Science.gov

Sample records for selective oxidation reactions

  1. Influence of composition of reaction mixture on selectivity in oxidation of aromatic compounds on oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Belokopytov, Yu.V.; Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Tatarinova, T.A.; Strashnenko, A.V.

    1985-07-01

    A general outline is given of a kinetic model of oxidation of a hydrocarbon under the conditions of coexistence on the catalyst surface of sections of different oxidation levels. An analytical dependence has been obtained of the selectivity of the process and conversion on the composition of the reaction mixture. A qualitative agreement has been established between the theoretical and experimental dependences of selectivity and conversion on the ratio of the benzene and oxygen concentrations in the reaction mixture.

  2. Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

  3. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of anthracene with selected atmospheric oxidants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Shu, Jinian; Zhang, Yuanxun; Yang, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The reactions of gas-phase anthracene and suspended anthracene particles with O3 and O3-NO were conducted in a 200-L reaction chamber, respectively. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formations from gas-phase reactions of anthracene with O3 and O3-NO were observed. Meanwhile, the size distributions and mass concentrations of SOA were monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) during the formation processes. The rapid exponential growths of SOA reveal that the atmospheric lifetimes of gas-phase anthracene towards O3 and O3-NO are less than 20.5 and 4.34 hr, respectively. The particulate oxidation products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were analyzed with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS). Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of oxidation products of anthracene were carried out for assigning the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra of products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Anthrone, anthraquinone, 9,10-dihydroxyanthracene, and 1,9,10-trihydroxyanthracene were the ozonation products of anthracene, while anthrone, anthraquinone, 9-nitroanthracene, and 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone were the main products of anthracene with O3-NO.

  4. Reaction-driven surface restructuring and selectivity control in allylic alcohol catalytic aerobic oxidation over Pd.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam F; Ellis, Christine V; Naughton, James N; Newton, Mark A; Parlett, Christopher M A; Wilson, Karen

    2011-04-20

    Synchronous, time-resolved DRIFTS/MS/XAS cycling studies of the vapor-phase selective aerobic oxidation of crotyl alcohol over nanoparticulate Pd have revealed surface oxide as the desired catalytically active phase, with dynamic, reaction-induced Pd redox processes controlling selective versus combustion pathways.

  5. Microelectrode arrays: a general strategy for using oxidation reactions to site selectively modify electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Kesselring, David; Tesfu, Eden; Moeller, Kevin D

    2014-03-04

    Oxidation reactions are powerful tools for synthesis because they allow for the functionalization of molecules. Here, we present a general method for conducting these reactions on a microelectrode array in a site-selective fashion. The reactions are run as a competition between generation of a chemical oxidant at the electrodes in the array and reduction of the oxidant by a "confining agent" in the solution above the array. The "confining agent" does not need to be more reactive than the substrate fixed to the surface of the array. In many cases, the same substrate placed on the surface of the array can also be used in solution as the confining agent.

  6. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize

  7. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, Stephan Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  8. Implications of sterically constrained n-butane oxidation reactions on the reaction mechanism and selectivity to 1-butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Sean T.; Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Getman, Rachel B.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to analyze the reaction network in n-butane oxidation to 1-butanol over a Ag/Pd alloy catalyst under steric constraints, and the implications on the ability to produce 1-butanol selectively using MOF-encapsulated catalysts are discussed. MOFs are porous crystalline solids comprised of metal nodes linked by organic molecules. Recently, they have been successfully grown around metal nanoparticle catalysts. The resulting porous networks have been shown to promote regioselective chemistry, i.e., hydrogenation of trans-1,3-hexadiene to 3-hexene, presumably by forcing the linear alkene to stand "upright" on the catalyst surface and allowing only the terminal C-H bonds to be activated. In this work, we extend this concept to alkane oxidation. Our goal is to determine if a MOF-encapsulated catalyst could be used to selectively produce 1-butanol. Reaction energies and activation barriers are presented for more than 40 reactions in the pathway for n-butane oxidation. We find that C-H bond activation proceeds through an oxygen-assisted pathway and that butanal and 1-butanol are some of the possible products.

  9. Tuning Selectivity of CO2 Hydrogenation Reactions at the Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Kattel, Shyam; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jingguang G

    2017-07-26

    The chemical transformation of CO2 not only mitigates the anthropogenic CO2 emission into the Earth's atmosphere but also produces carbon compounds that can be used as precursors for the production of chemicals and fuels. The activation and conversion of CO2 can be achieved on multifunctional catalytic sites available at the metal/oxide interface by taking advantage of the synergy between the metal nanoparticles and oxide support. Herein, we look at the recent progress in mechanistic studies of CO2 hydrogenation to C1 (CO, CH3OH, and CH4) compounds on metal/oxide catalysts. On this basis, we are able to provide a better understanding of the complex reaction network, grasp the capability of manipulating structure and combination of metal and oxide at the interface in tuning selectivity, and identify the key descriptors to control the activity and, in particular, the selectivity of catalysts. Finally, we also discuss challenges and future research opportunities for tuning the selective conversion of CO2 on metal/oxide catalysts.

  10. Tuning Selectivity of CO2 Hydrogenation Reactions at the Metal/Oxide Interface

    DOE PAGES

    Kattel, Shyam; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2017-06-26

    The chemical transformation of CO2 not only mitigates the anthropogenic CO2 emission into the Earth’s atmosphere but also produces carbon compounds that can be used as precursors for the production of chemicals and fuels. The activation and conversion of CO2 can be achieved on multifunctional catalytic sites available at the metal/oxide interface by taking advantage of the synergy between the metal nanoparticles and oxide support. In this paper, we look at the recent progress in mechanistic studies of CO2 hydrogenation to C1 (CO, CH3OH, and CH4) compounds on metal/oxide catalysts. On this basis, we are able to provide a bettermore » understanding of the complex reaction network, grasp the capability of manipulating structure and combination of metal and oxide at the interface in tuning selectivity, and identify the key descriptors to control the activity and, in particular, the selectivity of catalysts. In conclusion, we also discuss challenges and future research opportunities for tuning the selective conversion of CO2 on metal/oxide catalysts.« less

  11. Reactions of Propylene Oxide on Supported Silver Catalysts: Insights into Pathways Limiting Epoxidation Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Apoorva; Bedolla-Pantoja, Marco; Singh, Suyash; Lobo, Raul F.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Barteau, Mark A.

    2012-02-04

    The reactions of propylene oxide (PO) on silver catalysts were studied to understand the network of parallel and sequential reactions that may limit the selectivity of propylene epoxidation by these catalysts. The products of the anaerobic reaction of PO on Ag/a-Al2O3 were propanal, acetone and allyl alcohol for PO conversions below 2–3%. As the conversion of PO was increased either by increasing the temperature or the contact time, acrolein was formed at the expense of propanal, indicating that acrolein is a secondary reaction product in PO decomposition. With addition of oxygen to the feedstream the conversion of PO increased moderately. In contrast to the experiments in absence of oxygen, CO2 was a significant product while the selectivity to propanal decreased as soon as oxygen was introduced in the system. Allyl alcohol disappeared completely from the product stream in the presence of oxygen, reacting to form acrolein and CO2. The product distribution may be explained by a network of reactions involving two types of oxametallacycles formed by ring opening of PO: one with the oxygen bonded to C1 (OMC1, linear) and the other with oxygen bonded to C2 (OMC2, branched). OMC1 reacts to form PO, propanal, and allyl alcohol.

  12. Design of heterogeneous photocatalysts based on metal oxides to control the selectivity of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Maldotti, Andrea; Molinari, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalysis is particularly relevant in order to realize chemical transformations of interest in synthesis and, at the same time, to move towards a "sustainable chemistry" with a minimal environmental impact. Heterogeneous systems with well-defined textural characteristics represent a suitable means to tailor the selectivity of photocatalytic processes. Here, we summarize and classify the significant features of photocatalysts consisting of photoactive metal oxides dispersed on high-surface-area solid supports, or constrained inside their porous network. These systems are based on the use of titanium dioxide, highly dispersed oxides of titanium, chromium, vanadium, and polyoxotungstates. They share similar primary photoprocesses: light absorption induces a charge separation process with formation of positive holes able to oxidize organic substrates. A great number of the papers discussed here concern oxidation reactions carried out in the presence of O₂ for inducing partial oxidation of alcohols and monooxygenation of hydrocarbons. We also devote some attention to photocatalysis in the absence of O₂. In these conditions, the photogenerated charge separation offers the possibility to induce the formation of C-C and C-N bonds. We emphasize that the optimal tailoring of photoactive materials for synthetic purposes can be achieved by combining recent advances in the preparation of nanostructured materials with mechanistic knowledge derived from surface science and molecular level investigations.

  13. Kinetic and Product Studies of the Reaction Between Oxidized Mercury Species and Selected Thiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, L.; Ariya, P.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant with severe potential toxicity. The reduction of oxidized mercury species (Hg(II)) to elemental mercury (Hg(0)) affects the global distribution of mercury and competes for methylation processes of mercury in aquatic environment. This study focused on the reduction of Hg(II) by several selected thiols using a suite of complementary mass spectrometry and cold vapor fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS). Previous studies showed that irradiation of benzene solution of six mercury dimercaptides (benzyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, cyclopentyl, t-butyl and phenyl sulfide) at part-per-million level by a mercury arc lamp under a nitrogen atmosphere caused the formation of Hg(0) to occur. The reaction kinetics was studied using CVAFS, and the products of the reaction were analyzed using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and Gas Chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The kinetic data were obtained for 1-butanethiol, and 1-pentanethiol, 1-hexanethiol at environmental relevant conditions. The effects of light, pH, dissolved oxygen and chloride ion on reaction rates were also investigated. We will present our results and discuss their potential environmental implications on mercury cycling.

  14. Reduced graphene oxide: firm support for catalytically active palladium nanoparticles and game changer in selective hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Cano, Manuela; Benito, Ana M; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P; Arenal, Raul; Maser, Wolfgang K

    2013-11-07

    Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd(2+) complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd(0)-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer.

  15. Oxidized fatty acid analysis by charge-switch derivatization, selected reaction monitoring, and accurate mass quantitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinping; Moon, Sung Ho; Mancuso, David J; Jenkins, Christopher M; Guan, Shaoping; Sims, Harold F; Gross, Richard W

    2013-11-01

    A highly sensitive, specific, and robust method for the analysis of oxidized metabolites of linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was developed using charge-switch derivatization, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and quantitation by high mass accuracy analysis of product ions, thereby minimizing interferences from contaminating ions. Charge-switch derivatization of LA, AA, and DHA metabolites with N-(4-aminomethylphenyl)-pyridinium resulted in a 10- to 30-fold increase in ionization efficiency. Improved quantitation was accompanied by decreased false positive interferences through accurate mass measurements of diagnostic product ions during SRM transitions by ratiometric comparisons with stable isotope internal standards. The limits of quantitation were between 0.05 and 6.0pg, with a dynamic range of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude (correlation coefficient r(2)>0.99). This approach was used to quantitate the levels of representative fatty acid metabolites from wild-type (WT) and iPLA2γ(-/-) mouse liver identifying the role of iPLA2γ in hepatic lipid second messenger production. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of high mass accuracy product ion analysis in conjunction with charge-switch derivatization for the highly specific quantitation of diminutive amounts of LA, AA, and DHA metabolites in biologic systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidation and inactivation of SERCA by selective reaction of cysteine residues with amino acid peroxides.

    PubMed

    Dremina, Elena S; Sharov, Victor S; Davies, Michael J; Schöneich, Christian

    2007-10-01

    The oxidative modification of proteins plays an important role in a wide range of pathological processes and aging. Proteins are modified by numerous biologic oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals. More recently, an additional class of physiologically important oxidants has been identified, peptide and protein peroxides. The latter react quite rapidly and selectively with protein cysteine residues. The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) is reversibly regulated through NO-dependent S-glutathiolation of specific cysteine residues. The irreversible oxidation of these cysteine residues could, therefore, impair NO-dependent muscle relaxation. Here, we show that specific protein-derived (amino acid) peroxides react selectively with a subset of the 22 reduced cysteine residues of SERCA1, including a peptide-containing Cys674 and Cys675, where Cys674 (in SERCA2) represents one of the targets for NO-dependent S-glutathiolation. Out of 11 tested amino acid, peptide, and protein peroxides, those derived from free tryptophan and free tyrosine showed the highest reactivity towards SERCA, while no oxidation under similar experimental conditions was detected through hydrogen peroxide. Among the peroxides from tryptophan, those of free tryptophan showed a significantly higher reactivity as compared to those from N- and C-terminally blocked tryptophan. Quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis demonstrated that the highest reactivity of the tryptophan-derived peroxides was observed for Cys774 and Cys938, cysteine residues, which are embedded within the transmembrane domains of SERCA1. This unusual reactivity of transmembrane domains cannot be solely rationalized by the hydrophobicity of the oxidant, as the peroxide from dl-tryptophan shows considerable higher reactivity as compared to the one derived from N-acetyl-tryptophan methyl ester. Our data demonstrate a potential role of peptide- and protein

  17. Oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions: insights from quantum chemistry calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hujun; Liu, Chengcheng; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Ting; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    The mechanisms for the oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5) by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the calculations, we investigated the original mechanism proposed by Hillhouse and co-workers for the activation of N2O. The calculations showed that the complex with an initial O-coordination of N2O to the coordinatively unsaturated Hf center is not a local minimum. Then we proposed a new reaction mechanism to investigate how N2O is activated and why N2O selectively oxidize phenyl and hydride ligands of . Frontier molecular orbital theory analysis indicates that N2O is activated by nucleophilic attack by the phenyl or hydride ligand. Present calculations provide new insights into the activation of N2O involving the direct oxygen atom transfer from nitrous oxide to metal-ligand bonds instead of the generally observed oxygen abstraction reaction to generate metal-oxo species.

  18. Optimization of reaction conditions in selective oxidation of styrene over fine crystallite spinel-type CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} complex oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pardeshi, Satish K.; Pawar, Ravindra Y.

    2010-05-15

    The CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel-type catalyst was synthesized by citrate gel method and well characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The crystallization temperature of the spinel particle prepared by citrate gel method was 600 {sup o}C which was lower than that of ferrite prepared by other methods. CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalysts prepared by citrate gel method show better activity for styrene oxidation in the presence of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (30%) as an oxidizing agent. In this reaction the oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bond of styrene takes place selectively with 38 {+-} 2 mol% conversion. The major product of the reaction is benzaldehyde up to 91 {+-} 2 mol% and minor product phenyl acetaldehyde up to 9 {+-} 2 mol%, respectively. The products obtained in the styrene oxidation reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The influence of the catalyst, reaction time, temperature, amount of catalyst, styrene/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molar ratio and solvents on the conversion and product distribution were studied.

  19. Bismuth as a modifier of Au Pd catalyst: Enhancing selectivity in alcohol oxidation by suppressing parallel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Bi has been widely employed as a modifier for Pd and Pt based catalyst mainly in order to improve selectivity. We found that when Bi was added to the bimetallic system AuPd, the effect on activity in alcohol oxidation mainly depends on the amount of Bi regardless its position, being negligible when Bi was 0.1 wt% and detectably negative when the amount was increased to 3 wt%. However, the selectivity of the reactions notably varied only when Bi was deposited on the surface of metal nanoparticles suppressing parallel reaction in both benzyl alcohol and glycerol oxidation. After a careful characterization of all the catalysts and additional catalytic tests, we concluded that the Bi influence on the activity of the catalysts could be ascribed to electronic effect whereas the one on selectivity mainly to a geometric modification. Moreover, the Bi-modified AuPd/AC catalyst showed possible application in the production of tartronic acid, a useful intermediate, from glycerol.

  20. Selective oxidation of alcohols with alkali metal bromides as bromide catalysts: experimental study of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Katsuhiko; Takemura, Misato; Togo, Hideo

    2014-07-03

    A bromide-catalyzed oxidation of alcohols was developed which proceeded in the presence of an alkali metal bromide and an oxidant under mild conditions. The reaction involved an organic-molecule-free oxidation using KBr and Oxone and a Brønsted acid assisted oxidation using KBr and aqueous H2O2 solution to provide a broad range of carbonyl compounds in high yields. Moreover, the bromide-catalyzed oxidation of primary alcohols enabled the divergent synthesis of carboxylic acids and aldehydes under both reaction conditions in the presence of TEMPO. A possible catalytic mechanism was suggested on the basis of various mechanistic studies.

  1. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  2. Molecular Recognition in Mn-Catalyzed C-H Oxidation. Reaction Mechanism and Origin of Selectivity from a DFT Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Balcells, David; Moles, Pamela; Blakemore, James; Raynaud, Christophe; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the C-H oxidation of ibuprofen and methylcyclohexane acetic acid can be carried out with high selectivies using [(terpy’)Mn(OH2)(μ-O)2Mn(OH2)(terpy’)]3+ as catalyst, where terpy’ is a terpyridine ligand functionalized with a phenylene linker and a Kemp’s triacid serving to recognize the reactant via H-bonding. Experiments, described here, suggest that the sulfate counter anion, present in stochiometric amounts, coordinates to manganese in place of water. DFT calculations have been carried out using [(terpy’)Mn(O)(μ-O)2Mn(SO4)(terpy’)]+ as model catalyst, to analyze the origin of selectivity and its relation to molecular recognition, as well as the mechanism of catalyst inhibition by tert-butyl benzoic acid. The calculations show that a number of spin states, all having radical oxygen character, are energetically accessible. All these spin states promote C-H oxidation via a rebound mechanism. The catalyst recognizes the substrate by a double H bond. This interaction orients the substrate inducing highly selective C-H oxidation. The double hydrogen bond stabilizes the reactant, the transition state and the product to the same extent. Consequently, the reaction occurs at lower energy than without molecular recognition. The association of the catalyst with tert-butyl benzoic acid is shown to shield the access of unbound substrate to the reactive oxo site, hence preventing non-selective hydroxylation. It is shown that the two recognition sites of the catalyst can be used in a cooperative manner to control the access to the reactive centre. PMID:19623399

  3. Controlled Molybdenum Disulfide Assembly inside Carbon Nanofiber by Boudouard Reaction Inspired Selective Carbon Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dae-Hyun; Kang, Ho-Young; Jo, Jun-Hyun; Kim, Byung Kyu; Na, Sekwon; Sim, Uk; Ahn, In-Kyoung; Yi, Kyung-Woo; Nam, Ki Tae; Joo, Young-Chang

    2017-03-01

    Vertical stacking and lateral growth of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) are controlled with remarkable precision, and MoS2 nanotubes are directly converted from nanofibers. Predictive synthesis is enabled by identifying the specific thermodynamic region where the Boudouard reaction becomes favored. It reveals how the chemical potential of each species in the MoSCO system can predict phase behaviors.

  4. Size-selective photocatalytic reactions by titanium(IV) oxide coated with a hollow silica shell in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Ikoma, Yoshimitsu; Harada, Takashi; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Ohtani, Bunsho; Matsumura, Michio

    2007-12-28

    A novel core-shell composite photocatalyst, commercially available titanium(IV) oxide (TiO(2)) particles directly incorporated into a hollow amorphous silica shell, was fabricated by successive coating of TiO(2) with a carbon layer and a silica layer followed by heat treatment to remove the carbon layer. The composite induced efficient photocatalytic reactions when relatively small substrates were used, such as methanol dehydration and decomposition of acetic acid, without any reduction in the intrinsic activity of original TiO(2), but did not exhibit efficient photocatalytic activity for decomposition of large substrates, methylene blue and polyvinyl alcohol. The unique size-selective properties of the composites are due to their structural characteristics, i.e., the presence of a pore system and a void space in the silica shell and between the shell and medial TiO(2) particles, respectively. The loading of alkylsilyl groups on the surface of the composite led to highly photostable floatability: the floated sample also induced efficient photocatalytic reaction for decomposition of acetic acid while retaining floatation at the gas/water interface.

  5. Mitochondrial targeting of electron scavenging antioxidants: Regulation of selective oxidation vs random chain reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Valerian E.; Wipf, Peter; Stoyanovsky, Detcho; Greenberger, Joel S.; Borisenko, Grigory; Belikova, Natalia A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Samhan Arias, Alejandro K.; Tungekar, Muhammad A.; Jiang, Jianfei; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Ji, Jing; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Pitt, Bruce R.; Shvedova, Anna A; Bayır, Hülya

    2009-01-01

    Effective regulation of highly compartmentalized production of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation reactions in mitochondria requires targeting of small molecule antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes into the organelles. This review describes recently developed approaches to mitochondrial targeting of small biologically active molecules based on: (i) preferential accumulation in mitochondria because of their hydrophobicity and positive charge (hydrophobic cations), (ii) binding with high affinity to an intra-mitochondrial constituent, and (iii) metabolic conversions by specific mitochondrial enzymes to reveal an active entity. In addition, targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes via expression of leader-sequences directing the proteins into mitochondria is considered. Examples of successful antioxidant and anti-apoptotic protection based on the ability of targeted cargoes to inhibit cytochrome c-catalyzed peroxidation of a mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin, in vitro and in vivo are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on the employment of triphenylphosphonium- and hemi-gramicidin S-moieties as two effective vehicles for mitochondrial delivery of antioxidants. PMID:19716396

  6. Oxidative Heck Reaction as a Tool for Para-selective Olefination of Aniline: A DFT Supported Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Firouz Matloubi; Pourkaveh, Raheleh; Karimi, Ashkan

    2017-09-13

    This study describes the first para-selective palladium-catalyzed alkenylation of tertiary amines. This regioselective C-H activation was conducted without any chelation moieties. A series of olefins were reacted under mild reaction conditions at 60 °C, and the corresponding products were obtained in good yields with high selectivity.

  7. Sandmeyer reaction repurposed for the site-selective, non-oxidizing radioiodination of fully-deprotected peptides: studies on the endogenous opioid peptide α-neoendorphin.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Julie E; Nagakura, Kunihiko; Pasternak, Anna R; Grinnell, Steven G; Majumdar, Susruta; Lewis, Jason S; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2013-08-01

    Standard radioiodination methods lack site-selectivity and either mask charges (Bolton-Hunter) or involve oxidative reaction conditions (chloramine-T). Opioid peptides are very sensitive to certain structural modifications, making these labeling methods untenable. In our model opioid peptide, α-neoendorphin, we replaced a tyrosyl hydroxyl with an iodine, and in cell lines stably expressing mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors, we saw no negative effects on binding. We then optimized a repurposed Sandmeyer reaction using copper(I) catalysts with non-redoxing/non-nucleophilic ligands, bringing the radiochemical yield up to around 30%, and site-selectively incorporated radioactive iodine into this position under non-oxidizing reaction conditions, which should be broadly compatible with most peptides. The (125)I- and (131)I-labeled versions of the compound bound with high affinity to opioid receptors in mouse brain homogenates, thus demonstrating the general utility of the labeling strategy and of the peptide for exploring opioid binding sites.

  8. Selective Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions: Enabling Disulfide Mapping via Oxidation and Cleavage of Disulfide Bonds in Intermolecularly-Linked Polypeptide Ions.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-20

    The selective gas-phase oxidation of disulfide bonds to their thiosulfinate form using ion/ion reactions and subsequent cleavage is demonstrated here. Oxidizing reagent anions are observed to attach to all polypeptides, regardless of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide is also frequently observed. Activation of the ion/ion complex between an oxidizing reagent anion and a disulfide-containing peptide cation results in oxygen transfer from the reagent anion to the peptide cation to form the [M+H+O](+) species. This thiosulfinate derivative can undergo one of several rearrangements that result in cleavage of the disulfide bond. Species containing an intermolecular disulfide bond undergo separation of the two chains upon activation. Further activation can be used to generate more sequence information from each chain. These oxidation ion/ion reactions have been used to illustrate the identification of S-glutathionylated and S-cysteinylated peptides, in which low molecular weight thiols are attached to cysteine residues in peptides via disulfide bonds. The oxidation chemistry effectively labels peptide ions with readily oxidized groups, such as disulfide bonds. This enables a screening approach for the identification of disulfide-linked peptides in a disulfide mapping application involving enzymatic digestion. The mixtures of ions generated by tryptic and peptic digestions of lysozyme and insulin, respectively, without prior separation or isolation were subjected both to oxidation and proton transfer ion/ion chemistry to illustrate the identification of peptides in the mixtures with readily oxidized groups.

  9. New Reaction Pathway Induced by Plasmon for Selective Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation on BiOCl Possessing Oxygen Vacancies.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Qin, Feng; Yang, Zhiping; Cui, Ximin; Wang, Jianfang; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-03-08

    Selective organic transformation under mild conditions constitutes a challenge in green chemistry, especially for alcohol oxidation, which typically requires environmentally unfriendly oxidants. Here, we report a new plasmonic catalyst of Au supported on BiOCl containing oxygen vacancies. It photocatalyzes selective benzyl alcohol oxidation with O2 under visible light through synergistic action of plasmonic hot electrons and holes. Oxygen vacancies on BiOCl facilitate the trapping and transfer of plasmonic hot electrons to adsorbed O2, producing •O2(-) radicals, while plasmonic hot holes remaining on the Au surface mildly oxidize benzyl alcohol to corresponding carbon-centered radicals. The hypothesized concerted ring addition between these two radical species on the BiOCl surface highly favors the production of benzaldehyde along with an unexpected oxygen atom transfer from O2 to the product. The results and understanding acquired in this study, based on the full utilization of hot charge carriers in a plasmonic metal deposited on a rationally designed support, will contribute to the development of more active and/or selective plasmonic catalysts for a wide variety of organic transformations.

  10. A study on the reaction characteristics of vanadium-impregnated natural manganese oxide in ammonia selective catalytic reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Su; Lee, Sang Moon; Park, Kwang Hee; Kwon, Dong Wook; Hong, Sung Chang

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of adding vanadium (V) to natural manganese oxide (NMO) in ammonia (NH3) selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The addition of V to NMO decreased the catalytic activity at low temperatures by blocking the active site. However, the enhancement of catalytic activity was achieved by controlling NH3 oxidation at high temperatures. From the NH3 temperature programmed desorption and oxygen on/off test, it was confirmed that the amount of Lewis acid site and active lattice oxygen of the catalyst affects the catalytic performance at low temperature.

  11. Sandmeyer reaction repurposed for the site-selective, non-oxidizing radioiodination of fully-deprotected peptides: Studies on the endogenous opioid peptide α-neoendorphin

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, Julie E.; Nagakura, Kunihiko; Pasternak, Anna R.; Grinnell, Steven G.; Majumdar, Susruta; Lewis, Jason S.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2013-01-01

    Standard radioiodination methods lack site-selectivity and either mask charges (Bolton-Hunter) or involve oxidative reaction conditions (chloramine-T). Opioid peptides are very sensitive to certain structural modifications, making these labeling methods untenable. In our model opioid peptide, α-neoendorphin, we replaced a tyrosyl hydroxyl with an iodine, and in cell lines stably expressing mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors, we saw no negative effects on binding. We then optimized a repurposed Sandmeyer reaction using copper(I) catalysts with non-redoxing/non-nucleophilic ligands, bringing the radiochemical yield up to around 30%, and site-selectively incorporated radioactive iodine into this position under non-oxidizing reaction conditions, which should be broadly compatible with most peptides. The 125I- and 131I-labeled versions of the compound bound with high affinity to opioid receptors in mouse brain homogenates, thus demonstrating the general utility of the labeling strategy and of the peptide for exploring opioid binding sites. PMID:23796454

  12. Effect of Slow Aging Reactions on Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol Prepared by Oxidation of Selected Monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S. A.; Bones, D. L.; Henricksen, D. K.; Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Pan, X.; Nguyen, T. B.; Gonsior, M.; Cooper, W.; Laskin, J.; Laskin, A.

    2009-05-01

    Organic particulate matter (PM) has a major impact on atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a rather significant fraction of organic PM; this includes SOA produced by oxidation of biogenically emitted monoterpenes. Once such SOA is formed, it is believed to undergo slow aging processes, which may have large effects on the physical and chemical properties of the particles. This presentation focuses on the effect of slow chemical aging on optical properties of SOA formed from the ozone-induced oxidation of limonene, myrcene, and other selected monoterpenes. Several complementary techniques including high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, FTIR spectroscopy, UV/vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy, and photodissociation spectroscopy are used to probe the aging-induced changes in physical properties and chemical composition of laboratory generated SOA. Limonene SOA appears to undergo a dramatic change in its absorption spectrum on a time scale of hours; it develops strong visible bands in the 400-500 nm region, and becomes fluorescent. This transformation is catalyzed by ammonium sulfate and certain amino acids. This rather unusual aging process can potentially contribute to the formation of brown carbon in biogenic SOA.

  13. Selective Reaction Times and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between psychometric intelligence and 2 selective reaction time (RT) tasks was determined for 81 university students (27 males and 54 females). Results generally support the paradigm of W. E. Hick (1952). Some surprising findings are discussed with respect to the specific demands of selective RT tasks. (SLD)

  14. Pi-face-selective Diels-Alder reactions of 3,4-di-tert-butylthiophene 1-oxide and 1-imide and formation of 1,2-thiazetidines.

    PubMed

    Otani, Takashi; Takayama, Jun; Sugihara, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Akihiko; Nakayama, Juzo

    2003-07-09

    3,4-Di-tert-butylthiophene 1-oxide (1a) reacted with a series of electron-deficient alkenic dienophiles at its syn-pi-face relating to the S=O bond to give [4+2] adducts in excellent yields. The 1-oxide 1a also reacted even with angle-strained dienophiles acenaphthylene and norbornene at its syn-pi-face to afford [4+2] adducts; in the latter case, norbornene reacted exclusively at its exo-pi-face. The oxide 1a reacted with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate to produce dimethyl 4,5-di-tert-butylphthalate in high yield with spontaneous extrusion of SO from the initial adduct even at room temperature. Similarly, 3,4-di-tert-butylthiophene 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)imide (3a) reacted with alkenic dienophiles at its syn-pi-face relating to the S=N bond to give [4+2] adducts in good yields. The reaction of 3a with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) afforded a 1,2-thiazetidine 12a, the first example of S-unoxidized 1,2-thiazetidine, in good yield, through rearrangement of the initial [4+2] adduct. The molecular structure of 12a is discussed on the basis of the X-ray crystallographic analysis. Comparison of the foregoing reactions leads to the conclusion that the 1-oxide 1a is more reactive as a diene than the 1-imide 3a, which is more reactive than 3,4-di-tert-butylthiophene 1,1-dioxide. The origin of the syn-pi-face selectivities of 1a and 3a in Diels-Alder reactions is discussed in terms of the orbital mixing rule and steric effect and also based on B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculations.

  15. A Quantitative Proteomic Profile of the Nrf2-Mediated Antioxidant Response of Macrophages to Oxidized LDL Determined by Multiplexed Selected Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kinter, Caroline S.; Lundie, Jillian M.; Patel, Halee; Rindler, Paul M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The loading of macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key part of the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Oxidized LDL contains a wide ranging set of toxic species, yet the molecular events that allow macrophages to withstand loading with these toxic species are not completely characterized. The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of the cellular stress response. However, the specific parts of the Nrf2-dependent stress response are diverse, with both tissue- and treatment-dependent components. The goal of these experiments was to develop and use a quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the Nrf2-dependent response in macrophages to oxidized LDL. Cultured mouse macrophages, the J774 macrophage-like cell line, were treated with a combination of oxidized LDL, the Nrf2-stabilizing reagent tert- butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), and/or Nrf2 siRNA. Protein expression was determined using a quantitative proteomics assay based on selected reaction monitoring. The assay was multiplexed to monitor a set of 28 antioxidant and stress response proteins, 6 housekeeping proteins, and 1 non-endogenous standard protein. The results have two components. The first component is the validation of the multiplexed, quantitative proteomics assay. The assay is shown to be fundamentally quantitative, precise, and accurate. The second component is the characterization of the Nrf2-mediated stress response. Treatment with tBHQ and/or Nrf2 siRNA gave statistically significant changes in the expression of a subset of 11 proteins. Treatment with oxidized LDL gave statistically significant increases in the expression of 7 of those 11 proteins plus one additional protein. All of the oxLDL-mediated increases were attenuated by Nrf2 siRNA. These results reveal a specific, multifaceted response of the foam cells to the incoming toxic oxidized LDL. PMID:23166812

  16. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  17. Surface structure of crystalline and amorphous chromia catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. 1. Characterization by temperature-programmed reaction and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Curry-Hyde, H.E.; Musch, H.; Baiker, A. ); Schraml-Marth, M.; Wokaun, A. )

    1992-02-01

    Amorphous and crystalline chromia catalysts used for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH{sub 3} have been characterized using temperature-programmed reaction and desorption of preadsorbed NO and NH{sub 3}. The acidity of the Lewis acid sites and the associated labile oxygen species are investigated using NH{sub 3} as a probe molecule. The degree of coordinative unsaturation of these sites is inferred from the reactions of NO. The effects of reduction, oxidation, and SCR treatment on the state of the Lewis acid sites and the labile oxygen are discussed. Lewis acid sites on crystalline chromia are more acidic than those on amorphous chromia. Different labile oxygen species are discernible based on their oxidizing strengths and the products formed. All labile oxygen is readily removed by reduction; SCR treatment leads to the partial removal of labile oxygen from both morphologies of chromia. The degree of lability of the different oxygen species is related to the morphology of the chromia. The proportions of one- and twofold coordinatively unsaturated sites (1 and 2 c.u.s.) depends strongly on the morphology of the chromia and its pretreatment. Both types of sites show distinct differences in the acidity dependent on the morphology of the chromia. The most significant difference between the two morphologies is seen after SCR treatment. Crystalline chromia shows a very high density of 1 c.u.s. compared to amorphous chromia. These sites are generated from 2 c.u.s. by abstraction of oxygen from NO. Implications of these results on the SCR reaction are discussed.

  18. Rates and temperature dependences of the reaction of OH with isoprene, its oxidation products, and selected terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Harris, G.W.; Pitts, J.N. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Absolute rate constants determined by using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique are reported for the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with isoprene, ..cap alpha.., and ..beta..-pinene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein in the temperature range 297-424 K, and with methylglyoxal at 297 K. These results contribute to a more quantitative understanding of the tropospheric fate of gas-phase biomass-related organics and serve as input to models of the chemistry of the natural troposphere.

  19. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  20. Ni/Fe-supported over hydrotalcites precursors as catalysts for clean and selective oxidation of Basic Yellow 11: reaction intermediates determination.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; García, J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Basic Yellow 11 (BY 11) was employed as model compound to study catalytic wet air oxidation as a pre-treatment step to the conventional biological oxidation. Ni and Fe catalysts supported over hydrotalcite (HT) were prepared by incipient wetness and excess impregnation to obtain catalysts with different metal loadings (from 1 to 10 wt.%). HTs were synthesized by co-precipitation and characterized with XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM. Results showed that dye conversion increased with Ni and Fe content up to 7 wt.% and that the most effective catalyst were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The influence of metal loading in the catalyst, and the preparation method as well as the reaction conditions was investigated. A mechanism and reaction pathways for BY 11 during catalytic liquid phase oxidation have also been proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physicochemical properties of selectively oxidized 1-monolaurin from 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl oxoammonium ion/sodium hypochlorite-mediated reaction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seon Min; Lee, Hyong Joo; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Jaehwan; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2009-04-08

    The primary alcohol group of 1-monolaurin (1-ML) was selectively oxidized using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine oxoammonium ion/sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) without NaBr at two different conditions. The selective oxidation occurred more efficiently at 35 degrees C and 32.2 mmol of NaOCl than at 25 degrees C and 18.7 mmol of NaOCl. Regioselective oxidation of the primary alcohol without oxidation of a secondary alcohol was confirmed by a chemical shift at 175 ppm and no resonance between 198 and 205 ppm in (13)C NMR and the presence of a peak at 1560-1570 cm(-1) in IR spectra. The water solubility of oxidized 1-monolaurin (OML) was remarkably increased by 33.2 times as compared to that of 1-ML. Creaming velocities resulting from fat flocculation in a 0.2% level of OML and 1-ML were 0.16 and 1.13 mm/h, respectively, implying that OML showed higher efficiency and emulsion stability in preventing fat flocculation than 1-ML due to the selective oxidation of primary alcohol.

  2. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  3. Reaction pathways of NO oxidation by sodium chlorite powder.

    PubMed

    Byun, Youngchul; Ko, Kyoung Bo; Cho, Moohyun; Namkung, Won; Lee, Kiman; Shin, Dong Nam; Koh, Dong Jun

    2009-07-01

    NO oxidation is an important prerequisite step to assist selective catalytic reduction at low temperatures (< 250 degrees C). If sodium chlorite powder (NaClO2(s)) can oxidize NO to NO2, the injection of NaClO2(s) can be simply adapted to NO oxidation. Therefore, we explored the reaction pathways of NO oxidation by NaClO2(s). Known concentrations of NO and NO2 in N2 balance were injected into packed-bed reactor containing NaClO2(s) at 130 degreesC. NaClO2(s) oxidized NO to NO2 which reacts again with NaClO2(s) to produce OClO. Comparison of experimental data with simulation results demonstrates that each NO2 molecule removed by the reaction with NaClO2(s) generated one OClO molecule, which also oxidized NO to NO2 with the production of ClNO and ClNO2. Using these results, we conclude that the oxidation of NO by NaClO2(s) occurred by two pathways. One is through the direct reaction of NO with NaClO(s). The other is through both the reaction of NO with OlCO produced by the reaction of NO2 with NaClO2(s) and the reaction of NO with ClO produced by the reaction of NO with OClO.

  4. The nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    King, S Bruce

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used to treat a variety of cancers and sickle cell disease. Despite this widespread use, a complete mechanistic understanding of the beneficial actions of this compound remains to be understood. Hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase and increases the levels of fetal hemoglobin, which explains a portion of the effects of this drug. Administration of hydroxyurea to patients results in a significant increase in levels of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin, nitrite and nitrate suggesting the in vivo metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide. Formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea may explain a portion of the observed effects of hydroxyurea treatment. At the present, the mechanism or mechanisms of nitric oxide release, the identity of the in vivo oxidant and the site of metabolism remain to be identified. Chemical oxidation of hydroxyurea produces nitric oxide and nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These oxidative pathways generally proceed through the nitroxide radical (2) or C-nitrosoformamide (3). Biological oxidants, including both iron and copper containing enzymes and proteins, also convert hydroxyurea to nitric oxide or its decomposition products in vitro and these reactions also occur through these intermediates. A number of other reactions of hydroxyurea including the reaction with ribonucleotide reductase and irradiation demonstrate the potential to release nitric oxide and should be further investigated. Gaining an understanding of the metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide will provide valuable information towards the treatment of these disorders and may lead to the development of better therapeutic agents.

  5. Reactions of nitrogen oxides with polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariiskii, Georgii B.; Gaponova, I. S.; Davydov, Evgenii Ya

    2000-11-01

    The mechanisms of the reactions of nitrogen oxides and different classes of solid polymers are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis of the mechanisms of the formation of stable nitroxyl radicals. Double bonds and amide groups of macromolecules, as well as hydroperoxides and peroxide macroradicals are shown to be involved in the reactions with nitrogen oxides. The application of nitrogen oxides for the preparation of spin-labelled polymers and the use of the ESR imaging technique (ESR tomography) for the investigation of the structure of the reaction front during nitration of solid polymers are considered. The bibliography includes 111 references.

  6. Use of the nitrile oxide cycloaddition (NOC) reaction for molecular probe generation: a new class of enzyme selective histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) showing picomolar activity at HDAC6.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Tapadar, Subhasish; Luchini, Doris N; Kim, Ki Hwan; Billadeau, Daniel D

    2008-08-14

    A series of hydroxamate based HDAC inhibitors containing a phenylisoxazole as the CAP group has been synthesized using nitrile oxide cycloaddition chemistry. An HDAC6 selective inhibitor having a potency of approximately 2 picomolar was identified. Some of the compounds were examined for their ability to block pancreatic cancer cell growth and found to be about 10-fold more potent than SAHA. This research provides valuable, new molecular probes for use in exploring HDAC biology.

  7. Improved sensitivity and selectivity of pristine zinc oxide nanostructures to H2S gas: Detailed study on the synthesis reaction time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaung, David E.; Mhlongo, Gugu H.; Bolokang, Amogelang S.; Dhonge, Baban P.; Swart, Hendrik C.; Sinha Ray, Suprakas

    2016-11-01

    The gas sensing properties of ZnO nanostructures synthesized at various reaction times are reported in this study. The response of ZnO nanostructures to H2, NH3, H2S and NO2 gases was investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations. Surface morphology analyses showed that the geometry of the nanostructures transforms with the synthesis reaction time. Topography analyses demonstrated a surface roughness of approximately 68.25, 70.31, 74.75 nm for the samples synthesized for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. The dependence of the morphology on the H2, NH3, NO2 and H2S gas sensing performance was observed. The alteration of the nanostructures diameter/geometry demonstrated a change in both the magnitude and temperature of the maximum sensor response. The 72 h ZnO sensing material revealed improved response and higher sensitivity and selectivity to H2S gas, while the 24 h sensing material revealed enhanced response and selectivity to NO2 gas at 300 °C. Moreover, the 72 h sensing material exhibited a higher sensitivity of 144.22 ppm-1 at 300 °C. These findings disclosed that by varying the synthesis reaction time, the sensing properties, such as the response, sensitivity and selectivity of the ZnO nanostructures could be tuned.

  8. Recent advances in heterogeneous selective oxidation catalysis for sustainable chemistry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qinghong; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye; Yang, Yanhui

    2014-05-21

    Oxidation catalysis not only plays a crucial role in the current chemical industry for the production of key intermediates such as alcohols, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones and organic acids, but also will contribute to the establishment of novel green and sustainable chemical processes. This review is devoted to dealing with selective oxidation reactions, which are important from the viewpoint of green and sustainable chemistry and still remain challenging. Actually, some well-known highly challenging chemical reactions involve selective oxidation reactions, such as the selective oxidation of methane by oxygen. On the other hand some important oxidation reactions, such as the aerobic oxidation of alcohols in the liquid phase and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen, have attracted much attention in recent years because of their high significance in green or energy chemistry. This article summarizes recent advances in the development of new catalytic materials or novel catalytic systems for these challenging oxidation reactions. A deep scientific understanding of the mechanisms, active species and active structures for these systems are also discussed. Furthermore, connections among these distinct catalytic oxidation systems are highlighted, to gain insight for the breakthrough in rational design of efficient catalytic systems for challenging oxidation reactions.

  9. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  10. Selective immediate hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Canto, Maria Gabriela; Andreu, Isabel; Fernandez, Javier; Blanca, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs imply that patients develop a urticarial/anaphylactic response to a single drug with good tolerance to other compounds. No systematic review of these reactions has yet been made. With the increase in consumption of NSAIDs, these have become one of the most common drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. Although cross-intolerance reactions are the most common, a significant proportion is selective responses. As specific IgE antibodies are not always found, there is only indirect evidence supporting an IgE-mediated mechanism in selective NSAID reactors. Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs must be considered when a patient develops urticaria or anaphylaxis after intake of one drug with good tolerance to drugs from other groups or even a drug from the same group with a slightly different chemical structure. Further research is required to identify the antigenic determinant structures recognized.

  11. Interface-confined oxide nanostructures for catalytic oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Yang, Fan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-08-20

    Heterogeneous catalysts, often consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on high-surface-area oxide solids, are common in industrial chemical reactions. Researchers have increasingly recognized the importance of oxides in heterogeneous catalysts: that they are not just a support to help the dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles, but rather interact with supported metal nanoparticles and affect the catalysis. The critical role of oxides in catalytic reactions can become very prominent when oxides cover metal surfaces forming the inverse catalysts. The source of the catalytic activity in homogeneous catalysts and metalloenzymes is often coordinatively unsaturated (CUS) transition metal (TM) cations, which can undergo facile electron transfer and promote catalytic reactions. Organic ligands and proteins confine these CUS cations, making them highly active and stable. In heterogeneous catalysis, however, confining these highly active CUS centers on an inorganic solid so that they are robust enough to endure the reaction environment while staying flexible enough to perform their catalysis remains a challenge. In this Account, we describe a strategy to confine the active CUS centers on the solid surface at the interface between a TM oxide (TMO) and a noble metal (NM). Among metals, NMs have high electron negativity and low oxygen affinity. This means that TM cations of the oxide bind strongly to NM atoms at the interface, forming oxygen-terminated-bilayer TMO nanostructures. The resulting CUS sites at the edges of the TMO nanostructure are highly active for catalytic oxidation reactions. Meanwhile, the strong interactions between TMOs and NMs prevent further oxidation of the bilayer TMO phases, which would otherwise result in the saturation of oxygen coordination and the deactivation of the CUS cations. We report that we can also tune the oxide-metal interactions to modulate the bonding of reactants with CUS centers, optimizing their catalytic performance. We

  12. Ni-Cu Hydrotalcite-Derived Mixed Oxides as Highly Selective and Stable Catalysts for the Synthesis of β-Branched Bioalcohols by the Guerbet Reaction.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Willinton Y; De Vlieger, Kevin; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Verberckmoes, An

    2016-11-23

    A series of Ni-Cu hydrotalcite-derived mixed oxides have been synthesized and evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the dimerization of linear aliphatic alcohols to afford β-branched Guerbet alcohols. The use of the hydrotalcite-structured catalyst precursor highly favors the catalyst stability. This Cu/Ni catalyst has an enhanced reducibility of Ni(2+) species under reaction conditions, favoring the hydrogen transfer and hydrogenation capacity of the catalyst system. Catalytic results are reported for C8 , mixed C8 /C10 , and C18 alcohol feeds, with full conversions and Guerbet product purities of 72.5-96 %. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Production of pesticide metabolites by oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, E

    1982-08-01

    The cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system catalyzes a wide variety of oxidations of pesticide chemicals and related compounds. These reactions include epoxidation and aromatic hydroxylation, aliphatic hydroxylation, O-, N- and S-dealkylation, N-oxidation, oxidative deamination, S-oxidation, P-oxidation, desulfuration and ester cleavage and may result in either detoxication or activation of the pesticide. The current status of such reactions, relative to the production, in vivo, of biologically active intermediates in pesticide metabolism is summarized. More recently we have shown that the FAD-containing monooxygenase of mammalian liver (E.C.1.14.13.8), a xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme of broad specificity formerly known as an amine oxidase, is involved in a variety of pesticide oxidations. These include sulfoxidation of organophosphorus insecticides such as phorate and disulfoton, oxidative desulfuration of phosphonate insecticides such as fonofos and oxidation at the phosphorus atom in such compounds as the cotton defoliant, folex. The relative importance of the FAD-containing monooxygenase vis-a-vis the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system is discussed, based on in vitro studies on purified enzymes.

  14. Selected reaction monitoring applied to quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kiyonami, Reiko; Domon, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is gradually shifting from pure qualitative studies (protein identification) to large-scale quantitative experiments, prompted by the growing need to analyze consistently and precisely a large set of proteins in biological samples. The selected reaction monitoring (SRM) technique is increasingly applied to quantitative proteomics because of its selectivity (two levels of mass selection), its sensitivity (non-scanning mode), and its wide dynamic range. This account describes the different steps in the design and the experimental setup of SRM experiments.

  15. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  16. Oxidation state of BZ reaction mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Sabrina G; Hastings, Harold M; Field, Richard J

    2006-01-12

    The unstirred, ferroin (Fe(phen)(3)2+)-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction1-4 is the prototype oscillatory chemical system. After an induction period of several minutes, one sees "spontaneous" formation of "pacemaker" sites, which oscillate between a blue, oxidized state (high [Fe(phen)3(3+)]) and a red, reduced state (low [Fe(phen)(3)3+]). The reaction medium appears red (reduced) during the induction phase, and the pacemaker sites generate target patterns of concentric, outwardly moving waves of oxidation (blue). Auto-oscillatory behavior is also seen in the Oregonator model of Field, Korös, and Noyes (FKN), a robust, reduced model which captures qualitative BZ kinetics in the auto-oscillatory regime. However, the Oregonator model predicts a blue (oxidized) induction phase. Here, we show that including reaction R8 of the FKN mechanism, not incorporated in the original Oregonator, accounts for bromide release during the induction phase, thus producing the observed red oxidation state.

  17. Tannin oxidation: intra- versus intermolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Poncet-Legrand, Céline; Cabane, Bernard; Bautista-Ortín, Ana-Belén; Carrillo, Stéphanie; Fulcrand, Hélène; Pérez, Javier; Vernhet, Aude

    2010-09-13

    Grape and apple condensed tannin fractions were autoxidized at high concentrations (5 g/L) in aqueous solutions and analyzed by thiolysis (depolymerization followed by HPLC analysis) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Structural parameters of native (unoxidized) tannin polymers were derived from SAXS according to the wormlike chain model: the length per monomer is 15 A, the length of the statistical segment 17 A, and the cross section of the macromolecule has a radius within the range 3-4.5 A. The rather short length of the statistical segment is an effect of the different location of interflavanol linkages, which cause a loss of orientational correlation between successive monomers. Oxidation created new bonds that were resistant to thiolysis, and, according to thiolysis, some of these new bonds were intramolecular. However, according to SAXS, oxidation at high tannin concentration caused the weight average degree of polymerization to increase, indicating that intermolecular reactions took place as well, creating larger macromolecules. In the case of the smaller grape seed tannins, these intermolecular reactions took place "end to end" leading to the formation of longer linear macromolecules, at least in the earlier stages of oxidation. In the case of the larger apple tannins, the SAXS patterns were characteristic of larger branched macromolecules. Accordingly, the intermolecular reactions were mainly "end to middle". This is in agreement with the higher probabilities of "end to middle" reactions arising from a higher ratio extension unit/terminal unit in the latter case.

  18. Emergence of oxyl radicals as selective oxidants.

    PubMed

    Ramasarma, T

    2012-10-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (HO*) are derived in Fenton reaction with ferrous salt and H2O2 in acid medium, and at neutral pH, metal-oxyl radicals (M-O*) predominate. Evidence is accumulating that M-O* radicals are also active in oxidation reactions, in addition to metal-oxo (M=O) now shown in many publications. Reactivity of these radicals gives selective oxidized products useful in cellular activities, in contrast to purported indiscriminate cell damage by hydroxyl radicals. Reactions with vanadium compounds, such as diperoxovanadate, peroxo-bridged mixed valency divanadate, vanadium-oxyl radical, tetravalent vanadyl and decavanadate illustrates selective gain in oxidative capacity of oxo- and oxyl- species. Occurrence of ESR signals typical of hydroxyl radicals is demonstrated in cell homogenates and tissue perfusates treated with spin trap agents. It is known for a long time lipid peroxides are formed in tissue microsomal systems exclusively in presence of salts of iron, among many metals tested. Oxygen and a reducing agent, ascorbate (non-enzymic) or NADPH (enzymic) are required to produce 'ferryl', the chelated Fe=O active form (possibly Fe-O* and Fe-O-O-Fe ?) for the crucial step of H-atom abstraction. Yet literature is replete with unsupported affirmations that hydroxyl radicals initiate lipid peroxidation, an unexplained fixation of mindset. The best-known *OH generator, a mixture of ferrous salt and H2O2, does not promote lipid peroxidation, nor do the many hydroxyl radical quenching agents stop it. The availability of oxo and oxyl-radical forms with transition metals, and also with non metals, P, S, N and V, calls for expansion of vision beyond superoxide and hydroxyl radicals and explore functions of multiple oxygen radicals for their biological relevance.

  19. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  20. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  1. An “Aprotic” Tamao Oxidation/syn-Selective Tautomerization Reaction for the Efficient Synthesis of the C(1)–C(9) Fragment of Fludelone

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tyler J.; Rabbat, Philippe M. A.; Leighton, James L.

    2012-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of the C(1)–C(9) fragment of fludelone has been developed. The key step is a tandem silylformylation-crotylsilylation/Tamao oxidation sequence that establishes the C(5) ketone, the C(6), C(7), and C(8) stereocenters, and the C(9) alkene in a single operation from a readily accessed starting material. The stereochemical outcome at C(6) depends critically on the development of an “aprotic” Tamao oxidation, which leads to a reversal in the intrinsic diastereoselectivity observed using “standard” Tamao oxidation conditions. PMID:22950417

  2. Gas-phase reactions of nickel and nickel oxide clusters with nitrogen oxides. 3. Reactions of cations with nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, W.D.; Bell, R.C.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1999-12-16

    A fast flow reactor-quadrupole mass spectrometer system coupled with a laser vaporization source is used to study the gas-phase reactions of nickel and nickel oxide cluster cations with nitric oxide. Pseudo-first-order bimolecular rate constants are reported for the reactions of NO with nickel and nickel oxide cluster cations and O{sub 2} reactions with nickel cluster cations. The product distributions indicate that several different reaction mechanisms occur between NO and NI{sub x}{sup +} and Ni{sub x}O{sub y}{sup +}. Competing processes such as oxidation, NO addition, and replacement of oxygen with nitric oxide are observed to occur. Also, the presence of magic peaks in the distributions indicates unusually stable product cluster species.

  3. Selected reaction monitoring applied to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Duriez, Elodie; Domon, Bruno

    2011-03-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) performed on triple quadrupole mass spectrometers has been the reference quantitative technique to analyze small molecules for several decades. It is now emerging in proteomics as the ideal tool to complement shotgun qualitative studies; targeted SRM quantitative analysis offers high selectivity, sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. However, SRM applied to proteomics presents singularities that distinguish it from small molecules analysis. This review is an overview of SRM technology and describes the specificities and the technical aspects of proteomics experiments. Ongoing developments aiming at increasing multiplexing capabilities of SRM are discussed; they dramatically improve its throughput and extend its field of application to directed or supervised discovery experiments.

  4. Heterogeneous reaction of ozone with aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    Rates and collision efficiencies for ozone decomposition on aluminum oxide surfaces were determined. Samples were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, particle size, and chemical analysis. Collision efficiencies were found to be between 2 times 10 to the -10 power and 2 times 10 to the -9 power. This is many orders of magnitude below the value of 0.000001 to 0.00001 needed for appreciable long-term ozone loss in the stratosphere. An activation energy of 7.2 kcal/mole was found for the heterogeneous reaction between -40 C and 40 C. Effects of pore diffusion, outgassing and treatment of the aluminum oxide with several chemical species were also investigated.

  5. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  6. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  7. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-02-03

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  8. Highly diastereoselective and regioselective copper-catalyzed nitrosoformate dearomatization reaction under aerobic-oxidation conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weibo; Huang, Long; Yu, Yang; Pflästerer, Daniel; Rominger, Frank; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2014-04-01

    An unprecedented copper-catalyzed acylnitroso dearomatization reaction, which expands the traditional acylnitroso ene reaction and acylnitroso Diels-Alder reaction to a new type of transformation, has been developed under aerobic oxidation. Intermolecular and intra-/intermolecular reaction modes demonstrate an entirely different N- or O-acylnitroso selectivity. Hence, we can utilize this reaction as a highly diastereoselective access to a series of new pyrroloindoline derivatives, which are important structural motifs for natural-product synthesis.

  9. Selectivity in the carbon-oxygen reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokova, Kristina A.

    The dependence of the carbon-oxygen reaction rate and the CO/COsb2 ratio on temperature, oxygen pressure, carbon crystallite size, concentration of surface C(O) complexes, and content of heteroatoms was studied. It was shown that the temperature dependence of the CO/COsb2 ratio obeys an Arrhenius-type relationship, but the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy depend on oxygen pressure and carbon nature. The Arrhenius parameters were found to be directly proportional to each other. This confirmed the importance of the compensation effect in carbon oxidation. It was explained by active site heterogeneity in carbon materials. For all experimental conditions, the CO/COsb2 ratio was lower for carbons with more ordered graphitic structure. It was shown that the CO/COsb2 ratio is inversely proportional to the surface coverage with reactive C(O) complexes. More ordered carbons were revealed to possess lower concentrations of stable complexes, higher surface coverages with reactive complexes and thus lower CO/COsb2 ratios. The influence of B and N heteroatoms on carbon reactivity and the CO/COsb2 ratio was studied. It was confirmed that B acts as an inhibitor of carbon oxidation due to the formation of a protective Bsb2Osb3 coating. The N presence in the carbon structure increases its rate of oxidation, maybe due to decreasing carbon crystallite dimensions. The CO/COsb2 ratio did not correlate with the N content in the carbon, but depended on the concentration of surface carbon-oxygen complexes. A new reaction mechanism is proposed. A key feature of the mechanism is that it takes into account the presence and mobility of oxygen atoms on the basal plane. It was shown with the aid of theoretical molecular orbital calculations that chemisorption on a pair of adjacent edge and basal sites is thermodynamically favorable as a parallel process to the generally accepted path of chemisorption on two edge carbon atoms. The former process can lead to the formation of a

  10. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  11. Reaction and spectroscopic study of supported metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Narayanan C.

    The role of surface structure, cation reducibility, surface acidity and the effect of the support was examined in the reaction of 1-butene over well characterized, supported metal oxide catalysts. Cr, Mo and W oxides supported on SiOsb2 were used to study the effect of structure, surface acidity and cation reducibility in the isomerization and selective oxidation of 1-butene. Supported oxides of Mo on TiOsb2,\\ Alsb2Osb3 and SiOsb2 were used to understand the role of the support in the selective oxidation of 1-butene. The surface acidity of SiOsb2 supported Cr, Mo, W and V oxide catalysts was examined by pyridine adsorption. Existing theoretical models of acidity were compared against experimental data. Over Mo(VI)/SiOsb2 and W(VI)/SiOsb2, isomerization through both a Bronsted catalyzed pathway and an allylic pathway were observed, while only the allylic pathway was observed over Cr(VI)/SiOsb2. The greater reducibility of the Cr cation compared to Mo and W cations was identified as the reason for the allylic pathway being dominant over Cr(VI)/SiOsb2. Cation reducibility was again seen to play an important role in the selective oxidation of 1-butene over SiOsb2 supported metal oxides. The turn over frequencies for 1,3-butadiene formation followed the trend in red-ox ability, with Cr > Mo > W. The activity to 1,3-butadiene formation did not change with increasing weight loading of Mo over TiOsb2 and Alsb2Osb3 supports. An analysis of the turn over frequencies of the supports and the supported cations revealed that a support effect, through the bridging oxygen ligand, dominated the intrinsic cation reducibility of Mo for these catalysts. The existence of Bronsted acidity over SiOsb2 supported Cr, Mo and V oxides was shown by an analysis of the OH region of the infrared spectrum, and by the adsorption of 1-butene and pyridine. Existing theoretical models for Bronsted acidity over supported metal oxides were shown to be inadequate to describe the observed results over

  12. Reactions of. cap alpha. -oxides in the presence of hexamethylenetetramine and glycerine diphenyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, P.V.; Sveshnikova, N.F.; Ignatov, V.A.

    1987-11-20

    Hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) is widely used as a catalyst for the condensation and hardening of compositions based on epoxide oligomer. To provide objective information about the reaction scheme and the kinetics of reactions in which epoxide oligomers participate we studied a model reaction system. The model epoxide oligomer selected was phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) and the ..cap alpha..,..gamma..-diphenyl ether of glycerine (GDPE). The reference substances in the differential thermal analysis were magnesium oxide, aluminum oxide, and GDPE. Monitoring of the progress of the isothermal reaction was effected by determining the ..cap alpha..-oxide group mercurimetrically. The concentration of HMTA was determined iodometrically.

  13. Metal-organic frameworks as selectivity regulators for hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meiting; Yuan, Kuo; Wang, Yun; Li, Guodong; Guo, Jun; Gu, Lin; Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Huijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-11-01

    Owing to the limited availability of natural sources, the widespread demand of the flavouring, perfume and pharmaceutical industries for unsaturated alcohols is met by producing them from α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, through the selective hydrogenation of the carbon-oxygen group (in preference to the carbon-carbon group). However, developing effective catalysts for this transformation is challenging, because hydrogenation of the carbon-carbon group is thermodynamically favoured. This difficulty is particularly relevant for one major category of heterogeneous catalyst: metal nanoparticles supported on metal oxides. These systems are generally incapable of significantly enhancing the selectivity towards thermodynamically unfavoured reactions, because only the edges of nanoparticles that are in direct contact with the metal-oxide support possess selective catalytic properties; most of the exposed nanoparticle surfaces do not. This has inspired the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to encapsulate metal nanoparticles within their layers or inside their channels, to influence the activity of the entire nanoparticle surface while maintaining efficient reactant and product transport owing to the porous nature of the material. Here we show that MOFs can also serve as effective selectivity regulators for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Sandwiching platinum nanoparticles between an inner core and an outer shell composed of an MOF with metal nodes of Fe3+, Cr3+ or both (known as MIL-101; refs 19, 20, 21) results in stable catalysts that convert a range of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with high efficiency and with significantly enhanced selectivity towards unsaturated alcohols. Calculations reveal that preferential interaction of MOF metal sites with the carbon-oxygen rather than the carbon-carbon group renders hydrogenation of the former by the embedded platinum nanoparticles a thermodynamically favoured reaction. We anticipate that our basic design

  14. Oxygen-transfer reactions of methylrhenium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Omar, M.M.; Espenson, J.H.; Appelman, E.H.

    1996-12-18

    Methylrhenium dioxide, CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 2} (or MDO), is produced from methylrhenium trioxide, CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} (or MTO), and hypophosphorous acid in acidic aqueous medium. Its mechanism is discussed in light of MTO`s coordination ability and the inverse kinetic isotope effect (kie): H{sub 2}P(O)OH, k = 0.028 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}; D{sub 2}P(O)OH, k = 0.039 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The Re(V) complex, MDO, reduces perchlorate and other inorganic oxoanions (XO{sub n}{sup -}, where X = Cl, Br, or I and N = 4 or 3). The rate is controlled by the first oxygen abstraction from perchlorate to give chlorate, with a second-order rate constant at pH 0 and 25 {degrees}C of 7.3 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Organic oxygen-donors such as sulfoxides and pyridine N-oxides oxidize MDO to MTO as do metal oxo complexes: VO{sup 2+}{sub (aq)}, VO{sub 2}{sup +}{sub (aq)}, HOMoO{sub 2}{sup +}{sub (aq)}, and MnO{sub 4}{sup -}. The reaction between V{sup 2+}{sub (aq)} with MTO and the reduction of VO{sup 2+} with MDO made it possible to determine the free energy for MDO/MTO. Oxygen-atom transfer from oxygen-donors to MDO involves nucleophilic attack of X-O on the electrophilic Re(V) center of MDO; the reaction proceeds via an [MDO{center_dot}XO] adduct, which is supported by the saturation kinetics observed for some. The parameters that control and facilitate the kinetics of such oxygen-transfer processes are suggested and include the force constant for the asymmetric stretching of the element-oxygen bond.

  15. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes in Oxidation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčík, Václav; Cazin, Catherine S. J.

    This chapter describes applications of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) in oxidation chemistry. The strong σ-donation capabilities of the NHCs allow an efficient stabilisation of metal centres in high oxidation states, while high metal-NHC bond dissociation energies suppress their oxidative decomposition. These properties make NHCs ideal ligands for oxidation processes. The first part of this chapter is dedicated to the reactivity of NHC-metal complexes towards molecular oxygen whilst the second half highlights all oxidation reactions catalysed by such complexes. These include oxidation of alcohols and olefins, oxidative cyclisations, hydrations of alkynes and nitriles, oxidative cleavage of alkenes and the oxidation of methane.

  16. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  17. THz-Pulse-Induced Selective Catalytic CO Oxidation on Ru.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Jerry L; Katayama, Tetsuo; Lindenberg, Aaron; Fisher, Alan S; Öström, Henrik; Nilsson, Anders; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-07-17

    We demonstrate the use of intense, quasi-half-cycle THz pulses, with an associated electric field component comparable to intramolecular electric fields, to direct the reaction coordinate of a chemical reaction by stimulating the nuclear motions of the reactants. Using a strong electric field from a THz pulse generated via coherent transition radiation from an ultrashort electron bunch, we present evidence that CO oxidation on Ru(0001) is selectively induced, while not promoting the thermally induced CO desorption process. The reaction is initiated by the motion of the O atoms on the surface driven by the electric field component of the THz pulse, rather than thermal heating of the surface.

  18. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, September 1 - November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, R.G.; Wang, C.B.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research is the selective oxidation of methane to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Air, oxygen, or carbon dioxide rather than nitrous oxide, are utilized as the oxidizing gas at high gas hourly space velocity but mild reaction conditions (500-700{degrees}C, 1 atm total pressure). All the investigated processes are catalytic, aiming at minimizing gas phase reactions that are difficult to control. During this quarter, solid state {sup 51}V NMR and double catalyst bed experiments were conducted to demonstrate the unfavorable effect of the presence of bulk crystalline V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} xerogel catalysts on selective oxidation of methane to methanol and formaldehyde. Results are discussed.

  19. Selective insertion of sulfur dioxide reduction intermediates on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Humeres, Eduardo; Debacher, Nito A; Smaniotto, Alessandra; de Castro, Karen M; Benetoli, Luís O B; de Souza, Eduardo P; Moreira, Regina de F P M; Lopes, Cristiane N; Schreiner, Wido H; Canle, Moisés; Santaballa, J Arturo

    2014-04-22

    Graphite microparticles (d50 6.20 μm) were oxidized by strong acids, and the resultant graphite oxide was thermally exfoliated to graphene oxide sheets (MPGO, C/O 1.53). Graphene oxide was treated with nonthermal plasma under a SO2 atmosphere at room temperature. The XPS spectrum showed that SO2 was inserted only as the oxidized intermediate at 168.7 eV in the S 2p region. Short thermal shocks at 600 and 400 °C, under an Ar atmosphere, produced reduced sulfur and carbon dioxide as shown by the XPS spectrum and TGA analysis coupled to FTIR. MPGO was also submitted to thermal reaction with SO2 at 630 °C, and the XPS spectrum in the S 2p region at 164.0 eV showed that this time only the nonoxidized episulfide intermediate was inserted. Plasma and thermal treatment produced a partial reduction of MPGO. The sequence of thermal reaction followed by plasma treatment inserted both sulfur intermediates. Because oxidized and nonoxidized intermediates have different reactivities, this selective insertion would allow the addition of selective types of organic fragments to the surface of graphene oxide.

  20. Oxidative transformation of micropollutants during municipal wastewater treatment: comparison of kinetic aspects of selective (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ferrate VI, and ozone) and non-selective oxidants (hydroxyl radical).

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunho; von Gunten, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Chemical oxidation processes have been widely applied to water treatment and may serve as a tool to minimize the release of micropollutants (e.g. pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors) from municipal wastewater effluents into the aquatic environment. The potential of several oxidants for the transformation of selected micropollutants such as atenolol, carbamazepine, 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), ibuprofen, and sulfamethoxazole was assessed and compared. The oxidants include chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ferrate(VI), and ozone as selective oxidants versus hydroxyl radicals as non-selective oxidant. Second-order rate constants (k) for the reaction of each oxidant show that the selective oxidants react only with some electron-rich organic moieties (ERMs), such as phenols, anilines, olefins, and deprotonated-amines. In contrast, hydroxyl radicals show a nearly diffusion-controlled reactivity with almost all organic moieties (k>or=10(9)M(-1) s(-1)). Due to a competition for oxidants between a target micropollutant and wastewater matrix (i.e. effluent organic matter, EfOM), a higher reaction rate with a target micropollutant does not necessarily translate into more efficient transformation. For example, transformation efficiencies of EE2, a phenolic micropollutant, in a selected wastewater effluent at pH 8 varied only within a factor of 7 among the selective oxidants, even though the corresponding k for the reaction of each selective oxidant with EE2 varied over four orders of magnitude. In addition, for the selective oxidants, the competition disappears rapidly after the ERMs present in EfOM are consumed. In contrast, for hydroxyl radicals, the competition remains practically the same during the entire oxidation. Therefore, for a given oxidant dose, the selective oxidants were more efficient than hydroxyl radicals for transforming ERMs-containing micropollutants, while hydroxyl radicals are capable of transforming micropollutants even without ERMs. Besides Ef

  1. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  2. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene.

  3. Selective aerobic oxidation mediated by TiO(2) photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xianjun; Ma, Wanhong; Chen, Chuncheng; Ji, Hongwei; Zhao, Jincai

    2014-02-18

    TiO2 is one of the most studied metal oxide photocatalysts and has unparal-leled efficiency and stability. This cheap, abundant, and non-toxic material has the potential to address future environmental and energy concerns. Understanding about the photoinduced interfacial redox events on TiO2 could have profound effect on the degradation of organic pollutants, splitting of H2O into H2 and O2, and selective redox organic transformations. Scientists traditionally accept that for a semiconductor photocatalyst such as TiO2 under the illumination of light with energy larger than its band gap, two photocarriers will be created to carry out their independent reduction and oxidation processes. However, our recent discoveries indicate that it is the concerted rather than independent effect of both photocarriers of valence band hole (hvb(+)) and conduction band electron (ecb(-)) that dictate the product formation during interfacial oxidation event mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis. In this Account, we describe our recent findings on the selective oxidation of organic substrates with O2 mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis. The transfer of O-atoms from O2 to the corresponding products dominates the selective oxidation of alcohols, amines, and alkanes mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis. We ascribe this to the concerted effect of both hvb(+) and ecb(-) of TiO2 in contribution to the oxidation products. These findings imply that O2 plays a unique role in its transfer into the products rather than independent role of ecb(-) scavenger. More importantly, ecb(-) plays a crucial role to ensure the high selectivity for the oxygenation of organic substrates. We can also use the half reactions such as those of the conduction band electron of TiO2 for efficient oxidation reactions with O2. To this end, efficient selective oxidation of organic substrates such as alcohols, amines, and aromatic alkanes with O2 mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis under visible light irradiation has been achieved. In

  4. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  5. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  6. Hierarchical zeolites and their catalytic performance in selective oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Manuel; Grau-Atienza, Aida; Campos, Rafael; Romero, Antonio A; Serrano, Elena; Maria Marinas, Jose; García Martínez, Javier; Luque, Rafael

    2015-04-24

    Hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites prepared using a simple alkali treatment and subsequent HCl washing are found to exhibit unprecedented catalytic activities in selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol under microwave irradiation. The metal-free zeolites promote the microwave-assisted oxidation of benzyl alcohol with hydrogen peroxide in yields ranging from 45-35 % after 5 min of reaction under mild reaction conditions as well as the epoxidation of cyclohexene to valuable products (40-60 % conversion). The hierarchically porous systems also exhibited an interesting catalytic activity in the dehydration of N,N-dimethylformamide (25-30 % conversion), representing the first example of transition-metal free catalysts in this reaction. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  8. Selective cytotoxicity effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jiang, Hui; Selke, Matthias; Wang, Xuemei

    2014-02-01

    During photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancers, there are numerous side effects, accompanied by damage to normal cells/tissues caused by the abnormal elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, we aim to provide an effective method to reduce the relevant side effects of PDT by using cerium oxide nanoparticles. The well-dispersed poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) stabilized cerium oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by using a one-pot method at 60 degrees C in slightly alkaline environment. The morphological and structural characterizations clearly illustrate the excellent lattice structures of cerium oxide, nanoparticles. The MTT assay indicates that these cerium oxide nanoparticles show no intrinsic cytotoxicity even at a concentration up to 300 micro g/mL. More importantly, the results demonstrate that these nanoparticles can selectively protect human normal cells but not the cancer cells from ROS damage after exposure to UV-radiation, suggesting their potential applications for PDT treatment. The rationale behind the selective protection effect can be attributed to the hindrance of the Ce (III)/Ce (IV) redox reaction cycle on the surface of cerium oxide nanoparticles due to the abnormal intracellular pH in cancer cells. Furthermore, these cerium oxide nanoparticles can be used as effective drug carriers for enhancing drug delivery efficiency to target cancer cells like hepatoma HepG2 cells. This raises the possibility of applying cerium oxide nanoparticles for multifunctional therapeutic applications, i.e., combination of efficient PDT and chemotherapy.

  9. Dynamics of photoinduced reactions at oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shamery, K.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes our work on UV-laser induced desorption of small molecules and atoms from transition metal oxides. The systems presented serve as examples for a simple photochemical reaction, the fission of the molecule surface bond. State resolved detection methods were used to record the final state distributions of the desorbing neutral molecules. Detailed results on the systems NO/NiO(1 1 1) and CO/Cr2O3(0 0 0 1) are presented. The experiments include investigations on stereodynamic aspects like the angular distributions of the desorbing molecules and, in the case of CO desorption, the rotational alignment with respect to the surface normal. Large desorption cross sections of (6±1) ṡ 10-17 cm2 for NO and (3.5±1) ṡ 10-17 cm2 for CO have been found for the desorption at 6.4 eV. The wavelength dependence indicates that the primary excitation step is substrate induced. The final state distributions show a high degree of translational, rotational and vibrational excitation and are clearly nonthermal of origin. The results are consistent with the formation of a negative ion intermediate state of the adsorbate. This observation is supported from a comparison to former results on NO/NiO(1 0 0) for which extensive ab initio calculations including electronically excited states exist. A spin state dependence of the vibrational excitation of NO could only be observed for NO/NiO(1 1 1) and is absent for NO/NiO(1 0 0). We attribute this observation to a spin state dependent coupling of the desorbing molecule to the surface in case the spin lattice orientation of the surface shows a preferential orientation. In the (1 1 1) plane the spin orientation is parallel within neighbour nickel ions while it is alternating in the (1 0 0) plane. For both systems studied the velocity component parallel to the surface is constant leading to a strong peaking along the surface normal for the fast molecules. The change from a preferred helicopter rotation (angular momentum

  10. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng; Yang Shengchun; You Hongjun; Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  11. Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

    2008-12-31

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using

  12. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  13. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, March--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Wang, Chaun-Bao; Shi, Chunlei; Sun, Qun

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this research is the selective oxidative coupling of methane to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Air, oxygen or carbon dioxide, rather than nitrous oxide will be utilized as the oxidizing gas at high gas hourly space velocity, but mild reaction conditions (500-700 {degrees}C, 1 atm total pressure). All the investigated processes are catalytic, aiming at minimizing gas phase reactions that are difficult to control. The research is divided into the following three tasks: (1) maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} products over promoted Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (2) selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and (3) catalyst characterization and optimization. Task 1 dealt with the preparation, testing, and optimization of acidic promoted lanthana-based catalysts for the synthesis of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and is essentially completed. Task 2 aims at the formation and optimization of promoted catalysts for the synthesis of oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Task 3 involves characterization of the most promising catalysts so that optimization can be achieved under Task 2. Accomplishments for this period are presented.

  14. The pathophysiology of extracellular hemoglobin associated with enhanced oxidative reactions

    PubMed Central

    Rifkind, Joseph M.; Mohanty, Joy G.; Nagababu, Enika

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC), oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV)-ferrylHb and OxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV) contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(III)Hb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers are taken up into cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease, and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern with hemolytic anemia where there is an increase in hemolysis. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that the transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or the blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, do not further increase

  15. Guanine oxidation: one- and two-electron reactions.

    PubMed

    Pratviel, Geneviève; Meunier, Bernard

    2006-08-07

    Guanine bases in DNA are the most sensitive to oxidation. A lot of effort has been devoted to the understanding of the chemical modifications of guanine under different oxidizing conditions, the final goal being to know which lesions in DNA can be expected in vivo and their biological consequences. This article analyses the mechanisms underlying guanine oxidation by the comparison between one- and two-electron transfer processes. The different oxidants used in vitro give complementary answers. This overview presents a choice of some key intermediates and the predictive description of G-oxidation products that can be generated from these intermediates depending on the reaction conditions.

  16. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  17. [Characteristics of sulfate reduction-ammonia oxidation reaction].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yi; Huang, Yong; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Li; Pan, Yang; Liu, Fu-Xin

    2013-11-01

    The sulfate reduction-ammonia oxidation reaction with ANAMMOX sludge at autotrophic condition was implemented. It was found that the pH level decreased during the reaction. Elemental sulfur and nitrogen gas were the final products, while NO3(-) -N was the intermediate product during the sulfate reduction-ammonia oxidation reaction. The conversion ratio of NH4(+) -N/SO4(2-) -S decreased with the decrease in n(N)/n(S) (molar ratio) of raw water. n(N)/n(S) of raw water had little effect on the ammonia conversion ratio. Lower n(N)/n(S) could improve the SO4(2-)-S conversion ratio, but with more NH4(+) -N oxidized into NO3(-) -N, resulting in decreased n(TN)/n(TS) removal ratio. This indicates that the sulfate reduction-ammonia oxidation reaction is not an elementary reaction. Ammonia can be oxidized into NO2(-) -N or NO3(-) -N by sulfate. Shortening the reaction time would be conducive to nitrogen losses, because the reaction of NO3(-) -N production is the rate-limiting step.

  18. Cyclization Reactions through DDQ-Mediated Vinyl Oxazolidinone Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Floreancig, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Vinyl oxazolidinones react with DDQ to form α,β-unsaturated acyliminium ions in a new method for forming electrophiles under oxidative conditions. Appended nucleophiles undergo 1,4-addition reactions with these intermediates to form cyclic vinyl oxazolidinones with good levels of diastereocontrol, highlighting a new approach to utilizing oxidative carbon–hydrogen bond functionalization to increase molecular complexity. PMID:19552390

  19. The Effect of Metal Oxide on Nanoparticles from Thermite Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lewis Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how metal oxide used in a thermite reaction can impact the production of nanoparticles. The results showed the presence of nanoparticles (less than 1 micron in diameter) of at least one type produced by each metal oxide. The typical particles were metallic spheres, which ranged from 300 nanometers in…

  20. Mechanism of selective methanol oxidation over vanadium oxide-titanium oxide catalysts: a FT-IT and flow reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Busca, G.; Elmi, A.S.; Forzatti, P.

    1987-09-24

    The mechanism of the selective oxidation of methanol on two V-Ti oxide catalyst samples, prepared by impregnation and coprecipitation techniques, respectively is investigated. The interaction of methanol and its oxidation products (i.e., formaldehyde, dimethoxymethane, formic acid, and methyl formate) is studied by FR-IR spectroscopy and compares with the results of flow reactor measurements performed at different temperatures, contact times, and methanol/oxygen molar feed ratios. The data are interpreted on the basis of a reaction mechanism which involved the following steps: (i) condensation of methanol with surface VOH groups; (ii) H abstraction from methoxy groups leading to coordinated formaldehyde; (iii) formation of dioxymethylene species by interaction of adsorbed formaldehyde with nucelophilic sites; (iv) reaction of dioxymethylene species with methanol to give dimethoxymethane; (v) successive oxidation of dioxymethylene groups to formate ions; (vi) reaction of these ions either with methanol to produce methyl formate or with water to give formic acid; (vii) decomposition of formate species to produce carbon monoxide; (viii) parallel oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. The behaviors of the surface species are compared with those monitored on other systems and the catalyst requirements for the title reaction are discussed.

  1. Mutagenicity screening of reaction products from the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of phenolic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, I.J.; Aitken, M.D.; Ball, L.M.; Heck, P.E. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Phenol-oxidizing enzymes such as peroxidases, laccases, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of a wide range of phenolic pollutants. Although the use of these enzymes in waste-treatment applications has been proposed by a number of investigators, little information exists on the toxicological characteristics of the oxidation products. The enzymes chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase were used in this study to catalyze the oxidation of phenol, several mono-substituted phenols, and pentachlorophenol. Seventeen reaction mixtures representing selected combinations of enzyme and parent phenol were subjected to mutagenicity screening using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay; five selected mixtures were also incubated with the S9 microsomal preparation to detect the possible presence of promutagens. The majority of reaction mixtures tested were not directly mutagenic, and none of those tested with S9 gave a positive response. Such lack of mutagenicity of enzymatic oxidation products provides encouragement for establishing the feasibility of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation as a waste-treatment process. The only positive responses were obtained with reaction products from the lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. Clear positive responses were observed when strain TA100 was incubated with 2-nitrophenol reaction-product mixtures, and when strain TA98 was incubated with the 4-nitrophenol reaction mixture. Additionally, 2,4-dinitrophenol was identified as a reaction product from 4-nitrophenol, and preliminary evidence indicates that both 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrophenol are produced from the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol. Possible mechanism by which these nitration reactions occur are discussed.

  2. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalkylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms operative in thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes are investigated. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids is not established. It was determined that this behavior is not associated with hydrogen end groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres is dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio is reached, a steady rate appears to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, CF2OCF2CF2O2, no. CF2CF2O, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys is much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexafluoropropene derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys is very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appears to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes this takes place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... Substances § 721.10375 Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... Substances § 721.10375 Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... Substances § 721.10375 Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate,...

  6. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalklethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Harris, D. H.; Smythe, M. E.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to investigate the mechanisms operative in thermal and thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids has not been established. It was determined that this behavior was not associated with hydrogen end-groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres was found to be dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio was reached, a steady rate appeared to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, -CF2OCF2CF2O-, not -CF2CF2O-, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys was found to be much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexalfuoropropane oxide derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation/anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys was very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appeared to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes; this took place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  7. Oxidation Reactions of Ethane over Ba-Ce-O Based Perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James E.; Sault, Allen G.; Trudell, Daniel E.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Jackson, Nancy B.

    1999-08-18

    Ethane oxidation reactions were studied over pure and Ca-, Mg-, Sr-, La-, Nd-, and Y-substituted BaCeO{sub 3} perovskites under oxygen limited conditions. Several of the materials, notably the Ca- and Y-substituted materials, show activity for complete oxidation of the hydrocarbon to CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 650 C. At higher temperatures, the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) to ethylene becomes significant. Conversions and ethylene yields are enhanced by the perovskites above the thermal reaction in our system in some cases. The perovskite structure is not retained in the high temperature reaction environment. Rather, a mixture of carbonates and oxides is formed. Loss of the perovskite structure correlates with a loss of activity and selectivity to ethylene.

  8. Chemical tailoring of teicoplanin with site-selective reactions.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Tejas P; Miller, Scott J

    2013-06-05

    Semisynthesis of natural product derivatives combines the power of fermentation with orthogonal chemical reactions. Yet, chemical modification of complex structures represents an unmet challenge, as poor selectivity often undermines efficiency. The complex antibiotic teicoplanin eradicates bacterial infections. However, as resistance emerges, the demand for improved analogues grows. We have discovered chemical reactions that achieve site-selective alteration of teicoplanin. Utilizing peptide-based additives that alter reaction selectivities, certain bromo-teicoplanins are accessible. These new compounds are also scaffolds for selective cross-coupling reactions, enabling further molecular diversification. These studies enable two-step access to glycopeptide analogues not available through either biosynthesis or rapid total chemical synthesis alone. The new compounds exhibit a spectrum of activities, revealing that selective chemical alteration of teicoplanin may lead to analogues with attenuated or enhanced antibacterial properties, in particular against vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant strains.

  9. Quinone-Catalyzed Selective Oxidation of Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wendlandt, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    Lead In Quinones are common stoichiometric reagents in organic chemistry. High potential para-quinones, such as DDQ and chloranil, are widely used and typically promote hydride abstraction. In recent years, many catalytic applications of these methods have been achieved by using transition metals, electrochemistry or O2 to regenerate the oxidized quinone in situ. Complementary studies have led to the development of a different class of quinones that resemble the ortho-quinone cofactors in Copper Amine Oxidases and mediate efficient and selective aerobic and/or electrochemical dehydrogenation of amines. The latter reactions typically proceed via electrophilic transamination and/or addition-elimination reaction mechanisms, rather than hydride abstraction pathways. The collective observations show that the quinone structure has a significant influence on the reaction mechanism and have important implications for the development of new quinone reagents and quinone-catalyzed transformations. PMID:26530485

  10. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

  11. Equilibrating metal-oxide cluster ensembles for oxidation reactions using oxygen in water

    Treesearch

    Ira A. Weinstock; Elena M. G. Barbuzzi; Michael W. Wemple; Jennifer J. Cowan; Richard S. Reiner; Dan M. Sonnen; Robert A. Heintz; James S. Bond; Craig L. Hill

    2001-01-01

    Although many enzymes can readily and selectively use oxygen in water--the most familiar and attractive of all oxidants and solvents, respectively–-the design of synthetic catalysts for selective water-based oxidation processes utilizing molecular oxygen remains a daunting task. Particularly problematic is the fact that oxidation of substrates by O2 involves radical...

  12. A Bioorthogonal Reaction of N-Oxide and Boron Reagents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Justin; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-12-21

    The development of bioorthogonal reactions has classically focused on bond-forming ligation reactions. In this report, we seek to expand the functional repertoire of such transformations by introducing a new bond-cleaving reaction between N-oxide and boron reagents. The reaction features a large dynamic range of reactivity, showcasing second-order rate constants as high as 2.3×10(3)  M(-1)  s(-1) using diboron reaction partners. Diboron reagents display minimal cell toxicity at millimolar concentrations, penetrate cell membranes, and effectively reduce N-oxides inside mammalian cells. This new bioorthogonal process based on miniscule components is thus well-suited for activating molecules within cells under chemical control. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the metabolic diversity of nature enables the use of naturally occurring functional groups that display inherent biocompatibility alongside abiotic components for organism-specific applications.

  13. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  14. Selective oxidation of methanol and ethanol on supported ruthenium oxide clusters at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2004-03-04

    RuO2 domains supported on SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 catalyze the oxidative conversion of methanol to formaldehyde, methylformate, and dimethoxymethane with unprecedented rates and high combined selectivity (>99 percent) and yield at low temperatures (300-400 K). Supports influence turnover rates and the ability of RuO2 domains to undergo redox cycles required for oxidation turnovers. Oxidative dehydrogenation turnover rates and rates of stoichiometric reduction of RuO2 in H2 increased in parallel when RuO2 domains were dispersed on more reducible supports. These support effects, the kinetic effects of CH3OH and O2 on reaction rates, and the observed kinetic isotope effects with CH3OD and CD3OD reactants are consistent with a sequence of elementary steps involving kinetically relevant H-abstraction from adsorbed methoxide species using lattice oxygen atoms and with methoxide formation in quasi-equilibrated CH3OH dissociation on nearly stoichiometric RuO2 surfaces. Anaerobic transient experiments confirmed that CH3OH oxidation to HCHO requires lattice oxygen atoms and that selectivities are not influenced by the presence of O2. Residence time effects on selectivity indicate that secondary HCHO-CH3OH acetalization reactions lead to hemiacetal or methoxymethanol intermediates that convert to dimethoxymethane in reactions with CH3OH on support acid sites or dehydrogenate to form methylformate on RuO2 and support redox sites. These conclusions are consistent with the tendency of Al2O3 and SiO2 supports to favor dimethoxymethane formation, while SnO2, ZrO2, and TiO2 preferentially form methylformate. These support effects on secondary reactions were confirmed by measured CH3OH oxidation rates and selectivities on physical mixtures of supported RuO2 catalysts and pure supports. Ethanol also reacts on supported RuO2 domains to form predominately acetaldehyde and diethoxyethane at 300-400 K. The bifunctional nature of these reaction pathways and the remarkable

  15. Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

    1995-12-01

    During this quarter, progress was made on the following tasks: TPD techniques were employed to study the reaction mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia over iron oxide pillared clay catalyst; and a sulfur dioxide resistant iron oxide/titanium oxide catalyst was developed.

  16. Site-selective covalent reactions on proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Ho; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Wei; Wong, Clarence T T; Sun, Hongyan; Xia, Jiang

    2017-07-05

    To achieve precise control of the signaling events or to achieve unmistakable synthesis of biomolecules, nature has evolved organic reactions involving proteinogenic amino acids with unparalleled site selectivity. For example, dedicated enzymes accurately dictate the site of post-translational modifications in signaling proteins, and ribosomes precisely link the C-terminal carboxylic acid of one unprotected amino acid with the N-terminal amino group of the other amino acid through spatially confined proximity. For many years, chemists have been striving to achieve site selectivity on biomolecules by mimicking nature. Driven by the development of chemoselective protein conjugation reactions, enzymology and protein-protein interactions, the past decade has witnessed a boom in site-selective protein conjugation reactions. (In this review, a site-selective protein conjugation reaction is defined as an organic reaction that targets a single amino acid instead of a kind of amino acids in a protein or a proteome under physiological conditions, for example, a single cysteine residue among all of the cysteines.) In this review, we summarize the recent advancements of bioconjugation reactions that demonstrate this feature of precise site selectivity, focusing on the reactions of the proteinogenic amino acids (excluding those at non-coded or non-proteinogenic amino acids that are introduced to proteins through genetic manipulations). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity.

  18. Regioselective Carbohydrate Oxidations: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Study on Selectivity, Rate, and Side-Product Formation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Palladium/neocuproine catalyzed oxidation of glucosides shows an excellent selectivity for the C3-OH, but in mannosides and galactosides, unselective oxidation was initially observed. For further application in more-complex (oligo)saccharides, a better understanding of the reaction, in terms of selectivity and reactivity, is required. Therefore, a panel of different glycosides was synthesized, subjected to palladium/neocuproine catalyzed oxidation and subsequently analyzed by qNMR. Surprisingly, all studied glucosides, mannosides, galactosides, and xylosides show selective oxidation of the C3-OH. However, subsequent reaction of the resulting ketone moiety is the main culprit for side product formation. Measures are reported to suppress these side reactions. The observed differences in reaction rate, glucosides being the most rapidly oxidized, may be exploited for the selective oxidation of complex oligosaccharides. PMID:28367353

  19. Reactions of nitric oxide with tree and fungal laccase.

    PubMed

    Martin, C T; Morse, R H; Kanne, R M; Gray, H B; Malmström, B G; Chan, S I

    1981-09-01

    The reactions of nitric oxide (NO) with the oxidized and reduced forms of fungal and tree laccase, as well as with tree laccase depleted in type 2 copper, are reported. The products of the reactions were determined by NMR and mass spectroscopy, whereas the oxidation states of the enzymes were monitored by EPR and optical spectroscopy. All three copper sites in fungal laccase are reduced by NO. In addition, NO forms a specific complex with the reduced type 2 copper. NO similarly reduces all of the copper sites in tree laccase, but it also oxidizes the reduced sites produced by ascorbate or NO reduction. A catalytic cycle is set up in which N2O, NO2-, and various forms of the enzyme are produced. On freezing of fully reduced tree laccase in the presence of NO, the type 1 copper becomes reoxidized. This reaction does not occur with the enzyme depleted in type 2 copper, suggesting that it involves intramolecular electron transfer from the type 1 copper to NO bound to the type 2 copper. When the half-oxidized tree laccase is formed in the presence of NO, a population of molecules exists which exhibits a type 3 EPR signal. A triplet EPR signal is also seen in the same preparation and is attributed to a population of the enzyme molecules in which NO is bound to the reduced copper of a half-oxidized type 3 copper site.

  20. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  1. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  2. Gaseous Heterogeneous Catalytic Reactions over Mn-Based Oxides for Environmental Applications: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haomiao; Yan, Naiqiang; Qu, Zan; Liu, Wei; Mei, Jian; Huang, Wenjun; Zhao, Songjian

    2017-08-15

    Manganese oxide has been recognized as one of the most promising gaseous heterogeneous catalysts due to its low cost, environmental friendliness, and high catalytic oxidation performance. Mn-based oxides can be classified into four types: (1) single manganese oxide (MnOx), (2) supported manganese oxide (MnOx/support), (3) composite manganese oxides (MnOx-X), and (4) special crystalline manganese oxides (S-MnOx). These Mn-based oxides have been widely used as catalysts for the elimination of gaseous pollutants. This review aims to describe the environmental applications of these manganese oxides and provide perspectives. It gives detailed descriptions of environmental applications of the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3, the catalytic combustion of volatile organic compounds, Hg(0) oxidation and adsorption, and soot oxidation, in addition to some other environmental applications. Furthermore, this review mainly focuses on the effects of structure, morphology, and modified elements and on the role of catalyst supports in gaseous heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Finally, future research directions for developing manganese oxide catalysts are proposed.

  3. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  4. Kinetics of oxytetracycline reaction with a hydrous manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Kennedy F; Pedersen, Joel A

    2006-12-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics comprise a class of broad spectrum antimicrobial agents finding application in human therapy, animal husbandry, aquaculture, and fruit crop production. To better understand the processes affecting these antibiotics in soils and sediments, the kinetics of oxytetracycline transformation by a hydrous manganese oxide (MnO2) were investigated as a function of reactant concentration, pH, and temperature. Oxytetracycline was rapidly degraded by MnO2. Initial reaction rates exhibited pronounced pH-dependence, increasing as pH decreased. Reaction of oxytetracycline with MnO2 was accompanied by generation of Mn(II) ions, suggesting oxidative transformation of the antibiotic. At pH 5.6, apparent reaction orders for oxytetracycline and MnO2 were 0.7 and 0.8. Reaction order with respect to H+ was 0.6 between pH 4 and 9. Initial reaction rates increased by a factor of approximately 2.4 for 10 degrees C temperature increases; the apparent activation energy (60 kJ x mol(-1)) was consistent with a surface-controlled reaction. Reactivity of tetracycline antibiotics toward MnO2 increased in the following order: rolitetracyline oxytetracycline < or =tetracycline approximately meclocycline < chlortetracycline. The initial rate of chlortetracycline degradation by MnO2 was substantially larger than that of the other tetracycline antibiotics investigated. MnO2 reactivity toward oxytetracycline decreased with time; a retarded rate equation was used to describe oxytetracycline reaction with MnO2 under declining rate conditions. This study indicates that natural manganese oxides in soils and sediments are likely to promote appreciable degradation of tetracycline antibiotics, and that reaction rates are strongly dependent on reaction time scale and solution conditions.

  5. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-12-31

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate selective oxidation as a pretreatment for the enhanced desulfurization of Illinois Basin coals using a variety of mild thermal/chemical processes. Both an Illinois No.6 and an Indiana No.5 coal were selectively oxidized with peroxyacetic acid in the pretreatment step. The products were then treated with many hydroxide and carbonate bases using either water, methanol or ethanol as the solvent system. Other reaction variables investigated include reaction temperature, reaction time, pyrolysis pressure, particle size of the coal and the level of oxidation in the pretreatment step. Throughout the study the selectively oxidized coals were compared to unoxidized control coals. Model compounds were also studied. The results of these studies overwhelmingly show that selective oxidation with peroxyacetic acid significantly enhances the level of desulfurization obtained with subsequent chemical/thermal treatments. Indeed, every process investigated, including simple pyrolysis experiments, showed sulfur removal in the pretreatment step and the subsequent step to be substantially additive. In addition, considerable enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal was obtained by the selective oxidation pretreatment. Sulfur contents lower than 0.25% were obtained for selectively oxidized coals. This represents an overall sulfur reduction of around 95%. This is beyond the level required for compliance with Clean Air Act legislation. No unoxidized coal, regardless of the desulfurization treatment, approached this level of sulfur removal.

  6. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  7. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Wang, C.-B.

    1996-12-31

    Series of catalysts consisting of MoO{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2}, and SnO{sub 2} impregnated onto oxide supports consisting of SiO{sub 2} (Cab-O-Sil), TiO{sub 2} or SnO{sub 2} were previously prepared and tested for the selective oxidation of methane to oxygenates, and it was found that the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was the most active and most selective toward the formation of formaldehyde. These catalysts have been characterized by laser Raman spectroscopy after dehydration and during the methane oxidation reaction with a CH{sub 4}/02 = 10/1 reaction mixture at 500{degrees}C in a continuous flow in situ reaction cell. With the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst (the most active catalyst among those studied), no significant structural changes were revealed by in situ Raman analyses, indicating that the fully oxidized surface sites were related to the high formaldehyde selectivivity. Over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SnO{sub 2} catalysts, CO and CO{sub 2} were the principal products produced by oxidation of methane. For the first time, in situ Raman analysis clearly showed that for these latter catalysts, the surface vanadium(V) oxide species were partially reduced under the steady-state reaction conditions. The performance of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was similar to that of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}TiO{sub 2} catalyst, consistent with the earlier observation that vanadia was largely bound to the titania overlayer. It appears that formaldehyde selectivity decreased with increasing catalyst reducibility, but no direct correlation of catalyst activity with reductibility was observed.

  8. Elucidation of the reaction mechanism during the removal of copper oxide by halogen surfactant at the surface of copper plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Shun; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Takashi; Motomiya, Kenichi; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although copper nanoparticles have various attractive properties, electrical applications of these was not achieved because of its surface oxide layer which prohibited electrical conduction. Thus, it can be considered that a new elimination method of the oxide on Cu surface, which simultaneously provide the resistance to re-oxidized, should be developed. In this study, the reaction between the metal oxide on Cu plate surface and halogen surfactant was introduced into development as a new elimination method of surface oxide layer. Since electrochemical and surface analysis are effective for analyzing the reaction mechanism which expected to be the reduction reaction of the oxide on metal surface, Cu electrode, which represented material of Cu nanoparticles surface, was used for the reaction mechanism analysis. The oxide is removed by controlling the temperature and selecting the optimal combination of solvents and the halogen surfactant (TIC). Results of electrochemical measurements strongly suggest that the chemical reaction between the oxides on the surface with the halogen surfactant is a substitution reaction which converts Cu oxide to Cu bromide, and continuously formed Cu bromide was dissolved into solvent. Totally, the oxide on the Cu surface was successfully eliminated.

  9. Selective oxidation of CO in hydrogen over gold supported on manganese oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Torres Sanchez, R.M.; Ueda, Atsushi; Tanaka, Koji

    1997-05-01

    To develop PEFCs for general use it is necessary to make catalysts that are able to operate at low temperature, that work in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and which have the ability to selectively remove CO from reformed gas by oxidizing CO to CO{sub 2}, while at the same time being inactive for the oxidation of H{sub 2}. Through the screening of support materials which give the largest difference in catalytic activity between the oxidation of CO and H{sub 2}, we found Au/MnOx to be one of the best candidates for the removal of CO from hydrogen-rich fuel gases. Gold supported on manganese oxides has also been investigated by Hoflund and co-workers for CO oxidation reaction in an inert gas background and by Iwasawa and his co-workers for the preparation method by use of an organo gold complex in the liquid phase. Because supported gold catalysts prefer oxidizing pretreatments, our major concern has been whether Au/MnOx is stable in H{sub 2}. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Method for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions, device for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Beuhler, Robert J.; White, Michael G.; Hrbek, Jan

    2006-08-15

    A catalytic process for the oxidation of organic. Oxygen is loaded into a metal foil by heating the foil while in contact with an oxygen-containing fluid. After cooling the oxygen-activated foil to room temperature, oxygen diffuses through the foil and oxidizes reactants exposed to the other side of the foil.

  11. A Study on the Laser Spatter and the Oxidation Reactions During Selective Laser Melting of 316L Stainless Steel, Al-Si10-Mg, and Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, Marco; Tuck, Chris; Aboulkhair, Nesma T.; Maskery, Ian; Ashcroft, Ian; Wildman, Ricky D.; Hague, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The creation of an object by selective laser melting (SLM) occurs by melting contiguous areas of a powder bed according to a corresponding digital model. It is therefore clear that the success of this metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology relies on the comprehension of the events that take place during the melting and solidification of the powder bed. This study was designed to understand the generation of the laser spatter that is commonly observed during SLM and the potential effects that the spatter has on the processing of 316L stainless steel, Al-Si10-Mg, and Ti-6Al-4V. With the exception of Ti-6Al-4V, the characterization of the laser spatter revealed the presence of surface oxides enriched in the most volatile alloying elements of the materials. The study will discuss the implication of this finding on the material quality of the built parts.

  12. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-04-12

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  13. Thermal Behavior Study of the MoVTeNb Oxide Catalyst for Selective Oxidation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, R.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.

    2009-06-01

    Several parameters involved in preparing the multi metal oxide (MMO) catalysts (Mo{sub 1}V{sub 0.3}Te{sub 0.23}Nb{sub 0.12}O{sub x}) for selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid (AA) were investigated. These included the proper pre-calcined and calcinations atmosphere effect on the performance of the catalysts. It was found that each metal element plays a critical role to the performance of an effective catalyst and also the calcinations under a non-flow inert atmosphere. The characterization results from XRD, SEM, TG and DSC show the important differences depending on the activation procedures of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst. The XRD analysis is used to identify the phase inventory of the MoVTeNb oxide catalysts. The structure of orthorhombic M1, M2, TeMo{sub 5}O{sub 16}, V{sub 0.95}Mo{sub 0.97}O{sub 5} and Mo{sub 5}O{sub 14} phase was investigated. The orthorhombic M1 phase is the most active and selective phase and is responsible for the major of the efficiently of the best catalyst for selective oxidation process. TGA and DTG allow the identification of the number and types, of reactions involving evaporation of small molecules from removal of ligands and water to condensation or drying processes. From all these analyses it was proven that the activation procedures would affect the performance of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst.

  14. Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Crocker

    2005-09-30

    This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3

  15. A Gallium Oxide-Graphene Oxide Hybrid Composite for Enhanced Photocatalytic Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungdu; Han, Kook In; Lee, In Gyu; Park, Won Kyu; Yoon, Yeojoon; Yoo, Chan Sei; Yang, Woo Seok; Hwang, Wan Sik

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid composites (HCs) made up of gallium oxide (GaO) and graphene oxide (GO) were investigated with the intent of enhancing a photocatalytic reaction under ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The material properties of both GaO and GO were preserved, even after the formation of the HCs. The incorporation of the GO into the GaO significantly enhanced the photocatalytic reaction, as indicated by the amount of methylene blue (MB) degradation. The improvements in the reaction were discussed in terms of increased surface area and the retarded recombination of generated charged carriers. PMID:28335255

  16. Evaluating candidate reactions to selection practices using organisational justice theory.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara; Carr, Victoria; Irish, Bill; Gregory, Simon

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to examine candidate reactions to selection practices in postgraduate medical training using organisational justice theory. We carried out three independent cross-sectional studies using samples from three consecutive annual recruitment rounds. Data were gathered from candidates applying for entry into UK general practice (GP) training during 2007, 2008 and 2009. Participants completed an evaluation questionnaire immediately after the short-listing stage and after the selection centre (interview) stage. Participants were doctors applying for GP training in the UK. Main outcome measures were participants' evaluations of the selection methods and perceptions of the overall fairness of each selection stage (short-listing and selection centre). A total of 23,855 evaluation questionnaires were completed (6893 in 2007, 10,497 in 2008 and 6465 in 2009). Absolute levels of perceptions of fairness of all the selection methods at both the short-listing and selection centre stages were consistently high over the 3years. Similarly, all selection methods were considered to be job-related by candidates. However, in general, candidates considered the selection centre stage to be significantly fairer than the short-listing stage. Of all the selection methods, the simulated patient consultation completed at the selection centre stage was rated as the most job-relevant. This is the first study to use a model of organisational justice theory to evaluate candidate reactions during selection into postgraduate specialty training. The high-fidelity selection methods are consistently viewed as more job-relevant and fairer by candidates. This has important implications for the design of recruitment systems for all specialties and, potentially, for medical school admissions. Using this approach, recruiters can systematically compare perceptions of the fairness and job relevance of various selection methods. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  17. Oxygen-functionalized few-layer graphene sheets as active catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Viviane; Fu, Wujun; Tsai, Yu-Tung; Meyer, Harry M; Rondinone, Adam J; Chen, Jihua; Wu, Zili; Overbury, Steven H; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-05-01

    Nanostructured graphitic forms of carbons have shown intersting potential for catalysis research and are ideal candidates to substitute the conventional metal-oxide catalysts because they can be easily disposed, which enables a greener, more sustainable catalytic process. Few-layer graphene and its functionalized form offer the opportunity to investigate the nature of graphitic active sites for oxidation reactions in well-defined carbon-based catalysts. In this paper, we report the utilization of oxygen-functionalized few-layer graphene sheets containing variable amounts of oxygen in the heterogeneous catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction of isobutane at 400ºC. Interestingly, there is poor correlation between oxygen content and catalytic performance. Carbonyl groups were found to be highly stable, and graphene that had higher sp(2) character, the lowest oxygen content, and fewer edge sites presented the lowest specific rate of isobutane reaction, although the isobutene selectivity remained high. The reoxidation of the graphene surface occurred at the same rate as the ODH reaction suggesting a Mars-van Krevelen type of mechanism, similar to that which takes place on oxide surfaces. These results appear to suggest that a higher fraction of exposed edges where oxygen active sites can be formed and exchanged should lead to more active catalysts for ODH reactions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Experimental and Mechanistic Analysis of the Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative C8-Selective C–H Homocoupling of Quinoline N-Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, David E.; Lakey-Beitia, Johant; Chavez, Gabriel; Ilie, Carla; Arman, Hadi D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel site-selective palladium-catalyzed oxidative C8–H homocoupling reaction of quinoline N-oxides has been developed. The reaction affords substituted 8,8'-biquinolyl N,N'-dioxides that can be readily converted to a variety of functionalized 8,8'-biquinolyls. Mechanistic studies point to the crucial role of the oxidant and a non-innocent behavior of acetic acid as a solvent. PMID:25966913

  19. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth’s evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in “functional weightlessness” were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and

  20. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-12-20

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  1. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  2. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  3. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  4. Selective air oxidation of cyclohexane in supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Li; Buelow, S.J.; Tumas, W.

    1996-12-31

    We have explored the use of molecular oxygen as the oxidant for the selective oxidation of cyclohexane using cobalt catalysts in supercritical CO{sub 2}. We have chosen to use supercritial CO{sub 2} as a co-solvent for reasons: (1) oxygen, cyclohexane and acetic acid are miscible in supercritical CO{sub 2} and therefore oxidation can occur in a homogeneous phase; (2) C02 is inert for oxidation and can be easily separated from the reaction mixture; (3) CO{sub 2} is environmentally benign. Adipic acid was formed at 80 % selectivity with 5% conversion. Reaction rates and product selectivity will be reported as a function of temperature and pressure.

  5. Wavelength-selective light-triggered strand exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Morihiro, K; Kodama, T; Mori, S; Tsunoda, S; Obika, S

    2016-02-07

    We prepared an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) bearing two 4-hydroxy-2-mercaptobenzimidazole nucleobase analogues (SB(NV) and SB(NB)) modified with different photolabile groups. This ODN enabled a light-triggered strand exchange reaction in a wavelength-selective manner.

  6. Catalytic Reaction Synthesis for the Partial Oxidation of Methane to Formaldehyde.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas-Galindo, Maria-Guadalupe

    Catalytic reaction synthesis for the partial oxidation of methane to formaldehyde has been studied by combining microkinetic analysis with molecular orbital calculations. This strategy is used to establish microscopic correlations between the structure and composition of the active site and the kinetic parameters of the reaction mechanism. Using atom clusters to represent the active site of transition metal oxide catalysts, the relationship was probed between coordination number, oxidation state, and ionization potential of the active cation and the reaction steps of methane activation and surface reactions leading to formaldehyde formation. The analysis suggests that in transition metal oxide catalysts, the d-band orbitals of the metal cation should be empty, since otherwise CO_2 formation from CO oxidation will be excessive. Furthermore, the transition metal oxide d-band must be located at sufficiently low energy that it may accept electrons during methane activation. Oxygen O- species, representing vacancies in the 2p cluster band, will favor methane activation. However, clusters with fully occupied 2p bands (O^ {2-}^ecies) will favor formaldehyde production. Such inferences illustrate how experimental and theoretical information already incorporated into an existing microkinetic model for the reaction over V _2O_5 and MoO _3 catalysts can be extended to describe the reaction over new materials in the search for more active and selective catalysts. Using parameters estimated from the molecular orbital calculations, microkinetic reaction simulations were also shown to be useful to identify reactor operating conditions that may favor the production of formaldehyde. The simulation can be used to identify key experiments necessary to test the performance of postulated catalytic materials. The economic evaluation of the process design sets important target goals for methane conversion and formaldehyde selectivity that a catalytic material must satisfy to create a new

  7. Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics of Enargite Oxidation at Roasting Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Aracena, Alvaro; Ruiz, Maria C.

    2012-10-01

    Roasting of enargite (Cu3AsS4) in the temperature range of 648 K to 898 K (375 °C to 625 °C) in atmospheres containing variable amounts of oxygen has been studied by thermogravimetric methods. From the experimental results of weight loss/gain data and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of partially reacted samples, the reaction mechanism of the enargite oxidation was determined, which occurred in three sequential stages:

  8. Elementary reaction modeling of solid oxide electrolysis cells: Main zones for heterogeneous chemical/electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenying; Shi, Yixiang; Luo, Yu; Cai, Ningsheng

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model of solid oxide electrolysis cells considering the heterogeneous elementary reactions, electrochemical reactions and the transport process of mass and charge is applied to study the relative performance of H2O electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis and CO2/H2O co-electrolysis and the competitive behavior of heterogeneous chemical and electrochemical reactions. In cathode, heterogeneous chemical reactions exist near the outside surface and the electrochemical reactions occur near the electrolyte. According to the mathematical analysis, the mass transfer flux D ∇c determines the main zone size of heterogeneous chemical reactions, while the charge transfer flux σ ∇V determines the other one. When the zone size of heterogeneous chemistry is enlarged, more CO2 could react through heterogeneous chemical pathway, and polarization curves of CO2/H2O co-electrolysis could be prone to H2O electrolysis. Meanwhile, when the zone size of electrochemistry is enlarged, more CO2 could react through electrochemical pathway, and polarization curves of CO2/H2O co-electrolysis could be prone to CO2 electrolysis. The relative polarization curves, the ratio of CO2 participating in electrolysis and heterogeneous chemical reactions, the mass and charge transfer flux and heterogeneous chemical/electrochemical reaction main zones are simulated to study the effects of cathode material characteristics (porosity, particle diameter and ionic conductivity) and operating conditions (gas composition and temperature).

  9. In situ vibrational spectroscopic investigation of C4 hydrocarbon selective oxidation over vanadium-phosphorus-oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Zhi -Yang

    1999-05-10

    n-Butane selective oxidation over the VPO catalyst to maleic anhydride is the first and only commercialized process of light alkane selective oxidation. The mechanism of this reaction is still not well known despite over twenty years of extensive studies, which can partially be attributed to the extreme difficulties to characterize catalytic reactions real-time under typical reaction conditions. In situ spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Infrared spectroscopy and laser Raman spectroscopy were used in the current mechanistic investigations of n-butane oxidation over VPO catalysts. To identify the reaction intermediates, oxidation of n-butane, 1,3-butadiene and related oxygenates on the VPO catalyst were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy under transient conditions. n-Butane was found to adsorb on the VPO catalyst to form olefinic species, which were further oxidized to unsaturated, noncyclic carbonyl species. The open chain dicarbonyl species then experienced cycloaddition to form maleic anhydride. VPO catalyst phase transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction; Chapter 2: Literature review; and Chapter 5: Conclusion and recommendations.

  10. Vanadium and molybdenum peroxides: synthesis and catalytic activity in oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Conte, Valeria; Floris, Barbara

    2011-02-21

    Catalysis by transition metal ions in oxidation reactions with hydrogen peroxide and alkyl hydroperoxides is a leading topic in the pursuit of more sustainable and selective processes, to obtain compounds with high added value. The most recent achievements concerning the synthesis and characterization, as well as the key aspects of reactivity, of V(V) and Mo(VI) peroxo complexes have been collected here.

  11. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-04-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  12. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  13. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  15. Oxidation of antibiotics during water treatment with potassium permanganate: reaction pathways and deactivation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lanhua; Stemig, Amanda M; Wammer, Kristine H; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2011-04-15

    Recent work demonstrates that three widely administered antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, lincomycin, and trimethoprim) are oxidized by potassium permanganate [KMnO(4), Mn(VII)] under conditions relevant to water treatment operations. However, tests show that little to no mineralization occurs during reactions with Mn(VII), so studies were undertaken to characterize the reaction products and pathways and to assess the effects of Mn(VII)-mediated transformations on the antibacterial activity of solutions. Several oxidation products were identified for each antibiotic by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). For ciprofloxacin, 12 products were identified, consistent with oxidation of the tertiary aromatic and secondary aliphatic amine groups on the piperazine ring and the cyclopropyl group. For lincomycin, seven products were identified that indicate structural changes to the pyrrolidine ring and thioether group. For trimethoprim, seven products were identified, consistent with Mn(VII) reaction at C═C double bonds on the pyrimidine ring and the bridging methylene group. Oxidation pathways are proposed based on the identified products. Bacterial growth inhibition bioassays (E. coli DH5α) show that the mixture of products resulting from Mn(VII) reactions with the antibiotics collectively retain negligible antibacterial potency in comparison to the parent antibiotics. These results suggest that permanganate can be an effective reagent for eliminating the pharmaceutical activity of selected micropollutants during drinking water treatment.

  16. Oxidation induced ionization and reactions of metal carbide clusters (Nb, Zr, V, Ta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H. T.; Kerns, K. P.; Bell, R. C.; Castleman, A. W.

    1997-11-01

    Following our recent report of the oxidation induced formation of Ti8C12+ (H.T. Deng, K.P. Kerns, and A.W. Castleman, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 104 (1996) 4862), the oxidation induced ionization of niobium and zirconium carbide clusters are studied using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a laser induced plasma reaction source. It was found that reactions of both of these neutral carbide clusters with dioxygen leads to formation of carbide ions. The ion product distributions show that zirconium carbide clusters mainly take the form of Met--Car cations, but niobium carbide clusters favor a cubic-like crystalline pattern. Furthermore, reactions of mass-selected NbxCy+ with dioxygen result in a sequential loss of C2 units from NbxCy+, and leads to formation of Nbx+ and NbxC+ depending on y being an even or odd number. However, NbxCy+ shows comparably low reactivity towards nitrous oxide through a single oxygen abstraction mechanism. In comparison with the reaction products of VxCy+ with dioxygen, the complementary information obtained in the present study suggests that the C2 unit is a basic building block for formation of small early transition metal carbide clusters. The oxidation induced ionization mechanisms are also discussed in relation with the stability, ionization potentials, and structures of the clusters.

  17. Surface chemistry on small ruthenium nanoparticles: evidence for site selective reactions and influence of ligands.

    PubMed

    Novio, Fernando; Monahan, Daniele; Coppel, Yannick; Antorrena, Guillermo; Lecante, Pierre; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno

    2014-01-27

    The reactivity of two classes of ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) of small size, either sterically stabilized by a polymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP) or electronically stabilized by a ligand (bisdiphenylphosphinobutane, dppb) was tested towards standard reactions, namely CO oxidation, CO2 reduction and styrene hydrogenation. The aim of the work was to identify the sites of reactivity on the nanoparticles and to study how the presence of ancillary ligands can influence the course of these catalytic reactions by using NMR and IR spectroscopies. It was found that CO oxidation proceeds at room temperature (RT) on Ru NPs but that the system deactivates rapidly in the absence of ligands because of the formation of RuO2. In the presence of ligands, the reaction involves exclusively the bridging CO groups and no bulk oxidation is observed at RT under catalytic conditions. The reverse reaction, CO2 reduction, is achieved at 120 °C in the presence of H2 and leads to CO, which coordinates exclusively in a bridging mode, hence evidencing the competition between hydrides and CO for coordination on Ru NPs. The effect of ligands localized on the surface is also evidenced in catalytic reactions. Thus, styrene is slowly hydrogenated at RT by the two systems Ru/PVP and Ru/dppb, first into ethylbenzene and then into ethylcyclohexane. Selectively poisoning the nanoparticles with bridging CO groups leads to catalysts that are only able to reduce the vinyl group of styrene whereas a full poisoning with both terminal and bridging CO groups leads to inactive catalysts. These results are interpreted in terms of location of the ligands on the particles surface, and evidence site selectivity for both CO oxidation and arene hydrogenation.

  18. Catalysts for heterogeneous oxidation reaction based on metalloporphyrins immobilized on kaolinite modified with triethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Machado, Guilherme Sippel; Groszewicz, Pedro Braga; Castro, Kelly Aparecida Dias de Freitas; Wypych, Fernando; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2012-05-15

    Raw kaolinite was modified with triethanolamine (TEA), in an attempt to create a new support for the immobilization of metalloporphyrins. Anionic metalloporphyrins containing Fe(3+) or Mn(3+) as metallic centers were immobilized on the prepared support, and the obtained solids were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal analysis (thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses--TGA/DTA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The solids were used in heterogeneous oxidation catalysis of cyclooctene and cyclohexane. The yields from the oxidation of cyclooctene depended on the amount of TEA and/or water present in the solids. Good reaction yields were obtained for the oxidation of cyclohexane, with selectivity for the alcohol. In one specific case, a possible co-catalytic activity was verified for TEA during the oxidation of cyclohexane. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned establishing the level of selective oxidation required for successful desulfurization in subsequent treatments. Many desulfurization reactions were performed on pretreated as well as unoxidized coal. The results obtained support the following new conclusions: (1) The extent of selective oxidation in the pretreatment step does not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (2) Up to 84% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal and 86% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (3) Most desulfurizations at 250{degree}C did not produce significant levels of desulfurization. However as the temperature was increased levels of desulfurization increased considerably. (4) Although aqueous base was successful in removing sulfur from both pretreated and untreated samples, the most pronounced desulfurizations were obtained for the untreated samples. This is explained primarily by the dissolution of pyrite in the untreated samples. (5) The best desulfurizations involved SCM and base. Possible synergistic interactions between the methanol and the base are suspected. (6) Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product. The severity of desulfurization is reduced by selective oxidation pretreatment.

  20. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  1. Covalently Bonded Chitosan on Graphene Oxide via Redox Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bustos-Ramírez, Karina; Martínez-Hernández, Ana L.; Martínez-Barrera, Gonzalo; de Icaza, Miguel; Castaño, Víctor M.; Velasco-Santos, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures have played an important role in creating a new field of materials based on carbon. Chemical modification of carbon nanostructures through grafting has been a successful step to improve dispersion and compatibility in solvents, with biomolecules and polymers to form nanocomposites. In this sense carbohydrates such as chitosan are extremely valuable because their functional groups play an important role in diversifying the applications of carbon nanomaterials. This paper reports the covalent attachment of chitosan onto graphene oxide, taking advantage of this carbohydrate at the nanometric level. Grafting is an innovative route to modify properties of graphene, a two-dimensional nanometric arrangement, which is one of the most novel and promising nanostructures. Chitosan grafting was achieved by redox reaction using different temperature conditions that impact on the morphology and features of graphene oxide sheets. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared, Raman and Energy Dispersive spectroscopies were used to study the surface of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide. Results show a successful modification indicated by the functional groups found in the grafted material. Dispersions of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide samples in water and hexane revealed different behavior due to the chemical groups attached to the graphene oxide sheet. PMID:28809348

  2. Covalently Bonded Chitosan on Graphene Oxide via Redox Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Ramírez, Karina; Martínez-Hernández, Ana L; Martínez-Barrera, Gonzalo; Icaza, Miguel de; Castaño, Víctor M; Velasco-Santos, Carlos

    2013-03-07

    Carbon nanostructures have played an important role in creating a new field of materials based on carbon. Chemical modification of carbon nanostructures through grafting has been a successful step to improve dispersion and compatibility in solvents, with biomolecules and polymers to form nanocomposites. In this sense carbohydrates such as chitosan are extremely valuable because their functional groups play an important role in diversifying the applications of carbon nanomaterials. This paper reports the covalent attachment of chitosan onto graphene oxide, taking advantage of this carbohydrate at the nanometric level. Grafting is an innovative route to modify properties of graphene, a two-dimensional nanometric arrangement, which is one of the most novel and promising nanostructures. Chitosan grafting was achieved by redox reaction using different temperature conditions that impact on the morphology and features of graphene oxide sheets. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared, Raman and Energy Dispersive spectroscopies were used to study the surface of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide. Results show a successful modification indicated by the functional groups found in the grafted material. Dispersions of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide samples in water and hexane revealed different behavior due to the chemical groups attached to the graphene oxide sheet.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (PMN P-09-48) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (PMN P-09-48) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. Photovoltaic-driven organic electrosynthesis and efforts toward more sustainable oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Perkins, Robert J; Smith, Jake A

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combination of visible light, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry provides a convenient, inexpensive platform for conducting a wide variety of sustainable oxidation reactions. The approach presented in this article is compatible with both direct and indirect oxidation reactions, avoids the need for a stoichiometric oxidant, and leads to hydrogen gas as the only byproduct from the corresponding reduction reaction. PMID:25815081

  6. Method for catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions of simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bicker, D.; Bonaventura, J.

    1988-06-14

    A method for oxidizing carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide is described comprising: (1) contacting, together, carbon monoxide, a nitrogen-containing chelating agent and water; wherein the chelating agent is at least one member selected from the group consisting of methmeoglobin bound to a support, ferric hemoglobin bound to a support, iron-containing porphyrins bound to a support, and sperm whale myoglobin bound to a support, wherein the support is glass, a natural fiber, a synthetic fiber, a gel, charcoal, carbon ceramic material, a metal oxide, a synthetic polymer, a zeolite, a silica compound of an alumina compound; and (2) obtaining carbon dioxide.

  7. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  8. Selective nitrogen functionalization of graphene by Bucherer-type reaction.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdeněk; Luxa, Jan; Pumera, Martin

    2015-05-26

    Nitrogen functionalization of graphene offers new hybrid materials with improved performance for important technological applications. Despite studies highlighting the dependence of the performance of nitrogen-functionalized graphene on the types of nitrogen functional groups that are present, precise synthetic control over their ratio is challenging. Herein, the synthesis of nitrogen-functionalized graphene rich in amino groups by a Bucherer-type reaction under hydrothermal conditions is reported. The efficiency of the synthetic method under two hydrothermal conditions was examined for graphite oxide produced by Hummers and Hofmann oxidation routes. The morphological and structural properties of the amino-functionalized graphene were fully characterized. The use of a synthetic method with a well-known mechanism for derivatization of graphene will open new avenues for highly reproducible functionalization of graphene materials.

  9. Electrochemical reaction and oxidation of lecithin under pulsed electric fields (PEF) processing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Ruijin; Liang, Qi; Zhang, Wenbin; Hua, Xiao; Tang, Yali

    2012-12-12

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) processing is a promising nonthermal food preservation technology, which is ongoing from laboratory and pilot plant scale levels to the industrial level. Currently, greater attention has been paid to side effects occurring during PEF treatment and the influences on food qualities and food components. The present study investigated the electrochemical reaction and oxidation of lecithin under PEF processing. Results showed that electrochemical reaction of NaCl solutions at different pH values occurred during PEF processing. Active chlorine, reactive oxygen, and free radicals were detected, which were related to the PEF parameters and pH values of the solution. Lecithin extracted from yolk was further selected to investigate the oxidation of food lipids under PEF processing, confirming the occurrence of oxidation of lecithin under PEF treatment. The oxidative agents induced by PEF might be responsible for the oxidation of extracted yolk lecithin. Moreover, this study found that vitamin C as a natural antioxidant could effectively quench free radicals and inhibit the oxidation of lipid in NaCl and lecithin solutions as model systems under PEF processing, representing a way to minimize the impact of PEF treatment on food qualities.

  10. Nitrous Oxide-dependent Iron-catalyzed Coupling Reactions of Grignard Reagents.

    PubMed

    Döhlert, Peter; Weidauer, Maik; Enthaler, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The formation of carbon-carbon bonds is one of the fundamental transformations in chemistry. In this regard the application of palladium-based catalysts has been extensively investigated during recent years, but nowadays research focuses on iron catalysis, due to sustainability, costs and toxicity issues; hence numerous examples for iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions have been established, based on the coupling of electrophiles (R(1)-X, X = halide) with nucleophiles (R(2)-MgX). Only a small number of protocols deals with the iron-catalyzed oxidative coupling of nucleophiles (R(1)-MgX + R(2)-MgX) with the aid of oxidants (1,2-dihaloethanes). However, some issues arise with these oxidants; hence more recently the potential of the industrial waste product nitrous oxide (N(2)O) was investigated, because the unproblematic side product N(2) is formed. Based on that, we demonstrate the catalytic potential of easily accessible iron complexes in the oxidative coupling of Grignard reagents. Importantly, nitrous oxide was essential to obtain yields up to >99% at mild conditions (e.g. 1 atm, ambient temperature) and low catalyst loadings (0.1 mol%) Excellent catalyst performance is realized with turnover numbers of up to 1000 and turnover frequencies of up to 12000 h(-1). Moreover, a good functional group tolerance is observed (e.g. amide, ester, nitrile, alkene, alkyne). Afterwards the reaction of different Grignard reagents revealed interesting results with respect to the selectivity of cross-coupling product formation.

  11. Ionic Conductivity and its Role in Oxidation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamimi, Mazin Abdulla

    In the field of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a substantial portion of research is focused on the ability of some oxide materials to conduct oxygen anions through their structure. For electrolytes, the benefits of improving bulk transport of ions are obvious: decrease the resistive losses of the electrolyte, and device efficiency goes up and higher power densities are possible. Even for cathode materials, better bulk ion transport leads to an increase in the oxygen exchange rate at the cathode surface, and the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode surface is the rate limiting step for SOFC operation at intermediate temperatures (500-700ºC). As operation in this regime is a key step towards lowering the manufacturing cost and increasing the lifetime of devices, much effort is spent searching for new, more conductive materials, and analyzing existing materials to discover the structure-activity relationships that influence ionic conductivity. In the first part of this work, an overview is given of the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) techniques that are used to probe the structure of the materials in later parts. In the second part, NPD was used to analyze the structures of perovskite-type cathode materials, and show that increases in bulk conductivity led to increases in the surface oxygen exchange rate of these materials. In the final part, the methods used for SOFC cathode design were applied towards the design of oxide catalysts used for certain hydrocarbon partial oxidation reactions. The reactions studied follow the Mars van Krevelen mechanism, where oxygen atoms in the catalyst are consumed as part of the reaction and are subsequently replenished by oxygen in the gas phase. Similar to SOFC cathode operation, these processes include an oxygen reduction step, so it was hypothesized that increasing the ionic conductivity of the catalysts would improve their performance, just as it does for SOFC cathode materials. While the results are preliminary, the

  12. Switchable selectivity in an NHC-catalysed dearomatizing annulation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chang; Fleige, Mirco; Janssen-Müller, Daniel; Daniliuc, Constantin G.; Glorius, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The development of general catalytic methods for the regio- and stereoselective construction of chiral N-heterocycles in a diversity-oriented fashion remains a formidable challenge in organic synthesis. N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis has been shown to produce a variety of outcomes, but control of the reactivity has rarely been demonstrated. Here we report a switchable catalytic activation of enals with aromatic azomethine imines that provides high selectivity using NHC organocatalysts. The original selectivity corresponds to the acidity of the base used in the reaction. The catalytically generated chiral homoenolate or enol intermediate undergoes enantioselective annulation with electrophiles such as N-iminoquinolinium ylides, N-iminoisoquinolinium ylides and β-N-iminocarboline ylides. The good-to-high overall yields, high regioselectivities and excellent enantioselectivities observed are controlled by the catalyst and reaction conditions.

  13. Reaction of lincosamide antibiotics with manganese oxide in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ru; Ding, Yunjie; Johnston, Cliff T; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A; Li, Hui

    2010-06-15

    Lincosamides are among the most frequently detected antibacterial agents in effluents from wastewater treatment plants and surface runoff at agricultural production systems. Little is known about their transformations in the environment. This study revealed that manganese oxide caused rapid and extensive decomposition of clindamycin and lincomycin in aqueous solution. The reactions occurred mainly at the pyranose ring of lincosamides, initially by formation of complexes with Mn and cleavage of the ether linkage, leading to the formation of a variety of degradation products via subsequent hydrolytic and oxidative reactions. The results of LC-MS/MS and FTIR analysis confirm cleavage of the C-O-C bond in the pyranose ring, formation of multiple carbonyl groups, and transformation of the methylthio moiety to sulfur oxide. The overall transformation was controlled by interactions of cationic species of lincosamides with MnO(2) surfaces. The presence of electrolytes (i.e., NaCl, CaCl(2), and MnCl(2)) and dissolved organic matter in aqueous solution, and increase of solution pH, diminished lincosamide binding to MnO(2) hence reducing the rate and magnitude of the transformations. Results from this study indicate that manganese dioxides in soils and sediments could contribute to the decomposition of lincosamide antibiotics released into the environment.

  14. Selective Oxidation of Benzene to Phenol. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sherif, F.; Kung, H.; Marshall, C.

    2000-09-30

    Direct catalytic oxidation of commodity aromatics to phenolic compounds was studied by a team from Akzo Nobel Chemicals, Argonne National Lab., and Northwestern University. Results did not exceed previously published performance. The object of the project was to selectively oxidize benzene to phenol using a conventional oxidant.

  15. Kinetics, simulation and insights for CO selective oxidation in fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    The kinetics of CO preferential oxidation (PROX) was studied to evaluate various rate expressions and to simulate the performance the CO oxidation step of a methanol fuel processor for fuel cell applications. The reaction was carried out in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Engelhard Selectoxo (Pt-Fe/γ-alumina) catalyst and three self-prepared catalysts. Temperature was varied between 100 and 300 °C, and a of range feed rates and compositions were tested. A reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H 2 oxidation and the water gas shift reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. Using non-linear least squares, empirical power-law type rate expressions were found to fit the experimental data. It was critical to include all three reactions to determine good fitting results. In particular, the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Using this three reaction model, several simulation studies for a commercial PROX reactor were performed. In these simulations, the effect of O 2/CO ratio, the effect of water addition, and various non-isothermal modes of operation were evaluated. The results of the simulation were compared with corresponding experimental data and shows good agreement.

  16. Single Platinum Atoms Electrocatalysts: Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen Oxidation Reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Vukmirovic, Miomir B.; Teeluck, Krishani M.; Liu, Ping; ...

    2017-08-08

    We prepared atomically dispersed catalyst consisting of Pt atoms arranged in a c(2 × 2) array on RuO2(110) substrate. A large interatomic distance of Pt atoms in a c(2 × 2) phase precludes the reactants to interact with more than one Pt atoms. A strong bond of Pt atoms with RuO2 prevents agglomeration of Pt atoms to form 2D-islands or 3D-clusters. The activities of single Pt atom catalyst for the oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation reactions were determined and compared with those of bulk Pt. It has lower catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and similar activity for hydrogenmore » oxidation reaction compared to Pt(111). This was explained by a large calculated up-shift of the dband center of Pt atoms and larger Pt-Pt interatomic distance than that of Pt(111). Our information is of considerable interest for further development of electrocatalysis.« less

  17. Laccase-Functionalized Graphene Oxide Assemblies as Efficient Nanobiocatalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Patila, Michaela; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2016-01-01

    Multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies were prepared through the multi-point covalent immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor (TvL) on functionalized graphene oxide (fGO). The catalytic properties of the fGO-TvL nanoassemblies were found to depend on the number of the graphene oxide-enzyme layers present in the nanostructure. The fGO-TvL nanoassemblies exhibit an enhanced thermal stability at 60 °C, as demonstrated by a 4.7-fold higher activity as compared to the free enzyme. The multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies can efficiently catalyze the oxidation of anthracene, as well as the decolorization of an industrial dye, pinacyanol chloride. These materials retained almost completely their decolorization activity after five reaction cycles, proving their potential as efficient nano- biocatalysts for various applications. PMID:26927109

  18. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R; Ecija, David

    2016-03-11

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure.

  19. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-01-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure. PMID:26964764

  20. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-03-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure.

  1. The Pressure Dependency of Stabilized Criegee Intermediate Yields of Selected Ozone-Alkene Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, J. P.; Donahue, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) play an important role as an oxidizing species in atmospheric reactions. The ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere, i.e. the mechanism by which the SCIs are produced, is a major pathway to the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Just how much SCIs contribute to the SOA formation is not well known and fundamental research in the kinetics of SCI formation need to be performed to shed light on this mystery. The alkene ozonolysis is highly exothermic reaction, so a third body is needed for stabilizing the SCI, thus making the SCI yield pressure dependent. We studied the production of SCIs at different pressures by studying their ability to oxidize sulfur dioxide in a pressure controlled flow reactor. We used a mixture of ultra-high purity nitrogen, oxygen, and a selective scavenger for hydroxyl radical (OH) as a carrier gas, and injected a mixture of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and selected alkene to the center of the flow for ozonolysis to take place. With the OH radical scavenged, the SCI yield of the reaction was measured by measuring the amount of sulfuric acid formed in the reaction between SCI and sulfur dioxide with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). This work was supported by NASA/ROSES grant NNX12AE54G to CMU and Academy of Finland Center of Excellence project 1118615.

  2. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Asiri, Abdullah M; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-06-06

    This Concept is aimed at describing the current state of the art in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as heterogeneous catalysts for liquid-phase oxidations, focusing on three important substrates, namely, alkenes, alkanes and alcohols. Emphases are on the nature of active sites that have been incorporated within MOFs and on future targets to be set in this area. Thus, selective alkene epoxidation with peroxides or oxygen catalyzed by constitutional metal nodes of MOFs as active sites are still to be developed. Moreover, no noble metal-free MOF has been reported to date that can act as a general catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols. In contrast, in the case of alkanes, a target should be to tune the polarity of MOF internal pores to control the outcome of the autooxidation process, resulting in the selective formation of alcohol/ketone mixtures at high conversion.

  3. Reactions of oxidatively activated arylamines with thiols: reaction mechanisms and biologic implications. An overview.

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, P

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amines belong to a group of compounds that exert their toxic effects usually after oxidative biotransformation, primarily in the liver. In addition, aromatic amines also undergo extrahepatic activation to yield free arylaminyl radicals. The reactive intermediates are potential promutagens and procarcinogens, and responsible for target tissue toxicity. Since thiols react with these intermediates at high rates, it is of interest to know the underlying reaction mechanisms and the toxicologic implications. Phenoxyl radicals from aminophenols and aminyl radicals from phenylenediamines quickly disproportionate to quinone imines and quinone diimines. Depending on the structure, Michael addition or reduction reactions with thiols may prevail. Products of sequential oxidation/addition reactions (e.g., S-conjugates of aminophenols) are occasionally more toxic than the parent compounds because of their higher autoxidizability and their accumulation in the kidney. Even after covalent binding of quinone imines to protein SH groups, the resulting thioethers are able to autoxidize. The quinoid thioethers can then cross-link the protein by addition to neighboring nucleophiles. The reactions of nitrosoarenes with thiols yield a so-called "semimercaptal" from which various branching reactions detach, depending on substituents. Compounds with strong pi-donors, like 4-nitrosophenetol, give a resonance-stabilized N-(thiol-S-yl)-arylamine cation that may lead to bicyclic products, thioethers, and DNA adducts. Examples of toxicologic implications of the interactions of nitroso compounds with thiols are given for nitrosoimidazoles, heterocyclic nitroso compounds from protein pyrolysates, and nitrosoarenes. These data indicate that interactions of activated arylamines with thiols may not be regarded exclusively as detoxication reactions. PMID:7889834

  4. Palladium-catalyzed selective acyloxylation using sodium perborate as oxidant.

    PubMed

    Pilarski, Lukasz T; Janson, Pär G; Szabó, Kálmán J

    2011-03-04

    Sodium perborate (SPB), a principal component of washing powders, was employed as an inexpensive and eco-friendly oxidant in the palladium-catalyzed C-H acyloxylation of alkenes in excellent regio- and stereochemistry. The reactions used anhydrides as acyloxy sources. The method applies to both terminal and internal alkenes, and even benzylic C-H oxidation.

  5. Activity of deuterated aldehyde acetals in oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramshin, E.M.; Gumerova, V.K.; Kulak, L.G.; Zlotskii, S.S.

    1986-01-10

    This paper studies the activity of acetals - 2-methyl-1,3-dioxolane (I), 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane (II), and 1,1-dipropoxyethane (III) - and their deuterated analogs - 2-methyl-D/sub 3/-1,3-dioxolane-2-D (Ia), 2-phenyl-1,3dioxolane-2-D (IIa), and 1,1-dipropoxyethane-1,2,2,2-D/sub 4/ (IIIa) - in oxidation by ozone and oxygen. The replacement of hydrogen atoms at the acetal carbon by deuterium in I-III leads to a decrease in the ozonolysis and oxidation rate constants, indicating the predominant involvement of the C-H bond adjacent to the two heteroatoms. The increase in the kinetic isotope effect from 2 to 4 in going from formaldehyde derivatives to acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde derivatives is related to the increase in charge separation in the transition state of the reaction of acetals with ozone.

  6. Oxidation reactions of thymol: a pulse radiolysis and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Venu, S; Naik, D B; Sarkar, S K; Aravind, Usha K; Nijamudheen, A; Aravindakumar, C T

    2013-01-17

    The reactions of (•)OH and O(•-), with thymol, a monoterpene phenol and an antioxidant, were studied by pulse radiolysis technique and DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Thymol was found to efficiently scavenge OH radicals (k = 8.1 × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) to produce reducing adduct radicals, with an absorption maximum at 330 nm and oxidizing phenoxyl radicals, with absorption maxima at 390 and 410 nm. A major part of these adduct radicals was found to undergo water elimination, leading to phenoxyl radicals, and the process was catalyzed by OH(-) (or Na(2)HPO(4)). The rate of reaction of O(•-) with thymol was found to be comparatively low (k = 1.1 × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)), producing H abstracted species of thymol as well as phenoxyl radicals. Further, these phenoxyl radicals of thymol were found to be repaired by ascorbate (k = 2.1 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)). To support the interpretation of the experimental results, DFT calculations were carried out. The transients (both adducts and H abstracted species) have been optimized in gas phase at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of calculation. The relative energy values and thermodynamic stability suggests that the ortho adduct (C6_OH adduct) to be most stable in the reaction of thymol with OH radicals, which favors the water elimination. However, theoretical calculations showed that C4 atom in thymol (para position) can also be the reaction center as it is the main contributor of HOMO. The absorption maxima (λ(max)) calculated from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for these transient species were close to those obtained experimentally. Finally, the redox potential value of thymol(•)/thymol couple (0.98 V vs NHE) obtained by cyclic voltammetry is less than those of physiologically important oxidants, which reveals the antioxidant capacity of thymol, by scavenging these oxidants. The repair of the phenoxyl radicals of thymol with ascorbate together with the redox potential

  7. Selective mono-facial modification of graphene oxide nanosheets in suspension.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Brendan T; Mangadlao, Joey D; Rodier, Bradley J; Swisher, Jordan; Advincula, Rigoberto; Pentzer, Emily

    2016-01-07

    Graphene oxide (GO) is selectively functionalized on one face to prepare Janus platelets which are characterized by various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. With this methodology, Janus GO platelets can be prepared without the use of a solid substrate and the two platelet faces can be orthogonally modified in a one-pot reaction.

  8. A Highly Active Catalyst for Pd-Catalyzed Amination Reactions: Cross-Coupling Reactions Using Aryl Mesylates and the Highly Selective Monoarylation of Primary Amines Using Aryl Chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Fors, Brett P.; Watson, Donald A.; Biscoe, Mark R.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    A catalyst system based on a new biarylmonophosphine ligand (BrettPhos) that shows excellent reactivity for C–N cross-coupling reactions is reported. This catalyst system enables the use of aryl mesylates as a coupling partner in C–N bond-forming reactions. Additionally, the use of BrettPhos permits the highly selective monoarylation of an array of primary aliphatic amines and anilines at low catalyst loadings and with fast reaction times, including the first monoarylation of methylamine. Lastly, oxidative addition complexes of BrettPhos are included, which provide insight into the origin of reactivity for this system. PMID:18798626

  9. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and β-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ∼150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the β-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile β-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic

  10. Molybdenum chloride catalysts for Z-selective olefin metathesis reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ming Joo; Nguyen, Thach T.; Lam, Jonathan K.; Torker, Sebastian; Hyvl, Jakub; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2017-01-01

    The development of catalyst-controlled stereoselective olefin metathesis processes has been a pivotal recent advance in chemistry. The incorporation of appropriate ligands within complexes based on molybdenum, tungsten and ruthenium has led to reactivity and selectivity levels that were previously inaccessible. Here we show that molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes furnish higher-energy (Z) isomers of trifluoromethyl-substituted alkenes through cross-metathesis reactions with the commercially available, inexpensive and typically inert Z-1,1,1,4,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene. Furthermore, otherwise inefficient and non-stereoselective transformations with Z-1,2-dichloroethene and 1,2-dibromoethene can be effected with substantially improved efficiency and Z selectivity. The use of such molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes enables the synthesis of representative biologically active molecules and trifluoromethyl analogues of medicinally relevant compounds. The origins of the activity and selectivity levels observed, which contradict previously proposed principles, are elucidated with the aid of density functional theory calculations.

  11. Molybdenum chloride catalysts for Z-selective olefin metathesis reactions.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Joo; Nguyen, Thach T; Lam, Jonathan K; Torker, Sebastian; Hyvl, Jakub; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2017-02-02

    The development of catalyst-controlled stereoselective olefin metathesis processes has been a pivotal recent advance in chemistry. The incorporation of appropriate ligands within complexes based on molybdenum, tungsten and ruthenium has led to reactivity and selectivity levels that were previously inaccessible. Here we show that molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes furnish higher-energy (Z) isomers of trifluoromethyl-substituted alkenes through cross-metathesis reactions with the commercially available, inexpensive and typically inert Z-1,1,1,4,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene. Furthermore, otherwise inefficient and non-stereoselective transformations with Z-1,2-dichloroethene and 1,2-dibromoethene can be effected with substantially improved efficiency and Z selectivity. The use of such molybdenum monoaryloxide chloride complexes enables the synthesis of representative biologically active molecules and trifluoromethyl analogues of medicinally relevant compounds. The origins of the activity and selectivity levels observed, which contradict previously proposed principles, are elucidated with the aid of density functional theory calculations.

  12. Size- and shape-dependent catalytic performances of oxidation and reduction reactions on nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaowen; Tao, Franklin Feng; Tang, Yu; Li, Yuting; Yu, Jiaguo

    2016-08-22

    Heterogeneous catalysis is one of the most important chemical processes of various industries performed on catalyst nanoparticles with different sizes or/and shapes. In the past two decades, the catalytic performances of different catalytic reactions on nanoparticles of metals and oxides with well controlled sizes or shapes have been extensively studied thanks to the spectacular advances in syntheses of nanomaterials of metals and oxides. This review discussed the size and shape effects of catalyst particles on catalytic activity and selectivity of reactions performed at solid-gas or solid-liquid interfaces with a purpose of establishing correlations of size- and shape-dependent chemical and structural factors of surface of a catalyst with the corresponding catalytic performances toward understanding of catalysis at a molecular level.

  13. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  14. Deciphering Selectivity in Organic Reactions: A Multifaceted Problem.

    PubMed

    Balcells, David; Clot, Eric; Eisenstein, Odile; Nova, Ainara; Perrin, Lionel

    2016-05-17

    Computational chemistry has made a sustained contribution to the understanding of chemical reactions. In earlier times, half a century ago, the goal was to distinguish allowed from forbidden reactions (e.g., Woodward-Hoffmann rules), that is, reactions with low or high to very high activation barriers. A great achievement of computational chemistry was also to contribute to the determination of structures with the bonus of proposing a rationalization (e.g., anomeric effect, isolobal analogy, Gillespie valence shell pair electron repulsion rules and counter examples, Wade-Mingos rules for molecular clusters). With the development of new methods and the constant increase in computing power, computational chemists move to more challenging problems, close to the daily concerns of the experimental chemists, in determining the factors that make a reaction both efficient and selective: a key issue in organic synthesis. For this purpose, experimental chemists use advanced synthetic and analytical techniques to which computational chemists added other ways of determining reaction pathways. The transition states and intermediates contributing to the transformation of reactants into the desired and undesired products can now be determined, including their geometries, energies, charges, spin densities, spectroscopy properties, etc. Such studies remain challenging due to the large number of chemical species commonly present in the reactive media whose role may have to be determined. Calculating chemical systems as they are in the experiment is not always possible, bringing its own share of complexity through the large number of atoms and the associated large number of conformers to consider. Modeling the chemical species with smaller systems is an alternative that historically led to artifacts. Another important topic is the choice of the computational method. While DFT is widely used, the vast diversity of functionals available is both an opportunity and a challenge. Though

  15. Information-Theoretical Complexity Analysis of Selected Elementary Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Espíritu, M.; Esquivel, R. O.; Dehesa, J. S.

    We investigate the complexity of selected elementary chemical reactions (namely, the hydrogenic-abstraction reaction and the identity SN2 exchange reaction) by means of the following single and composite information-theoretic measures: disequilibrium (D), exponential entropy(L), Fisher information (I), power entropy (J), I-D, D-L and I-J planes and Fisher-Shannon (FS) and Lopez-Mancini-Calbet (LMC) shape complexities. These quantities, which are functionals of the one-particle density, are computed in both position (r) and momentum (p) spaces. The analysis revealed that the chemically significant regions of these reactions can be identified through most of the single information-theoretic measures and the two-component planes, not only the ones which are commonly revealed by the energy, such as the reactant/product (R/P) and the transition state (TS), but also those that are not present in the energy profile such as the bond cleavage energy region (BCER), the bond breaking/forming regions (B-B/F) and the charge transfer process (CT). The analysis of the complexities shows that the energy profile of the abstraction reaction bears the same information-theoretical features of the LMC and FS measures, however for the identity SN2 exchange reaction does not hold a simple behavior with respect to the LMC and FS measures. Most of the chemical features of interest (BCER, B-B/F and CT) are only revealed when particular information-theoretic aspects of localizability (L or J), uniformity (D) and disorder (I) are considered.

  16. Oxidative Degradation of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides. 2; Evidence for Reactions Occurring at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (Cp-MAS) NMR. C-13 labeling of selected sites in the polymers allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. As opposed to model compound studies, the reactions were followed directly in the polymer. The labeling experiments confirm the previously reported oxidation of the methylene carbon to ketone in the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer chain. They also show the formation of two other oxidized species, acid and ester, from this same carbon. In addition, the technique provides the first evidence of the kind of degradation reactions that are occurring in the nadic end caps. Several PMR formulations containing moieties determined to be present after oxidation, as suggested by the labeling study, were synthesized. Weight loss, FTIR, and natural abundance NMR of these derivatives were followed during aging. In this way, weight loss could be related to the observed transformations.

  17. Iron Complex Catalyzed Selective C-H Bond Oxidation with Broad Substrate Scope.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sandipan; Ghosh, Munmun; Ambule, Mayur; Sen Gupta, Sayam

    2017-02-17

    The use of a peroxidase-mimicking Fe complex has been reported on the basis of the biuret-modified TAML macrocyclic ligand framework (Fe-bTAML) as a catalyst to perform selective oxidation of unactivated 3° C-H bonds and activated 2° C-H bonds with low catalyst loading (1 mol %) and high product yield (excellent mass balance) under near-neutral conditions and broad substrate scope (18 substrates which includes arenes, heteroaromatics, and polar functional groups). Aliphatic C-H oxidation of 3° and 2° sites of complex substrates was achieved with predictable selectivity using steric, electronic, and stereoelectronic rules that govern site selectivity, which included oxidation of (+)-artemisinin to (+)-10β-hydroxyartemisinin. Mechanistic studies indicate Fe(V)(O) to be the active oxidant during these reactions.

  18. Mechanism of heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Xu, Wenqing; Yu, Yunbo

    2007-05-24

    Heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) under ambient conditions was investigated by in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It reveals that OCS can be catalytically hydrolyzed by surface hydroxyl on MgO to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and then H2S can be further catalytically oxidized by surface oxygen or gaseous oxygen on MgO to form sulfite (SO3(2-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)). Hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) was found to be the crucial intermediate. Surface hydrogen sulfide (HS), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and surface sulfite (SO3(2-)) were also found to be intermediates for the formation of sulfate. Furthermore, the surface hydroxyl contributes not only to the formation of HSCO2- but also to HSCO2- decomposition. On the basis of experimental results, the heterogeneous reaction mechanism of OCS on MgO was discussed.

  19. Selective oxidation of low-concentration coal mine gas to methanol in oleum over PbSO4 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Li, Fan; Zhu, Li-Hua; Wu, Yang

    2017-06-01

    Selective oxidation of low-concentration coal mine gas to methanol was carried out over PbSO4 catalyst in a concentration of 20% oleum. The effects of reaction temperature, reaction pressure, reaction time and catalyst dosage on the conversion of methane in gas as well as the yield of methanol were studied. What is more, the reaction mechanism of selective oxidation of low-concentration coal mine gas was also investigated. The results showed that the optimal reaction conditions are determined under the reaction temperature of 180°, the reaction pressure of 5MPa, the reaction time of 3h, and the PbSO4 dosage of 300μmol for selective oxidation of low-concentration coal mine gas to methanol by PbSO4 catalyst in oleum. Under this technological condition, the conversion ratio of methane in gas is 8.56% while the methanol selectivity is 78.59%. Mechanism research showed that methane in gas is transformed into methyl bisulfate firstly. Besides, the methyl bisulfate is hydrolyzed into methanol. The selective oxidation of low-concentration coal mine gas is following the mechanism of electrophilic substitution.

  20. One-electron oxidation reactions of purine and pyrimidine bases in cellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J. Richard; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this survey is to critically review the available information on one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases in cellular DNA with emphasis on damage induced through the transient generation of purine and pyrimidine radical cations. Since the indirect effect of ionizing radiation mediated by hydroxyl radical is predominant in cells, efforts have been made to selectively ionize bases using suitable one-electron oxidants that consist among others of high intensity UVC laser pulses. Thus, the main oxidation product in cellular DNA was found to be 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine as a result of direct bi-photonic ionization of guanine bases and indirect formation of guanine radical cations through hole transfer reactions from other base radical cations. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and other purine and pyrimidine degradation products was rationalized in terms of the initial generation of related radical cations followed by either hydration or deprotonation reactions in agreement with mechanistic pathways inferred from detailed mechanistic studies. The guanine radical cation has been shown to be implicated in three other nucleophilic additions that give rise to DNA-protein and DNA-DNA cross-links in model systems. Evidence was recently provided for the occurrence of these three reactions in cellular DNA. Conclusion There is growing evidence that one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases whose mechanisms have been characterized in model studies involving aqueous solutions take place in a similar way in cells. It may also be pointed out that the above cross-linked lesions are only produced from the guanine radical cation and may be considered as diagnostic products of the direct effect of ionizing radiation. PMID:24369822

  1. Selective Autooxidation of Ethanol over Titania-Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts: Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Carlos; Thirunavukkarasu, K; Anilkumar, M; Shiju, N R; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    We study the selective catalytic oxidation of ethanol with air as a sustainable alternative route to acetaldehyde. The reaction is catalysed by molybdenum oxide supported on titania, in a flow reactor under ambient pressure. High selectivity to acetaldehyde (70%–89%, depending on the Mo loading) is obtained at 150 °C. Subsequently, we investigate the structure/performance relationship for various molybdenum oxide species using a combination of techniques including diffuse reflectance UV-visible, infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed reduction. As their surface density increases, the monomeric molybdenum oxide species undergo two-dimensional and three-dimensional oligomerisation. This results in polymolybdates and molybdenum oxide crystallites. Importantly, the ethanol oxidation rate depends not only on the overall molybdenum loading and dispersion, but also on the type of molybdenum oxide species prevalent at each surface density and on the domain size. As the molybdenum oxide oligomerisation increases, electron delocalisation becomes easier. This lowers the absorption edge energy and increases the reaction rate. PMID:23396482

  2. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  3. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  4. Characterization of MoVTeNbOx catalysts during oxidation reactions using in situ/operando techniques: A review

    DOE PAGES

    Lwin, Soe; Diao, Weijian; Baroi, Chinmoy; ...

    2017-04-08

    The domestic fossil feedstock in recent years is shifting towards light hydrocarbons due to abundance of shale gas from hydraulic fracturing. This shift induces a need for greater flexibility in both new and existing processing plants to produce consumer products (polymers, paints, lubricants, etc.) from new feedstocks. The oxidative catalytic reactions operate at milder conditions than the processing of feedstocks through steam cracking. The conversion of light feedstocks (C3 and shorter hydrocarbons) to high value chemicals through highly selective catalysts in the presence of oxygen plays a crucial role in eliminating wastes, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and lowering market prices.more » Among all catalysts for light hydrocarbon processing through oxidation reactions, bulk mixed metal oxides such as MoVTe(Sb)NbOx catalysts are the most promising due to their performance under favorable reaction conditions (temperature, pressure, etc). Here, state-of-the-art in situ/operando techniques along with transient kinetics can revolutionize the development of catalysts by providing information about the nature of active sites, intermediates and kinetics under realistic industrial conditions. Only through detailed understanding of these catalyst behaviors can new synthesis methods be developed that will improve reactivity, selectivity and lifetimes of these catalysts. In this review, dynamic changes of this mixed oxide catalyst during the reaction (such as changes in surface composition, oxidation states, acidity, etc) are discussed mainly from knowledge and insights obtained from these in situ/operando approaches. The most common oxidation reactions driven by the MoVTeNbOx catalysts and studied under operando/in situ conditions to be discussed here are: (1) oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes (ethane and propane), (2) propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and (3) selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid.« less

  5. Infrared driven CO oxidation reactions on isolated platinum cluster oxides, Pt(n)O(m)+.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Alexander C; Hamilton, Suzanne M; Cooper, Graham A; Kerpal, Christian; Harding, Dan J; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2012-01-01

    This collaboration has recently shown that infrared excitation can drive decomposition reactions of molecules on the surface of gas-phase transition metal clusters. We describe here a significant extension of this work to the study of bimolecular reactions initiated in a similar manner. Specifically, we have observed the infrared activated CO oxidation reaction (CO(ads) + O(ads) --> CO2(g)) on isolated platinum oxide cations, Pt(n)O(m)+. Small platinum cluster oxides Pt(n)O(m)+ (n = 3-7, m = 2, 4), have been decorated with CO molecules and subjected to multiple photon infrared excitation in the range 400-2200 cm(-1) using the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX). The Pt(n)O(m)CO+ clusters have been characterised by infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy using messenger atom tagging. Evidence is observed for isomers involving both dissociatively and molecularly adsorbed oxygen on the cluster surface. Further information is obtained on the evolution of the cluster structure with number of platinum atoms and CO coverage. In separate experiments, Pt(n)O(m)CO+ clusters have been subjected to infrared heating via the CO stretch around 2100 cm(-1). On all clusters investigated, the CO oxidation reaction, indicated by CO2 loss and production of Pt(n)O(m) = 1+, is found to compete effectively with the CO desorption channel. The experimental observations are compared with the results of preliminary DFT calculations in order to identify both cluster structures and plausible mechanisms for the surface reaction.

  6. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-09-28

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development.

  7. Selective Pinacol-Coupling Reaction using a Continuous Flow System.

    PubMed

    Sotto, Nicolas; Cazorla, Clément; Villette, Carole; Billamboz, Muriel; Len, Christophe

    2016-11-18

    The first continuous flow pinacol coupling reaction of carbonyl compounds was successfully achieved within only 2 min during a single pass through a cartridge filled with zinc(0). The optimized method allowed the efficient production of gram-scale value-added compounds with high productivity. The developed methodology is efficient for aromatic or α,β-unsaturated aldehydes but gives moderate results for more stable acetophenone derivatives. Moreover, the flow method displayed better results in terms of yield and selectivity in comparison to the corresponding batch methodology.

  8. Oxidative-coupling reaction of TNT reduction products by manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Min; Shin, Hyunsang

    2006-03-01

    Abiotic transformation of TNT reduction products via oxidative-coupling reaction was investigated using Mn oxide. In batch experiments, all the reduction products tested were completely transformed by birnessite, one of natural Mn oxides present in soil. Oxidative-coupling was the major transformation pathway, as confirmed by mass spectrometric analysis. Using observed pseudo-first-order rate constants with respect to birnessite loadings, surface area-normalized specific rate constants, ksurf, were determined. As expected, ksurf of diaminonitrotoluenes (DATs) (1.49-1.91L/m2 d) are greater about 2 orders than that of dinitroaminotoluenes (DNTs) (1.15 x 10(-2)-2.09 x 10(-2)L/m2d) due to the increased number of amine group. In addition, by comparing the value of ksurf between DNTs or DATs, amine group on ortho position is likely to be more preferred for the oxidation by birnessite. Although cross-coupling of TNT in the presence of various mediator compounds was found not to be feasible, transformation of TNT by reduction using Fe0 followed by oxidative-coupling using Mn oxide was efficient, as evaluated by UV-visible spectrometry.

  9. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving an adsorbed CO species on bulk and supported platinum and copper-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.

    1991-07-01

    The proposed research is an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player -- be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2} and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools.

  10. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned the investigation of the desulfurization of the selectively oxidized coals using aqueous or alcoholic base mixtures. Model compound studies were initiated. Results were: Levels of desulfurization obtained in this study are at, or very close to, the 90% removal levels required for these coals to be in compliance with the Clean Air Act legislation; Up to 89.4% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal and 88.9% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and alcoholic/base reactions; Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product than the untreated sample; Substantial enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal has been achieved by the selective oxidation pretreatment; The highest levels of desulfurization obtained so far all involve bases as additives; The water/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} combination, was superior than any of the aqueous hydroxide bases. Possible synergistic interactions between the alcohol and the base are suspected. Over 70% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal can be removed by performing vacuum pyrolysis on the selectively oxidized coal. Lower sulfur contents are obtained by lowing the pyrolysis pressure.

  11. Influence of oxygen and pH on the selective oxidation of ethanol on Pd catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbitts, David D.; Neurock, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The selective oxidation of ethanol on supported Pd is catalytically promoted by the presence of hydroxide species on the Pd surface as well as in solution. These hydroxide intermediates act as Brønsted bases which readily abstract protons from the hydroxyl groups of adsorbed or solution-phase alcohols. The C1AH bond of the resulting alkoxide is subsequently activated on the metal surface via hydride elimination to form acetaldehyde. Surface and solution-phase hydroxide intermediates can also readily react with the acetaldehyde via nucleophilic addition to form a germinal diol intermediate, which subsequently undergoes a second C1AH bond activation on Pd to form acetic acid. The role of O2 is to remove the electrons produced in the oxidation reaction via the oxygen reduction reaction over Pd. The reduction reaction also regenerates the hydroxide intermediates and removes adsorbed hydrogen that is produced during the oxidation.

  12. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M S; Larsen, F; Postma, D

    2001-10-15

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4 x 10(-10) mol FeS2/g x s are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate the reaction stoichiometry and partitioning of gases between the solution and the gas phase. Pyrite oxidation with concurrent calcite dissolution was found to be consistent with the experimental data while organic carbon oxidation was not. The reaction involves changes in the total volume of the gas phase. The reaction scheme predicts the volume of O2 gas consumed to be larger than of CO2 produced. In addition the solubility of CO2 in water is about 30 times larger than of O2 causing a further decrease in total gas volume. The change in total gas volume therefore also depends on the gas/water volume ratio and the lower the ratio the more pronounced the loss of volume will be. Under field conditions the change in total volume may amount up to 20% in the absence of calcite and over 10% in the presence of calcite. Such changes in gas volume during the oxidation of pyrite are expected to result in pressure gradients causing advective transport of gaseous oxygen.

  13. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine.

  14. Copper-catalyzed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a longstanding goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective, and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. In this work we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines, and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine, and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  15. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine.

  16. ESIMS and NMR studies on the selective deprotection of acetylated glucosides by dibutyltin oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Min; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Kang, Jian-Xun; Liu, Hong-Min; Chen, Jun-Miao; Li, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Kai

    2011-02-01

    The reaction process for the selective deprotection of acetylated glucosides by dibutyltin oxide in methanol is investigated by using methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-α-d-glucopyranoside as a model substrate with ESIMS and NMR techniques. According to the results, it is inferred that at first, dimeric 1,3-dimethoxytetrabutyldistannoxane is formed by the reaction of dibutyltin oxide with methanol, and then the tetraorganodistannoxane reacts with the acetylated glucoside to produce glucoside-organotin complex intermediates. Finally, the complex intermediates are hydrolyzed leading to the free-OH glucoside and organotin acetate derivatives. The reaction is affected by neighboring group participation and steric hindrance, which allow for high selectivities among different acetyl groups in acetylated glucosides.

  17. Coulomb explosion sputtering of selectively oxidized Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Naik, V.; Sinha, A. K.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2010-05-01

    We have studied the sputtering of a unique system comprising of coexisting silicon and silicon oxide surfaces due to the impact of multiply charged Arq + ions. Such surfaces are produced by oblique angle oxygen ion bombardment on Si(100), which results in one side oxidized ripple formation due to preferential oxygen implantation. It is observed by atomic force microscopy and conducting atomic force microscopy studies that the higher the potential energy of the Arq + ion, the higher the sputtering yield of the nonconducting (oxide) side of the ripple as compared to the semiconducting side while ensuring an identical irradiation and measurement condition. It also shows experimentally the potential of highly charged ions in the gentle cleaning or tailoring of nanostructures. The results are explained in terms of the Coulomb explosion model, where potential sputtering depends on the conductivity of the ion impact sites.

  18. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

  19. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

  20. Self-assembled benzophenone bis-urea macrocycles facilitate selective oxidations by singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Geer, Michael F; Walla, Michael D; Solntsev, Kyril M; Strassert, Cristian A; Shimizu, Linda S

    2013-06-07

    This manuscript investigates how incorporation of benzophenone, a well-known triplet sensitizer, within a bis-urea macrocycle, which self-assembles into a columnar host, influences its photophysical properties and affects the reactivity of bound guest molecules. We further report the generation of a remarkably stable organic radical. As expected, UV irradiation of the host suspended in oxygenated solvents efficiently generates singlet oxygen similar to the parent benzophenone. In addition, this host can bind guests such as 2-methyl-2-butene and cumene to form stable solid host-guest complexes. Subsequent UV irradiation of these complexes facilitated the selective oxidation of 2-methyl-2-butene into the allylic alcohol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, at 90% selectivity as well as the selective reaction of cumene to the tertiary alcohol, α,α'-dimethyl benzyl alcohol, at 63% selectivity. However, these products usually arise through radical pathways and are not observed in the presence of benzophenone in solution. In contrast, typical reactions with benzophenone result in the formation of the reactive singlet oxygen that reacts with alkenes to form endoperoxides, diooxetanes, or hydroperoxides, which are not observed in our system. Our results suggest that the confinement, the formation of a stable radical species, and the singlet oxygen photoproduction are responsible for the selective oxidation processes. A greater understanding of the mechanism of this selective oxidation could lead to development of greener oxidants.

  1. SN-EXCHANGED HYDROTALCITES AS CATALYSTS FOR CLEAN AND SELECTIVE BAEYER-VILLIGER OXIDATION OF KETONES USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Sn-doped hydrotalcite (Sn/HT) catalyst prepared by ion-exchange is found to be an active and selective catalyst for the liquid phase Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclic ketones in acetonitrile using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant. Different reaction perameters such as...

  2. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-01-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts. PMID:26952517

  3. Automated workflow for large-scale selected reaction monitoring experiments.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Rosenberger, George; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-03-02

    Targeted proteomics allows researchers to study proteins of interest without being drowned in data from other, less interesting proteins or from redundant or uninformative peptides. While the technique is mostly used for smaller, focused studies, there are several reasons to conduct larger targeted experiments. Automated, highly robust software becomes more important in such experiments. In addition, larger experiments are carried out over longer periods of time, requiring strategies to handle the sometimes large shift in retention time often observed. We present a complete proof-of-principle software stack that automates most aspects of selected reaction monitoring workflows, a targeted proteomics technology. The software allows experiments to be easily designed and carried out. The steps automated are the generation of assays, generation of mass spectrometry driver files and methods files, and the import and analysis of the data. All data are normalized to a common retention time scale, the data are then scored using a novel score model, and the error is subsequently estimated. We also show that selected reaction monitoring can be used for label-free quantification. All data generated are stored in a relational database, and the growing resource further facilitates the design of new experiments. We apply the technology to a large-scale experiment studying how Streptococcus pyogenes remodels its proteome under stimulation of human plasma.

  4. Biotransformations Utilizing β-Oxidation Cycle Reactions in the Synthesis of Natural Compounds and Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Œwizdor, Alina; Panek, Anna; Milecka-Tronina, Natalia; Kołek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    β-Oxidation cycle reactions, which are key stages in the metabolism of fatty acids in eucaryotic cells and in processes with a significant role in the degradation of acids used by microbes as a carbon source, have also found application in biotransformations. One of the major advantages of biotransformations based on the β-oxidation cycle is the possibility to transform a substrate in a series of reactions catalyzed by a number of enzymes. It allows the use of sterols as a substrate base in the production of natural steroid compounds and their analogues. This route also leads to biologically active compounds of therapeutic significance. Transformations of natural substrates via β-oxidation are the core part of the synthetic routes of natural flavors used as food additives. Stereoselectivity of the enzymes catalyzing the stages of dehydrogenation and addition of a water molecule to the double bond also finds application in the synthesis of chiral biologically active compounds, including medicines. Recent advances in genetic, metabolic engineering, methods for the enhancement of bioprocess productivity and the selectivity of target reactions are also described. PMID:23443116

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-01-28

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, it was planned to investigate the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and to obtain data on the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane. The investigation of the reaction mechanism will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations. The last component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium. In the current reporting period, the screening of the promoted catalysts were completed, sufficient amount of the selected catalysts were prepared and delivered to TDA for long term deactivation testing.

  6. Electrode Reaction Pathway in Oxide Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyuan

    Oxide anodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with the advantage of fuel flexibility, resistance to coarsening, small chemical expansion and etc. have been attracting increasing interest. Good performance has been reported with a few of perovskite structure anodes, such as (LaSr)(CrMn)O3. However, more improvements need to be made before meeting the application requirement. Understanding the oxidation mechanism is crucial for a directed optimization, but it is still on the early stage of investigation. In this study, reaction mechanism of oxide anodes is investigated on doped YCrO 3 with H2 fuel, in terms of the origin of electrochemical activity, rate-determining steps (RDS), extension of reactive zone, and the impact from overpotential under service condition to those properties. H2 oxidation on the YCs anodes is found to be limited by charge transfer and H surface diffusion. A model is presented to describe the elementary steps in H2 oxidation. From the reaction order results, it is suggested that any models without taking H into the charge transfer step are invalid. The nature of B site element determines the H2 oxidation kinetics primarily. Ni displays better adsorption ability than Co. However, H adsorption ability of such oxide anode is inferior to that of Ni metal anode. In addition, the charge transfer step is directly associated with the activity of electrons in the anode; therefore it can be significantly promoted by enhancement of the electron activity. It is found that A site Ca doping improves the polarization resistance about 10 times, by increasing the activity of electrons to promote the charge transfer process. For the active area in the oxide anode, besides the traditional three-phase boundary (3PB), the internal anode surface as two-phase boundary (2PB) is proven to be capable of catalytically oxidizing the H2 fuel also when the bulk lattice is activated depending on the B site elements. The contribution from each part is estimated by switching

  7. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  8. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  9. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of various alcohols is studied in liquid phase under nitrogen atmosphere over vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method are found to be suitable for the selective oxidation of a variet...

  10. Oxidation of humic substances supports denitrification reactions in agricultural soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Trump, J. I.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    , nitrite, Fe(II), and humic-born hydroquinones. All data were analyzed with respect to dilution factors obtained through analysis of a conservative bromide tracer present in electron donor medium. Addition of oxidized HS, reduced HS, and acetate all resulted in significant loss of nitrate from the columns. Significant nitrite accumulation was not observed. Of all the electron donor treatments, reduced HS, enriched for hydroquinone-containing functional moieties, supported the greatest degree of denitrification. The participation of excess hydroquinones in denitrification accounted for approximately 104% of the difference in nitrate reduction between reduced and oxidized HS treatments. This electron balance allowed for assignment of respiratory activity due to hydroquinone oxidation, rather than degradation of humic substances or associated electron-donating compounds. These results suggest that denitrification reactions catalyzed by microbial oxidation of reduced HS may be prevalent in agricultural soils. Likewise, these results demonstrate for the first time that respiratory behavior due to hydroquinone oxidation, as well as impact upon local geochemistry, can be analyzed in complex flow-through model systems.

  11. Semiconducting Metal Oxide Based Sensors for Selective Gas Pollutant Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Sofian M.; El-Kadri, Oussama M.; Abu-Yousef, Imad A.; Kanan, Marsha C.

    2009-01-01

    A review of some papers published in the last fifty years that focus on the semiconducting metal oxide (SMO) based sensors for the selective and sensitive detection of various environmental pollutants is presented. PMID:22408500

  12. Analyzing site selectivity in Rh2(esp)2-catalyzed intermolecular C-H amination reactions.

    PubMed

    Bess, Elizabeth N; DeLuca, Ryan J; Tindall, Daniel J; Oderinde, Martins S; Roizen, Jennifer L; Du Bois, J; Sigman, Matthew S

    2014-04-16

    Predicting site selectivity in C-H bond oxidation reactions involving heteroatom transfer is challenged by the small energetic differences between disparate bond types and the subtle interplay of steric and electronic effects that influence reactivity. Herein, the factors governing selective Rh2(esp)2-catalyzed C-H amination of isoamylbenzene derivatives are investigated, where modification to both the nitrogen source, a sulfamate ester, and substrate are shown to impact isomeric product ratios. Linear regression mathematical modeling is used to define a relationship that equates both IR stretching parameters and Hammett σ(+) values to the differential free energy of benzylic versus tertiary C-H amination. This model has informed the development of a novel sulfamate ester, which affords the highest benzylic-to-tertiary site selectivity (9.5:1) observed for this system.

  13. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  14. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  15. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  16. Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide composite for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyitanga, Theophile; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-10-01

    Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide (GO-MoS2) composite is prepared through a wet process by using hydrolysis of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and it exhibits excellent catalytic activity of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a low overpotential of -0.47 V, which is almost two and three times lower than those of precursor MoS2 and GO. The high performance of HER of the composite attributes to the reduced GO supporting MoS2, providing a conducting network for fast electron transport from MoS2 to electrodes. The composite also shows high stability after 500 cycles, demonstrating a synergistic effect of MoS2 and GO for efficient HER.

  17. Iron(III) chloride in oxidative C-C coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Abdelwareth A O; Bolm, Carsten

    2009-09-01

    In this critical review, the use of iron(III) chloride in oxidative C-C couplings of arenes and related unsaturated compounds is presented and reviewed. The approach allows highly selective dimerisations of phenol derivatives, naphthols, and heterocyclic compounds. Sequential couplings give access to structurally well-defined oligo- and polymers. Iron(III) chloride is commercially available and inexpensive. Being a mild oxidising agent it has been applied in numerous reactions leading to new carbon-carbon-bonds in complex molecular arrays (107 references).

  18. Oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction modulation by white wine.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Alberto A E; Migliori, Massamiliano; Panichi, Vincenzo; Longoni, Bianamaria; Origlia, Nicola; Ferretti, Agnese; Cuttano, Maria Giuseppa; Giovannini, Luca

    2002-05-01

    Wine and olive oil, essential components of the Mediterranean diet, are considered important factors for a healthy life style. Tyrosol (T) and caffeic acid (CA) are found in both extra virgin olive oil and in white wine. Three white wines from the northeast Italy and four white wines from Germany were analyzed for their content of T and CA. These compounds were tested for their antioxidant activity and their capacity to modulate three different cytokines: IL-1 beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, which are currently considered to be the major cytokines influencing the acute phase of the inflammatory response. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of T and CA was analyzed by monitoring the oxidation of a redox-sensitive probe by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. T and CA, applied at nanomolar range, were found to significantly reduce the generation of oxidants induced by azobis-amidinopropanedihydrochloride. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy volunteers were incubated at 37 degrees C for 12 hours with 100 ng LPS (E. coli and P. maltofilia). Increasing doses of T and CA (150 nM to 300 microM) were added and cell-associated IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha were determined by immunoreactive tests after three freeze-thaw cycles. IL-6 release was also determined in cell surnatants. LPS-stimulated PBMC showed a significant increase in cytokine release, while T and CA, used at nanomolar concentrations, were able to modulate their expression. Taken together, these results suggest a remarkable effect of white wine non-alcoholic compounds on oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction.

  19. Graphene-hemin hybrid material as effective catalyst for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongjia; Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yujing; Xu, Yuxi; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Enbo; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2013-05-01

    An effective hemin catalyst on graphene support for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene is reported with an over 50% conversion rate achieved at mild conditions. Significantly this hybrid material shows catalytic efficiency in toluene oxidation with selectivity towards benzoic acid. The role of graphene support is discussed here as providing large contact area between the catalyst and the substrate, maintaining hemin in catalytically active monomer form, attracting electron to promote site isolation, as well as protecting hemin from oxidative degradation during the reaction. Moreover, graphene is suggested to largely alter the final product selectivity, due to the different π-π interaction strength between the graphene support and the substrate/oxidized products. With longer reaction time, overall conversion rate tends to maintain relatively unchanged while toluene undergoes a series of oxidation to convert mostly to benzoic acid.

  20. Graphene-hemin hybrid material as effective catalyst for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongjia; Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yujing; Xu, Yuxi; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Enbo; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    An effective hemin catalyst on graphene support for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene is reported with an over 50% conversion rate achieved at mild conditions. Significantly this hybrid material shows catalytic efficiency in toluene oxidation with selectivity towards benzoic acid. The role of graphene support is discussed here as providing large contact area between the catalyst and the substrate, maintaining hemin in catalytically active monomer form, attracting electron to promote site isolation, as well as protecting hemin from oxidative degradation during the reaction. Moreover, graphene is suggested to largely alter the final product selectivity, due to the different π-π interaction strength between the graphene support and the substrate/oxidized products. With longer reaction time, overall conversion rate tends to maintain relatively unchanged while toluene undergoes a series of oxidation to convert mostly to benzoic acid.

  1. Noncovalent Bonding Controls Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Coupling Reactions on Gold.

    PubMed

    Karakalos, Stavros; Xu, Yunfei; Cheenicode Kabeer, Fairoja; Chen, Wei; Rodríguez-Reyes, Juan Carlos F; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2016-11-23

    Enhancing the selectivity of catalytic processes has potential for substantially increasing the sustainability of chemical production. Herein, we establish relationships between reaction selectivity and molecular structure for a homologous series of key intermediates for oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold using a combination of experiment and theory. We establish a scale of binding for molecules with different alkyl structures and chain lengths and thereby demonstrate the critical nature of noncovalent van der Waals interactions in determining the selectivity by modulating the stability of key reaction intermediates bound to the surface. The binding hierarchy is the same for Au(111) and Au(110), which demonstrates a relative lack of sensitivity to the surface structure. The hierarchy of binding established in this work provides guiding principles for predicting how molecular structure affects the competition for binding sites more broadly. Besides the nature of the primary surface-molecule bonding, three additional factors that affect the stabilities of the reactive intermediates are clearly established: (1) the number of C atoms in the alkyl chain, (2) the presence of C-C bond unsaturation, and (3) the degree of branching of the alkyl group of the adsorbed molecules. We suggest that this is a fundamental principle that is generally applicable to a broad range of reactions on metal catalysts.

  2. On the interaction of isotopic exchange processes with photochemical reactions in atmospheric oxides of nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, H.D.; Kley, D.; Volz-Thomas, A.; Kobel, K.

    1993-08-20

    The authors study the isotopic composition of nitic oxide and nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere. They model the observed results for {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N ratios in terms of isotopic exchange reactions with ozone and photolytic reactions on the oxides. They find there has to be an interaction of these two reactions, in conjunction with seasonl variations of nitrogen oxide/ozone ratios, to account for observed isotopic ratios of the nitrogen isotopes.

  3. Spin-selective recombination reactions of radical pairs: Experimental test of validity of reaction operators

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kiminori; Liddell, Paul; Gust, Devens; Hore, P. J.

    2013-12-21

    Spin-selective reactions of radical pairs are conventionally modelled using an approach that dates back to the 1970s [R. Haberkorn, Mol. Phys. 32, 1491 (1976)]. An alternative approach based on the theory of quantum measurements has recently been suggested [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. We present here the first experimental attempt to discriminate between the two models. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate intramolecular electron transfer in the radical pair form of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene molecular triad. The rate of spin-spin relaxation of the fullerene radical in the triad was found to be inconsistent with the quantum measurement description of the spin-selective kinetics, and in accord with the conventional model when combined with spin-dephasing caused by rotational modulation of the anisotropic g-tensor of the fullerene radical.

  4. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-02

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications.

  5. THE REACTIONS OF 2- AND 4-PICOLINE N-OXIDES WITH PHENYLACETIC ANHYDRIDE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    pyridinemethanol phenylacetate (X) and 2-phenylethylpyridine (XI) in the case of 2-picoline N-oxide and of 4 - pyridinemethanol phenylacetate (XIV) and 4 ...The reactions of 2- and 4 -picoline N-oxide with phenylacetic anhydride yield the oxidation-reduction products, benzaldehyde, carbon dioxide...phenylethylpyridine (XV) in the case of 4 -picoline N-oxide. The product composition is unchanged when the reactions are performed in the presence of the radical

  6. Application of Mössbauer Spectroscopy to the Carbon Oxides Hydrogenation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeiro, M. L.; González-Jiménez, F.; Goldwasser, M. R.; Pérez-Zurita, M. J.; Pietri, E.; García, L.

    2001-05-01

    Iron-based catalysts have favorable activity and selectivity properties for the CO and CO2 hydrogenation reactions. Several Fe phases (oxides and carbides) can be present in these catalysts. The interaction of Fe with the other components of the catalyst (support, promoters) can affect the ease of reduction and also its transformation during the reactions. In this work, the relationship between catalytic behavior in the CO and CO2 hydrogenation reactions and the Fe phase composition of fresh and reacted catalysts was studied. Two types of catalysts were tested: a laterite and the other one made of iron supported on alumina, both unpromoted and promoted with K and Mn. Only those Fe species which can be reduced-carburized, by means of a pretreatment or by an in situ transformation under the reaction, seem to be able to perform the CO or CO2 hydrogenation. The reoxidation of the Fe carbide to magnetite was not associated to deactivation. The selectivity seems to be more affected by Fe species difficult to reduce than by magnetite produced by reoxidation.

  7. Photoelectrochemical Catalysis toward Selective Anaerobic Oxidation of Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruikang; Shao, Mingfei; Li, Zhenhua; Ning, Fanyu; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2017-06-16

    Selective oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes plays an important role in perfumery, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals industry. Different from traditional catalysis or photocatalytic process, here we report an effective photoelectrochemical (PEC) approach for selective anaerobic oxidation of alcohols accompanied with H2 production by means of solar energy. By using TiO2 nanowires modified with graphitic carbon layer as photoanode, benzyl alcohol (BA) has been oxidized to benzaldehyde with high efficiency and selectivity (>99 %) in aqueous media at room temperature, superior to individual electrocatalytic or photocatalytic processes. Moreover, this PEC synthesis method can be effectively extended to the oxidation of several other aryl alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes under mild conditions. The electron spin resonance (ESR) results indicate the formation of intermediate active oxygen (O2(.-) ) on the photoanode, which further reacts with alcohols to produce final aldehyde compounds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Oxidation of ofloxacin by Oxone/Co(2+): identification of reaction products and pathways.

    PubMed

    Pi, Yunqing; Feng, Jinglan; Sun, Jingyu; Song, Mengke; Sun, Jianhui

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative degradation of ofloxacin (OFX) by sulfate free radicals (SO4 (-•)) in the UV/Oxone/Co(2+)oxidation process was investigated for the first time, with a special focus upon identifying the transformation products as well as understanding the reaction pathways. Thirteen main compounds were identified after the initial transformation of OFX; the detailed structural information of which were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and MS fragmentation analysis. The degradation pathways mainly encompassed ring openings at both the piperazinyl substituent and the quinolone moiety, indicating that the usage of SO4 (-•) aided the oxidative degradation of OFX to undergo more facile routes compared to those in previous reports by using OH(•)/h(+) as the oxidant, where the initial transformation attacks were mainly confined to the piperazine moiety. Moreover, in this study, smart control over the pH conditions of the oxidation system via different modes of Oxone dosage resulted in the selective degradation of the functional sites of OFX molecule, where it was shown that the SO4 (-•)-driven destruction of the quinolone moiety of OFX molecule favored the neutral pH conditions. This would be beneficial for the reduction of bacterial resistance against quinolones in the aqueous environment.

  9. Tuning the selectivity of Gd3N cluster endohedral metallofullerene reactions with Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Steven; Rottinger, Khristina A; Fahim, Muska; Field, Jessica S; Martin, Benjamin R; Arvola, Kristine D

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate the manipulation of the Lewis acid strength to selectively fractionate different types of Gd3N metallofullerenes that are present in complex mixtures. Carbon disulfide is used for all Lewis acid studies. CaCl2 exhibits the lowest reactivity but the highest selectivity by precipitating only those gadolinium metallofullerenes with the lowest first oxidation potentials. ZnCl2 selectively complexes Gd3N@C88 during the first 4 h of reaction. Reaction with ZnCl2 for an additional 7 days permits a selective precipitation of Gd3N@C84 as the dominant endohedral isolated. A third fraction is the filtrate, which possesses Gd3N@C86 and Gd3N@C80 as the two dominant metallofullerenes. The order of increasing reactivity and decreasing selectivity (left to right) is as follows: CaCl2 < ZnCl2 < NiCl2 < MgCl2 < MnCl2 < CuCl2 < WCl4 ≪ WCl6 < ZrCl4 < AlCl3 < FeCl3. As a group, CaCl2, ZnCl2, and NiCl2 are the weakest Lewis acids and have the highest selectivity because of their very low precipitation onsets, which are below +0.19 V (i.e., endohedrals with first oxidation potentials below +0.19 V are precipitated). For CaCl2, the precipitation threshold is estimated at a remarkably low value of +0.06 V. Because most endohedrals possess first oxidation potentials significantly higher than +0.06 V, CaCl2 is especially useful in its ability to precipitate only a select group of gadolinium metallofullerenes. The Lewis acids of intermediate reactivity (i.e., precipitation onsets estimated between +0.19 and +0.4 V) are MgCl2, MnCl2, CuCl2, and WCl4. The strongest Lewis acids (WCl6, ZrCl4, AlCl3, and FeCl3) are the least selective and tend to precipitate the entire family of gadolinium metallofullerenes. Tuning the Lewis acid for a specific type of endohedral should be useful in a nonchromatographic purification method. The ability to control which metallofullerenes are permitted to precipitate and which endohedrals would remain in solution is a key outcome of this work.

  10. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  11. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  12. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D.; Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions were studied with the aid of a mass spectrometer. A pinhole bleed system provided continuous sampling of the gas mixture in the cell during the reaction. It was found that the homogeneous reactions of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide with hydrogen peroxide are too slow to be of any significance in the upper atmosphere. However, the heterogeneous reactions may be important in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide in the case of polluted urban atmospheres.

  13. Two Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Contaminant Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Two catalysts for the selective oxidation of trace amounts of contaminant gases in air have been developed for use aboard the International Space Station. These catalysts might also be useful for reducing concentrations of fumes in terrestrial industrial facilities especially facilities that use halocarbons as solvents, refrigerant liquids, and foaming agents, as well as facilities that generate or utilize ammonia. The first catalyst is of the supported-precious-metal type. This catalyst is highly active for the oxidation of halocarbons, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates at low concentrations in air. This catalyst is more active for the oxidation of hydrocarbons and halocarbons than are competing catalysts developed in recent years. This catalyst completely converts these airborne contaminant gases to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral acids that can be easily removed from the air, and does not make any chlorine gas in the process. The catalyst is thermally stable and is not poisoned by chlorine or fluorine atoms produced on its surface during the destruction of a halocarbon. In addition, the catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to nitrogen at a temperature between 200 and 260 C, without making nitrogen oxides, which are toxic. The temperature of 260 C is higher than the operational temperature of any other precious-metal catalyst that can selectively oxidize ammonia. The purpose of the platinum in this catalyst is to oxidize hydrocarbons and to ensure that the oxidation of halocarbons goes to completion. However, the platinum exhibits little or no activity for initiating the destruction of halocarbons. Instead, the attack on the halocarbons is initiated by the support. The support also provides a high surface area for exposure of the platinum. Moreover, the support resists deactivation or destruction by halogens released during the destruction of halocarbons. The second catalyst is of the supported- metal-oxide type. This catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to

  14. Considerations on selected reaction monitoring experiments: implications for the selectivity and accuracy of measurements.

    PubMed

    Domon, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Targeted MS analyses based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) has enabled significant achievements in proteomic quantification, such that its application to clinical studies has augured great advancements for life sciences. The approach has been challenged by the complexity of clinical samples that affects the selectivity of measurements, in many cases limiting analytical performances to a larger extent than expected. This Personal Perspective discusses some insight to better comprehend the mismatch between the often underestimated sample complexity and the selectivity of SRM measurements performed on a triple quadrupole instrument. The implications for the design and evaluation of SRM assays are discussed and illustrated with selected examples, providing a baseline for a more critical use of the technique in the context of clinical samples and to evaluate alternative methods.

  15. Uraninite oxidation and dissolution induced by manganese oxide: A redox reaction between two insoluble minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zimeng; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kapoor, Pratyul; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    The longevity of subsurface U(IV) produced by reduction of U(VI) during in situ bioremediation can be limited by reoxidation to more mobile U(VI) species. Coupling of the biogeochemical cycles of U and Mn may affect the fate and transport of uranium. Manganese oxides can act as a powerful oxidant that accelerates the oxidative dissolution of UO2. This study investigated the physical and chemical factors controlling the interaction between UO2 and MnO2, which are both poorly soluble minerals. A multi-chamber reactor with a permeable membrane was used to eliminate direct contact of the two minerals while still allowing transport of aqueous species. The oxidation of UO2 was not significantly enhanced by MnO2 if the two solids were physically separated. Complete mixing of MnO2 with UO2 led to a much greater extent and rate of U oxidation. When direct contact is not possible, the reaction slowly progresses through release of soluble U(IV) with its adsorption and oxidation on MnO2. Continuously-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) were used to quantify the steady-state rates of UO2 dissolution induced by MnO2. MnO2 dramatically promoted UO2 dissolution, but the degree of promotion leveled off once the MnO2:UO2 ratio exceeded a critical value. Substantial amounts of U(VI) and Mn(II) were retained on MnO2 surfaces. The total production of Mn(II) was less than that of U(VI), indicating that the fate of Mn products and their impact on UO2-MnO2 reaction kinetics were complicated and may involve formation of Mn(III) phases. At higher dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations, UO2 oxidation by MnO2 was faster and less U(VI) was adsorbed to MnO2. Such an inverse relationship suggested that U(VI) may passivate MnO2 surfaces. A conceptual model was developed to describe the oxidation rate of UO2 by MnO2. This model is potentially applicable to a broad range of water chemistry conditions and is relevant to other environmental redox processes involving two poorly soluble minerals.

  16. Method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L [Broomfield, CO; Gardner, Timothy J [Albuquerque, NM; McLaughlin, Linda I [Albuquerque, NM

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  17. Method For Selective Catalytic Reduction Of Nitrogen Oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  18. Thermochemistry and reaction paths in the oxidation reaction of benzoyl radical: C6H5C•(═O).

    PubMed

    Sebbar, Nadia; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Bockhorn, Henning

    2011-10-27

    Alkyl substituted aromatics are present in fuels and in the environment because they are major intermediates in the oxidation or combustion of gasoline, jet, and other engine fuels. The major reaction pathways for oxidation of this class of molecules is through loss of a benzyl hydrogen atom on the alkyl group via abstraction reactions. One of the major intermediates in the combustion and atmospheric oxidation of the benzyl radicals is benzaldehyde, which rapidly loses the weakly bound aldehydic hydrogen to form a resonance stabilized benzoyl radical (C6H5C(•)═O). A detailed study of the thermochemistry of intermediates and the oxidation reaction paths of the benzoyl radical with dioxygen is presented in this study. Structures and enthalpies of formation for important stable species, intermediate radicals, and transition state structures resulting from the benzoyl radical +O2 association reaction are reported along with reaction paths and barriers. Enthalpies, ΔfH298(0), are calculated using ab initio (G3MP2B3) and density functional (DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) calculations, group additivity (GA), and literature data. Bond energies on the benzoyl and benzoyl-peroxy systems are also reported and compared to hydrocarbon systems. The reaction of benzoyl with O2 has a number of low energy reaction channels that are not currently considered in either atmospheric chemistry or combustion models. The reaction paths include exothermic, chain branching reactions to a number of unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates along with formation of CO2. The initial reaction of the C6H5C(•)═O radical with O2 forms a chemically activated benzoyl peroxy radical with 37 kcal mol(-1) internal energy; this is significantly more energy than the 21 kcal mol(-1) involved in the benzyl or allyl + O2 systems. This deeper well results in a number of chemical activation reaction paths, leading to highly exothermic reactions to phenoxy radical + CO2 products.

  19. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis at a Low Pressure on Subnanometer Cobalt Oxide Clusters: The Effect of Cluster Size and Support on Activity and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungsik; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Sönke; Winans, Randall E.; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-05-21

    In this study, the catalytic activity and changes in the oxidation state during the Fischer Tropsch (FT) reaction was investigated on subnanometer size-selected cobalt clusters deposited on oxide (Al2O3, MgO) and carbon-based (ultrananocrystalline diamond UNCD) supports by temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) combined with in-situ grazing-incidence X-ray absorption characterization (GIXAS). The activity and selectivity of ultrasmall cobalt clusters exhibits a very strong dependence on cluster size and support. The evolution of the oxidation state of metal cluster during the reaction reveals that metal-support interaction plays a key role in the reaction.

  20. Hydrogen oxidation reaction at the Ni/YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cells from first principles.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S; Bernasconi, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-11-11

    By means of ab initio simulations we here provide a comprehensive scenario for hydrogen oxidation reactions at the Ni/zirconia anode of solid oxide fuel cells. The simulations have also revealed that in the presence of water chemisorbed at the oxide surface, the active region for H oxidation actually extends beyond the metal/zirconia interface unraveling the role of water partial pressure in the decrease of the polarization resistance observed experimentally.

  1. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, September 8, 1992--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sun, Q.; Sarkany, J.

    1993-01-01

    Support effects on catalytic reactions, especially of highly exothermic oxidation reactions, can be very significant. Since we had shown that a MoO{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, especially when used in a double bed configuration with a Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, can selectively oxidize methane to formaldehyde, the role of the SiO{sub 2} support was investigated. Therefore, partial oxidation of methane by oxygen to form formaldehyde, carbon oxides, and C{sub 2} products (ethane and ethene) has been studied over silica catalyst supports (fumed Cabosil and Grace 636 silica gel) in the 630-780{degrees}C temperature range under ambient pressure. When relatively high gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) were utilized, the silica catalysts exhibit high space time yields (at low conversions) for methane partial oxidation to formaldehyde, and the C{sub 2} hydrocarbons were found to be parallel products with formaldehyde. In general, the selectivities toward CO were high while those toward CO{sub 2} were low. Based on the present results obtained by a double catalyst bed experiment, the observations of product composition dependence on the variation of GHSV (i.e. gas residence time), and differences in apparent activation energies of formation of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and CH{sub 2}O, a reaction mechanism is proposed for the activation of methane over the silica surface. This mechanism can explain the observed product distribution patterns (specifically the parallel formation of formaldehyde and C{sub 2} hydrocarbons).

  2. Development of oxidative coupling strategies for site-selective protein modification.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Adel M; Francis, Matthew B

    2015-07-21

    the challenges and opportunities associated with the optimization of site-selective chemistries that target native amino acids. We close by discussing the most recent reports from our laboratory that have capitalized on the unique reactivity of o-iminoquinone derivatives. We discuss the various oxidants and conditions that can be used to generate these reactive intermediates from appropriate precursors, as well as the product distributions that result. We also describe our work to determine the nature of iminoquinone reactivity with proteins and peptides bearing free N-terminal amino groups. Through this discussion, we hope to facilitate the use of oxidative approaches to protein bioconjugation, as well as inspire the discovery of new reactions for the site-selective modification of biomolecular targets.

  3. Identification of a suitable and selective inhibitor towards aldehyde oxidase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Palacharla, Raghava Choudary; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Kanamarlapudi, Vijaya Bhargava; Ponnamaneni, Ranjith Kumar; Manoharan, Arun Kumar

    2014-03-01

    1. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a liver cytosolic molybdoflavoprotein enzyme whose importance in drug metabolism is gaining in the recent. The objective of this work is to find a potent and selective inhibitor for AO activity using phthalazine oxidation as a marker reaction. 2. Among organic solvents tested, it was identified that methanol was not a suitable choice for AO activity even at concentrations less than 0.2% v/v. Acetonitrile and DMSO did not show any effect till 0.5% v/v but thereafter activites tend to decrease. 3. For selectivity, 23 compounds were selected and evaluated for their effects on AO and nine CYP450 enzymes. Among the tested compounds chlorpromazine, estradiol, hydralazine, quetiapine and raloxifene were selected based on their potency of inhibition towards AO activity. 4. Raloxifene was found to be a non-specific inhibitor of all major tested CYP450 enzymes and was excluded as a selective inhibitor for AO. Quetiapine also showed a degree of inhibition towards the major CYP450 tested. Hydralazine used as a specific inhibitor during the past for AO activity demonstrated a stimulation of AO activity at high and low concentrations respectively and the inhibition noted to be time dependent while inhibiting other enzymes like monoamine oxidase. 5. Estradiol showed no inhibition towards the tested CYP450 enzymes and thus proved to be a selective and specific inhibitor for AO activity with an uncompetitive mode of inhibition.

  4. Selective oxidation of styrene on an oxygen-adsorbed Au(111): A density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li-Qin; Pang, Xian-Yong; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2009-02-01

    The reaction mechanism for the styrene selective oxidation on the oxygen preadsorbed Au(111) surface has been studied by the density functional theory calculation with the periodic slab model. The calculated results showed that the process of reaction includes two steps: forming the oxametallacycle intermediate (OMME) and then producing the products. It was found that the second step, from OMME to product is the rate-controlling step, which is similar to ethylene selective oxidation on Ag. Importantly, the present density-functional-theory calculation results suggested that the mechanism via the OMME (2) (i.e. the preadsorbed atomic oxygen bound to the CH2 group involved in C6H5--CH=CH2) to produce styrene epoxide is kinetically favored than that of OMME (1).

  5. Nondestructive covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by selective oxidation of the original defects with K2FeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-yang; Xu, Xue-cheng

    2015-08-01

    Chemical oxidation is still the major approach to the covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Theoretically, the defects on CNTs are more reactive than skeletal hexagons and should be preferentially oxidized, but conventional oxidation methods, e.g., HNO3/H2SO4 treatment, have poor reaction selectivity and inevitably consume the Cdbnd C bonds in the hexagonal lattices, leading to structural damage, π-electrons loss and weight decrease. In this work, we realized the nondestructive covalent functionalization of CNTs by selective oxidation of the defects. In our method, potassium ferrate K2FeVIO4 was employed as an oxidant for CNTs in H2SO4 medium. The CNT samples, before and after K2FeO4/H2SO4 treatment, were characterized with colloid dispersibility, IR, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM and XPS. The results indicated that (i) CNTs could be effectively oxidized by Fe (VI) under mild condition (60 °C, 3 h), and hydrophilic CNTs with abundant surface sbnd COOH groups were produced; and (ii) Fe (VI) oxidation of CNTs followed a defect-specific oxidation process, that is, only the sp3-hybridized carbon atoms on CNT surface were oxidized while the Cdbnd C bonds remained unaffected. This selective/nondestructive oxidation afforded oxidized CNTs in yields of above 100 wt%. This paper shows that K2FeO4/H2SO4 is an effective, nondestructive and green oxidation system for oxidative functionalization of CNTs and probably other carbon materials as well.

  6. Fracture of flash oxidized, yttria-doped sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govila, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a slip cast, yttria-doped, sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride after 'flash oxidation' was investigated. It was found that both the static oxidation resistance and flexural stress rupture life (creep deformation) were improved at 1000 C in air compared to those of the same material without flash oxidation. Stress rupture data at high temperatures (1000 to 1200 C) are presented to indicate applied stress levels for oxidation-dependent and independent failures.

  7. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  8. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  9. Tandem Brook Rearrangement/Silicon Polonovski Reaction via Oxidative Generation of Ammonium Ylides.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Hiromasa; Nakago, Takahiro; Inoue, Seiichi; Hoshino, Yujiro; Honda, Kiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    A tandem Brook rearrangement/silicon Polonovski reaction has been achieved by in situ generation of ammonium ylides via the oxidation of α-silyl-tertiary amines. Furthermore, we found that the oxidation of N-(1-cyano-1-silyl)methyl-tertiary amines with peracids induced the tandem Brook rearrangement/silicon Polonovski reaction/fragmentation to give formamide derivatives in moderate yields.

  10. Elemental Mercury Oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn Spinel: Performance, Mechanism, and Reaction Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shangchao; Xiao, Xin; Huang, Nan; Dang, Hao; Liao, Yong; Zou, Sijie; Yang, Shijian

    2017-01-03

    The design of a high-performance catalyst for Hg(0) oxidation and predicting the extent of Hg(0) oxidation are both extremely limited due to the uncertainties of the reaction mechanism and the reaction kinetics. In this work, Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was developed as a high-performance catalyst for Hg(0) oxidation, and the reaction mechanism and the reaction kinetics of Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel were studied. The reaction orders of Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel with respect to gaseous Hg(0) concentration and gaseous HCl concentration were approximately 1 and 0, respectively. Therefore, Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel mainly followed the Eley-Rideal mechanism (i.e., the reaction of gaseous Hg(0) with adsorbed HCl), and the rate of Hg(0) oxidation mainly depended on Cl(•) concentration on the surface. As H2O, SO2, and NO not only inhibited Cl(•) formation on the surface but also interfered with the interface reaction between gaseous Hg(0) and Cl(•) on the surface, Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was obviously inhibited in the presence of H2O, SO2, and NO. Furthermore, the extent of Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel can be predicted according to the kinetic parameter kE-R, and the predicted result was consistent with the experimental result.

  11. Ti-STT: a new zeotype shape selective oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Eilertsen, Einar André; Giordanino, Filippo; Lamberti, Carlo; Bordiga, Silvia; Damin, Alessandro; Bonino, Francesca; Olsbye, Unni; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2011-11-21

    A new zeotype titanium silicate oxidation catalyst with the STT topology has been synthesized from direct synthesis. Ti-STT has a microporous structure with small pore openings, allowing shape selective oxidation catalysis. The isomorphous substitution of Si by Ti in the framework has been confirmed by Raman, FT-IR, UV-VIS and XANES spectroscopies. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  12. Anti-oxidant enzyme activities and expression and oxidative damage in patients with non-immediate reactions to drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Garcia, J A; Mayorga, C; Torres, M J; Fernandez, T D; R-Pena, R; Bravo, I; Mates, J M; Blanca, M

    2006-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions with an immunological basis (ADRIB) may involve activation of other concomitant, non-specific mechanisms, amplifying the specific response and contributing to the severity and duration. One concomitant mechanism could be the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or their detoxification by anti-oxidants, including anti-oxidant enzymes. We analysed the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPX), as well as certain markers of oxidative damage (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and carbonyl content) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with non-immediate ADRIB using spectrophotometric methods and the anti-oxidant enzymes expression by quantitative real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. SOD activity and expression were increased in all types of non-immediate reactions (urticaria, maculopapular exanthema and toxic epidermal necrolysis). Regarding oxidative damage, TBARS were increased in urticaria and maculopapular exanthema, and carbonyl groups in all types of reactions. Our observations indicate that oxidative damage occurs in non-immediate reactions. Carbonyl stress and the inadequacy of the anti-oxidant defences are probable causes. PMID:16879248

  13. Anti-oxidant enzyme activities and expression and oxidative damage in patients with non-immediate reactions to drugs.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Garcia, J A; Mayorga, C; Torres, M J; Fernandez, T D; R-Pena, R; Bravo, I; Mates, J M; Blanca, M

    2006-08-01

    Adverse drug reactions with an immunological basis (ADRIB) may involve activation of other concomitant, non-specific mechanisms, amplifying the specific response and contributing to the severity and duration. One concomitant mechanism could be the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or their detoxification by anti-oxidants, including anti-oxidant enzymes. We analysed the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPX), as well as certain markers of oxidative damage (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and carbonyl content) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with non-immediate ADRIB using spectrophotometric methods and the anti-oxidant enzymes expression by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. SOD activity and expression were increased in all types of non-immediate reactions (urticaria, maculopapular exanthema and toxic epidermal necrolysis). Regarding oxidative damage, TBARS were increased in urticaria and maculopapular exanthema, and carbonyl groups in all types of reactions. Our observations indicate that oxidative damage occurs in non-immediate reactions. Carbonyl stress and the inadequacy of the anti-oxidant defences are probable causes.

  14. Porcelain enamelled absorbers, coated by spectral selective tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, F.; Faber, A.J.; Hoogendoorn, C.J.

    1987-02-01

    The use of porcelain enamelled absorbers in flat plate collectors features longevity thanks to the durability and thermal stability of the enamel finish. The porcelain enamel can be made spectral selective by coating with doped tin oxide or indium oxide. The application procedure involves an enamelling step followed by a pyrosol process with tin or indium compounds. The optical properties of tin oxide coated enamel yield values of 0.90-0.92 absorptance and 0.13-0.18 hemispherical emittance. The temperature dependence of the emittance is very small. The thermal stability has been proved up to 400/sup 0/C in air.

  15. Reaction of CO2 with propylene oxide and styrene oxide catalyzed by a chromium(III) amine-bis(phenolate) complex.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca K; Devaine-Pressing, Katalin; Dawe, Louise N; Kozak, Christopher M

    2013-07-07

    A diamine-bis(phenolate) chromium(III) complex, {CrCl[O2NN'](BuBu)}2 catalyzes the copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The synthesis of this metal complex is straightforward and it can be obtained in high yields. This catalyst incorporates a tripodal amine-bis(phenolate) ligand, which differs from the salen or salan ligands typically used with Cr and Co complexes that have been employed as catalysts for the synthesis of such polycarbonates. The catalyst reported herein yields low molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities when the reaction is performed at room temperature. Performing the reaction at elevated temperatures causes the selective synthesis of propylene carbonate. The copolymerization activity for propylene oxide and carbon dioxide, as well as the coupling of carbon dioxide and styrene oxide to give styrene carbonate are presented.

  16. Biomimetic oxidation reactions of a naked manganese(V)-oxo porphyrin complex.

    PubMed

    Lanucara, Francesco; Crestoni, Maria Elisa

    2011-10-17

    The intrinsic reactivity of a manganese(V)-oxo porphyrin complex, a typically fleeting intermediate in catalytic oxidation reactions in solution, has been elucidated in a study focused on its gas-phase ion-chemistry. The naked high-valent Mn(V)-oxo porphyrin intermediate 1 ([(tpfpp)Mn(V)O](+); tpfpp=meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphinato dianion), has been obtained by controlled treatment of [(tpfpp)Mn(III)]Cl (2-Cl) with iodosylbenzene in methanol, delivered in the gas phase by electrospray ionization and assayed by FT-ICR mass spectrometry. A direct kinetic study of the reaction with selected substrates, each containing a heteroatom X (X=S, N, P) including amines, sulfides, and phosphites, was thus performed. Ionic products arising from electron transfer (ET), hydride transfer (HT), oxygen-atom transfer (OAT), and formal addition (Add) may be observed, with a predominance of two-electron processes, whereas the product of hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT), [(tpfpp)Mn(IV)OH](+), is never detected. A thermochemical threshold for the formation of the product radical cation allows an evaluation of the electron-transfer ability of a Mn(V)-oxo complex, yielding a lower limit of 7.85 eV for the ionization energy of gaseous [(tpfpp)Mn(IV)O]. Linear free-energy analyses of the reactions of para-substituted N,N-dimethylanilines and thioanisoles indicate that a considerable amount of positive charge is developed on the heteroatom in the oxidation transition state. Substrates endowed with different heteroatoms, but similar ionization energy display a comparable reaction efficiency, consistent with a mechanism initiated by ET. For the first time, the kinetic acidity of putative hydroxo intermediates playing a role in catalytic oxidations, [(tpfpp)Fe(IV)OH](+) and [(tpfpp)Mn(IV)OH](+), has been investigated with selected reference bases, revealing a comparatively higher basicity for the ferryl, [(tpfpp)Fe(IV)O], with respect to the manganyl, [(tpfpp)Mn(IV)O], unit. Finally, the

  17. Surface Reactions of Uranium Oxide Powder, Thin Films and Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Idriss, H.

    2010-01-01

    The review deals with surface reactions of the complex uranium oxide systems with relevance to catalysis and the environment. After a brief introduction on the properties of uranium oxides, the focus of the review is on surface science studies of defined structures of uranium oxides which are entirely on UO{sub 2} because of the lack of available model on other uranium oxide systems. Powder work is also included as it has given considerable information related to the dynamics between the many phases of uranium oxides. Many chemical reactions are mapped and these include water dissociative adsorption and reaction, CO oxidation and reductive coupling, as well as the reaction of oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids in addition to a few examples of sulfur and nitrogen containing compounds.

  18. Combined temperature-programmed reaction and in-situ x-ray scattering studies of size-selected silver clusters under realistic reaction conditions in the epoxidation of propene.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, S.; Lee, S.; Sell, K.; Barke, I.; Kleibert, A.; von Oeynhausen, V.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Rodriguez, A. F.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. M.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. W.; Yale Univ.; Univ. Rostock; Swiss Light Source

    2009-09-28

    The catalytic activity and dynamical shape changes in size-selected nanoclusters at work are studied under realistic reaction conditions by using a combination of simultaneous temperature-programmed reaction with in situ grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering. This approach allows drawing a direct correlation between nanocatalyst size, composition, shape, and its function under realistic reaction conditions for the first time. The approach is illustrated in a chemical industry highly relevant selective partial oxidation of propene on a monodisperse silver nanocatalyst. The shape of the catalyst undergoes rapid change already at room temperature upon the exposure to the reactants, followed by a complex evolution of shape with increasing temperature. Acrolein formation is observed around 50 C while the formation of the propylene oxide exhibits a sharp onset at 80 C and is leveling off at 150 C. At lower temperatures acrolein is produced preferentially to propylene oxide; at temperatures above 100 C propylene oxide is favored.

  19. Free computational resources for designing selected reaction monitoring transitions.

    PubMed

    Cham Mead, Jennifer A; Bianco, Luca; Bessant, Conrad

    2010-03-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a technique for quantifying specific proteins using triple quadrupole MS. Proteins are digested into peptides and fed into MS following HPLC separation. The stream of ionized peptides is filtered by m/z ratio so only specific peptide targets enter the collision cell, where they are fragmented into product ions. A specific product ion is then filtered from the cell and its intensity measured. By spiking an isotopically labeled version of each target peptide into a sample, both native and surrogate peptides enter MS, pass the filters and transition into product ions in tandem; thus the quantity of the native peptide may be calculated by examining the relative intensities of the native and surrogate signals. The choice of precursor-to-product ion transitions is critical for SRM, but predicting the best candidates is challenging and time-consuming. To alleviate this problem, software tools for designing and optimizing transitions have recently emerged, predominantly driven by data from public proteomics repositories, such as the Global Proteome Machine and PeptideAtlas. In this review, we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art in automated SRM transition design tools in the public domain, explaining how the systems work and how to use them.

  20. Evaluation of absolute peptide quantitation strategies using selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James; Rezai, Taha; Prakash, Amol; Krastins, Bryan; Dayon, Loïc; Ward, Malcolm; Robinson, Sarah; Lopez, Mary

    2011-03-01

    The use of internal peptide standards in selected reaction monitoring experiments enables absolute quantitation. Here, we describe three approaches addressing calibration of peptide concentrations in complex matrices and assess their performance in terms of trueness and precision. The simplest approach described is single reference point quantitation where a heavy peptide is spiked into test samples and the endogenous analyte quantified relative to the heavy peptide internal standard. We refer to the second approach as normal curve quantitation. Here, a constant amount of heavy peptide and a varying amount of light peptide are spiked into matrix to construct a calibration curve. This accounts for matrix effects but due to the presence of endogenous analyte, it is usually not possible to determine the lower LOQ. We refer to the third method as reverse curve quantitation. Here, a constant amount of light peptide and a varying amount of heavy peptide are spiked into matrix to construct a calibration curve. Because there is no contribution to the heavy peptide signal from endogenous analyte, it is possible to measure the equivalent of a blank sample and determine LOQ. These approaches are applied to human plasma samples and used to assay peptides of a set of apolipoproteins. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Mann, Jessica M; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-08-17

    Absolute quantification of target proteins within complex biological samples is critical to a wide range of research and clinical applications. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions for the development and application of quantitative assays using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). First, likely quantotypic target peptides are identified based on numerous criteria. This includes identifying proteotypic peptides, avoiding sites of posttranslational modification, and analyzing the uniqueness of the target peptide to the target protein. Next, crude external peptide standards are synthesized and used to develop SRM assays, and the resulting assays are used to perform qualitative analyses of the biological samples. Finally, purified, quantified, heavy isotope labeled internal peptide standards are prepared and used to perform isotope dilution series SRM assays. Analysis of all of the resulting MS data is presented. This protocol was used to accurately assay the absolute abundance of proteins of the chemotaxis signaling pathway within RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line). The quantification of Gi2 (a heterotrimeric G-protein α-subunit) is described in detail.

  2. Selective placement of carbon nanotubes on metal-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hannon, J B; Afzali, A; Klinke, Ch; Avouris, Ph

    2005-09-13

    We describe a method to selectively position carbon nanotubes on Al2O3 and HfO2 surfaces. The method exploits the selective binding of alkylphosphonic acids to oxide surfaces with large isoelectric points (i.e. basic rather than acidic surfaces). We have patterned oxide surfaces with acids using both microcontact printing and conventional lithography. With proper choice of the functional end group (e.g., -CH3 or -NH2), nanotube adhesion to the surface can be either prevented or enhanced.

  3. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C.; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications.Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2

  4. Exothermic Surface Reactions in Alumina-Aluminum Shell-Core Nanoparticles with Iodine Oxide Decomposition Fragments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-22

    AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Exothennic smface reactions in alumina-aluminum shell-core W911NF-11-1-0439 nanoprui icles with iodine oxide...is observed for aluminum and an iodine -containing oxidizer. This PIR is exothermic and precedes the main exothennic reaction conesponding to aluminum...combustion. For the aluminum and iodine oxide system, exothennic smface chemistiy was recently predicted for I-0 fragments fonning bridge bonds with

  5. Oxidative reactions during early stages of beer brewing studied by electron spin resonance and spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Anne M; Festersen, Rikke M; Andersen, Mogens L

    2008-09-24

    An electron spin resonance (ESR)-based method was used for evaluating the levels of radical formation during mashing and in sweet wort. The method included the addition of 5% (v/v) ethanol together with the spin trap alpha-4-pyridyl(1-oxide)- N- tert-butylnitrone (POBN) to wort, followed by monitoring the rate of formation of POBN spin adducts during aerobic heating of the wort. The presence of ethanol makes the spin trapping method more selective and sensitive for the detection of highly reactive radicals such as hydroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Samples of wort that were collected during the early stages of the mashing process gave higher rates of spin adduct formation than wort samples collected during the later stages. The lower oxidative stability of the early wort samples was confirmed by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption during heating of the wort. The addition of Fe(II) to the wort samples increased the rate of spin adduct formation, whereas the addition of Fe(II) during the mashing had no effect on the oxidative stability of the wort samples. Analysis of the iron content in the sweet wort samples demonstrated that iron added during the mashing had no effect on the iron level in the wort. The moderate temperatures during the early steps of mashing allow the endogenous malt enzymes to be active. The potential antioxidative effects of different redox-active enzymes during mashing were tested by measuring the rate of spin adduct formation in samples of wort. Surprisingly, a high catalase dosage caused a significant, 20% reduction of the initial rate of radical formation, whereas superoxide dismutase had no effect on the oxidation rates. This suggests that hydrogen peroxide and superoxide are not the only intermediates that play a role in the oxidative reactions occurring during aerobic oxidation of sweet wort.

  6. Low-temperature, highly selective, gas-phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol over mesoporous K-Cu-TiO2 with stable copper(I) oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Dai, Yihu; Li, Yunlong; Zheng, Nanfeng; Guo, Junfang; Yan, Xiaoqing; Stucky, Galen D

    2009-11-04

    A newly developed mesoporous mixed metal oxide (K-Cu-TiO(2)) catalyst is capable of highly selective, gas-phase benzyl alcoholbenzaldehyde transformation at excellent yields (>99%) under surprisingly low temperatures (203 degrees C, bp of benzyl alcohol). The low-temperature reaction conditions and integration of K and Cu(I) components into the TiO(2) matrix are of vital importance for the stabilization of an active Cu(I) oxidation state and resultant stable, excellent catalytic performance.

  7. The kinetics of reactions of hexacarbonyls of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Maksakov, V.A.; Ershova, V.A.

    1994-04-01

    The mechanism of the reactions of M(CO){sub 6}(M=Cr, Mo, and W) with hydroxylamine was studied. As follows from kinetic data, the reaction results in the oxidation of CO to CO{sub 2} and an intramolecular transfer of the formed amine to a central metal atom. The mechanisms of reactions of M(CO){sub 6} with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide are compared.

  8. Ability of different biomaterials to enantioselectively catalyze oxidation and reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    We studied the ability of different biomaterials to enantioselectively catalyze oxidation or reduction reactions with the help of substrate rac-1-m or p-ArCH(OH)Me and the 1-o-ArC(O)Me derivatives. Apoenzyme (NAD(P)(+)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase(NAD(P)-E)) and cofactor (NAD(P)(+)) were activated by preincubating immobilized aqueous plant leaf (e.g., young wheat leaves), cereal tissue (wheat bran), vegetable (e.g., carrot), and seaweed (e.g., wakame seaweed) solutions, and the NAD(P)-E oxidized only (R)-isomers highly enantioselectively. Thus, greater than 99% ee(s) of (S)-isomers (1m-5m and 1p-5p) can be obtained from corresponding rac-1-m or p-ArCH(OH)Me. Further, immobilized chlorella cells and immobilized baker's yeast can reduce highly stereoselectively; greater than 99% ee(s) of (S)-isomers (1o-5o) can be obtained from corresponding 1-o-ArC(O)Me. Specific use of each isomer ((S)-6 and (R)-6) with greater than 99% ee(s) of racemic-1-2-NpCH(OH)Me becomes possible through selective use of NAD(P)-E eluted from artemisia vulgaris indica leaves and young wheat leaves. We suggest that the pH of the reaction media can determine not only the direction of NAD(P)-E, toward enantioselectively catalyzed oxidation (pH > 7.0) or reduction reaction (pH < 7.0), but also the regioselective reactivity of NAD(P)-E to the substrate o- (pH < 7.0), m-, and p-substituted groups (pH > 7.0). Thus, in comparison to current biocatalysts, several biomaterials can serve as asymmetric reagent bases, providing easily obtained, low-cost natural catalysts with stereoselectivity, regioselectivity, and substrate specificity that work under mild conditions for asymmetric synthesis of organic compounds.

  9. Reactions Leading to Ignition in Nanocomposite Al-oxide Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    processing at room temperature, and the nature of the interface present between aluminum and the oxidizer (metal oxide, e.g., CuO, MoO3, Bi2O3 , etc...at room temperature, and the nature of the interface present between aluminum and the oxidizer (metal oxide, e.g., CuO, MoO3, Bi2O3 , etc.) is

  10. Computational studies of the isomerization and hydration reactions of acetaldehyde oxide and methyl vinyl carbonyl oxide.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Keith T; Hermes, Matthew R; Carlson, Matthew J; Zogg, Cheryl K

    2010-09-02

    Alkene ozonolysis is a major source of hydroxyl radical (*OH), the most important oxidant in the troposphere. Previous experimental and computational work suggests that for many alkenes the measured *OH yields should be attributed to the combined impact of both chemically activated and thermalized syn-alkyl Criegee intermediates (CIs), even though the thermalized CI should be susceptible to trapping by molecules such as water. We have used RRKM/master equation and variational transition state theory calculations to quantify the competition between unimolecular isomerization and bimolecular hydration reactions for the syn and anti acetaldehyde oxide formed in trans-2-butene ozonolysis and for the CIs formed in isoprene ozonolysis possessing syn-methyl groups. Statistical rate theory calculations were based on quantum chemical data provided by the B3LYP, QCISD, and multicoefficient G3 methods, and thermal rate constants were corrected for tunneling effects using the Eckart method. At tropospheric temperatures and pressures, all thermalized CIs with syn-methyl groups are predicted to undergo 1,4-hydrogen shifts from 2 to 8 orders of magnitude faster than they react with water monomer at its saturation number density. For thermalized anti acetaldehyde oxide, the rates of dioxirane formation and hydration should be comparable.

  11. Quantitation of four guanine oxidation products from reaction of DNA with varying doses of peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Venkatarangan, Lata; Wishnok, John S; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2005-12-01

    The oxidation products obtained from the reaction of peroxynitrite (ONOO-) with dG include-among others-8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), 2,2-diamino-4[(2-deoxy-beta-d-erythro-pentafuranosyl)amino]-5(2H)-oxazolone (oxazolone), spiroiminodihydantoin, and N1-(beta-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-5-guanidinohydantoin (guanidinohydantoin). In the present work, the formation of these products from the treatment of calf thymus DNA with varying amounts of ONOO- was studied quantitatively in vitro. 13C-, 15N-labeled standards were synthesized for the nucleosides of interest, and calf thymus DNA was reacted with ONOO- and digested enzymatically down to the nucleoside level. Specific modifications in the DNA were measured by HPLC separation followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric analysis in the selected reaction-monitoring mode. Artifacts of the above four oxidation products, arising from oxidation of dG and/or 8-oxodG during DNA digestion and subsequent workup, were evaluated with 7-15N-dG and/or stable-isotope-labeled 8-oxodG as internal standards. Levels of artifactual 8-oxodG were about 5/10(6) nucleosides. The artifacts of spiroiminodihydantoin and guanidinohydantoin, arising from 8-oxodG, were 3.7% and 0.6% of the measured 8-oxodG values, respectively. No artifacts of oxazolone were detected. 8-OxodG and oxazolone were formed dose-dependently in DNA treated with ONOO-, while the levels of spiroiminodihydantoin and guanidinohydantoin increased significantly at low ONOO- doses, and then dropped off at higher ONOO- doses. The complexity of these dose-response relationships is likely due to the dual role of peroxynitrite as both an oxidant and a nucleophile in competition with water.

  12. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  13. Experimental Study of Iron Reaction with Oxides: Implications for Core-Mantle Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, S.; Rekhi, S.; Wang, Z.; Pischedda, V.; Liermann, P.; Shen, G.

    2001-05-01

    Whether the iron core reacts with the silicate mantle is an important question in geophysics. If a significant reaction occurs, it may also provide a mechanism of introducing a mantle component in the outer core as required by seismic density profiling of the core. We have studied several reactions at high pressure and high temperature over the last five years. The study covers the species enstatite (MgSiO3), FeO, MgO and Al2O3. Our experimental techniques employ the use of diamond-anvil cells. The samples in the cells were heated either externally to 1800 K or by stabilized YLF laser. Pressure was measured mostly from cell constants of the sample material with XRD. All samples were in fine powder form to ensure reactivity. Our conclusions are that enstatite and MgO did not react with iron at any pressure to iron melting temperatures in this study. We also used water to wet the samples thoroughly. At pressures in excess of 60 GPa, again no reaction was noted (1). In contrast to these results, corundum (Al2O3) did react strongly with iron at 36 Gpa. The laser-heated spots showed iron to rise as plumes through corundum and in all cases resulted in Fe-Al alloys of various compositions. It was not possible to determine the compositions quantitatively. The result confirms the study by Annersten et al. (2) who used Mossbauer spectroscopy to determine the composition of Fe-Al alloy. Compositionally Al2O3 could only be a minor component of the lower mantle occurring in perovskite. Elsewhere (3), we have discussed a possible dissociation of ferropericlase to an oxide mixture. FeO or FeO component in wustite does react with Fe as shown by Boehler (4) without lowering the iron melting temperature significantly (a point that requires confirmation). In conclusion, FeO from ferropericlase and Al2O3 from perovskite are the only two components that could be extracted from the mantle and incorporated in to the outer core. 1. Saxena, S.K., Wang, Z., Pischedda, V. and Durovinsky, L

  14. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, wemore » show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.« less

  15. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  16. PH Dependent Interactions between Aqueous Iodide Ion and Selected Oxidizers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-06

    between the oxidizers oeroxydisultte, peroxide. percarbonate, and perborate ions and aqueous iodide have been measured at pH 1. 4. 7, 9. Reactions were... Perborate and percarbonate are salts with "hydrogen peroxide of crystallization" (see formulae listed in Table i). These salts appear to release this...between hydrogen peroxide and iodide are highly pH dependent. These materials react very slowly, or not at all, at pH 49. 2). Perborate and percarbonate are

  17. Gas-phase reactions of nickel and nickel-rich oxide cluster anions with nitric oxide. 2: The addition of nitric oxide, oxidation of nickel clusters, and the formation of nitrogen oxide anions

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, W.D.; Wagner, R.L.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1998-11-05

    A fast flow reactor-quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a laser vaporization source is used to study the gas-phase reactions of nickel and nickel oxide cluster anions (Ni{sub x}O{sub y}{sup {minus}}, where x = 1--12 and y = 0, 1, or 2) with nitric oxide. The results indicate that three processes are occurring in the presence of the nickel cluster anions. First, nickel and nickel oxide clusters are oxidized by the reaction with nitric oxide. Second, addition products with these oxides are also formed. Third, nitrogen dioxide and nitrogen trioxide are formed on nickel oxide clusters and subsequently released as anions. Rate constants are reported for the initial reaction occurring between the nickel cluster anions and the nitric oxide, and the reaction rates are compared with reaction rates of the same nickel anion clusters with molecular oxygen. Finally, a comparison of the reaction rates for nickel oxides formed both in the flow tube and in the laser vaporization source are reported. These reactions (previously reported on Part 1) to help to provide a better understanding of the formation of free nitrogen oxide anions observed in the current experiments.

  18. Single transverse mode selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.

    2000-04-18

    Vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) sources have been adopted into Gigabit Ethernet applications in a remarkably short time period. VCSELs are particularly suitable for multimode optical fiber local area networks (LANs), due to their reduced threshold current, circular output beam, and inexpensive and high volume manufacture. Moreover, selectively oxidized VCSELs are nearly ideal LAN sources since the oxide aperture within the laser cavity produces strong electrical and optical confinement which enables high electrical to optical conversion efficiency and minimal modal discrimination allowing emission into multiple transverse optical modes. In addition to the large demand for multimode lasers, VCSELs which emit into a single optical mode are also increasingly sought for emerging applications, which include data communication with single mode optical fiber, bar code scanning, laser printing, optical read/write heads, and modulation spectroscopy. To achieve single mode selectively oxidized VCSELs is a challenging task, since the inherent index confinement within these high performance lasers is very large.

  19. Photocatalytic selective oxidation of hydrocarbons in the aqueous phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.A.; Howell, S.G.; Sikdar, S.K.

    1999-04-01

    The sustainable transformation of an inert alkane into its corresponding oxygenates has been the subject of intense chemical research. These oxygenates typically produced from processes using stringent conditions and materials offer disadvantages that include decreased selectivities to the partial oxygenates and by-product formation. As environmental concerns and regulations become more rigorous, the need for alternative catalytic oxidation processes that use mild or ambient conditions is increased. In this Note, the authors have investigated the use of photocatalysis as a low-temperature and green alternative for the direct and selective oxidation of alkanes with molecular oxygen. Research has been directed toward the use of a heterogeneous liquid-phase reactor for the partial oxidation of cyclohexane, toluene, methylcyclohexane, ethylbenzene, and cumene to their corresponding oxygenates.

  20. Selective electrocatalytic oxidation of sorbitol to fructose and sorbose.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Youngkook; de Jong, Ed; van der Waal, Jan Kees; Koper, Marc T M

    2015-03-01

    A new electrocatalytic method for the selective electrochemical oxidation of sorbitol to fructose and sorbose is demonstrated by using a platinum electrode promoted by p-block metal atoms. By the studying a range of C4, C5 and C6 polyols, it is found that the promoter interferes with the stereochemistry of the polyol and thereby modifies its reactivity.

  1. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canlas, Christian P.; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A.; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A.; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.; van Duyne, Richard P.; Stair, Peter C.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al2O3 (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with ‘nanocavities’ (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO2 photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations.

  2. Synthetic and Mechanistic Aspects of the Regioselective Base-Mediated Reaction of Perfluoroalkyl- and Perfluoroarylsilanes with Heterocyclic N-Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, David E.; Chavez, Gabriel; Valdes, Martin; Dovalina, Monica; Arman, Hadi D.

    2014-01-01

    The scope and mechanistic implications of the direct transformation of heterocyclic N-oxides to 2-trifluoromethyl-, and related perfluoroalkyl- and perfluoroaryl-substituted N-heterocycles has been studied. The reaction is effected by perfluoroalkyl- and perfluorophenyltrimethylsilane in the presence of strong base. In situ displacement of the para-fluoro substituent in the pentafluorophenyl ring and the methoxy group in 8-methoxyquinolines with additional nucleophiles allows for further site-selective refunctionalization of the N-heterocyclic products. PMID:24993899

  3. High-temperature oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. T.; Singh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics was investigated in the temperature range of 1100 to 1400 C. The oxidation weight change was recorded by TGA; the oxidized materials were examined by light and electron microscopy, and the oxidation product by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The materials exhibited initial weight loss, followed by passive weight gain (with enhanced parabolic rates, k(sub p)), and ending with a negative (logarithmic) deviation from the parabolic law. The weight loss arose from the oxidation of residual carbon, and the enhanced k(sub p) values from internal oxidation and the oxidation of residual silicon, while the logarithmic kinetics is thought to have resulted from crystallization of the oxide. The presence of a small amount of MoSi, in the RFSC material caused a further increase in the oxidation rate. The only solid oxidation product for all temperatures studied was silica.

  4. Computational Explorations of Mechanisms and Ligand-Directed Selectivities of Copper-Catalyzed Ullmann-Type Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gavin O.; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Computational investigations of ligand-directed selectivities in Ullmann-type coupling reactions of methanol and methylamine with iodobenzene by β-diketone- and 1,10-phenanthroline-ligated Cu(I) complexes are reported. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with several functionals were performed on both the nucleophile formation and aryl halide activation steps of these reactions. The origin of ligand-directed selectivities in N- vs. O-arylation reactions as described in a previous publication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 3490–3491) were studied and explained. The selectivities observed experimentally are not derived from initial Cu(I)-nucleophile formation, but from the subsequent steps involving aryl halide activation. The arylation may occur via single-electron transfer (SET) or iodine atom transfer (IAT), depending on the electron-donating ability of the ligand and nucleophile. Mechanisms involving either oxidative addition/reductive elimination or sigma-bond metathesis are disfavored. SET mechanisms are favored in reactions promoted by the β-diketone ligand; N-arylation is predicted to be favored in these cases, in agreement with experimental results. The phenanthroline ligand promotes O-arylation reactions via IAT mechanisms in preference to N-arylation reactions, which occur via SET mechanisms; this result is also in agreement with experimental results. PMID:20387898

  5. High-temperature thermochemical energy storage based on redox reactions using Co-Fe and Mn-Fe mixed metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Laurie; Abanades, Stéphane; Cassayre, Laurent

    2017-09-01

    Metal oxides are potential materials for thermochemical heat storage via reversible endothermal/exothermal redox reactions, and among them, cobalt oxide and manganese oxide are attracting attention. The synthesis of mixed oxides is considered as a way to answer the drawbacks of pure metal oxides, such as slow reaction kinetics, loss-in-capacity over cycles or sintering issues, and the materials potential for thermochemical heat storage application needs to be assessed. This work proposes a study combining thermodynamic calculations and experimental measurements by simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis and calorimetry, in order to identify the impact of iron oxide addition to Co and Mn-based oxides. Fe addition decreased the redox activity and energy storage capacity of Co3O4/CoO, whereas the reaction rate, reversibility and cycling stability of Mn2O3/Mn3O4 was significantly enhanced with added Fe amounts above 15 mol%, and the energy storage capacity was slightly improved. The formation of a reactive cubic spinel explained the improved re-oxidation yield of Mn-based oxides that could be cycled between bixbyite and cubic spinel phases, whereas a low reactive tetragonal spinel phase showing poor re-oxidation was formed below 15 mol% Fe. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations predict accurately the behavior of both systems. The possibility to identify other suitable mixed oxides becomes conceivable, by enabling the selection of transition metal additives for tuning the redox properties of mixed metal oxides destined for thermochemical energy storage applications.

  6. Reaction mechanisms of CO oxidation on cationic, neutral, and anionic X-O-Cu (X = Au, Ag) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; He, Xiao

    2017-10-01

    We performed extensive DFT calculations for the microscopic mechanism of CO oxidation on cationic, neutral and anionic X-O-Cu (X = Au, Ag) clusters. We obtained following findings. First, the reaction mechanism of neutral X-O-Cu (X = Au, Ag) to the CO follows the Eley-Rideal-like (ER) mechanism and Langmuir-Hinshelwood-like (LH) mechanism. Second, as compared to the pure Au clusters, new reaction pathways have been found via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-like (LH) mechanism. The oxidation of CO on cationic Au-O-Cu in nature follows an Eley-Rideal-like (ER) mechanism. Third, comparing with their reaction profiles between cationic, neutral and anionic Au-O-Cu and CO, all the reactions on Ag-O-Cu can occur more easily. Furthermore, the selectivity of the oxidation of CO on Ag-O-Cu will be improved. On the basis of our calculations, we suggest that AgCu may also be a good catalyst due to its high oxidation performance.

  7. Photo- and thermal-oxidation studies on methyl and phenyl linoleate: anti-oxidant behaviour and rates of reaction.

    PubMed

    Chacón, J N; Gaggini, P; Sinclair, R S; Smith, F J

    2000-09-01

    Photo-peroxidation of methyl and phenyl linoleate in methanol solutions at 25 degrees C, in the presence of methylene blue or 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TPP) as sensitisers of singlet oxygen, was found to proceed at more than 30 times the rate of the same polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ester species undergoing thermal-peroxidation in the bulk phase at 50 degrees C. The addition of anti-oxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) quench the thermal-oxidation effectively but appear to only partially inhibit the photosensitized peroxidation reactions. The kinetics of the overall peroxidation reactions were followed by ultraviolet spectroscopy, measurements of hydroperoxide concentration and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The photo-peroxidation reaction proceeds more rapidly in chloroform solution as the lifetime of singlet oxygen is shown to be over ten times longer in chloroform than methanol. The initial fast reaction kinetics of the photo-peroxidation reactions were evaluated using a pulsed laser technique to show that singlet oxygen reacts competitively with both the anti-oxidants and the polyunsaturated fatty acid ester. Second order kinetic rate constants (in the range 10(5)-10(7) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) were evaluated for the reactivity of singlet oxygen with a range of anti-oxidants and a singlet oxygen quencher, and the results used to explain the effect of anti-oxidants at different concentrations on the rate of the linoleate photo-peroxidation reaction.

  8. Mild and selective oxidation of cellulose fibers in the presence of N-hydroxyphthalimide.

    PubMed

    Coseri, S; Nistor, G; Fras, L; Strnad, S; Harabagiu, V; Simionescu, B C

    2009-08-10

    The oxidation reaction of regenerated cellulose fibers mediated by N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) and various cocatalysts at room temperature for different time intervals and various amounts of low concentration sodium hypochlorite solution has been investigated to produce oxidized cellulose (OC), a biocompatible and bioresorbable polymer. The results revealed that the nonpersistent phthalimide-N-oxyl (PINO) radical generated in situ from NHPI in both, metallic or metal-free systems, is a powerful agent in this kind of transformation. Moreover, the reaction converts highly selectively C(6) primary hydroxyl groups to carboxylic groups under mild reaction conditions and shorter reaction times than previously reported. The amounts of negatively charged groups in OC were determined by means of potentiometric titration. Further characterization of the products were accomplished by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy/attenuated total internal reflection spectroscopy (FT-IR/ATR), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and X-ray and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Notably, water retention values of the oxidized fibers increased by 30% in comparison with the original nonoxidized sample, as a result of the introduction of hydrophilic carboxylate groups.

  9. Oxidation of antibacterial molecules by aqueous ozone: moiety-specific reaction kinetics and application to ozone-based wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Michael C; Buffle, Marc-Olivier; Von Gunten, Urs

    2006-03-15

    Ozone and hydroxyl radical (*OH) reaction kinetics were measured for 14 antibacterial compounds from nine structural families, to determine whether municipal wastewater ozonation is likely to result in selective oxidation of these compounds' biochemically essential moieties. Each substrate is oxidized by ozone with an apparent second-order rate constant, k''(O3,app) > 1 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), at pH 7, with the exception of N(4)-acetylsulfamethoxazole (K''(O3,app) is 2.5 x 102 M(-1) s(-1)). k''(O3,app) values (pH 7) for macrolides, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, tetracycline, vancomycin, and amikacin appear to correspond directly to oxidation of biochemically essential moieties. Initial reactions of ozone with N(4)-acetylsulfamethoxazole, fluoroquinolones, lincomycin, and beta-lactams do not lead to appreciable oxidation of biochemically essential moieties. However, ozone oxidizes these moieties within fluoroquinolones and lincomycin via slower reactions. Measured k''(O3,app) values and second-order *OH rate constants, k''(*OH,app) were utilized to characterize pollutant losses during ozonation of secondary municipal wastewater effluent. These losses were dependent on k''(O3,app), but independent of k''(*OH,app). Ozone doses > or =3 mg/L yielded > or =99% depletion of fast-reacting substrates (K''(O3,app) > 5 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 7.7. Ten substrates reacted predominantly with ozone; only four were oxidized predominantly by .OH. These results indicate that many antibacterial compounds will be oxidized in wastewater via moiety-specific reactions with ozone.

  10. Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension.

    PubMed

    Che, Hyeongsu; Lee, Woojin

    2011-02-01

    Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatics by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension was investigated in a closed system. Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was used as a representative target of perchlorinated alkanes and trichloroethylene (TCE) was used as one of highly chlorinated alkenes. Degradation of CT in Fenton reaction was significantly enhanced by pyrite used as an iron source instead of soluble Fe. Pyrite Fenton showed 93% of CT removal in 140 min, while Fenton reaction with soluble Fe(II) showed 52% and that with Fe(III) 15%. Addition of 2-propanol to the pyrite Fenton system significantly inhibited degradation of TCE (99% to 44% of TCE removal), while degradation of CT was slightly improved by the 2-propanol addition (80-91% of CT removal). The result suggests that, unlike oxidative degradation of TCE by hydroxyl radical in pyrite Fenton system, an oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is not a main degradation mechanism for the degradation of CT in pyrite Fenton system but a reductive dechlorination by superoxide can rather be the one for the CT degradation. The degradation kinetics of CT in the pyrite Fenton system was decelerated (0.13-0.03 min(-1)), as initial suspension pH decreased from 3 to 2. The formation of superoxide during the CT degradation in the pyrite Fenton system was observed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The formation at initial pH 3 was greater than that at initial pH 2, which supported that superoxide was a main reductant for degradation of CT in the pyrite Fenton system.

  11. Manganese Triazacyclononane Oxidation Catalysts Grafted under Reaction Conditions on Solid Co-Catalytic Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeldt, Nicholas J.; Ni, Zhenjuan; Korinda, Andrew W.; Meyer, Randall J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-01-23

    Manganese complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tmtacn) are highly active and selective alkene oxidation catalysts with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Here, carboxylic acid-functionalized SiO{sub 2} simultaneously immobilizes and activates these complexes under oxidation reaction conditions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the functionalized support are both necessary to transform the inactive [(tmtacn)Mn{sup IV}({mu}-O)3Mn{sup IV}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+} into the active, dicarboxylate-bridged [(tmtacn)Mn{sup III}({mu}-O)({mu}-RCOO){sub 2}Mn{sup III}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+}. This transformation is assigned on the basis of comparison of diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra to known soluble models, assignment of oxidation state by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, the dependence of rates on the acid/Mn ratios, and comparison of the surface structures derived from density functional theory with extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Productivity in cis-cyclooctene oxidation to epoxide and cis-diol with 2-10 equiv of solid cocatalytic supports is superior to that obtained with analogous soluble valeric acid cocatalysts, which require 1000-fold excess to reach similar levels at comparable times. Cyclooctene oxidation rates are near first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and near zero order in all other species, including H{sub 2}O. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of substrate oxidation following rate-limiting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation on the hydrated, supported complex. This general mechanism and the observed alkene oxidation activation energy of 38 {+-} 6 kJ/mol are comparable to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation by related soluble catalysts. Undesired decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a limiting factor for these solid catalysts, and as such, productivity remains high up to 25 C and initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.5 M, increasing reactor throughput. These results show that immobilized carboxylic acids can be utilized and understood

  12. Outpatient desensitization in selected patients with platinum hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, David M; Vetter, Monica Hagan; Cohn, David E; Khan, Ambar; Hays, John L

    2017-06-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapies are a standard treatment for both initial and recurrent gynecologic cancers. Given this widespread use, it is important to be aware of the features of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the subsequent treatment of these reactions. There is also increasing interest in the development of desensitization protocols to allow patients with a history of platinum hypersensitivity to receive further platinum based therapy. In this review, we describe the management of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the desensitization protocols utilized at our institution. We also describe the clinical categorizations utilized to triage patients to appropriate desensitization protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of Alumina Reaction Tube Impurities on the Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Pure coupons of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were oxidized for 100 h in dry flowing oxygen at 1300 C. The oxidation kinetics were monitored using thermogravimetry (TGA). The experiments were first performed using high-purity alumina reaction tubes. The experiments were then repeated using fused quartz reaction tubes. Differences in oxidation kinetics, scale composition, and scale morphology were observed. These differences were attributed to impurities in the alumina tubes. Investigators interested in high-temperature oxidation of silica formers should be aware that high-purity alumina can have significant effects on experiment results.

  14. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  15. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  16. Nanoporous and highly active silicon carbide supported CeO₂-catalysts for the methane oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Claudia; Biemelt, Tim; Lohe, Martin R; Rümmeli, Mark H; Kaskel, Stefan

    2014-01-29

    CeOx @SiO2 nanoparticles are used for the first time for the generation of porous SiC materials with tailored pore diameter in the mesopore range containing encapsulated and catalytically active CeO2 nanoparticles. The nanocasting approach with a preceramic polymer and subsequent pyrolysis is performed at 1300 °C, selective leaching of the siliceous part results in CeOx /SiC catalysts with remarkable characteristics like monodisperse, spherical pores and specific surface areas of up to 438 m(2) ·g(-1) . Porous SiC materials are promising supports for high temperature applications. The catalysts show excellent activities in the oxidation of methane with onset temperatures of the reaction 270 K below the onset of the homogeneous reaction. The synthesis scheme using core-shell particles is suited to functionalize silicon carbide with a high degree of stabilization of the active nanoparticles against sintering in the core of the template even at pyrolysis temperatures of 1300 °C rendering the novel synthesis principle as an attractive approach for a wide range of catalytic reactions. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Palladium and gold nanotubes as oxygen reduction reaction and alcohol oxidation reaction catalysts in base.

    PubMed

    Alia, Shaun M; Duong, Kathlynne; Liu, Toby; Jensen, Kurt; Yan, Yushan

    2014-06-01

    Palladium (PdNTs) and gold nanotubes (AuNTs) were synthesized by the galvanic displacement of silver nanowires. PdNTs and AuNTs have wall thicknesses of 6 nm, outer diameters of 60 nm, and lengths of 5-10 and 5-20 μm, respectively. Rotating disk electrode experiments showed that the PdNTs and AuNTs have higher area normalized activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than conventional nanoparticle catalysts. The PdNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 3.4, 2.2, and 3.7 times greater than that on carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/C), bulk polycrystalline palladium, and carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C), respectively. The AuNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 2.3, 9.0, and 2.0 times greater than that on carbon-supported gold nanoparticles (Au/C), bulk polycrystalline gold, and Pt/C, respectively. The PdNTs also had lower onset potentials than Pd/C and Pt/C for the oxidation of methanol (0.236 V), ethanol (0.215 V), and ethylene glycol (0.251 V). In comparison to Pt/C, the PdNTs and AuNTs further demonstrated improved alcohol tolerance during the ORR. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Selective oxidation of cyclohexane using Ce1-xMnxO2 nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Selvamani, A; Selvaraj, M; Gurulakshmi, M; Ramya, R; Shanthi, K

    2014-04-01

    The Ce1-xMnxO2 nanocatalysts (x = 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 wt.%) were synthesized by sol-gel method. The catalysts were characterized using various techniques such as XRD, N2 sorption study, DRSUV-Vis, TPR, SEM and TEM. The incorporation of Mn ions into the ceria lattice was confirmed by XRD analysis. DRUV-Vis spectra confirm the presence of Ce3+ ions in the lattice of Ce1-xMnxO2. H2-TPR study revealed the oxygen storage capacity of the catalyst. The 3D flowerlike morphology of the nanocatalysts was confirmed from FESEM and HRTEM images. The catalytic activity was tested for the vapor phase oxidation of cyclohexane using air as an oxidant. The key reaction parameters were varied to study the stability, activity and selectivity of the catalysts. The study concluded that suitable amount of manganese content is essential for the selective oxidation of cyclohexane at low temperature and Ce0.25Mn0.75O2 is the most suitable catalyst for high conversion and selectivity under the given reaction conditions. The activity of the catalyst is correlated with the characterization results.

  19. Selective enrichment and desalting of hydrophilic peptides using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Qi, Linyu; Liu, Peiru; Wang, Zijun; Duan, Zhigui; Wang, Ying; Liu, Zhonghua; Chen, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The wide variety and low abundance of peptides in tissue brought great difficulties to the separation and identification of peptides, which is not in favor of the development of peptidomics. RP-HPLC, which could purify small molecules based on their hydrophobicity, has been widely used in the separation and enrichment of peptide due to its fast, good reproducibility and high resolution. However, RP-HPLC requires the instrument and expensive C18 column and its sample capacity is also limited. Recently, graphene oxide has been applied to the adsorption of amino acids. However, the enrichment efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide for peptides remain unclear. In this study, the adsorption efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide and RP-C18 matrix were compared on trypsinized α-actin and also on tissue extracts from pituitary gland and hippocampus. For α-actin, there exhibit similar elution peaks for total trypsinized products and those adsorpted by GO and C18 matrix. But peptides adsorbed by GO showed the higher hydrophilic peaks than which adsorbed by C18 matrix. The resulted RP-HPLC profile showed that most of peptides enriched by graphene oxide were eluted at low concentration of organic solvent, while peptides adsorbed by RP-C18 matrix were mostly eluted at relatively high concentration. Moreover, mass spectrometry analysis suggested that, in pituitary sample, there were 495 peptides enriched by graphene oxide, 447 peptides enriched by RP-C18 matrix while in hippocampus sample 333 and 243 peptides respectively. The GRAVY value analysis suggested that the graphene oxide has a stronger adsorption for highly hydrophilic peptides compared to the RP-C18 matrix. Furthermore, the combination of these two methods could notably increase the number of identification peptides but also the number of predicted protein precursors. Our study provided a new thought to the role of graphene oxide during the enrichment of peptides from tissue which should be useful for

  20. The role of oxygen in lipid oxidation reactions: a review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Decker, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of food oil to quality loss is largely determined by the presence of oxygen. This article reviews the current understanding concerning the effect of oxygen types, location, and concentration on the oxidative stability of foods. It also discusses the major factors that influence the interaction between oxygen and lipids such as antioxidants, prooxidants, reactive oxygen species (ROS), environmental conditions, and oxygen scavengers. Research has shown that the amount of oxygen needed to cause oxidation is generally very small and that by reducing oxygen concentration in containers to less than 2%, oxidative stability can be greatly enhanced. However, very few studies have systematically examined the oxygen levels needed to reduce, or inhibit, lipid oxidation processes. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between oxygen levels and lipid oxidation is necessary for the development of innovative antioxidant solutions and package designs that prolong the quality of foods containing lipids.

  1. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of linear perfluoroalkyl ethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Paclorek, K. J. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal and thermal oxidative stability studies were performed on linear perfluoroalkyl ether fluids. The effect on degradation by metal catalysts and degradation inhibitors is reported. The linear perfluoroalkyl ethers are inherently unstable at 316 C in an oxidizing atmosphere. The metal catalysts greatly increased the rate of degradation in oxidizing atmospheres. In the presence of these metals in an oxidizing atmosphere, the degradation inhibitors were highly effective in arresting degradation at 288 C. However, the inhibitors had only limited effectiveness at 316 C. The metals promote degradation by chain scission. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, the linear perfluoroalkyl ether fluids have a structural arrangement based on difluoroformyl and tetrafluoroethylene oxide units, with the former predominating. Previously announced in STAR as N82-26468

  2. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of linear perfluoroalky lethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Paciorek, K. J. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal and thermal oxidative stability studies were performed on linear perfluoro alkyl ether fluids. The effect on degradation by metal catalysts and degradation inhibitors are reported. The liner perfluoro alkylethers are inherently unstable at 316 C in an oxidizing atmosphere. The metal catalysts greatly increased the rate of degradation in oxidizing atmospheres. In the presence of these metals in an oxidizing atmosphere, the degradation inhibitors were highly effective in arresting degradation at 288 C. However, the inhibitors had only limited effectiveness at 316 C. The metals promote degradation by chain scission. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, the linear perfluoro alkylether fluids have a structural arrangement based on difluoroformyl and tetrafluoroethylene oxide units, with the former predominating.

  3. Influence of a reaction medium on the oxidation of aromatic nitrogen-containing compounds by peroxyacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, V. S.; Matsyuk, N. V.; Dutka, Yu. V.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of different solvents on the oxidation reaction rate of pyridine (Py), quinoline (QN), acridine (AN), α-oxyquinoline (OQN) and α-picolinic acid (APA) by peroxydecanoic acid (PDA) was studied. It was found that the oxidation rate grows in the series Py < QN < AN, and the rate of the oxidation reaction of compounds containing a substituent in the α position from a reactive center is significantly lower than for unsubstituted analogues. The effective energies of activation of the oxidation reaction were found. It was shown that in the first stage, the reaction mechanism includes the rapid formation of an intermediate complex nitrogen-containing compound, peroxyacid, which forms products upon decomposing in the second stage. A kinetic equation that describes the studied process is offered. The constants of equilibrium of the intermediate complex formation ( K eq) and its decomposition constant ( k 2) in acetone and benzene were calculated. It was shown that the nature of the solvent influences the numerical values of both K p and k 2. It was established that introduction of acetic acid (which is able to form compounds with Py) into the reaction medium slows the rate of the oxidation process drastically. Correlation equations linking the polarity, polarizability, electrophilicity, and basicity of solvents with the constant of the PDA oxidation reaction rate for Py were found. It was concluded that the basicity and polarity of the solvent have a decisive influence on the oxidation reaction rate, while the polarizability and electrophilicity of the reaction medium do not influence the oxidation reaction rate.

  4. Graphene oxide for acid catalyzed-reactions: Effect of drying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, H. P.; Hua, W. M.; Yue, Y. H.; Gao, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene oxides (GOs) were prepared by Hummers method through various drying processes, and characterized by XRD, SEM, FTIR, XPS and N2 adsorption. Their acidities were measured using potentiometric titration and acid-base titration. The catalytic properties were investigated in the alkylation of anisole with benzyl alcohol and transesterification of triacetin with methanol. GOs are active catalysts for both reaction, whose activity is greatly affected by their drying processes. Vacuum drying GO exhibits the best performance in transesterification while freezing drying GO is most active for alkylation. The excellent catalytic behavior comes from abundant surface acid sites as well as proper surface functional groups, which can be obtained by selecting appropriate drying process.

  5. PET-modified red mud as catalysts for oxidative desulfurization reactions.

    PubMed

    do Prado, Nayara T; Heitmann, Ana P; Mansur, Herman S; Mansur, Alexandra A; Oliveira, Luiz C A; de Castro, Cinthia S

    2017-07-01

    This work describes the synthesis of catalysts based on red mud/polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composites and their subsequent heat treatment under N2 atmosphere. The materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and N2 adsorption/desorption. The catalysts were evaluated in the oxidative desulfurization reaction of dibenzothiophene (DBT) in a biphasic system. The results indicated that the PET impregnation on red mud increased the affinity of the catalyst with the nonpolar phase (fuel), in which the contaminant was dissolved, allowing a higher conversion (up to 80%) and selectivity to the corresponding dibenzothiophene sulfone. The sulfone compound is more polar than DBT and diffused into the polar solvent as indicated by the data obtained via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals. PMID:28289220

  7. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya; Kihara, Akio

    2017-03-28

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals.

  8. Selective reduction of metals in the lattice of a complex oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchin, V. E.; Roshchin, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    The results of our experiments on the carbon reduction of metals from iron-containing rich and lean monometallic ores and complex ores in which iron is present along with other metal oxides in a common crystal lattice are analyzed. It is concluded that reduction should be considered as an electrochemical process consisting in the supply of electrons to the cations to be reduced. The source of electrons in the experiments is a chemical reaction on the surface of interaction between a reducer and oxides. Electron transport deep into ore lumps is performed by anion vacancies. Vacancies draw cations with a high electron affinity and neutral atoms, which ensures selective metal reduction. A continuous metallic shell does not form on the surface of lean and complex ores, and oxide layers, along which vacancies move into an ore lump, are retained. As a result, the entire ore lump undergoes reduction. Therefore, lean and complex ores can easily be reduced as compared to rich ores.

  9. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  10. Carbon-coated magnetic palladium: applications in partial oxidation of alcohols and coupling reactions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; catalyst can be used for oxidation of alcohols, amination reaction and arylation of aryl halides (cross coupli...

  11. Carbon-coated magnetic palladium: applications in partial oxidation of alcohols and coupling reactions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; catalyst can be used for oxidation of alcohols, amination reaction and arylation of aryl halides (cross coupli...

  12. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  13. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  14. Bulk Gold-Catalyzed Reactions of Isocyanides, Amines, and Amine N-Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Klobukowski, Erik; Angelici, Robert; Woo, Keith L.

    2012-01-26

    Bulk gold powder (5–50 μm particles) catalyzes the reactions of isocyanides with amines and amine N-oxides to produce ureas. The reaction of n-butyl isocyanide (nBu–N≡C) with di-n-propylamine and N-methylmorpholine N-oxide in acetonitrile, which was studied in the greatest detail, produced 3-butyl-1,1-dipropylurea (O═C(NHnBu)(NnPr2)) in 99% yield at 60 °C within 2 h. Sterically and electronically different isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides react successfully under these conditions. Detailed studies support a two-step mechanism that involves a gold-catalyzed reaction of adsorbed isocyanide with the amine N-oxide to form an isocyanate (RN═C═O), which rapidly reacts with the amine to give the urea product. These investigations show that bulk gold, despite its reputation for poor catalytic activity, is capable of catalyzing these reactions.

  15. Knocking on wood: base metal complexes as catalysts for selective oxidation of lignin models and extracts.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Susan K; Baker, R Tom

    2015-07-21

    This work began as part of a biomass conversion catalysis project with UC Santa Barbara funded by the first NSF Chemical Bonding Center, CATSB. Recognizing that catalytic aerobic oxidation of diol C-C bonds could potentially be used to break down lignocellulose, we began to synthesize oxovanadium complexes and explore their fundamental reactivity. Of course there were theories regarding the oxidation mechanism, but our mechanistic studies soon revealed a number of surprises of the type that keep all chemists coming back to the bench! We realized that these reactions were also exciting in that they actually used the oxygen-on-every-carbon property of biomass-derived molecules to control the selectivity of the oxidation. When we found that these oxovanadium complexes tended to convert sugars predominantly to formic acid and carbon dioxide, we replaced one of the OH groups with an ether and entered the dark world of lignin chemistry. In this Account, we summarize results from our collaboration and from our individual labs. In particular, we show that oxidation selectivity (C-C vs C-O bond cleavage) of lignin models using air and vanadium complexes depends on the ancillary ligands, the reaction solvent, and the substrate structure (i.e., phenolic vs non-phenolic). Selected vanadium complexes in the presence of added base serve as effective alcohol oxidation catalysts via a novel base-assisted dehydrogenation pathway. In contrast, copper catalysts effect direct C-C bond cleavage of these lignin models, presumably through a radical pathway. The most active vanadium catalyst exhibits unique activity for the depolymerization of organosolv lignin. After Weckhuysen's excellent 2010 review on lignin valorization, the number of catalysis studies and approaches on both lignin models and extracts has expanded rapidly. Today we are seeing new start-ups and lignin production facilities sprouting up across the globe as we all work to prove wrong the old pulp and paper chemist

  16. Selective etchant for oxide sacrificial material in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Clews, Peggy J.; Mani, Seethambal S.

    2005-05-17

    An etching composition and method is disclosed for removing an oxide sacrificial material during manufacture of semiconductor devices including micromechanical, microelectromechanical or microfluidic devices. The etching composition and method are based on the combination of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4). These acids can be used in the ratio of 1:3 to 3:1 HF:H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 to remove all or part of the oxide sacrificial material while providing a high etch selectivity for non-oxide materials including polysilicon, silicon nitride and metals comprising aluminum. Both the HF and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 can be provided as "semiconductor grade" acids in concentrations of generally 40-50% by weight HF, and at least 90% by weight H.sub.2 SO.sub.4.

  17. Passivation oxide controlled selective carbon nanotube growth on metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Bult, J B; Sawyer, W G; Ajayan, P M; Schadler, L S

    2009-02-25

    Vertically aligned arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) are grown on Inconel 600, a nickel-based super-alloy. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of the MWNTs it is shown that a stable oxidation barrier is required for the stabilization of iron on the substrate and subsequent nanotube growth. This evidence for passivation oxide supported growth of MWNTs was then used to grow MWNTs on patterned oxidized substrates in a selective growth furnace. The unique advantage of this patterned growth on Inconel 600 is found to be the chromia passivation layer's electrical conductivity (measured value of 1.08 micro Omega m), creating the opportunity for low resistivity electrodes made from nanotubes. Inconel substrates with 100 microm long aligned MWNTs are demonstrated to exhibit an average resistance value of 2 Omega.

  18. Selective anaerobic oxidation of methane enables direct synthesis of methanol.

    PubMed

    Sushkevich, Vitaly L; Palagin, Dennis; Ranocchiari, Marco; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2017-05-05

    Direct functionalization of methane in natural gas remains a key challenge. We present a direct stepwise method for converting methane into methanol with high selectivity (~97%) over a copper-containing zeolite, based on partial oxidation with water. The activation in helium at 673 kelvin (K), followed by consecutive catalyst exposures to 7 bars of methane and then water at 473 K, consistently produced 0.204 mole of CH3OH per mole of copper in zeolite. Isotopic labeling confirmed water as the source of oxygen to regenerate the zeolite active centers and renders methanol desorption energetically favorable. On the basis of in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations, we propose a mechanism involving methane oxidation at Cu(II) oxide active centers, followed by Cu(I) reoxidation by water with concurrent formation of hydrogen. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Copper-Catalyzed SN2'-Selective Allylic Substitution Reaction of gem-Diborylalkanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Qi; Zhang, Ben; Lu, Xi; Liu, Jing-Hui; Lu, Xiao-Yu; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2016-03-04

    A Cu/(NHC)-catalyzed SN2'-selective substitution reaction of allylic electrophiles with gem-diborylalkanes is reported. Different substituted gem-diborylalkanes and allylic electrophiles can be employed in this reaction, and various synthetic valuable functional groups can be tolerated. The asymmetric version of this reaction was initially researched with chiral N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands.

  20. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  1. Microporous polyurethane material for size selective heterogeneous catalysis of the Knoevenagel reaction.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sandeep Kumar; de Sousa Amadeu, Nader; Janiak, Christoph

    2016-06-14

    The first polyurethane material which is microporous (BET surface area of 312 m(2) g(-1)) is prepared by solvothermal synthesis and acts as highly efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst in the Knoevenagel condensation showing size selectivity, and in the Henry reaction showing substrate selectivity under mild reaction conditions.

  2. Heterogeneous photochemical reactions of a propylene-nitrogen dioxide-metal oxide-dry air system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ibusuki, Takashi

    Photochemical reactions of a C 3H 6-NO 2-air system in the presence of metal oxide were investigated. The metal oxides showing strong photooxidation activity were found to be n-type semiconductor oxides with the energy band gap around 3 eV. Formation of cyano-compounds (HCN and CH 3CN) was also observed and the activity can be explained in terms of the adsorptivity of NO onto metal oxides. Coalfired fly ash as a model of mixed metal oxides was also examined and their photocatalytic action was discussed.

  3. New Insights into the Diels-Alder Reaction of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Patrick P; Kuss, Christian; Schougaard, Steen B; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Siaj, Mohamed

    2016-04-18

    Graphene oxide is regarded as a major precursor for graphene-based materials. The development of graphene oxide based derivatives with new functionalities requires a thorough understanding of its chemical reactivity, especially for canonical synthetic methods such as the Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Diels-Alder reaction has been successfully extended with graphene oxide as a source of diene by using maleic anhydride as a dienophile, thereby outlining the presence of the cis diene present in the graphene oxide framework. This reaction provides fundamental information for understanding the exact structure and chemical nature of graphene oxide. On the basis of high-resolution (13) C-SS NMR spectra, we show evidence for the formation of new sp(3) carbon centers covalently bonded to graphene oxide following hydrolysis of the reaction product. DFT calculations are also used to show that the presence of a cis dihydroxyl and C vacancy on the surface of graphene oxide are promoting the reaction with significant negative reaction enthalpies.

  4. Conversion Reaction-Based Oxide Nanomaterials for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seung-Ho; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Sung, Yung-Eun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-04-27

    Developing high-energy-density electrodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) is of primary importance to meet the challenges in electronics and automobile industries in the near future. Conversion reaction-based transition metal oxides are attractive candidates for LIB anodes because of their high theoretical capacities. This review summarizes recent advances on the development of nanostructured transition metal oxides for use in lithium ion battery anodes based on conversion reactions. The oxide materials covered in this review include oxides of iron, manganese, cobalt, copper, nickel, molybdenum, zinc, ruthenium, chromium, and tungsten, and mixed metal oxides. Various kinds of nanostructured materials including nanowires, nanosheets, hollow structures, porous structures, and oxide/carbon nanocomposites are discussed in terms of their LIB anode applications.

  5. Intrinsic selectivity in some prebiotic reactions of urazole with sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Colloton, Patricia A.

    2004-02-01

    Urazole (1,2,4-triazolidine-3,5-dione) (1), 4-methylurazole (12), and its carbon analog, 4,4-dimethylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione (18), react with 2-deoxy-D-ribose (2-deoxy-D-erythro-pentose; 6) in an aqueous solution at room temperature in a regioselective manner (a single substitution on a hydrazidic nitrogen, no reaction on the imide nitrogen) to give a mixture of four nucleosides. These are α and β pyranosides (p) and α and β furanosides (f). The α p forms in a stereoselective manner. A crystalline precipitate is formed in each of the above reactions, which is an exclusive enantiospecific product, 1R, 2R α p. 1 with 2-deoxy-L-ribose (10) gives a precipitate with the exclusive 1S, 2S α p stereochemistry. With 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-deoxy-D-arabino-hexose; 7) the reaction with 1 is stereospecific, since only one isomer, β p, forms in the solution. Causes of enhanced reactivity of 1 with sugars were also studied. It was found that cyclic hydrazide analogs of 1, such as 12 and 18, are reactive, but open-chain analogs, 1,2,-diacetylhydrazine (21) and 1,2-dicarbethoxyhydrazine (22), are not. Although this reactivity assessment was done qualitatively and under restrictive reaction conditions, it still may be valuable for understanding α -effect of hydrazide nucleophiles. The prebiotic significance of our results is discussed.

  6. Rapid and effective oxidative pretreatment of woody biomass at mild reaction conditions and low oxidant loadings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One route for producing cellulosic biofuels is by the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars generated from a pretreatment that can be effectively coupled with an enzymatic hydrolysis of the plant cell wall. While woody biomass exhibits a number of positive agronomic and logistical attributes, these feedstocks are significantly more recalcitrant to chemical pretreatments than herbaceous feedstocks, requiring higher chemical and energy inputs to achieve high sugar yields from enzymatic hydrolysis. We previously discovered that alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment catalyzed by copper(II) 2,2΄-bipyridine complexes significantly improves subsequent enzymatic glucose and xylose release from hybrid poplar heartwood and sapwood relative to uncatalyzed AHP pretreatment at modest reaction conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure). In the present work, the reaction conditions for this catalyzed AHP pretreatment were investigated in more detail with the aim of better characterizing the relationship between pretreatment conditions and subsequent enzymatic sugar release. Results We found that for a wide range of pretreatment conditions, the catalyzed pretreatment resulted in significantly higher glucose and xylose enzymatic hydrolysis yields (as high as 80% for both glucose and xylose) relative to uncatalyzed pretreatment (up to 40% for glucose and 50% for xylose). We identified that the extent of improvement in glucan and xylan yield using this catalyzed pretreatment approach was a function of pretreatment conditions that included H2O2 loading on biomass, catalyst concentration, solids concentration, and pretreatment duration. Based on these results, several important improvements in pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions were identified that may have a positive economic impact for a process employing a catalyzed oxidative pretreatment. These improvements include identifying that: (1) substantially lower H2O2 loadings can be used that

  7. Ceramic oxide reactions with V2O5 and SO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Williams, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic oxides are not inert in combustion environments, but can react with, inter alia, SO3, and Na2SO4 to yield low melting mixed sulfate eutectics, and with vanadium compounds to produce vanadates. Assuming ceramic degradation to become severe only when molten phases are generated in the surface salt (as found for metallic hot corrosion), the reactivity of ceramic oxides can be quantified by determining the SO3 partial pressure necessary for molten mixed sulfate formation with Na2SO3. Vanadium pentoxide is an acidic oxide that reacts with Na2O, SO3, and the different ceramic oxides in a series of Lux-Flood type of acid-base displacement reactions. To elucidate the various possible vanadium compound-ceramic oxide interactions, a study was made of the reactions of a matrix involving, on the one axis, ceramix oxides of increasing acidity, and on the other axis, vanadium compounds of increasing acidity. Resistance to vanadium compound reaction increased as the oxide acidity increased. Oxides more acidic than ZrO2 displaced V2O5. Examination of Y2O3- and CeO2-stabilized ZrO2 sintered ceramics which were degraded in 700 C NaVO3 has shown good agreement with the reactions predicted above, except that the CeO2-ZrO2 ceramic appears to be inexplicably degraded by NaVO3.

  8. [Formation and reactions of biogenic manganese oxides with heavy metals in environment].

    PubMed

    Meng, You-Ting; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2009-02-15

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are common minerals in natural environments that may play an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of heavy metals. Increasing evidences have shown that Mn (II) oxidation is a microbially-mediated process, and the Mn oxidizing microorganisms are thus recognized as the major drivers of the global Mn cycle. The major pathway for bacterial Mn (II) oxidation is catalysed by a multicopper oxidizing enzyme family. The primary Mn (IV) biooxides are phyllomanganate-like minerals most similar to delta-MnO2 or acid birnessite. Manganese oxides are known to have high sorption capacities for a wide variety of metal ions and considered to be the important environmental oxidant to many metal ions. This paper reviewed the mechanisms of biogenic manganese oxides formation and their reactions with heavy metal ions in environment.

  9. Reaction pathways during oxidation of cereal β-glucans.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Noora; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula; Schiehser, Sonja; Potthast, Antje; Maaheimo, Hannu; Maina, Ndegwa H

    2017-02-10

    Oxidation of cereal β-glucans may affect their stability in food products. Generally, polysaccharides oxidise via different pathways leading to chain cleavage or formation of oxidised groups within the polymer chain. In this study, oxidation pathways of oat and barley β-glucans were assessed with different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or ascorbic acid (Asc) with ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) as a catalyst. Degradation of β-glucans was evaluated using high performance size exclusion chromatography and formation of carbonyl groups using carbazole-9-carbonyloxyamine labelling. Furthermore, oxidative degradation of glucosyl residues was studied. Based on the results, the oxidation with Asc mainly resulted in glycosidic bond cleavage. With H2O2, both glycosidic bond cleavage and formation of carbonyl groups within the β-glucan chain was found. Moreover, H2O2 oxidation led to production of formic acid, which was proposed to result from Ruff degradation where oxidised glucose (gluconic acid) is decarboxylated to form arabinose.

  10. Hybridization of Zinc Oxide Tetrapods for Selective Gas Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Lupan, O; Postica, V; Gröttrup, J; Mishra, A K; de Leeuw, N H; Carreira, J F C; Rodrigues, J; Ben Sedrine, N; Correia, M R; Monteiro, T; Cretu, V; Tiginyanu, I; Smazna, D; Mishra, Y K; Adelung, R

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the exceptionally improved sensing capability of highly porous three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid ceramic networks toward reducing gases is demonstrated for the first time. The 3-D hybrid ceramic networks are based on doped metal oxides (MexOy and ZnxMe1-xOy, Me = Fe, Cu, Al) and alloyed zinc oxide tetrapods (ZnO-T) forming numerous junctions and heterojunctions. A change in morphology of the samples and formation of different complex microstructures is achieved by mixing the metallic (Fe, Cu, Al) microparticles with ZnO-T grown by the flame transport synthesis (FTS) in different weight ratios (ZnO-T:Me, e.g., 20:1) followed by subsequent thermal annealing in air. The gas sensing studies reveal the possibility to control and change/tune the selectivity of the materials, depending on the elemental content ratio and the type of added metal oxide in the 3-D ZnO-T hybrid networks. While pristine ZnO-T networks showed a good response to H2 gas, a change/tune in selectivity to ethanol vapor with a decrease in optimal operating temperature was observed in the networks hybridized with Fe-oxide and Cu-oxide. In the case of hybridization with ZnAl2O4, an improvement of H2 gas response (to ∼7.5) was reached at lower doping concentrations (20:1), whereas the increase in concentration of ZnAl2O4 (ZnO-T:Al, 10:1), the selectivity changes to methane CH4 gas (response is about 28). Selectivity tuning to different gases is attributed to the catalytic properties of the metal oxides after hybridization, while the gas sensitivity improvement is mainly associated with additional modulation of the electrical resistance by the built-in potential barriers between n-n and n-p heterojunctions, during adsorption and desorption of gaseous species. Density functional theory based calculations provided the mechanistic insights into the interactions between different hybrid networks and gas molecules to support the experimentally observed results. The studied networked materials and

  11. Mercury oxidation over a vanadia-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng He; Jinsong Zhou; Yanqun Zhu; Zhongyang Luo; Mingjiang Ni; Kefa Cen

    2009-01-15

    The process of the reaction among elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and reactive flue gas components across the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was studied in a laboratory-scale reactor. Prepared vanadia-based SCR catalysts were characterized and analyzed to understand the potential reaction pathways. Mercury oxidation was observed when pro-exposure of the SCR catalyst to HCl, followed by passing through Hg{sup 0}/N{sub 2} in the absence of gas-phase HCl. At testing conditions, Hg{sup 0} was found to desorb from the catalyst surface by adding HCl to the gas stream, which implies that HCl adsorption onto the SCR catalyst is strong relative to the mercury. Surface analysis verified the absorption of HCl onto the SCR catalysts, and the potential reaction pathways were proposed. Indeed, the monomeric vanadyl sites on the catalyst surface were found to be responsible for the adsorption of both Hg{sup 0} and HCl, which means they are active for mercury oxidation. Furthermore, the detailed Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism was proposed to explain the mercury oxidation on the SCR catalyst, where reactive Cl generated from adsorbed HCl reacts with adjacent Hg{sup 0}. 44 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Catalytic reactions on neutral Rh oxide clusters more efficient than on neutral Rh clusters.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akira; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2012-03-28

    Gas phase catalytic reactions involving the reduction of N(2)O and oxidation of CO were observed at the molecular level on isolated neutral rhodium clusters, Rh(n) (n = 10-28), using mass spectrometry. Sequential oxygen transfer reactions, Rh(n)O(m-1) + N(2)O → Rh(n)O(m) + N(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were monitored and the rate constant for each reaction step was determined as a function of the cluster size. Oxygen extraction reactions by a CO molecule, Rh(n)O(m) + CO → Rh(n)O(m-1) + CO(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were also observed when a small amount of CO was mixed with the reactant N(2)O gas. The rate constants of the oxygen extraction reactions by CO for m ≥ 4 were found to be two or three orders of magnitude higher than the rate constants for m ≤ 3, which indicates that the catalytic reaction proceeds more efficiently when the reaction cycles turn over around Rh(n)O(m) (m ≥ 4) than around bare Rh(n). Rhodium clusters operate as more efficient catalysts when they are oxidized than non- or less-oxidized rhodium clusters, which is consistent with theoretical and experimental studies on the catalytic CO oxidation reaction on a rhodium surface.

  13. Photocatalytic reaction of catechol on rutile titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Peter; Wang, Chundao; Diebold, Ulrike

    2008-03-01

    In an attempt to understand the fundamental aspects of photocatalysis we have studied the substituted benzene catechol on TiO2(110). Previous studies have given detailed information about the catechol bonding configuration letting our group focus on molecular level interactions with scanning tunneling microscopy and X ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under UV exposure (248 nm) in an oxygen background, catechol is observed to degrade via oxidation. This oxidation process results in removal of roughly 10% of the initial monolayer. The removal of carbon from the TiO2 surface is shown to depend upon the background gas. Formation of a residual carbon layer is achieved by annealing the catechol monolayer to 600C. This carbon layer is more difficult to remove by photocatalytic oxidation than a pristine catechol monolayer. Work supported by Intel Corporation

  14. Determination of carbon by the oxidation reduction reaction with chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashkovich, L.; Kuteynikov, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Free carbon was determined in silicon and boron carbides in ash, oxides, and other materials by oxidation to carbon dioxide with a mixture of K2Cr2O7 + H2SO4. The determination was made from the amount of CR(6) consumed, by adding excess Mohr's salt and titrating with a standard solution of KMnO4. The amount of Cr(6) self reduced was determined in a blank test. Optimum oxidation and conditions were achieved when the volumes of 5% k2Cr2Oz and H2SO4 were equal. The mixture was boiled for 1-2 hours using a reflex condenser. The volume should not be reduced, in order to avoid an increase in the sulfuric acid concentration. The relative error was 4-7% for 0.005-0.04 g C and less than or equal to 3.5% for 0.1 g C.

  15. A Highly diastereoselective synthesis of (1R)-(+)-camphor-based chiral allenes and their asymmetric hydroboration-oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shang-Cheng; Wen, Yen-Fang; Chang, Jia-Wen; Liao, Chun-Chen; Uang, Biing-Jiun

    2002-02-22

    Synthesis of camphor derived chiral allenes and their hydroboration-oxidation reactions are described. Reaction of (1R)-(+)-camphor with alkynyllithium followed by the reduction of the resulted propargyl alcohol derivatives using AlH3 furnished chiral allenes 2a-g in excellent yields with high diastereoselectivity. Reduction of the propargyl alcohols with aluminum hydride proceeded through selective intermolecular anti-addition of hydride ion. The stereochemistry of the chiral allenes 2 was assigned based on lanthanide shift studies and chemical correlations. Diastereoselectivity was observed in the hydroboration-oxidation of 2 which produced a mixture of (E,R) and (E,S) stereoisomers in a ratio of 6:1 to 18:1.

  16. A comparative theoretical study of CO oxidation reaction by O2 molecule over Al- or Si-decorated graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Sharifi, Fahimeh; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-09-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, the probable CO oxidation reaction mechanisms are investigated over Al- or Si-decorated graphene oxide (GO). The equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of these metal decorated-GOs along with the O2/CO adsorption configurations are studied in detail. The relatively large adsorption energies reveal that both Al and Si atoms can disperse on GO quite stably without clustering problem. Hence, both Al- and Si-decorated GOs are stable enough to be utilized in catalytic oxidation of CO by molecular O2. The two possible reaction pathways proposed for the oxidation of CO with O2 molecule are as follows: O2+CO→CO2+Oads and CO+Oads→CO2. The estimated energy barriers of the first oxidation reaction on Si-decorated GOs, following the Eley-Rideal (ER) reaction, are lower than that on Al-decorated ones. This is most likely due to the larger atomic charge on the Si atom than the Al one, which tends to stabilize the corresponding transition state structure. The results of this study can be useful for better understanding the chemical properties of Al- and Si-decorated GOs, and are valuable for the development of an automobile catalytic converter in order to remove the toxic CO molecule.

  17. Nitrogen oxide reactions in the urban plume of Boston.

    PubMed

    Spicer, C W

    1982-02-26

    The rate of removal or conversion of nitrogen oxides has been determined from airborne measurements in the urban plume of Boston. The average pseudo-first-order rate constant for removal was 0.18 per hour, with a range of 0.14 to 0.24 per hour under daylight conditions for four study days. The removal process is dominated by chemical conversion to nitric acid and organic nitrates. The removal rate suggests an atmospheric lifetime for nitrogen oxides of about 5 to 6 hours in urban air.

  18. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen oxidation reaction in solid oxide fuel cell anode based on species territory adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    A modified reaction model of hydrogen oxidation around a triple phase boundary (TPB) is proposed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a Ni/oxide ion conductor cermet anode containing proton conductor particles in order to describe the mechanism of anode overpotential reduction. In this model, three kinds of TPBs consisting of nickel metal, oxide ion conductors, proton conductors, and gas phases were considered. It was assumed that the chemical species could be adsorbed within a finite narrow area on each material around the TPB. The reaction rate in the anode was controlled by the surface reaction between the adsorbed hydrogen and adsorbed oxygen; all other reactions took place under chemical equilibrium. Based on the reaction model, analytical expressions of current density with oxygen activity and anode overpotential with current density could be obtained. The latter could combine the anode overpotential at low- and high-current-density regions, which were conventionally expressed independently. The analytical results were in good agreement with the experimental results for both the conventional anode and the new anode incorporating a proton conductor. Especially, the anode overpotential reduction could be explained by the additional supply of adsorbed hydrogen from the proton conductor to the TPB.

  19. The gas chromatographic analysis of the reaction products of the partial isobutane oxidation as a two phase process.

    PubMed

    Willms, Thomas; Kryk, Holger; Hampel, Uwe

    2016-08-05

    The partial oxidation of isobutane to t-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) has been studied analytically for the first time as a two-phase process in a capillary micro reactor. In order to obtain detailed information on products, yields, selectivities and reaction pathways, the products have been investigated by GC/MS. An Rxi-5ms column and a PTV-injector have been used to analyze the liquid products. TBHP, di-t-butyl peroxide (DTBP), t-butanol (TBA), and propanone as main products as well as further by-products e.g. methanal, isopropanol, isobutanol and isobutanal in minor quantities have been identified by MS. The liquid products have been obtained by quenching the reaction and vaporizing the isobutane afterwards by pressure reduction using a mass flow controller allowing a constant mass flow. For all liquid reaction products calibrations, a validation of the method including limits of quantification and detection as well as calculation of uncertainties has been performed. The results have been applied successfully for the investigation of the selectivities of the main products (TBHP, DTBP, TBA, propanone) of the isobutane oxidation. In the frame of the analytical investigation of this reaction a correlation coefficient of r(2)>0.999 for TBHP and DTBP, which is necessary to perform a validation, has been obtained for the first time. The gaseous phase has been analyzed using a GASPRO column, a DEANS switch, a mole sieve column and a TCD detector. Apart from the gaseous reactants, isobutene has been found.

  20. Cold state-selected molecular collisions and reactions.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Ye, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, and particularly the past five years, a quiet revolution has been building at the border between atomic physics and experimental quantum chemistry. The rapid development of techniques for producing cold and even ultracold molecules without a perturbing rare-gas cluster shell is now enabling the study of chemical reactions and scattering at the quantum scattering limit with only a few partial waves contributing to the incident channel. Moreover, the ability to perform these experiments with nonthermal distributions comprising one or a few specific states enables the observation and even full control of state-to-state collision rates in this computation-friendly regime: This is perhaps the most elementary study possible of scattering and reaction dynamics.

  1. The aniline-to-azobenzene oxidation reaction on monolayer graphene or graphene oxide surfaces fabricated by benzoic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of aniline to azobenzene was conducted in the presence of either monolayer graphene (EG) or graphene-oxide-like surface, such as GOx, under ultra-high vacuum conditions maintaining a 365-nm UV light exposure to enhance the oxidation reaction. The surface-bound products were investigated using micro Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy, and work function measurements. The oxygen carriers present on the GOx surfaces, but not on the EG surfaces, acted as reaction reagents to facilitate the oxidation reaction from aniline to azobenzene. Increasing the aniline concentration at 300 K confirmed that the exchange ratio from the aniline to the azobenzene was enhanced, as determined by the intensity ratio between the aniline- and azobenzene-induced N 1 s core-level spectra. The work function changed dramatically as the aniline concentration increased, indicating that the aniline on the GOx surface conveyed n-type doping characteristics at a low coverage level. A higher aniline concentration increased the p-type doping character by increasing the azobenzene concentration on the GOx surface. A comparison of the oxidation reactivity of aniline molecules on the EG or GOx surfaces revealed the role of the oxygen carriers on the GOx surfaces in the context of catalytic oxidation. PMID:24229051

  2. The aniline-to-azobenzene oxidation reaction on monolayer graphene or graphene oxide surfaces fabricated by benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungjin; Kim, Kijeong; Lee, Hangil

    2013-09-02

    The oxidation of aniline to azobenzene was conducted in the presence of either monolayer graphene (EG) or graphene-oxide-like surface, such as GOx, under ultra-high vacuum conditions maintaining a 365-nm UV light exposure to enhance the oxidation reaction. The surface-bound products were investigated using micro Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy, and work function measurements. The oxygen carriers present on the GOx surfaces, but not on the EG surfaces, acted as reaction reagents to facilitate the oxidation reaction from aniline to azobenzene. Increasing the aniline concentration at 300 K confirmed that the exchange ratio from the aniline to the azobenzene was enhanced, as determined by the intensity ratio between the aniline- and azobenzene-induced N 1 s core-level spectra. The work function changed dramatically as the aniline concentration increased, indicating that the aniline on the GOx surface conveyed n-type doping characteristics at a low coverage level. A higher aniline concentration increased the p-type doping character by increasing the azobenzene concentration on the GOx surface. A comparison of the oxidation reactivity of aniline molecules on the EG or GOx surfaces revealed the role of the oxygen carriers on the GOx surfaces in the context of catalytic oxidation.

  3. The aniline-to-azobenzene oxidation reaction on monolayer graphene or graphene oxide surfaces fabricated by benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myungjin; Kim, Kijeong; Lee, Hangil

    2013-09-01

    The oxidation of aniline to azobenzene was conducted in the presence of either monolayer graphene (EG) or graphene-oxide-like surface, such as GOx, under ultra-high vacuum conditions maintaining a 365-nm UV light exposure to enhance the oxidation reaction. The surface-bound products were investigated using micro Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy, and work function measurements. The oxygen carriers present on the GOx surfaces, but not on the EG surfaces, acted as reaction reagents to facilitate the oxidation reaction from aniline to azobenzene. Increasing the aniline concentration at 300 K confirmed that the exchange ratio from the aniline to the azobenzene was enhanced, as determined by the intensity ratio between the aniline- and azobenzene-induced N 1 s core-level spectra. The work function changed dramatically as the aniline concentration increased, indicating that the aniline on the GOx surface conveyed n-type doping characteristics at a low coverage level. A higher aniline concentration increased the p-type doping character by increasing the azobenzene concentration on the GOx surface. A comparison of the oxidation reactivity of aniline molecules on the EG or GOx surfaces revealed the role of the oxygen carriers on the GOx surfaces in the context of catalytic oxidation.

  4. Polyhedral Interpolation for Optimal Reaction Control System Jet Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefert, Leon P.; Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is described for interpolating optimal values for spacecraft Reaction Control System jet firing duty cycles. The algorithm uses the symmetrical geometry of the optimal solution to reduce the number of calculations and data storage requirements to a level that enables implementation on the small real time flight control systems used in spacecraft. The process minimizes acceleration direction errors, maximizes control authority, and minimizes fuel consumption.

  5. Graphitic-Carbon Layers on Oxides: Toward Stable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haifeng; Schwartz, Thomas J; Andersen, Nalin I; Dumesic, James A; Datye, Abhaya K

    2015-06-26

    Conversion of biomass-derived molecules involves catalytic reactions under harsh conditions in the liquid phase (e.g., temperatures of 250 °C and possibly under either acidic or basic conditions). Conventional oxide-supported catalysts undergo pore structure collapse and surface area reduction leading to deactivation under these conditions. Here we demonstrate an approach to deposit graphitic carbon to protect the oxide surface. The heterogeneous catalysts supported on the graphitic carbon/oxide composite exhibit excellent stability (even under acidic conditions) for biomass conversion reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Size-dependent selectivity and activity of silver nanoclusters in the partial oxidation of propylene to propylene oxide and acrolein : A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, L M.; Lee, S.; Sell, K.; Barcaro, G.; Fortunelli, A.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Barke, I.; von Oeynhausen, V.; Lei, Y.; Meyer, R. J.; Alonso, J. A.; Fraile-Rodriguez, A.; Kleibert, A.; Giorgio, S.; Henry, C. R.; Heinz Meiwes-Broer, K.; Vadja, S.; Univ. de Valladolid; Univ. Rostock; IPCF-CNR; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Swiss Light Source; CINaM-CNRS and Aix-Marseille Univ.; Yale Univ.

    2011-02-02

    Model silver nanocatalysts between 9 and 23 nm in size were prepared by size-selected cluster deposition from a free cluster beam on amorphous alumina films and their size-dependent catalytic performance studied in the partial oxidation of propylene under realistic reaction conditions. Smaller clusters preferentially produced acrolein, while the 23 nm particles were considerably more selective towards the formation of propylene oxide, at reaction rates far exceeding those previously reported for larger silver particles. The activity of clusters dropped significantly with increasing particle size. First-principle calculations, of the activation energies for oxygen adsorption and its dissociation, at variable surface coverage yielded surface energies which resulted in particle shapes resembling the experimentally observed shapes of partially oxidized silver clusters. The calculated activation barriers for propylene oxide and acrolein formation on various facets and on the edges of the nanoparticles provided detailed information about the energetics of the competing reaction pathways. The size- and corresponding morphology dependent theoretical activity and selectivity are in good accord with experimental observations.

  7. Highly-Efficient Buried-Oxide-Waveguide Laser by selective Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GAO,YING

    2000-02-15

    An edge-emitting buried-oxide waveguide (BOW) laser structure employing lateral selective oxidation of AlGaAs layers above and below the active region for waveguiding and current confinement is presented. This laser configuration has the potential for very small lateral optical mode size and high current confinement and is well suited for integrated optics applications where threshold current and overall efficiency are paramount. Optimization of the waveguide design, oxide layer placement, and bi-parabolic grading of the heterointerfaces on both sides of the AlGaAs oxidation layers has yielded 95% external differential quantum efficiency and 40% wall-plug efficiency from a laser that is very simple to fabricate and does not require epitaxial regrowth of any kind.

  8. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  9. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-11-30

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane was investigated. Unpromoted and promoted catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than the other metals (Rh, Li, K, Na, Zn, and Sn) for the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study. The effectiveness of the promoter increased with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. Among the catalysts tested, the Cu1Ce3 catalyst promoted with 1 weight % Mn was found to be the best catalyst for the SCR of NO with methane. This catalyst was subjected to long-term testing at the facilities of our industrial partner TDA Research. TDA report indicated that the performance of this catalyst did not deteriorate during 100 hours of operation and the activity and selectivity of the catalyst was not affected by the presence of SO{sub 2}. The conversions obtained by TDA were significantly lower than those obtained at Hampton University due to the transport limitations on the reaction rate in the TDA reactor, in which 1/8th inch pellets were used while the Hampton University reactor contained 250-425-{micro}m catalyst particles. The selected catalyst was also tested at the TDA facilities with high-sulfur heavy oil as the reducing agent. Depending on the heavy oil flow rate, up to 100% NO conversions were obtained. The

  11. [Study on apparent kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation degradation Rhodamine B by photo-Fenton reaction].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Zheng, Huai-Li; Li, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Li-Guo; Tang, Xue

    2008-11-01

    The Fenton process, mixed by hydrogen peroxide and iron salts with highly oxidative effect, is recognized as one of powerful advanced oxidation technologies available and can be used to destroy a variety of persistent organic pollutants. The oxidation power of Fenton reagent is due to the generation of hydroxyl radical (* OH) during the iron catalysed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in acid medium. The hydroxyl radical with a high oxidation potential (2.8 eV) attacks and completely destroys the pollutants in Fenton process. The degradation of pollutants can be considerably improved by using sunlight radiation, which is due to the generation of additional hydroxyl radicals. This photo-Fenton process had been effectively used to degrade the pollutants. In this paper, the definite quantity of Fenton reagent was added in the definite concentration of Rhodamine B solution. The degradation reaction was carried out at pH 3.5 under natural sunlight. The factors influencing on photocatalytic oxidation degradation rate of Rhodamine B were studied following: the initial concentration of Rhodamine B, initial concentrateions of Fe2+ and H2O2. The orders of degradation reaction were obtained by solving exponential kinetics equations of curve fitting, thereby gaining the kinetic parameters and reaction dynamics equation of the reaction system. The research contents included mainly: the UV-Vis spectra of Rhodamine B solution, the concentration-absorbency work curve of Rhodamine B solution, the analysis of the reaction system at various initial Rhodamine B concentrations, the analysis of the reaction system at various initial Fe2+ concentrateions, the analysis of the reaction system at various initial H2O2 concentrations, and the calculation of the apparent kinetics parameters in reaction dynamics equation. The reaction dynamics equation from experiments was constructed: V = 5 x 10(-9) P1.28 F0.366 E0.920, and overall reaction order was 2.57.

  12. Single transverse mode selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; GEIB,KENT M.; BRIGGS,RONALD D.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; HINDI,JANA JO

    2000-04-26

    Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) which operate in multiple transverse optical modes have been rapidly adopted into present data communication applications which rely on multi-mode optical fiber. However, operation only in the fundamental mode is required for free space interconnects and numerous other emerging VCSEL applications. Two device design strategies for obtaining single mode lasing in VCSELs based on mode selective loss or mode selective gain are reviewed and compared. Mode discrimination is attained with the use of a thick tapered oxide aperture positioned at a longitudinal field null. Mode selective gain is achieved by defining a gain aperture within the VCSEL active region to preferentially support the fundamental mode. VCSELs which exhibit greater than 3 mW of single mode output power at 850 nm with mode suppression ratio greater than 30 dB are reported.

  13. Lipid oxidation volatiles absent in milk after selected ultrasound processing.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Pablo; Torkamani, Amir Ehsan; Leong, Thomas; Kolb, Veronika; Watkins, Peter; Ajlouni, Said; Singh, Tanoj Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic processing can suit a number of potential applications in the dairy industry. However, the impact of ultrasound treatment on milk stability during storage has not been fully explored under wider ranges of frequencies, specific energies and temperature applications. The effect of ultrasonication on lipid oxidation was investigated in various types of milk. Four batches of raw milk (up to 2L) were sonicated at various frequencies (20, 400, 1000, 1600 and 2000kHz), using different temperatures (4, 20, 45 and 63°C), sonication times and ultrasound energy inputs up to 409kJ/kg. Pasteurized skim milk was also sonicated at low and high frequency for comparison. In selected experiments, non-sonicated and sonicated samples were stored at 4°C and were drawn periodically up to 14days for SPME-GCMS analysis. The cavitational yield, characterized in all systems in water, was highest between 400kHz and 1000kHz. Volatile compounds from milk lipid oxidation were detected and exceeded their odor threshold values at 400kHz and 1000kHz at specific energies greater than 271kJ/kg in raw milk. However, no oxidative volatile compounds were detected below 230kJ/kg in batch systems at the tested frequencies under refrigerated conditions. Skim milk showed a lower energy threshold for oxidative volatile formation. The same oxidative volatiles were detected after various passes of milk through a 0.3L flow cell enclosing a 20kHz horn and operating above 90kJ/kg. This study showed that lipid oxidation in milk can be controlled by decreasing the sonication time and the temperature in the system depending on the fat content in the sample among other factors.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-05-31

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures

  15. Things fall apart: Fragmentation reactions in the oxidative aging of organic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J. H.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wilson, K. R.; Daumit, K. E.; Kessler, S. H.; Lim, C. Y.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds involves a wide array of chemical transformations, including functionalization reactions (addition of polar functional groups to the carbon skeleton), fragmentation reactions (formation of lower carbon-number products via C-C bond scission), and accretion reactions (increases in molecular weight by the combination of two chemical species). Each of these reaction classes can lead to large changes in volatility, and hence can have major implications for atmospheric organic aerosol (OA). For example, the formation of OA is predominantly driven by functionalization and accretion reactions, which generally lead to decreases in volatility. Here we describe a series of laboratory studies of the subsequent organic "aging", the multiday oxidation processes that occur after the initial OA formation and growth. In these studies, the multigenerational oxidation of organic compounds in various phases (the gas phase, the condensed OA phase, and the aqueous phase) is carried out within either an environmental chamber or a flow reactor, and monitored using various high-resolution mass spectrometric techniques. In all cases it is found that fragmentation reactions play a major role in the observed aging chemistry, dominated by the formation of small, volatile oxidation products. These results suggest that multi-day oxidative aging processes do not lead to sustained aerosol growth, but rather may serve as a chemical sink for atmospheric OA.

  16. The reactions of imidogen with nitric oxide and molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Melius, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    Using potential energy surface information from BAC-MP4 calculations and statistical-dynamical methods, we have calculated the branching fraction for the NH + NO reaction, NH + NO {r arrow} N{sub 2} + H (1) NH + NO {r arrow} N{sub 2}O + H (2). We find that reaction (2) dominates over the entire temperature range considered, 300 K < T < 3500 K, with f=k{sub 1}/(k{sub 1} + K{sub 2}) varying from about 0.07 at room temperature to about 0.20 at 3500 K. In addition, we have calculated rate coefficients for the two-channel process, NH + O{sub 2} {r arrow} HNO + O (3) NH + O{sub 2} {r arrow} NO + OH (4). In this case we find that reaction (4) dominates at low temperature, reaction (3) at high temperature. All these results are discussed in terms of the experimental results available and compared with previous theoretical investigations where appropriate. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. The reactions of imidogen with nitric oxide and molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Melius, C.F.

    1991-12-31

    Using potential energy surface information from BAC-MP4 calculations and statistical-dynamical methods, we have calculated the branching fraction for the NH + NO reaction, NH + NO {r_arrow} N{sub 2} + H (1) NH + NO {r_arrow} N{sub 2}O + H (2). We find that reaction (2) dominates over the entire temperature range considered, 300 K < T < 3500 K, with f=k{sub 1}/(k{sub 1} + K{sub 2}) varying from about 0.07 at room temperature to about 0.20 at 3500 K. In addition, we have calculated rate coefficients for the two-channel process, NH + O{sub 2} {r_arrow} HNO + O (3) NH + O{sub 2} {r_arrow} NO + OH (4). In this case we find that reaction (4) dominates at low temperature, reaction (3) at high temperature. All these results are discussed in terms of the experimental results available and compared with previous theoretical investigations where appropriate. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  19. Gas-Phase Oxidation via Ion/Ion Reactions: Pathways and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-06-01

    Here, we provide an overview of pathways available upon the gas-phase oxidation of peptides and DNA via ion/ion reactions and explore potential applications of these chemistries. The oxidation of thioethers (i.e., methionine residues and S-alkyl cysteine residues), disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylated cysteine residues, and DNA to the [M+H+O]+ derivative via ion/ion reactions with periodate and peroxymono-sulfate anions is demonstrated. The oxidation of neutral basic sites to various oxidized structures, including the [M+H+O]+, [M-H]+, and [M-H-NH3]+ species, via ion/ion reactions is illustrated and the oxidation characteristics of two different oxidizing reagents, periodate and persulfate anions, are compared. Lastly, the highly efficient generation of molecular radical cations via ion/ion reactions with sulfate radical anion is summarized. Activation of the newly generated molecular radical peptide cations results in losses of various neutral side chains, several of which generate dehydroalanine residues that can be used to localize the amino acid from which the dehydroalanine was generated. The chemistries presented herein result in a diverse range of structures that can be used for a variety of applications, including the identification and localization of S-alkyl cysteine residues, the oxidative cleavage of disulfide bonds, and the generation of molecular radical cations from even-electron doubly protonated peptides. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Gas-Phase Oxidation via Ion/Ion Reactions: Pathways and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we provide an overview of pathways available upon the gas-phase oxidation of peptides and DNA via ion/ion reactions and explore potential applications of these chemistries. The oxidation of thioethers (i.e., methionine residues and S-alkyl cysteine residues), disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylated cysteine residues, and DNA to the [M+H+O]+ derivative via ion/ion reactions with periodate and peroxymono-sulfate anions is demonstrated. The oxidation of neutral basic sites to various oxidized structures, including the [M+H+O]+, [M-H]+, and [M-H-NH3]+ species, via ion/ion reactions is illustrated and the oxidation characteristics of two different oxidizing reagents, periodate and persulfate anions, are compared. Lastly, the highly efficient generation of molecular radical cations via ion/ion reactions with sulfate radical anion is summarized. Activation of the newly generated molecular radical peptide cations results in losses of various neutral side chains, several of which generate dehydroalanine residues that can be used to localize the amino acid from which the dehydroalanine was generated. The chemistries presented herein result in a diverse range of structures that can be used for a variety of applications, including the identification and localization of S-alkyl cysteine residues, the oxidative cleavage of disulfide bonds, and the generation of molecular radical cations from even-electron doubly protonated peptides.

  1. Fabrication of highly selective tungsten oxide ammonia sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Llobet, E.; Molas, G.; Molinas, P.; Calderer, J.; Vilanova, X.; Brezmes, J.; Sueiras, J.E.; Correig, X.

    2000-02-01

    Tungsten oxide is shown to be a very promising material for the fabrication of highly selective ammonia sensors. Films of WO{sub 3} were deposited onto a silicon substrate by means of the drop-coating method. Then, the films were annealed in dry air at two different temperatures (300 and 400 C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the composition of the films. Tungsten appeared both in WO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} oxidation states, but the second state was clearly dominant. Scanning electron microscopy results showed that the oxide was amorphous or nanocrystalline. The WO{sub 3}-based devices were sensitive to ammonia vapors when operated between 250 and 350 C. The optimal operating temperature for the highest sensitivity to ammonia was 300 C. Furthermore, when the devices were operated at 300 C, their sensitivity to other reducing species such as ethanol, methane, toluene, and water vapor was significantly lower, and this resulted in a high selectivity to ammonia. A model for the sensing mechanisms of the fabricated sensors is proposed.

  2. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide--IGCC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Stevens, R.W.; Newby, R.A.; Keairns, D.L.

    2006-09-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) to elemental sulfur using activated carbon and NETL-processed metal oxide catalyst systems has been investigated under bench-scale, simulated pressurized IGCC conditions for use in dry and humid gas cleaning process applications. For this technology to be successful, a 20% cost effective advantage and 1 percentage-point plant efficiency gain over current commercial technology, and <10-15 ppm total gas phase sulfur release into the effluent gas stream must be demonstrated. The results of our bench-scale catalyst/sorbent desulfurization and regeneration efforts for both bulk and polishing sulfur removal indicate that direct selective catalytic oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur utilizing current activated carbon systems occurs only under conditions of low syngas temperature (<150°C), and in syngas effluent streams containing a low water and CO content. Thus the SCOHS desulfurization process is considered to be only potentially feasible for use in dry gas cleaning conditions for IGCC applications where syngas-CO is shifted to CO2, and regeneration of the catalyst occurs through heating in warm CO2, with simultaneous CO2 sequestration. SCOHS is not considered as a candidate desulfurization approach for use in humid IGCC gas cleaning applications.

  3. Oxidation of flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol a by aqueous permanganate: reaction kinetics, brominated products, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Pang, Su-Yan; Jiang, Jin; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Yang; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Liu, Yongze; Ma, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the most widely used brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBrBPA) was shown to exhibit appreciable reactivity toward potassium permanganate [Mn(VII)] in water over a wide pH range of 5-10 with the maxima of second-order rate constants (kMn(VII) = 15-700 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH near its pKa values (7.5/8.5). A novel precursor ion scan (PIS) approach using negative electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-QqQMS) was adopted and further optimized for fast selective detection of brominated oxidation products of TBrBPA by Mn(VII). By setting PIS of m/z 79 and 81, two major products (i.e., 4-(2-hydroxyisopropyl)-2,6-dibromophenol and 4-isopropylene-2,6-dibromophenol) and five minor ones (including 2,6-dibromophenol, 2,6-dibromo-1,4-benzoquinone, and three dimers) were detected and suggested with chemical structures from their product ion spectra and bromine isotope patterns. Reaction pathways mainly involving the initial one-electron oxidation of TBrBPA and subsequent release and further reactions of 2,6-dibromo-4-isopropylphenol carbocation intermediate were proposed. The effectiveness of Mn(VII) for treatment of TBrBPA in real waters was confirmed. It is important to better understand the reactivity and toxicity of primary brominated products before Mn(VII) can be applied for treatment of TBrBPA-contaminated wastewater and source water.

  4. Controlled nitric oxide production via O(1D) + N2O reactions for use in oxidation flow reactor studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; Kolb, Charles; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas; Brune, William

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO + NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D) + N2O → 2NO, followed by the reaction NO + O3 → NO2 + O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D) + N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 + NO reactions relative to RO2 + HO2 and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO3-) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and α-pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  5. Controlled Nitric Oxide Production via O(1D) + N2O Reactions for Use in Oxidation Flow Reactor Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; hide

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO+NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D)+N2O->2NO, followed by the reaction NO+O3->NO2+O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D)+N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 +NO reactions relative to RO2 +HO2 and/or RO2+RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO-3 ) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and -pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  6. A step forwards in ethanol selective photo-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ciambelli, P; Sannino, D; Palma, V; Vaiano, V; Mazzei, R S

    2009-05-01

    This work focuses on the optimization of a photocatalyst formulation for the selective oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. VO(x)/TiO(2) catalysts at different vanadium loading were studied in a gas-solid photocatalytic fluidized bed reactor at high illumination efficiency, in which the bed is constituted by photocatalyst diluted with alpha-Al(2)O(3) or silica gel. Photocatalytic tests showed the selective formation of acetaldehyde, with ethylene and carbon dioxide as by-products. Selectivity is influenced by the vanadium loading. For ethanol inlet concentration of 0.2 vol%, maximum conversion and acetaldehyde selectivity of 73% and 97%, respectively, were obtained at 100 degrees C on catalyst at nominal 5 wt% V(2)O(5) content (53% of surface monolayer) mixed with alpha-Al(2)O(3). Selective sites were related to surface polymeric vanadates possessing Ti-O-V and V-O-V functionalities while the photoactivity appeared correlated with the catalyst equivalent band gap energy. Increasing the ethanol inlet concentration to 1 vol% and diluting the catalyst with silica gel, total ethanol conversion with about 97% selectivity to acetaldehyde was achieved with a photoreactivity of 0.34 mol m(irradiated)(-3) s(-1). This is three times higher than reported for other photoreactors.

  7. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; ...

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt₇Ru₃ NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication ofmore » crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.« less

  8. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt₇Ru₃ NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication of crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.

  9. Evaluation of Salivary Nitric Oxide Levels in Smokers, Tobacco Chewers and Patients with Oral Lichenoid Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Joy Idiculla; Sivapathasundharam, B.; Sabarinath, B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nitric oxide (NO), a free radical, acts as a signalling molecule affecting numerous physiological and pathological processes. Role of nitric oxide as a mediator in tobacco related habits and the resultant oral lichenoid reactions was assessed. Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the salivary nitric oxide levels in normal patients with that of smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in the study which included 30 healthy patients without any chronic inflammatory lesion and habit as controls (group I), 30 smokers without the habit of tobacco/betel nut chewing and any oral lesion (group II), 30 tobacco chewers without the habit of smoking and any oral lesion (group III) and 30 histologically confirmed cases of oral lichenoid reaction with the habit of tobacco usage (group IV). Saliva from these patients was collected and the nitrite concentration was assessed. Results Our results concluded that there was highly significant increase in the nitric oxide levels in smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions compared to that of controls. Also, there was a significant increase in nitric oxide levels in patients with smoking associated oral lichenoid reactions in comparison with smokers and in patients with lichenoid reactions associated with tobacco chewing in comparison with tobacco chewers. Conclusion Estimation of salivary nitric oxide levels is a simple, non-invasive procedure and could be analysed to suggest the role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of these lesions. The increased activity of the enzyme may indicate that nitric oxide has a pathophysiological role in these lesions. PMID:26894179

  10. Investigating the mechanism of the selective hydrogenation reaction of cinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Laicai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CAL) belongs to the group of aromatic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes; the selective hydrogenation of CAL plays an important role in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Using Ptn clusters as catalytic models, we studied the selective hydrogenation reaction mechanism for CAL catalyzed by Ptn (n = 6, 10, 14, 18) clusters by means of B3LYP in density functional theory at the 6-31+ G(d) level (the LanL2DZ extra basis set was used for the Pt atom). The rationality of the transition state was proved by vibration frequency analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinate computation. Moreover, atoms in molecules theory and nature bond orbital theory were applied to discuss the interaction among orbitals and the bonding characteristics. The results indicate that three kinds of products, namely 3-phenylpropyl aldehyde, 3-phenyl allyl alcohol and cinnamyl alcohol, are produced in the selective hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by Ptn clusters; each pathway possesses two reaction channels. Ptn clusters are more likely to catalyze the activation and hydrogenation of the C = O bond in CAL molecules, eventually producing cinnamic alcohol, which proves that Ptn clusters have a strong reaction selectivity to catalyze CAL. The reaction selectivity of the catalyzer cluster is closely related to the size of the Ptn cluster, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity. Graphical Abstract The reaction mechanism for the selective hydrogenation reaction ofcinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters was studied by densityfunctional theory. The reactionselectivity of cluster catalyzer was concluded to be closely related to the size of Ptn clusters, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity.

  11. Reaction mechanism of oxidation, hydroxylation, and epoxidation by hypofluorous acid: a theoretical study of unusual H-bond-assisted catalysis.

    PubMed

    Srnec, Martin; Oncak, Milan; Zahradník, Rudolf

    2008-04-24

    The oxidation of organic molecules by hypofluorous acid (HOF) was studied extensively and systematically by Rozen et al. Therefore, it seems appropriate to refer to the process as Rozen oxidation. An entire set of model molecules was selected for quantum chemical investigation of the oxidation mechanism: a C=C double bond in ethylene, sulfur and selenium in dimethyl derivatives, nitrogen and phosphorus in trimethyl derivatives, as well as methyl azides. In the gas phase, van der Waals complexes between HOF and the previously mentioned species easily are formed, but these complexes are reluctant to undergo oxidation. The addition of another HOF molecule connected with the formation of a cyclic complex (i.e., substrate and two molecules of HOF) seems to be decisive for the oxidation process. The attempt to substitute the second HOF molecule with H2O demonstrated the superiority of HOF. Complexes of this kind decompose along the reaction path smoothly (i.e., with a low activation energy) to the respective oxidation product. A potential role of the hydroxyl cation (HO+) in the oxidation step is mentioned. Besides an oxidation product, one HOF molecule is released (an essential feature of catalysis), and furthermore, hydrogen fluoride is formed. It was suggested by Sertchook et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 8275) that the interaction between the substrate to be oxidized and HOF is catalytically influenced by the HF molecule. The mechanism suggested here is more feasible and, particularly at the early stages of the oxidation process, decisive. Also, the role of acetonitrile, used as a solvent by Rozen et al., is discussed in terms of a continuum model. Moreover, passing from potential energies to Gibbs energies is considered.

  12. Reversible Fluorescent Probe for Selective Detection and Cell Imaging of Oxidative Stress Indicator Bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajiao; Guan, Lingmei; Yu, Huan; Yan, Yehan; Du, Libo; Liu, Yang; Sun, Mingtai; Huang, Dejian; Wang, Suhua

    2016-04-19

    In this paper, we report a benzothiazole-functionalized cyanine fluorescence probe and demonstrate that it is selectively reactive to bisulfite, an intermediate indicator for oxidative stress. The selective reaction can be monitored by distinct ratiometric fluorescence variation favorable for cell imaging and visualization. The original probe can be regenerated in high yield through the elimination of bisulfite from the product by peroxides such as hydrogen peroxide, accompanied by fluorescence turning on at 590 nm, showing a potential application for the detection of peroxides. We successfully applied this probe for fluorescence imaging of bisulfite in cancer cells (MCF-7) treated with bisulfite and hydrogen peroxide as well as a selective detection limit of 0.34 μM bisulfite in aqueous solution.

  13. Generation of Oxidants From the Reaction of Nanoparticulate Zero-Valent Iron and Oxygen for the use in Contaminant Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, C. R.; Lee, C.; Sedlak, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    The reaction of zero-valent iron (ZVI) with oxygen can lead to the formation of oxidants, which may be used to transform recalcitrant contaminants including non-polar organics and certain metals. Nanoparticulate iron might provide a practical mechanism of remediating oxygen-containing groundwater and contaminated soil. To gain insight into the reaction mechanism and to quantify the yield of oxidants, experiments were performed with model organic compounds in the presence of nanoparticulate zero-valent iron and oxygen. At pH values below 5, ZVI nanoparticles were oxidized within 30 minutes with a stoichiometry of approximately two Fe0 oxidized per O2 consumed. Using the oxidation of methanol and ethanol to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, respectively, we found that less than 2% of the consumed oxygen was converted to reactive oxidants under acidic conditions. The yield of aldehydes increased with pH up to pH 7, with maximum oxidant yields of around 5% relative to the mass of ZVI added. The increase of aldehyde yield with pH was attributable to changes in the processes responsible for oxidant production. At pH values below 5, the corrosion of ZVI by oxygen produces hydrogen peroxide, which subsequently reacts with ferrous iron [Fe(II)] via the Fenton reaction. At higher pH values, the aldehydes are produced when Fe(II), the initial product of ZVI oxidation, reacts with oxygen. The decrease in oxidant yield at pH values above 7 may be attributable to precipitation of Fe(II). The oxidation of benzoic acid and 2-propanol to para-hydroxybenzoic acid and acetone, respectively, followed a very different trend compared to the primary alcohols. In both cases, the highest product yields (approximately 2% with respect to ZVI added) were observed at pH 3. Yields decreased with increasing pH, with no oxidized product detected at neutral pH. These results suggest that two different oxidants may be produced by the system: hydroxyl radical (OH-·) at acidic pH and a more selective

  14. Comprehensive mechanism and structure-sensitivity of ethanol oxidation on platinum: new transition-state searching method for resolving the complex reaction network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Fang; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2008-08-20

    Ethanol oxidation on Pt is a typical multistep and multiselectivity heterogeneous catalytic process. A comprehensive understanding of this fundamental reaction would greatly benefit design of catalysts for use in direct ethanol fuel cells and the degradation of biomass-derived oxygenates. In this work, the reaction network of ethanol oxidation on different Pt surfaces, including close-packed Pt{111}, stepped Pt{211}, and open Pt{100}, is explored thoroughly with an efficient reaction path searching method, which integrates our new transition-state searching technique with periodic density functional theory calculations. Our new technique enables the location of the transition state and saddle points for most surface reactions simply and efficiently by optimization of local minima. We show that the selectivity of ethanol oxidation on Pt depends markedly on the surface structure, which can be attributed to the structure-sensitivity of two key reaction steps: (i) the initial dehydrogenation of ethanol and (ii) the oxidation of acetyl (CH3CO). On open surface sites, ethanol prefers C-C bond cleavage via strongly adsorbed intermediates (CH2CO or CHCO), which leads to complete oxidation to CO2. However, only partial oxidizations to CH3CHO and CH3COOH occur on Pt{111}. Our mechanism points out that the open surface Pt{100} is the best facet to fully oxidize ethanol at low coverages, which sheds light on the origin of the remarkable catalytic performance of Pt tetrahexahedra nanocrystals found recently. The physical origin of the structure-selectivity is rationalized in terms of both thermodynamics and kinetics. Two fundamental quantities that dictate the selectivity of ethanol oxidation are identified: (i) the ability of surface metal atoms to bond with unsaturated C-containing fragments and (ii) the relative stability of hydroxyl at surface atop sites with respect to other sites.

  15. Reduction reaction analysis of nanoparticle copper oxide for copper direct bonding using formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Masahisa; Akaike, Masatake; Matsuoka, Naoya; Suga, Tadatomo

    2017-04-01

    Copper direct bonding is required for electronics devices, especially power devices, and copper direct bonding using formic acid is expected to lower the bonding temperature. In this research, we analyzed the reduction reaction of copper oxide using formic acid with a Pt catalyst by electron spin resonance analysis and thermal gravimetry analysis. It was found that formic acid was decomposed and radicals were generated under 200 °C. The amount of radicals generated was increased by adding the Pt catalyst. Because of these radicals, both copper(I) oxide and copper(II) oxide start to be decomposed below 200 °C, and the reduction of copper oxide is accelerated by reactants such as H2 and CO from the decomposition of formic acid above 200 °C. The Pt catalyst also accelerates the reaction of copper oxide reduction. Herewith, it is considered that the copper surface can be controlled more precisely by using formic acid to induce direct bonding.

  16. Application of hydrogen peroxide encapsulated in silica xerogels to oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Bednarz, Szczepan; Ryś, Barbara; Bogdał, Dariusz

    2012-07-04

    Hydrogen peroxide was encapsulated into a silica xerogel matrix by the sol-gel technique. The composite was tested as an oxidizing agent both under conventional and microwave conditions in a few model reactions: Noyori's method of octanal and 2-octanol oxidation and cycloctene epoxidation in a 1,1,1-trifluoroethanol/Na2WO4 system. The results were compared with yields obtained for reactions with 30% H2O2 and urea-hydrogen peroxide (UHP) as oxidizing agents. It was found that the composite has activity similar to 30% H2O2 and has a several advantages over UHP such as the fact that silica and H2O are the only products of the composite decomposition or no contamination by urea or its derivatives occurs; the xerogel is easier to heated by microwave irradiation than UHP and could be used as both an oxidizing agent and as solid support for microwave assisted solvent-free oxidations.

  17. High Temperature Reactions of Uranium Dioxide with Various Metal Oxides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1956-02-20

    less oxygen than that in U308, even at low tem- peratures; (b) reduction of oxides such as U205 , U30,, and UO3 at temperatures above 1,450’ C to a...Corporation. Thorium dioxide (ThO2). Lindsay Light & Power Co. low-tem- perature, calcined material of 99.99-percent purity. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O6

  18. Mass spectrometer sampling of supercritical water-oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.R.; Maharrey, S.

    1995-03-01

    Supercritical water is a useful medium for oxidation of toxic hydrocarbons because under such conditions hydrocarbons and oxidizers are dissolved into a single phase, diffusivities are high, the combustion is complete, and it occurs at relatively low temperatures. There is a large literature on the thermodynamics, kinetics, and applications of supercritical water oxidation. Supercritical fluids have also been used as solvent carriers in chromatography and the interface of the column output to mass spectrometers has been investigated by many researchers. In the present investigation the authors seek to operate a micro-reactor in which supercritical water oxidation kinetics can be examined and for which the output flow can be injected directly into a mass spectrometer system. The motivation for this approach was the microjet burner utilized by Groeger and Fenn for combustion studies. Water is one of the more difficult supercritical solvents to interface with the mass spectrometer, compared with CO{sub 2} for example, because the pressures and temperatures are of order 30MPa and 500{degrees}C, and because the large water throughput must be removed by the vacuum pumps. They have fabricated supercritical nozzles from both stainless steel and from quartz capillary tubing. Despite the fact that supercritical water can dissolve quartz in the ppm range they have been able to operate quartz capillary reactors and nozzles in excess of 20hrs without any measurable degradation in performance. Because these nozzles are much easier to fabricate, especially to diameters below 0.004cm, they have been recently using them exclusively. This variable nozzle diameter is important because it permits us to vary the range of residence times in the reactor. The converging nozzle length is less than two capillary diameters, so the flow time through the nozzle is very short compared with the residence time in the reactor.

  19. Selectively oxidized vertical-cavity laser performance and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-02-01

    The authors discuss revolutionary performance advances in selectively oxidized vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), which have enabled low operating power laser diodes appropriate for aerospace applications. Incorporating buried oxide layers converted from AIGaAs layers within the laser cavity produces enhanced optical and electrical confinement enabling superior laser performance, such as high efficiency and modulation bandwidth. VCSELs also shown to be viable over varied environmental conditions such as ambient temperature and ionized radiation. The development of novel VCSEL technologies for advanced system applications is also described. Two dimensional individually addressable VCSEL arrays exhibit uniform threshold and operating characteristics. Bottom emitting 850 nm VCSEL arrays fabricated using wafer fusion are also reported.

  20. The Psychophysiological Reactions of Film Viewers While Viewing Selected Cinemagraphic Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeltzer, Dennis K.

    This study focused on the psychophysiological reactions of viewers seeing such selected cinemagraphic elements as varying camera distances, tracking shots, panning shots, and zooming shots. Subjects (N=29), randomly selected from introductory speech courses, viewed five films that varied in the presence or absence of the selected filmic elements.…

  1. Silica-lanthanum oxide: pioneer composite of rare-Earth metal oxide in selective phosphopeptides enrichment.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Fahmida; Hussain, Dilshad; Fatima, Batool; Musharraf, S Ghulam; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Gűnther K; Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad

    2012-12-04

    Relying on the successful journey of metal oxides in phosphoproteomics, lanthanum oxide is employed for the engineering of an affinity material for phosphopeptide enrichment. The lanthanum oxide is chemically modified on the surface of silica and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The obtained silica-lanthanum oxide composite is applied for the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides from tryptic digest of standard protein (α-casein, β-casein, and commercially available casein mixtures from bovine milk). The enriched entities are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The mass spectroscopy (MS) results show that the silica-lanthanum oxide composite exhibits enhanced capability for phosphopeptide enrichment with sensitivity assessed to be 50 fmol. Sequence coverage of casein is interpreted showing successful recovery. As a real sample, a protein digest of nonfat milk is applied. Also, the ability of lanthanum in different formats is checked in the selective phosphopeptides enrichment. The composite holds promising future in economic ground as it also possesses the regenerative ability for repetitive use.

  2. Boundary effects in a surface reaction model for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosilow, Benjamin J.; Gulari, Erdogan; Ziff, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The surface reaction model of Ziff, Gulari, and Barshad (ZGB) is investigated on finite systems with ``hard'' oxygen boundary conditions. The rate of production of CO2 is calculated as a function of y and system size. When the rate of CO adsorption y is above the first-order transition value y2, the reactive region is found to extend into the system a distance ξ which scales as (y-y2)-0.40 when y→y2.

  3. Exact probability distributions of selected species in stochastic chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    López-Caamal, Fernando; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T

    2014-09-01

    Chemical reactions are discrete, stochastic events. As such, the species' molecular numbers can be described by an associated master equation. However, handling such an equation may become difficult due to the large size of reaction networks. A commonly used approach to forecast the behaviour of reaction networks is to perform computational simulations of such systems and analyse their outcome statistically. This approach, however, might require high computational costs to provide accurate results. In this paper we opt for an analytical approach to obtain the time-dependent solution of the Chemical Master Equation for selected species in a general reaction network. When the reaction networks are composed exclusively of zeroth and first-order reactions, this analytical approach significantly alleviates the computational burden required by simulation-based methods. By building upon these analytical solutions, we analyse a general monomolecular reaction network with an arbitrary number of species to obtain the exact marginal probability distribution for selected species. Additionally, we study two particular topologies of monomolecular reaction networks, namely (i) an unbranched chain of monomolecular reactions with and without synthesis and degradation reactions and (ii) a circular chain of monomolecular reactions. We illustrate our methodology and alternative ways to use it for non-linear systems by analysing a protein autoactivation mechanism. Later, we compare the computational load required for the implementation of our results and a pure computational approach to analyse an unbranched chain of monomolecular reactions. Finally, we study calcium ions gates in the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum mediated by ryanodine receptors.

  4. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  5. Criegee Intermediates: What Direct Production and Detection Can Teach Us About Reactions of Carbonyl Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taatjes, Craig A.

    2017-05-01

    The carbonyl oxide intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, often known as Criegee intermediates, are potentially important reactants in Earth's atmosphere. For decades, careful analysis of ozonolysis systems was employed to derive an understanding of the formation and reactions of these species. Recently it has proved possible to synthesize at least some of these intermediates separately from ozonolysis, and hence to measure their reaction kinetics directly. Direct measurements have allowed new or more detailed understanding of each type of gas-phase reaction that carbonyl oxides undergo, often acting as a complement to highly detailed ozonolysis experiments. Moreover, the use of direct characterization methods to validate increasingly accurate theoretical investigations can enhance their impact well beyond the set of specific reactions that have been measured. Reactions that initiate particles or fuel their growth could be a new frontier for direct measurements of Criegee intermediate chemistry.

  6. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-09-01

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments

  8. Design of a metal-promoted oxide catalyst for the selective synthesis of butadiene from ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sushkevich, Vitaly L; Ivanova, Irina I; Ordomsky, Vitaly V; Taarning, Esben

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of buta-1,3-diene from ethanol has been studied over metal-containing (M=Ag, Cu, Ni) oxide catalysts (MO(x)=MgO, ZrO2, Nb2O5, TiO2, Al2O3) supported on silica. Kinetic study of a wide range of ethanol conversions (2-90%) allowed the main reaction pathways leading to butadiene and byproducts to be determined. The key reaction steps of butadiene synthesis were found to involve ethanol dehydrogenation, acetaldehyde condensation, and the reduction of crotonaldehyde with ethanol into crotyl alcohol. Catalyst design included the selection of active components for each key reaction step and merging of these components into multifunctional catalysts and adjusting the catalyst functions to achieve the highest selectivity. The best catalytic performance was achieved over the Ag/ZrO2/SiO2 catalyst, which showed the highest selectivity towards butadiene (74 mol%). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metabolic alkene labeling and in vitro detection of histone acylation via the aqueous oxidative Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Ourailidou, Maria E; Dockerty, Paul; Witte, Martin; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Dekker, Frank J

    2015-03-28

    The detection of protein lysine acylations remains a challenge due to lack of specific antibodies for acylations with various chain lengths. This problem can be addressed by metabolic labeling techniques using carboxylates with reactive functionalities. Subsequent chemoselective reactions with a complementary moiety connected to a detection tag enable the visualization and quantification of the protein lysine acylome. In this study, we present EDTA-Pd(II) as a novel catalyst for the oxidative Heck reaction on protein-bound alkenes, which allows employment of fully aqueous reaction conditions. We used this reaction to monitor histone lysine acylation in vitro after metabolic incorporation of olefinic carboxylates as chemical reporters.

  10. Effects of midazolam and phenobarbital on brain oxidative reactions induced by pentylenetetrazole in a convulsion model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yukiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Shimada, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2012-04-01

    Brain oxidative reactions are involved in epilepsy as well as neurodegenerative diseases. In animal convulsion models, some anticonvulsants have been found to suppress oxidative reactions associated with convulsions. However, the effect of anticonvulsants on brain oxidative reactions has not fully been clarified. Midazolam and phenobarbital are often used as an intravenous anesthetic, and are known to have anticonvulsive effect, but antioxidative effect of these drugs has rarely been studied. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of these drugs on the degree of convulsions and brain oxidative reactions in an animal convulsion model. In order to evaluate brain oxidative reactions, we measured malondialdehyde (MDA) level and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA expression level in the brain of mice in a convulsion model generated by a single injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). We evaluated the effects of midazolam and phenobarbital on the degree of PTZ-induced convulsions and on the changes in brain MDA level and HO-1 mRNA expression level. After PTZ injection, severe convulsions were observed in all mice. MDA level was increased in the whole brain, while HO-1 mRNA expression level was increased only in the hippocampus. Both midazolam and phenobarbital prevented the convulsions and suppressed the increase in both MDA level and HO-1 mRNA expression level in the brain. In this study, both midazolam and phenobarbital suppressed PTZ-induced MDA and HO-1 reactions in the brain, suggesting that these drugs inhibit brain oxidative reactions in a convulsion model.

  11. The characteristics of the `peroxidatic' reaction of catalase in ethanol oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Oshino, Nozomu; Oshino, Reiko; Chance, Britton

    1973-01-01

    Ethanol oxidation by rat liver catalase (the `peroxidatic' reaction) was studied quantitatively with respect to the rate of H2O2 generation, catalase haem concentration, ethanol concentration and the steady-state concentration of the catalase–H2O2 intermediate (Compound I). At a low ratio of H2O2-generation rate to catalase haem concentration, the rate of ethanol oxidation was independent of the catalase haem concentration. The magnitude of the inhibition of ethanol oxidation by cyanide was not paralleled by the formation of the catalase–cyanide complex and was altered greatly by varying either the ethanol concentration or the ratio of the rate of H2O2 generation to catalase haem concentration. The ethanol concentration producing a half-maximal activity was also dependent on the ratio of the H2O2-generation rate to catalase haem concentration. These phenomena are explained by changes in the proportion of the `catalatic' and `peroxidatic' reactions in the overall H2O2-decomposition reaction. There was a correlation between the proportion of the `peroxidatic' reaction in the overall catalase reaction and the steady-state concentration of the catalase–H2O2 intermediate. Regardless of the concentration of ethanol and the rate of H2O2 generation, a half-saturation of the steady state of the catalase–H2O2 intermediate indicated that about 45% of the H2O2 was being utilized by the ethanol-oxidation reaction. The results reported show that the experimental results in the study on the `microsomal ethanol-oxidation system' may be reinterpreted and the catalase `peroxidatic' reaction provides a quantitative explanation for the activity hitherto attributed to the `microsomal ethanol-oxidation system'. PMID:4720713

  12. Reaction of low-molecular-mass organoselenium compounds (and their sulphur analogues) with inflammation-associated oxidants.

    PubMed

    Carroll, L; Davies, M J; Pattison, D I

    2015-06-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element in mammals, with the majority specifically encoded as seleno-L-cysteine into a range of selenoproteins. Many of these proteins play a key role in modulating oxidative stress, via either direct detoxification of biological oxidants, or repair of oxidised residues. Both selenium- and sulphur-containing residues react readily with the wide range of oxidants (including hydrogen peroxide, radicals, singlet oxygen and hypochlorous, hypobromous, hypothiocyanous and peroxynitrous acids) that are produced during inflammation and have been implicated in the development of a range of inflammatory diseases. Whilst selenium has similar properties to sulphur, it typically exhibits greater reactivity with most oxidants, and there are considerable differences in the subsequent reactivity and ease of repair of the oxidised species that are formed. This review discusses the chemistry of low-molecular-mass organoselenium compounds (e.g. selenoethers, diselenides and selenols) with inflammatory oxidants, with a particular focus on the reaction kinetics and product studies, with the differences in reactivity between selenium and sulphur analogues described in the selected examples. These data provide insight into the therapeutic potential of low-molecular-mass selenium-containing compounds to modulate the activity of both radical and molecular oxidants and provide protection against inflammation-induced damage. Progress in their therapeutic development (including modulation of potential selenium toxicity by strategic design) is demonstrated by a brief summary of some recent studies where novel organoselenium compounds have been used as wound healing or radioprotection agents and in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Comparative analysis of four oxidized guanine lesions from reactions of DNA with peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and γ-radiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Ye, Wenjie; Prestwich, Erin G; Wishnok, John S; Taghizadeh, Koli; Dedon, Peter C; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2013-02-18

    Oxidative damage to DNA has many origins, including irradiation, inflammation, and oxidative stress, but the chemistries are not the same. The most oxidizable base in DNA is 2-deoxyguanosine (dG), and the primary oxidation products are 8-oxodG and 2-amino-imidazolone. The latter rapidly converts to 2,2-diamino-oxazolone (Ox), and 8-oxodG is further oxidized to spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and guanidinohydantoin (Gh). In this study, we have examined the dose-response relationship for the formation of the above four products arising in calf thymus DNA exposed to gamma irradiation, photoactivated rose bengal, and two sources of peroxynitrite. In order to carry out these experiments, we developed a chromatographic system and synthesized isotopomeric internal standards to enable accurate and precise analysis based upon selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. 8-OxodG was the most abundant products in all cases, but its accumulation was highly dependent on the nature of the oxidizing agent and the subsequent conversion to Sp and Gh. Among the other oxidation products, Ox was the most abundant, and Sp was formed in significantly greater yield than Gh.

  14. Mode specificity in bond selective reactions F + HOD → HF + OD and DF + OH

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The influence of vibrational excitations in the partially deuterated water (HOD) reactant on its bond selective reactions with F is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method on an accurate global potential energy surface. Despite the decidedly early barrier of the F + H{sub 2}O reaction, reactant vibrational excitation in each local stretching mode of HOD is found to significantly enhance the reaction which breaks the excited bond. In the mean time, excitation of the HOD bending mode also enhances the reaction, but with much lower efficacy and weaker bond selectivity. Except for low collision energies, all vibrational modes are more effective in promoting the bond selective reactions than the translational energy. These results are compared with the predictions of the recently proposed sudden vector projection model.

  15. Evaluation of reaction mechanism of coal-metal oxide interactions in chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Poston, James; Tian, Hanjing; Miller, Duane; Simonyi, Thomas

    2010-11-15

    The knowledge of reaction mechanism is very important in designing reactors for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of coal. Recent CLC studies have considered the more technically difficult problem of reactions between abundant solid fuels (i.e. coal and waste streams) and solid metal oxides. A definitive reaction mechanism has not been reported for CLC reaction of solid fuels. It has often been assumed that the solid/solid reaction is slow and therefore requires that reactions be conducted at temperatures high enough to gasify the solid fuel, or decompose the metal oxide. In contrast, data presented in this paper demonstrates that solid/solid reactions can be completed at much lower temperatures, with rates that are technically useful as long as adequate fuel/metal oxide contact is achieved. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations as well as experimental techniques such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), flow reactor studies, in situ X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate how the proximal interaction between solid phases proceeds. The data indicate that carbon induces the Cu-O bond breaking process to initiate the combustion of carbon at temperatures significantly lower than the spontaneous decomposition temperature of CuO, and the type of reducing medium in the vicinity of the metal oxide influences the temperature at which the oxygen release from the metal oxide takes place. Surface melting of Cu and wetting of carbon may contribute to the solid-solid contacts necessary for the reaction. (author)

  16. Extensive Bone Reaction From Catastrophic Oxidized Zirconium Wear.

    PubMed

    Cassar-Gheiti, Adrian J; Collins, Dennis; McCarthy, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The use of alternative bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty has become popular to minimize wear and increase longevity, especially in young patients. Oxidized zirconium (Oxinium; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) femoral heads were introduced in the past decade for use in total hip arthroplasty. The advantages of oxidized zirconium include less risk of fracture compared with traditional ceramic heads. This case report describes a patient with a history of bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Nonoperative management of avascular necrosis failed, and the patient was treated with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The patient was followed at regular intervals and had slow eccentric polyethylene wear during a 10-year period. After 10 years, the patient had accelerated wear, with femoral and acetabular bone changes as a result of Oxinium and ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene wear during a 6-month period. This article highlights the unusual accelerated bone changes that occurred as a result of Oxinium wear particles.

  17. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-08

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  18. Reaction of trichloroethylene and trichloroethylene oxide with cytochrome P450 enzymes: inactivation and sites of modification.

    PubMed

    Cai, H; Guengerich, F P

    2001-04-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) has been shown to be toxic to experimental animals and humans. TCE oxide is a reactive electrophile formed during TCE oxidation and rearranges to acylating intermediates [Cai, H., and Guengerich, F. P. (1999) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 121, 11656-11663], which may be related to the toxicity. Mice treated with TCE have been reported to contain N(6)-dichloroacetylLys residues in P450 2E1, as detected by immunochemical methods. TCE can be oxidized by both P450 2E1 and (rat) 2B1. In this work, direct reaction of TCE oxide with either human P450 2E1, P450 2B1, or NADPH-P450 reductase was shown to lead to enzyme inactivation, and no recovery of the activity of either enzyme occurred, consistent with the view of inactivation reactions with Lys groups and not hydroxyls or Cys. Furthermore, Lys adducts were detected in the reaction of TCE oxide with both P450 2E1 and NADPH-P450 reductase, with a larger amount of N(6)-formylLys observed compared to N(6)-dichloroacetylLys in both cases. Inactivation of P450 2E1 during NADPH-dependent TCE oxidation was not observed, compared to control experiments. However, inactivation of P450 2B1 during NADPH-dependent TCE oxidation was detected. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides indicated that the direct reaction of TCE oxide with human P450 2E1 resulted in the modification of peptides containing Lys87 (AVKEALLDYK), Lys251 (VKEHHQSLDPNCPR), and Lys487 (YKLCVIPR), with either a formyl or dichloroacetyl group attached. Lys87 and Lys487 of human P450 2E1 appear to be modified during the oxidation of TCE, using the same approach. The results are considered in the context of comparison of species and P450s.

  19. The selective oxidation of toluene to benzaldehyde applying a fuel cell system in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, K.; Ishizuka, K.; Yamanaka, I.; Hatano, M. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper discusses a fuel cell system used for the synthesis of benzaldehyde from toluene in the gas phase. The cell system (anode: Pd-black with added graphite/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}(aq.)/cathode: Pt-black with added graphite) operated at ca. 373 K under short-circuit conditions and produced the partial oxidation products benzaldehyde (PhCHO) and benzoic acid (PhCOOH). The addition of chlorides such as HCl, NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, etc., to the anode remarkably improved the selectivity of the sum of PhCHO and PhCOOH. In the presence of chlorides, CO{sub 2} was not produced at all. Among the chlorides tested, NaCl is the best additive for the synthesis of PhCHO. Kinetic results on the reaction with the NaCl-added anode have shown that decreasing temperatures and increasing pressures of the reactants (toluene and O{sub 2}) favor the oxidation to PhCHO. The oxidation of toluene under an externally applied potential showed a product distribution similar to that observed under short-circuit conditions. The turnover number grater than unite (2.4) indicates catalytic cycling of the Pd in the anode. The current efficiency was improved by cyclic short- and open-circuit operation of the cell. A reaction mechanism assuming a {pi} allylbenzyl-Pd{sup 2+} (ligand){sub x} complex as the reaction intermediate explains the kinetic results and the favorable effect of chloride. The intermediate complex may be generated through the electrochemical oxidation of Pd and toluene. The subsequent competitive formations of PhCHO and CO{sub 2} from this complex proceed nonelectrochemically.

  20. Selective Neuronal Vulnerability to Oxidative Stress in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinkun; Michaelis, Elias K.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), caused by the imbalance between the generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), plays an important role in brain aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and other related adverse conditions, such as ischemia. While ROS/RNS serve as signaling molecules at physiological levels, an excessive amount of these molecules leads to oxidative modification and, therefore, dysfunction of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The response of neurons to this pervasive stress, however, is not uniform in the brain. While many brain neurons can cope with a rise in OS, there are select populations of neurons in the brain that are vulnerable. Because of their selective vulnerability, these neurons are usually the first to exhibit functional decline and cell death during normal aging, or in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of selective neuronal vulnerability (SNV) to OS is important in the development of future intervention approaches to protect such vulnerable neurons from the stresses of the aging process and the pathological states that lead to neurodegeneration. In this review, the currently known molecular and cellular factors that contribute to SNV to OS are summarized. Included among the major underlying factors are high intrinsic OS, high demand for ROS/RNS-based signaling, low ATP production, mitochondrial dysfunction, and high inflammatory response in vulnerable neurons. The contribution to the selective vulnerability of neurons to OS by other intrinsic or extrinsic factors, such as deficient DNA damage repair, low calcium-buffering capacity, and glutamate excitotoxicity, are also discussed. PMID:20552050

  1. The oxidant and laser power-dependent plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis reaction of p-aminothiophenol dimerizing into p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene on Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Enzhong; Yin, Penggang; Yu, Chunna; Yu, Ge; Zhao, Chang

    2016-09-01

    Recently, plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis (PDSPC) reactions have attracted more and more attention by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) because we can in situ monitor the reaction process and determine the final products and their quantities by the real-time SERS spectrum. In this work, self-assembly AuNPs with both high catalytic activity and strong SERS effect were used as a bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of PDSPC reactions. p-Aminothiophenol (PATP), a famous model molecule, was selected as a probe molecule and FeCl3 and NaClO were selected as oxidants. In this way, oxidation reaction of PATP dimerizing into p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) has been investigated by SERS, and the results show that oxidant and laser power can alter the conversion rate of the reaction. This work provides a novel approach for controlling PDSPC reaction rate, which may be useful for understanding the mechanism of PDSPC reactions.

  2. The oxidant and laser power-dependent plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis reaction of p-aminothiophenol dimerizing into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Enzhong; Yin, Penggang; Yu, Chunna; Yu, Ge; Zhao, Chang

    2016-09-05

    Recently, plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis (PDSPC) reactions have attracted more and more attention by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) because we can in situ monitor the reaction process and determine the final products and their quantities by the real-time SERS spectrum. In this work, self-assembly AuNPs with both high catalytic activity and strong SERS effect were used as a bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of PDSPC reactions. p-Aminothiophenol (PATP), a famous model molecule, was selected as a probe molecule and FeCl3 and NaClO were selected as oxidants. In this way, oxidation reaction of PATP dimerizing into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) has been investigated by SERS, and the results show that oxidant and laser power can alter the conversion rate of the reaction. This work provides a novel approach for controlling PDSPC reaction rate, which may be useful for understanding the mechanism of PDSPC reactions.

  3. Selective hydrodeoxygenation of cyclic vicinal diols to cyclic alcohols over tungsten oxide-palladium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Amada, Yasushi; Ota, Nobuhiko; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation of cyclic vicinal diols such as 1,4-anhydroerythritol was conducted over catalysts containing both a noble metal and a group 5-7 transition-metal oxide. The combination of Pd and WOx allowed the removal of one of the two OH groups selectively. 3-Hydroxytetrahydrofuran was obtained from 1,4-anhydroerythritol in 72 and 74% yield over WOx -Pd/C and WOx -Pd/ZrO2 , respectively. The WOx -Pd/ZrO2 catalyst was reusable without significant loss of activity if the catalyst was calcined as a method of regeneration. Characterization of WOx -Pd/C with temperature-programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy suggested that Pd metal particles approximately 9 nm in size were formed on amorphous tungsten oxide particles. A reaction mechanism was proposed on the basis of kinetics, reaction results with tungsten oxides under an atmosphere of Ar, and density functional theory calculations. A tetravalent tungsten center (W(IV) ) was formed by reduction of WO3 with the Pd catalyst and H2 , and this center served as the reductant for partial hydrodeoxygenation.

  4. Mn(II) Oxidation in Fenton and Fenton Type Systems: Identification of Reaction Efficiency and Reaction Products.

    PubMed

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2017-03-07

    Efficient and low-cost methods of removing aqueous Mn(II) are required to improve the quality of impacted groundwater supplies. In this work, we show that Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) permits the oxidative removal of Mn(II) from solution by reaction with the reactive oxidant species produced through Fe(II) oxidation. Manganese(II) removal was enhanced when the accumulation of aqueous Fe(II) was minimized, which was achieved at low Fe(II) production rates, high pH, the presence of H2O2 instead of O2 as the initial Fe(II) oxidant, or a combination of all three. In addition, in the EC-H2O2 system, Mn(II) removal efficiency increased as pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.5 and as pH increased from 6.5 to 8.5, which implicates different reactive oxidants in acidic and alkaline solutions. Chemical analyses and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that Mn(II) removal during Fe(0) EC leads to the formation of Mn(III) (0.02 to >0.26 Mn·Fe(-1) molar ratios) and its incorporation into the resulting Fe(III) coprecipitates (lepidocrocite and hydrous ferric oxide for EC-O2 and EC-H2O2, respectively), regardless of pH and Fe(II) production rate. The Mn(II) oxidation pathways elucidated in this study set the framework to develop kinetic models on the impact of Mn(II) during EC treatment and in other Fenton type systems.

  5. Chiral Polymerization in Open Systems From Chiral-Selective Reaction Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Nelson, Bradley J.; Walker, Sara Imari

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the possibility that prebiotic homochirality can be achieved exclusively through chiral-selective reaction rate parameters without any other explicit mechanism for chiral bias. Specifically, we examine an open network of polymerization reactions, where the reaction rates can have chiral-selective values. The reactions are neither autocatalytic nor do they contain explicit enantiomeric cross-inhibition terms. We are thus investigating how rare a set of chiral-selective reaction rates needs to be in order to generate a reasonable amount of chiral bias. We quantify our results adopting a statistical approach: varying both the mean value and the rms dispersion of the relevant reaction rates, we show that moderate to high levels of chiral excess can be achieved with fairly small chiral bias, below 10%. Considering the various unknowns related to prebiotic chemical networks in early Earth and the dependence of reaction rates to environmental properties such as temperature and pressure variations, we argue that homochirality could have been achieved from moderate amounts of chiral selectivity in the reaction rates.

  6. Chiral polymerization in open systems from chiral-selective reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Nelson, Bradley J; Walker, Sara Imari

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the possibility that prebiotic homochirality can be achieved exclusively through chiral-selective reaction rate parameters without any other explicit mechanism for chiral bias. Specifically, we examine an open network of polymerization reactions, where the reaction rates can have chiral-selective values. The reactions are neither autocatalytic nor do they contain explicit enantiomeric cross-inhibition terms. We are thus investigating how rare a set of chiral-selective reaction rates needs to be in order to generate a reasonable amount of chiral bias. We quantify our results adopting a statistical approach: varying both the mean value and the rms dispersion of the relevant reaction rates, we show that moderate to high levels of chiral excess can be achieved with fairly small chiral bias, below 10%. Considering the various unknowns related to prebiotic chemical networks in early Earth and the dependence of reaction rates to environmental properties such as temperature and pressure variations, we argue that homochirality could have been achieved from moderate amounts of chiral selectivity in the reaction rates.

  7. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen-Popper, Dion-Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  8. Selective oxidation of bromide in wastewater brines from hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Lowry, Gregory V; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-07-01

    Brines generated from oil and natural gas production, including flowback water and produced water from hydraulic fracturing of shale gas, may contain elevated concentrations of bromide (~1 g/L). Bromide is a broad concern due to the potential for forming brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment. Conventional treatment processes for bromide removal is costly and not specific. Selective bromide removal is technically challenging due to the presence of other ions in the brine, especially chloride as high as 30-200 g/L. This study evaluates the ability of solid graphite electrodes to selectively oxidize bromide to bromine in flowback water and produced water from a shale gas operation in Southwestern PA. The bromine can then be outgassed from the solution and recovered, as a process well understood in the bromine industry. This study revealed that bromide may be selectively and rapidly removed from oil and gas brines (~10 h(-1) m(-2) for produced water and ~60 h(-1) m(-2) for flowback water). The electrolysis occurs with a current efficiency between 60 and 90%, and the estimated energy cost is ~6 kJ/g Br. These data are similar to those for the chlor-alkali process that is commonly used for chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide production. The results demonstrate that bromide may be selectively removed from oil and gas brines to create an opportunity for environmental protection and resource recovery.

  9. Surface Selective Oxidation of Sn-Added CMnSi TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Lawrence; Seo, Eun Jung; Jung, Geun Su; Suh, Dong Woo; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the addition of Sn on the selective oxidation and the reactive wetting of CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by means of galvanizing simulator tests. A reference TRIP steel and TRIP steels containing Sn in the range of 0.05 to 1 wt pct were intercritically annealed at 1093 K (820 °C) in an N2+ 5 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point of -60 °C. The thin-film oxides formed on the surface of the Sn-added CMnSi TRIP steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. The addition of Sn (≥0.05 wt pct) changed the morphology of the xMnO·SiO2 surface oxides from a continuous film morphology to a lens-shaped island morphology. It also suppressed the formation of the Mn-rich oxides of MnO and 2MnO·SiO2. The changes in the morphology and chemistry of the surface oxides were clearly related to the surface segregation of Sn, which appeared to result in a decrease of the oxygen permeability at the surface. The formation of lens-shaped oxides improved the wettability of the CMnSi TRIP steel surface by the molten Zn. The improved wetting effect was attributed to an increased area fraction of the surface where the oxide layer was thinner. This enabled a direct, unhindered reaction between Fe and the Al in the liquid Zn and the formation of the inhibition layer in the initial stages of the hot dipping. The addition of a small amount of Sn was also found to decrease significantly the density of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steel.

  10. Using reduced catalysts for oxidation reactions: mechanistic studies of the "Periana-Catalytica" system for CH4 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Oleg A; Bischof, Steven M; Konnick, Michael M; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Ziatdinov, Vadim R; Goddard, William A; Ahlquist, Mårten; Periana, Roy A

    2013-10-02

    Designing oxidation catalysts based on CH activation with reduced, low oxidation state species is a seeming dilemma given the proclivity for catalyst deactivation by overoxidation. This dilemma has been recognized in the Shilov system where reduced Pt(II) is used to catalyze methane functionalization. Thus, it is generally accepted that key to replacing Pt(IV) in that system with more practical oxidants is ensuring that the oxidant does not over-oxidize the reduced Pt(II) species. The "Periana-Catalytica" system, which utilizes (bpym)Pt(II)Cl2 in concentrated sulfuric acid solvent at 200 °C, is a highly stable catalyst for the selective, high yield oxy-functionalization of methane. In lieu of the over-oxidation dilemma, the high stability and observed rapid oxidation of (bpym)Pt(II)Cl2 to Pt(IV) in the absence of methane would seem to contradict the originally proposed mechanism involving CH activation by a reduced Pt(II) species. Mechanistic studies show that the originally proposed mechanism is incomplete and that while CH activation does proceed with Pt(II) there is a solution to the over-oxidation dilemma. Importantly, contrary to the accepted view to minimize Pt(II) overoxidation, these studies also show that increasing that rate could increase the rate of catalysis and catalyst stability. The mechanistic basis for this counterintuitive prediction could help to guide the design of new catalysts for alkane oxidation that operate by CH activation.

  11. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed.

  12. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Joshua J.; Davis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  13. High-value chemicals obtained from selective photo-oxidation of glucose in the presence of nanostructured titanium photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, Juan C; Magdziarz, Agnieszka; Bielejewska, Anna

    2011-12-01

    Glucose was oxidized in the presence of powdered TiO(2) photocatalysts synthesized by an ultrasound-promoted sol-gel method. The catalysts were more selective towards glucaric acid, gluconic acid and arabitol (total selectivity approx. 70%) than the most popular photocatalyst, Degussa P-25. The photocatalytic systems worked at mild reaction conditions: 30°C, atmospheric pressure and very short reaction time (e.g. 5 min). Such relatively good selectivity towards high-valued molecules are attributed to the physico-chemical properties (e.g. high specific surface area, nanostructured anatase phase, and visible light absorption) of novel TiO(2) materials and the reaction conditions. The TiO(2) photocatalysts have potential for water purification and energy production and for use in the pharmaceutical, food, perfume and fuel industries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Aqueous photoreduction of oxidized mercury species in presence of selected alkanethiols.

    PubMed

    Si, Lin; Ariya, Parisa A

    2011-08-01

    Mercury is a global environmental contaminant with severe toxicity impact. The chemical processes resulting in the transformation of oxidized mercury species (Hg2+) to elemental mercury (Hg0), greatly affects the fate and transport of mercury in the natural environment. We hereby provide the first study on the photochemistry of Hg2+ with selected alkanethiols (R-SH) as model compounds to represent thiols and thiol-type binding sites on humic substances in natural waters because of the common sulfhydryl functional group (-SH). Kinetic studies were performed using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS), the formation of Hg2+-thiol complexes (Hg(SR)2) were confirmed by UV-visible spectrometry and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (APCI-MS), and the reaction products were analyzed using Electron Impact-Mass Spectrometry (EI-MS) and Solid Phase Microextraction coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS). Our results indicated that the photoreduction of Hg2+ by selected alkanethiols may be mediated by Hg2+-thiol complexes to produce Hg0. Under our experimental conditions, the apparent first order rate constants obtained for 1-propanethiol, 1-butanethiol, and 1-pentanethiol were (2.0±0.2)×10(-7) s(-1), (1.4±0.1)×10(-7) s(-1), (8.3±0.5)×10(-8) s(-1), respectively. The effects of ionic strength, dissolved oxygen or chloride ion on reaction rates were found to be minimal under our experimental conditions. The identified products of the reaction between oxidized mercury species with selected alkanethiols (C3-C5) were Hg0 and disulfides (RS-SR). The potential environmental implications are herein discussed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  16. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Senanayake, S. D.; Pappoe, N. A.; Nguyen-Phan, T. -D.; ...

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO+0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5wt% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface statesmore » or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure was also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggests that a surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.« less

  17. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  18. Cation–hydroxide–water coadsorption inhibits the alkaline hydrogen oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Martinez, Ulises; Matanovic, Ivana; Kim, Yu Seung

    2016-10-24

    Rotating disk electrode voltammograms and infrared reflection absorption spectra indicate that the hydrogen oxidation reaction of platinum in 0.1 M tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution is adversely impacted by time-dependent and potential-driven cation–hydroxide–water coadsorption. Impedance analysis suggests that the hydrogen oxidation reaction inhibition is mainly caused by the hydrogen diffusion barrier of the coadsorbed trilayer rather than intuitive catalyst site blocking by the adsorbed cation species. Finally, these results give useful insights on how to design ionomeric binders for advanced alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  19. Domination of thermodynamically demanding oxidative processes in reaction of iodine with hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanović, Kristina Z.; Bubanja, Itana Nuša M.; Stanisavljev, Dragomir R.

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the degree of isothermal iodine conversion to iodate as one of the most intriguing steps of the Bray-Liebhafsky oscillator. The amount of the produced iodate, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, was determined by the stopped-flow titration with iodide ions. From five different experiments, high degree of iodine conversion to iodate (95.4 ± 0.6)% is obtained. It confirmed that, after the induction period of spontaneous hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition, reaction dynamics is dominated by thermodynamically demanding oxidative processes. Isothermal change of the reaction dynamics introduces some specific energy redistribution as a possible initiator of oxidizing radicals.

  20. "Click" reaction in conjunction with diazeniumdiolate chemistry: developing high-load nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Oladeinde, Oyebola A; Hong, Sam Y; Holland, Ryan J; Maciag, Anna E; Keefer, Larry K; Saavedra, Joseph E; Nandurdikar, Rahul S

    2010-10-01

    The use of Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reactions of alkyne-substituted diazeniumdiolate prodrugs with bis- and tetrakis-azido compounds is described. The "click" reaction for the bis-azide using CuSO(4)/Na-ascorbate predominantly gave the expected bis-triazole. However, CuI/diisopropylethylamine predominantly gave uncommon triazolo-triazole products as a result of oxidative coupling. Neither set of "click" conditions showed evidence of compromising the integrity of the diazeniumdiolate groups. The chemistry developed has applications in the synthesis of polyvalent and dendritic nitric oxide donors.

  1. Bimolecular Coupling Reactions through Oxidatively Generated Aromatic Cations: Scope and Stereocontrol

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yubo; Villafane, Louis A.; Clausen, Dane J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromenes, isochromenes, and benzoxathioles react with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone to form stable aromatic cations that react with a range of nucleophiles. These oxidative fragment coupling reactions provide rapid access to structurally diverse heterocycles. Conducting the reactions in the presence of a chiral Brønsted acid results in the formation of an asymmetric ion pair that can provide enantiomerically enriched products in a rare example of a stereoselective process resulting from the generation of a chiral electrophile through oxidative carbon–hydrogen bond cleavage. PMID:23913987

  2. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-03-22

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect - oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level.

  3. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation.

  4. Surface reaction network of CO oxidation on CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liangbing; Xiong, Feng; Jin, Yuekang; Wang, Zhengming; Sun, Guanghui; Huang, Weixin

    2016-11-30

    CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts were prepared and their activity toward the adsorption and co-adsorption of O2, CO, CO2 and water was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, thermal desorption spectra and temperature-programmed reaction spectra. The Au surface of CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts molecularly adsorbs CO, CO2 and water, and the polycrystalline CeO2 surface of CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts molecularly adsorbs O2, and molecularly and reactively adsorbs CO, CO2 and water. By controllably preparing co-adsorbed surface species on CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts, we successfully identified various surface reaction pathways of CO oxidation to produce CO2 with different barriers both on the CeO2 surface and at the Au-CeO2 interface, including CO oxidation by various oxygen species, and water/hydroxyl group-involved CO oxidation. These results establish a surface reaction network of CO oxidation catalyzed by Au/CeO2 catalysts, greatly advancing the fundamental understandings of catalytic CO oxidation reactions.

  5. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level.

  6. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level. PMID:28327642

  7. Enhancement of nitrite on heme-induced oxidative reactions: A potential toxicological implication.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Jingjie; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is one of the major end products of NO metabolism. Although the biological significance of heme/NO(2)(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration is a subject of great interest, the important roles of NO(2)(-) on heme-dependent redox reaction have been greatly underestimated. In this study, we investigated the influence of NO(2)(-) on heme -dependent oxidative reactions. It was found that NO(2)(-) had the capacity to act as a reducing agent to remove high oxidation states of heme iron. In the reduction of ferryl heme to ferric heme, NO(2)(-) was oxidized to a nitrating agent NO(2), and subsequently, tyrosine residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nitrated. However, the presence of NO(2)(-) surprisingly exerted pro-oxidant effect on heme-H(2)O(2)-induced formation of BSA carbonyls at lower concentrations and enhanced the loss of HepG2 cell viability dose-dependently, which was probably due to the ability of this inorganic compound to efficiently enhance the peroxidase activity and oxidative degradation of heme. These data provide novel evidence that the dietary intake and experimental use of NO(2)(-) in vivo and in vitro would possess the pro-oxidant activity through interfering in heme-dependent oxidative reactions. Besides the classic role in protein tyrosine nitration, the deleterious effects on heme redox reactions may provide new insights into the toxicological implications of NO(2)(-) with cellular heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidation-Initiated Cyclizations of Pentadienyl Ethers: An Alternative Entry to the Nazarov Reaction.

    PubMed

    Fradette, Ryan J; Kang, Minkyu; West, F G

    2017-05-22

    Oxidation-initiated Nazarov reactions of 1,4-pentadien-3-yl ethers take place in the presence of DDQ. Termination by regioselective elimination preserves both stereocenters created during electrocyclization, providing cyclopentanone products bearing an exocyclic methylene unit. Use of catalytic DDQ with MnO2 as terminal oxidant is also described. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Weighted next reaction method and parameter selection for efficient simulation of rare events in biochemical reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhouyi; Cai, Xiaodong

    2011-07-25

    The weighted stochastic simulation algorithm (wSSA) recently developed by Kuwahara and Mura and the refined wSSA proposed by Gillespie et al. based on the importance sampling technique open the door for efficient estimation of the probability of rare events in biochemical reaction systems. In this paper, we first apply the importance sampling technique to the next reaction method (NRM) of the stochastic simulation algorithm and develop a weighted NRM (wNRM). We then develop a systematic method for selecting the values of importance sampling parameters, which can be applied to both the wSSA and the wNRM. Numerical results demonstrate that our parameter selection method can substantially improve the performance of the wSSA and the wNRM in terms of simulation efficiency and accuracy.

  10. Oxidative C-H/C-H Coupling Reactions between Two (Hetero)arenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yudong; Lan, Jingbo; You, Jingsong

    2017-01-13

    Transition metal-mediated C-H bond activation and functionalization represent one of the most straightforward and powerful tools in modern organic synthetic chemistry. Bi(hetero)aryls are privileged π-conjugated structural cores in biologically active molecules, organic functional materials, ligands, and organic synthetic intermediates. The oxidative C-H/C-H coupling reactions between two (hetero)arenes through 2-fold C-H activation offer a valuable opportunity for rapid assembly of diverse bi(hetero)aryls and further exploitation of their applications in pharmaceutical and material sciences. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals and applications of transition metal-mediated/catalyzed oxidative C-H/C-H coupling reactions between two (hetero)arenes. The substrate scope, limitation, reaction mechanism, regioselectivity, and chemoselectivity, as well as related control strategies of these reactions are discussed. Additionally, the applications of these established methods in the synthesis of natural products and exploitation of new organic functional materials are exemplified. In the last section, a short introduction on oxidant- or Lewis acid-mediated oxidative Ar-H/Ar-H coupling reactions is presented, considering that it is a very powerful method for the construction of biaryl units and polycylic arenes.

  11. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  12. Kinetic Spectroscopy of Metal Atom/Oxidizer Chemiluminescent Reactions for Laser Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    The Journal of Chemical Physics 69, 1112—1120...on Chemi— juminescent Sn—Oxidizer Reactions,” AeroChem TP—387, July 1979 , The Journal of Chemical Physics , submitted. Product quenching of SnO(a5E... Journal of Chemical Physics , submitted. The reaction Ge(43P0,1,3) + N20 -~ GeO(Xhif, ~~~~ b3fl1, A’I[) + N2 (1) has been studied in a high—temperature

  13. Chemomechanical interactions resulting from fuel-alkali metal reactions inside LMFBR oxide fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.G.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Bottcher, J.H.; Hofman, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Chemomechanical interactions inside metal-clad fuel elements are defined as those fuel-cladding mechanical interactions (FCMI) that are influenced by or result from chemical reactions between constituents of the irradiated fuel system. The purpose of the present paper is to interpret some recent experimental and analytical results in terms of chemomechanical reaction mechanisms, with special emphasis on the modeling of breached LMFBR oxide fuel pin behavior.

  14. Galactodendritic porphyrinic conjugates as new biomimetic catalysts for oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Castro, Kelly A D F; Silva, Sandrina; Pereira, Patrícia M R; Simões, Mário M Q; Neves, Maria da Graça P M S; Cavaleiro, José A S; Wypych, Fernando; Tomé, João P C; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2015-05-04

    This work employed [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin] ([H2(TPPF20)], H2P1) as the platform to prepare a tetrasubstituted galactodendritic conjugate porphyrin (H2P3). After metalation with excess copper(II) acetate, H2P3 afforded a new solid porphyrin material, Cu4CuP3S. This work also assessed the ability of the copper(II) complex (CuP3) of H2P3 to coordinate with zinc(II) acetate, to yield the new material Zn4CuP3S. UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies aided full characterization of the synthesized solids. (Z)-Cyclooctene epoxidation under heterogeneous conditions helped to evaluate the catalytic activity of Cu4CuP3S and Zn4CuP3S. The efficiency of Cu4CuP3S in the oxidation of another organic substrate, catechol, was also investigated. According to the results obtained in the heterogeneous process, Cu4CuP3S mimicked the activity of cytochrome P-450 and catecholase. In addition, Cu4CuP3S was reusable after recovery and reactivation. The data obtained herein were compared with the results achieved for the copper complex (CuP1) of [H2(TPPF20)] and for CuP3 under homogeneous conditions.

  15. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  16. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; ...

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  17. An investigation of oxidation products and SOA yields from OH + pesticide reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murschell, T.; Friedman, B.; Link, M.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Pesticides are used globally in agricultural and residential areas. After application and/or volatilization from a surface, these compounds can be transported over long distances in the atmosphere. However, their chemical fate, including oxidation and gas-particle partitioning in the atmosphere, is not well understood. We present gas and particle measurements of oxidation products from pesticide + OH reactions using a dynamic solution injection system coupled to an Oxidative Flow Reactor. Products were detected with a High Resolution Time of Flight Iodide Chemical Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) and a Size Mobility Particle Scanner (SMPS). The OFR allows pesticides to react with variable OH radical exposures, ranging from the equivalent of one day to a full week of atmospheric oxidative aging. In this work, we explore pesticide oxidation products from reaction with OH and ozone, and compare those products to photolysis reactions. Pesticides of similar chemical structures were explored, including acetochlor / metolachlor and permethrin / cypermethrin, to explore mechanistic differences. We present chemical parameters including average product oxidation state, average oxygen to carbon ratio, and potential secondary organic aerosol formation for each of these compounds.

  18. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braten, Miles N.

    Nanostructured metal oxide materials are found in many products and processes in our society today, but they play a particularly important role in the conversion and storage of energy. The materials are used as catalysts and redox active supports in devices such as dye sensitized solar cells, solid oxide fuel cells, and flow batteries, where they transfer and store electrons and charge balancing cations. Oftentimes electron transfer is modulated by the cations and when the cation is a proton, these redox reactions are known as proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. The work described in this dissertation focuses on understanding the PCET reactivity of nanocrystalline metal oxide materials. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of PCET and provides background information on the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) which the majority of the research is focused on. Chapter 2 examines the chemistry that occurs during the photoreduction of ZnO NCs. Chapter 3 describes experiments probing how ZnO NC capping ligand concentration and NC size modulate PCET reaction rates. Chapter 4 describes experiments that compare the PCET reactivity of ZnO NCs with different numbers of electrons and protons stored on them. Chapter 5 describes attempts to observe the electrochemical reduction of ZnO NCs attached to gold electrodes. Finally, Chapter 6 contains attempts to identify a nanostructured metal oxide alkane oxidation catalyst for use in fuel cell.

  19. Platinum Metal-Free Catalysts for Selective Soft Oxidative Methane → Ethylene Coupling. Scope and Mechanistic Observations.

    PubMed

    Peter, Matthias; Marks, Tobin J

    2015-12-09

    Using abundant soft oxidants, a high methane-to-ethylene conversion might be achievable due to the low thermodynamic driving force for over-oxidation. Here we report on the oxidative coupling of methane by gaseous S2 (SOCM). The catalytic properties of Pd/Fe3O4 are compared with those of Fe3O4, and it is found that high ethylene selectivities can be achieved without noble metals; conversion and selectivity on Fe3O4 are stable for at least 48 h at SOCM conditions. SOCM data for 10 oxides are compared, and ethylene selectivities as high as 33% are found; the C2H4/C2H6 ratios of 9-12 observed at the highest S2 conversions are significantly higher than the C2H4/C2H6 ratios usually found in the CH4 coupling with O2. Complementary in-detail analytical studies show that, on Mg, Zr, Sm, W, and La catalysts, which strongly coke during the reaction, lower ethylene selectivities are observed than on Fe, Ti, and Cr catalysts, which only coke to a minor extent. Further catalyst-dependent changes during SOCM in surface area, surface composition, and partial conversion to oxysulfides and sulfides are discussed. Evidence concerning the reaction mechanism is obtained taking into account the selectivity for the different reaction products versus the contact time. CH4 coupling proceeds non-oxidatively with the evolution of H2 on some catalysts, and evidence is presented that C2H4 and C2H2 formation occur via C2H6 and C2H4 dehydrogenation, respectively.

  20. Ultrasound promoted selective synthesis of 1,1'-binaphthyls catalyzed by Fe impregnated pillared Montmorillonite K10 in presence of TBHP as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Bhor, Malhari D; Nandurkar, Nitin S; Bhanushali, Mayur J; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2008-03-01

    Naphthols were selectively coupled under sonication using Fe(+3) impregnated pillared Montmorillonite K10 and TBHP as an oxidant. Considerable enhancement in the reaction rate was observed under sonication as compared to the reaction performed under silent condition. The activity of catalyst was compared with other Fe clay catalysts. Various parameters like solvent, catalyst and TBHP concentration has been studied. The heterogeneous active catalyst K10-FePLS120 was recycled without loss in activity and selectivity performance.

  1. Enhanced ethanol electro-oxidation reaction on carbon supported Pd-metal oxide electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Abdel Hameed, R M

    2017-11-01

    Various Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts were fabricated using ethylene glycol as a reducing agent in modified microwave-assisted polyol process. The crystal structure and surface morphology were studied using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. All prepared Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts exhibited a shift of Pd diffraction planes in the positive direction in relation to that of Pd/C. Highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles were formed on different metal oxide/C supports. The electrocatalytic performance of these electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation was examined in NaOH solution using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. An improvement in electrochemical parameters including onset potential, oxidation current density and If/Ib values was recorded at different Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts, especially Pd-NiO/C. Three folds increment in steady state oxidation current density value was also displayed by investigated Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts when contrasted to that of Pd/C to reflect their enhanced stability behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Solid state tungsten oxide hydrate/tin oxide hydrate electrochromic device prepared by electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Kentaro; Matsuo, Ryo; Sasano, Junji; Yokoyama, Seiji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The solid state electrochromic device composed of tungsten oxide hydrate (WO3(H2O)0.33) and tin oxide hydrate (Sn(O,OH)) has been constructed by anodic deposition of WO3(H2O)0.33 and Sn(O,OH) layers and showed the color change from clear to blue by applying voltage through an Au electrode.

  3. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  4. Gaseous species as reaction tracers in the solvothermal synthesis of the zinc oxide terephthalate MOF-5.

    PubMed

    Hausdorf, Steffen; Baitalow, Felix; Seidel, Jürgen; Mertens, Florian O R L

    2007-05-24

    Gaseous species emitted during the zinc oxide/zinc hydroxide 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate metal organic framework synthesis (MOF-5, MOF-69c) have been used to investigate the reaction scheme that leads to the framework creation. Changes of the gas-phase composition over time indicate that the decomposition of the solvent diethylformamide occurs at least via two competing reaction pathways that can be linked to the reaction's overall water and pH management. From isotope exchange experiments, we deduce that one of the decomposition pathways leads to the removal of water from the reaction mixture, which sets the conditions when the synthesis of an oxide-based (MOF-5) instead of an hydroxide-based MOF (MOF-69c) occurs. A quantitative account of most reactants and byproducts before and after the MOF-5/MOF-69c synthesis is presented. From the investigation of the reaction intermediates and byproducts, we derive a proposal of a basic reaction scheme for the standard synthesis zinc oxide carboxylate MOFs.

  5. Homogeneous cationic substitution for two-dimensional layered metal oxide nanosheets via a galvanic exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jang Mee; Park, Boyeon; Jin, Xiaoyan; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2017-01-05

    The galvanic exchange reaction of an exfoliated 2D layered metal oxide nanosheet (NS) with excess substituent metal cations enables the synthesis of a mixed metal oxide 2D NS with controllable cation compositions and physicochemical properties. The reaction of the exfoliated MnO2 NS with Fe(2+) or Sn(2+) ions at 90 °C induces the uniform galvanic replacement of Mn ions with these substituent ions, whereas the same reaction at 25 °C results in the intercalative restacking of the negatively-charged MnO2 NS with Fe(2+) or Sn(2+) cations. Upon the galvanic exchange reaction, the highly anisotropic MnO2 2D NS retains its original 2D morphology and layered structure, which is in stark contrast to 0D nanoparticles yielding hollow nanospheres via the galvanic exchange reaction. This observation is attributable to the thin thickness of the 2D NS allowing the simultaneous replacement of all the component surface-exposed metal ions. The resulting substitution of the MnO2 NS with Fe and Sn ions remarkably improves the electrode performance of the carbon-coated derivatives of the MnO2 NS for lithium ion batteries. The present study clearly demonstrates that the galvanic exchange reaction can provide an efficient method not only to tailor cation compositions but also to improve the functionalities of 2D metal oxide NSs and their carbon-coated derivatives.

  6. Cavitands as Reaction Vessels and Blocking Groups for Selective Reactions in Water.

    PubMed

    Masseroni, Daniele; Mosca, Simone; Mower, Matthew P; Blackmond, Donna G; Rebek, Julius

    2016-07-11

    The majority of reactions currently performed in the chemical industry take place in organic solvents, compounds that are generally derived from petrochemicals. To promote chemical processes in water, we examined the use of synthetic, deep water-soluble cavitands in the Staudinger reduction of long-chain aliphatic diazides (C8 , C10 , and C12 ). The diazide substrates are taken up by the cavitand in D2 O in folded, dynamic conformations. The reduction of one azide group to an amine gives a complex in which the substrate is fixed in an unsymmetrical conformation, with the amine terminal exposed and the azide terminal deep and inaccessible within the cavitand. Accordingly, the reduction of the second azide group is inhibited, even with excess phosphine, and good yields of the monofunctionalized products are obtained. In contrast, the reduction of the free diazides in bulk solution yields diamine products. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation by Molecular-Weight Building Reactions of Biogenic Oxidation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsanti, K.; Guenther, A.; Matsunaga, S.; Smith, J.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the chemical composition of atmospheric organic aerosols (OA) remains one of the significant challenges to accurately representing OA in air quality and climate models. Meeting this challenge will require further understanding of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), of which biogenic emissions are thought to be major precursors. Of recent interest is the significance of higher-molecular weight (MW) compounds (i.e., "oligomers"). Theoretical, laboratory, and field study results suggest that relatively volatile oxidation products may contribute to SOA formation through multi-phase MW- building reactions. The significance of such reactions for biogenic SOA formation, including for newly considered precursors such as isoprene, is explored in this work. Theoretical and field studies are employed to: 1) identify MW-building reactions that may contribute to SOA formation in the atmosphere, 2) identify MW-building reaction products in ambient samples, and 3) parameterize atmospheric SOA formation by MW-building reactions of biogenic oxidation products. Likely reactions of biogenic oxidation products include ester, amide, and peroxyhemiacetal formation. Each of the proposed reactions involves known oxidation productions of biogenic precursors (e.g., carboxylic acids and aldehydes) reacting with one another and/or other atmospheric constituents (e.g., sulfuric acid and ammonia) to form higher-MW/lower-volatility products that can condense to form SOA. It has been suggested that products of MW-building reactions can revert to the parent reactants during sampling and analysis. Thus, relatively volatile compounds detected in ambient particle samples in fact may be decomposition products of higher-MW products. The contribution of relatively volatile biogenic oxidation products to SOA via ester, amide, and peroxyhemiacetal formation, as determined by studies based on fundamental thermodynamics and gas/particle partitioning theory, will be discussed; in addition to

  8. Reactions of lactones with tropospheric oxidants: A kinetics and products study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walavalkar, M. P.; Sharma, A.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.

    2017-07-01

    Tropospheric lifetimes of two lactones, gamma-valerolactone (GVL) and alpha-methyl gamma-butyrolactone (AMGBL) in terms of their reactions with two important tropospheric oxidants- OH and Cl - are estimated, after determining the respective rate coefficients of their reactions in the gas phase using relative rate method. Values of the rate coefficients of the reactions of GVL (kOH = (1.95 ± 0.58) x 10-12; kCl = 2.26 ± 0.53 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) and AMGBL (kOH = 1.81 ± 0.43 × 10-12; kCl = 3.42 ± 0.63 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) at 298 K imply that reaction with OH is the dominant reaction in the ambient conditions, and that reaction with Cl atom becomes relevant under marine boundary layer (MBL) conditions, reducing the tropospheric lifetimes to almost half. The tropospheric life times of GVL and AMGBL based on their reaction with OH under ambient conditions are comparable, 71.2 and 76.7 h respectively. However, the products of the reactions are found to be different. In GVL, a promising second generation biofuel component, only ring opening reactions are important, acetic acid and CO2 being the only observed volatile products. In AMGBL, additional ring oxidized products are also formed, of which 3,4-dihydro-3-methyl-2,5-furandione is the most dominant one. The absence of such ring oxidized products in GVL is assigned to the difference in the preferred position of H atom abstraction, based on the computed rate coefficients of individual channels reported in the literature. This suggests that the impact in terms of aerosol generation in the troposphere may also be different for GVL and AMGBL, which differ only in the position of methyl substitution.

  9. Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of NO2 on a Chromium (III) Oxide Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, N.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2O3) is a major component of the oxide layer on stainless steel surfaces. It is also widely used as pigment in paints and roofs and as a protective coating on various surfaces. While many studies have focused on the catalytic activity of Cr2O3 surfaces for selective catalytic reduction (SCR), less attention has been paid to its surface chemistry involving atmospherically important species such as NO2 under atmospheric conditions. In this study, we have investigated thermal and photochemical reactions of NO2 in the presence and the absence of water vapor, using a thin layer of Cr2O3 as a model for the surface of stainless steel as well as other similarly coated surfaces in the boundary layer. A 30 nm thick Cr2O3 film was deposited on a germanium attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystal, and the changes in the surface species were monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon NO2 adsorption, nitrate (NO3-) ions appeared likely coordinated to Cr3+ ion(s). The NO3- peaks reversibly shifted when water vapor was added, suggesting that NO3- become solvated. Irradiation at 311 nm led to a decrease in NO3- ions under both dry and humid conditions. The major gas-phase species formed by the irradiation was NO under dry conditions, while NO2 was mainly formed in the presence of H2O. Possible mechanisms and the implications for heterogeneous NO2 chemistry in the boundary layer will be discussed. The results will also be compared to similar chemistry on other surfaces.

  10. Reaction pattern and mechanism of light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Renger, Gernot; Kühn, Philipp

    2007-06-01

    This mini review is an attempt to briefly summarize our current knowledge on light driven oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis. The reaction leading to molecular oxygen and four protons via photosynthesis comprises thermodynamic and kinetic constraints that require a balanced fine tuning of the reaction coordinates. The mode of coupling between electron (ET) and proton transfer (PT) reactions is shown to be of key mechanistic relevance for the redox turnover of Y(Z) and the reactions within the WOC. The WOC is characterized by peculiar energetics of its oxidation steps in the WOC. In all oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms the redox state S(1) is thermodynamically most stable and therefore this general feature is assumed to be of physiological relevance. Available information on the Gibbs energy differences between the individual redox states S(i+1) and S(i) and on the activation energies of their oxidative transitions are used to construct a general reaction coordinate of oxidative water splitting in photosystem II (PS II). Finally, an attempt is presented to cast our current state of knowledge into a mechanism of oxidative water splitting with special emphasis on the formation of the essential O-O bond and the active role of the protein environment in tuning the local proton activity that depends on time and redox state S(i). The O-O linkage is assumed to take place within a multistate equilibrium at the redox level of S(3), comprising both redox isomerism and proton tautomerism. It is proposed that one state, S(3)(P), attains an electronic configuration and nuclear geometry that corresponds with a hydrogen bonded peroxide which acts as the entatic state for the generation of complexed molecular oxygen through S(3)(P) oxidation by Y(Z)(ox).

  11. Site of metabolism prediction for oxidation reactions mediated by oxidoreductases based on chemical bond.

    PubMed

    He, Shuaibing; Li, Manman; Ye, Xiaotong; Wang, Hongyu; Yu, Wenkang; He, Wenjing; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2017-02-01

    The metabolites of exogenous and endogenous compounds play a pivotal role in the domain of metabolism research. However, they are still unclear for most chemicals in our environment. The in silico methods for predicting the site of metabolism (SOM) are considered to be efficient and low-cost in SOM discovery. However, many in silico methods are focused on metabolism processes catalyzed by several specified Cytochromes P450s, and only apply to substrates with special skeleton. A SOM prediction model always deserves more attention, which demands no special requirements to structures of substrates and applies to more metabolic enzymes. By incorporating the use of hybrid feature selection techniques (CHI, IG, GR, Relief) and multiple classification procedures (KStar, BN, IBK, J48, RF, SVM, AdaBoostM1, Bagging), SOM prediction models for six oxidation reactions mediated by oxidoreductases were established by the integration of enzyme data and chemical bond information. The advantage of the method is the introduction of unlabeled SOM. We defined the SOM which not reported in the literature as unlabeled SOM, where negative SOM was filtered. Consequently, for each type of reaction, a series of SOM prediction models were built based on information about metabolism of 1237 heterogeneous chemicals. Then optimal models were attained through comparisons among these models. Finally, independent test set was used to validate optimal models. It demonstrated that all models gave accuracies above 0.90. For receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under curve values of all these models over 0.906. The results suggested that these models showed good predicting power. All the models will be available when contact with wangyun@bucm.edu.cn. wangyun@bucm.edu.cn or yjqiao@yahoo.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. The reaction mechanism of catalytic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ozone in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Choi, H; Ahn, K H

    2003-01-01

    The sorption and catalytic oxidation of model compounds (pCBA and phenanthrene) and NOM on FeOOH were investigated using hydrogen peroxide and ozone, respectively. After oxidation with ozone, the hydrophobic, transphilic, and hydrophilic NOM fractions were isolated using XAD-8 and -4 resins to analyze the reaction characteristics. The sorption of pCBA was strongly dependent upon the pH, but phenanthrene exhibited a sorption behavior that was independent of the pH. In the case of NOM, the hydrophobic portion showed higher sorption affinity than hydrophilic and transphilic at pH 7.2. The concentrations of model compounds and oxidants were measured during the oxidations and the efficiency was compared for tests done with ozone alone and those using catalytic ozonation. Through the comparison of the sorption and decomposition of the model compounds, along with the effects of bicarbonate addition, mechanisms for catalytic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide or ozone were proposed, respectively.

  13. Acidity-controlled selective oxidation of alpha-pinene, isolated from Indonesian pine's turpentine oils (pinus merkusii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masruri; Farid Rahman, Mohamad; Nurkam Ramadhan, Bagus

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-pinene was isolated in high purity from turpentine oil harvested from Pinus merkusii plantation. The recent investigation on selective oxidation of alpha-pinene using potassium permanganate was undertaken under acidic conditions. The result taught the selective oxidation of alpha-pinene in acidic using potassium permanganate lead to the formation of 2-(3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutyl)acetaldehyde or pinon aldehyde. The study method applied reaction in various different buffer conditions i.e. pH 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively, and each reaction product was monitored using TLC every hour. Product determination was undertaken on spectrometry basis such as infrared, ultra violet-visible, gas chromatography- and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  14. A Highly Selective Vanadium Catalyst for Benzylic C–H Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ji-Bao; Cormier, Kevin W.; Chen, Chuo

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium complexes have been used extensively to catalyze olefin and alcohol oxidation. However, their application in C–H oxidation has not been well-studied. We report herein that commercially available Cp2VCl2 catalyzes benzylic C–H oxidation selectively and effectively, giving no aromatic oxidation products. PMID:22712051

  15. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO2, TiO2, Ta2O5, and Al2O3, to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta2O5 RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy.

  16. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy.

  17. Increased Oxidative Stress as a Selective Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to tumorgenesis. Under hypoxic environment, increased levels of ROS induce the expression of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) in cancer stem cells (CSCs), resulting in the promotion of the upregulation of CSC markers, and the reduction of intracellular ROS level, thus facilitating CSCs survival and proliferation. Although the ROS level is regulated by powerful antioxidant defense mechanisms in cancer cells, it is observed to remain higher than that in normal cells. Cancer cells may be more sensitive than normal cells to the accumulation of ROS; consequently, it is supposed that increased oxidative stress by exogenous ROS generation therapy has an effect on selectively killing cancer cells without affecting normal cells. This paper reviews the mechanisms of redox regulation in CSCs and the pivotal role of ROS in anticancer treatment. PMID:26273420

  18. Influence of Synbiotics on Selected Oxidative Stress Parameters

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess synbiotic (Lactobacillus casei + inulin) influence on oxidative stress parameters such as concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), glutathione, and free sulfhydryl groups content. Experiments were carried out on healthy volunteers (n = 32). The subjects were divided into women group (n = 16) and men group (n = 16) and randomly assigned to synbiotic and control groups. Blood samples were collected before synbiotic supplementation and after 7 wks, at the end of the study. The administration of synbiotic resulted in a significant decrease in MDA (p < 0.01), H2O2 (p < 0.01), and GSSG concentrations (p < 0.05) as compared with the control groups and significant increase in the concentrations of GSHt (p < 0.001), GSH (p < 0.01), and -SH group content (p < 0.05) versus control. Synbiotics containing L. casei plus inulin may have positive influence on selected oxidative stress markers. PMID:28286605

  19. Selected attributes of polyphenols in targeting oxidative stress in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stepanic, Visnja; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Troselj, Koraljka Gall; Amic, Dragan; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-01-01

    Various plant polyphenols have been recognized as redox active molecules. This review discusses some aspects of polyphenols' modes of redox action, corresponding structure-activity relationships and their potential to be applied as adjuvants to conventional cytostatic drugs. Polyphenols' antioxidative capacity has been discussed as the basis for targeting oxidative stress and, consequently, for their chemopreventive and anti-inflammatory activities, which may alleviate side-effects on normal cells arising from oxidative stress caused by cytostatics. Some polyphenols may scavenge various free radicals directly, and some of them are found to suppress free radical production through inhibiting NADPH oxidases and xanthine oxidase. Additionally, polyphenols may increase antioxidative defense in normal cells by increasing the activity of NRF2, transcription factor for many protective proteins. The activation of the NRF2-mediated signaling pathways in cancer cells results in chemoresistance. Luteolin, apigenin and chrysin reduce NRF2 expression and increase the chemosensitivity of cancer cells to cytostatic drugs. Their common 5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one moiety, may represent a starting pharmacophore model for designing novel, non-toxic compounds for overcoming chemoresistance. However, prooxidative activity of some polyphenols (quercetin, EGCG) may also provide a basis for their use as chemotherapeutic adjuvants since they may enhance cytotoxic effects of cytostatics selectively on cancer cells. However, considerable caution is needed in applying polyphenols to anticancer therapy, since their effects greatly depend on the applied dose, the cell type, exposure time and environmental conditions.

  20. The reactions of O(ID) and OH with CH3OH, oxidation of the HCO radial, and the photochemical oxidation of formaldehyde. [photochemical reactions in stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osif, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental, laboratory study of the various photochemical reactions that can occur in the mesosphere and stratosphere is presented. N2O was photolyzed at 2139 A in the presence of CH3OH and CO. The O(id) produced in the photolysis reacted with CH3OH to produce OH radicals, and thus the reactions of both O(id) and OH were able to be studied. Also considered was the oxidation of the HCO radical. Mixtures of Cl2, O2, H2CO, and sometimes N2 or He were irradiated at 3660 A at several temperatures to photodecompose the Cl2. The photochemical oxidation of formaldehyde was studied as follows: formaldehyde in the presence of N2 and/or O2 (usually dry air) was photolyzed with a medium pressure Hg lamp used in conjunction with various filters which transmit different relative amounts of Hg lines from 2894 A to 3660 A. Results are presented and discussed, along with a description of experimental procedures and apparatus, and chemical reaction kinetics.

  1. Adsorption of propylene oxide on Pt(111) surfaces and its reactions with gaseous and adsorbed H atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinger, A.; Lutterloh, C.; Biener, J.; Küppers, J.

    2000-03-01

    Adsorption of propylene oxide (PO) on Pt(111) surfaces and its reactions with gaseous and coadsorbed hydrogen atoms was studied using TDS and HREELS methods. PO adsorbs molecularly and desorbs from the multilayer and monolayer states near 130 and 180 K, respectively. Monolayer PO is bound through the O atom to the Pt surface. Approximately 50% of the monolayer PO molecules dissociate near 180 K leading to desorption of CO and H 2 above 250 K. The initial step of the PO dissociation is cleavage of the COC ring. Reactions of gaseous H atoms with PO monolayers on Pt(111) lead to the formation of acetone, n-propanol, and isopropanol. The branching of the reactions toward the products changes with the H atom exposure as the coadsorption of hydrogen weakens the PO/Pt(111) interaction, illustrating the influence of the metallic substrate on the reaction paths in atom/adsorbate reactions. Coadsorbed PO and hydrogen react toward a strongly bound acetone species, probably η 2-acetone, with a selectivity of 100%.

  2. Aryl Transfer Selectivity in Metal-Free Reactions of Unsymmetrical Diaryliodonium Salts.

    PubMed

    Stuart, David R

    2017-08-09

    Aromatic rings are found in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and functional materials. Diaryliodonium salts are new reagents used to transfer aryl groups under both metal-free and metal-catalyzed reactions and thereby synthesize arene-containing compounds. This minireview focuses on recent studies in selective aryl transfer reactions from unsymmetrical diaryliodonium salts under metal-free conditions. Reactions reported from 2007 to 2017, which represents a period of significant growth in diaryliodonium salt chemistry, are presented and organized by the type of reactive intermediate formed in the reaction. Specifically, reactions involving λ(3) -iodane, λ(3) -iodane radical anions, aryl radicals, and arynes are discussed. Chemoselectivity trends in aryl transfer are compared and contrasted across reaction intermediates and translation to potential auxiliaries are posited. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl{sub 4}-UO{sub 2} shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl{sub 2}) that has a good solubility in molten UCl{sub 4}. This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl{sub 4}, ZrCl{sub 4}, SiCl{sub 4}, ThCl{sub 4}) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl{sub 4}.

  4. Anion effect controlling the selectivity in the zinc-catalysed copolymerisation of CO2 and cyclohexene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Elmas, Sait; Subhani, Muhammad Afzal; Leitner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Summary The choice of the anion has a surprisingly strong effect on the incorporation of CO2 into the polymer obtained during the zinc-catalysed copolymerisation of CO2 and cyclohexene oxide. The product span ranges from polyethercarbonates, where short polyether sequences alternate with carbonate linkages, to polycarbonates with a strictly alternating sequence of the repeating units. Herein, we report on the influence of the coordination ability of the anion on the selectivity and kinetics of the copolymerisation reaction. PMID:25670991

  5. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  6. Porphyrin-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Heterogeneous Catalysts in Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla F; Simões, Mário M Q; Tomé, João P C; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2016-10-12

    Porphyrin-based Metal-Organic Frameworks (Por-MOFs) constitute a special branch of the wide MOF family that has proven its own value and high potential in different applications. In this mini-review the application of these materials as catalysts in oxidation reactions is highlighted.

  7. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  8. Efficient synthesis of oxygenated terphenyls and other oligomers: sequential arylation reactions through phenol oxidation-rearomatization.

    PubMed

    Dohi, Toshifumi; Kamitanaka, Tohru; Watanabe, Shohei; Hu, Yinjun; Washimi, Naohiko; Kita, Yasuyuki

    2012-10-22

    One by one: starting from simple phenols, a diverse series of oxygenated terphenyl compounds can be prepared in a concise and practical manner using sequential arylation reactions involving phenol oxidation/rearomatization and quinone monoacetal intermediates. Many of the terphenyl products can be used for preparing well-defined oligomers and, furthermore, contain valuable functional groups that can be transformed for further diversification.

  9. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  10. On the biologic role of the reaction of NO with oxidized cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Fernando; Boveris, Alberto; Cadenas, Enrique

    2007-10-01

    The inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX) by nitric oxide (NO) is analyzed with a mathematical model that simulates the metabolism in vivo. The main results were the following: (a) We derived novel equations for the catalysis of CcOX that can be used to predict CcOX inhibition in any tissue for any [NO] or [O(2)]; (b) Competitive inhibition (resulting from the reversible binding of NO to reduced CcOX) emerges has the sole relevant component of CcOX inhibition under state 3 in vivo; (c) In state 4, contribution of uncompetitive inhibition (resulting from the reaction of oxidized CcOX with NO) represents a significant nonmajority fraction of inhibition, being favored by high [O(2)]; and (d) The main biologic role of the reaction between NO and oxidized CcOX is to consume NO. By reducing [NO], this reaction stimulates, rather than inhibits, respiration. Finally, we propose that the biologic role of NO as an inhibitor of CcOX is twofold: in state 4, it avoids an excessive buildup of mitochondrial membrane potential that triggers rapid production of oxidants, and in state 3, increases the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing the ADP/O ratio, supporting the therapeutic use of NO in situations in which mitochondria are dysfunctional.

  11. Surface electronic structure and isomerization reactions of alkanes on some transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrib, A.; Logie, V.; Saurel, N.; Wehrer, P.; Hilaire, L.; Maire, G.

    1997-04-01

    XP spectra of some reduced transition metal oxides are presented. Different number of free nd,( n + 1)s valence electrons in each case could be observed by the presence of a certain density of states (DOS) at the Fermi-level in the valence band (VB) energy region of the XP spectrum. Catalytic isomerization reactions of 2-methylpentane yielding 3-methylpentane and n-hexane at 350°C have been observed on these reduced valence surface states. The bifunctionel mechanism in terms of metallic and acidic sites required for such reactions is proposed by considering the metallic properties of the rutile deformed structure through the C-axis in the case of MoO 2 and WO 2, while the oxygen atom(s) in the lattice structure exhibit Brönsted acidic properties. On the other hand, highly reduced or clean surfaces of these transition metals yield hydrogenolysis catalytic reactions for the same reactant with methane as the major product. In all cases, the exposure of the lower valence oxidation states of bulk transition metal oxides to air results in the surface partial oxidation to the stable oxides such as MoO 3, WO 3, V 2O 5 and Nb 2O 5.

  12. Oxidative degradation of nalidixic acid by nano-magnetite via Fe2+/O2-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ardo, Sandy G; Nélieu, Sylvie; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Delarue, Ghislaine; Brest, Jessica; Pironin, Elsa; Morin, Guillaume

    2015-04-07

    Organic pollution has become a critical issue worldwide due to the increasing input and persistence of organic compounds in the environment. Iron minerals are potentially able to degrade efficiently organic pollutants sorbed to their surfaces via oxidative or reductive transformation processes. Here, we explored the oxidative capacity of nano-magnetite (Fe3O4) having ∼ 12 nm particle size, to promote heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions for the removal of nalidixic acid (NAL), a recalcitrant quinolone antibacterial agent. Results show that NAL was adsorbed at the surface of magnetite and was efficiently degraded under oxic conditions. Nearly 60% of this organic contaminant was eliminated after 30 min exposure to air bubbling in solution in the presence of an excess of nano-magnetite. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed a partial oxidation of magnetite to maghemite during the reaction, and four byproducts of NAL were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (UHPLC-MS/MS). We also provide evidence that hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) were involved in the oxidative degradation of NAL, as indicated by the quenching of the degradation reaction in the presence of ethanol. This study points out the promising potentialities of mixed valence iron oxides for the treatment of soils and wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants.

  13. Surface reactions of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2005-06-30

    Despite the fact that carbon dioxide is an abundant atmospheric gas with profound environmental implications, there is little information on the reaction of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-oxide interface. In this study, the chemistry of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface is investigated with FTIR spectroscopy. As shown here, the thin water layer on the iron oxide surface plays an important role in the surface chemistry of carbon dioxide. In particular, adsorbed water enhances CO(2) uptake, undergoes isotope exchange with CO(2) in O(18)-labeled experiments, and influences the chemical nature of the predominant adsorbed product on the surface from bicarbonate to carbonate. The resultant thin water film is acidic in nature from the reaction of CO(2). The IR spectrum recorded of adsorbed carbonate at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface is remarkably similar to that at the bulk liquid water-iron oxide interface. Since reactions in thin water films estimated to be approximately 2 layers will play a role in a number of environmental processes, it is essential to understand the chemistry of these "wet" interfaces with atmospheric gases.

  14. DNA lesions derived from the site selective oxidation of Guanine by carbonate radical anions.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Avrum; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2003-12-01

    Carbonate radical anions are potentially important oxidants of nucleic acids in physiological environments. However, the mechanisms of action are poorly understood, and the end products of oxidation of DNA by carbonate radicals have not been characterized. These oxidation pathways were explored in this work, starting from the laser pulse-induced generation of the primary radical species to the identification of the stable oxidative modifications (lesions). The cascade of events was initiated by utilizing 308 nm XeCl excimer laser pulses to generate carbonate radical anions on submicrosecond time scales. This laser flash photolysis method involved the photodissociation of persulfate to sulfate radical anions and the one electron oxidation of bicarbonate anions by the sulfate radicals to yield the carbonate radical anions. The latter were monitored by their characteristic transient absorption band at 600 nm. The rate constants of reactions of carbonate radicals with oligonucleotides increase in the ascending order: 5'-d(CCATCCTACC) [(5.7 +/- 0.6) x 10(6) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)] < 5'-d(TATAACGTTATA), self-complementary duplex [(1.4 +/- 0.2) x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)] < 5'-d(CCATCGCTACC [(2.4 +/- 0.3) x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)] < 5'-d(CCATC[8-oxo-G]CTACC) [(3.2 +/- 0.4) x 10(8) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)], where 8-oxo-G is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, the product of a two electron oxidation of guanine. This remarkable enhancement of the rate constants is correlated with the presence of either G or 8-oxo-G bases in the oligonucleotides. The rate constant for the oxidation of G in a single-stranded oligonuclotide is faster by a factor of approximately 2 than in the double-stranded form. The site selective oxidation of G and 8-oxo-G residues by carbonate radicals results in the formation of unique end products, the diastereomeric spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) lesions, the products of a four electron oxidation of guanine. These lesions, formed in high yields (40-60%), were isolated by reversed phase

  15. Effect of magnetic field on the zero valent iron induced oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-hyo; Kim, Jungwon; Choi, Wonyong

    2011-08-30

    The magnetic field (MF) effect on the zero valent iron (ZVI) induced oxidative reaction was investigated for the first time. The degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in the ZVI system was employed as the test oxidative reaction. MF markedly enhanced the degradation of 4-CP with the concurrent production of chlorides. The consumption of dissolved O(2) by ZVI reaction was also enhanced in the presence of MF whereas the competing reaction of H(2) production from proton reduction was retarded. Since the ZVI-induced oxidation is mainly driven by the in situ generated hydroxyl radicals, the production of OH radicals was monitored by the spin trap method using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. It was confirmed that the concentration of trapped OH radicals was enhanced in the presence of MF. Since both O(2) and Fe(0) are paramagnetic, the diffusion of O(2) onto the iron surface might be accelerated under MF. The magnetized iron can attract oxygen on itself, which makes the mass transfer process faster. As a result, the surface electrochemical reaction between Fe(0) and O(2) can be accelerated with the enhanced production of OH radicals. MF might retard the recombination of OH radicals as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tailoring transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by photon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Kai -Yang; Fang, Liang; Ye, Rong; Nordlund, Dennis; Doeff, Marca M.; Lin, Feng; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-10-18

    Controlled synthesis of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides with earth-abundant elements have attracted significant interest because of their wide applications, for example as battery electrode materials or electrocatalysts for fuel generation. Here, we report the tuning of the structure of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by controlling chemical reactions using an unfocused laser to irradiate the precursor solution. A Nd:YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 nm or 1064 nm was used. The Ni2+, Mn2+, and Co2+ ion-containing aqueous solution undergoes photo-induced reactions and produces hollow metal-oxide nanospheres (Ni0.18Mn0.45Co0.37Ox) or core–shell metal hydroxide nanoflowers ([Ni0.15Mn0.15Co0.7(OH)2](NO3)0.2•H2O), depending on the laser wavelengths. We propose two reaction pathways, either by photo-induced redox reaction or hydrolysis reaction, which are responsible for the formation of distinct nanostructures. As a result, the study of photon-induced materials growth shines light on the rational design of complex nanostructures with advanced functionalities.

  17. Tailoring transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by photon-induced reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Kai -Yang; Fang, Liang; Ye, Rong; ...

    20