeonova, Rumyana; Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Mitcheva, Mitka

    2015-01-01

    One of the mechanisms involved in the development of addiction, as well as in brain toxicity, is the oxidative stress. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), on cocaine withdrawal and neurotoxicity in male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups: control; group treated with cocaine (15 mg/kg−1, i.p., 7 days); group treated with 7-NI (25 mg/kg−1, i.p., 7 days); and a combination group (7-NI + cocaine). Cocaine repeated treatment resulted in development of physical dependence, judged by withdrawal symptoms (decreased locomotion, increased salivation and breathing rate), accompanied by an increased nNOS activity and oxidative stress. The latter was discerned by an increased formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, and impairment of the enzymatic antioxidant defense system measured in whole brain. In synaptosomes, isolated from cocaine-treated rats, mitochondrial activity and GSH levels were also decreased. 7-NI administered along with cocaine not only attenuated the withdrawal, due to its nNOS inhibition, but also reversed both the GSH levels and antioxidant enzyme activities near control levels. PMID:26576217

  11. Improvement in memory and static balance with abstinence in alcoholic men and women: selective relations with change in brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Rohlfing, Torsten; O'Reilly, Anne W; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V

    2007-07-15

    We investigated whether changes in memory or static balance in chronic alcoholics, occurring with abstinence or relapse, are associated with changes in lateral and fourth ventricular volume. Alcoholics meeting DSM-IV criteria for Alcohol Dependence (n=15) and non-alcoholic controls (n=26) were examined twice at a mean interval of 2 years with standard Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI), Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) tests, an ataxia battery, and structural MRI. At study entry, alcoholics had been abstinent on average for over 4 months and achieved lower scores than controls on WASI General IQ Index, WMS-R General Memory Index, and the ataxia battery. The 10 alcoholics who maintained sobriety at retest did not differ at study entry in socio-demographic measures, alcohol use, or WASI and WMS-R summary scores from the five relapsers. At follow-up, abstainers improved more than controls on the WMS-R General Memory Index. Ataxia tended to improve in abstainers relative to controls. Associations were observed between memory and lateral ventricular volume change and between ataxia and fourth ventricular volume change in alcoholics but not in the controls. Both memory and ataxia can improve with sustained sobriety, and brain-behavior associations suggest selective brain structural substrates for the changes observed.

  12. Toward independent home use of brain-computer interfaces: a decision algorithm for selection of potential end-users.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Andrea; Holz, Elisa Mira; Sellers, Eric W; Vaughan, Theresa M

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) use scalp-recorded electrical activity from the brain to control an application. Over the past 20 years, research demonstrating that BCIs can provide communication and control to individuals with severe motor impairment has increased almost exponentially. Although considerable effort has been dedicated to offline analysis for improving signal detection and translation, far less effort has been made to conduct online studies with target populations. Thus, there remains a great need for both long-term and translational BCI studies that include individuals with disabilities in their own homes. Completing these studies is the only sure means to answer questions about BCI utility and reliability. Here we suggest an algorithm for candidate selection for electroencephalographic (EEG)-based BCI home studies. This algorithm takes into account BCI end-users and their environment and should assist in study design and substantially improve subject retention rates, thereby improving the overall efficacy of BCI home studies. It is the result of a workshop at the Fifth International BCI Meeting that allowed us to leverage the expertise of multiple research laboratories and people from multiple backgrounds in BCI research.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mutant rats show selective cognitive changes and vulnerability to chronic corticosterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Gururajan, A; Hill, R A; van den Buuse, M

    2015-01-22

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a widely expressed neurotrophin involved in neurodevelopment, neuroprotection and synaptic plasticity. It is also implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Stress during adolescence/young adulthood can have long-term psychiatric and cognitive consequences, however it is unknown how altered BDNF signaling is involved in such effects. Here we investigated whether a congenital deficit in BDNF availability in rats increases vulnerability to the long-term effects of the stress hormone, corticosterone (CORT). Compared to wildtype (WT) littermates, BDNF heterozygous (HET) rats showed higher body weights and minor developmental changes, such as reduced relative brain and pituitary weight. These animals furthermore showed deficits in short-term spatial memory in the Y-maze and in prepulse inhibition and startle, but not in object-recognition memory. CORT treatment induced impairments in novel-object recognition memory in both genotypes but disrupted fear conditioning extinction learning in BDNF HET rats only. These results show selective behavioral changes in BDNF HET rats, at baseline or after chronic CORT treatment and add to our understanding of the role of BDNF and its interaction with stress. Importantly, this study demonstrates the utility of the BDNF HET rat in investigations into the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders.

  14. Discovery of Isonicotinamides as Highly Selective, Brain Penetrable, and Orally Active Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Burton, Catherine R; Xiao, Hong; Sivaprakasam, Prasanna; Krause, Carol M; Cao, Yang; Liu, Nengyin; Lippy, Jonathan; Clarke, Wendy J; Snow, Kimberly; Raybon, Joseph; Arora, Vinod; Pokross, Matt; Kish, Kevin; Lewis, Hal A; Langley, David R; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2016-02-11

    GSK-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has numerous substrates. Many of these proteins are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions, including metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inhibition of GSK-3 may be useful in treating a number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), type II diabetes, mood disorders, and some cancers, but the approach poses significant challenges. Here, we present a class of isonicotinamides that are potent, highly kinase-selective GSK-3 inhibitors, the members of which demonstrated oral activity in a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD. The remarkably high kinase selectivity and straightforward synthesis of these compounds bode well for their further exploration as tool compounds and therapeutics.

  15. Attentional Selection Accompanied by Eye Vergence as Revealed by Event-Related Brain Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Sole Puig, Maria; Pallarés, Josep Marco; Perez Zapata, Laura; Puigcerver, Laura; Cañete, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Neural mechanisms of attention allow selective sensory information processing. Top-down deployment of visual-spatial attention is conveyed by cortical feedback connections from frontal regions to lower sensory areas modulating late stimulus responses. A recent study reported the occurrence of small eye vergence during orienting top-down attention. Here we assessed a possible link between vergence and attention by comparing visual event related potentials (vERPs) to a cue stimulus that induced attention to shift towards the target location to the vERPs to a no-cue stimulus that did not trigger orienting attention. The results replicate the findings of eye vergence responses during orienting attention and show that the strength and time of eye vergence coincide with the onset and strength of the vERPs when subjects oriented attention. Our findings therefore support the idea that eye vergence relates to and possibly has a role in attentional selection. PMID:27973591

  16. [Selective stimulations and lesions of the rat brain nuclei as the models for research of the human sleep pathology mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Šaponjić, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Many complex behavioral phenomena such as sleep can not be explained without multidisciplinary experimental approach, and complementay approaches in the animal models "in vivo" and human studies. Electrophysiological, pharmacological, anatomical and immunohistochemical techniques, and particularly stereotaxically guided local nanovolume microinjection technique, enable us to selectively stimulate and lesion the brain nuclei or their specific neuronal subpopulation, and to reslove the mechanisms of certain brain structure regulatory role, and its afferent-efferent connectivity within the brain. Local stereotaxically guided nanovolume microinjection technique enable us to investigate in animals the brain nulcei functional topography with a resolution of < or = 10 microM, and at a level of 300 microM of effective radius within the brain tissue "in vivo". The advantage of local glutamate or DL- homocysteic acid microinjection stimulation or local excitotoxic (glutamate, ibotenic acid, IgG saporin) microinjection lesion over electrical stimulation/lesion of the same neuronal population are that they reduces the likelihood of activation/lesion of fibers of passage. Much of our knowledge of the sleep neuronal substrates is based on animal studies primarly in cat and rat. Selective pharmacological stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) in freely moving rat, using glutamate microinjection, proved that excitation of its cholinergic part is necessary for induction of wakefulness or REM (Datta S, 2001). Local nanovolume glutamate microinjection into PPT of anesthetized rats (Saponjić et al, 2003a) additionally evidenced P-wave and respiratory regulating neuronal subpopulation within the cholinergic compartment of PPT (apneogenic neuronal zone). Local microinjection of serotonin and noradrenaline into cholinergic PPT apneogenic zone evidenced their opposed impact through PPT on breathing, in contrast to their convergent regulatory role in behavioral state control

  17. Experimental studies with selected light sources for NIRS of brain tissue: quantifying tissue chromophore concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu; Korhonen, Vesa; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) based techniques are utilised in quantifying changes of chromophore concentrations in tissue. Particularly, non-invasive in vivo measurements of tissue oxygenation in the cerebral cortex are of interest. The measurement method is based on illuminating tissue and measuring the back-scattered light at wavelengths of interest. Tissue illumination can be realised using different techniques and various light sources. Commonly, lasers and laser diodes (LD) are utilised, but also high-power light emitting diodes (HPLED) are becoming more common. At the moment, a wide range of available narrow-band light sources exists, covering basically the entire spectrum of interest in brain tissue NIRS measurements. In this paper, in the centre of our interest are LDs and HPLEDs, because of their affordability, efficiency in terms of radiant flux versus size and easiness to adopt in in vivo medical applications. We compare characteristics of LDs and HPLEDs at specific wavelengths and their suitability for in vivo quantifying of different tissue chromophore concentration, particularly in cerebral blood flow (CBF). A special focus is on shape and width of the wavelength bands of interest, generated by the LDs and HPLEDs. Moreover, we experimentally study such effects as, spectroscopy cross talk, separability and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when quantifying tissue chromophore concentration. Chromophores of our interest are cytochrome, haemoglobin and water. Various LDs and HPLEDs, producing narrow-band wavelengths in the range from 500 nm to 1000 nm are tested.

  18. Subject combination and electrode selection in cooperative brain-computer interface based on event related potentials.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, Hubert; Rivet, Bertrand

    2014-04-30

    New paradigms are required in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems for the needs and expectations of healthy people. To solve this issue, we explore the emerging field of cooperative BCIs, which involves several users in a single BCI system. Contrary to classical BCIs that are dependent on the unique subject's will, cooperative BCIs are used for problem solving tasks where several people shall be engaged by sharing a common goal. Similarly as combining trials over time improves performance, combining trials across subjects can significantly improve performance compared with when only a single user is involved. Yet, cooperative BCIs may only be used in particular settings, and new paradigms must be proposed to efficiently use this approach. The possible benefits of using several subjects are addressed, and compared with current single-subject BCI paradigms. To show the advantages of a cooperative BCI, we evaluate the performance of combining decisions across subjects with data from an event-related potentials (ERP) based experiment where each subject observed the same sequence of visual stimuli. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to achieve a mean AUC superior to 0.95 with 10 subjects and 3 electrodes on each subject, or with 4 subjects and 6 electrodes on each subject. Several emerging challenges and possible applications are proposed to highlight how cooperative BCIs could be efficiently used with current technologies and leverage BCI applications.

  19. Binary particle swarm optimization for frequency band selection in motor imagery based brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingguo; Wei, Zhonghai

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables people suffering from affective neurological diseases to communicate with the external world. Common spatial pattern (CSP) is an effective algorithm for feature extraction in motor imagery based BCI systems. However, many studies have proved that the performance of CSP depends heavily on the frequency band of EEG signals used for the construction of covariance matrices. The use of different frequency bands to extract signal features may lead to different classification performances, which are determined by the discriminative and complementary information they contain. In this study, the broad frequency band (8-30 Hz) is divided into 10 sub-bands of band width 4 Hz and overlapping 2 Hz. Binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO) is used to find the best sub-band set to improve the performance of CSP and subsequent classification. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieved an average improvement of 6.91% in cross-validation accuracy when compared to broad band CSP.

  20. limited potentiation of blood pressure in response to oral tyramine by the anti-Parkinson brain selective multifunctional monoamine oxidase-AB inhibitor, M30.

    PubMed

    Gal, Shunit; Abassi, Zaid A; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2010-08-01

    One of the limitations of non-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors as anti-depressant or anti-Parkinson drugs is their ability to potentiate the cardiovascular effect of oral tyramine, resulting from inhibition of systemic MAO-A and release of noradrenaline. We have investigated the cardiovascular effect of oral tyramine in response to the novel multifunctional, brain selective MAO-AB inhibitor, M30 [5-(N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline], and compared it to the classical non-selective inhibitor tranylcypromine (TCP) in rats. We also measured MAO-A and B in the striatum, hippocampus, liver, and small intestine and determined brain levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin. At the doses employed, intraperitoneal (i.p.) M30 (5 and 10 mg/kg) selectively inhibited brain MAO-A and B by more than 85%, with little inhibition of liver and small intestine enzymes while raising striatal levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin. In contrast to TCP (10 mg/kg, i.p.), which fully inhibits both enzymes in the brain and systemic organs and significantly potentiates the tyramine pressor effect, M30 had a limited pressor effect as compared to it and controls. The limited potentiation of tyramine pressor effect by M30, its ability to raise brain levels of aminergic neurotransmitters together with its neuroprotective and neurorestorative activities make this drug potentially important as an anti-depressant and anti-Parkinsonian agent, for which it is being developed.

  1. Cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, L.

    1984-02-21

    A cooling device is claimed for coal dust comprising a housing, a motor-driven conveyor system therein to transport the coal dust over coolable trays in the housing and conveyor-wheel arms of spiral curvature for moving the coal dust from one or more inlets to one or more outlets via a series of communicating passages in the trays over which the conveyor-wheel arms pass under actuation of a hydraulic motor mounted above the housing and driving a vertical shaft, to which the conveyor-wheel arms are attached, extending centrally downwardly through the housing.

  2. Sorption cooling: a valid extension to passive cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornink, Jan; Burger, Johannes; ter Brake, Marcel

    2007-10-01

    Passive cooling has shown to be a very dependable cryogenic cooling method for space missions. Several missions employ passive radiators to cool down their delicate sensor systems for many years, without consuming power, without exporting vibrations or producing electromagnetic interference. So for a number of applications, passive cooling is a good choice. At lower temperatures, the passive coolers run into limitations that prohibit accommodation on a spacecraft. The approach to this issue has been to find a technology able to supplement passive cooling for lower temperatures, which maintains as much as possible of the advantages of passive coolers. Sorption cooling employs a closed cycle Joule-Thomson expansion process to achieve the cooling effect. Sorption cells perform the compression phase in this cycle. At a low temperature and pressure, these cells adsorb the working fluid. At a higher temperature they desorb the fluid and thus produce a high-pressure flow to the restriction in the cold stage. The sorption process selected for this application is of the physical type, which is completely reversible. It does not suffer from degradation as is the case with chemical sorption of e.g. hydrogen in metal hydrides. Sorption coolers include no moving parts except for some check valves, they export neither mechanical vibrations nor electromagnetic interference, and are potentially very dependable due to their simplicity. The required cooling temperature determines the type of working fluid to be applied. Sorption coolers can be used in conjunction with passive cooling for heat rejection at different levels. This paper starts with a brief discussion on applications of passive coolers in different types of orbits and the limitations on passive cooling at low cooling temperatures. Next, the working principle of sorption cooling is summarized. The DARWIN mission is chosen as an example application of sorption and passive cooling and special attention is paid to the

  3. Sorption cooling: A valid extension to passive cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornink, D. J.; Burger, J. F.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2008-05-01

    Passive cooling has shown to be a very dependable cryogenic cooling method for space missions. Several missions employ passive radiators to cool down their delicate sensor systems for many years, without consuming power, without exporting vibrations or producing electromagnetic interference. So for a number of applications, passive cooling is a good choice. At lower temperatures, the passive coolers run into limitations that prohibit accommodation on a spacecraft. The approach to this issue has been to find a technology able to supplement passive cooling for lower temperatures, which maintains as much as possible of the advantages of passive coolers. Sorption cooling employs a closed cycle Joule-Thomson expansion process to achieve the cooling effect. Sorption cells perform the compression phase in this cycle. At a low temperature and pressure, these cells adsorb the working fluid. At a higher temperature they desorb the fluid and thus produce a high-pressure flow to the expander in the cold stage. The sorption process selected for this application is of the physical type, which is completely reversible. It does not suffer from degradation as is the case with chemical sorption of, e.g., hydrogen in metal hydrides. Sorption coolers include no moving parts except for some check valves, they export neither mechanical vibrations nor electromagnetic interference, and are potentially very dependable due to their simplicity. The required cooling temperature determines the type of working fluid to be applied. Sorption coolers can be used in conjunction with passive cooling for heat rejection at different levels. This paper starts with a brief discussion on applications of passive coolers in different types of orbits and on the limitations of passive cooling for lower cooling temperatures. Next, the working principle of sorption cooling is summarized. The DARWIN mission is chosen as an example application of sorption and passive cooling and special attention is paid to the

  4. Unilateral brain hypothermia as a method to examine efficacy and mechanisms of neuroprotection against global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Silasi, Gergely; Colbourne, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Hypothermia, especially applied during ischemia, is the gold-standard neuroprotectant. When delayed, cooling must often be maintained for a day or more to achieve robust, permanent protection. Most animal and clinical studies use whole-body cooling-an arduous technique that can cause systemic complications. Brain-selective cooling may avoid such problems. Thus, in this rat study, we used a method that cools one hemisphere without affecting the contralateral side or the body. Localized brain hypothermia was achieved by flushing cold water through a metal tube attached to the rats' skull. First, in anesthetized rats we measured temperature in the cooled and contralateral hemisphere to demonstrate selective unilateral cooling. Subsequent telemetry recordings in awake rats confirmed that brain cooling did not cause systemic hypothermia during prolonged treatment. Additionally, we subjected rats to transient global ischemia and after recovering from anesthesia they remained at normothermia or had their right hemisphere cooled for 2 days (∼32°C-33°C). Hypothermia significantly lessened CA1 injury and microglia activation on the right side at 1 and 4 week survival times. Near-complete injury and a strong microglia response occurred in the left (normothermic) hippocampus as occurred in both hippocampi of the untreated group. Thus, this focal cooling method is suitable for evaluating the efficacy and mechanisms of hypothermic neuroprotection in global ischemia models. This method also has advantages over many current systemic cooling protocols in rodents, namely: (1) lower cost, (2) simplicity, (3) safety and suitability for long-term cooling, and (4) an internal control-the normothermic hemisphere.

  5. An automatic fuzzy-based multi-temporal brain digital subtraction angiography image fusion algorithm using curvelet transform and content selection strategy.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Saba; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2014-08-01

    Recently image fusion has prominent role in medical image processing and is useful to diagnose and treat many diseases. Digital subtraction angiography is one of the most applicable imaging to diagnose brain vascular diseases and radiosurgery of brain. This paper proposes an automatic fuzzy-based multi-temporal fusion algorithm for 2-D digital subtraction angiography images. In this algorithm, for blood vessel map extraction, the valuable frames of brain angiography video are automatically determined to form the digital subtraction angiography images based on a novel definition of vessel dispersion generated by injected contrast material. Our proposed fusion scheme contains different fusion methods for high and low frequency contents based on the coefficient characteristic of wrapping second generation of curvelet transform and a novel content selection strategy. Our proposed content selection strategy is defined based on sample correlation of the curvelet transform coefficients. In our proposed fuzzy-based fusion scheme, the selection of curvelet coefficients are optimized by applying weighted averaging and maximum selection rules for the high frequency coefficients. For low frequency coefficients, the maximum selection rule based on local energy criterion is applied to better visual perception. Our proposed fusion algorithm is evaluated on a perfect brain angiography image dataset consisting of one hundred 2-D internal carotid rotational angiography videos. The obtained results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed fusion algorithm in comparison with common and basic fusion algorithms.

  6. Classification effects of real and imaginary movement selective attention tasks on a P300-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvaris, Mathew; Sepulveda, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) rely on various electroencephalography methodologies that allow the user to convey their desired control to the machine. Common approaches include the use of event-related potentials (ERPs) such as the P300 and modulation of the beta and mu rhythms. All of these methods have their benefits and drawbacks. In this paper, three different selective attention tasks were tested in conjunction with a P300-based protocol (i.e. the standard counting of target stimuli as well as the conduction of real and imaginary movements in sync with the target stimuli). The three tasks were performed by a total of 10 participants, with the majority (7 out of 10) of the participants having never before participated in imaginary movement BCI experiments. Channels and methods used were optimized for the P300 ERP and no sensory-motor rhythms were explicitly used. The classifier used was a simple Fisher's linear discriminant. Results were encouraging, showing that on average the imaginary movement achieved a P300 versus No-P300 classification accuracy of 84.53%. In comparison, mental counting, the standard selective attention task used in previous studies, achieved 78.9% and real movement 90.3%. Furthermore, multiple trial classification results were recorded and compared, with real movement reaching 99.5% accuracy after four trials (12.8 s), imaginary movement reaching 99.5% accuracy after five trials (16 s) and counting reaching 98.2% accuracy after ten trials (32 s).

  7. Mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain integrate context and cue values upon attentional stimulus selection.

    PubMed

    Filla, Ina; Menzel, Randolf

    2015-09-01

    Multimodal GABA-immunoreactive feedback neurons in the honeybee brain connecting the output region of the mushroom body with its input are expected to tune the input to the mushroom body in an experience-dependent way. These neurons are known to change their rate responses to learned olfactory stimuli. In this work we ask whether these neurons also transmit learned attentional effects during multisensory integration. We find that a visual context and an olfactory cue change the rate responses of these neurons after learning according to the associated values of both context and cue. The learned visual context promotes attentional response selection by enhancing olfactory stimulus valuation at both the behavioral and the neural level. During a rewarded visual context, bees reacted faster and more reliably to a rewarded odor. We interpreted this as the result of the observed enhanced neural discharge toward the odor. An unrewarded context reduced already low rate responses to the unrewarded odor. In addition to stimulus valuation, these feedback neurons generate a neural error signal after an incorrect behavioral response. This might act as a learning signal in feedback neurons. All of these effects were exclusively found in trials in which the animal prepares for a motor response that happens during attentional stimulus selection. We discuss possible implications of the results for the feedback connections of the mushroom body.

  8. Selective effects of aging on brain white matter microstructure: a diffusion tensor imaging tractography study.

    PubMed

    Michielse, Stijn; Coupland, Nick; Camicioli, Richard; Carter, Rawle; Seres, Peter; Sabino, Jennifer; Malykhin, Nikolai

    2010-10-01

    We examined age-related changes in the cerebral white matter. Structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and diffusion tensor images (DTIs) were acquired from 69 healthy subjects aged 22-84 years. Quantitative DTI tractography was performed for nine different white matter tracts to determine tract volume, fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial, and radial diffusivities. We used automated and manual segmentation to determine volumes of gray matter (GM), white mater (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and intracranial space. The results showed significant effects of aging on WM, GM, CSF volumes, and selective effects of aging on structural integrity of different white matter tracts. WM of the prefrontal region was the most vulnerable to aging, while temporal lobe connections, cingulum, and parieto-occipital commissural connections showed relative preservation with age. This study was cross-sectional, and therefore, additional longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  9. AGE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS OF AROCLOR 1254 ON CALCIUM UPTAKE BY SUBCELLULAR ORGANELLES IN SELECTED BRAIN REGIONS OF RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Earlier reports from our laboratory have indicated that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) affect signal transduction mechanisms in brain, including Ca2+ homeostasis, phosphoinositol hydrolysis, and protein kinase C (PKC) translocation in mature neurons and adult brain homogenate p...

  10. The Potential for Brain Injury on Selected Surfaces Used by Cheerleaders

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Brenda J.; Smith, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Context: Although playground surfaces have been investigated for fall impact attenuation, the surfaces that cheerleaders use have received little attention. Objective: To determine (1) the critical height for selected surfaces used by cheerleaders at or below which a serious head impact injury from a fall is unlikely to occur, (2) the critical heights for non–impact-absorbing surfaces for comparison purposes, and (3) the effect of soil moisture and grass height on gmax (which is defined as the multiple of g [acceleration due to gravity at the earth's surface at sea level: ie, 32.2 feet·s−1·s−1] that represents the maximum deceleration experienced during an impact) and the Head Injury Criterion (HIC) at the critical height for a dry grass surface. Design: Observational study. Settings: A local cheerleading gym, indoor locations within the authors' institution, and various outdoor locations. Main Outcome Measure(s): gmax, HIC, and critical height. Results: Critical heights for the surfaces tested ranged from 0.5 ft (0.15 m) for concrete and vinyl tile installed over concrete to more than 11 ft (3.35 m) for a spring floor. Increases in grass height and soil moisture resulted in an increase in the critical height for grass surfaces. Only spring floors and 4-in (0.10-m)–thick landing mats placed on traditional foam floors had critical heights greater than 10.5 ft (3.20 m), thus providing enough impact-absorbing capacity for performance of 2-level stunts. Conclusions: The potential for serious head impact injuries can be minimized by increasing the shock-absorbing capacity of the surface, decreasing the height from which the person falls, or both. Cheerleaders and cheerleading coaches should use the critical heights reported in this study to compare the relative impact-absorbing capacities of the various surfaces tested, with critical height as an indicator of the impact-absorption capacity of the surface. The findings of this study can be used to

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls functional differentiation and microcircuit formation of selectively isolated fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Paul; Dobszay, Marton B; Sousa, Kyle M; Schulte, Gunnar; Mager, Peter P; Härtig, Wolfgang; Görcs, Tamás J; Zilberter, Yuri; Ernfors, Patrik; Harkany, Tibor

    2004-09-01

    GABAergic interneurons with high-frequency firing, fast-spiking (FS) cells, form synapses on perisomatic regions of principal cells in the neocortex and hippocampus to control the excitability of cortical networks. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for the differentiation of multiple interneuron subtypes and the formation of their synaptic contacts. Here, we examined whether BDNF, alone or in conjunction with sustained KCl-induced depolarization, drives functional FS cell differentiation and the formation of inhibitory microcircuits. Homogeneous FS cell cultures were established by target-specific isolation using the voltage-gated potassium channel 3.1b subunit as the selection marker. Isolated FS cells expressed parvalbumin, were surrounded by perineuronal nets, formed immature inhibitory connections and generated slow action potentials at 12 days in vitro. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoted FS cell differentiation by increasing the somatic diameter, dendritic branching and the frequency of action potential firing. In addition, BDNF treatment led to a significant up-regulation of synaptophysin and vesicular GABA transporter expression, components of the synaptic machinery critical for GABA release, which was paralleled by an increase in synaptic strength. Long-term membrane depolarization alone was detrimental to dendritic branching. However, we observed that BDNF and KCl exerted additive effects, as reflected by the significantly accelerated maturation of synaptic contacts and high discharge frequencies, and was required for the formation of reciprocal connections between FS cells. Our results show that BDNF, along with membrane depolarization, is critical for FS cells to establish inhibitory circuitries during corticogenesis.

  12. Depletion of brain histamine produces regionally selective protection against thiamine deficiency-induced lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Philip J; McRee, Robert Carter; Nalwalk, Julia A; Hough, Lindsay B

    2002-09-01

    Breakdown of the blood brain barrier and the subsequent accumulation of free radicals, lactate, and glutamate appear to be the immediate causes of thiamine deficiency (TD)-induced damage to thalamus. The mechanisms triggering these events are unknown but recent evidence suggests an important role of histamine. We therefore studied the effects of histamine depletion on thalamic lesions in the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficient (PTD) rat. Chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v., 7 days) infusion of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), combined with bilateral ibotenate destruction of the histamine-containing neurons in the tuberomammillary (TM) nucleus and bolus i.c.v. infusion of 48/80, a potent mast cell degranulating agent, was used to deplete brain histamine levels. PTD rats receiving combined FMH + 48/80 + TM lesions developed acute neurological symptoms, including spontaneous seizures, approximately 1 day earlier than PTD rats treated with i.c.v. infusion of vehicle and sham lesions of the TM. When examined 1 week after restoration of thiamine, the PTD vehicle + sham lesion animals contained severe neuronal loss and gliosis in midline, intralaminar, ventral, lateral, and posterior nuclei. PTD animals treated with FMH + 48/80 + TM lesions had little evidence of neuronal loss or microglial proliferation in thalamus except in the gelatinosus and anteroventral nuclei, in which there was complete neuronal loss. These data demonstrate a significant and regionally selective role of histamine in the development of thalamic lesions in a rat model of Wernicke's encephalopathy. Furthermore, these data suggest either a dissociation between seizures and thalamic lesions or a significant role of histamine in seizure-related damage to the thalamus.

  13. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Deverman, Benjamin E; Pravdo, Piers L; Simpson, Bryan P; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV9 (refs. 14,15,16,17), and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications.

  14. Non-invasive brain stimulation targeting the right fusiform gyrus selectively increases working memory for faces.

    PubMed

    Brunyé, Tad T; Moran, Joseph M; Holmes, Amanda; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A

    2017-04-01

    The human extrastriate cortex contains a region critically involved in face detection and memory, the right fusiform gyrus. The present study evaluated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting this anatomical region would selectively influence memory for faces versus non-face objects (houses). Anodal tDCS targeted the right fusiform gyrus (Brodmann's Area 37), with the anode at electrode site PO10, and cathode at FP2. Two stimulation conditions were compared in a repeated-measures design: 0.5mA versus 1.5mA intensity; a separate control group received no stimulation. Participants completed a working memory task for face and house stimuli, varying in memory load from 1 to 4 items. Individual differences measures assessed trait-based differences in facial recognition skills. Results showed 1.5mA intensity stimulation (versus 0.5mA and control) increased performance at high memory loads, but only with faces. Lower overall working memory capacity predicted a positive impact of tDCS. Results provide support for the notion of functional specialization of the right fusiform regions for maintaining face (but not non-face object) stimuli in working memory, and further suggest that low intensity electrical stimulation of this region may enhance demanding face working memory performance particularly in those with relatively poor baseline working memory skills.

  15. The perceived spatial frequency shift: evidence for frequency-selective neurones in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Blakemore, Colin; Nachmias, Jacob; Sutton, Peter

    1970-01-01

    1. Prolonged observation of a high-contrast grating pattern causes an apparent shift in the spatial frequency of gratings subsequently viewed with the same retinal region. Gratings of higher and lower frequency than the adapting pattern seem, respectively, higher and lower than in fact they are. 2. There is no significant after-effect at the adapting frequency itself nor at frequencies more than two octaves away. 3. For very low adapting frequencies, the after-effect remains centred at about 3·0 c/deg and declines in strength as the adapting frequency is successively lowered. 4. The magnitude of the after-effect increases with the contrast of the adapting grating and the length of time spent in adaptation. It takes several hours to recover completely from 30 min adaptation. 5. The phenomenon is orientation-specific: a horizontal adapting grating has no effect on vertical test gratings. There is partial interocular transfer of the after-effect. 6. These findings provide further evidence that the visual system of man, like those of the cat and the monkey, contains neurones selectively sensitive to the orientation and dimensions of retinal images, and that these adaptable cells are actually involved in the encoding and perception of the size of simple patterns. PMID:5499822

  16. The expression of brain sexual dimorphism in artificial selection of rat strains.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Pinos, Helena; Collado, Paloma; Pasaro, Eduardo; Fernandez, Rosa; Segovia, Santiago; Guillamon, Antonio

    2005-08-09

    Central nervous system sex differences have two morphological patterns. In one pattern, males show larger measurements (volume, number of neurons) than females (male > female; m > f) and, in the other, the opposite is true (female > male; f > m). The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is a unique model for the study of sex differences because it has dimorphic and isomorphic subdivisions, with the former showing the two sexually differentiated morphological patterns. Meanwhile, other CNS structures, like the locus coeruleus (LC), present the f > m pattern. The philogenetic maintenance of the two patterns of sexual differentiation can help to disentangle the functional meaning of sex differences. Laboratory rat strains, whether albino or pigmented, descend from the Wistar strain through artificial selection. The present work compares the BST and LC of Wistar and Long-Evans rats. The medial posterior subdivision of the BST (BSTMP) is sexually dimorphic (m > f pattern) in the original (Wistar) and derived (Long-Evans) strains, while the lateral anterior and medial anterior subdivisions of the BST and the LC only present sex differences (f > m pattern) in the ancestor Wistar strain. Isomorphic BST regions are the same in both strains. The fact that the BSTMP, which is implicated in male copulatory behavior, is sexually dimorphic in both strains, as well as in other species, including humans, indicates the relevance of this structure in male sexual behavior in mammals.

  17. In vivo single-shot three-dimensionally localized multiple quantum spectroscopy of GABA in the human brain with improved spectral selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, In-Young; Lee, Sang-Pil; Shen, Jun

    2005-01-01

    A single-shot multiple quantum filtering method is developed that uses two double-band frequency selective pulses for enhanced spectral selectivity in combination with a slice-selective 90°, a slice-selective universal rotator 90°, and a spectral-spatial pulse composed of two slice-selective universal rotator 45° pulses for single-shot three-dimensional localization. The use of this selective multiple quantum filtering method for C3 and C4 methylene protons of GABA resulted in improved spectral selectivity for GABA and effective suppression of overlapping signals such as creatine and glutathione in each single scan, providing reliable measurements of the GABA doublet in all subjects. The concentration of GABA was measured to be 0.7 ± 0.2 μmol/g (means ± SD, n = 15) in the fronto-parietal region of the human brain in vivo.

  18. An in vitro and in vivo study of peptide-functionalized nanoparticles for brain targeting: The importance of selective blood-brain barrier uptake.

    PubMed

    Bode, Gerard H; Coué, Gregory; Freese, Christian; Pickl, Karin E; Sanchez-Purrà, Maria; Albaiges, Berta; Borrós, Salvador; van Winden, Ewoud C; Tziveleka, Leto-Aikaterini; Sideratou, Zili; Engbersen, Johan F J; Singh, Smriti; Albrecht, Krystyna; Groll, Jürgen; Möller, Martin; Pötgens, Andy J G; Schmitz, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Grandfils, Christian; Sinner, Frank M; Kirkpatrick, C James; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Frank, Hans-Georg; Unger, Ronald E; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2016-11-21

    Targeted delivery of drugs across endothelial barriers remains a formidable challenge, especially in the case of the brain, where the blood-brain barrier severely limits entry of drugs into the central nervous system. Nanoparticle-mediated transport of peptide/protein-based drugs across endothelial barriers shows great potential as a therapeutic strategy in a wide variety of diseases. Functionalizing nanoparticles with peptides allows for more efficient targeting to specific organs. We have evaluated the hemocompatibilty, cytotoxicity, endothelial uptake, efficacy of delivery and safety of liposome, hyperbranched polyester, poly(glycidol) and acrylamide-based nanoparticles functionalized with peptides targeting brain endothelial receptors, in vitro and in vivo. We used an ELISA-based method for the detection of nanoparticles in biological fluids, investigating the blood clearance rate and in vivo biodistribution of labeled nanoparticles in the brain after intravenous injection in Wistar rats. Herein, we provide a detailed report of in vitro and in vivo observations.

  19. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  20. Mild body cooling impairs attention via distraction from skin cooling.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephen S; Westwood, David A; Knox, Matthew K

    2007-02-01

    Many contemporary workers are routinely exposed to mild cold stress, which may compromise mental function and lead to accidents. A study investigated the effect of mild body cooling of 1.0 degree C rectal temperature (Tre) on vigilance (i.e. sustained attention) and the orienting of spatial attention (i.e. spatially selective processing of visual information). Vigilance and spatial attention tests were administered to 14 healthy males and six females at four stages (pre-immersion, deltaTre = 0, -0.5 and - 1.0 degree C ) of a gradual, head-out immersion cooling session (18-25 deltaC water), and in four time-matched stages of a contrast session, in which participants sat in an empty tub and no cooling took place. In the spatial attention test, target discrimination times were similar for all stages of the contrast session, but increased significantly in the cooling phase upon immersion (deltaTre = 0 degrees C), with no further increases at deltaTre = -0.5 and - 1.0 degree C. Despite global response slowing, cooling did not affect the normal pattern of spatial orienting. In the vigilance test, the variability of detection time was adversely affected in the cooling but not the contrast trials: variability increased at immersion but did not increase further with additional cooling. These findings suggest that attentional impairments are more closely linked to the distracting effects of cold skin temperature than decreases in body core temperature.

  1. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Petin, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF6 and CF3I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF6 molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation.

  2. Assessing blood brain barrier dynamics or identifying or measuring selected substances, including ethanol or toxins, in a subject by analyzing Raman spectrum signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A non-invasive method for analyzing the blood-brain barrier includes obtaining a Raman spectrum of a selected portion of the eye and monitoring the Raman spectrum to ascertain a change to the dynamics of the blood brain barrier.Also, non-invasive methods for determining the brain or blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, drugs, alcohol, poisons, and the like, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam at a selected wavelength (e.g., at a wavelength of about 400 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor, vitreous humor, or one or more conjunctiva vessels in the eye is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated portion of the eye; and then determining the blood level or brain level (intracranial or cerebral spinal fluid level) of an analyte of interest for the subject from the Raman spectrum. In certain embodiments, the detecting step may be followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level and/or brain level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing methods are also disclosed.

  3. [Interhemisphere neurochemical differences in the brain of silver foxes selected for behavior and the problem of directed asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Trut, L N; Pliusnina, I Z; Kolesnikova, L A; Kozlova, O N

    2000-07-01

    The study deals with the mechanisms that bring about a directional asymmetry in the expression of some morphological traits observed in some animals subjected to experimental domestication. The key role in the integration of development is attributed to the genetic systems controlling the activity of brain neurotransmitter systems. Therefore, the investigation of directional asymmetry of morphological traits began with the analysis of interhemispheral differences in neurotransmitter activity in animal lines selected for domestic and aggressive behavior. Experiments on silver foxes reveal interhemispheral differences in the dopaminergic system emerging in the striatum. An increased dopamine level is observed in the right half of the striatum of aggressive foxes and in both right and left halves of the striata of domestic foxes. On the basis of the literature data, it is suggested that the considerable increase in the dopamine level in the right halves of the striata of both aggressive and domestic animals is related to a genetic increase in the manifestation of emotional response in both lines, whereas its increase in the left half of the striatum of domesticated foxes may be related to a correlated deterioration of the function of the pituitary-adrenal system.

  4. Visualization of the cell-selective distribution of PUFA-containing phosphatidylcholines in mouse brain by imaging mass spectrometry[S

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Yuki; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Kajihara, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Ryo; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) can be used to visualize the distribution of various biomolecules, especially lipids, in the cells and tissues. In this study, we report the cell-selective distribution of PUFA-containing glycerophospholipids (GPLs) in the mouse brain. We established a practical experimental procedure for the IMS of GPLs. We demonstrated that optimization of the composition of the matrix solution and spectrum normalization to the total ion current (TIC) is critical. Using our procedure, we simultaneously differentiated and visualized the localizations of specific molecular species of GPLs in mouse brain sections. The results showed that PUFA-containing phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were distributed in a cell-selective manner: arachidonic acid- and docosahexaenoic acid-containing PCs were seen in the hippocampal neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells, respectively. Furthermore, these characteristic localizations of PUFA-PCs were formed during neuronal maturation. The phenomenon of brain cell-selective production of specific PUFA-GPLs will help elucidate the potential physiological functions of PUFAs in specific brain regions. PMID:19417221

  5. MicroRNA-103-1 selectively downregulates brain NCX1 and its inhibition by anti-miRNA ameliorates stroke damage and neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Antonio; Formisano, Luigi; Cerullo, Pierpaolo; Guida, Natascia; Cuomo, Ornella; Esposito, Alba; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Annunziato, Lucio; Pignataro, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    Na(+)/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) is a plasma membrane transporter that, by regulating Ca2+ and Na(+) homeostasis, contributes to brain stroke damage. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether there might be miRNAs in the brain able to regulate NCX1 expression and, thereafter, to set up a valid therapeutic strategy able to reduce stroke-induced brain damage by regulating NCX1 expression. Thus, we tested whether miR-103-1, a microRNA belonging to the miR-103/107 family that on the basis of sequence analysis might be a potential NCX1 regulator, could control NCX1 expression. The role of miR-103-1 was assessed in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia by evaluating the effect of the correspondent antimiRNA on both brain infarct volume and neurological deficits. NCX1 expression was dramatically reduced when cortical neurons were exposed to miR-103-1. This alleged tight regulation of NCX1 by miR-103-1 was further corroborated by luciferase assay. Notably, antimiR-103-1 prevented NCX1 protein downregulation induced by the increase in miR-103-1 after brain ischemia, thereby reducing brain damage and neurological deficits. Overall, the identification of a microRNA able to selectively regulate NCX1 in the brain clarifies a new important molecular mechanism of NCX1 regulation in the brain and offers the opportunity to develop a new therapeutic strategy for stroke.

  6. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  7. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  8. Isomer-selective distribution of 3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) hydroxylated metabolites, 3-hydroxy-NBP and 10-hydroxy-NBP, across the rat blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Xing-xing; Zhong, Kan; Li, Xiu-li; Zhong, Da-fang; Chen, Xiao-yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the isomer-selective distribution of 3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) hydroxylated metabolites, 3-hydroxy-NBP (3-OH-NBP) and 10-hydroxy-NBP (10-OH-NBP), across the blood brain barrier (BBB). Methods: After oral administration of NBP (20 mg/kg) to rats, the pharmacokinetics of two major hydroxylated metabolites, 3-OH-NBP and 10-OH-NBP, in plasma and brains were investigated. Plasma and brain protein binding of 3-OH-NBP and 10-OH-NBP was also assessed. To evaluate the influences of major efflux transporters, rats were pretreated with the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar (10 mg/kg, iv) and BCRP inhibitor pantoprazole (40 mg/kg, iv), then received 3-OH-NBP (12 mg/kg, iv) or 10-OH-NBP (3 mg/kg, iv). The metabolic profile of NBP was investigated in rat brain homogenate. Results: After NBP administration, the plasma exposure of 3-OH-NBP was 4.64 times that of 10-OH-NBP, whereas the brain exposure of 3-OH-NBP was only 11.8% of 10-OH-NBP. In the rat plasma, 60%±5.2% of 10-OH-NBP was unbound to proteins versus only 22%±2.3% of 3-OH-NBP being unbound, whereas in the rat brain, free fractions of 3-OH-NBP and 10-OH-NBP were 100%±9.7% and 49.9%±14.1%, respectively. In the rats pretreated with tariquidar and pantoprazole, the unbound partition coefficient Kp,uu of 3-OH-NBP was significantly increased, while that of 10-OH-NBP showed a slight but not statistically significant increase. Incubation of rat brain homogenate with NBP yielded 3-OH-NBP but not 10-OH-NBP. Conclusion: The isomer-selective distribution of 10-OH-NBP and 3-OH-NBP across the BBB of rats is mainly attributed to the differences in plasma and brain protein binding and the efflux transport of 3-OH-NBP. The abundant 10-OH-NBP is not generated in rat brains. PMID:26567730

  9. Selection and amplification of a single optical frequency comb mode for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical clock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Yin, Mojuan; Kong, Dehuan; Xu, Qinfang; Zhang, Shougang; Chang, Hong

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we report on the active filtering and amplification of a single mode from an optical femtosecond laser comb with mode spacing of 250 MHz by optical injection of two external-cavity diode lasers operating in cascade to build a narrow linewidth laser for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical lattice clock. Despite the low injection of individual comb mode of approximately 50 nW, a single comb line at 689 nm could be filtered and amplified to reach as high as 10 mW with 37 dB side mode suppression and a linewidth of 240 Hz. This method could be applied over a broad spectral band to build narrow linewidth lasers for various applications.

  10. An ion microprobe study of the intra-crystalline behavior of REE and selected trace elements in pyroxene from mare basalts with different cooling and crystallization histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of crystallization interaction on the trace element zoning characteristics of pyroxenes are analyzed using electron and ion microprobe techniques. Four pigeonite basalts with similar isochemical composition, but different cooling rates and crystallization histories are studied. Pyroxene quadrilaterals displaying crystallization trends are presented. The crystal chemical rationalization of REE zoning, pattern shapes, and abundances are examined. The data reveal that the trace element zoning characteristics in pyroxene and the partitioning of trace elements between pyroxene and the melt are related to the interaction between the efficiency of the crystallization process, the kinetics at the crystal-melt interface, the kinetics of plagioclase nucleation and the characteristics of the crystal chemical substitutions in the pyroxene and the associated crystallizing phase.

  11. THE THYROID HORMONE TRANSPORTER, MCT8, SELECTIVELY RESPONDS TO THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY IN THE DEVELOPMENT RAT BRAIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for normal brain development. Therefore, it is not surprising that a variety of adaptive mechanisms are activated in response to TH insufficiency. However, not all brain regions respond in the same fashion to TH insufficiency. This observation...

  12. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  13. Neurochemical and behavioral profiling of the selective GlyT1 inhibitors ALX5407 and LY2365109 indicate a preferential action in caudal vs. cortical brain areas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Kenneth W; Falcone, Julie F; Fell, Matthew J; Ryder, John W; Yu, Hong; Love, Patrick L; Katner, Jason; Gordon, Kimberly D; Wade, Mark R; Man, Teresa; Nomikos, George G; Phebus, Lee A; Cauvin, Annick J; Johnson, Kirk W; Jones, Carrie K; Hoffmann, Beth J; Sandusky, George E; Walter, Magnus W; Porter, Warren J; Yang, Lijuan; Merchant, Kalpana M; Shannon, Harlan E; Svensson, Kjell A

    2008-10-01

    Selective inhibitors of the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) have been implicated in central nervous system disorders related to hypoglutamatergic function such as schizophrenia. The selective GlyT1 inhibitors ALX5407 (NFPS) and LY2365109 {[2-(4-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl-2-tert-butylphenoxy)ethyl]-methylamino}-acetic acid increased cerebrospinal fluid levels of glycine and potentiated NMDA-induced increases in dialysate levels of neurotransmitters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the striatum. However, higher doses produced both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on motor performance and impaired respiration, suggesting significant involvement of cerebellar and brain stem areas. A dual probe microdialysis study showed that ALX5407 transiently elevated extracellular levels of glycine in the PFC with more sustained increases in the cerebellum. In support of these findings, immuno-staining with pan-GlyT1 and GlyT1a antibodies showed a higher abundance of immunoreactivity in the brain stem/cerebellum as compared to the frontal cortical/hippocampal brain areas in four different species studied, including the mouse, rat, monkey and human. In addition, the inhibitory effects of ALX5407 on cerebellar levels of cGMP in the mouse could be reversed by the glycine A receptor antagonist strychnine but not the glycine B receptor antagonist L-701324. We propose that the adverse events seen with higher doses of ALX5407 and LY2365109 are the result of high GlyT1 inhibitory activity in caudal areas of the brain with sustained elevations of extracellular glycine. High levels of glycine in these brain areas may result in activation of strychnine-sensitive glycine A receptors that are inhibitory on both motor activity and critical brain stem functions such as respiration.

  14. Facile large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites via a selective etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Qihua; Wang, Tingmei

    2015-10-01

    The core-shell structured mesoporous silica nanomaterials (MSNs) are experiencing rapid development in many applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, bio-imaging and drug delivery wherein a large pore volume is desirable. We develop a one-pot method for large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites based on the reasonable change of the intrinsic nature of the -Si-O-Si- framework of silica nanoparticles together with a selective etching strategy. The as-synthesized products show good monodispersion and a large pore volume of 1.0 cm3 g-1. The novelty of this approach lies in the use of an inorganic-organic hybrid layer to assist the creation of large-pore morphology on the outermost shell thereby promoting efficient mass transfer or storage. Importantly, the method is reliable and grams of products can be easily prepared. The morphology on the outermost silica shell can be controlled by simply adjusting the VTES-to-TEOS molar ratio (VTES: triethoxyvinylsilane, TEOS: tetraethyl orthosilicate) as well as the etching time. The as-synthesized products exhibit fluorescence performance by incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) covalently into the inner silica walls, which provide potential application in bioimaging. We also demonstrate the applications of as-synthesized large-pore structured nanocomposites in drug delivery systems and stimuli-responsive nanoreactors for heterogeneous catalysis.The core-shell structured mesoporous silica nanomaterials (MSNs) are experiencing rapid development in many applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, bio-imaging and drug delivery wherein a large pore volume is desirable. We develop a one-pot method for large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites based on the reasonable change of the intrinsic nature of the -Si-O-Si- framework of silica nanoparticles together with a selective etching strategy. The as-synthesized products show good monodispersion and a large pore volume

  15. Target Selection Recommendations Based on Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries on Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Lin; Sperry, Laura; Olichney, John; Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Chang, Norika Malhado; Liu, Ying; Wang, Su-Ping; Wang, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review examines the evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) has extensive impact on nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Data Sources: We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to September, 2015, using various search terms and their combinations including PD, NMSs, DBS, globus pallidus internus (GPi), subthalamic nucleus (STN), and ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus. Study Selection: We included data from peer-reviewed journals on impacts of DBS on neuropsychological profiles, sensory function, autonomic symptoms, weight changes, and sleep disturbances. For psychological symptoms and cognitive impairment, we tried to use more reliable proofs: Random, control, multicenter, large sample sizes, and long period follow-up clinical studies. We categorized the NMSs into four groups: those that would improve definitively following DBS; those that are not significantly affected by DBS; those that remain controversial on their surgical benefit; and those that can be worsened by DBS. Results: In general, it seems to be an overall beneficial effect of DBS on NMSs, such as sensory, sleep, gastrointestinal, sweating, cardiovascular, odor, urological symptoms, and sexual dysfunction, GPi-DBS may produce similar results; Both STN and Gpi-DBS are safe with regard to cognition and psychology over long-term follow-up, though verbal fluency decline is related to DBS; The impact of DBS on behavioral addictions and dysphagia is still uncertain. Conclusions: As the motor effects of STN-DBS and GPi-DBS are similar, NMSs may determine the target choice in surgery of future patients. PMID:26668154

  16. N-Terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in dichorionic diamniotic twins with selective intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Mizobuchi, Masami; Sakai, Hitomi; Iwatani, Sota; Wada, Keiko; Yoshimoto, Seiji; Nakao, Hideto

    2014-03-04

    Monochorionic diamniotic (MD) twins with selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR) have known associations with cardiac complications. However, the cardiac load of dichorionic diamniotic (DD) twins with sIUGR (DD-sIUGR) remains unclear. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) is a convenient marker of cardiac dysfunction in neonates, and is elevated in MD twins with sIUGR (MD-sIUGR). However, there are no reports assessing serum NT-pro BNP levels in DD-sIUGR. Here, we aimed to clarify serum NT-pro BNP levels at birth in DD-sIUGR, and to compare them with those of MD-sIUGR. Forty-one DD twin pairs admitted to our center between October 2007 and January 2013 were enrolled in this study and separated into two groups: nine twins with sIUGR (DD-sIUGR group) and 32 twins without sIUGR (DD without sIUGR group). Sixteen MD twins with sIUGR (MD-sIUGR group) served as positive controls. Serum NT-pro BNP levels at birth in DD-sIUGR [median 2,115 pg/ml (range, 443-6,590 pg/ml)] were significantly higher than in DD without sIUGR [1,080 pg/ml (range, 313-3,470 pg/ml); p=0.001], and significantly lower than in MD twins with sIUGR [4,520 pg/ml (range, 529-62,400 pg/ml); p=0.04]. Serum NT-pro BNP levels between larger and smaller DD co-twins were significantly correlated (r = 0.582; p<0.0001). In conclusion, serum NT-pro BNP levels at birth in DD twins with sIUGR were higher than those without, and lower than in MD twins with sIUGR.

  17. Selective and integrated rehabilitation programs for disturbances of visual/spatial attention and executive function after brain damage: a neuropsychological evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Zoccolotti, P; Cantagallo, A; De Luca, M; Guariglia, C; Serino, A; Trojano, L

    2011-03-01

    The present evidence-based review systematically examines the literature on the neuropsychological rehabilitation of attentional and executive dysfunctions in patients with acquired brain lesions. Four areas are considered: 1) neuropsychological rehabilitation of attentional disorders; 2) neuropsychological rehabilitation of neglect disorders; 3) neuropsychological rehabilitation of dysexecutive disorders and 4) rehabilitation trainings for patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). In each area, search and selection of papers were performed on several databases and integrated by crosschecking references from relevant and recent reviews. The literature up to 2007 was examined (in some areas the search was limited from 2000 to 2007). Class of evidence for each selected study was evaluated according to the SPREAD (2010) criteria. Based on this analysis, recommendations on the effectiveness of rehabilitation trainings are proposed separately for each rehabilitation method in each of the four areas considered. Information on follow-up data and impact on activities of daily living is provided whenever available.

  18. Relationship between plasma and brain tryptophan in pigs during experimental hepatic coma before and after hemodialysis with selective membranes.

    PubMed

    Delorme, M L; Denis, J; Nordlinger, B; Boschat, M; Opolon, P

    1981-03-01

    Experimental acute liver ischemia in pigs induces an increment in plasma free tryptophan with decreased total tryptophan. Brain tryptophan is elevated in all brain areas. A slight, but significant increase of brain serotonin is demonstrated in the striatum only, while 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) is significantly lower in the hypothalamus. Other brain areas do not show significant changes in serotonin and 5-HIAA levels. Neither the high plasma free tryptophan levels, nor the decreased sum of neutral competitive amino acids are consistent with such an elevation of brain tryptophan. Hemodialysis was carried out with two different kinds of membranes: cuprophan (with an efficient removal of molecules up to molecular weight 1300) and AN 69 polyacrylonitrile (efficient removal up to 15,000). Ammonia and aminoacid clearance are similar for both membranes. After AN 69, plasmatic free tryptophan and brain tryptophan are lower than after liver devascularization, but still higher than normal. Serotonin significantly increases in the cortex, midbrain and hypothalamus without concomitant rise of 5-HIAA levels. After cuprophan hemodialysis, plasma total tryptophan is lower than in normal and even comatose animals, whereas free tryptophan is normal. Intracerebral tryptophan is similar to AN 69 dialysed animals, but in the hypothalamus it is similar to nondialysed animals. Brain serotonin levels are not modified. 5-HIAA decreases in the hypothalamus. This finding suggests that middle molecules (which are not cleared out with cuprophan hemodialysis) are involved in the intracerebral transfer of tryptophan and the metabolism of serotonin, mainly in the hypothalamus.

  19. Dolphin social intelligence: complex alliance relationships in bottlenose dolphins and a consideration of selective environments for extreme brain size evolution in mammals.

    PubMed

    Connor, Richard C

    2007-04-29

    Bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, live in a large, unbounded society with a fission-fusion grouping pattern. Potential cognitive demands include the need to develop social strategies involving the recognition of a large number of individuals and their relationships with others. Patterns of alliance affiliation among males may be more complex than are currently known for any non-human, with individuals participating in 2-3 levels of shifting alliances. Males mediate alliance relationships with gentle contact behaviours such as petting, but synchrony also plays an important role in affiliative interactions. In general, selection for social intelligence in the context of shifting alliances will depend on the extent to which there are strategic options and risk. Extreme brain size evolution may have occurred more than once in the toothed whales, reaching peaks in the dolphin family and the sperm whale. All three 'peaks' of large brain size evolution in mammals (odontocetes, humans and elephants) shared a common selective environment: extreme mutual dependence based on external threats from predators or conspecific groups. In this context, social competition, and consequently selection for greater cognitive abilities and large brain size, was intense.

  20. Impact of random and systematic recall errors and selection bias in case--control studies on mobile phone use and brain tumors in adolescents (CEFALO study).

    PubMed

    Aydin, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Andersen, Tina Veje; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Prochazka, Michaela; Klaeboe, Lars; Kuehni, Claudia E; Tynes, Tore; Röösli, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Whether the use of mobile phones is a risk factor for brain tumors in adolescents is currently being studied. Case--control studies investigating this possible relationship are prone to recall error and selection bias. We assessed the potential impact of random and systematic recall error and selection bias on odds ratios (ORs) by performing simulations based on real data from an ongoing case--control study of mobile phones and brain tumor risk in children and adolescents (CEFALO study). Simulations were conducted for two mobile phone exposure categories: regular and heavy use. Our choice of levels of recall error was guided by a validation study that compared objective network operator data with the self-reported amount of mobile phone use in CEFALO. In our validation study, cases overestimated their number of calls by 9% on average and controls by 34%. Cases also overestimated their duration of calls by 52% on average and controls by 163%. The participation rates in CEFALO were 83% for cases and 71% for controls. In a variety of scenarios, the combined impact of recall error and selection bias on the estimated ORs was complex. These simulations are useful for the interpretation of previous case-control studies on brain tumor and mobile phone use in adults as well as for the interpretation of future studies on adolescents.

  1. Evidence that formulations of the selective MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, which bypass first-pass metabolism, also inhibit MAO-A in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.; Shumay, Elena; McCall-Perez, Fred; Gilmor, Michelle; Jayne, Millard; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David L.; Apelskog-Torres, Karen; Hubbard, Barbara; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Fahn, Stanley; Telang, Frank; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Muench, Lisa

    2015-10-29

    Selegiline (L-deprenyl) is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) at the conventional dose (10 mg/day oral) that is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. However, controlled studies have demonstrated antidepressant activity for high doses of oral selegiline and for transdermal selegiline suggesting that when plasma levels of selegiline are elevated, brain MAO-A might also be inhibited. Zydis selegiline (Zelapar®) is an orally disintegrating formulation of selegiline, which is absorbed through the buccal mucosa producing higher plasma levels of selegiline and reduced amphetamine metabolites compared to equal doses of conventional selegiline. Although there is indirect evidence that Zydis selegiline at high doses loses its selectivity for MAO-B, there is no direct evidence that it also inhibits brain MAO-A in humans. We measured brain MAO-A in 18 healthy men after a 28-day treatment with Zydis selegiline (2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/day) and in 3 subjects receiving the selegiline transdermal system (Emsam patch, 6 mg/day) using PET and the MAO-A radiotracer [¹¹C]clorgyline. We also measured dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in three subjects from the 10 mg group. The 10 mg Zydis selegiline dose significantly inhibited MAO-A (36.9 ± 19.7%, range 11–70%, p<0.007)) but not DAT; and while Emsam also inhibited MAO-A (33.2 ± 28.9 (range 9-68%) the difference did not reach significance (p=0.10)) presumably because of the small sample size. Our results provide the first direct evidence of brain MAO-A inhibition in humans by formulations of selegiline, which are currently postulated but not verified to target brain MAO-A in addition to MAO-B.

  2. Evidence that formulations of the selective MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, which bypass first-pass metabolism, also inhibit MAO-A in the human brain

    DOE PAGES

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.; ...

    2015-10-29

    Selegiline (L-deprenyl) is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) at the conventional dose (10 mg/day oral) that is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. However, controlled studies have demonstrated antidepressant activity for high doses of oral selegiline and for transdermal selegiline suggesting that when plasma levels of selegiline are elevated, brain MAO-A might also be inhibited. Zydis selegiline (Zelapar®) is an orally disintegrating formulation of selegiline, which is absorbed through the buccal mucosa producing higher plasma levels of selegiline and reduced amphetamine metabolites compared to equal doses of conventional selegiline. Although there is indirect evidence thatmore » Zydis selegiline at high doses loses its selectivity for MAO-B, there is no direct evidence that it also inhibits brain MAO-A in humans. We measured brain MAO-A in 18 healthy men after a 28-day treatment with Zydis selegiline (2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/day) and in 3 subjects receiving the selegiline transdermal system (Emsam patch, 6 mg/day) using PET and the MAO-A radiotracer [¹¹C]clorgyline. We also measured dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in three subjects from the 10 mg group. The 10 mg Zydis selegiline dose significantly inhibited MAO-A (36.9 ± 19.7%, range 11–70%, p<0.007)) but not DAT; and while Emsam also inhibited MAO-A (33.2 ± 28.9 (range 9-68%) the difference did not reach significance (p=0.10)) presumably because of the small sample size. Our results provide the first direct evidence of brain MAO-A inhibition in humans by formulations of selegiline, which are currently postulated but not verified to target brain MAO-A in addition to MAO-B.« less

  3. Cooling rates of group IVA iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, J.; Wasson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    Cooling rates of six group IVA iron meteorites were estimated by a taenite central Ni concentration-taenite half-width method. Calculated cooling rates range from 13 to 25 C/Myr, with an average of 20 C/Myr. No correlation between cooling rate and bulk Ni content is observed, and the data appear to be consistent with a uniform cooling rate as expected from an igneous core origin. This result differs from previous studies reporting a wide range in cooling rates that were strongly correlated with bulk Ni content. The differences result mainly from differences in the phase diagram and the selected diffusion coefficients. Cooling rates inferred from taenite Ni concentrations at the interface with kamacite are consistent with those based on taenite central Ni content.

  4. A novel muscarinic receptor ligand which penetrates the blood brain barrier and displays in vivo selectivity for the m2 subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Gitler, M.S.; Cohen, V.I.; De La Cruz, R.; Boulay, S.F.; Jin, B.; Zeeberg, B.R. ); Reba, R.C. Univ. of Chicago Hospital, IL )

    1993-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype neuroreceptors in the posterior parietal cortex of the human brain. Emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD is limited by the fact that there is currently no available m2-selective radioligand which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. In our efforts to prepare such a radioligand, the authors have used competition studies against currently existing muscarinic receptor radioligands to infer the in vitro and in vivo properties of a novel muscarinic receptor ligand, 5-[[4-[4-(diisobutylamino)butyl]-1-phenyl]acetyl]-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,e][1,4]diazepin-11-one (DIBD). In vitro competition studies against [[sup 3]H](R)-3-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([[sup 3]H]QNB) and [[sup 3]H]N-methylscopolamine ([[sup 3]H]NMS), using membranes derived from transfected cells expressing only m1, m2, m3, or m4 receptor subtypes, indicate that DIBD is selective for m2/m4 over m1/m3. In vivo competition studies against (R,R)-[[sup 125]I]IQNB indicate that DIBD crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB). The relationship of the regional percentage decrease in (R,R)-[[sup 125]I]IQNB versus the percentage of each of the receptor subtypes indicates that DIBD competes more effectively in those brain regions which are known to be enriched in the m2, relative to the m1, m3, and m4, receptor subtype; however, analysis of the data using a mathematical model shows that caution is required when interpreting the in vivo results. The authors conclude that a suitably radiolabeled derivative of DIBD may be of potential use in emission tomographic study of changes in m2 receptors in the central nervous system.

  5. Population pharmacokinetics, brain distribution, and pharmacodynamics of 2nd generation dopamine transporter selective benztropine analogs developed as potential substitute therapeutics for treatment of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Syed, Shariq A; Newman, Amy H; Othman, Ahmed A; Eddington, Natalie D

    2008-05-01

    A second generation of N-substituted 3alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropanes (GA 1-69, JHW 005 and JHW 013) binds with high affinity to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and are highly selective toward DAT compared to muscarinic receptor binding (M1). The objective of this study was to characterize brain distribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics [extracellular brain dopamine (DA) levels] of three novel N-substituted benztropine (BZT) analogs in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The BZT analogs displayed a higher distribution (Vd = 8.69-34.3 vs. 0.9 L/kg) along with longer elimination (t l/2: 4.1-5.4 vs. 0.5 h) than previously reported for cocaine. Brain-to-plasma partition coefficients were 1.3-2.5 vs. 2.1 for cocaine. The effect of the BZT analogs on extracellular brain (DA) levels ranged from minimal effects (GA 1-69) to several fold elevation (approximately 850% of basal DA for JHW 013) at the highest dose evaluated. PK/PD analysis of exposure-response data resulted in lower IC50 values for the BZT analogs compared to cocaine indicating their higher potency to inhibit DA reuptake (0.1-0.3 vs. 0.7 mg/L). These BZT analogs possess significantly different PK and PD profiles as compared to cocaine suggesting that further evaluation as cocaine abuse therapeutics is warranted.

  6. Different inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in selected parts of the rat brain following intoxication with VX and Russian VX.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Petr; Bajgar, Jiri; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Kuca, Kamil; Capek, Lukas; Fusek, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Differences between acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition in the brain structures following VX and RVX exposure are not known as well as information on the possible correlation of biochemical and histochemical methods detecting AChE activity. Therefore, inhibition of AChE in different brain parts detected by histochemical and biochemical techniques was compared in rats intoxicated with VX and RVX. AChE activities in defined brain regions 30 min after treating rats with VX and Russian VX intramuscularly (1.0 x LD(50)) were determined by using biochemical and histochemical methods. AChE inhibition was less expressed for RVX, in comparison with VX. Frontal cortex and pontomedullar areas containing ncl. reticularis has been found as the most sensitive areas for the action of VX. For RVX, these structures were determined to be frontal cortex, dorsal septum, and hippocampus, respectively. Histochemical and biochemical results were in good correlation (R(xy) = 0.8337). Determination of AChE activity in defined brain structures was a more sensitive parameter for VX or RVX exposure than the determination of AChE activity in the whole-brain homogenate. This activity represents a "mean" of the activities in different structures. Thus, AChE activity is the main parameter investigated in studies searching for target sites following nerve-agent poisoning contributing to better understanding of toxicodynamics of nerve agents.

  7. Selective deficit of second language: a case study of a brain-damaged Arabic-Hebrew bilingual patient

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Raphiq

    2009-01-01

    Background An understanding of how two languages are represented in the human brain is best obtained from studies of bilingual patients who have sustained brain damage. The primary goal of the present study was to determine whether one or both languages of an Arabic-Hebrew bilingual individual are disrupted following brain damage. I present a case study of a bilingual patient, proficient in Arabic and Hebrew, who had sustained brain damage as a result of an intracranial hemorrhage related to herpes encephalitis. Methods The patient's performance on several linguistic tasks carried out in the first language (Arabic) and in the second language (Hebrew) was assessed, and his performance in the two languages was compared. Results The patient displayed somewhat different symptomatologies in the two languages. The results revealed dissociation between the two languages in terms of both the types and the magnitude of errors, pointing to aphasic symptoms in both languages, with Hebrew being the more impaired. Further analysis disclosed that this dissociation was apparently caused not by damage to his semantic system, but rather by damage at the lexical level. Conclusion The results suggest that the principles governing the organization of lexical representations in the brain are not similar for the two languages. PMID:19284632

  8. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, G N; Petin, A N

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF{sub 6} and CF{sub 3}I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF{sub 6} molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation. (laser separation of isotopes)

  9. Discovery of a highly selective glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor (PF-04802367) that modulates tau phosphorylation in brain: Translation for PET neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Steven H.; Chen, Jinshan Michael; Normandin, Marc D.; Chang, Jeanne S.; Chang, George C.; Taylor, Christine K.; Trapa, Patrick; Plummer, Mark S.; Para, Kimberly S.; Conn, Edward L.; Lopresti-Morrow, Lori; Lanyon, Lorraine F.; Cook, James M.; Richter, Karl E. G.; Nolan, Charlie E.; Schachter, Joel B.; Janat, Fouad; Che, Ye; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Lefker, Bruce A.; Enerson, Bradley E.; Livni, Elijahu; Wang, Lu; Guehl, Nicolas; Patnaik, Debasis; Wagner, Florence F.; Perlis, Roy; Holson, Edward B.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) regulates multiple cellular processes in diabetes, oncology and neurology. We have identified N-(3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl)-5-(3-chloro-4-methoxyphenyl)oxazole-4-carboxamide (PF-04802367 or PF-367) as a highly potent inhibitor, which is among the most selective antagonists of GSK-3 to date. We demonstrated its efficacy in modulation of tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Whereas the kinetics of PF-367 binding in brain tissues are too fast for an effective therapeutic agent, the pharmacokinetic profile of PF-367 is ideal for discovery of radiopharmaceuticals for GSK-3 in the central nervous system. A 11C-isotopologue of PF-367 was synthesized and preliminary PET imaging studies in non-human primates confirmed that we have overcome the two major obstacles for imaging GSK-3, namely, reasonable brain permeability and displaceable binding. PMID:27355874

  10. Solar heating and cooling: Technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The solar energy research is reported including climatic data, architectural data, heating and cooling equipment, thermal loads, and economic data. Lists of data sources presented include: selected data sources for solar energy heating and cooling; bibliography of solar energy, and other energy sources; sources for manufacturing and sales, solar energy collectors; and solar energy heating and cooling projects.

  11. Turbopump thermodynamic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, T. C.; Mckee, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    System for cooling turbopumps used in cryogenic fluid storage facilities is described. Technique uses thermodynamic propellant vent to intercept pump heat at desired conditions. Cooling system uses hydrogen from outside source or residual hydrogen from cryogenic storage tank.

  12. Cooling Water Intakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Industries use large volumes of water for cooling. The water intakes pull large numbers of fish and other organisms into the cooling systems. EPA issues regulations on intake structures in order to minimize adverse environmental impacts.

  13. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  14. Metamaterial enhances natural cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-03-01

    A new metamaterial film that uses passive radiative cooling to dissipate heat from an object and provides cooling without a power input has been developed by a team at the University of Colorado Boulder in the US.

  15. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  16. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  17. Effect of selected anti-malarial drugs on the blood chemistry and brain serotonin levels in male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Eigbibhalu, Ukpo Grace; Albert Taiwo, Ebuehi Osaretin; Douglass, Idiakheua Akhabue; Abimbola, Efunogbon Aderonke

    2013-01-01

    The effects of oral administration of sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine (SP), artesunate (A) and sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine - artesunate (SPA) on blood chemistry and brain serotonin in rabbits were investigated. Forty rabbits were divided into four groups of ten animals each. The group that served as the control received 2ml of distilled water while the other groups were received 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP, 3.3mg/kg body weight of A and 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP plus 3.3mg/kg body weight of A respectively by oral route daily for 3 days in a week for four weeks. At the end of each week of drug administration, three rabbits from each group were anaesthetized, blood was taken from the jugular veins using sterile needle and serum was extracted. The rabbits were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver and brain tissues were excised and homogenized. Total blood protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, albumin, creatinine and urea concentrations, creatine kinase, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase, ALP activities were assayed using CX5 synchron autoanalyzer. The brain and liver serotonin levels were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). There were no significant differences (P < 0.05) in the concentrations of serum albumin, urea, creatinine, cholesterol and triglyceride of rabbits administered SP, A and SPA for 4 weeks, except in serum total protein. No significant differences existed in the activities of AST, ALT and ALP, except in creatine kinase which was elevated in the control. The brain serotonin levels of rabbits administered SP, A and SPA were significantly higher as compared to the control throughout the duration of the study Data of the study indicate that oral administration of SP, A or SPA in rabbits do not affect blood chemistry, but affected brain serotonin levels and could alter some neural functions.

  18. Insulin resistance, selfish brain, and selfish immune system: an evolutionarily positively selected program used in chronic inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a general phenomenon of many physiological states, disease states, and diseases. IR has been described in diabetes mellitus, obesity, infection, sepsis, trauma, painful states such as postoperative pain and migraine, schizophrenia, major depression, chronic mental stress, and others. In arthritis, abnormalities of glucose homeostasis were described in 1920; and in 1950 combined glucose and insulin tests unmistakably demonstrated IR. The phenomenon is now described in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, and others. In chronic inflammatory diseases, cytokine-neutralizing strategies normalize insulin sensitivity. This paper delineates that IR is either based on inflammatory factors (activation of the immune/ repair system) or on the brain (mental activation via stress axes). Due to the selfishness of the immune system and the selfishness of the brain, both can induce IR independent of each other. Consequently, the immune system can block the brain (for example, by sickness behavior) and the brain can block the immune system (for example, stress-induced immune system alterations). Based on considerations of evolutionary medicine, it is discussed that obesity per se is not a disease. Obesity-related IR depends on provoking factors from either the immune system or the brain. Chronic inflammation and/or stress axis activation are thus needed for obesity-related IR. Due to redundant pathways in stimulating IR, a simple one factor-neutralizing strategy might help in chronic inflammatory diseases (inflammation is the key), but not in obesity-related IR. The new considerations towards IR are interrelated to the published theories of IR (thrifty genotype, thrifty phenotype, and others). PMID:25608958

  19. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  20. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  1. The Cool Flames Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Sheredy, William; Wu, Ming-Shin; Tornabene, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A space-based experiment is currently under development to study diffusion-controlled, gas-phase, low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignition in an unstirred, static reactor. At Earth's gravity (1g), natural convection due to self-heating during the course of slow reaction dominates diffusive transport and produces spatio-temporal variations in the thermal and thus species concentration profiles via the Arrhenius temperature dependence of the reaction rates. Natural convection is important in all terrestrial cool flame and auto-ignition studies, except for select low pressure, highly dilute (small temperature excess) studies in small vessels (i.e., small Rayleigh number). On Earth, natural convection occurs when the Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds a critical value of approximately 600. Typical values of the Ra, associated with cool flames and auto-ignitions, range from 104-105 (or larger), a regime where both natural convection and conduction heat transport are important. When natural convection occurs, it alters the temperature, hydrodynamic, and species concentration fields, thus generating a multi-dimensional field that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to be modeled analytically. This point has been emphasized recently by Kagan and co-workers who have shown that explosion limits can shift depending on the characteristic length scale associated with the natural convection. Moreover, natural convection in unstirred reactors is never "sufficiently strong to generate a spatially uniform temperature distribution throughout the reacting gas." Thus, an unstirred, nonisothermal reaction on Earth does not reduce to that generated in a mechanically, well-stirred system. Interestingly, however, thermal ignition theories and thermokinetic models neglect natural convection and assume a heat transfer correlation of the form: q=h(S/V)(T(bar) - Tw) where q is the heat loss per unit volume, h is the heat transfer coefficient, S/V is the surface to

  2. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  3. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  4. Expression of α-subunit of α-glucosidase II in adult mouse brain regions and selected organs.

    PubMed

    Anji, Antje; Miller, Hayley; Raman, Chandrasekar; Phillips, Mathew; Ciment, Gary; Kumari, Meena

    2015-01-01

    α-Glucosidase II (GII), a resident of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and an important enzyme in the folding of nascent glycoproteins, is heterodimeric, consisting of α (GIIα) and β (GIIβ) subunits. The catalytic GIIα subunit, with the help of mannose 6-phosphate receptor homology domain of GIIβ, sequentially hydrolyzes two α1-3-linked glucose residues in the second step of N-linked oligosaccharide-mediated protein folding. The soluble GIIα subunit is retained in the ER through its interaction with the HDEL-containing GIIβ subunit. N-glycosylation and correct protein folding are crucial for protein stability and trafficking and cell surface expression of several proteins in the brain. Alterations in N-glycosylation lead to abnormalities in neuronal migration and mental retardation, various neurodegenerative diseases, and invasion of malignant gliomas. Inhibitors of GII are used to inhibit cell proliferation and migration in a variety of different pathologies, such as viral infection, cancer, and diabetes. Despite the widespread use of GIIα inhibitory drugs and the role of GIIα in brain function, little is known about its expression in brain and other tissues. Here, we report generation of a highly specific chicken antibody to the GIIα subunit and its characterization by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation using cerebral cortical extracts. By using this antibody, we showed that the GIIα protein is highly expressed in testis, kidney, and lung, with the lowest amount in heart. GIIα polypeptide levels in whole brain were comparable to those in spleen. However, a higher expression of GIIα protein was detected in the cerebral cortex, reflecting its continuous requirement in correct folding of cell surface proteins.

  5. Postexercise Cooling Rates in 2 Cooling Jackets

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Carly; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen; Polglaze, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Cooling jackets are a common method for removing stored heat accumulated during exercise. To date, the efficiency and practicality of different types of cooling jackets have received minimal investigation. Objective: To examine whether a cooling jacket containing a phase-change material (PC17) results in more rapid postexercise cooling than a gel cooling jacket and a no-jacket (control) condition. Design: Randomized, counterbalanced design with 3 experimental conditions. Setting: Participants exercised at 75% V̇o2max workload in a hot climate chamber (temperature  =  35.0 ± 1.4°C, relative humidity  =  52 ± 4%) for 30 minutes, followed by postexercise cooling for 30 minutes in cool laboratory conditions (ambient temperature  =  24.9 ± 1.8°C, relative humidity  =  39% ± 10%). Patients or Other Participants: Twelve physically active men (age  =  21.3 ± 1.1 years, height  =  182.7 ± 7.1 cm, body mass  =  76.2 ± 9.5 kg, sum of 6 skinfolds  =  50.5 ± 6.9 mm, body surface area  =  1.98 ± 0.14 m2, V̇o2max  =  49.0 ± 7.0 mL·kg−1·min−1) participated. Intervention(s): Three experimental conditions, consisting of a PC17 jacket, a gel jacket, and no jacket. Main Outcome Measure(s): Core temperature (TC), mean skin temperature (TSk), and TC cooling rate (°C/min). Results: Mean peak TC postexercise was 38.49 ± 0.42°C, 38.57 ± 0.41°C, and 38.55 ± 0.40°C for the PC17 jacket, gel jacket, and control conditions, respectively. No differences were observed in peak TC cooling rates among the PC17 jacket (0.038 ± 0.007°C/min), gel jacket (0.040 ± 0.009°C/min), and control (0.034 ± 0.010°C/min, P > .05) conditions. Between trials, no differences were calculated for mean TSk cooling. Conclusions: Similar cooling rates for all 3 conditions indicate that there is no benefit associated with wearing the PC17 or gel jacket. PMID:20210620

  6. Laminated turbine vane design and fabrication. [utilizing film cooling as a cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A turbine vane and associated endwalls designed for advanced gas turbine engine conditions are described. The vane design combines the methods of convection cooling and selective areas of full coverage film cooling. The film cooling technique is utilized on the leading edge, pressure side, and endwall regions. The turbine vane involves the fabrication of airfoils from a stack of laminates with cooling passages photoetched on the surface. Cold flow calibration tests, a thermal analysis, and a stress analysis were performed on the turbine vanes.

  7. Selective perturbation of cognitive conflict in the human brain-A combined fMRI and rTMS study.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Claudia; Köster, Raphael; Korsch, Margarethe; Frühholz, Sascha; Thiel, Christiane M; Herrmann, Manfred; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2016-12-13

    We investigated if single and double conflicts are processed separately in different brain regions and if they are differentially vulnerable to TMS perturbation. Fifteen human volunteers performed a single (Flanker or Simon) conflict task or a double (Flanker and Simon) conflict task in a combined functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) study. The fMRI approach aimed at localizing brain regions involved in interference resolution induced by single Flanker (stimulus-stimulus, S-S) and Simon (stimulus-response, S-R) conflicts as well as regions involved in the double conflict condition. The data revealed a distinct activation in the right intraparietal sulcus (IPS) for Flanker interference and in the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) for the double interference condition. The causal functional role of these brain regions was then examined in the same volunteers by using offline TMS over right IPS and right MFG. TMS perturbation of the right IPS increased the Flanker effect, but had no effect in the Simon or double conflict condition. In contrast, perturbation of the right MFG had no effect on any of the conflict types. These findings suggest a causal role of the right IPS in the processing of the single conflict of Flanker (stimulus-stimulus) interference.

  8. Region-selective effects of neuroinflammation and antioxidant treatment on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and NMDA receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Biegon, A.; Alvarado, M.; Budinger, T.F.; Grossman, R.; Hensley, K.; West, M.S.; Kotake, Y.; Ono, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    2001-12-10

    Following induction of acute neuroinflammation by intracisternal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats, quantitative autoradiography was used to assess the regional level of microglial activation and glutamate (NMDA) receptor binding. The possible protective action of the antioxidant phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone in this model was tested by administering the drug in the drinking water for 6 days starting 24 hours after endotoxin injection. Animals were killed 7 days post-injection and consecutive cryostat brain sections labeled with [3H]PK11195 as a marker of activated microglia and [125I]iodoMK801 as a marker of the open-channel, activated state of NMDA receptors. Lipopolysaccharide increased [3H]PK11195 binding in the brain, with the largest increases (2-3 fold) in temporal and entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. A significant (>50 percent) decrease in [125I]iodoMK801 binding was found in the same brain regions. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone treatment resulted in a partial inhibition ({approx}25 percent decrease) of the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in [3H]PK11195 binding but completely reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in [125I]iodoMK80 binding in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. Loss of NMDA receptor function in cortical and hippocampal regions may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in diseases with a neuroinflammatory component, such as meningitis or Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Application of structure-based drug design and parallel chemistry to identify selective, brain penetrant, in vivo active phosphodiesterase 9A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Claffey, Michelle M; Helal, Christopher J; Verhoest, Patrick R; Kang, Zhijun; Fors, Kristina S; Jung, Stanley; Zhong, Jiaying; Bundesmann, Mark W; Hou, Xinjun; Lui, Shenping; Kleiman, Robin J; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Schmidt, Anne W; Menniti, Frank; Schmidt, Christopher J; Hoffman, William E; Hajos, Mihaly; McDowell, Laura; O'Connor, Rebecca E; Macdougall-Murphy, Mary; Fonseca, Kari R; Becker, Stacey L; Nelson, Frederick R; Liras, Spiros

    2012-11-08

    Phosphodiesterase 9A inhibitors have shown activity in preclinical models of cognition with potential application as novel therapies for treating Alzheimer's disease. Our clinical candidate, PF-04447943 (2), demonstrated acceptable CNS permeability in rats with modest asymmetry between central and peripheral compartments (free brain/free plasma = 0.32; CSF/free plasma = 0.19) yet had physicochemical properties outside the range associated with traditional CNS drugs. To address the potential risk of restricted CNS penetration with 2 in human clinical trials, we sought to identify a preclinical candidate with no asymmetry in rat brain penetration and that could advance into development. Merging the medicinal chemistry strategies of structure-based design with parallel chemistry, a novel series of PDE9A inhibitors was identified that showed improved selectivity over PDE1C. Optimization afforded preclinical candidate 19 that demonstrated free brain/free plasma ≥ 1 in rat and reduced microsomal clearance along with the ability to increase cyclic guanosine monophosphosphate levels in rat CSF.

  10. A Genetic-Based Feature Selection Approach in the Identification of Left/Right Hand Motor Imagery for a Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Yaacoub, Charles; Mhanna, Georges; Rihana, Sandy

    2017-01-23

    Electroencephalography is a non-invasive measure of the brain electrical activity generated by millions of neurons. Feature extraction in electroencephalography analysis is a core issue that may lead to accurate brain mental state classification. This paper presents a new feature selection method that improves left/right hand movement identification of a motor imagery brain-computer interface, based on genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks used as classifiers. Raw electroencephalography signals are first preprocessed using appropriate filtering. Feature extraction is carried out afterwards, based on spectral and temporal signal components, and thus a feature vector is constructed. As various features might be inaccurate and mislead the classifier, thus degrading the overall system performance, the proposed approach identifies a subset of features from a large feature space, such that the classifier error rate is reduced. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to reduce the number of features to as low as 0.5% (i.e., the number of ignored features can reach 99.5%) while improving the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and precision of the classifier.

  11. A Genetic-Based Feature Selection Approach in the Identification of Left/Right Hand Motor Imagery for a Brain-Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Yaacoub, Charles; Mhanna, Georges; Rihana, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography is a non-invasive measure of the brain electrical activity generated by millions of neurons. Feature extraction in electroencephalography analysis is a core issue that may lead to accurate brain mental state classification. This paper presents a new feature selection method that improves left/right hand movement identification of a motor imagery brain-computer interface, based on genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks used as classifiers. Raw electroencephalography signals are first preprocessed using appropriate filtering. Feature extraction is carried out afterwards, based on spectral and temporal signal components, and thus a feature vector is constructed. As various features might be inaccurate and mislead the classifier, thus degrading the overall system performance, the proposed approach identifies a subset of features from a large feature space, such that the classifier error rate is reduced. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to reduce the number of features to as low as 0.5% (i.e., the number of ignored features can reach 99.5%) while improving the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and precision of the classifier. PMID:28124985

  12. Reducing home heating and cooling costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

  13. Cooling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1982-01-01

    A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

  14. UTILIZATION OF THE LEAST SHREW AS A RAPID AND SELECTIVE SCREENING MODEL FOR THE ANTIEMETIC POTENTIAL AND BRAIN PENETRATION OF SUBSTANCE P AND NK1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS

    PubMed Central

    Darmani, Nissar A.; Wang, Yaozhi; Abad, Joseph; Ray, Andrew P.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Ramirez, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is thought to play a cardinal role in emesis via the activation of central tachykinin NK1 receptors during the delayed phase of vomiting produced by chemotherapeutics. Although the existing supportive evidence is significant, due to lack of an appropriate animal model, the evidence is indirect. As yet, no study has confirmed that emesis produced by SP or a selective NK1 receptor agonist is sensitive to brain penetrating antagonists of either NK1, NK2, or NK3 receptors. The goals of this investigation were to demonstrate: 1) whether intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of either SP, a brain penetrating (GR73632) or non-penetrating (e.g. SarMet – SP) NK1 receptor agonist, an NK2 receptor agonist (GR64349), or an NK3 receptor agonist (Pro7-NKB), would induce vomiting and/or scratching in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva) in a dose-dependent manner; and whether these effects are sensitive to the above selective receptor antagonists; 2) whether an exogenous emetic dose of SP (50 mg/kg, i.p.) can penetrate into the shrew brain stem and frontal cortex; 3) whether GR73632 (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced activation of NK1 receptors increases Fos-measured neuronal activity in the neurons of both brain stem emetic nuclei and the enteric nervous system of the gut; and 4) whether selective ablation of peripheral NK1 receptors can affect emesis produced by GR73632. The results clearly demonstrated that while SP produced vomiting only, GR73632 caused both emesis and scratching behavior dose-dependently in shrews, and these effects were sensitive to NK1-, but not NK2- or NK3-receptor antagonists. Neither the selective, non-penetrating NK1 receptor agonists, nor the selective NK2- or NK3-receptor agonists, caused a significant dose-dependent behavioral effect. An emetic dose of SP selectively and rapidly penetrated the brain stem but not the frontal cortex. Systemic GR73632 increased Fos expression in the enteric nerve plexi, the medial subnucleus of nucleus tractus

  15. Real-time monitoring of changes in brain extracellular sodium and potassium concentrations and intracranial pressure after selective vasopressin-1a receptor inhibition following focal traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Liang, Xiuyin; Wang, Weili; Parveen, Shanaaz; Baumgarten, Clive M; Marmarou, Christina R

    2014-07-15

    Brain swelling and increased intracranial pressure (ICP) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to poor outcome. Vasopressin-1a receptors (V1aR) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) regulate water transport and brain edema formation, perhaps in part by modulating cation fluxes. After focal TBI, V1aR inhibitors diminish V1aR and AQP4, reduce astrocytic swelling and brain edema. We determined whether V1aR inhibition with SR49059 after lateral controlled-cortical-impact (CCI) injury affects extracellular Na(+) and K(+) concentrations ([Na(+)]e; [K(+)]e). Ion-selective Na(+) and K(+) electrodes (ISE) and an ICP probe were implanted in rat parietal cortex, and [Na(+)]e, [K(+)]e, and physiological parameters were monitored for 5 h post-CCI. Sham-vehicle-ISE, CCI-vehicle-ISE and CCI-SR49059-ISE groups were studied, and SR49059 was administered 5 min to 5 h post-injury. We found a significant injury-induced decrease in [Na(+)]e to 80.1 ± 15 and 87.9 ± 7.9 mM and increase in [K(+)]e to 20.9 ± 3.8 and 13.4 ± 3.4 mM at 5 min post-CCI in CCI-vehicle-ISE and CCI-SR49059-ISE groups, respectively (p<0.001 vs. baseline; ns between groups). Importantly, [Na(+)]e in CCI-SR49059-ISE was reduced 5-20 min post-injury and increased to baseline at 25 min, whereas recovery in CCI-vehicle-ISE required more than 1 hr, suggesting SR49059 accelerated [Na(+)]e recovery. In contrast, [K(+)]e recovery took 45 min in both groups. Further, ICP was lower in the CCI-SR49059-ISE group. Thus, selective V1aR inhibition allowed faster [Na(+)]e recovery and reduced ICP. By augmenting the [Na(+)]e recovery rate, SR49059 may reduce trauma-induced ionic imbalance, blunting cellular water influx and edema after TBI. These findings suggest SR49059 and V1aR inhibitors are potential tools for treating cellular edema post-TBI.

  16. [On the role of selective silencer Freud-1 in the regulation of the brain 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression].

    PubMed

    Naumenko, V S; Osipova, D V; Tsybko, A S

    2010-01-01

    Selective 5-HT(1A) receptor silencer (Freud-1) is known to be one of the main factors for transcriptional regulation of brain serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor. However, there is a lack of data on implication of Freud-1 in the mechanisms underlying genetically determined and experimentally altered 5-HT(1A) receptor system state in vivo. In the present study we have found a difference in the 5-HT(1A) gene expression in the midbrain of AKR and CBA inbred mouse strains. At the same time no distinction in Freud-1 expression was observed. We have revealed 90.3% of homology between mouse and rat 5-HT(1A) receptor DRE-element, whereas there was no difference in DRE-element sequence between AKR and CBA mice. This indicates the absence of differences in Freud-1 binding site in these mouse strains. In the model of 5-HT(1A) receptor desensitization produced by chronic 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist administration, a significant reduction of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression together with considerable increase of Freud-1 expression were found. These data allow us to conclude that the selective silencer of 5-HT(1A) receptor, Freud-1, is involved in the compensatory mechanisms that modulate the functional state of brain serotonin system, although it is not the only factor for 5-HT(1A) receptor transcriptional regulation.

  17. Brain-selective overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 attenuates sympathetic nerve activity and enhances baroreflex function in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Gao, Lie; Lazartigues, Eric; Zucker, Irving H

    2011-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been suggested to be involved in the central regulation of autonomic function. During chronic heart failure (CHF), elevated central angiotensin II signaling contributes to the sustained increase of sympathetic outflow. This is accompanied by a downregulation of ACE2 in the brain. We hypothesized that central overexpression of ACE2 decreases sympathetic outflow and enhances baroreflex function in CHF. Transgenic mice overexpressing human ACE2 selectively in the brain (SYN-hACE2 [SA]) and wild-type littermates (WT) were used. CHF was induced by permanent coronary artery ligation. Four weeks after coronary artery ligation, both WT and SA mice exhibited a significant decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (<40%). A slight decrease in mean arterial pressure was found only in SA mice. Compared with WT mice with CHF, brain-selective ACE2 overexpression attenuated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure; decreased urinary norepinephrine excretion; baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity (WT CHF: 71.6±7.6% max versus SA CHF: 49.3±6.1% max); and enhanced baroreflex sensitivity (maximum slope: WT sham: 1.61±0.16%/mm Hg versus SA CHF: 1.51±0.17%/mm Hg). Chronic subcutaneous blockade of mas receptor increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in SA mice with CHF (A779: 67.3±5.8% versus vehicle: 46.4±3.6% of max). An upregulation in angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression was detected in medullary nuclei in WT CHF mice, which was significantly attenuated in SA mice with CHF. These data suggest that central ACE2 overexpression exerts a potential protective effect in CHF through attenuating sympathetic outflow. The mechanism for this effect involves angiotensin (1-7) mas signaling, as well as a decrease in angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling in the medulla.

  18. Passive Cooling of Body Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtz, Ronald; Matic, Peter; Mott, David

    2013-03-01

    Warfighter performance can be adversely affected by heat load and weight of equipment. Current tactical vest designs are good insulators and lack ventilation, thus do not provide effective management of metabolic heat generated. NRL has undertaken a systematic study of tactical vest thermal management, leading to physics-based strategies that provide improved cooling without undesirable consequences such as added weight, added electrical power requirements, or compromised protection. The approach is based on evaporative cooling of sweat produced by the wearer of the vest, in an air flow provided by ambient wind or ambulatory motion of the wearer. Using an approach including thermodynamic analysis, computational fluid dynamics modeling, air flow measurements of model ventilated vest architectures, and studies of the influence of fabric aerodynamic drag characteristics, materials and geometry were identified that optimize passive cooling of tactical vests. Specific architectural features of the vest design allow for optimal ventilation patterns, and selection of fabrics for vest construction optimize evaporation rates while reducing air flow resistance. Cooling rates consistent with the theoretical and modeling predictions were verified experimentally for 3D mockups.

  19. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  20. Different alcohol exposures induce selective alterations on the expression of dynorphin and nociceptin systems related genes in rat brain.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, Claudio; Caputi, Francesca F; Rimondini, Roberto; Gandolfi, Ottavio; Del Borrello, Elia; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2013-05-01

    Molecular mechanisms of adaptive transformations caused by alcohol exposure on opioid dynorphin and nociceptin systems have been investigated in the rat brain. Alcohol was intragastrically administered to rats to resemble human drinking with several hours of exposure: water or alcohol (20% in water) at a dose of 1.5 g/kg three times daily for 1 or 5 days. The development of tolerance and dependence were recorded daily. Brains were dissected 30 minutes (1- and 5-day groups) or 1, 3 or 7 days after the last administration for the three other 5-day groups (groups under withdrawal). Specific alterations in opioid genes expression were ascertained. In the amygdala, an up-regulation of prodynorphin and pronociceptin was observed in the 1-day group; moreover, pronociceptin and the kappa opioid receptor mRNAs in the 5-day group and both peptide precursors in the 1-day withdrawal group were also up-regulated. In the prefrontal cortex, an increase in prodynorhin expression in the 1-day group was detected. These data indicate a relevant role of the dynorphinergic system in the negative hedonic states associated with multiple alcohol exposure. The pattern of alterations observed for the nociceptin system appears to be consistent with its role of functional antagonism towards the actions of ethanol associated with other opioid peptides. Our findings could help to the understanding of how alcohol differentially affects the opioid systems in the brain and also suggest the dynorphin and nociceptin systems as possible targets for the treatment and/or prevention of alcohol dependence.

  1. Blockade of 5-Ht3 receptors in the septal area increases Fos expression in selected brain areas.

    PubMed

    Urzedo-Rodrigues, Lilia S; Ferreira, Hilda S; Santana, Rejane Conceição; Luz, Carla Patrícia; Perrone, Camila F; Fregoneze, Josmara B

    2014-04-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the brain and is involved in a multiplicity of visceral, cognitive and behavioral responses. It has been previously shown that injections of different doses of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, into the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band complex (MS/vDB) induce a hypertensive response in rats. On the other hand, administration of m-CPBG, a 5-HT3 agonist, into the MS/vDB inhibits the increase of blood pressure during restraint stress. However, it is unclear which neuronal circuitry is involved in these responses. The present study investigated Fos immunoreactive nuclei (Fos-IR) in different brain areas following the blockade of 5-HT3 receptors located in the MS/vDB in sham and in sinoaortic denervated (SAD) rats. Ondansetron injection into the MS/vDB increases Fos-IR in different brain areas including the limbic system (central amygdala and ventral part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis), hypothalamus (medial parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, anterodorsal preoptic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus), mesencephalon (ventrolateral periaqueductal gray region) and rhombencephalon (lateral parabrachial nucleus) in sham rats. Barodenervation results in higher Fos expression at the parvocellular and magnocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus, the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the central nucleus of amygdala, the locus coeruleus, the medial part of the nucleus of the solitary tract, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the caudal ventrolateral medulla following 5-HT3receptor blockade in the MS/vDB. Based on the present results and previous data showing a hypertensive response to ondansetron injected into the MS/vDB, it is reasonable to suggest that 5-HT3receptors in the MS/vDB exert an inhibitory drive that may oscillate as a functional regulatory part of the complex central neuronal network participating in the control of blood pressure.

  2. Brain regions involved in processing facial identity and expression are differentially selective for surface and edge information.

    PubMed

    Harris, Richard J; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2014-08-15

    Although different brain regions are widely considered to be involved in the recognition of facial identity and expression, it remains unclear how these regions process different properties of the visual image. Here, we ask how surface-based reflectance information and edge-based shape cues contribute to the perception and neural representation of facial identity and expression. Contrast-reversal was used to generate images in which normal contrast relationships across the surface of the image were disrupted, but edge information was preserved. In a behavioural experiment, contrast-reversal significantly attenuated judgements of facial identity, but only had a marginal effect on judgements of expression. An fMR-adaptation paradigm was then used to ask how brain regions involved in the processing of identity and expression responded to blocks comprising all normal, all contrast-reversed, or a mixture of normal and contrast-reversed faces. Adaptation in the posterior superior temporal sulcus--a region directly linked with processing facial expression--was relatively unaffected by mixing normal with contrast-reversed faces. In contrast, the response of the fusiform face area--a region linked with processing facial identity--was significantly affected by contrast-reversal. These results offer a new perspective on the reasons underlying the neural segregation of facial identity and expression in which brain regions involved in processing invariant aspects of faces, such as identity, are very sensitive to surface-based cues, whereas regions involved in processing changes in faces, such as expression, are relatively dependent on edge-based cues.

  3. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  4. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  5. Domestication and tameness: brain gene expression in red junglefowl selected for less fear of humans suggests effects on reproduction and immunology

    PubMed Central

    Agnvall, Beatrix; Johnsson, Martin; Wright, Dominic; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    The domestication of animals has generated a set of phenotypic modifications, affecting behaviour, appearance, physiology and reproduction, which are consistent across a range of species. We hypothesized that some of these phenotypes could have evolved because of genetic correlation to tameness, an essential trait for successful domestication. Starting from an outbred population of red junglefowl, ancestor of all domestic chickens, we selected birds for either high or low fear of humans for five generations. Birds from the fifth selected generation (S5) showed a divergent pattern of growth and reproduction, where low fear chickens grew larger and produced larger offspring. To examine underlying genetic mechanisms, we used microarrays to study gene expression in thalamus/hypothalamus, a brain region involved in fear and stress, in both the parental generation and the S5. While parents of the selection lines did not show any differentially expressed genes, there were a total of 33 genes with adjusted p-values below 0.1 in S5. These were mainly related to sperm-function, immunological functions, with only a few known to be relevant to behaviour. Hence, five generations of divergent selection for fear of humans produced changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles related to pathways associated with male reproduction and to immunology. This may be linked to the effects seen on growth and size of offspring. These results support the hypothesis that domesticated phenotypes may evolve because of correlated effects related to reduced fear of humans. PMID:27853585

  6. Receptor binding and selectivity of three 11C-labelled dopamine receptor antagonists in the brain of rhesus monkeys studied with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hartvig, P; Eckernäs, S A; Ekblom, B; Lindström, L; Lundqvist, H; Axelsson, S; Fasth, K J; Gullberg, P; Långström, B

    1988-04-01

    The regional distribution of 3 11C-labelled dopamine receptor antagonists, N-methyl spiperone, raclopride and clozapine, in the brain of Rhesus monkeys was studied by positron emission tomography (PET). The measured radioactivities in the striatal area were similar for the 3 antagonists, although the highest selectivity as compared to cerebellum was found for 11C-raclopride 60 min after administration. The selectivity of the radiotracers for the serotonin and D2-dopamine receptors was evaluated after pretreatment of the monkeys with serotonin and dopamine receptor antagonists. 11C-N-methylspiperone and 11C-clozapine both bound to serotonin receptors in the frontal cortex and to D2-dopamine receptors in the striatal area. Raclopride was selectively bound to the D2-dopamine receptors. The radioactivities measured in the striatal area with cerebellum as reference were fitted to a 3-compartment model which made possible evaluation of receptor binding characteristics. The rate proportional to the association rate constant for the receptor, kon and number of receptors, Bmax, varied from 0.02-0.07 min-1 between the studied radiolabelled drugs, whereas the apparent dissociation rate was highest for clozapine. This means that clozapine had the lowest affinity for the receptors in the striatum, assuming that the Bmax values are identical. The observed difference in selective receptor binding and binding characteristics of the 3 tracers may have an influence both on the clinical efficacy and side effects of the studied dopamine receptor antagonists.

  7. Distinct representations of configural and part information across multiple face-selective regions of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Golarai, Golijeh; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Eberhardt, Jennifer L.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2015-01-01

    Several regions of the human brain respond more strongly to faces than to other visual stimuli, such as regions in the amygdala (AMG), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the fusiform face area (FFA). It is unclear if these brain regions are similar in representing the configuration or natural appearance of face parts. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of healthy adults who viewed natural or schematic faces with internal parts that were either normally configured or randomly rearranged. Response amplitudes were reduced in the AMG and STS when subjects viewed stimuli whose configuration of parts were digitally rearranged, suggesting that these regions represent the 1st order configuration of face parts. In contrast, response amplitudes in the FFA showed little modulation whether face parts were rearranged or if the natural face parts were replaced with lines. Instead, FFA responses were reduced only when both configural and part information were reduced, revealing an interaction between these factors, suggesting distinct representation of 1st order face configuration and parts in the AMG and STS vs. the FFA. PMID:26594191

  8. The neuropathology of schizophrenia: A selective review of past studies and emerging themes in brain structure and cytoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, K; Chance, S A

    2015-09-10

    Schizophrenia is a devastating mental illness. Although its etiology is still largely unknown, strides have been taken throughout the last several decades to elucidate the nature of the neuropathology behind this disorder. The advent of neuroimaging technologies such as computerized axial tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have progressed knowledge about the macroscopic brain changes that occur in schizophrenia, including the characteristic enlarged ventricle size and reductions in gray matter volume, whole-brain volume, and white matter anisotropy. Although this review presents a broad outline of current and historical neuropathological research, the focus is primarily on the quantitative neuropathology of the cerebral cortex in schizophrenia, which may underlie many of the larger scale changes observed. The reduced neuropil hypothesis has been suggested as a microanatomical explanation to account for these macroscopic changes, although the present review finds that evidence does not always support this. A quantitative meta-analytic summary of these studies, focused on neuron density, provides support for the finding of increased neuron density in schizophrenia, with variation dependent on age. This is consistent with neuroimaging data and implicates an altered aging trajectory as a factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Combined with evidence from other neuroanatomical studies reviewed here, as well as studies in childhood-onset schizophrenia, the evidence converges on a progressive neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia related to altered neuroplasticity. The evidence also supports a particular vulnerability of inhibitory cortical circuits with markers of interneurons showing some of the more consistent reductions in schizophrenia.

  9. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  10. Gas turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Bancalari, Eduardo E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  11. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  12. The cooling of particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling.

  13. Comparison of binding parameters of sigma 1 and sigma 2 binding sites in rat and guinea pig brain membranes: novel subtype-selective trishomocubanes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V H; Kassiou, M; Johnston, G A; Christie, M J

    1996-09-12

    Comparisons of binding parameters of [3H](+)-pentazocine and [3H]1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) at sigma binding sites in guinea pig and rat brain membranes demonstrated that [3H](+)-pentazocine binds to a single high-affinity site, whereas [3H]DTG binds to two high-affinity sites in both species. The Kd values of the radioligands were similar in both types of membranes. However, the density of sigma 1 sites in guinea pig was significantly higher than that of rat. Novel trishomocubanes were tested for their affinities at sigma 1 and sigma 2 binding sites in guinea pig brain membranes using [3H](+)-pentazocine and [3H]DTG as the radioligands. N-(4-Phenylbutyl)-3-hydroxy-4- azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0(2,6).0(3,10).0(5,9).0(8,11)]dodecane (ANSTO-14) showed the highest affinity for the sigma 1 site (Ki = 9.4 nM) and 19-fold sigma 1/sigma 2 selectivity, as a result of increasing the alkyl chain between the cubane moiety and the aromatic ring. N-(3'-Fluorophenyl)methyl- 3-hydroxy-4-azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0(2,6).0(3,10).0(5,9).0(8,11]dodeca ne (ANSTO-19), displayed the highest affinity for sigma 2 sites (Ki = 19.6 nM) and 8-fold sigma 2/sigma 1 selectivity due to a fluoro substitution in the meta position of the aromatic ring. These represent structurally novel lead compounds, especially for the development of selective sigma 2 receptor ligands.

  14. Genetic selection for body weight in chickens has altered responses of the brain's AMPK system to food intake regulation effect of ghrelin, but not obestatin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingwen; Siegel, Paul B; Denbow, D Michael

    2011-08-01

    The effects of ghrelin and obestatin regulation of food intake are different in mammals and chickens. We investigated central effects of ghrelin and obestatin in lines of chickens selected 50 generations for high (HWS) or low (LWS) body weight. We hypothesized that the effect of ghrelin and obestatin on food intake in 5-day-old chicks is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) system and selection for body weight alters the brain's response to ghrelin and obestatin by changing the neuronal AMPK system. Although intracerebroventricular (ICV) ghrelin injection decreased food intake in both lines, the threshold for the anorexigenic effect of central ghrelin was lower in LWS than HWS chicks. Obestatin caused a linear dose-dependent increase in food intake in HWS but not LWS chicks. ICV injection of 0.4 nmol ghrelin inhibited hypothalamic AMPK related gene expression and phosphorylation of AMPK α and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) with the magnitude of inhibition different in the two lines. In contrast, ICV injection of 4 nmol obestatin did not affect mRNA expression of AMPK system or phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC in either line. These data support the premise of a lower threshold for anorexigenic effect of central ghrelin in LWS than HWS chicks, and this difference may be associated with differential hypothalamic AMPK signaling. Additionally, the hypothalamic mRNA level of ghrelin was significantly higher in LWS than HWS, which may have also contributed to the different threshold response to ghrelin in these two lines. The expression of the ghrelin receptor was also higher in the LWS line, but not until 56 days of age. In summary, selection for body weight has resulted in differences in the central ghrelin and obestatin system, and an altered brain AMPK system may contribute to the different neuronal response to ghrelin, but not obestatin.

  15. The backtracking search optimization algorithm for frequency band and time segment selection in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhonghai; Wei, Qingguo

    2016-09-01

    Common spatial pattern (CSP) is a powerful algorithm for extracting discriminative brain patterns in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). However, its performance depends largely on the subject-specific frequency band and time segment. Accurate selection of most responsive frequency band and time segment remains a crucial problem. A novel evolutionary algorithm, the backtracking search optimization algorithm is used to find the optimal frequency band and the optimal combination of frequency band and time segment. The former is searched by a frequency window with changing width of which starting and ending points are selected by the backtracking optimization algorithm; the latter is searched by the same frequency window and an additional time window with fixed width. The three parameters, the starting and ending points of frequency window and the starting point of time window, are jointly optimized by the backtracking search optimization algorithm. Based on the chosen frequency band and fixed or chosen time segment, the same feature extraction is conducted by CSP and subsequent classification is carried out by Fisher discriminant analysis. The classification error rate is used as the objective function of the backtracking search optimization algorithm. The two methods, named BSA-F CSP and BSA-FT CSP, were evaluated on data set of BCI competition and compared with traditional wideband (8-30[Formula: see text]Hz) CSP. The classification results showed that backtracking search optimization algorithm can find much effective frequency band for EEG preprocessing compared to traditional broadband, substantially enhancing CSP performance in terms of classification accuracy. On the other hand, the backtracking search optimization algorithm for joint selection of frequency band and time segment can find their optimal combination, and thus can further improve classification rates.

  16. Selective cognitive deficits and reduced hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, J P R; Redrobe, J P; Hansen, H H; Petersen, S; Bond, C T; Adelman, J P; Mikkelsen, J D; Mirza, N R

    2009-09-29

    Small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels 1-3 (SK1-3) are important for neuronal firing regulation and are considered putative CNS drug targets. For instance non-selective SK blockers improve performance in animal models of cognition. The SK subtype(s) involved herein awaits identification and the question is difficult to address pharmacologically due to the lack of subtype-selective SK-channel modulators. In this study, we used doxycycline-induced conditional SK3-deficient (T/T) mice to address the cognitive consequences of selective SK3 deficiency. In T/T mice SK3 protein is near-eliminated from the brain following doxycycline treatment. We tested T/T and wild type (WT) littermate mice in five distinct learning and memory paradigms. In Y-maze spontaneous alternations and five-trial inhibitory avoidance the performance of T/T mice was markedly inferior to WT mice. In contrast, T/T and WT mice performed equally well in passive avoidance, object recognition and the Morris water maze. Thus, some aspects of working/short-term memory are disrupted in T/T mice. Using in situ hybridization, we further found the cognitive deficits in T/T mice to be paralleled by reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus and CA3 of the hippocampus. BDNF mRNA levels in the frontal cortex were not affected. BDNF has been crucially implicated in many cognitive processes. Hence, the biological substrate for the cognitive impairments in T/T mice could conceivably entail reduced trophic support of the hippocampus.

  17. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  18. District cooling gets hot

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities across the country are adopting cool storage methods, such as ice-storage and chilled-water tanks, as an economical and environmentally safe way to provide cooling for cities and towns. The use of district cooling, in which cold water or steam is pumped to absorption chillers and then to buildings via a central community chiller plant, is growing strongly in the US. In Chicago, San Diego, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and elsewhere, independent district-energy companies and utilities are refurbishing neglected district-heating systems and adding district cooling, a technology first developed approximately 35 years ago.

  19. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  20. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  1. Cool-1-mediated inhibition of c-Cbl modulates multiple critical properties of glioblastomas, including the ability to generate tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Brett M; Folts, Christopher J; Cui, Wanchang; Bardin, Addie L; Walter, Kevin; Carson-Walter, Eleanor; Vescovi, Angelo; Noble, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We discovered that glioblastoma (GBM) cells use Cool-1/β-pix to inhibit normal activation of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase via the redox/Fyn/c-Cbl pathway and that c-Cbl inhibition is critical for GBM cell function. Restoring normal c-Cbl activity by Cool-1 knockdown in vitro reduced GBM cell division, almost eliminated generation of adhesion-independent spheroids, reduced the representation of cells expressing antigens thought to identify tumor initiating cells (TICs), reduced levels of several proteins of critical importance in TIC function (such as Notch-1 and Sox2), and increased sensitivity to BCNU (carmustine) and temozolomide (TMZ). In vivo, Cool-1 knockdown greatly suppressed the ability of GBM cells to generate tumors, an outcome that was c-Cbl dependent. In contrast, Cool-1 knockdown did not reduce division or increase BCNU or TMZ sensitivity in primary glial progenitor cells and Cool-1/c-Cbl complexes were not found in normal brain tissue. Our studies provide the first evidence that Cool-1 may be critical in the biology of human tumors, that suppression of c-Cbl by Cool-1 may be critical for generation of at least a subset of GBMs and offer a novel target that appears to be selectively necessary for TIC function and modulates chemoresistance in GBM cells. Targeting such proteins that inhibit c-Cbl offers potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development.

  2. Human Exposure to Selected Animal Neurocarcinogens: A Biomarker-Based Assessment and Implications for Brain Tumor Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Il’yasova, Dora; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Erdal, Serap; Shimek, Joanna; Goldstein, Jennifer; Doerge, Daniel R.; Myers, Steven R.; Vineis, Paolo; Wishnok, John S.; Swenberg, James A.; Bigner, Darell D.; Davis, Faith G.

    2013-01-01

    This review is based on the proceedings from the Second Lebow Conference held in Chicago in 2007. The conference concentrated on developing a framework for innovative studies in the epidemiology of environmental exposures, focusing specifically on the potential relationship with brain tumors. Researchers with different perspectives, including toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and epidemiological exposure assessment, exchanged information and ideas on the use of biomarkers of exposure in molecular epidemiology studies and summarized the current knowledge on methods and approaches for biomarker-based exposure assessment. This report presents the state of science regarding biomarker-based exposure assessment of the 4 most common neurocarcinogens: acrylamide, 1,3-butadiene, N-nitroso compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Importantly, these chemicals are also carcinogenic in other organs; therefore, this discussion is useful for environmental epidemiologists studying all cancer types. PMID:19466671

  3. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Paula A; Turecki, Gustavo; Robison, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow to emerge. The transcription factor ΔFosB is induced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) of rodents in response to stress or cocaine, and its expression in these regions is thought to regulate their "top down" control of reward circuitry, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we use biochemistry to examine the expression of the FosB family of transcription factors and their potential gene targets in PFC and HPC postmortem samples from depressed patients and cocaine addicts. We demonstrate that ΔFosB and other FosB isoforms are downregulated in the HPC but not the PFC in the brains of both depressed and addicted individuals. Further, we show that potential ΔFosB transcriptional targets, including GluA2, are also downregulated in the HPC but not PFC of cocaine addicts. Thus, we provide the first evidence of FosB gene expression in human HPC and PFC in these psychiatric disorders, and in light of recent findings demonstrating the critical role of HPC ΔFosB in rodent models of learning and memory, these data suggest that reduced ΔFosB in HPC could potentially underlie cognitive deficits accompanying chronic cocaine abuse or depression.

  4. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Paula A.; Turecki, Gustavo; Robison, Alfred J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow to emerge. The transcription factor ΔFosB is induced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) of rodents in response to stress or cocaine, and its expression in these regions is thought to regulate their “top down” control of reward circuitry, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we use biochemistry to examine the expression of the FosB family of transcription factors and their potential gene targets in PFC and HPC postmortem samples from depressed patients and cocaine addicts. We demonstrate that ΔFosB and other FosB isoforms are downregulated in the HPC but not the PFC in the brains of both depressed and addicted individuals. Further, we show that potential ΔFosB transcriptional targets, including GluA2, are also downregulated in the HPC but not PFC of cocaine addicts. Thus, we provide the first evidence of FosB gene expression in human HPC and PFC in these psychiatric disorders, and in light of recent findings demonstrating the critical role of HPC ΔFosB in rodent models of learning and memory, these data suggest that reduced ΔFosB in HPC could potentially underlie cognitive deficits accompanying chronic cocaine abuse or depression. PMID:27494187

  5. Neuroimaging reveals enhanced activation in a reach-selective brain area for objects located within participants' typical hand workspaces.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Jason P; McLean, Adam; Culham, Jody C

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, there has been growing excitement within cognitive neuroscience about the concept of embodiment: How do the capabilities and limitations of our physical bodies affect neural representations in the brain? Neuropsychological and neurophysiological studies show clear evidence that short-term visuomotor experience can influence the encoding of the space around the body in parietal cortex. For example, tool-use may expand the neural representation of peripersonal space. But how is this initial spatial representation influenced by a lifetime of object-related interactions? To examine this question we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural effects of an individual's hand preferences for acting within peripersonal space. Left- and right-handed participants viewed real-world objects at different locations accessible by either the left hand, right hand, or neither hand. The superior parieto-occipital cortex (SPOC), an area most often implicated in reaching actions, showed enhanced visual responses for objects located within the range of space in which each group typically acts. Specifically, in right-handers, who strongly prefer grasping with the right hand, SPOC showed strongest activation for objects located within the range of space for the right hand only. In contrast, in left-handers, who use their two hands comparably often in visuomotor tasks, SPOC showed strongest activation for objects located within the range of space of either hand. These findings show that, even in the absence of overt responses, real 3D objects located in the individual's typical workspace for hand actions automatically invoke enhanced responses in associated visuomotor areas of the brain.

  6. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

    2004-10-01

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 105 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

  7. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program: Topical report I, selection of candidate alloys. Volume 3. Selection of surface coating/substrate systems for screening creep and structural stability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-20

    Considering the high temperature, low O/sub 2/, high C environment of operation in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Systems, the utilization of coatings is envisaged to hold potential for extending component lifetimes through the formation of stable and continuous oxide films with enhanced resistance to C diffusion. A survey of the current state of technology for high temperature coatings has been performed. The usefulness of these coatings on the Mo, Ni, and Fe base alloys is discussed. Specifically, no coating substitute was identified for TZM other than the well known W-3 (pack silicide) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ forming coatings were recommended for the Fe and Ni base structural materials. Recommendations as to coating types and processng have been made based on the predicted VHTR component size, shape, base metal and operational environment. Four tests designed to evaluate the effects of selected combinations of coatings and substrate matrices are recommended for consideration.

  8. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  9. A novel cholinesterase and brain-selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor for the treatment of dementia comorbid with depression and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Marta; Gorodetsky, Elena; Poltyrev, Tatyana; Gross, Aviva; Sagi, Yotam; Youdim, Moussa

    2003-06-01

    Degeneration of cholinergic cortical neurons is one of the main reasons for the cognitive deficit in dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD) and in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Many subjects with AD and DLB have extrapyramidal dysfunction and depression resulting from degeneration of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotoninergic neurons. We prepared a novel drug, TV-3326 (N-propargyl-3R-aminoindan-5yl)-ethyl methylcarbamate), with both cholinesterase (ChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory activity, as potential treatment of AD and DLB. TV-3326 inhibits brain acetyl and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) in rats after oral doses of 10-100 mg/kg. After chronic but not acute treatment, it inhibits MAO-A and -B in the brain by more than 70% but has almost no effect on these enzymes in the small intestine in rats and rabbits. The brain selectivity results in minimal potentiation of the pressor response to oral tyramine. TV-3326 acts like other antidepressants in the forced swim test in rats, indicating a potential for antidepressant activity. Chronic treatment of mice with TV-3326 (26 mg/kg) prevents the destruction of nigrostriatal neurons by the neurotoxin MPTP (N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine). In addition to ChE and MAO inhibition, the propargylamine moiety of TV-3326 confers neuroprotective activity against cytotoxicity induced by ischemia and peroxynitrite in cultured neuronal cells that results from prevention of the fall in mitochondrial membrane potential and antiapoptotic activity. These unique multiple actions of TV-3326 make it a potentially useful drug for the treatment of dementia with Parkinsonian-like symptoms and depression.

  10. Visualization of the dopamine transporter in the human brain postmortem with the new selective ligand [125I]PE2I.

    PubMed

    Hall, H; Halldin, C; Guilloteau, D; Chalon, S; Emond, P; Besnard, J; Farde, L; Sedvall, G

    1999-01-01

    Using a new, 125I-labeled, selective high affinity dopamine transporter ligand, N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4'-methy lph enyl)nort ropane (PE2I), the distribution of the dopamine transporter was characterized in the normal postmortem human brain using whole hemisphere autoradiography. PE2I was radioiodinated to high specific radioactivity (2200 Ci/mmol, 81 GBq/micromol). PE2I binds to the dopamine transporter with high potency and, in contrast to beta-CIT, it has very low affinities for the serotonin and noradrenaline transporters. The autoradiograms showed very intense binding in basal ganglia (putamen, nucleus caudatus, nucleus accumbens) and lower binding in substantia nigra. Very low or no binding was found in other brain structures, including the neocortex or cerebellum. The labeling of human dopamine transporters with [125I]PE2I was inhibited by the dopamine transporter inhibitors GBR 12909 and beta-CIT, but not by citalopram (serotonin transporter inhibitor) or maprotiline (noradrenaline transporter inhibitor). Possibly due to the relatively high lipophilicity of the compound (theoretical log p = 4.68), it accumulated slightly in white matter. Thus, in vitro autoradiography using [125I]PE2I provided detailed qualitative and quantitative evidence that the dopamine transporter is almost exclusively localized in the basal ganglia of the human brain. Moreover, the autoradiograms indicate that [11C]PE2I and [123I]PE2I should be suitable for the in vivo visualization of the human dopamine transporter with PET or SPECT, respectively.

  11. Elastocaloric cooling: Stretch to actively cool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossmer, Hinnerk; Kohl, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    The elastocaloric effect can be exploited in solid-state cooling technologies as an alternative to conventional vapour compression. Now, an elastocaloric device based on the concept of active regeneration achieves a temperature lift of 15.3 K and efficiencies competitive with other caloric-based approaches.

  12. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  13. Why Cool Roofs?

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  14. Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Astronauts working on the surface of the moon had to wear liquid-cooled garments under their space suits as protection from lunar temperatures which sometimes reach 250 degrees Fahrenheit. In community service projects conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center, the technology developed for astronaut needs has been adapted to portable cooling systems which will permit two youngsters to lead more normal lives.

  15. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2016-07-12

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  16. S'COOL Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one fifth grade's participation in in NASA's S'COOL (Students' Cloud Observations On-Line) Project, making cloud observations, reporting them online, exploring weather concepts, and gleaning some of the things involved in authentic scientific research. S?COOL is part of a real scientific study of the effect of clouds on…

  17. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  18. DOAS, Radiant Cooling Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The article discusses dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) and radiant cooling technologies. Both of these topics were covered in previous ASHRAE Journal columns. This article reviews the technologies and their increasing acceptance. The two steps that ASHRAE is taking to disseminate DOAS information to the design community, available energy savings and the market potential of radiant cooling systems are addressed as well.

  19. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2016-07-12

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  20. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  1. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  2. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  3. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Berman, Mark J.

    2008-01-29

    A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

  4. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  5. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  6. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system.

  7. Potent and Selective Triazole-Based Inhibitors of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl-Hydroxylases with Activity in the Murine Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Mun Chiang; Atasoylu, Onur; Hodson, Emma; Tumber, Anthony; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Gómez-Pérez, Verónica; Demetriades, Marina; Rydzik, Anna M.; Holt-Martyn, James; Tian, Ya-Min; Bishop, Tammie; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Kawamura, Akane; Pugh, Christopher W.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the cellular adaptation to limiting oxygen availability in animals, the expression of a large set of genes is activated by the upregulation of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Therapeutic activation of the natural human hypoxic response can be achieved by the inhibition of the hypoxia sensors for the HIF system, i.e. the HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs). Here, we report studies on tricyclic triazole-containing compounds as potent and selective PHD inhibitors which compete with the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate. One compound (IOX4) induces HIFα in cells and in wildtype mice with marked induction in the brain tissue, revealing that it is useful for studies aimed at validating the upregulation of HIF for treatment of cerebral diseases including stroke. PMID:26147748

  8. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  9. Biospheric Cooling and the Emergence of Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzman, David; Middendorf, George

    The long-term cooling history of the Earth's biosphere implies a temperature constraint on the timing of major events in biologic evolution, e.g., emergence of cyanobacteria, eucaryotes and Metazoa apparently occurred at times when temperatures were near their upper growth limits. Could biospheric cooling also have been a necessary condition for the emergence of veterbrates and their encephalization? The upper temperature limit for vertebrate growth is about 10 degrees below the limit for Metazoa (50 degrees C). Heterothermy followed by full homeothermy was likely a necessary condition for greater encephalization because of the energy requirement of larger brains. The temperature differential between an animal and a cooler environment, all other factors equal, will increase the efficiency of heat loss from the brain, but too large a differential will shift metabolic energy away from the brain to the procurement of food. Encephalization has also entailed the evolution of internal cooling mechanisms to avoid overheating the brain. The two periods of pronounced Phanerozoic cooling, the PermoCarboniferous and late Cenozoic, corresponded to the emergence of mammal-like reptiles and hominids respectively, with a variety of explanations offered for the apparent link. The origin of highly encephalized whales, dolphins and porpoises occurred with the drop in ocean temperatures 25-30 mya. Of course, other possible paths to encephalization are conceivable, with radically different solutions to the problem of heat dissipation. But the intrinsic requirements for information processing capacity necessary for intelligence suggest our terrestrial pattern may resemble those of alien biospheres given similar histories.

  10. Controlling selective stimulations below a spinal cord hemisection using brain recordings with a neural interface system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetsos, Fivos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Torets, Carlos; Largo, Carla; Micera, Silvestro

    2011-08-01

    In this work we address the use of realtime cortical recordings for the generation of coherent, reliable and robust motor activity in spinal-lesioned animals through selective intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). The spinal cord of adult rats was hemisectioned and groups of multielectrodes were implanted in both the central nervous system (CNS) and the spinal cord below the lesion level to establish a neural system interface (NSI). To test the reliability of this new NSI connection, highly repeatable neural responses recorded from the CNS were used as a pattern generator of an open-loop control strategy for selective ISMS of the spinal motoneurons. Our experimental procedure avoided the spontaneous non-controlled and non-repeatable neural activity that could have generated spurious ISMS and the consequent undesired muscle contractions. Combinations of complex CNS patterns generated precisely coordinated, reliable and robust motor actions.

  11. Controlling selective stimulations below a spinal cord hemisection using brain recordings with a neural interface system approach.

    PubMed

    Panetsos, Fivos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Torets, Carlos; Largo, Carla; Micera, Silvestro

    2011-08-01

    In this work we address the use of realtime cortical recordings for the generation of coherent, reliable and robust motor activity in spinal-lesioned animals through selective intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). The spinal cord of adult rats was hemisectioned and groups of multielectrodes were implanted in both the central nervous system (CNS) and the spinal cord below the lesion level to establish a neural system interface (NSI). To test the reliability of this new NSI connection, highly repeatable neural responses recorded from the CNS were used as a pattern generator of an open-loop control strategy for selective ISMS of the spinal motoneurons. Our experimental procedure avoided the spontaneous non-controlled and non-repeatable neural activity that could have generated spurious ISMS and the consequent undesired muscle contractions. Combinations of complex CNS patterns generated precisely coordinated, reliable and robust motor actions.

  12. Preparation of magnetic core-mesoporous shell microspheres with C8-modified interior pore-walls and their application in selective enrichment and analysis of mouse brain peptidome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Li, Yan; Deng, Chunhui; Mao, Yu; Zhang, Xiangmin; Yang, Pengyuan

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, magnetic mesoporous silica microspheres with C8-modified interior pore-walls were prepared through a facile one-pot sol-gel coating strategy, and were successfully applied for selective enrichment of endogenous peptides in mouse brain for peptidome analysis. Through the one-pot sol-gel approach with surfactant (CTAB) as a template, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and n-ctyltriethoxysilane (C8TEOS) as the precursors, C8-modified magnetic mesoporous microspheres (C8-Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2)) consisting magnetic core and mesoporous silica shell with C8-groups exposed in the mesopore channels were synthesized. The obtained microspheres possess highly open mesopores of 3.4 nm, high surface area (162.5 m(2)/g), large pore volume (0.17 cm(3)/g), excellent magnetic responsivity (56.3 emu/g) and good dispersibility in aqueous solution. Based on the abundant surface silanol groups, functional C8 groups and the strong magnetic responsivity of the core-shell C8-Fe(3) O(4) @mSiO(2) microspheres, efficient and fast enrichment of peptides was achieved. Additionally, the C8-Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres exhibit excellent performance in selective enrichment of endogenous peptides from complex samples that are consist of peptides, large proteins and other compounds, including human serum and mouse brain followed by automated nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These results indicate C8-Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres would be a potential candidate for endogenous peptides enrichment and biomarkers discovery in peptidome analysis.

  13. Feasibility of cool storage systems in refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmahgary, Yehia; Kekkonen, Veikko; Laitinen, Ari; Pihala, Hannu

    1989-05-01

    In the present report, the economic viability and technical feasibility of selected cool storage systems are considered. Cool storage has clear potential for several applications: in connection with air-conditioning systems, domestic refrigerating and freezing systems; commercially e.g., in the dairy and vegetable industries; and in deep freezing, as in the meat industry. Air-conditioning has limited significance in Finland. For this reason it was not investigated in this study. In domestic refrigeration and freezing two systems were investigated; a controlled cooling/heating system and a simple built-in system in individual refrigerators and freezers. The central cooling/heating system in houses was found to be economically unattractive. It also has several technical drawbacks. The simple built-in system appeared to be promising. The amount of savings is rationally a function of the difference between day and night tariffs and the costs of installing an automatic switch and storage media. In the vegetable and dairy industries cool storage also has considerable potential. Several systems were investigated in this respect and compared to the conventional system. The cool storage system using Cristopia balls, one of the most common commercial systems available in Europe, was not economical at a tariff difference of 10 p/k Wh or more. Cool storage for freezing in meat plants was also investigated.

  14. Selective astrocytic gap junctional trafficking of molecules involved in the glycolytic pathway: Impact on cellular brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Gautam K.; Cruz, Nancy F.; Ball, Kelly K.; Theus, Sue A.; Dienel, Gerald A.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the specificity of metabolite trafficking among gap junction-coupled astrocytes, we developed novel, real-time, single-cell enzymatic fluorescence assays to assay cell-to-cell transfer of unlabeled glycolytic intermediates and report (i) highly restricted transfer of glucose-6-phosphate(P) and two analogs, deoxyglucose-6-P (DG-6-P), and 2-NBDG-6-P, compared to DG and 2- and 6-NBDG, (ii) extensive junctional diffusion of glyceraldehyde-3-P, NADH, and NADPH plus three anionic fluorescent dyes used as internal standards for transfer assays, and (iii) stimulation of gap junctional communication by increased intracellular Na+ that also evokes metabolic responses in nearby coupled astrocytes. Thus, dye transfer does not predict gap junctional permeability of endogenous metabolites. Intracellular retention of flux-regulating compounds (e.g., glucose-6-P) may be necessary for local metabolic control, whereas ‘syncytial sharing’ may dissipate the work load on peri-synaptic astrocytes. Imaging of brain functional activity depends on local accumulation of exogenous or endogenous signals, and DG-6-P is trapped in the cell where it is phosphorylated, whereas rapid dispersal of cytoplasmic NAD(P)H and labeled glucose metabolites throughout the astrocytic syncytium can interfere with cellular assessment of neuron-astrocyte relationships in autoradiographic, fluorescence microscopic, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies. PMID:19457076

  15. Methods and apparatus for cooling electronics

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Shawn Anthony; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent

    2014-12-02

    Methods and apparatus are provided for choosing an energy-efficient coolant temperature for electronics by considering the temperature dependence of the electronics' power dissipation. This dependence is explicitly considered in selecting the coolant temperature T.sub.0 that is sent to the equipment. To minimize power consumption P.sub.Total for the entire system, where P.sub.Total=P.sub.0+P.sub.Cool is the sum of the electronic equipment's power consumption P.sub.0 plus the cooling equipment's power consumption P.sub.Cool, P.sub.Total is obtained experimentally, by measuring P.sub.0 and P.sub.Cool, as a function of three parameters: coolant temperature T.sub.0; weather-related temperature T.sub.3 that affects the performance of free-cooling equipment; and computational state C of the electronic equipment, which affects the temperature dependence of its power consumption. This experiment provides, for each possible combination of T.sub.3 and C, the value T.sub.0* of T.sub.0 that minimizes P.sub.Total. During operation, for any combination of T.sub.3 and C that occurs, the corresponding optimal coolant temperature T.sub.0* is selected, and the cooling equipment is commanded to produce it.

  16. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-06

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling.

  17. Cooling system with automated seasonal freeze protection

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth, Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Simons, Robert E.; Singh, Prabjit; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-24

    An automated multi-fluid cooling system and method are provided for cooling an electronic component(s). The cooling system includes a coolant loop, a coolant tank, multiple valves, and a controller. The coolant loop is at least partially exposed to outdoor ambient air temperature(s) during normal operation, and the coolant tank includes first and second reservoirs containing first and second fluids, respectively. The first fluid freezes at a lower temperature than the second, the second fluid has superior cooling properties compared with the first, and the two fluids are soluble. The multiple valves are controllable to selectively couple the first or second fluid into the coolant in the coolant loop, wherein the coolant includes at least the second fluid. The controller automatically controls the valves to vary first fluid concentration level in the coolant loop based on historical, current, or anticipated outdoor air ambient temperature(s) for a time of year.

  18. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  19. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGES

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  20. High Performance Torso Cooling Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conger, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The concept proposed in this paper is to improve thermal efficiencies of the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) in the torso area, which could facilitate removal of LCVG tubing from the arms and legs, thereby increasing suited crew member mobility. EVA space suit mobility in micro-gravity is challenging, and it becomes even more challenging in the gravity of Mars. By using shaped water tubes that greatly increase the contact area with the skin in the torso region of the body, the heat transfer efficiency can be increased. This increase in efficiency could provide the required liquid cooling via torso tubing only; no arm or leg LCVG tubing would be required. Benefits of this approach include increased crewmember mobility, reduced LCVG mass, enhanced evaporation cooling, increased comfort during Mars EVA tasks, and easing of the overly dry condition in the helmet associated with the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) ventilation loop currently under development. This report describes analysis and test activities performed to evaluate the potential improvements to the thermal performance of the LCVG. Analyses evaluated potential tube shapes for improving the thermal performance of the LCVG. The analysis results fed into the selection of flat flow strips to improve thermal contact with the skin of the suited test subject. Testing of small segments was performed to compare thermal performance of the tubing approach of the current LCVG to the flat flow strips proposed as the new concept. Results of the testing is presented along with recommendations for future development of this new concept.

  1. High Performance Torso Cooling Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conger, Bruce; Makinen, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The concept proposed in this paper is to improve thermal efficiencies of the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) in the torso area, which could facilitate removal of LCVG tubing from the arms and legs, thereby increasing suited crew member mobility. EVA space suit mobility in micro-gravity is challenging, and it becomes even more challenging in the gravity of Mars. By using shaped water tubes that greatly increase the contact area with the skin in the torso region of the body, the heat transfer efficiency can be increased. This increase in efficiency could provide the required liquid cooling via torso tubing only; no arm or leg LCVG tubing would be required. Benefits of this approach include increased crewmember mobility, enhanced evaporation cooling, increased comfort during Mars EVA tasks, and easing of the overly dry condition in the helmet associated with the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) ventilation loop currently under development. This report describes analysis and test activities performed to evaluate the potential improvements to the thermal performance of the LCVG. Analyses evaluated potential tube shapes for improving the thermal performance of the LCVG. The analysis results fed into the selection of flat flow strips to improve thermal contact with the skin of the suited test subject. Testing of small segments was performed to compare thermal performance of the tubing approach of the current LCVG to the flat flow strips proposed as the new concept. Results of the testing is presented along with recommendations for future development of this new concept.

  2. Cryogenic generator cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckels, P. W.; Fagan, T. J.; Parker, J. H., Jr.; Long, L. J.; Shestak, E. J.; Calfo, R. M.; Hannon, W. F.; Brown, D. B.; Barkell, J. W.; Patterson, A.

    The concept for a hydrogen cooled aluminum cryogenic generator was presented by Schlicher and Oberly in 1985. Following their lead, this paper describes the thermal design of a high voltage dc, multimegawatt generator of high power density. The rotor and stator are cooled by saturated liquid and supercritical hydrogen, respectively. The brushless exciter on the same shaft is also cooled by liquid hydrogen. Component development testing is well under way and some of the test results concerning the thermohydraulic performance of the conductors are reported. The aluminum cryogenic generator's characteristics are attractive for hydrogen economy applications.

  3. Nanogap experiments for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stintz, Andreas; Epstein, Richard I.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor; Malloy, Kevin J.; Hasselbeck, Michael P.; Boyd, Stephen T. P.

    2008-02-01

    One of the challenges of laser cooling a semiconductor is its typically high index of refraction (greater than 3), which limits efficient light output of the upconverted photon. This issue is addressed with a novel concept of coupling the photon out via a thin, thermally insulating vacuum gap that allows light to pass efficiently by frustrated internal reflection. Although silicon technology is mature and inexpensive, the indirect nature of the bandgap of silicon makes it unsuitable for laser cooling. The material of choice is the binary compound semiconductor GaAs, which can be fabricated with high quality necessary for laser cooling experiments. Moreover, process technology exists that enables a relatively simple fabrication of a thin vacuum gap in this material system. This paper will present an investigation of heat transport and light transmission across a "nanogap" consisting of a thin epitaxial film supported over a substrate by an array of nanometer-sized posts. The structure is manufactured by crystal growth of a sacrificial Al 0.98Ga 0.02As layer on a single crystal GaAs substrate. After lithographically defining holes in the Al 0.98Ga 0.02As layer, the holes are filled with GaAs and a top GaAs layer is deposited. Lateral selective etching of the Al 0.98Ga 0.02As will create a nanogap between two GaAs layers separated by GaAs posts. We are demonstrating the successful fabrication of various size nanogaps in this material system, as well as their properties with respect to reduced heat transfer across the gap. We are also presenting data supporting that the interface quality is high enough to allow evanescent tunneling of light at angles otherwise forbidden by total internal reflection. The implications for semiconductor laser cooling will be discussed.

  4. Analytical investigation of chord size and cooling methods on turbine blade cooling requirements. Book 1: Sections 1 through 8 and appendixes A through I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of chord size on air cooled turbine blades. In the preliminary design phase, eight turbine blade cooling configurations in 0.75-in., 1.0-in., and 1.5-in. chord sizes were analyzed to determine the maximum turbine inlet temperature capabilities. A pin fin convection cooled configuration and a film-impingement cooled configuration were selected for a final design analysis in which the maximum turbine inlet temperature was determined as a function of the cooling air inlet temperature and the turbine inlet total pressure for each of the three chord sizes. The cooling air flow requirements were also determined for a varying cooling air inlet temperature with a constant turbine inlet temperature. It was determined that allowable turbine inlet temperature increases with increasing chord for the convection cooled and transpiration cooled designs, however, the film-convection cooled designs did not have a significant change in turbine inlet temperature with chord.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for axonal growth of selective groups of neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guey-Ying; Bouyer, Karine; Kamitakahara, Anna; Sahibzada, Niaz; Wang, Chien-Hua; Rutlin, Michael; Simerly, Richard B.; Xu, Baoji

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent regulator of neuronal development, and the Bdnf gene produces two populations of transcripts with either a short or long 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR). Deficiencies in BDNF signaling have been shown to cause severe obesity in humans; however, it remains unknown how BDNF signaling impacts the organization of neuronal circuits that control energy balance. Methods We examined the role of BDNF on survival, axonal projections, and synaptic inputs of neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARH), a structure critical for the control of energy balance, using Bdnfklox/klox mice, which lack long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA and develop severe hyperphagic obesity. Results We found that a small fraction of neurons that express the receptor for BDNF, TrkB, also expressed proopiomelanocortin (POMC) or neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein (AgRP) in the ARH. Bdnfklox/klox mice had normal numbers of POMC, NPY, and TrkB neurons in the ARH; however, retrograde labeling revealed a drastic reduction in the number of ARH axons that project to the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) in these mice. In addition, fewer POMC and AgRP axons were found in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and the lateral part of PVH, respectively, in Bdnfklox/klox mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the impact of BDNF deficiency on inputs to ARH neurons. We found that excitatory inputs onto POMC and NPY neurons were increased and decreased, respectively, in Bdnfklox/klox mice, likely due to a compensatory response to marked hyperphagia displayed by the mutant mice. Conclusion This study shows that the majority of TrkB neurons in the ARH are distinct from known neuronal populations and that BDNF plays a critical role in directing projections from these neurons to the DMH and PVH. We propose that hyperphagic obesity due to BDNF deficiency is in part attributable to impaired axonal growth of TrkB-expressing ARH neurons. PMID:26042201

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor selectively regulates dendritogenesis of parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the main olfactory bulb through the PLCgamma pathway.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Paul; Agerman, Karin; Dobszay, Marton B; Minichiello, Liliana; Harkany, Tibor; Ernfors, Patrik

    2006-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms of neurotrophin signaling on dendrite development and dynamics are only partly understood. To address the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the morphogenesis of GABAergic neurons of the main olfactory bulb, we analyzed mice lacking BDNF, mice carrying neurotrophin-3 (NT3) in the place of BDNF, and TrkB signaling mutant mice with a receptor that can activate phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma) but is unable to recruit the adaptors Shc/Frs2. BDNF deletion yielded a compressed olfactory bulb with a significant loss of parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity in GABAergic interneurons of the external plexiform layer. Dendrite development of PV-positive interneurons was selectively attenuated by BDNF since other Ca2+ -binding protein-containing neuron populations appeared unaffected. The deficit in PV-positive neurons could be rescued by the NT3/NT3 alleles. The degree of PV immunoreactivity was dependent on BDNF and TrkB recruitment of the adaptor proteins Shc/Frs2. In contrast, PLCgamma signaling from the TrkB receptor was sufficient for dendrite growth in vivo and consistently, blocking PLCgamma prevented BDNF-dependent dendrite development in vitro. Collectively, our results provide genetic evidence that BDNF and TrkB signaling selectively regulate PV expression and dendrite growth in a subset of neurochemically-defined GABAergic interneurons via activation of the PLCgamma pathway.

  7. Head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia in anesthetized piglets is neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Tooley, James R; Satas, Saulius; Porter, Helen; Silver, Ian A; Thoresen, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Hypothermia is potentially therapeutic in the management of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. However, not all studies have shown a neuroprotective effect. It is suggested that the stress of unsedated hypothermia may interfere with neuroprotection. We propose that selective head cooling (SHC) combined with mild total-body hypothermia during anesthesia enhances local neuroprotection while minimizing the occurrence of systemic side effects and stress associated with unsedated whole-body cooling. Our objective was to determine whether SHC combined with mild total-body hypothermia while anesthetized for a period of 24 hours reduces cerebral damage in our piglet survival model of global hypoxia-ischemia. Eighteen anesthetized piglets received a 45-minute global hypoxic-ischemic insult. The pigs were randomized either to remain normothermic or to receive SHC. We found that the severity of the hypoxic-ischemic insult was similar in the SHC versus the normothermic group, and that the mean neurology scores at 30 and 48 hours and neuropathology scores were significantly better in the SHC group versus the normothermic group. We conclude that selective head cooling combined with mild systemic hypothermia and anesthesia is neuroprotective when started immediately after the insult in our piglet model of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  8. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-01

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was <25% chance of survival. A novel adjunctive to our ECPR protocol, cerebral selective deep (<30°C) hypothermia (CSDH), was applied. CSDH adds a second independent femoral access extracorporeal circuit, perfusing cold blood into the patient's common carotid artery. The ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest. PMID:28108436

  9. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-20

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was <25% chance of survival. A novel adjunctive to our ECPR protocol, cerebral selective deep (<30°C) hypothermia (CSDH), was applied. CSDH adds a second independent femoral access extracorporeal circuit, perfusing cold blood into the patient's common carotid artery. The ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest.

  10. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-25

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was <25% chance of survival. A novel adjunctive to our ECPR protocol, cerebral selective deep (<30°C) hypothermia (CSDH), was applied. CSDH adds a second independent femoral access extracorporeal circuit, perfusing cold blood into the patient's common carotid artery. The ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest.

  11. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  12. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  13. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  14. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  15. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie.

    1992-01-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  16. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie

    1992-09-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  17. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  18. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  19. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  20. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    DOEpatents

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  1. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  2. Review and status of liquid-cooling technology for gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J., Jr.; Stepka, F. S.

    1979-01-01

    A review was conducted of liquid-cooled turbine technology. Selected liquid-cooled systems and methods are presented along with an assessment of the current technology status and requirements. A comprehensive bibliography is presented.

  3. Gene expression biomarkers in the brain of a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease: mining of microarray data by logic classification and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Arisi, Ivan; D'Onofrio, Mara; Brandi, Rossella; Felsani, Armando; Capsoni, Simona; Drovandi, Guido; Felici, Giovanni; Weitschek, Emanuel; Bertolazzi, Paola; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2011-01-01

    The identification of early and stage-specific biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is critical, as the development of disease-modification therapies may depend on the discovery and validation of such markers. The identification of early reliable biomarkers depends on the development of new diagnostic algorithms to computationally exploit the information in large biological datasets. To identify potential biomarkers from mRNA expression profile data, we used the Logic Mining method for the unbiased analysis of a large microarray expression dataset from the anti-NGF AD11 transgenic mouse model. The gene expression profile of AD11 brain regions was investigated at different neurodegeneration stages by whole genome microarrays. A new implementation of the Logic Mining method was applied both to early (1-3 months) and late stage (6-15 months) expression data, coupled to standard statistical methods. A small number of "fingerprinting" formulas was isolated, encompassing mRNAs whose expression levels were able to discriminate between diseased and control mice. We selected three differential "signature" genes specific for the early stage (Nudt19, Arl16, Aph1b), five common to both groups (Slc15a2, Agpat5, Sox2ot, 2210015, D19Rik, Wdfy1), and seven specific for late stage (D14Ertd449, Tia1, Txnl4, 1810014B01Rik, Snhg3, Actl6a, Rnf25). We suggest these genes as potential biomarkers for the early and late stage of AD-like neurodegeneration in this model and conclude that Logic Mining is a powerful and reliable approach for large scale expression data analysis. Its application to large expression datasets from brain or peripheral human samples may facilitate the discovery of early and stage-specific AD biomarkers.

  4. Intracellular Dialysis Disrupts Zn2+ Dynamics and Enables Selective Detection of Zn2+ Influx in Brain Slice Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Isamu; West, Adrian K; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2013-01-01

    We examined the impact of intracellular dialysis on fluorescence detection of neuronal intracellular Zn2+ accumulation. Comparison between two dialysis conditions (standard; 20minutes, brief; 2minutes) by standard whole-cell clamp revealed a high vulnerability of intracellular Zn2+ buffers to intracellular dialysis. Thus low concentrations of zinc-pyrithione generated robust responses in neurons with standard dialysis, but signals were smaller in neurons with short dialysis. Release from oxidation-sensitive Zn2+ pools were reduced by standard dialysis, when compared with responses in neurons with brief dialysis. The dialysis effects were partly reversed by inclusion of recombinant metallothionein-3 in the dialysis solution. These findings suggested that extensive dialysis could be exploited for selective detection of transmembrane Zn2+ influx. Different dialysis conditions were then used to probe responses to synaptic stimulation. Under standard dialysis conditions, synaptic stimuli generated significant FluoZin-3 signals in wild-type (WT) preparations, but responses were almost absent in preparations lacking vesicular Zn2+ (ZnT3-KO). In contrast, under brief dialysis conditions, intracellular Zn2+ transients were very similar in WT and ZnT3-KO preparations. This suggests that both intracellular release and transmembrane flux can contribute to intracellular Zn2+ accumulation after synaptic stimulation. These results demonstrate significant confounds and potential use of intracellular dialysis to investigate intracellular Zn2+ accumulation mechanisms. PMID:23517525

  5. A Biphasic and Brain-Region Selective Down-Regulation of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Concentrations Supports Object Recognition in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hotte, Maïte; Dauphin, François; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Levallet, Guenaëlle

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to further understand the relationship between cAMP concentration and mnesic performance. Methods and Findings Rats were injected with milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and/or the selective 5-HT4R agonist RS 67333 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) before testing in the object recognition paradigm. Cyclic AMP concentrations were measured in brain structures linked to episodic-like memory (i.e. hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices) before or after either the sample or the testing phase. Except in the hippocampus of rolipram treated-rats, all treatment increased cAMP levels in each brain sub-region studied before the sample phase. After the sample phase, cAMP levels were significantly increased in hippocampus (1.8 fold), prefrontal (1.3 fold) and perirhinal (1.3 fold) cortices from controls rat while decreased in prefrontal cortex (∼0.83 to 0.62 fold) from drug-treated rats (except for milrinone+RS 67333 treatment). After the testing phase, cAMP concentrations were still increased in both the hippocampus (2.76 fold) and the perirhinal cortex (2.1 fold) from controls animals. Minor increase were reported in hippocampus and perirhinal cortex from both rolipram (respectively, 1.44 fold and 1.70 fold) and milrinone (respectively 1.46 fold and 1.56 fold)-treated rat. Following the paradigm, cAMP levels were significantly lower in the hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices from drug-treated rat when compared to controls animals, however, only drug-treated rats spent longer time exploring the novel object during the testing phase (inter-phase interval of 4 h). Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that a “pre-sample” early increase in cAMP levels followed by a specific lowering of cAMP concentrations in each brain sub-region linked to the object recognition paradigm support learning efficacy after a middle-term delay. PMID:22359674

  6. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  7. Active skin cooling in conjunction with laser dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J S; Majaron, B; Kelly, K M

    2000-12-01

    The clinical objective in the laser treatment of patients with specific dermatoses is to maximize thermal damage to the target chromophore while minimizing injury to the normal skin. Unfortunately, for some lesions, the threshold incident light dosage for epidermal injury can be very close to the threshold for permanent removal of the target chromophore, thus precluding the use of higher light dosages. An important method of overcoming the aforementioned problem is to selectively cool the most superficial layers of the skin. Although melanin absorption will result in heat production during laser exposure, cooling the epidermis can prevent its temperature elevation from exceeding the threshold for thermal injury. Spatially selective cooling can be achieved by active cooling using a cryogen spray or cold sapphire contact handpieces. These devices promote rapid and spatially selective epidermal cooling to low temperatures without affecting the target chromophore temperature before the laser pulse is delivered. Cooling has become an Integral part in the emerging discipline of laser dermatologic surgery. Attend almost any academic dermatology conference and you are likely to find many lectures that relate to cooling during dermatologic laser surgery. Although cooling in conjunction with laser therapy has become the clinical standard for many laser procedures, considerable controversy surrounds this methodology. We present herewith an overview of currently used techniques for active cooling of human skin and explore their advantages and disadvantages in relationship to specific dermatoses amenable to laser therapy.

  8. Plants for passive cooling. A preliminary investigation of the use of plants for passive cooling in temperate humid climates

    SciTech Connect

    Spirn, A W; Santos, A N; Johnson, D A; Harder, L B; Rios, M W

    1981-04-01

    The potential of vegetation for cooling small, detached residential and commercial structures in temperate, humid climates is discussed. The results of the research are documented, a critical review of the literature is given, and a brief review of energy transfer processes is presented. A checklist of design objectives for passive cooling, a demonstration of design applications, and a palette of selected plant species suitable for passive cooling are included.

  9. Study on Control of Brain Temperature for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaohua, Lu; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    The brain hypothermia treatment is an attractive therapy for the neurologist because of its neuroprotection in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients. The present paper deals with the possibility of controlling the brain and other viscera in different temperatures from the viewpoint of system control. It is theoretically attempted to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment to cool only the head but to warm the body by using the simple apparatus such as the cooling cap, muffler and warming blanket. For this purpose, a biothermal system concerning the temperature difference between the brain and the other thoracico-abdominal viscus is synthesized from the biothermal model of hypothermic patient. The output controllability and the asymptotic stability of the system are examined on the basis of its structure. Then, the maximum temperature difference to be realized is shown dependent on the temperature range of the apparatus and also on the maximum gain determined from the coefficient matrices A, B and C of the biothermal system. Its theoretical analysis shows the realization of difference of about 2.5°C, if there is absolutely no constraint of the temperatures of the cooling cap, muffler and blanket. It is, however, physically unavailable. Those are shown by simulation example of the optimal brain temperature regulation using a standard adult database. It is thus concluded that the surface cooling and warming apparatus do no make it possible to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment, because the brain temperature cannot be cooled lower than those of other viscera in an appropriate temperature environment. This study shows that the ever-proposed good method of clinical treatment is in principle impossible in the actual brain hypothermia treatment.

  10. Cool Flame Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  11. Factors influencing the precision of estimating the postmortem interval using the triple-exponential formulae (TEF). Part II. A study of the effect of body temperature at the moment of death on the postmortem brain, liver and rectal cooling in 117 forensic cases.

    PubMed

    al-Alousi, Louay M; Anderson, Robert A; Worster, Diana M; Land, David V

    2002-02-18

    The temperatures of three body sites, namely, the brain, liver and the rectum as well as the temperature of the environment were continuously monitored, every 5-10 min, in 117 forensic cases commencing soon after death and in most cases, within 45 min postmortem. The body temperature at the moment of death was empirically determined by a computer-based extrapolation method. Thus, temperature data for the first 3h of each body site were fitted to single-exponential equations and the fitted curve was extrapolated backwards to obtain the intercept on the Y-axis (the temperature axis). The effect of body temperature at the moment of death on postmortem cooling rate is examined and factors influencing body temperature at death are discussed. Forensic fatalities associated with hyper and hypothermia are reviewed briefly.

  12. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-12-31

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers.

  13. Temperature Manipulation in Songbird Brain Implicates the Premotor Nucleus HVC in Birdsong Syntax.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yisi S; Wittenbach, Jason D; Jin, Dezhe Z; Kozhevnikov, Alexay A

    2017-03-08

    Variable motor sequences of animals are often structured and can be described by probabilistic transition rules between action elements. Examples include the songs of many songbird species such as the Bengalese finch, which consist of stereotypical syllables sequenced according to probabilistic rules (song syntax). The neural mechanisms behind such rules are poorly understood. Here, we investigate where the song syntax is encoded in the brain of the Bengalese finch by rapidly and reversibly manipulating the temperature in the song production pathway. Cooling the premotor nucleus HVC (proper name) slows down the song tempo, consistent with the idea that HVC controls moment-to-moment timings of acoustic features in the syllables. More importantly, cooling HVC alters the transition probabilities between syllables. Cooling HVC reduces the number of repetitions of long-repeated syllables and increases the randomness of syllable sequences. In contrast, cooling the downstream motor area RA (robust nucleus of the acropallium), which is critical for singing, does not affect the song syntax. Unilateral cooling of HVC shows that control of syllables is mostly lateralized to the left HVC, whereas transition probabilities between the syllables can be affected by cooling HVC in either hemisphere to varying degrees. These results show that HVC is a key site for encoding song syntax in the Bengalese finch. HVC is thus involved both in encoding timings within syllables and in sequencing probabilistic transitions between syllables. Our finding suggests that probabilistic selections and fine-grained timings of action elements can be integrated within the same neural circuits.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many animal behaviors such as birdsong consist of variable sequences of discrete actions. Where and how the probabilistic rules of such sequences are encoded in the brain is poorly understood. We locally and reversibly cooled brain areas in songbirds during singing. Mild cooling of area HVC

  14. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  15. The serotonin transporter gene is a substrate for age and stress dependent epigenetic regulation in rhesus macaque brain: Potential roles in genetic selection and Gene × Environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, Stephen G.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Zhou, Zhifeng; Goldman, David; Thompson, Robert C.; Lopez, Juan F.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Higley, J. Dee; Barr, Christina S.

    2015-01-01

    In humans, it has been demonstrated that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotype moderates risk in the face of adversity. One mechanism by which stress could interact with genotype is via epigenetic modifications. We wanted to examine whether stress interacted with genotype to predict binding of a histone 3 protein trimethylated at lysine 3 (H3K4me3) that marks active promoters. The brains (N = 61) of male rhesus macaques that had been reared in the presence or absence of stress were archived and the hippocampusi dissected. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed with an antibody against H3K4me3 followed by sequencing on a SolexaG2A. The effects of age, genotype (5-HTTLPR long/long vs. short), and stress exposure (peer-reared vs. mother-reared) on levels of H3K4me3 binding were determined. We found effects of age and stress exposure. There was a decline in H3K4me3 from preadolescence to postadolescence and lower levels in peer-reared monkeys and no effects of genotype. When we controlled for age, however, we found that there were effects of 5-HTTLPR genotype and rearing condition on H3K4me3 binding. In a larger sample, we observed that cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were subject to interactive effects among age, rearing history, and genotype. Genes containing both genetic selection and epigenetic regulation may be particularly important in stress adaptation and development. We find evidence for selection at the solute carrier family C6 member 4 gene and observe epigenetic reorganization according to genotype, stress, and age. These data suggest that developmental stage may moderate effects of stress and serotonin transporter genotype in the emergence of alternative adaptation strategies and in the vulnerability to developmental or psychiatric disorders. PMID:23062305

  16. Cooling in a compound bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Hu, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Electron cooling in the Fermilab Recycler ring is found to create correlation between longitudinal and transverse tails of the antiproton distribution. By separating the core of the beam from the tail and cooling the tail using 'gated' stochastic cooling while applying electron cooling on the entire beam, one may be able to significantly increase the overall cooling rate. In this paper, we describe the procedure and first experimental results.

  17. Comparative study of patches for liquid cooled garments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shitzer, A.; Chambers, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were performed on 12 cooling patches of various designs to establish criteria for the evaluation of their performance in liquid-cooled suits in industrial, military and aerospace applications. The thermal effectiveness value was 0.088 for patch designs with a double spiral flow pattern, and 0.075 for patch designs with a parallel flow pattern. The ratio of thermal energy transfer rate to cooling-medium pumping power requirement is indicated as the prime performance characteristic to be considered in the selection and rating of cooling patches.

  18. Changes in mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor after wheel running in rats selectively bred for high- and low-aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Groves-Chapman, Jessica L.; Murray, Patrick S.; Stevens, Kristin L.; Monroe, Derek; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Holmes, Philip V.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated levels of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) messenger RNA (mRNA) within the hippocampal formation in rats selectively bred for 1) high intrinsic (i.e., untrained) aerobic capacity (High Capacity Runners, HCR), 2) low intrinsic aerobic capacity (Low Capacity Runners, LCR), and 3) unselected Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with or without free access to running wheels for three weeks. The specific aim of the study was to determine whether a dose-response relationship exists between cumulative running distance and levels of BDNF mRNA. No additional treatments or behavioral manipulations were used. HCR, LCR, and SD rats were grouped by strain and randomly assigned to sedentary or activity (voluntary access to activity wheel) conditions. Animals were killed after 21 days of exposure to the assigned conditions. Daily running distances (mean ± standard deviation meters/d) during week three were: HCR (4726 ± 3220), SD (2293 ± 3461), LCR (672 ± 323). Regardless of strain, levels of BDNF mRNA in CA1 were elevated in wheel runners compared to sedentary rats and this difference persisted after adjustment for age (p=0.040). BDNF mRNA was not affected by intrinsic aerobic capacity and was not related to total running distance. The results support that BDNF mRNA expression is increased by unlimited access to activity wheel running for 3 weeks but is not dependent upon accumulated running distance. PMID:22024546

  19. Changes in mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor after wheel running in rats selectively bred for high- and low-aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Groves-Chapman, Jessica L; Murray, Patrick S; Stevens, Kristin L; Monroe, Derek C; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Holmes, Philip V; Dishman, Rod K

    2011-11-24

    We evaluated levels of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) messenger RNA (mRNA) within the hippocampal formation in rats selectively bred for 1) high intrinsic (i.e., untrained) aerobic capacity (High Capacity Runners, HCR), 2) low intrinsic aerobic capacity (Low Capacity Runners, LCR), and 3) unselected Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with or without free access to running wheels for 3 weeks. The specific aim of the study was to determine whether a dose-response relationship exists between cumulative running distance and levels of BDNF mRNA. No additional treatments or behavioral manipulations were used. HCR, LCR, and SD rats were grouped by strain and randomly assigned to sedentary or activity (voluntary access to activity wheel) conditions. Animals were killed after 21 days of exposure to the assigned conditions. Daily running distances (mean ± standard deviation meters/day) during week three were: HCR (4726 ± 3220), SD (2293 ± 3461), LCR (672 ± 323). Regardless of strain, levels of BDNF mRNA in CA1 were elevated in wheel runners compared to sedentary rats and this difference persisted after adjustment for age (p=0.040). BDNF mRNA was not affected by intrinsic aerobic capacity and was not related to total running distance. The results support that BDNF mRNA expression is increased by unlimited access to activity wheel running for 3 weeks but is not dependent upon accumulated running distance.

  20. Influence of CGS 21680, a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, on NMDA receptor function and expression in the brain of Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Antonella; Martire, Alberto; Armida, Monica; Chiodi, Valentina; Pézzola, Antonella; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2010-04-06

    The effect of chronic treatment with the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist CGS 21680 on N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor function and expression has been studied in the striatum and cortex of R6/2 mice, a genetic mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD). Starting from 8weeks of age, R6/2 and wild type (WT) mice were treated daily with CGS 21680 (0.5mg/kg i.p.) for 3weeks and the expression levels of NMDA receptor subunits were then evaluated. In addition, to study CGS 21680-induced changes in NMDA receptor function, NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices from both R6/2 and WT mice was investigated. We found that CGS 21680 increased NR2A subunit expression and the NR2A/NR2B ratio in the cortex of R6/2 mice, having no effect in WT mice. In the striatum, CGS 21680 reduced NR1 expression in both R6/2 and WT mice while the effect on NR2A and NR2/NR2B expression was genotype-dependent, reducing and increasing their expression in WT and R6/2 mice, respectively. On the contrary, NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices was not modified by the treatment in WT or HD mice. These results demonstrate that in vivo activation of A(2A) receptors modulates the subunit composition of NMDA receptors in the brain of HD mice.

  1. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  2. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  3. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  4. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  5. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.CAMERON,P.WEI,J.

    2003-05-12

    Emittance growth due to Intra-Beam Scattering significantly reduces the heavy ion luminosity lifetime in RHIC. Stochastic cooling of the stored beam could improve things considerably by counteracting IBS and preventing particles from escaping the rf bucket [1]. High frequency bunched-beam stochastic cooling is especially challenging but observations of Schottky signals in the 4-8 GHz band indicate that conditions are favorable in RHIC [2]. We report here on measurements of the longitudinal beam transfer function carried out with a pickup kicker pair on loan from FNAL TEVATRON. Results imply that for ions a coasting beam description is applicable and we outline some general features of a viable momentum cooling system for RHIC.

  6. Classification of electrocaloric cooling device types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, P.; Raatz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The research on the electrocaloric effect (ECE), the materials and their application has significantly increased in the last years, which resulted in several different concepts and demonstrators of electrocaloric (EC) cooling devices. The aim of this paper is to give a systematic overview of possible design concepts of EC cooling devices and to provide a method for their classification. Nine different device types could be distinguished. Each device type is being specified according to function principle, characteristic properties, technical challenges and technical readiness level. This classification and state of the art reveal areas requiring deeper research and can help researchers and engineers to select appropriate concepts for further investigation, improvement and application.

  7. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  8. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  9. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  10. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  11. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  12. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  13. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  14. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  15. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. Evolution of cooling-channel properties for varying aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzarelli, M.; Nasuti, F.; Onofri, M.

    2016-07-01

    A trade-off analysis is performed on a cooling channel system representative of liquid rocket engine cooling systems. This analysis requires multiple cooling channel flow calculations which are performed by means of a proper numerical approach, referred to as quasi-two-dimensional (2D) model. This model, which is suited to high-aspect-ratio cooling channels (HARCC), permits to have a fast prediction of both the coolant flow evolution and the temperature distribution along the whole cooling channel structure. Before using the quasi-2D model for the trade-off analysis, its validation by comparison with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results is presented and discussed. The results show that the pump power required to overcome losses in the cooling circuit can be minimized selecting a channel shaped with a suitably high aspect ratio.

  17. Probabilistic versus deterministic tractography for delineation of the cortico-subthalamic hyperdirect pathway in patients with Parkinson disease selected for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Mikkel V; Lund, Torben E; Sunde, Niels; Frandsen, Jesper; Rosendal, Frederikke; Juul, Niels; Østergaard, Karen

    2016-07-08

    OBJECTIVE Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and tractography allows noninvasive mapping of the structural connections of the brain, and may provide important information for neurosurgical planning. The hyperdirect pathway, connecting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) with the motor cortex, is assumed to play a key role in mediating the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS), which is an effective but poorly understood treatment for Parkinson disease. This study aimed to apply recent methodological advances in DWI acquisition and analysis to the delineation of the hyperdirect pathway in patients with Parkinson disease selected for surgery. METHODS High spatial and angular resolution DWI data were acquired preoperatively from 5 patients with Parkinson disease undergoing DBS. The authors compared the delineated hyperdirect pathways and associated STN target maps generated by 2 different tractography methods: a tensor-based deterministic method, typically available in clinical settings, and an advanced probabilistic method based on constrained spherical deconvolution. In addition, 10 high-resolution data sets with the same scanning parameters were acquired from a healthy control participant to assess the robustness of the tractography results. RESULTS Both tractography approaches identified connections between the ipsilateral motor cortex and the STN. However, the 2 methods provided substantially different target regions in the STN, with the target center of gravity differing by > 1.4 mm on average. The probabilistic method (based on constrained spherical deconvolution) plausibly reconstructed a continuous set of connections from the motor cortex, terminating in the dorsolateral region of the STN. In contrast, the tensor-based method reconstructed a comparatively sparser and more variable subset of connections. Furthermore, across the control scans, the probabilistic method identified considerably more consistent targeting regions within the STN compared with the deterministic

  18. Effects of coffee bean aroma on the rat brain stressed by sleep deprivation: a selected transcript- and 2D gel-based proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han-Seok; Hirano, Misato; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Hwang, In Kyeong; Masuo, Yoshinori

    2008-06-25

    The aim of this study was 2-fold: (i) to demonstrate influences of roasted coffee bean aroma on rat brain functions by using the transcriptomics and proteomics approaches and (ii) to evaluate the impact of roasted coffee bean aroma on stress induced by sleep deprivation. The aroma of the roasted coffee beans was administered to four groups of adult male Wistar rats: 1, control group; 2, 24 h sleep deprivation-induced stress group (the stress group); 3, coffee aroma-exposed group without stress (the coffee group); and 4, the stress with coffee aroma group (the stress with coffee group). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of some known genes responsive to aroma or stress was performed using total RNA from these four groups. A total of 17 selected genes of the coffee were differently expressed over the control. Additionally, the expression levels of 13 genes were different between the stress group and the stress with coffee group: Up-regulation was found for 11 genes, and down-regulation was seen for two genes in the stress with coffee group. We also looked to changes in protein profiles in these four samples using two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis; 25 differently expressed gel spots were detected on 2D gels stained by silver nitrate. Out of these, a total of nine proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Identified proteins belonged to five functional categories: antioxidant; protein fate; cell rescue, defense, and virulence; cellular communication/signal transduction mechanism; and energy metabolism. Among the differentially expressed genes and proteins between the stress and the stress with coffee group, NGFR, trkC, GIR, thiol-specific antioxidant protein, and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 are known to have antioxidant or antistress functions. In conclusion, the roasted coffee bean aroma changes the mRNA and protein expression levels of the rat brain, providing for the first time clues to the potential antioxidant or stress

  19. Curved film cooling admission tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Papell, S. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Effective film cooling to protect a wall surface from a hot fluid which impinges on or flows along the surface is provided. A film of cooling fluid having increased area is provided by changing the direction of a stream of cooling fluid through an angle of from 135 deg. to 165 deg. before injecting it through the wall into the hot flowing gas. The 1, cooling fluid is injected from an orifice through a wall into a hot flowing gas at an angle to form a cooling fluid film. Cooling fluid is supplied to the orifice from a cooling fluid source via a turbulence control passageway having a curved portion between two straight portions. The angle through which the direction of the cooling fluid is turned results in less mixing of the cooling fluid with the hot gas, thereby substantially increasing the length of the film in a downstream direction.

  20. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, Ke